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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

B3.6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations- 6 SWCX for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Project and Conventional Lab Operations- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations Introduction LAs defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated Management System Procedure, NEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, ·which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit \Vithin the scope (i.e., same nature and intent, and of the same or lesser scope) of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10

2

The research bench meets industry: New facility scales up production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data in his notebook. Argonne material engineer YoungHo Shin prepares a coin cell battery in a glovebox in the Materials Engineering Research Facility. Once it is prepared,...

3

Bench-Scale Fermentation Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Bench-Scale Fermentation Laboratory capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center.

Not Available

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

The research bench meets industry: New facility scales up production of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video: Scenes from Argonne's Materials Engineering Research Facility Video: Scenes from Argonne's Materials Engineering Research Facility Scenes from Argonne's Materials Engineering Research Facility Experiments can keep researchers on their feet all day long. Process R&D chemist Kris Pupek moves between fume hoods in the Materials Engineering Research Facility's process research and development lab, while lab-mate Trevor Dzwiniel records data in his notebook. Experiments can keep researchers on their feet all day long. Process R&D chemist Kris Pupek moves between fume hoods in the Materials Engineering Research Facility's process research and development lab, while lab-mate Trevor Dzwiniel records data in his notebook. Argonne material engineer YoungHo Shin prepares a coin cell battery in a glovebox in the Materials Engineering Research Facility. Once it is prepared, the battery can be tested to determine the energy output characteristics of a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries.

5

BENCH SCALE SALTSTONE PROCESS DEVELOPMENT MIXING STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop a bench scale test facility, using a mixer, transfer pump, and transfer line to determine the impact of conveying the grout through the transfer lines to the vault on grout properties. Bench scale testing focused on the effect the transfer line has on the rheological property of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Rheological and other physical properties of grout samples were obtained prior to and after pumping through a transfer line. The Bench Scale Mixing Rig (BSMR) consisted of two mixing tanks, grout feed tank, transfer pump and transfer hose. The mixing tanks were used to batch the grout which was then transferred into the grout feed tank. The contents of the feed tank were then pumped through the transfer line (hose) using a progressive cavity pump. The grout flow rate and pump discharge pressure were monitored. Four sampling stations were located along the length of the transfer line at the 5, 105 and 205 feet past the transfer pump and at 305 feet, the discharge of the hose. Scaling between the full scale piping at Saltstone to bench scale testing at SRNL was performed by maintaining the same shear rate and total shear at the wall of the transfer line. The results of scaling down resulted in a shorter transfer line, a lower average velocity, the same transfer time and similar pressure drops. The condition of flow in the bench scale transfer line is laminar. The flow in the full scale pipe is in the transition region, but is more laminar than turbulent. The resulting plug in laminar flow in the bench scale results in a region of no-mixing. Hence mixing, or shearing, at the bench scale should be less than that observed in the full scale, where this plug is non existent due to the turbulent flow. The bench scale tests should be considered to be conservative due to the highly laminar condition of flow that exists. Two BSMR runs were performed. In both cases, wall shearing was shown to reduce the rheological properties of the grout as it was processed through the transfer line. Samples taken at the static feed tank showed that gelling impacted the rheological properties of the grout before it was fed into the pump and transfer line. A comparison of the rheological properties of samples taken at the feed tank and transfer line discharge indicated shearing of the grout was occurring in the transfer line. Bench scale testing of different mixing methods with three different salt solutions showed that method of mixing influences the rheological properties of the grouts. The paddle blade mixing method of the salt solution used for the BMSR testing provided comparable rheological properties of the grout prepared in the BMSR after 14 minutes of processing, B3. The paddle blade mixing method can be used to represent BMSR results and mixing time can be adjusted to represent larger scale mixing.

Cozzi, A.; Hansen, E.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

6

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Bench Scale Kinetics of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench Scale Kinetics of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors Bench Scale Kinetics of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors When research into the measurement and control of Hg emissions from coal-fired power plants began in earnest in the early 1990s, it was observed that oxidized mercury can be scrubbed at high efficiency in wet FGD systems, while elemental mercury can not. In many cases, elemental mercury concentrations were observed to increase slightly across wet FGD systems, but this was typically regarded as within the variability of the measurement methods. However, later measurements have shown substantial re-emissions from some FGD systems. The goal of this project is to develop a fundamental understanding of the aqueous chemistry of mercury (Hg) absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbing liquors. Specifically, the project will determine the chemical reactions that oxidized mercury undergoes once absorbed, the byproducts of those reactions, and reaction kinetics.

7

NETL: IEP - Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture Project No.: FE0007502 GE Global Research and their project partners are conducting research on the use of a novel silicone solvent to capture CO2 with a continuous bench-scale system. The project will utilize both computational and experimental methods. Previously measured experimental data from a continuous laboratory-scale CO2 capture system will be used to design this bench-scale system. Data from the bench-scale system, such as kinetics and mass transfer information, will be used to determine scale-up effects and needed design parameters to develop a scale-up strategy, update cost of electricity (COE) calculations and perform a technical and economic feasibility study. A manufacturing plan for the aminosilicone solvent and a price model will be used for optimization. The final objective of the program is to demonstrate, at the bench-scale, a process that achieves 90 percent CO2 capture efficiency with less than a 35 percent increase in the COE. Development of this scalable bench-scale process combined with a rigorous process model and thorough manufacturability analysis for the solvent, will enable a practical technology path to later development at larger scales and commercialization. The technology will eventually be retrofittable to coal-based power plants.

8

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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7 7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research January 1 - March 31, 2008, DOE/SC-ARM/P-08-007 iii Contents 1. Data Availability ................................................................................................................................... 1 2. Site Visit Requests, Archive Accounts, and Research Computer Accounts ......................................... 2 3. Safety ....................................................................................................................................................

9

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the...

10

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SC-ARMTR-082 1 1. Introduction This report documents key aspects of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) data quality assurance program as...

11

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Comparison of Meteorological Measurements from Sparse and Dense Surface Observation Networks in the U.S. Southern Great Plains February 2008 J.W. Monroe Climate Research Section, Environmental Science Division/Argonne National Laboratory Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies/University of Oklahoma M.T. Ritsche, M. Franklin Climate Research Section, Environmental Science Division/Argonne National Laboratory, K.E. Kehoe Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies/University of Oklahoma Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S.

12

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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October 1 - December 31, 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research October 1 - December 31, 2008,...

13

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM-0707 ARM-0707 Report on the ARM Climate Research Facility EXPANSION WORKSHOP October 31 - November 1, 2007 Reston, Virginia Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE AC05 76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 DOE/SC-ARM-0707 iii Executive Summary The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to provide the infrastructure needed to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere. Designated as a national user facility the ACRF

14

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Cloud Occurrence Frequency at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Third Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report M. Jensen, Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Johnson, Brookhaven National Laboratory J.H. Mather, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory June 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

15

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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7 7 Time Series of Aerosol Column Optical Depth at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Fourth Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report C. Flynn, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory A.S. Koontz, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory J.H. Mather, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory September 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

16

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

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2 2 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future December 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored b y the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their em ployees, makes any warranty, express or i mplied, or assu mes

17

Bench-Scale Evaporation of a Large Hanford Envelope C Sample (Tank 241-AN-102)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains the results of the Bench Scale evaporation of a large sample of pretreated Envelope C (AN102).

Crowder, M.L.

2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

18

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model Second Quarter 2008 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Report M. Jensen/Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Johnson/Brookhaven National Laboratory J. Mather/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory D. Randall/Colorado State University March 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S.

19

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 RACORO Science and Operations Plan December 2008 Dr. Andrew M. Vogelmann, Principal Investigator* RACORO Steering Committee (RSC): Andrew Vogelmann - Brookhaven National Laboratory Greg McFarquhar - University of Illinois John Ogren and Graham Feingold - NOAA/Earth System Research Laboratory Dave Turner - University of Wisconsin-Madison Jennifer Comstock and Chuck Long - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) Technical Operations Office Beat Schmid and Jason Tomlinson - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Center for Interdisciplinary Remotely-Piloted Aircraft Studies (CIRPAS) Haf Jonsson - Naval Postgraduate School *Brookhaven National Laboratory Bldg 490-D Upton, NY 11973 Tel: (631)-344-4421, Fax: (631) 344-2060

20

CMC Bench Scale Material Test Plan  

SciTech Connect

The test plan detailed in this topical report supports Task 3.5 of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources - Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The purpose of these tests is to verify that materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed this test plan with technical assistance from ceramic scientists at the Dept. of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Albany Research Center who will perform the environmental exposure tests.

Mark Fitzsimmons; Gerard Pelletier; Dave Grimmett

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November - December 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

22

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future February 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

23

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September - October 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

24

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future August 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

25

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6.1 6.1 Retrieving Temperature and Moisture Profiles from AERI Radiance Observations: AERIPROF Value-Added Product Technical Description Revision 1 W.F. Feltz D.D. Turner H.B. Howell W.L. Smith R.O. Knuteson H.M. Woolf J. Comstock C. Sivaraman R. Mahon T.Halter April 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

26

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 The Status of the ACRF Millimeter Wave Cloud Radars (MMCRs), the Path Forward for Future MMCR Upgrades, the Concept of 3D Volume Imaging Radar and the UAV Radar P. Kollias, M. Miller Brookhaven National Laboratory K. Widener, R. Marchand, T. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory December 2005 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

27

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future June 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

28

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 ISDAC Flight Planning Document S.J. Ghan G. McFarquhar A. Korolev P. Liu W. Strapp H. Verlinde M. Wolde April 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

29

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 Evaluation of A New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with the NCAR Climate Atmospheric Model (CAM3) and ARM Observations Fourth Quarter 2007 ARM Metric Report September 2007 Xiaohong Liu and Steven J. Ghan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Shaocheng Xie, James Boyle, and Stephen A. Klein Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research X. Liu et al., September 2007, DOE/SC-ARM/P-07-012 Summary Mixed-phase clouds are composed of a mixture of cloud droplets and ice crystals. The cloud microphysics in mixed-phase clouds can significantly impact cloud optical depth, cloud radiative forcing,

30

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future November 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

31

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Science Overview Document Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) April 2008 November 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor an agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

32

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future October 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

33

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future September 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

34

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model First Quarter 2008 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Report J. Mather/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory D. Randall/Colorado State University December 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

35

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model Third Quarter 2008 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Report J. Mather/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory D. Randall/Colorado State University C. Flynn/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory June 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

36

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Investigation of the Downwelling LW Differences Between the Niamey AMF Main and Supplementary Sites C.N. Long/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA P. Gotseff/National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO E.G. Dutton/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO April 2008 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

37

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ARM Value-Added Product (VAP) Monthly Status Report ARM Translator Team J. Comstock C. Flynn M. Jensen C. Long S. McFarlane D. Turner S. Xie October 1, 2007 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service

38

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 A Year of Radiation Measurements at the North Slope of Alaska Second Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report S.A. McFarlane/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Y. Shi/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory C.N. Long/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory April 2009 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed,

39

Full-scale and bench-scale testing of a coal-fueled gas turbine system  

SciTech Connect

Components for a coal-fueled industrial gas turbine were developed and tested at both benchscale and full-scale. The components included a two stage slagging combustor, a particulate rejection impact separator (PRIS), and a secondary particulate filter. The Integrated Bench Scale Test Facility (IBSTF) was used for the filter tests ana some of the PRIS testing. Full-scale combustor testing has been carried-out both with and without the PRIS. Bench-scale testing has included evaluating the feasibility of on-site CWM preparation, developing a water-cooled impactor and an extended run with new secondary candle filters.

Roberts, P.B.; LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Full-scale and bench-scale testing of a coal-fueled gas turbine system  

SciTech Connect

Components for a coal-fueled industrial gas turbine were developed and tested at both benchscale and full-scale. The components included a two stage slagging combustor, a particulate rejection impact separator (PRIS), and a secondary particulate filter. The Integrated Bench Scale Test Facility (IBSTF) was used for the filter tests ana some of the PRIS testing. Full-scale combustor testing has been carried-out both with and without the PRIS. Bench-scale testing has included evaluating the feasibility of on-site CWM preparation, developing a water-cooled impactor and an extended run with new secondary candle filters.

Roberts, P.B.; LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Manual of procedures for the operation of bench-scale anaerobic digesters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful operation of any laboratory-scale biological system is often a difficult and frustrating experience. This is especially true when dealing with the anaerobic digestion process. Because of the stringent environmental requirements associated with anaerobic digesters, efficient operation of bench-scale units requires rigid monitoring and control. The purpose of this manual is to present the methods and procedures which are followed in bench-scale anaerobic digestion studies at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Among the topics discussed are operating parameters, a description of the experimental system, typical digestion substrates, operational procedures, analytical techniques, and safety considerations. The document serves as a technical guide to PNL personnel assigned to a U.S. Department of Energy sponsored program evaluating the effect of powdered activated carbon on the anaerobic digestio of sewage sludge. It should be noted that the methods described in this manual do not necessarily represent the best or only means of conducting the research. They are merely procedures that have been found to be successful at PNL. It is hoped that this information may be useful to other researchers who are contemplating or pursuing bench-scale studies of their own.

Spencer, R.R.

1978-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Bench-scale studies on gasification of biomass in the presence of catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of bench-scale studies on the development of catalysts for conversion of biomass to specific gas products. The primary objective of these studies was to define operating conditions that allow long lifetimes for secondary catalysts used in biomass gasification. Nickel-based catalysts that were found to be active for conversion of wood to synthesis gases in previous studies were evaluated. These catalysts remained active indefinitely in laboratory studies but lost activity rapidly when evaluated in a process research unit. Bench-scale equipment was designed and installed to resolve the differences between laboratory and PRU results. Primary catalysts (alkali carbonates) were also evaluated for their effectiveness in improving conversion yields from biomass gasification. 21 refs., 27 figs., 19 tabs.

Mudge, L.K.; Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.; Wilcox, W.A.

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

NETL: Bench-Scale High-Performance Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale High-Performance Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Bench-Scale High-Performance Thin Film Composite Hollow Fiber Membranes for Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture Project No.: DE-FE0007514 GE Global Research is developing high performance thin film polymer composite hollow fiber membranes and advanced processes for economical post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from pulverized coal flue gas at temperatures typical of existing flue gas cleanup processes. The project will optimize the novel membranes at the bench scale, including tuning the properties of a novel phosphazene polymer in a coating solution and fabricating highly engineered porous hollow fiber supports. The project will also define the processes for coating the fiber support to manufacture ultrathin, defect-free composite hollow fiber membranes. Physical, chemical, and mechanical stability of the materials (individual and composite) towards coal flue gas components will be evaluated using exposure and performance tests. Membrane fouling and cleanability studies will define long term performance. Technical and economic feasibility analyses will be conducted to evaluate the overall performance and impact of the process on the cost of electricity (COE). Membranes based on coupling this novel selective material (phosphazene-based polymer) with an engineered hollow fiber support have the potential to meet DOE cost and performance goals.

44

Goethite Bench-scale and Large-scale Preparation Tests  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is the keystone for cleanup of high-level radioactive waste from our nation's nuclear defense program. The WTP will process high-level waste from the Hanford tanks and produce immobilized high-level waste glass for disposal at a national repository, low activity waste (LAW) glass, and liquid effluent from the vitrification off-gas scrubbers. The liquid effluent will be stabilized into a secondary waste form (e.g. grout-like material) and disposed on the Hanford site in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) along with the low-activity waste glass. The major long-term environmental impact at Hanford results from technetium that volatilizes from the WTP melters and finally resides in the secondary waste. Laboratory studies have indicated that pertechnetate ({sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) can be reduced and captured into a solid solution of {alpha}-FeOOH, goethite (Um 2010). Goethite is a stable mineral and can significantly retard the release of technetium to the environment from the IDF. The laboratory studies were conducted using reaction times of many days, which is typical of environmental subsurface reactions that were the genesis of this new process. This study was the first step in considering adaptation of the slow laboratory steps to a larger-scale and faster process that could be conducted either within the WTP or within the effluent treatment facility (ETF). Two levels of scale-up tests were conducted (25x and 400x). The largest scale-up produced slurries of Fe-rich precipitates that contained rhenium as a nonradioactive surrogate for {sup 99}Tc. The slurries were used in melter tests at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) to determine whether captured rhenium was less volatile in the vitrification process than rhenium in an unmodified feed. A critical step in the technetium immobilization process is to chemically reduce Tc(VII) in the pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}) to Tc(Iv)by reaction with the ferrous ion, Fe{sup 2+}-Fe{sup 2+} is oxidized to Fe{sup 3+} - in the presence of goethite seed particles. Rhenium does not mimic that process; it is not a strong enough reducing agent to duplicate the TcO{sub 4}{sup -}/Fe{sup 2+} redox reactions. Laboratory tests conducted in parallel with these scaled tests identified modifications to the liquid chemistry necessary to reduce ReO{sub 4}{sup -} and capture rhenium in the solids at levels similar to those achieved by Um (2010) for inclusion of Tc into goethite. By implementing these changes, Re was incorporated into Fe-rich solids for testing at VSL. The changes also changed the phase of iron that was in the slurry product: rather than forming goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH), the process produced magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). Magnetite was considered by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and VSL to probably be a better product to improve Re retention in the melter because it decomposes at a higher temperature than goethite (1538 C vs. 136 C). The feasibility tests at VSL were conducted using Re-rich magnetite. The tests did not indicate an improved retention of Re in the glass during vitrification, but they did indicate an improved melting rate (+60%), which could have significant impact on HLW processing. It is still to be shown whether the Re is a solid solution in the magnetite as {sup 99}Tc was determined to be in goethite.

Josephson, Gary B.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

45

Development of a bench-scale metal distillation furnace  

SciTech Connect

Design of an inductively heated bench-scale distillation furnace (retort) capable of processing actinides is described. The apparatus consists of a vacuum/inert gas bell jar, a bell-jar lift, a nonwater-cooled induction coil, the induction tank circuit, and a series of components designed to contain the metal melts and vapors. The apparatus is located within a nitrogen glovebox and is designed to process plutonium-containing feeds. The electrical parameters of the induction coil and tank circuit necessary for design were determined by two different methods; one is based solely on calculated impedance values, and the other used high-frequency impedance measurements on a mock-up of the induction coil/susceptor arrangement. During the design state, the two methods of determining electrical parameters gave similar results. With the as-built system, the impedance meter did detect some efficiency loss to the metal bell jar and coil support that the calculational method did not predict. These losses were not significant enough to cause operating problems, and thus, both methods were shown to be adequate for the intended purpose. Zinc and magnesium were distilled, and uranium was melted in a successful series of shake-down runs.

Vest, M.A.; Lewandowski, E.F.; Pierce, R.D.; Smith, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

NETL: Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent CO2 Capture Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Bench-Scale Development of a Non-Aqueous Solvent (NAS) CO2 Capture Process for Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-FE0013865 Research Triangle Institute (RTI) is continuing the development process for a non-aqueous solvent (NAS)-based CO2 capture process that was originated at laboratory scale under an ARPA-E project. This project will conduct bench-scale testing to show the potential of the technology to reduce the parasitic energy penalty. Key technical and economic challenges and uncertainties to be addressed include solvent makeup cost, scalable regenerator design, development of a complete NAS process arrangement, and improved confidence in the capital cost estimate that will enable the scale up of the process. One major focus is identification of best-candidate NAS formulations. This will entail reducing solvent makeup costs by reducing the formulation cost. In addition, efforts will be made to reduce evaporative and degradation losses while maintaining the desired CO2 absorption chemistry. A second focus area involves advancing the design of the process. This will be done by developing and evaluating the effectiveness of two process units specific to NASs - the NAS Recovery/Wash Section and NAS Regenerator. As the project proceeds, the testing campaign will evaluate thermal regeneration energy requirements [kJt / kg CO2] and develop a detailed understanding of the operation of the process. Preliminary analyses indicate that the NAS process can reduce energy consumption by 30 to 50 percent compared to current state of the art CO2 capture processes.

47

NETL: Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent Bench-Scale Process for Low-Cost Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Capture Using a Phase-Changing Absorbent Project No.: DE-FE0013687 GE global is constructing and operating a continuous, bench-scale CO2 capture system that employs a phase-changing silicone solvent . Experimental data obtained at the laboratory scale in a previous ARPA-E funded project, including mass transfer and kinetic information, is being used to determine process scalability and perform a techno-economic assessment of the commercial scale process. The manufacturability of the solvent is being examined to obtain the material needed for bench-scale testing. Data obtained from the bench-scale system will include mass transfer parameters, kinetic parameters, heat transfer parameters, solvent stability, effects of flue gas contaminants, and recommended operating conditions. Other data such as absorption/desorption isotherms and solvent regeneration energy will be determined in laboratory testing. The solvent manufacturing cost, the bench-scale engineering data, and the laboratory property data will be used to complete the techno-economic assessment and to develop a scale-up strategy for commercialization.

48

Bench-scale studies with mercury contaminated SRS soil  

SciTech Connect

Bench-scale studies with mercury contaminated soil were performed at the SRTC to determine the optimum waste loading obtainable in the glass product without sacrificing durability, leach resistance, and processability. Vitrifying this waste stream also required offgas treatment for the capture of the vaporized mercury. Four soil glasses with slight variations in composition were produced, which were capable of passing the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP). The optimum glass feed composition contained 60 weight percent soil and produced a soda-lime-silica glass when melted at 1,350 C. The glass additives used to produce this glass were 24 weight percent Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and 16 weight percent CaCO{sub 3}. Volatilized mercury released during the vitrification process was released to the proposed mercury collection system. The proposed mercury collection system consisted of quartz and silica tubing with a Na{sub 2}S wash bottle followed by a NaOH wash bottle. Once in the system, the volatile mercury would pass through the wash bottle containing Na{sub 2}S, where it would be converted to Hg{sub 2}S, which is a stable form of mercury. However, attempts to capture the volatilized mercury in a Na{sub 2}S solution wash bottle were not as successful as anticipated. Maximum mercury captured was only about 3.24% of the mercury contained in the feed. Mercury capture efforts then shifted to condensing and capturing the volatilized mercury. These attempts were much more successful at capturing the volatile mercury, with a capture efficiency of 34.24% when dry ice was used to pack the condenser. This captured mercury was treated on a mercury specific resin after digestion of the volatilized mercury.

Cicero, C.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling efforts.

Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

50

BENCH-SCALE STEAM REFORMING OF ACTUAL TANK 48H WASTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) has been demonstrated to be a viable technology to remove >99% of the organics from Tank 48H simulant, to remove >99% of the nitrate/nitrite from Tank 48H simulant, and to form a solid product that is primarily carbonate based. The technology was demonstrated in October of 2006 in the Engineering Scale Test Demonstration Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer1 (ESTD FBSR) at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) facility in Golden, CO. The purpose of the Bench-scale Steam Reformer (BSR) testing was to demonstrate that the same reactions occur and the same product is formed when steam reforming actual radioactive Tank 48H waste. The approach used in the current study was to test the BSR with the same Tank 48H simulant and same Erwin coal as was used at the ESTD FBSR under the same operating conditions. This comparison would allow verification that the same chemical reactions occur in both the BSR and ESTD FBSR. Then, actual radioactive Tank 48H material would be steam reformed in the BSR to verify that the actual tank 48H sample reacts the same way chemically as the simulant Tank 48H material. The conclusions from the BSR study and comparison to the ESTD FBSR are the following: (1) A Bench-scale Steam Reforming (BSR) unit was successfully designed and built that: (a) Emulated the chemistry of the ESTD FBSR Denitration Mineralization Reformer (DMR) and Carbon Reduction Reformer (CRR) known collectively as the dual reformer flowsheet. (b) Measured and controlled the off-gas stream. (c) Processed real (radioactive) Tank 48H waste. (d) Met the standards and specifications for radiological testing in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF). (2) Three runs with radioactive Tank 48H material were performed. (3) The Tetraphenylborate (TPB) was destroyed to > 99% for all radioactive Bench-scale tests. (4) The feed nitrate/nitrite was destroyed to >99% for all radioactive BSR tests the same as the ESTD FBSR. (5) The radioactive Tank 48H DMR product was primarily made up of soluble carbonates. The three most abundant species were thermonatrite, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O], sodium carbonate, [Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}], and trona, [Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} {center_dot} 2H{sub 2}O] the same as the ESTD FBSR. (6) Insoluble solids analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) did not detect insoluble carbonate species. However, they still may be present at levels below 2 wt%, the sensitivity of the XRD methodology. Insoluble solids XRD characterization indicated that various Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn phases are present. These crystalline phases are associated with the insoluble sludge components of Tank 48H slurry and impurities in the Erwin coal ash. The percent insoluble solids, which mainly consist of un-burnt coal and coal ash, in the products were 4 to 11 wt% for the radioactive runs. (7) The Fe{sup +2}/Fe{sub total} REDOX measurements ranged from 0.58 to 1 for the three radioactive Bench-scale tests. REDOX measurements > 0.5 showed a reducing atmosphere was maintained in the DMR indicating that pyrolysis was occurring. (8) Greater than 90% of the radioactivity was captured in the product for all three runs. (9) The collective results from the FBSR simulant tests and the BSR simulant tests indicate that the same chemistry occurs in the two reactors. (10) The collective results from the BSR simulant runs and the BSR radioactive waste runs indicates that the same chemistry occurs in the simulant as in the real waste. The FBSR technology has been proven to destroy the organics and nitrates in the Tank 48H waste and form the anticipated solid carbonate phases as expected.

Burket, P; Gene Daniel, G; Charles Nash, C; Carol Jantzen, C; Michael Williams, M

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

51

NETL: Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture Process Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture Process Project No.: DE-FE0013118 Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) is developing and evaluating a hybrid membrane-absorption CO2 capture system. This work builds on prior DOE-funded work and combines MTR's Polaris(tm) membrane, in a low-pressure-drop, large area, plate-and-frame module, with UT Austin's piperazine (PZ) solvent and advanced, high-temperature and pressure regeneration technology. Preliminary estimates indicate that this hybrid system could lower the regeneration energy by 30 percent compared to that required with 30 weight percent monoethanolamine (MEA). MTR is evaluating two variations of the hybrid design consisting of the cross-flow Polaris membrane, which enriches flue gas to approximately 20 percent CO2, and an advanced 5 molal PZ advanced flash stripper with cold-rich bypass. The flash stripper will be optimized to take advantage of the higher CO2 concentration. In the first variation, the two systems are operated in series; in the second, the flue gas flow is split and treated by each system in parallel. The first phase of this project will include an examination of both hybrid configurations, using an integrated process model and a preliminary techno-economic assessment. In the second phase, MTR will manufacture and test a low pressure drop, large-area membrane module and UT Austin will modify their 0.1 MWe pilot plant and operate it under simulated series and parallel configurations. Based on the model and test results, the most promising configuration will be identified. In the final stage of the project, the membrane module will be integrated into the pilot plant where the fully integrated hybrid system, in its most promising cost optimized configuration, will be tested on simulated flue gas.

52

NETL: Bench-Scale Development & Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development & Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process Bench-Scale Development & Testing of a Novel Adsorption Process Project No.: DE-FE0007948 InnoSepra, LLC is demonstrating the effectiveness of an innovative adsorption-based carbon dioxide (CO2) capture technology utilizing a combination of novel microporous materials and process cycles. The process utilizes physical sorbents with much lower heats of adsorption compared to competing processes. Lab scale testing has produced greater than 99 percent CO2 purity and greater than 90 percent CO2 recovery from synthetic flue gas. Projections based on detailed engineering evaluations show that at commercial scale, the technology can reduce the power consumption for CO2 capture by more than 40 percent and the capital cost for the CO2 capture equipment by more than 60 percent, resulting in a more than a 40 percent reduction in the CO2 capture cost compared to alternate technologies such as amines and chilled ammonia.

53

Bench-scale studies of in-duct mercury capture using cupric chloride-impregnated carbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brominated activated carbon (Darco Hg-LH) and cupric chloride-impregnated activated carbon (CuCl{sub 2}-ACs) sorbent have been tested in a bench-scale entrained-flow reactor system which was developed for simulating in-flight mercury capture in ducts upstream of particulate matter control devices. The bench-scale experimental system has been operated with the conditions of a residence time of 0.75 s and a gas temperature of 140{sup o}C to simulate typical conditions in the duct of coal-fired exhaust gas. In addition, sorbent deposition on walls which can occur in a laboratory-scale system more than in a full-scale system was significantly reduced so that additional mercury capture by the deposited sorbent was minimized. In the entrained-flow system, CuCl{sub 2}-ACs demonstrated similar performance in Hg adsorption and better performance in Hg{sup 0} oxidation than Darco Hg-LH. In addition, the carbon content of those sorbents was found to determine their Hg adsorption capability in the entrained-flow system. The bench-scale entrained-flow system was able to demonstrate the important Hg adsorption and oxidation characteristics of the tested sorbents. 18 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Sang-Sup Lee; Joo-Youp Lee; Tim C. Keener [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Bench-Scale Demonstration of Hot-Gas Desulfurization Technology  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal-derived fuel-gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The hot gas cleanup work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs.

Jeffrey W. Portzer; Santosh K. Gangwal

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

BENCH-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC), is sponsoring research in advanced methods for controlling contaminants in hot coal gasifier gas (coal-derived fuel-gas) streams of integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. The hot gas cleanup work seeks to eliminate the need for expensive heat recovery equipment, reduce efficiency losses due to quenching, and minimize wastewater treatment costs. Hot-gas desulfurization research has focused on regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents that can reduce the sulfur in coal-derived fuel-gas to less than 20 ppmv and can be regenerated in a cyclic manner with air for multicycle operation. Zinc titanate (Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} or ZnTiO{sub 3}), formed by a solid-state reaction of zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}), is currently one of the leading sorbents. Overall chemical reactions with Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} during the desulfurization (sulfidation)-regeneration cycle are shown below: Sulfidation: Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} + 2H{sub 2}S {yields} 2ZnS + TiO{sub 2} + 2H{sub 2}O; Regeneration: 2ZnS + TiO{sub 2} + 3O{sub 2} {yields} Zn{sub 2} TiO{sub 4} + 2SO{sub 2} The sulfidation/regeneration cycle can be carried out in a fixed-bed, moving-bed, or fluidized-bed reactor configuration. The fluidized-bed reactor configuration is most attractive because of several potential advantages including faster kinetics and the ability to handle the highly exothermic regeneration to produce a regeneration offgas containing a constant concentration of SO{sub 2}.

Unknown

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Enhanced durability and reactivity for zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Volume 1, Bench-scale testing and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AMAX Research & Development Center (AMAX R&D) has been investigating methods for enhancing the reactivity and durability of the zinc ferrite desulfurization sorbent. Zinc ferrite sorbents are intended for use in desulfurization of hot coal gas in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) or molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) applications. For the present program, the reactivity of the sorbent may be defined as its sulfur sorption capacity at the breakthrough point and at saturation in a bench-scale, fixed-bed reactor. Durability may be defined as the ability of the sorbent to maintain important physical characteristics such As size, strength, and specific surface area during 10 cycles of sulfidation and oxidation.

Jha, M.C.; Berggren, M.H.

1989-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

57

Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Bench-scale reactor tests of low-temperature, catalytic gasification of wet, industrial wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bench-scale reactor tests are under way at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for to a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. The current research program is focused on the use of a continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The catalyst is nickel metal on an inert support. Typical results show that feedstocks such as solutions of 2% para-cresol or 5% and 10% lactose in water or cheese whey can be processed to >99% reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) at a rate of up to 2 L/hr. The estimated residence time is less than 5 min at 360{degree}C and 3000 psig, not including 1 to 2 min required in the preheating zone of the reactor. The liquid hourly space velocity has been varied from 1.8 to 2.9 L feedstock/L catalyst/hr depending on the feedstock. The product fuel gas contains 40% to 55% methane, 35% to 50% carbon dioxide, and 5% to 10% hydrogen with as much as 2% ethane, but less than 0.1% ethylene or carbon monoxide, and small amounts of higher hydrocarbons. The byproduct water stream carries residual organics amounting to less than 500 mg/L COD. 9 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Baker, E.G.; Butner, R.S.; Sealock, L.J.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES FOR SELECTING WASTE SAMPLES FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER TREATABILITY STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the data quality objectives to select archived samples located at the 222-S Laboratory for Bench-Scale Reforming testing. The type, quantity, and quality of the data required to select the samples for Fluid Bed Steam Reformer testing are discussed. In order to maximize the efficiency and minimize the time to treat Hanford tank waste in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant, additional treatment processes may be required. One of the potential treatment processes is the fluidized bed steam reformer. A determination of the adequacy of the fluidized bed steam reformer process to treat Hanford tank waste is required. The initial step in determining the adequacy of the fluidized bed steam reformer process is to select archived waste samples from the 222-S Laboratory that will be used in a bench scale tests. Analyses of the selected samples will be required to confirm the samples meet the shipping requirements and for comparison to the bench scale reformer (BSR) test sample selection requirements.

BANNING DL

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

60

SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SMALJ,SCALE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMEN...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and equipment for bench-scale use * minor modifications to rooms, equipment, and instrumentation if in direct support of bench-scale laboratory operations. Proposed...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Program on Technology Innovation: Bench-Scale Evaluation of an Ammonia Slip Destruction Catalyst at Intermediate and Post SCR Reacto r Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing ammonia slip from selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems may allow unit operators to maintain or increase NOx removal efficiencies by increasing reagent flow rates without affecting downstream equipment or ash contamination. This research project is studying the performance of a near-commercial ammonia destruction catalyst using a gas-fired bench-scale reactor. A test program was designed to evaluate the catalyst at different NH3 to NOx ratios, flue gas temperatures, and catalyst volumes. C...

2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

62

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Bench-Scale  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0004360 The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign will evaluate the Hot Carbonate Absorption Process (Hot-CAP) process with crystallization-enabled high pressure stripping. The Hot-CAP is an absorption-based, post-combustion CO2 technology that uses a carbonate salt (K2CO3 or Na2CO3) as a solvent. The process integrates a high temperature (70-80°C) CO2 absorption column, a slurry-based high pressure (up to 40atm) CO2 stripping column, a crystallization unit to separate bicarbonate and recover the carbonate solvent, and a reclaimer to recover CaSO4 as the byproduct of the SO2 removal.

63

Final PHP bench-scale report for the DOE-ID/SAIC sole source contract  

SciTech Connect

The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) Technology Development Project was established to develop, test, and evaluate a new concept for treating mixed waste. The new concept uses direct current (dc) transferred-arc plasma torch technology to process mixed waste into a glass-like end-product. Under the cognizance of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA), the technology is being explored for its potential to treat mixed waste. Because it is a mature technology, well-understood and commercially available, it is expected to develop rapidly in this new application. This report summarizes the radioactive bench-scale system activities funded under PHP Sole Source Contract DE-AC07-94ID13266 through the end of the contract.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Bench-scale screening tests for a boiling sodium-potassium alloy solar receiver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bench-scale tests were carried out in support of the design of a second-generation 75-kW{sub t} reflux pool-boiler solar receiver. The receiver will be made from Haynes Alloy 230 and will contain the sodium-potassium alloy NaK-78. The bench-scale tests used quartz-lamp-heated boilers to screen candidate boiling-stabilization materials and methods at temperatures up to 750{degree}C. Candidates that provided stable boiling were tested for hot-restart behavior. Poor stability was obtained with single 1/4-inch diameter patches of powdered metal hot-press-sintered onto the wetted side of the heat-input area. Laser-drilled and electric-discharge-machined cavities in the heated surface also performed poorly. Small additions of xenon, and heated-surface tilt out of the vertical dramatically improved poor boiling stability; additions of helium or oxygen did not. The most stable boiling was obtained when the entire heat-input area was covered by a powdered-metal coating. The effect of heated-area size was assessed for one coating: at low incident fluxes, when even this coating performed poorly, increasing the heated-area size markedly improved boiling stability. Good hot-restart behavior was not observed with any candidate, although results were significantly better with added xenon in a boiler shortened from 3 to 2 feet. In addition to the screening tests, flash-radiography imaging of metal-vapor bubbles during boiling was attempted. Contrary to the Cole-Rohsenow correlation, these bubble-size estimates did not vary with pressure; instead they were constant, consistent with the only other alkali metal measurements, but about 1/2 their size.

Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Preliminary results from bench-scale testing of a sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Portions of a bench-scale model of a sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle have been operated at General Atomic Company as part of a comprehensive program to demonstrate the technology for hydrogen production from nonfossil sources. The hydrogen program is funded by the US Department of Energy, the Gas Research Institute, and General Atomic Company. The bench-scale model consists of three subunits which can be operated separately or together and is capable of producing as much as 4 std liters/min (6.7 x 10/sup -5/ m/sup 3//s at standard conditions) of gaseous hydrogen. One subunit (main solution reaction) reacts liquid water, liquid iodine (I/sub 2/) and gaseous sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) to form two separable liquid phases: 50 wt % sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) and a solution of iodine in hydriodic acid (HI/sub x/). Another subunit (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ concentration and decomposition) concentrates the H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ phase to the azeotropic composition, then decomposes it at high temperature over a catalyst to form gaseous SO/sub 2/ and oxygen. The third subunit (HI separation and decomposition) separates the HI from water and I/sub 2/ by extractive distillation with phosphoric acid (H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/) and decomposes the HI in the vapor phase over a catalyst to form I/sub 2/ and product hydrogen. This paper presents the results of on-going parametric studies to determine the operating characteristics, performance, and capacity limitations of major components.

O'Keefe, D.; Allen, C.; Besenbruch, G.; McCorkle, K.; Norman, J.; Sharp, R.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Environmental data from laboratory- and bench-scale Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

As part of a 3-year program to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) Process for Eastern oil shales, IGT conducted tests in laboratory-scale batch and continuous units as well as a 45-kg/h bench-scale unit to generate a data base for 6 Eastern shales. Data were collected during PFH processing of raw Alabama and Indiana shales and a beneficiated Indiana shale for environmental mitigation analyses. The data generated include trace element analyses of the raw feeds and spent shales, product oils, and sour waters. The sulfur compounds present in the product gas and trace components in the sour water were also determined. In addition, the leaching characteristics of the feed and residue solids were determined. The data obtained were used to evaluate the environmental impact of a shale processing plant based on the PFH process. This paper presents the environmental data obtained from bench-scale tests conducted during the program.

Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Roberts, M.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Environmental data from laboratory- and bench-scale Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

As part of a 3-year program to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) Process for Eastern oil shales, IGT conducted tests in laboratory-scale batch and continuous units as well as a 45-kg/h bench-scale unit to generate a data base for 6 Eastern shales. Data were collected during PFH processing of raw Alabama and Indiana shales and a beneficiated Indiana shale for environmental mitigation analyses. The data generated include trace element analyses of the raw feeds and spent shales, product oils, and sour waters. The sulfur compounds present in the product gas and trace components in the sour water were also determined. In addition, the leaching characteristics of the feed and residue solids were determined. The data obtained were used to evaluate the environmental impact of a shale processing plant based on the PFH process. This paper presents the environmental data obtained from bench-scale tests conducted during the program.

Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Roberts, M.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Treatment studies of plutonium-bearing INEEL waste surrogates in a bench-scale arc furnace  

SciTech Connect

Since 1989, the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) has been included on the National Priority List for remediation. Arc- and plasma-heated furnaces are being considered for converting the radioactive mixed waste buried in the SDA to a stabilized-vitreous form. Nonradioactive, surrogate SDA wastes have been melted during tests in these types of furnaces, but data are needed on the behavior of transuranic (TRU) constituents, primarily plutonium, during thermal treatment. To begin collecting this data, plutonium-spiked SDA surrogates were processed in a bench-scale arc furnace to quantify the fate of the plutonium and other hazardous and nonhazardous metals. Test conditions included elevating the organic, lead, chloride, and sodium contents of the surrogates. Blends having higher organic contents caused furnace power levels to fluctuate. An organic content corresponding to 50% INEEL soil in a soil-waste blend was the highest achievable before power fluctuations made operating conditions unacceptable. The glass, metal, and off-gas solids produced from each surrogate blend tested were analyzed for elemental (including plutonium) content and the partitioning of each element to the corresponding phase was calculated.

Freeman, C.J.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Safety analysis of the CSTR-1 bench-scale coal liquefaction unit  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the program reported herein was to provide a Safety Analysis of the CSTR-1 bench scale unit located in Building 167 at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center. It was apparent that considerable effort was expended in the design and construction of the unit, and in the development of operating procedures, with regard to safety. Exhaust ventilation, H/sub 2/ and H/sub 2/S monitoring, overpressure protection, overtemperature protection, and interlock systems have been provided. Present settings on the pressure and temperature safety systems are too high, however, to insure prevention of vessel deformation or damage in all cases. While the occurrence of catastrophic rupture of a system pressure vessel (e.g., reactor, high pressure separators) is unlikely, the potential consequences to personnel are severe. Feasibility of providing shielding for these components should be considered. A more probable mode of vessel failure in the event of overpressure or overtemperature and failure of the safety system is yielding of the closure bolts followed by high pressure flow across the mating surfaces. As a minimum, shielding should be designed to restrict travel of resultant spray. The requirements for personal protective equipment are presently stated in rather broad and general terms in the operating procedures. Safe practices and procedures would be more assured if specific requirements were stated and included for each operational step. Recommendations were developed for all hazards triggered by the guidelines.

Hulburt, D.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Design of a bench-scale apparatus for processing carbon black derived from scrap tires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this work is to design a bench-scale apparatus, for laboratory applications, that will perform solid processing operations for carbon black obtained through the thermal catalytic depolymerization of scrap tires. These operations are as follows: filtration and washing, extraction, and fine/coarse particle separation. It is beneficial to perform the three processing steps in a single apparatus to minimize, both, the amount of solid product lost and the time required for processing. By minimizing the time, a greater number of samples may be analyzed in a given amount of time. Thus, the effects of variations in process conditions can be determined in a shorter time span. The final design of the apparatus was formulated through combining the requirements of the three individual processing steps. Theoretical aspects, as well as quantitative and qualitative observations were important tools in generating the final design specifications. Without a doubt, the practical experience of working with the carbon black was the most important aid in performing this work.

Woodrow, Philip Travis

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Bench-Scale Electrochemical System for Generation of CO and Syn-Gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A bench-scale system for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 has been developed which produces CO and H2 (syn-gas) mixtures. The system is equipped with a gas-diffusion electrode which partially alleviates some of the mass-transport issues associated with CO2 delivery to the cathode. The positive effect of temperature was discovered where at 70C a reduction in cell voltage of 1.57 V (compared to ambient) was observed at 70 mA cm-2. Controlling the flow of CO2 made it possible to maintain set H2:CO ratios with CO accounting for 25-90% of the product and H2 accounting for 10-75%. The cell, after an initial stabilization period of 40 min, displays reproducible, stable behavior. The current cell design brings the current densities for CO2 reduction closer to what is currently achieved in industrial alkaline electrolysis cells. This report discusses the electrolyte, electrode materials and variables which have been found to be significant in the production of CO and syn-gas mixtures.

Eric J. Dufek; Tedd E. Lister; Michael E. McIlwain

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

Field, J.G.

1994-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Bench Scale Study of Integrated Chemical Oxidation and Enhanced Bio-Stabilization of Manufactured Gas Plant SoilsBench Scale Study of Integrated Chemical Oxidation and Enhanced Bio-Stabilization of Manufactured Gas Plant Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bench-scale study was conducted to investigate a new remedial approach to treat constituents of concern (COC) that were present in soil from a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site. The approach combines in situ chemical oxidation, in situ stabilization, and enhanced biodegradation to provide overall degradation/stabilization of COCs that would not be possible using any of the three technologies alone. Sodium persulfate was chosen as the oxidant because it can be activated by ...

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

74

Results of bench-scale plasma system testing in support of the Plasma Hearth Process  

SciTech Connect

The Plasma Hearth Process (PHP) is a high-temperature process that destroys hazardous organic components and stabilizes the radioactive components and hazardous metals in a leach-resistant vitreous slag waste form. The PHP technology development program is targeted at mixed waste that cannot be easily treated by conventional means. For example, heterogeneous debris, which may contain hazardous organics, toxic metals, and radionuclides, is difficult to characterize and cannot be treated with conventional thermal, chemical, or physical treatment methods. A major advantage of the PHP over other plasma processes is its ability to separate nonradioactive, non-hazardous metals from the non-metallic and radioactive components which are contained in the vitreous slag. The overall PHP program involves the design, fabrication, and operation of test hardware to demonstrate and certify that the PHP concept is viable for DOE waste treatment. The program involves bench-scale testing of PHP equipment in radioactive service, as well as pilot-scale demonstration of the PHP concept using nonradioactive, surrogate test materials. The fate of secondary waste streams is an important consideration for any technology considered for processing mixed waste. The main secondary waste stream generated by the PHP is flyash captured by the fabric- filter baghouse. The PHP concept is that flyash generated by the process can, to a large extent, be treated by processing this secondary waste stream in the PHP. Prior to the work presented in the paper, however, the PHP project has not quantitatively demonstrated the ability to treat PHP generated flyash. A major consideration is the quantity of radionuclides and RCRA-regulated metals in the flyash that can be retained the resultant waste form.

Leatherman, G.L.; Cornelison, C. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frank, S. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for coal fueled turbines Phase III bench-scale testing and evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of coal-fired turbine technologies such as Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC), coal Gasification Combined Cycles (GCC), and Direct Coal-Fired Turbines (DCFT). A major technical development challenge remaining for coal-fired turbine systems is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental emissions standards, as well as to ensure acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, has evaluated an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept that has been configured to meet this technical challenge. This ceramic hot gas filter (HGF), ILEC concept controls particulate emissions, while simultaneously contributing to the control of sulfur and alkali vapor contaminants in high-temperature, high-pressure, fuel gases or combustion gases. This document reports on the results of Phase III of the ILEC evaluation program, the final phase of the program. In Phase III, a bench-scale ILEC facility has been tested to (1) confirm the feasibility of the ILEC concept, and (2) to resolve some major filter cake behavior issues identified in PFBC, HGF applications.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Bench-scale experimental determination of the thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bench-scale experiment was designed and constructed to determine the effective thermal diffusivity of crushed tuff. Crushed tuff particles ranging from 12.5 mm to 37.5 mm (0.5 in. to 1.5 in.) were used to fill a cylindrical volume of 1.58 m{sup 3} at an effective porosity of 0.48. Two iterations of the experiment were completed; the first spanning approximately 502 hours and the second 237 hours. Temperatures near the axial heater reached 700 degrees C, with a significant volume of the test bed exceeding 100 degrees C. Three post-test analysis techniques were used to estimate the thermal diffusivity of the crushed tuff. The first approach used nonlinear parameter estimation linked to a one dimensional radial conduction model to estimate thermal diffusivity from the first 6 hours of test data. The second method used the multiphase TOUGH2 code in conjunction with the first 20 hours of test data not only to estimate the crushed tuffs thermal diffusivity, but also to explore convective behavior within the test bed. Finally, the nonlinear conduction code COYOTE-II was used to determine thermal properties based on 111 hours of cool-down data. The post-test thermal diffusivity estimates of 5.0 x 10-7 m{sup 2}/s to 6.6 x 10-7 m{sup 2}/s were converted to effective thermal conductivities and compared to estimates obtained from published porosity-based relationships. No obvious match between the experimental data and published relationships was found to exist; however, additional data for other particle sizes and porosities are needed.

Ryder, E.E.; Finley, R.E.; George, J.T.; Ho, C.K.; Longenbaugh, R.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Connolly, J.R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process bench studies and PDU scale-up with sub-bituminous coal. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reported are the details and results of Laboratory and Bench-Scale experiments using sub-bituminous coal conducted at Hydrocarbon Research, Inc., under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-88PC88818 during the period October 1, 1988 to December 31, 1992. The work described is primarily concerned with testing of the baseline Catalytic Two-Stage Liquefaction (CTSL{trademark}) process with comparisons with other two stage process configurations, catalyst evaluations and unit operations such as solid separation, pretreatments, on-line hydrotreating, and an examination of new concepts. In the overall program, three coals were evaluated, bituminous Illinois No. 6, Burning Star and sub-bituminous Wyoming Black Thunder and New Mexico McKinley Mine seams. The results from a total of 16 bench-scale runs are reported and analyzed in detail. The runs (experiments) concern process variables, variable reactor volumes, catalysts (both supported, dispersed and rejuvenated), coal cleaned by agglomeration, hot slurry treatments, reactor sequence, on-line hydrotreating, dispersed catalyst with pretreatment reactors and CO{sub 2}/coal effects. The tests involving the Wyoming and New Mexico Coals are reported herein, and the tests involving the Illinois coal are described in Topical Report No. 2. On a laboratory scale, microautoclave tests evaluating coal, start-up oils, catalysts, thermal treatment, CO{sub 2} addition and sulfur compound effects were conducted and reported in Topical Report No. 3. Other microautoclave tests are described in the Bench Run sections to which they refer such as: rejuvenated catalyst, coker liquids and cleaned coals. The microautoclave tests conducted for modelling the CTSL{trademark} process are described in the CTSL{trademark} Modelling section of Topical Report No. 3 under this contract.

Comolli, A.G.; Johanson, E.S.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Lee, L.K.T.; Stalzer, R.H.; Smith, T.O.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Removal of H{sub2}S from geothermal steam by catalytic oxidation process: bench scale testing results. Interim report  

SciTech Connect

A process was investigated to remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub2}S) from geothermal steam. This process is an upstream steam treatment process which utilizes a catalytic oxidation reaction to convert H{sub2}S in geothermal steam to water vapor and sulfur. The process consists of passing geothermal steam, containing H{sub2}S and other noncondensible gases, through fixed beds of activated carbon catalyst. Oxygen is provided by injection of air or oxygen upstream of the catalyst beds. The treated steam, with H{sub2}S being almost completely removed, passes to steam turbines for power generation. The elemental sulfur produced deposits on the catalyst surface and is retained. The catalyst activity decreases gradually with sulfur accumulation. Sulfur removal, and catalyst regeneration, is accomplished by solvent extraction. Sulfur is recovered from solvent by evaporation/crystallization. Bench scale experimental work on this process was performed to determine its performance and limits of applicability to power generation systems employing geothermal steam. The bench scale system employed a one-inch diameter reactor, a steam supply with controlled temperature and pressure, an injection system for adding {Hsub2}S and other gases at controlled rates, and instrumentation for control and measurement of temperatures, pressures, flow rates and presssure drop. H{sub2}S and other analyses were performed by wet chemistry techniques.

Li, C.T.; Brouns, R.A.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Bench-scale demonstration of biological production of ethanol from coal synthesis gas. Quarterly report: July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to present results from culture isolation and selection studies, bench-scale fermentation experiments, and ethanol recovery experiments. Several promising isolates have been obtained in addition to Clostridium ljungdahlii, strain PETC, and are being used in batch and continuous culture comparison studies. C. ljungdahlii is being utilized in two-stage bench-scale reactor studies, aimed at producing ethanol in high concentrations from a stable culture system. Finally, solvent comparison studies have been performed for the economical recovery of ethanol from the fermentation broth.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Bench-Scale Silicone Process for Low-Cost CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov Benjamin Wood Principal Investigator GE Global Research One Research Circle Niskayuna, NY 12309...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Bench-scale testing and evaluation of the direct sulfur recovery process. Final report, February 1990--March 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) is a two-stage catalytic reduction process for efficiently recovering up to 99% or higher amounts of elemental sulfur from SO{sub 2}-containing regeneration tail-gas produced in advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power systems by reacting the tail-gas with a small slipstream of coal gas. In this project, the DSRP was demonstrated with simulated gases at bench-scale with 3-in. diameter, 1-L size catalytic reactors. Fundamental kinetic and modeling studies were conducted to explain the significantly higher than thermodynamically expected sulfur recoveries in DSRP and to enable prediction of sulfur recovery in larger reactors. Technology transfer activities to promote the DSRP consisted of publications and discussions with architectural engineering firms and industrial parties especially IGCC system developers. Toward the end of the project, an agreement was signed with an IGCC system developer to scale up the DSRP and test it with actual gases in their 10-MW (thermal) coal gasification pilot-plant under a cooperative R&D agreement with the US Department of Energy.

Gangwal, S.K.; Chen, D.H.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Thermochemical water-splitting cycle, bench-scale investigations, and process engineering. Final report, February 1977-December 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sulfur-iodine water-splitting cycle is characterized by the following three reactions: 2H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ + 2HI; H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ ..-->.. H/sub 2/O + SO/sub 2/ + 1/2 O/sub 2/; and 2HI ..-->.. H/sub 2/ + I/sub 2/. This cycle was developed at General Atomic after several critical features in the above reactions were discovered. These involved phase separations, catalytic reactions, etc. Estimates of the energy efficiency of this economically reasonable advanced state-of-the-art processing unit produced sufficiently high values (to approx.47%) to warrant cycle development effort. The DOE contract was largely directed toward the engineering development of this cycle, including a small demonstration unit (CLCD), a bench-scale unit, engineering design, and costing. The work has resulted in a design that is projected to produce H/sub 2/ at prices not yet generally competitive with fossil-fuel-produced H/sub 2/ but are projected to be favorably competitive with respect to H/sub 2/ from fossil fuels in the future.

Norman, J.H.; Besenbruch, G.E.; Brown, L.C.; O'Keefe, D.R.; Allen, C.L.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

In situ encapsulation bench-scale demonstration report FY-94 (for TTP-ID 142012)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the test objectives, procedures, and results of the laboratory-scale tests of in situ waste encapsulation of buried waste using a synthetic analogue of natural cement. The products of the reaction FeSO{sub 4} {center_dot} 7H{sub 2}O + Ca(OH){sub 2} = gypsum and iron oxide/hydroxide were examined as a possible waste encapsulation material for application at the Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This technique for transuranic waste encapsulation is being pursued by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration as a possible candidate containment and stabilization method for geologic time. The data indicate that the iron waste encapsulation materials tested are appropriate choices for the intended purpose. Based on these observations and conclusions, full-scale tests are recommended to determine the performance of the iron waste isolation materials under field conditions and for extended time periods. The viscosity of the reagents indicates that jet grouting is probably an appropriate application method.

Weidner, J.R.; Shaw, P.G.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

TYPE OF OPERATION R Research & Development T& Facility Type  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-- R Research & Development T& Facility Type 0 Production scale testing a Pilat scale Y-. Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis 0 Productian 0 Disposal...

85

Bench-Scale Development of Fluidized-Bed Spray-Dried Sorbents  

SciTech Connect

Successful development of regenerable mixed-metal oxide sorbents for removal of reduced sulfur species (such as H{sub 2}S and COS) from coal-derived fuel gas streams at high=temperature, high-pressure (HTHP) conditions is a key to commercialization of the integrated-gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. Among the various available coal-to-electricity pathways, IGCC power plants have the most potential with high thermal efficiency, simple system configuration, low emissions of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} and other contaminants, modular design, and low capital cost. Due to these advantages, the power plants of the 21st century are projected to utilize IGCC technology worldwide. Sorbents developed for sulfur removal are primarily zinc oxide-based inorganic materials, because of their ability to reduce fuel gas sulfur level to a few parts-per-million (ppm). This project extends the prior work on the development of fluidizable zinc titanate particles using a spray-drying technique to impart high reactivity and attrition resistance. Specific objectives are to develop highly reactive and attrition-resistant zinc titanate sorbents in 40- to 150-{mu}m particle size range for transport reactor applications using semicommercial- to full commercial-scale spray dryers, to transfer sorbent production technology to private sector, and to provide technical support for Sierra Pacific`s Clean Coal Technology Demonstration plant and METC`s hot-gas desulfurization process development unit (PDU), both employing a transport reactor system.

Gupta, R.P.; Turk, B.S.; Gangwal, S.K. [Research Triangle Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

WASTE SOLIDIFICATION BUILDING BENCH SCALE HIGH ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANT VARIABILITY STUDY FY2008  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this task was to perform a variability study of the high activity waste (HAW) acidic feed to determine the impact of feed variability on the quality of the final grout and on the mixability of the salt solution into the dry powders. The HAW acidic feeds were processed through the neutralization/pH process, targeting a final pH of 12. These fluids were then blended with the dry materials to make the final waste forms. A secondary objective was to determine if elemental substitution for cost prohibitive or toxic elements in the simulant affects the mixing response, thus providing a more economical simulant for use in full scale tests. Though not an objective, the HAW simulant used in the full scale tests was also tested and compared to the results from this task. A statistically designed test matrix was developed based on the maximum molarity inputs used to make the acidic solutions. The maximum molarity inputs were: 7.39 HNO{sub 3}, 0.11618 gallium, 0.5423 silver, and 1.1032 'other' metals based on their NO{sub 3}{sup -} contribution. Substitution of the elements aluminum for gallium and copper for silver was also considered in this test matrix, resulting in a total of 40 tests. During the NaOH addition, the neutralization/pH adjustment process was controlled to a maximum temperature of 60 C. The neutralized/pH adjusted simulants were blended with Portland cement and zircon flour at a water to cement mass ratio of 0.30. The mass ratio of zircon flour to Portland cement was 1/12. The grout was made using a Hobart N-50 mixer running at low speed for two minutes to incorporate and properly wet the dry solids with liquid and at medium speed for five minutes for mixing. The resulting fresh grout was measured for three consecutive yield stress measurements. The cured grout was measured for set, bleed, and density. Given the conditions of preparing the grout in this task, all of the grouts were visually well mixed prior to preparing the grouts for measurements. All of the cured grouts were measured for bleed and set. All of the cured grouts satisfied the bleed and set requirements, where no bleed water was observed on any of the grout samples after one day and all had set within 3 days of curing. This data indicates, for a well mixed product, bleed and set requirement are satisfied for the range of acidic feeds tested in this task. The yield stress measurements provide both an indication on the mixability of the salt solution with dry materials and an indication of how quickly the grout is starting to form structure. The inability to properly mix these two streams into a well mixed grout product will lead to a non-homogeneous mixture that will impact product quality. Product quality issues could be unmixed regions of dry material and hot spots having high concentrations of americium 241. Mixes that were more difficult to incorporate typically resulted in grouts with higher yield stresses. The mixability from these tests will provide Waste Solidification Building (WSB) an indication of which grouts will be more challenging to mix. The first yield stress measurements were statistically compared to a list of variables, specifically the batched chemicals used to make the acidic solutions. The first yield stress was also compared to the physical properties of the acidic solutions, physical and pH properties of the neutralized/pH adjusted solutions, and chemical and physical properties of the grout.

Hansen, E; Timothy Jones, T; Tommy Edwards, T; Alex Cozzi, A

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

87

Bench-scale demonstration of biological production of ethanol from coal synthesis gas. Quarterly report, January 1, 1994--March 31, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents results from the solvent selection, fermentation, and product recovery studies performed thus far in the development of a bench scale unit for the production of ethanol from coal-derived synthesis gas. Several additional solvents have been compared for their ability to extract ethanol from aqueous solutions of ethanol in water and fermentation permeate. The solvent 2,6-dimethyl-4-heptanol still appears to be the solvent of choice. Liquid-liquid equilibrium data have been collected for ethanol and 2,6-dimethyl-4-heptanol.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

JV TASK 45-MERCURY CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES FOR ELECTRIC UTILITIES BURNING LIGNITE COAL, PHASE I BENCH-AND PILOT-SCALE TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The Energy & Environmental Research Center has completed the first phase of a 3-year, two-phase consortium project to develop and demonstrate mercury control technologies for utilities that burn lignite coal. The overall project goal is to maintain the viability of lignite-based energy production by providing utilities with low-cost options for meeting future mercury regulations. Phase I objectives are to develop a better understanding of mercury interactions with flue gas constituents, test a range of sorbent-based technologies targeted at removing elemental mercury (Hg{sup o}) from flue gases, and demonstrate the effectiveness of the most promising technologies at the pilot scale. The Phase II objectives are to demonstrate and quantify sorbent technology effectiveness, performance, and cost at a sponsor-owned and operated power plant. Phase I results are presented in this report along with a brief overview of the Phase II plans. Bench-scale testing provided information on mercury interactions with flue gas constituents and relative performances of the various sorbents. Activated carbons were prepared from relatively high-sodium lignites by carbonization at 400 C (752 F), followed by steam activation at 750 C (1382 F) and 800 C (1472 F). Luscar char was also steam-activated at these conditions. These lignite-based activated carbons, along with commercially available DARCO FGD and an oxidized calcium silicate, were tested in a thin-film, fixed-bed, bench-scale reactor using a simulated lignitic flue gas consisting of 10 {micro}g/Nm{sup 3} Hg{sup 0}, 6% O{sub 2}, 12% CO{sub 2}, 15% H{sub 2}O, 580 ppm SO{sub 2}, 120 ppm NO, 6 ppm NO{sub 2}, and 1 ppm HCl in N{sub 2}. All of the lignite-based activated (750 C, 1382 F) carbons required a 30-45-minute conditioning period in the simulated lignite flue gas before they exhibited good mercury sorption capacities. The unactivated Luscar char and oxidized calcium silicate were ineffective in capturing mercury. Lignite-based activated (800 C, 1472 F) carbons required a shorter (15-minute) conditioning period in the simulated lignite flue gas and captured gaseous mercury more effectively than those activated at 750 C (1382 F). Subsequent tests with higher acid gas concentrations including 50 ppm HCl showed no early mercury breakthrough for either the activated (750 C, 1382 F) Bienfait carbon or the DARCO FGD. Although these high acid gas tests yielded better mercury capture initially, significant breakthrough of mercury ultimately occurred sooner than during the simulated lignite flue gas tests. The steam-activated char, provided by Luscar Ltd., and DARCO FGD, provided by NORIT Americas, were evaluated for mercury removal potential in a 580 MJ/hr (550,000-Btu/hr) pilot-scale coal combustion system equipped with four particulate control devices: (1) an electrostatic precipitator (ESP), (2) a fabric filter (FF), (3) the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter, and (4) an ESP and FF in series, an EPRI-patented TOXECON{trademark} technology. The Ontario Hydro method and continuous mercury monitors were used to measure mercury species concentrations at the inlet and outlet of the control technology devices with and without sorbent injection. Primarily Hg{sup o} was measured when lignite coals from the Poplar River Plant and Freedom Mine were combusted. The effects of activated Luscar char, DARCO FGD, injection rates, particle size, and gas temperature on mercury removal were evaluated for each of the four particulate control device options. Increasing injection rates and decreasing gas temperatures generally promoted mercury capture in all four control devices. Relative to data reported for bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases, higher sorbent injection rates were generally required for the lignite coal to effectively remove mercury. Documented results in this report provide the impacts of these and other parameters and provide the inputs needed to direct Phase II of the project.

John H. Pavlish; Michael J. Holmes; Steven A. Benson; Charlene R. Crocker; Edwin S. Olson; Kevin C. Galbreath; Ye Zhuang; Brandon M. Pavlish

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Bench- and Pilot-Scale Studies of Reaction and Regeneration of Ni-Mg-K/Al2O3 for Catalytic Conditioning of Biomass-Derived Syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is collaborating with both industrial and academic partners to develop technologies to help enable commercialization of biofuels produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The focus of this paper is to report how various operating processes, utilized in-house and by collaborators, influence the catalytic activity during conditioning of biomass-derived syngas. Efficient cleaning and conditioning of biomass-derived syngas for use in fuel synthesis continues to be a significant technical barrier to commercialization. Multifunctional, fluidizable catalysts are being developed to reform undesired tars and light hydrocarbons, especially methane, to additional syngas, which can improve utilization of biomass carbon. This approach also eliminates both the need for downstream methane reforming and the production of an aqueous waste stream from tar scrubbing. This work was conducted with NiMgK/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. These catalysts were assessed for methane reforming performance in (i) fixed-bed, bench-scale tests with model syngas simulating that produced by oak gasification, and in pilot-scale, (ii) fluidized tests with actual oak-derived syngas, and (iii) recirculating/regenerating tests using model syngas. Bench-scale tests showed that the catalyst could be completely regenerated over several reforming reaction cycles. Pilot-scale tests using raw syngas showed that the catalyst lost activity from cycle to cycle when it was regenerated, though it was shown that bench-scale regeneration by steam oxidation and H{sub 2} reduction did not cause this deactivation. Characterization by TPR indicates that the loss of a low temperature nickel oxide reduction feature is related to the catalyst deactivation, which is ascribed to nickel being incorporated into a spinel nickel aluminate that is not reduced with the given activation protocol. Results for 100 h time-on-stream using a recirculating/regenerating reactor suggest that this type of process could be employed to keep a high level of steady-state reforming activity, without permanent deactivation of the catalyst. Additionally, the differences in catalyst performance using a simulated and real, biomass-derived syngas stream indicate that there are components present in the real stream that are not adequately modeled in the syngas stream. Heavy tars and polycyclic aromatics are known to be present in real syngas, and the use of benzene and naphthalene as surrogates may be insufficient. In addition, some inorganics found in biomass, which become concentrated in the ash following biomass gasification, may be transported to the reforming reactor where they can interact with catalysts. Therefore, in order to gain more representative results for how a catalyst would perform on an industrially-relevant scale, with real contaminants, appropriate small-scale biomass solids feeders or slip-streams of real process gas should be employed.

Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Jablonski, W. S.; Parent, Y. O.; Yung, M. M.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Research and Development with Full Scale Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the research programs of the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) concerns the built environment. Several facilities to conduct the research activities are at ECN's disposal. One of these facilities, are five research dwellings located on the site of ECN (Petten, Netherlands). Measured data from these facilities together with weather data and computer models of the buildings are used to evaluate performance of innovative energy concepts and components in these systems. The facilities are used for a broad range of research activities as well as product development. This paper explains more about the test facilities and the methods that are used to evaluate performance.

Sijpheer, N.; Bakker, E.J.; Opstelten, I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101 & 241AZ-102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-l0-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FBSR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-5.2.1-2010-001, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.

DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

93

CESIUM REMOVAL FROM TANKS 241-AN-103 & 241-SX-105 & 241-AZ-101/102 COMPOSITE FOR TESTING IN BENCH SCALE STEAM REFORMER  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the preparation of three actual Hanford tank waste samples for shipment to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Two of the samples were dissolved saltcakes from tank 241-AN-103 (hereafter AN-103) and tank 241-SX-105 (hereafter SX-105); one sample was a supernate composite from tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 (hereafter AZ-101/102). The preparation of the samples was executed following the test plans LAB-PLAN-10-00006, Test Plan for the Preparation of Samples from Hanford Tanks 241-SX-105, 241-AN-103, 241-AN-107, and LAB-PLN-10-00014, Test Plan for the Preparation of a Composite Sample from Hanford Tanks 241-AZ-101 and 241-AZ-102 for Steam Reformer Testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory. All procedural steps were recorded in laboratory notebook HNF-N-274 3. Sample breakdown diagrams for AN-103 and SX-105 are presented in Appendix A. The tank samples were prepared in support of a series of treatability studies of the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) process using a Bench-Scale Reformer (BSR) at SRNL. Tests with simulants have shown that the FBSR mineralized waste form is comparable to low-activity waste glass with respect to environmental durability (WSRC-STI-2008-00268, Mineralization of Radioactive Wastes by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR): Comparisons to Vitreous Waste Forms and Pertinent Durability Testing). However, a rigorous assessment requires long-term performance data from FB SR product formed from actual Hanford tank waste. Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) has initiated a Waste Form Qualification Program (WP-S.2.1-20 1 0-00 1, Fluidized Bed Steam Reformer Low-level Waste Form Qualification) to gather the data required to demonstrate that an adequate FBSR mineralized waste form can be produced. The documentation of the selection process of the three tank samples has been separately reported in RPP-48824, 'Sample Selection Process for Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Treatability Studies Using Hanford Waste Samples.'

DUNCAN JB; HUBER HJ

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

94

NaK pool-boiler bench-scale receiver durability test: Test results and materials analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pool-boiler reflux receivers have been considered as an alternative to heat pipes for the input of concentrated solar energy to Stirling-cycle engines in dish-Stirling electric generation systems. Pool boilers offer simplicity in design and fabrication. The operation of a full-scale pool-boiler receiver has been demonstrated for short periods of time. However, to generate cost-effective electricity, the receiver must operate Without significant maintenance for the entire system life, as much as 20 to 30 years. Long-term liquid-metal boiling stability and materials compatibility with refluxing NaK-78 is not known and must be determined for the pool boiler receiver. No boiling system has been demonstrated for a significant duration with the current porous boiling enhancement surface and materials. Therefore, it is necessary to simulate the full-scale pool boiler design as much as possible, including flux levels, materials, and operating cycles. On-sun testing is impractical because of the limited test time available. A test vessel was constructed with a porous boiling enhancement surface. The boiling surface consisted of a brazed stainless steel powder with about 50% porosity. The vessel was heated with a quartz lamp array providing about go W/CM2 peak incident thermal flux. The vessel was charged with NaK-78. This allows the elimination of costly electric preheating, both on this test and on fullscale receivers. The vessel was fabricated from Haynes 230 alloy. The vessel operated at 750{degrees}C around the clock, with a 1/2-hour shutdown cycle to ambient every 8 hours. The test completed 7500 hours of lamp-on operation time, and over 1000 startups from ambient. The test was terminated when a small leak in an Inconel 600 thermowell was detected. The test design and data are presented here. Metallurgical analysis of virgin and tested materials has begun, and initial results are also presented.

Andraka, C.E.; Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Jones, S.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Well rounded Postdoctoral Researchers with initiative, who are not always tied to the bench are more successful academically  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

health/safety issues Understand process of funding and evaluating research Justify principles/tec 289 hniques used in your own research Understand process of academic and commercial exploitation of research results... of the process of research (i.e. the process of acquisition of funding, commercialisation of research outputs) were lacking. Furthermore, these skills were associated with higher publication outputs, and improved with mobility between institutions at postdoctoral...

Lee, Lucy J; Gowers, Isobel; Ellis, Lorraine; Bellantuono, Ilaria

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plalnts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scale Development of an scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO 2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions, & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current

97

Roadrunner supercomputer puts research at a new scale  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

supercomputer puts research at a new scale Los Alamos researchers are using the computer to mimic extremely complex neurological processes. June 12, 2008 Roadrunner, a hybrid...

98

The eLabBench: an interactive tabletop system for the biology laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the eLabBench -- a tabletop system supporting experimental research in the biology laboratory. The eLabBench allows biologists to organize their experiments around the notions of activities and resources, and seamlessly ... Keywords: activity-based computing, bench, biology, digital notebook, laboratory, tabletop

Aurlien Tabard; Juan-David Hincapi-Ramos; Morten Esbensen; Jakob E. Bardram

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Research-scale melter test report  

SciTech Connect

The Melter Performance Assessment (MPA) activity in the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Technology Development (PHTD) effort is intended to determine the impact of noble metals on the operational life of the reference HWVP melter. As a part of this activity, a parametric melter test was completed using a Research-Scale Melter (RSM). The RSM is a small, approximately 1/100-scale melter, 6-in.-diameter, that allows rapid changing of process conditions and subsequent re-establishment of a steady-state condition. The test matrix contained nine different segments that varied the melter operating parameters (glass and plenum temperatures) and feed properties (oxide concentration, redox potential, and noble metal concentrations) so that the effects of these parameters on noble metal agglomeration on the melter floor could be evaluated. The RSM operated for 48 days and consumed 1,300 L of feed, equating to 153 tank turnovers. The run produced 531 kg of glass. During the latter portion of the run, the resistance between the electrodes decreased. Upon destructive examination of the melter, a layer of noble metals was found on the bottom. This was surprising because the glass residence time in the RSM is only 10% of the HWVP plant melter. The noble metals layer impacted the melter significantly. Approximately 1/3 of one paddle electrode was melted or corroded off. The cause is assumed to be localized heating from short circuiting of the electrode to the noble metal layer. The metal layer also removed approximately 1/2 in. of the refractory on the bottom of the melter. The mechanism for this damage is not presently known.

Cooper, M.F.; Elliott, M.L.; Eyler, L.L.; Freeman, C.J.; Higginson, J.J.; Mahoney, L.A.; Powell, M.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Geothermal-reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. Second annual report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in the following tasks is discussed: heat extraction from hydrothermal reservoirs, noncondensable gas reservoir engineering, well test analysis and bench-scale experiments, DOE-ENEL Cooperative Research, Stanford-IIE Cooperative Research, and workshop and seminars. (MHR)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Bench-Scale Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a Hot Development of a Hot Carbonate Absorption Process with Crystallization-Enabled High Pressure Stripping for Post-Combustion CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same

102

Bench-scale testing of on-line control of column flotation using a novel analyzer. Revised final report, [October 1992--October 1993]: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main advantage of the project is that it allowed PTI to gain knowledge and experience about the proper approach, methods and hardware required to properly optimize and control column flotation performance. Many operational problems were incurred during the project, some of that PTI was able to solve during the project and other that must be overcome as the technology is further developed and commercialized. The key operating problems experienced with the KEN-FLOTE{sup TM} Column that must be further researched and overcome include: (1)The low concentrate solids content which limited the throughput capacity of the column, due to high froth washing requirements. The low concentrate solids content also lead to difficulty obtaining accurate On-Line Monitor measurements, due to the poor measurement sensitivity obtained with low solids content samples (particularly less than 5.0 wt %). (2) The higher-than-anticipated reagent dosages that undoubtedly contributed to the low solids content listed above, and also caused foaming problems within PTI`s On-Line Monitor. A defoaming reagent addition (Nalco 7810) was required to provide consistent sample size and reproducible On-Line Monitor counts for the concentrate samples collected within the circuit. PTI and UK`s CAER staff will continue to research alternative column design, particularly alternative air bubble generation and air distribution systems, to try to maximize column concentrate solids content while reducing reagent dosage requirements. In addition to the KEN-FLOTE{sup TM} Column operation there were also a number of hardware problems with PTI`s On-Line Quality Monitor that must be remedied for future commercial installations.

Not Available

1993-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

103

RADIOACTIVE DEMONSTRATION OF FINAL MINERALIZED WASTE FORMS FOR HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT SECONDARY WASTE BY FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMING USING THE BENCH SCALE REFORMER PLATFORM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of River Protection (ORP) is responsible for the retrieval, treatment, immobilization, and disposal of Hanford's tank waste. Currently there are approximately 56 million gallons of highly radioactive mixed wastes awaiting treatment. A key aspect of the River Protection Project (RPP) cleanup mission is to construct and operate the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The WTP will separate the tank waste into high-level and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions, both of which will subsequently be vitrified. The projected throughput capacity of the WTP LAW Vitrification Facility is insufficient to complete the RPP mission in the time frame required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, also known as the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA), i.e. December 31, 2047. Therefore, Supplemental Treatment is required both to meet the TPA treatment requirements as well as to more cost effectively complete the tank waste treatment mission. In addition, the WTP LAW vitrification facility off-gas condensate known as WTP Secondary Waste (WTP-SW) will be generated and enriched in volatile components such as {sup 137}Cs, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, Cl, F, and SO{sub 4} that volatilize at the vitrification temperature of 1150 C in the absence of a continuous cold cap (that could minimize volatilization). The current waste disposal path for the WTP-SW is to process it through the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF). Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered for immobilization of the ETF concentrate that would be generated by processing the WTP-SW. The focus of this current report is the WTP-SW. FBSR offers a moderate temperature (700-750 C) continuous method by which WTP-SW wastes can be processed irrespective of whether they contain organics, nitrates, sulfates/sulfides, chlorides, fluorides, volatile radionuclides or other aqueous components. The FBSR technology can process these wastes into a crystalline ceramic (mineral) waste form. The mineral waste form that is produced by co-processing waste with kaolin clay in an FBSR process has been shown to be as durable as LAW glass. Monolithing of the granular FBSR product is being investigated to prevent dispersion during transport or burial/storage, but is not necessary for performance. A Benchscale Steam Reformer (BSR) was designed and constructed at the SRNL to treat actual radioactive wastes to confirm the findings of the non-radioactive FBSR pilot scale tests and to qualify the waste form for applications at Hanford. BSR testing with WTP SW waste surrogates and associated analytical analyses and tests of granular products (GP) and monoliths began in the Fall of 2009, and then was continued from the Fall of 2010 through the Spring of 2011. Radioactive testing commenced in 2010 with a demonstration of Hanford's WTP-SW where Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Waste (HLW) secondary waste from the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) was shimmed with a mixture of {sup 125/129}I and {sup 99}Tc to chemically resemble WTP-SW. Prior to these radioactive feed tests, non-radioactive simulants were also processed. Ninety six grams of radioactive granular product were made for testing and comparison to the non-radioactive pilot scale tests. The same mineral phases were found in the radioactive and non-radioactive testing.

Crawford, C.; Burket, P.; Cozzi, A.; Daniel, W.; Jantzen, C.; Missimer, D.

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

104

Generalized Test Plan for the Vitrification of Simulated High-Level -Waste Calcine in the Idaho National Laboratorys Bench -Scale Cold Crucible Induction Melter  

SciTech Connect

This Preliminary Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Test Plan outlines the chronological steps required to initially evaluate the validity of vitrifying INL surrogate (cold) High-Level-Waste (HLW) solid particulate calcine in INL's Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM). Its documentation and publication satisfies interim milestone WP-413-INL-01 of the DOE-EM (via the Office of River Protection) sponsored work package, WP 4.1.3, entitled 'Improved Vitrification' The primary goal of the proposed CCIM testing is to initiate efforts to identify an efficient and effective back-up and risk adverse technology for treating the actual HLW calcine stored at the INL. The calcine's treatment must be completed by 2035 as dictated by a State of Idaho Consent Order. A final report on this surrogate/calcine test in the CCIM will be issued in May 2012-pending next fiscal year funding In particular the plan provides; (1) distinct test objectives, (2) a description of the purpose and scope of planned university contracted pre-screening tests required to optimize the CCIM glass/surrogate calcine formulation, (3) a listing of necessary CCIM equipment modifications and corresponding work control document changes necessary to feed a solid particulate to the CCIM, (4) a description of the class of calcine that will be represented by the surrogate, and (5) a tentative tabulation of the anticipated CCIM testing conditions, testing parameters, sampling requirements and analytical tests. Key FY -11 milestones associated with this CCIM testing effort are also provided. The CCIM test run is scheduled to be conducted in February of 2012 and will involve testing with a surrogate HLW calcine representative of only 13% of the 4,000 m3 of 'hot' calcine residing in 6 INL Bin Sets. The remaining classes of calcine will have to be eventually tested in the CCIM if an operational scale CCIM is to be a feasible option for the actual INL HLW calcine. This remaining calcine's make-up is HLW containing relatively high concentrations of zirconium and aluminum, representative of the cladding material of the reprocessed fuel that generated the calcine. A separate study to define the CCIM testing needs of these other calcine classifications in currently being prepared under a separate work package (WP-0) and will be provided as a milestone report at the end of this fiscal year.

Vince Maio

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Assistance in MSD Research and Development: Part 1, Small scale research, development and testing: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The development and testing of a simple mechanical stemming aid is described. The aid comprises a solid unit placed in the stemming above the explosive column and is designed to improve blasting efficiency and reduce drilling and blasting costs. It is designed to work with back filled drill cuttings or any other suitable stemming material. To date it has consisted of the testing of the aid in small diameter (1.5 and 1.625 inch) holes in Jefferson City Dolomite for both bench and crater blasting configurations. Full scale field trials are being conducted nearby in similar rock in an aggregate quarry. The data acquisition equipment used in Phase 1 included both a Spin Physics SP2000 high speed video motion analysis system and acoustic and seismic monitoring units. Measurements for each test included peak air over pressure, ground surface ppv, stemming displacement and velocity and face movement and extent. The results illustrate that the concept is sound and that its successful application to production blasting at full scale will be a function of manufacturing cost, the development of suitable insertion techniques for large diameter boreholes and the selection of a suitable low cost material for the aid. 17 refs., 20 figs.

Worsey, P.N.; Canon, C.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

impact is greatest. The thickness and extent of subtropical low clouds is dependent on tight couplings between surface fluxes of heat and moisture, radiative cooling,...

107

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DR Cook, January 2011, DOE/SC-ARM/TR-052 iii Contents 1.0 General Overview ................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Contacts ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.1 Mentor .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2.2 Instrument Developer ................................................................................................................... 2 3.0 Deployment Locations and History ...................................................................................................... 2

108

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

84 84 UC-400 Annual Report 1999 Computing and Information Sciences R. A. Bair, Deputy Director and the Staff of the Computing and Information Sciences Directorate June 2000 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Battelle Memorial Institute, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

109

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and S. C. Smith ... 2-1 Kinetics of Bacterial Reduction of Goethite by Shewanella putrefaciens Strain CN32 C. Liu, S. Kota, J. M. Zachara, J. K. Fredrickson, and C....

110

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Pressure and Dissolved Gas Supersaturation on Turbine-Passed Fish Laboratory Studies of the Effects Laboratory Studies of the Effects of Pressure and Dissolved Gas of Pressure...

111

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

deployment to Germany that could address this problem, and the upcoming AMF deployment to Storm Peak in 20102011 may also prove useful. Ultimately, a site would likely need to be...

112

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

that is poorly observed, but important for climate studies. Therefore, significant fundamental advances that are pertinent to reducing uncertainties in the radiation...

113

TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.

Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.

2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

114

THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a ''road ready'' waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

Marshall, D.W.; Soelberg, N.R.; Shaber, K.M.

2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

115

TWR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by ThermoChem Waste Remediation, LLC, (TWR) for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). TWR is the licensee of Manufacturing Technology Conservation International (MTCI) steam-reforming technology in the field of radioactive waste treatment. A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrate residues were about 400 ppm in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 86%. The demonstration was successful.

D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

THOR Bench-Scale Steam Reforming Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) was home to nuclear fuel reprocessing activities for decades at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. As a result of the reprocessing activities, INTEC has accumulated approximately one million gallons of acidic, radioactive, sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The purpose of this demonstration was to investigate a reforming technology, offered by THORsm Treatment Technologies, LLC, for treatment of SBW into a "road ready" waste form that would meet the waste acceptance criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). A non-radioactive simulated SBW was used based on the known composition of waste tank WM-180 at INTEC. Rhenium was included as a non-radioactive surrogate for technetium. Data was collected to determine the nature and characteristics of the product, the operability of the technology, the composition of the off-gases, and the fate of key radionuclides (cesium and technetium) and volatile mercury compounds. The product contained a low fraction of elemental carbon residues in the cyclone and filter vessel catches. Mercury was quantitatively stripped from the product but cesium, rhenium (Tc surrogate), and the heavy metals were retained. Nitrates were not detected in the product and NOx destruction exceeded 98%. The demonstration was successful.

D. W. Marshall; N. R. Soelberg; K. M. Shaber

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of whether the local conditions are dominated by a dust event. Specifically the data files includes the following fields in comma-separated ASCII format: * total scattering...

118

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the ARM Sunset Committee, which is chaired by the ARM Chief Scientist. This aging system has experienced maintenance and performance conditions that are too expensive...

119

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- ECO-00646 AMFAAF Deployment to China FY 2009 and EWO 12358, Design Data System Infrastructure for China Taihu Site, are open to communicate information related to this...

120

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOESC-ARMP-08-004.1 11 Committee, which is chaired by the ARM Chief Scientist. This aging system has experienced maintenance and performance conditions that are too expensive...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the Atmosphere (CASA) consortium, and this concept is being assessed to determine utility to ARM and ACRF science objectives. There is a good analysis data set available to...

122

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by BATTELLE for the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under Contract DE-AC06-76RLO 1830 Printed in the United States of America Available...

123

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 ARM Mobile Facility Deployment in China 2008 (AMF-China) Science Plan April 2008 Zhanqing Li, Principal Investigator* and AMF-China Ad-hoc Science Committee: Zhanqing Li, Hongbin...

124

Bench-Scale Cross Flow Filtration of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-2 Accessing the EMSL... 1-2 Mission of the Environmental Dynamics and Simulation Directorate ... 1-4 2....

125

2010 Thin Film & Small Scale Mechanical Behavior Gordon Research Conference  

SciTech Connect

Over the past decades, it has been well established that the mechanical behavior of materials changes when they are confined geometrically at least in one dimension to small scale. It is the aim of the 2010 Gordon Conference on 'Thin Film and Small Scale Mechanical Behavior' to discuss cutting-edge research on elastic, plastic and time-dependent deformation as well as degradation mechanisms like fracture, fatigue and wear at small scales. As in the past, the conference will benefit from contributions from fundamental studies of physical mechanisms linked to material science and engineering reaching towards application in modern applications ranging from optical and microelectronic devices and nano- or micro-electrical mechanical systems to devices for energy production and storage. The conference will feature entirely new testing methodologies and in situ measurements as well as recent progress in atomistic and micromechanical modeling. Particularly, emerging topics in the area of energy conversion and storage, such as material for batteries will be highlighted. The study of small-scale mechanical phenomena in systems related to energy production, conversion or storage offer an enticing opportunity to materials scientists, who can provide new insight and investigate these phenomena with methods that have not previously been exploited.

Dr. Thomas Balk

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Bench terracing in the Kerinci uplands of Sumatra, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bench terracing in the Kerinci uplands of Sumatra, Indonesia ABSTRACF: Bench terracing's effect farmers views and use of bench terraces were evaluated in the Kerinci uplands of Sumatra , Indonesia

Belsky, Jill M.

127

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

SciTech Connect

IThe National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,000 users and hosting some 550 projects that involve nearly 700 codes for a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-scale computing resources NERSC provides critical staff support and expertise to help scientists make the most efficient use of these resources to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Science. In May 2011, NERSC, DOEs Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOEs Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for NP research over the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSCs continuing involvement in anticipating future user needs and deploying necessary resources to meet these demands. The workshop revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing NP computing. The key requirements include: 1. Larger allocations of computational resources at NERSC; 2. Visualization and analytics support; and 3. Support at NERSC for the unique needs of experimental nuclear physicists. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. The results are based upon representative samples, called case studies, of the needs of science teams within NP. The case studies were prepared by NP workshop participants and contain a summary of science goals, methods of solution, current and future computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, multi-core environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report also includes a section with NERSC responses to the workshop findings. NERSC has many initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings and all of the action items are aligned with NERSC strategic plans.

Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey J.

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

128

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, FacilitiesNP) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

outlined in the 2011 DOE Strategic Plan. U.S. Departmentstrategic plans. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics DOE

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to cutting edge technologies, including CO2 storage and energy-efficient fossil fuel utilization. It operates in conjunction with facilities for sorbentcatalyst bench-scale...

131

Research on a super-small-scale MHD power system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a super-small-scale MHD power system, which can generate 4--10W pulse power with a plasma produced by an explosive or combustion as a working substance. Heat shielding material was made and tested, with the result that electrical insulation is desirable. This power generator can be used as an electrical power source of rocket or missile fuses.

He, Z.; Huam, L.Z.; Yao, F.G. (East China Inst. of Tech., Nanjing (China))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The Fan Observatory Bench Optical Spectrograph (FOBOS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fan Observatory Bench Optical Spectrograph (FOBOS) is intended for single-object optical spectroscopy at moderate resolution (R~1500-3000) using a fiber-fed, bench-mounted design to maintain stability. Whenever possible, the instrument uses off-the-shelf components to maintain a modest cost. FOBOS supports Galactic astronomy projects that require consistently well-measured (~5 km/sec) radial velocities for large numbers of broadly distributed and relatively bright (Vdesign was optimized for use in the range 470-670 nm. Test data indicate that the instrument is stable and capable of measuring radial velocities with precision better than 3 km/sec at a resolution of R~1500 with minimal calibration overhead.

Jeffrey D. Crane; Steven R. Majewski; Richard J. Patterson; Michael F. Skrutskie; Elena Y. Adams; Peter M. Frinchaboy

2005-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

133

Full-scale wind turbine rotor aerodynamics research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are conducting research to improve wind turbine technology at the NREL National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). One program, the Combined Experiment, has focused on making measurements needed to understand aerodynamic and structural responses of horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT). A new phase of this program, the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment, will focus on quantifying unsteady aerodynamic phenomena prevalent in stall-controlled HAWTs. Optimally twisted blades and innovative instrumentation and data acquisition systems will be used in these tests. Data can now be acquired and viewed interactively during turbine operations. This paper describes the NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment and highlights planned future research activities.

Simms, D A; Butterfield, C P

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program. Finaltopical report, Bench Run 4 (227-95)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of bench-scale work, Bench Run PB-04, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept-Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. The Bench Run PB-04 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. Bench Run PB-04 had multiple goals. These included the evaluation of the effects of dispersed slurry catalyst system on the performance of direct liquefaction of a subbituminous Wyoming Black Thunder mine coal under extinction recycle (454{degrees}C+ recycle) condition; another goal was to investigate the effects of the combined processing of automobile shredder residue (auto-fluff) with coal and other organic waste materials. PB-04 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. The HTI`s newly modified P/Fe catalyst was very effective for direct liquefaction and coprocessing of Black Thunder mine subbituminous coal with Hondo resid and auto-fluff; during `coal-only` liquefaction mode, over 93% maf coal conversion was obtained with about 90% residuum conversion and as high as 67% light distillate (C{sub 4}-975 F) yield, while during `coprocessing` mode of operation, distillate yields varied between 58 and 69%; the residuum conversions varied between 74 and 89% maf. Overall, it is concluded, based upon the yield data available from PB-04, that auto-effective as MSW plastics in improving coal hydroconversion process performance. Auto-fluff did not increase light distillate yields nor decrease light gas make and chemical hydrogen consumption in coal liquefaction, as was observed to occur with MSW plastics.

Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K. [and others

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Measuring a Utility-Scale Turbine Wake Using the TTUKa Mobile Research Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations of the wake generated by a single utility-scale turbine and collected by the Texas Tech University Ka-band mobile research radars on 27 October 2011 are introduced. Remotely sensed turbine wake observations using lidar technology have ...

Brian D. Hirth; John L. Schroeder; W. Scott Gunter; Jerry G. Guynes

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Project Title: (0207-1609) Planar Energy - Solid-State All Inorganic Rechargeable Lithium Batteries Location: Florida Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recover), and Reinvestment Act: ~ Funding will support laboratory, bench scale, and pilot scale research and development on lithium battery manufacturing processes for use in electrical energy storage for transportation. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: x ~ 83.6 Sitinglconstruct1onJoperationldecommlssloning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, smalJ..scale research and development and pilot projects *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of to CFRIO 21 £::lli:klkrc

137

Emergence of learning in computer-supported, large-scale collective dynamics: a research agenda  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seen through the lens of complexity theory, past CSCL research may largely be characterized as small-scale (i.e., small-group) collective dynamics. While this research tradition is substantive and meaningful in its own right, we propose a line of inquiry ...

Manu Kapur; David Hung; Michael Jacobson; John Voiklis; Charles K. Kinzer; Chen Der-Thanq Victor

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Report on Recommendations for Lab and Bench-Scale Tasks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(as opposed to in-bed tar removal) are typically based on Ni catalysts, which operate at 700­900°C and catalysts or other processes to convert algae- derived materials into suitable fuels. Microbial fuel cells fuels, such as coal, in boilers origi- nally designed for only one fuel.5,6 In fixed-bed furnaces

139

Bench-scale studies with mercury contaminated SRS soil  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has been charactered by the Department of Enregy (DOE) - Office of Technology Development (OTD) to investigate vitrification technology for the treatment of Low Level Mixed Wastes (LLMW). In fiscal year 1995, LLW streams containing mercury and organics were targeted. This report will present the results of studies with mercury contaminated waste. In order to successfully apply vitrification technology to LLMW, the types and quantities of glass forming additives necessary for producing homogeneous glasses from the wastes had to be determined, and the treatment for the mercury portion had to also be determined. The selected additives had to ensure that a durable and leach resistant waste form was produced, while the mercury treatment had to ensure that hazardous amounts of mercury were not released into the environment.

Cicero, C.A.

1996-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

140

NETL: Bench Scale Development and Testing of Aerogel Sorbent...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

flue gas contaminants, crush strength, attrition, fluidized bed properties, and heat transfer coefficients for the adsorptiondesorption process. The sorbent will be evaluated in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Microsoft Word - Indoor Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development 3767X_final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development (3767X) Indoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development (3767X) Program or Field Office: Office of Science - ORNL Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: The U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Site Office (DOE-OSO) proposes to conduct indoor, small- and pilot-scale research and development activities, laboratory operations, and associated transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in personal or real property involving advanced computing, advanced materials, biological and ecological systems, energy science, manufacturing, nanotechnology, national security, neutron sciences, chemical sciences, and nuclear physics including but not limited to developing, evaluating and testing: materials and their properties; systems; equipment; instrumentation; renewable energy systems; and

142

Microsoft Word - Outdoor Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development 3768X_final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Outdoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development (3768X) Outdoor, Small- and Pilot-Scale Research and Development (3768X) Program or Field Office: Office of Science - ORNL Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: The U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Site Office (DOE-OSO) proposes to conduct outdoor, small- and pilot-scale research and development activities and associated transfer, lease, disposition or acquisition of interests in personal or real property involving advanced materials, biological and ecological systems, energy science, and national security including but not limited to collecting samples and analyzing ecosystem and atmospheric field data; developing, evaluating and testing equipment, materials and components; and

143

A Quadrotor Test Bench for Six Degree of Freedom Flight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a quadrotor test bench that can test and verify the 6 DOF flight controller is presented. The development of controller for aerial vehicle is usually a long and dangerous procedure. It needs series of tests from simulation to real flight. ... Keywords: Flight test, Hardware and software system, Parameter identification, Quadrotor, Test bench, Trajectory linearization control

Yushu Yu; Xilun Ding

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Alternative Bench Standards: Sample Production Report  

SciTech Connect

The INL has prepared four standards representing krypton concentrations of 1.1X, 1.54X, 10X and 100X the reported atmospheric value of 70 dpm 85Kr per cubic centimeter of Kr gas at 25 degrees C (ie. 1.1X is 1.1 x 70, or 77 dpm 85Kr per cubic centimeter of Kr gas at 25 degrees C). A t-zero date and time of January 1, 2012 at 1200 Zulu was used for all standards. The Alternative Bench Standards (ABS) of 1.1X, 1.54X, 10X and 100X, are designated by titles of ABS-A, ABS-B, ABS C and ABS-D, respectively. The concentration of Kr in air is 1.14 ppm.

N. R. Mann; T. P. Houghton; M. G. Watrous; J. G. Eisenmenger; R. K. Hague

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

RHIC electron lens test bench diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

An Electron Lens (E-Lens) system will be installed in RHIC to increase luminosity by counteracting the head-on beam-beam interaction. The proton beam collisions at the RHIC experimental locations will introduce a tune spread due to a difference of tune shifts between small and large amplitude particles. A low energy electron beam will be used to improve luminosity and lifetime of the colliding beams by reducing the betatron tune shift and spread. In preparation for the Electron Lens installation next year, a test bench facility will be used to gain experience with many sub-systems. This paper will discuss the diagnostics related to measuring the electron beam parameters.

Gassner, D.; Beebe, E.; Fischer, W.; Gu, X.; Hamdi, K.; Hock, J.; Liu, C.; Miller, T.; Pikin, A.; Thieberger, P.

2011-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

146

Brine chemistry: scaling and corrosion. Geothermal research study in the Salton Sea region of California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to recommend a reasonable program of brine chemistry research that will result in the development of methods for predicting and controlling scale deposition, and in guidelines for the selection of corrosion-resistant construction materials. First, background information, which is necessary for the understanding of the problems of scaling and corrosion in the Salton Sea KGRA, is presented through a review of the history of geothermal exploration and development in the Salton Sea. Second, literature relevant to the geochemistry of the Salton Sea field is reviewed and important results are emphasized. Third, current research efforts directed toward actual power plant construction are summarized and evaluated. Fourth, research which has been proposed but is not currently funded is discussed. Fifth, because silica scaling has been the most troublesome problem in the past, the basic chemistry of silica and its relationship to scaling is discussed. Sixth, recommendations for future research are made in which a fundamental engineering approach is emphasized. In this approach, experiments would be conducted on actual process equipment and detailed chemical analyses would be performed on site in well-equipped field laboratories. 88 references.

Hoffmann, M.R.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Efficient data management in a large-scale epidemiology research project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the concept of a ''Central Data Management'' (CDM) and its implementation within the large-scale population-based medical research project ''Personalized Medicine''. The CDM can be summarized as a conjunction of data capturing, ... Keywords: Central Data Management, Electronic Case Report Forms, Electronic Data Capture, Individualized medicine, Personalized Medicine

Jens Meyer; Stefan Ostrzinski; Daniel Fredrich; Christoph Havemann; Janina Krafczyk; Wolfgang Hoffmann

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

ATTACHMENT CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SMALL-SCALE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS USING NANOSCALE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SMALL-SCALE RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS USING NANOSCALE MATERIALS, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, RICHLAND,WASH[NGTON Proposed Adion: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to conduct indoor small-scale research and development projects and small-scale pilot projects using nanoscale materials. Nanoscale materials are engineered materials consisting of, or containing structures of between 1 and 100 nanometers (nm) that make use of properties unique to nanoscale forms of materials. Location of Action: The proposed action would occur on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site and in the vicinity ofPNNL facilities in the State of Washington. Description of the Proposed Action:

149

NREL: Biomass Research - Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pilot plant accommodates bench-to-pilot-scale processes for converting cellulosic biomass into a variety of fuels and chemicals at process throughputs of up to one ton of dry...

150

300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

Freshley, Mark D.

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

151

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16) Penn State Univ. - 16) Penn State Univ. - Development of Rhodobacter as a Versatile Microbial Platform for Fuels Production Location: Pennsylvania Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recovcf)' and Reinvestment Act: 181 Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and development on a rhodobacter fuel production platform for use in the production of energy dense, liquid transportation fuels from biological-based non-photosynthetic systems. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: x w 83.6 SiUng/constructionloperationldecommission!ng of facilities for bench-scale research, convenUooallaboratory operations. small-scale research and development and pilot projects O+~For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFRIO 21 ('tick Here

152

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3) Regents of the Univ. of California - 3) Regents of the Univ. of California - Electro-Autotrophic Synthesis of Higher Alcohols Location: California Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: 181 Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and development on electro-autotrophic synthesis for use in the production of energy dense, liquid transpcrtatlon fuels from biological-based non-photosynthetic systems. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: x - 83.6 SitingJoonstructlonfoperationldecommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventionallaboralory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of to CFRlO 21 Click I !ere

153

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: e-Bench  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

e-Bench e-Bench e-Bench logo. Desktop computer tool for comprehensively measuring the energy, utility and environmental efficiency of a facility or process and comparing it to established benchmarks. e-Bench enables organisations, industry sectors and even countries to improve energy, utility and environmental performance. It is a management tool that will create financial savings through reduced energy use and improved load management, and improve indoor environmental quality (IEQ) (and consequent staff productivity). It also enables organisations to achieve financial savings through picking up on errors in their supplier invoices and through additional process and production efficiencies as well as to more adequately meet the requirements of Triple Bottom Line

154

Scales  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation SCALES Fish are stream-lined. They have to be. Some kinds, like the catfish, are covered with a...

155

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sorbent and Catalyst Preparation Facilities Sorbent and Catalyst Preparation Facilities NETL researchers are seeking technical solutions to pressing problems related to fossil fuel extraction, processing, and utilization. To this end, laboratory-scale facilities are used to prepare, test, and analyze sorbents and catalysts used in fixed-, moving-, and fluid-bed reactors — three types of reactors often used in advanced fossil-fueled power plants. Equipment in these facilities is also available for standard American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) attrition tests, crush measurements, and particle size analysis to confirm the suitability of the sorbents and catalysts for their intended applications. NETL researchers use these facilities in conjunction with facilities for sorbent/catalyst bench-scale testing and for in-situ (in-place) reaction studies. In 2000, NETL received an R&D 100 Award for its RSV-1 Regenerable Desulfurization Sorbent. The process for preparation of this sorbent has been patented, licensed, and published.

156

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility supporting research within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. NERSC provides high-performance computing (HPC) resources to approximately 4,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. In addition to hosting large-scale computing facilities, NERSC provides the support and expertise scientists need to effectively and efficiently use HPC systems. In February 2010, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BES research through 2013. The workshop was part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users future needs and deploying the necessary resources to meet these demands. Workshop participants reached a consensus on several key findings, in addition to achieving the workshop's goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The key requirements for scientists conducting research in BES are: (1) Larger allocations of computational resources; (2) Continued support for standard application software packages; (3) Adequate job turnaround time and throughput; and (4) Guidance and support for using future computer architectures. This report expands upon these key points and presents others. Several 'case studies' are included as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BES. Research teams scientific goals, computational methods of solution, current and 2013 computing requirements, and special software and support needs are summarized in these case studies. Also included are researchers strategies for computing in the highly parallel, 'multi-core' environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. NERSC has strategic plans and initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings. This report includes a brief summary of those relevant to issues raised by researchers at the workshop.

Gerber, Richard; Wasserman, Harvey

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility supporting research within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. NERSC provides high-performance computing (HPC) resources to approximately 4,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. In addition to hosting large-scale computing facilities, NERSC provides the support and expertise scientists need to effectively and efficiently use HPC systems. In February 2010, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BES research through 2013. The workshop was part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users future needs and deploying the necessary resources to meet these demands. Workshop participants reached a consensus on several key findings, in addition to achieving the workshop's goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The key requirements for scientists conducting research in BES are: (1) Larger allocations of computational resources; (2) Continued support for standard application software packages; (3) Adequate job turnaround time and throughput; and (4) Guidance and support for using future computer architectures. This report expands upon these key points and presents others. Several 'case studies' are included as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BES. Research teams scientific goals, computational methods of solution, current and 2013 computing requirements, and special software and support needs are summarized in these case studies. Also included are researchers strategies for computing in the highly parallel, 'multi-core' environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. NERSC has strategic plans and initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings. This report includes a brief summary of those relevant to issues raised by researchers at the workshop.

Gerber, Richard; Wasserman, Harvey

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

158

Small-scale Facilities for Gas Clean Up and Carbon Capture Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Henry W. Pennline Henry W. Pennline Chemical Engineer National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6013 henry.pennline@netl.doe.gov Diane (DeeDee) Newlon Technology Transfer Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4086 r.diane.newlon@netl.doe.gov Small-Scale FacilitieS For GaS clean Up and carbon captUre reSearch Capabilities The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is conducting research on the cleanup of gas produced either by the combustion or gasification of fossil fuels. This effort directly supports the goal of various DOE technology programs (i.e., Carbon Sequestration, Gasification, etc.) to ensure the continued utilization of coal in an environmentally and economically

159

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategic plans. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences DOE

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BES) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilities

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, FacilitiesOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and

DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office BER,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Act of 2009 Advanced Scientific Computing Research Courseof Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)and for Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilities

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Agency -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Location: Location: New York Proposed Action or Project Description: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: 181 Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and development on aero-thermodynamic Inertial separation for use in carbon capture processes.' Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: x - 83.6 Siting/constructiOnloperationtdecommissioning of facilities for benctrscale research, conventionallaboralory operations, small-scala research and development and pilot projects *-For the complete DOE National Euyironmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of to CFRIO 21 [lkk Here lois action vr'Ould not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or pennit requirements for environment, safety, and health, including OOE andlor Executive Orders;

164

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office (BER), DOE Office of Science National Energy ResearchDepartment of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced ScientificDirectors of the Office of Science, Office of Biological &

DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office BER,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

NREL: Biomass Research - Daniel J. Schell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Daniel J. Schell Daniel J. Schell Photo of Daniel Schell Daniel Schell is a senior biochemical engineer and supervisor of the Bioprocess Integration R&D section of the National Bioenergy Center at NREL. Mr. Schell has more than 25 years of research experience in bio-based conversion of lignocellulosic biomass and has expertise in integrated operations at the bench and pilot scales. He also manages numerous projects for industrial clients investigating various aspects of lignocellulosic biomass conversion and currently leads a multi-disciplinary team of engineers, microbiologists, and chemists. Research Interests Integrated biomass processing High solids biomass conversion Fermentation development Separation processes Technoeconomic analysis Measurement uncertainty Pilot plant operation and process scale up

166

Evolution of the N = 28 shell closure: a test bench for nuclear forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evolution of the N = 28 shell closure: a test bench for nuclear forces O. Sorlin1 and M.-G. Porquet;The N = 28 shell closure: a test bench for nuclear forces 2 reach a value of 4.8 MeV. This effect has and 90). More generally, questions related to the evolution of nuclear forces towards the drip

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

167

Hanford Sr/TRU Decontamination Program: Research from Beaker to Pilot Scale  

SciTech Connect

Plutonium and americium are present in the Hanford High Level Liquid Waste complexant concentrate (CC) waste due to the presence of complexing agents including di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (D2EHPA), tributylphosphate (TBP), hydroxyethylene diamine triacetic acid (HEDTA), ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), citric acid, glycolic acid, and sodium gluconate. The transuranic (TRU) concentrations approach 600 nCi/g and require processing prior to encapsulation into low activity glass. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has been actively participating in the development of a strontium/TRU decontamination process for the CC waste stored at Hanford in Tanks AN-107 and AN-102. The current baseline flowsheet involves the addition of strontium nitrate to effectively remove radio-strontium through an isotopic dilution, followed by a sodium permanganate strike to co-precipitate the actinides in the in-situ produced manganese solid phases. Demonstration efforts to validate the Sr/TRU flowsheet have included beaker scale reagent optimization and reaction kinetics testing and engineering scale-up experiments at the multi-liter and 1/100th plant scale (200-gallon) using both simulated and actual waste samples. Several key process engineering and process chemistry needs were identified during a recent Hanford Waste Treatment Plant project risk review.

Wilmarth, W.R.

2003-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

168

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 2009, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BER-funded research over the subsequent three to five years. The workshop revealed several key points, in addition to achieving its goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. Chief among them: scientific progress in BER-funded research is limited by current allocations of computational resources. Additionally, growth in mission-critical computing -- combined with new requirements for collaborative data manipulation and analysis -- will demand ever increasing computing, storage, network, visualization, reliability and service richness from NERSC. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. It also presents a number of"case studies" as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BER. Workshop participants were asked to codify their requirements in this"case study" format, summarizing their science goals, methods of solution, current and 3-5 year computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel,"multi-core" environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years.

DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Office (BER),

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Large-scale User Facility Imaging and Scattering Techniques to Facilitate Basic Medical Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conceptually, modern medical imaging can be traced back to the late 1960's and into the early 1970's with the advent of computed tomography . This pioneering work was done by 1979 Nobel Prize winners Godfrey Hounsfield and Allan McLeod Cormack which evolved into the first prototype Computed Tomography (CT) scanner in 1971 and became commercially available in 1972. Unique to the CT scanner was the ability to utilize X-ray projections taken at regular angular increments from which reconstructed three-dimensional (3D) images could be produced. It is interesting to note that the mathematics to realize tomographic images was developed in 1917 by the Austrian mathematician Johann Radon who produced the mathematical relationships to derive 3D images from projections - known today as the Radon Transform . The confluence of newly advancing technologies, particularly in the areas of detectors, X-ray tubes, and computers combined with the earlier derived mathematical concepts ushered in a new era in diagnostic medicine via medical imaging (Beckmann, 2006). Occurring separately but at a similar time as the development of the CT scanner were efforts at the national level within the United States to produce user facilities to support scientific discovery based upon experimentation. Basic Energy Sciences within the United States Department of Energy currently supports 9 major user facilities along with 5 nanoscale science research centers dedicated to measurement sciences and experimental techniques supporting a very broad range of scientific disciplines. Tracing back the active user facilities, the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) a SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was built in 1974 and it was realized that its intense x-ray beam could be used to study protein molecular structure. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory was commissioned in 1982 and currently has 60 x-ray beamlines optimized for a number of different measurement techniques including imaging and tomography. The next generation NSLS-II facility is now under construction. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) commissioned in 1993 has one of the world's brightest sources of coherent long wavelength x-rays suitable for probing biological samples in 3D. The Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory also has a number of x-ray beamlines dedicated to imaging and tomography suitable for biological and medical imaging research. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) also has a number of beamlines suitable for studying the structure and dynamics of proteins and other biological systems. A neutron imaging and tomography beamline is currently being planned for SNS. Similarly, the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) also at ORNL has beamlines suitable for examining biological matter and has an operational imaging beamline. In addition, the production of medical isotopes is another important HFIR function. These user facilities have been intended to facilitate basic and applied research and were not explicitly designed with the intention to scan patients the same way a commercial medical imaging scanner does. Oftentimes the beam power is significantly more powerful than those produced by medical scanners. Thus the ionizing radiation effects of these beams must be considered when contemplating how these facilities can contribute to medical research. Suitable research areas involving user facilities include the study of proteins, human and animal tissue sample scanning, and in some cases, the study of non-human vertebrate animals such as various rodent species. The process for scanning biological and animal specimens must be approved by the facility biosafety review board. The national laboratories provide a number of imaging and scattering instruments which can be used to facilitate basic medical research. These resources are available competitively via the scientific peer review process for proposals submitted through the user programs operated by each facility. Imaging human and animal

Miller, Stephen D [ORNL; Bilheux, Jean-Christophe [ORNL; Gleason, Shaun Scott [ORNL; Nichols, Trent L [ORNL; Bingham, Philip R [ORNL; Green, Mark L [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Pilot-scale incineration of ballistic missile liquid propellant components. Research paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) recently concluded agreements with the Ukraine and the Russian Federation under which the DoD is committed to providing both former Soviet Union (FSU) states with equipment and other aid for use in eliminating their strategic offensive arms in accordance with schedules negotiated in the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. One specific need consists of process equipment to treat or destroy pure ballistic missile liquid propellant components as well as vapor or purge media contaminated by these components. The propellant components are unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) fuel and nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) oxidizer. Incineration is one possible treatment process. To supply data to demonstrate that incineration is a safe and effective treatment process, a series of tests was conducted at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency`s Incineration Research Facility.

Waterland, L.R.; Venkatesh, S.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Modeling rock fracturing in bench-blasting problems  

SciTech Connect

A computational model of rock blasting is being developed to examine the blasting problems associated with in situ oil shale processing. This model, however, will also be useful as a design tool for the traditional problems in rock blasting. The model includes fundamental treatment of both shock-wave propagation and the accumulation of brittle fracture in the rock. As a result, the model accurately predicts the degree and extent of fracturing as functions of design parameters. The model has proven useful for making parametric studies and for evaluation of alternate blast designs. This paper demonstrates the use of the numerical model to simulate the fracturing induced by the detonation of a vertical explosive column near a bench. The fracturing induced by three different explosives indicate that (in the chosen geometry) the most efficient breakage is done by a column of ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixture (ANFO) used with a toe charge of aluminized ANFO. There was too much unfractured rock left when ANFO was used alone; aluminized ANFO used for the entire explosive column caused excessive fracturing. A final case involves ANFO used alone to fracture a different rock type. This case points out that in a different rock type, the ANFO will not leave excessive unfractured rock.

Kuszmaul, J.S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Objective Forecasting of Foehn Winds for a Subgrid-Scale Alpine Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Foehn winds often depend on topographical features of a scale that is not sufficiently resolved in numerical models. Consequently, a successful foehn forecast has crucially depended on the experience of bench forecasters. This study provides a ...

Susanne Drechsel; Georg J. Mayr

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

An automated bench testing system for direct current parameters of instrumentation amplifiers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical testing is performed at multiple stages in the production of analog integrated circuits (ICs). An efficient system for low-volume IC testing is one that automates bench tests and provides good measurement precision ...

Musah, Arthur

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The E-lens test bench for RHIC beam-beam compensation  

SciTech Connect

To compensate for the beam-beam effects from the proton-proton interactions at IP6 and IP8 in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we are fabricating two electron lenses that we plan to install at RHIC IR10. Before installing the e-lenses, we are setting-up the e-lens test bench to test the electron gun, collector, GS1 coil, modulator, partial control system, some instrumentation, and the application software. Some e-lens power supplies, the electronics for current measurement will also be qualified on test bench. The test bench also was designed for measuring the properties of the cathode and the profile of the beam. In this paper, we introduce the layout and elements of the e-lens test bench; and we discuss its present status towards the end of this paper.

Gu X.; Altinbas, F.Z.; Aronson, J.; Beebe, E. et al

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

175

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Brown University - Metcalf Research  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Brown University - Metcalf Research Brown University - Metcalf Research Lab - RI 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Brown University (Metcalf Research Lab.) (RI.01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Providence , Rhode Island RI.01-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 RI.01-1 Site Operations: Research/Development on the preparation of pure halides of heavy metals, Bench Scale Process, and Sample & Analysis. RI.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual radioactive contamination from small quantities of radioactive material is considered remote RI.01-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Thorium RI.01-1 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated

176

Research project on CO2 geological storage and groundwaterresources: Large-scale hydrological evaluation and modeling of impact ongroundwater systems  

SciTech Connect

If carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies areimplemented on a large scale, the amounts of CO2 injected and sequesteredunderground could be extremely large. The stored CO2 then replaces largevolumes of native brine, which can cause considerable pressureperturbation and brine migration in the deep saline formations. Ifhydraulically communicating, either directly via updipping formations orthrough interlayer pathways such as faults or imperfect seals, theseperturbations may impact shallow groundwater or even surface waterresources used for domestic or commercial water supply. Possibleenvironmental concerns include changes in pressure and water table,changes in discharge and recharge zones, as well as changes in waterquality. In compartmentalized formations, issues related to large-scalepressure buildup and brine displacement may also cause storage capacityproblems, because significant pressure buildup can be produced. Toaddress these issues, a three-year research project was initiated inOctober 2006, the first part of which is summarized in this annualreport.

Birkholzer, Jens; Zhou, Quanlin; Rutqvist, Jonny; Jordan,Preston; Zhang,K.; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

177

The effects of the topographic bench on ground motion from mining explosions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the effects of the bench on ground motion can improve the design of cast blasts and achieve improved blast efficiency while remaining below vibration requirements. A new dataset recorded in September 2003 from a coal mine in Arizona has allowed us to examine the excitation of short-period Rayleigh-type surface waves from four simultaneously-detonated explosions in and below a topographic bench of a mine. The explosions were recorded on a network of over 150 seismic sensors, providing an extensive understanding of the ground motion radiation patterns from these explosions. We detonated two separate explosions in the deepest pit of the mine, thus the explosions were shot to solid rock. Within 25 meters of these two explosions, we detonated two additional explosions of similar explosive yields in a bench, thus these explosions were shot to the free face. Radiation patterns and spectral ratios from the explosions show increased amplitudes at azimuths behind the bench relative to the amplitudes in front of the bench. We compared these findings to seismic observations from two {approximately} 1.5 million pound cast blasts at the same mine and found similar radiations patterns. Modeling of these blasts shows that the variations in ground motion are caused by the topographic bench as a result of 1) horizontal spalling of the rock falling into the pit and 2) non-linear scattering near the free-face. Shooting to a buffer also causes the azimuthal variations to be significantly reduced.

Bonner, J.L.; Blomberg, W.S.; Hopper, H.; Leidig, M. [Weston Geophysical Corporation (United States)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Evacuated optical structure comprising optical bench mounted to sidewall of vacuum chamber in a manner which inhibits deflection and rotation of the optical bench  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved evacuated optical structure is disclosed comprising an optical bench mounted in a vacuum vessel in a manner which inhibits transmission of movement of the vacuum vessel to the optical bench, yet provides a compact and economical structure. The vacuum vessel is mounted, through a sidewall thereof, to a support wall at four symmetrically positioned and spaced apart areas, each of which comprises a symmetrically positioned group of mounting structures passing through the sidewall of the vacuum vessel. The optical bench is pivotally secured to the vacuum vessel by four symmetrically spaced apart bolts and spherical bearings, each of which is centrally positioned within one of the four symmetrically positioned groups of vacuum vessel mounting structures. Cover plates and o-ring seals are further provided to seal the vacuum vessel mounting structures from the interior of the vacuum vessel, and venting bores are provided to vent trapped gases in the bores used to secure the cover plates and o-rings to the vacuum vessel. Provision for detecting leaks in the mounting structures from the rear surface of the vacuum vessel sidewall facing the support wall are also provided. Deflection to the optical bench within the vacuum vessel is further minimized by tuning the structure for a resonant frequency of at least 100 Hertz. 10 figures.

Bowers, J.M.

1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

179

NETL: Bench-Scale Development and Testing of Rapid PSA for CO2...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDF-8.5MB Project kick off meeting presentation, Pittsburgh, PA, May 22, 2012. Contacts: For further information on this project, contact the NETL Project Manager, Barbara Carney...

180

A New Bench Scale Test for Determining Energy Requirement of an ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Water and Energy in Mineral Processing ... For most green and brown field operations, the amount of feed required is quite prohibitive and often ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

BENCH-SCALE, MULTIFILAMENT SPINNING CONDITIONS EFFECT ON THE STRUCTURE AND PROPERTIES OF POLYACRYLONITRILE PRECURSOR FIBER.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Due to its unique characteristics, carbon fiber is one of the leading materials for light weight, high strength and stiffness applications in composite materials. The (more)

Morris, Elizabeth Ashley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Bench-scale...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

parasitic energy loads and associated capital and operating costs for CO2 capture from coal-fired power plants compared to conventional aqueous amine CO2 scrubbing. Specific...

183

SUMMARY PLAN FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER AND PRODUCT TESTING TREATABILITY STUDIES USING HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the sample selection, sample preparation, environmental, and regulatory considerations for shipment of Hanford radioactive waste samples for treatability studies of the FBSR process at the Savannah River National Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

ROBBINS RA

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

184

TYPE OF OPERATION R Research & Development T& Facility Type  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

--____ --____ R Research & Development T& Facility Type 0 Production scale testing a Pilat scale Y-. Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis 0 Productian 0 Disposal/Storage a Research Organization a Government 0 Other Sponsored i F[fa' tty ------__------__ I Prime 5 Subcontractor 0 Purchase Order a Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit p CgNTRACTING PERIOD: L.&G , PX& & cx LFkoL ~~~~~~~~~----------_ __ _______ OWNERSH; P: AEC/MED AEC/MED GOVT GOVT CONTRACTOR Cot+ "ACTOR OWNED LEASED ----- -----_ w!ET) C_EtlSLE ~~s!_NE!?~~ z L ACZD -------- - LANDS a BUILDINGS 0 EQUIPMENT u ORE OR RAW MATL FINAL PRODUCT f i ; : ' 0 WASTE .% RESIDLIE q 0 G G &EC/NED INVOLVEtiE?4T AT SITE .--------_------___~~~~~~~-- ,I

185

Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench Rule 20A: history of the law regarding civil money judgment and mortgage enforcement.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This Master of Laws thesis provides an analysis of Manitoba Court of Queen's Bench civil money judgment cases, sampled quantitatively for 1995 and 2004, to (more)

Effler, Barry Curtis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fundamental Research on Percussion Drilling: Improved rock mechanics analysis, advanced simulation technology, and full-scale laboratory investigations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the research efforts on the DOE supported research project Percussion Drilling (DE-FC26-03NT41999), which is to significantly advance the fundamental understandings of the physical mechanisms involved in combined percussion and rotary drilling, and thereby facilitate more efficient and lower cost drilling and exploration of hard-rock reservoirs. The project has been divided into multiple tasks: literature reviews, analytical and numerical modeling, full scale laboratory testing and model validation, and final report delivery. Literature reviews document the history, pros and cons, and rock failure physics of percussion drilling in oil and gas industries. Based on the current understandings, a conceptual drilling model is proposed for modeling efforts. Both analytical and numerical approaches are deployed to investigate drilling processes such as drillbit penetration with compression, rotation and percussion, rock response with stress propagation, damage accumulation and failure, and debris transportation inside the annulus after disintegrated from rock. For rock mechanics modeling, a dynamic numerical tool has been developed to describe rock damage and failure, including rock crushing by compressive bit load, rock fracturing by both shearing and tensile forces, and rock weakening by repetitive compression-tension loading. Besides multiple failure criteria, the tool also includes a damping algorithm to dissipate oscillation energy and a fatigue/damage algorithm to update rock properties during each impact. From the model, Rate of Penetration (ROP) and rock failure history can be estimated. For cuttings transport in annulus, a 3D numerical particle flowing model has been developed with aid of analytical approaches. The tool can simulate cuttings movement at particle scale under laminar or turbulent fluid flow conditions and evaluate the efficiency of cutting removal. To calibrate the modeling efforts, a series of full-scale fluid hammer drilling tests, as well as single impact tests, have been designed and executed. Both Berea sandstone and Mancos shale samples are used. In single impact tests, three impacts are sequentially loaded at the same rock location to investigate rock response to repetitive loadings. The crater depth and width are measured as well as the displacement and force in the rod and the force in the rock. Various pressure differences across the rock-indentor interface (i.e. bore pressure minus pore pressure) are used to investigate the pressure effect on rock penetration. For hammer drilling tests, an industrial fluid hammer is used to drill under both underbalanced and overbalanced conditions. Besides calibrating the modeling tool, the data and cuttings collected from the tests indicate several other important applications. For example, different rock penetrations during single impact tests may reveal why a fluid hammer behaves differently with diverse rock types and under various pressure conditions at the hole bottom. On the other hand, the shape of the cuttings from fluid hammer tests, comparing to those from traditional rotary drilling methods, may help to identify the dominant failure mechanism that percussion drilling relies on. If so, encouraging such a failure mechanism may improve hammer performance. The project is summarized in this report. Instead of compiling the information contained in the previous quarterly or other technical reports, this report focuses on the descriptions of tasks, findings, and conclusions, as well as the efforts on promoting percussion drilling technologies to industries including site visits, presentations, and publications. As a part of the final deliveries, the 3D numerical model for rock mechanics is also attached.

Michael S. Bruno

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-scale, Low Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility (Book), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Center Loads for a Large- Data Center Loads for a Large- scale, Low-energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility The NREL Approach * December 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. 2 National Renewable Energy Laboratory Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Low-Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility Michael Sheppy, Chad Lobato, Otto Van Geet, Shanti Pless, Kevin Donovan, Chuck Powers National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado December 2011

188

Oak Ridge Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge:Task D -Multi-Process and Multi-Scale Modeling and Data Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The task objectives are: (1) Gain an improved understanding of hydrologic, geochemical and biological processes and their interactions at relevant time and space scales; and (2) Develop practical, site-independent tools for evaluating effects of natural and engineered processes on long-term performance.

Jack Parker

2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

189

Mercury Emissions Control in Coal Combustion Systems Using Potassium Iodide: Bench-Scale and Pilot-Scale Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to develop effective Hg0 capture or oxidation technologies. In coal combustion flue gases, Hg0 is oxidized mercury in the gas phase upon introduction of KI, indicating that the oxidation product HgI2 was captured and hydrogen bromide gas16 to flue gas was demonstrated to enhance Hg0 oxidation, but the extent of enhancement

Li, Ying

190

HEU Holdup Measurements in the 321-M Draw Bench, Straightener, and Fluoroscope Components  

SciTech Connect

The Analytical Development Section of Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. This report covers holdup measurements of uranium residue on the draw bench, straightener, and the fluoroscope components of the 321-M facility.

Dewberry, R.A.

2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

191

MeaBench: A toolset for multi-electrode data acquisition and on-line analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MeaBench: A toolset for multi-electrode data acquisition and on-line analysis Daniel Wagenaar integration with stimulator systems. We have been able to generate stimulation se- quences in response to live sharing a common library. These programs commu- This work was partially supported by grants NS044134

192

Categorical Exclusion Determination Form Program or Field Office: Advanced Research Projects Ag  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project T Project T itle: (02 06- 1565) Columbia - Biofue ls from C02 using Amm onia-Oxid izing Bacte ria in a Reve rse Microbi a l Fue l Cell L ocati on: New Y ork Pr oposed Action or Proj ect Description: American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: D Funding will support in-lab R&D activities involving liquid biofuel production from biological-based non-photosynthetic systems. Proposed work consists of (1) initial testing and genetic modification of ammonia-oxidizing and iron-oxidizing bacteria used to produce liquid biofuel and (2) development and optimization of a reverse microbial fuel cel l. All proposed work will take place on the Columbia University campus in New York, NY. Categorical Exciusi on(s) Applied: x - 83.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and developme

193

Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

194

Reducing Plug and Process Loads for a Large Scale, Low Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents the design and operational plug and process load energy efficiency measures needed to allow a large scale office building to reach ultra high efficiency building goals. The appendices of this document contain a wealth of documentation pertaining to plug and process load design in the RSF, including a list of equipment was selected for use.

Lobato, C.; Pless, S.; Sheppy, M.; Torcellini, P.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Instrumentation and monitoring of a full-scale shaft seal installed at atomic energy of canada limited's underground research laboratory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Atomic Energy of Canada Limiteds Underground Research Laboratory was built to allow study of concepts for the long-term disposal of Canadas used nuclear fuel in (more)

Holowick, Blake

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Multi-Scale Action Effectiveness Research in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2011 - FINAL ANNUAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The study reported here was conducted by researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the University of Washington (UW), and the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (USACE). This research project was initiated in 2007 by the Bonneville Power Administration to investigate critical uncertainties regarding juvenile salmon ecology in shallow tidal freshwater habitats of the lower Columbia River. However, as part of the Washington Memorandum of Agreement, the project was transferred to the USACE in 2010. In transferring from BPA to the USACE, the focus of the tidal freshwater research project shifted from fundamental ecology toward the effectiveness of restoration in the Lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The research is conducted within the Action Agencies Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program (CEERP). Data reported herein spans the time period May 2010 to September 2011.

Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Johnson, Gary E.; Teel, D. J.; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Kaufmann, Ronald M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Blaine, Jennifer; Kuligowski, D. R.; Kropp, Roy K.; Dawley, Earl M.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

197

Data acquisition system time measurement capabilities using WorkBench{trademark} software  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing interest in the ability to measure transient behavior in the Heat Transfer Laboratory (HTL). To accomplish this the timing system behavior for the Data Acquisition Systems (DAS) must be evaluated. This report discusses the evaluation of a DAS timing system using WorkBench{trademark} Software in a Macintosh II environment. It also describes a method which can be successfully used to calibrate the timing system associated with the DAS.

Coutts, D.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Data acquisition system time measurement capabilities using WorkBench[trademark] software  

SciTech Connect

There is an increasing interest in the ability to measure transient behavior in the Heat Transfer Laboratory (HTL). To accomplish this the timing system behavior for the Data Acquisition Systems (DAS) must be evaluated. This report discusses the evaluation of a DAS timing system using WorkBench[trademark] Software in a Macintosh II environment. It also describes a method which can be successfully used to calibrate the timing system associated with the DAS.

Coutts, D.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Direct liquefaction proof-of-concept program: Bench Run 05 (227-97). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results Bench Run PB-05, conducted under the DOE Proof of Concept - Bench Option Program in direct coal liquefaction at Hydrocarbon Technologies, Inc. in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Bench Run PB-05 was the fifth of the nine runs planned in the POC Bench Option Contract between the U.S. DOE and included the evaluation of the effect of using dispersed slurry catalyst in direct liquefaction of a high volatile bituminous Illinois No. 6 coal and in combined coprocessing of coal with organic wastes, such as heavy petroleum resid, MSW plastics, and auto-shredder residue. PB-05 employed a two-stage, back-mixed, slurry reactor system with an interstage V/L separator and an in-line fixed-bed hydrotreater. Coprocessing of waste plastics with Illinois No. 6 coal did not result in the improvement observed earlier with a subbituminous coal. In particular, decreases in light gas yield and hydrogen consumption were not observed with Illinois No. 6 coal as they were with Black Thunder Mine coal. The higher thermal severity during PB-05 is a possible reason for this discrepancy, plastics being more sensitive to temperatures (cracking) than either coal or heavy resid. The ASR material was poorer than MSW plastics in terms of increasing conversions and yields. HTI`s new dispersed catalyst formulation, containing phosphorus-promoted iron gel, was highly effective for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 coal under the reaction conditions employed; over 95% coal conversion was obtained, along with over 85% residuum conversion and over 73% distillate yields.

Comolli, A.G.; Pradhan, V.R.; Lee, T.L.K.; Karolkiewicz, W.F.; Popper, G.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

DOE-Supported Technology Passes Scale-Up Test Converting CO DOE-Sponsored Research Improves Gas Turbine Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into Valuable Materials into Valuable Materials Publications News Release Release Date: June 17, 2013 DOE-Sponsored Research Improves Gas Turbine Performance DOE Lab Receives Award for Work on Drilling Technology An innovative airfoil manufacturing technology that promises to improve the performance of state-of-the-art gas turbines has been commercialized through research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. Photo courtesy of Mikro Systems, Inc. Washington, D.C. - An innovative airfoil manufacturing technology that promises to improve the performance of state-of-the-art gas turbines has been commercialized through research sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The technology - which is expected to contribute to cleaner, more reliable and affordable domestic energy production as well as creating new

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NREL: Wind Research - Large Wind Turbine Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Large Wind Turbine Research NREL's utility scale wind system research addresses performance and...

202

Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. First annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The work on energy extraction experiments concerns the efficiency with which the in-place heat and fluids can be produced. The work on noncondensable gas reservoir engineering covers both the completed and continuing work in these two interrelated research areas: radon emanation from the rock matrix of geothermal reservoirs, and radon and ammonia variations with time and space over geothermal reservoirs. Cooperative research programs with Italy and Mexico are described. The bench-scale experiments and well test analysis section covers both experimental and theoretical studies. The small core model continues to be used for the study of temperature effects on absolute permeability. The unconsolidated sand study was completed at the beginning of this contract period. The Appendices describe some of the Stanford Geothermal program activities that results in interactions with the geothermal community. These occur in the form of SGP Technical Reports, presentations at technical meetings and publications in the open literature.

Brigham, W.E.; Horne, R.N.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research. Fourth annual report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir definition research consisted of well test analysis and bench-scale experiments. Well testing included both single-well pressure drawdown and buildup testing, and multiple-well interference testing. The development of new well testing methods continued to receive major emphasis during the year. Work included a project on multiphase compressibility, including the thermal content of the rock. Several projects on double-porosity systems were completed, and work was done on relative-permeability. Heat extraction from rock will determine the long-term response of geothermal reservoirs to development. The work in this task area involved a combination of physical and mathematical modeling of heat extraction from fractured geothermal reservoirs. International cooperative research dealt with adsorption of water on reservoir cores, the planning of tracer surveys, and an injection and tracer test in the Los Azufres fields. 32 refs.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Final Technical Report for DUSEL Research and Development on Sub-Kelvin Germanium Detectors for Ton Scale Dark Matter Search  

SciTech Connect

We have supported one graduate student and a small percentage of fabrication staff on $135k per year for three years plus one no cost extension year on this DUSEL R&D grant. ? There were three themes within our research program: (1) how to improve the radial sensitivity for single sided phonon readout with four equal area sensors of which three form a central circle and fourth a surrounding ring; (2) how to instrument double sided phonon readouts which will give us better surface event rejection and increased fiducial volume for future CDMS style detectors; and (3) can we manufacture much larger Ge detectors using six inch diameter material which is not suitable for standard gamma ray spectroscopy.

Prof. Blas Cabrera

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Symmetrical sequence contours: a method for bench-testing negative sequence detecting relays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symmetrical Components is a topic which even a graduate electrical engineer, who took a course on the subject, may not completely understand. Workers who maintain protective relays may have little knowledge of Symmetrical Components. The result of this unfamiliarity may be that relays such as those which respond to negative sequence voltages are never again tested properly, or readjusted to a more desireable setting, after leaving the manufacturer. The intent of this paper is to present a method of bench-testing negative sequence detecting devices by individuals who possess little knowledge of Symmetrical Components.

Yanniello, R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Test bench for studying the outlook for industrial applications of an oxygen-iodine laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the development and tests of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser test bench based on a twisted-aerosol-flow singlet-oxygen generator and a supersonic laser model for studying the outlook for industrial applications of this laser. The maximal output power of the laser is {approx}65 kW (the average power is {approx}50 kW), corresponding to a specific output power of {approx}110 W cm{sup -2}. The maximal chemical efficiency is {approx}34%. (letters)

Adamenkov, A A; Bakshin, V V; Bogachev, A V; Buryak, E V; Vdovkin, L A; Velikanov, S D; Vyskubenko, B A; Garanin, Sergey G; Gorbacheva, E V; Grigorovich, Sergei V; Il'in, S P; Il'kaev, R I; Ilyushin, Yurii N; Kalashnik, A M; Kolobyanin, Yu V; Leonov, M L; Svischev, V V; Troshkin, M V [Russian Federal Nuclear Center 'All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics', Sarov, Nizhnii Novgorod Region (Russian Federation)

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Low-Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility (Book)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This publication detailing the design, implementation strategies, and continuous performance monitoring of NREL's Research Support Facility data center. Data centers are energy-intensive spaces that facilitate the transmission, receipt, processing, and storage of digital data. These spaces require redundancies in power and storage, as well as infrastructure, to cool computing equipment and manage the resulting waste heat (Tschudi, Xu, Sartor, and Stein, 2003). Data center spaces can consume more than 100 times the energy of standard office spaces (VanGeet 2011). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported that data centers used 61 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) in 2006, which was 1.5% of the total electricity consumption in the U.S. (U.S. EPA, 2007). Worldwide, data centers now consume more energy annually than Sweden (New York Times, 2009). Given their high energy consumption and conventional operation practices, there is a potential for huge energy savings in data centers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is world renowned for its commitment to green building construction. In June 2010, the laboratory finished construction of a 220,000-square-foot (ft{sup 2}), LEED Platinum, Research Support Facility (RSF), which included a 1,900-ft{sup 2} data center. The RSF will expand to 360,000 ft{sup 2} with the opening of an additional wing December, 2011. The project's request for proposals (RFP) set a whole-building demand-side energy use requirement of a nominal 35 kBtu/ft{sup 2} per year. On-site renewable energy generation will offset the annual energy consumption. To support the RSF's energy goals, NREL's new data center was designed to minimize its energy footprint without compromising service quality. Several implementation challenges emerged during the design, construction, and first 11 months of operation of the RSF data center. This document highlights these challenges and describes in detail how NREL successfully overcame them. The IT settings and strategies outlined in this document have been used to significantly reduce data center energy requirements in the RSF; however, these can also be used in existing buildings and retrofits.

Sheppy, M.; Lobato, C.; Van Geet, O.; Pless, S.; Donovan, K.; Powers, C.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Computer modeling of gas flow and gas loading of rock in a bench blasting environment  

SciTech Connect

Numerical modeling can contribute greatly to an understanding of the physics involved in the blasting process. This paper will describe the latest enhancements to the blast modeling code DMC (Distinct Motion Code) (Taylor and Preece, 1989) and will demonstrate the ability of DMC to model gas flow and rock motion in a bench blasting environment. DMC has been used previously to model rock motion associated with blasting in a cratering environment (Preece and Taylor, 1990) and in confined volume blasting associated with in-situ oil shale retorting (Preece, 1990 a b). These applications of DMC treated the explosive loading as force versus time functions on specific spheres which were adjusted to obtain correct face velocities. It was recognized that a great need in explosives modeling was the coupling of an ability to simulate gas flow with the rock motion simulation capability of DMC. This was accomplished by executing a finite difference code that computes gas flow through a porous media (Baer and Gross, 1989) in conjunction with DMC. The marriage of these two capabilities has been documented by Preece and Knudsen, 1991. The capabilities that have been added recently to DMC and which will be documented in this paper include: (1) addition of a new equation of state for the explosive gases; (2) modeling of gas flow and sphere loading in a bench environment. 8 refs., 5 figs.

Preece, D.S.; Baer, M.R. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Knudsen, S.D. (RE/SPEC, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Fabrication, assembly, bench and drilling tests of two prototype downhole pneumatic turbine motors: Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first and second prototype downhole pneumatic turbine motors have been fabricated, assembled and tested. All bench tests showed that the motor will produce horsepower and bit speeds approximating the predicted values. Specifically, the downhole pneumatic turbine motor produced approximately 50 horsepower at 100 rpm, while being supplied with about 3600 SCFM of compressed air. The first prototype was used in a drilling test from a depth of 389 feet to a depth of 789 feet in the Kirtland formation. This first prototype motor drilled at a rate exceeding 180 ft/hr, utilizing only 3000 SCFM of compressed air. High temperature tests (at approximately 460/sup 0/F) were carried out on the thrust assembly and the gearboxes for the two prototypes. These components operated successfully at these temperatures. Although the bench and drilling tests were successful, the tests revealed design changes that should be made before drilling tests are carried out in geothermal boreholes at the Geysers area, near Santa Rosa, California.

Bookwalter, R.; Duettra, P.D.; Johnson, P.; Lyons, W.C.; Miska, S.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron (hot metal) consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work which is labeled as Phase II will take place at two levels; namely, the bench scale level and the process development unit (PDU) level. The bench scale work is being divided into two parts; the construction and operation of Bench Scale No.1 to make hot metal direct as one part and the construction and operation of Bench Scale No.2 to make DRI with its conversion to hot metal as the second part. The work at the PDU consists of getting the PDU which exists ready for advancing the activities from bench scale to PDU level.

Albert Calderon

2001-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

211

Scale-Up of CdTe Photovoltaic Device Processes for Commercial Application: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-196  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Through this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement, NREL and PrimeStar Solar will work together to scale up the NREL CdTe photovoltaic process from the laboratory to produce photovoltaic devices in a size that is commercially viable. The work in this phase will focus on the transference of NREL CdTe device fabrication techniques to PrimeStar Solar. NREL and PrimeStar Solar will engage in a series of technical exchange meetings and laboratory training sessions to transfer the knowledge of CdTe PV film growth from NREL to PrimeStar Solar. PrimeStar Solar will grow thin films on PrimeStar Solar equipment and interleave them with NREL-grown films in an effort to develop a commercial scale process on PrimeStar Solar equipment. Select NREL film growth equipment will be upgraded either by PrimeStar Solar or at PrimeStar Solar's expense to increase equipment reliability and throughput.

Albin, D.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

MEMORANDUM I TO: FILE Fi=aP'  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

1 ---r---w- IYPE OF OPERATION Jf ---- ---- Research & Development cl Facility Type 0 Production scale testing Cl Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical...

213

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

contacted TYPE OF OPERATION -------- P Research & Development 0 Facility Type Production scale testing Pilot Scale Bench Scale Process Theoretical Studies 0 :...

214

NJ,O-04 MEMOHANDUtl TO: FILE FRon: SITE NAME: CITY:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

if yes, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATION ----------- 0 Research & Develapment q Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale g Bench Scale Process ? a Theoretical...

215

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE FROM:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

c)ki& TYPE OF OPEMTION --- &Research .& Development La Facility Type D Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 4. Bench Scale Process @ Theoretical Studies @...

216

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

--------- TYPE OF OPERATION ------------ f4 Research & Development R Facility Type 0 Production scale testing R Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 Theoretical...

217

SITE NAME: CITY:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- TYPE OF OPERATION ---------- n Research & Development n Facility Type 0 Production scale testing C Pilot Scale 0 tlanuf acturing 0 Bench Scale...

218

I HEHORANDIJH I TO{ FILE DATE SUti.lECTa I O&R(S)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

contactd--?-2--- :TY+E OF OPERATION --- - ---- Research & Development 0 Facility Type Production scale testing Pi lot Scale Bench Scale Process Theoretical Studies *i...

219

TO: FILE MEMORANDUM ALTERNATE NAME:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

if yes, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATION --- q Research & Development P Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale & Manufacturing 0 Bench Scale Process 0...

220

Microsoft Word - 25A5311 Continued  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X - B3.6 Sitingconstructionoperationdecommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Bench-scale study of the dry removal of SO/sub 2/ with nahcolite and trona. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to characterize a process designed to remove SO/sub 2/ by injecting a dry sodium-based sorbent into the flue gas stream ahead of a fabric filter baghouse. The experimental system consisted of a pulverized coal-fired combustor which fired a 0.45 percent sulfur western coal and produced a flue gas flow rate of about 2500 lb/hr (or about 800 acfm). The flue gas exited the combustor, flowed through a duct, then through a heat exchanger, and last through a fabric filter. The residence time in the duct between the combustor and fabric filter was approximately two seconds; the heat exchanger was used to independently control the temperature of the fabric filter. The dry sorbent could be injected either at the inlet to the fabric filter or into the duct before the heat exchanger. The experiments quantified the effects of the following process parameters on the dry SO/sub 2/ removal process: sorbent type (nahcolite, trona, commercial sodium bicarbonate), normalized stoichiometric ratio (NSR), sorbent particle size, baghouse temperature, air-to-cloth ratio, cleaning cycle time, sorbent injection schedule (continuous and batch), injection at temperatures up to 800/sup 0/F, predecomposition of the nahcolite, and initial SO/sub 2/ level.

Muzio, L.J.; Arand, J.K.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

INNOVATIVE EXPERIMENTAL SETUP FOR THE PARALLEL OPERATION OF MULTIPLE BENCH SCALE BIOTRICKLING FILTERS FOR WASTE AIR TREATMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBKI vapors in air during passage through compost-based biofilters served an equivolume mixture of compost and polystyrene spheres. Acid-neutralizing components (probably limestone) were

223

High-temperature-staged fluidized-bed combustion (HITS), bench scale experimental test program conducted during 1980. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the process feasibility of the first stage of the HITS two-stage coal combustion system. Tests were run in a small (12-in. ID) fluidized bed facility at the Energy Engineering Laboratory, Aerojet Energy Conversion Company, Sacramento, California. The first stage reactor was run with low (0.70%) and high (4.06%) sulfur coals with ash fusion temperatures of 2450/sup 0/ and 2220/sup 0/F, respectively. Limestone was used to scavenge the sulfur. The produced low-Btu gas was burned in a combustor. Bed temperature and inlet gas percent oxygen were varied in the course of testing. Key results are summarized as follows: the process was stable and readily controllable, and generated a free-flowing char product using coals with low (2220/sup 0/F) and high (2450/sup 0/F) ash fusion temperatures at bed temperatures of at least 1700/sup 0/ and 1800/sup 0/F, respectively; the gaseous product was found to have a total heating value of about 120 Btu/SCF at 1350/sup 0/F, and the practicality of cleaning the hot product gas and delivering it to the combustor was demonstrated; sulfur capture efficiencies above 80% were demonstrated for both low and high sulfur coals with a calcium/sulfur mole ratio of approximately two; gasification rates of about 5,000 SCF/ft/sup 2/-hr were obtained for coal input rates ranging from 40 to 135 lbm/hr, as required to maintain the desired bed temperatures; and the gaseous product yielded combustion temperatures in excess of 3000/sup 0/F when burned with preheated (900/sup 0/F) air. The above test results support the promise of the HITS system to provide a practical means of converting high sulfur coal to a clean gas for industrial applications. Sulfur capture, gas heating value, and gas production rate are all in the range required for an effective system. Planning is underway for additional testing of the system in the 12-in. fluid bed facility, including demonstration of the second stage char burnup reactor.

Anderson, R E; Jassowski, D M; Newton, R A; Rudnicki, M L

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Bench-scale demonstration of biological production of ethanol from coal synthesis gas. Topical report 5, Process analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economics of converting coal to ethanol by a biological process is quite attractive. When processing 1500 tons of coal per day, the plant generates 85 million gallons of ethanol per year. The return on investment for the process is 110 percent and the payout is 0.9 years.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Test bench to commission a third ion source beam line and a newly designed extraction system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HIT (Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center) is the first hospital-based treatment facility in Europe where patients can be irradiated with protons and carbon ions. Since the commissioning starting in 2006 two 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are routinely used to produce a variety of ion beams from protons up to oxygen. In the future a helium beam for regular patient treatment is requested, therefore a third ion source (Supernanogan source from PANTECHNIK S.A.) will be integrated. This third ECR source with a newly designed extraction system and a spectrometer line is installed at a test bench at HIT to commission and validate this section. Measurements with different extraction system setups will be presented to show the improvement of beam quality for helium, proton, and carbon beams. An outlook to the possible integration scheme of the new ion source into the production facility will be discussed.

Winkelmann, T.; Cee, R.; Haberer, T.; Naas, B.; Peters, A. [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapie Centrum (HIT), D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Monitoring the Performance of a Residential Central Air Conditioner under Degraded Conditions on a Test Bench  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents the measured degradation in performance of a residential air conditioning system operating under degraded conditions. Experiments were conducted using a R-22 threeton split-type cooling system with a short-tube orifice expansion device. Results are presented here for a series of tests in which the various commonly occurring degraded conditions were simulated on a test bench. At present, very little information is available which quantifies the performance of a residential cooling system operating under degraded conditions. Degraded performance measurements can provide information which could help electric utilities evaluate the potential impact of systemwide maintenance programs. This report also discuss the development of a diagnostic procedure based on measurement of refrigerant and air side temperatures.

Palani, M.; O'Neal, D. L.; Haberl, J. S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

High Solid Anaerobic Co-digestion Pilot Scale Experiment of Kitchen Waste and Cow-dung  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under mesophilic condition (37C), a bench-scale experiment based on high solid anaerobic digestion process was conducted in a fed-batch single phase reactor. The result shows: (1) According to gas production and ph value change, there are mainly ... Keywords: Kitchen waste, Cow-dung, High solid, Anaerobic co-digestion, Pilotsate

Lei Feng; Yan Chen; Rundong Li; Jie Xu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

POC-SCALE TESTING OF A DRY TRIBOELECTROSTATIC SEPARATOR FOR FINE COAL CLEANING  

SciTech Connect

Numerous advanced coal cleaning processes have been developed in recent years that are capable of substantially reducing both ash- and sulfur-forming minerals from coal. However, most of the processes involve fine grinding and use water as the cleaning medium; therefore, the clean coal products must be dewatered before they can be transported and burned. Unfortunately, dewatering fine coal is costly, which makes it difficult to deploy advanced coal cleaning processes for commercial applications. As a means of avoiding problems associated with the fine coal dewatering, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) developed a dry coal cleaning process in which mineral matter is separated from coal without using water. In this process, pulverized coal is subjected to triboelectrification before being placed in an electric field for electrostatic separation. The triboelectrification is accomplished by passing a pulverized coal through an in-line mixer made of copper. Copper has a work function that lies between that of carbonaceous material (coal) and mineral matter. Thus, coal particles impinging on the copper wall lose electrons to the metal thereby acquiring positive charges, while mineral matter impinging on the wall gain electrons to acquire negative charges. The charged particles then pass through an electric field where they are separated according to their charges into two or more products depending on the configuration of the separator. The results obtained at NETL showed that it is capable of removing more than 90% of the pyritic sulfur and 70% of the ash-forming minerals from a number of eastern U.S. coals. However, the BTU recoveries were less than desirable. The laboratory-scale batch triboelectrostatic separator (TES) used by NETL relied on adhering charged particles on parallel electrode surfaces and scraping them off. Therefore, its throughput will be proportional to the electrode surface area. If this laboratory device is scaled-up as is, it would suffer from low throughput capacities and high maintenance requirements. In general, surface area-based separators (e.g., shaking tables, magnetic drum separator, electrodynamic separator, etc.) have lower throughput capacities than volume-based separators (e.g., flotation cell, dense-medium bath, cyclones, etc.) by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, the electrodes of the laboratory unit need to be cleaned frequently, creating a high maintenance requirement if it is scaled-up to a commercial unit. The bench-scale continuous TES unit developed at NETL, on the other hand, separates positively and negatively charged particles by splitting the gaseous stream containing these particles in an electric field by means of a flow splitter, so that the oppositely charged particles can be directed into different compartments. This device is fundamentally different from the laboratory unit in that the former is a surface area-based separator, while the latter is a volume-based separator. The bench-scale unit is referred to as an entrained flow separator by the in-house researchers at NETL. Thus, the entrained flow TES unit is a significant improvement over the laboratory unit with regard to throughput capacity. In the present work, the entrained flow separator concept will be utilized for developing a proof-of concept (POC) separator that can be scaled-up to commercial size units. To accomplish this, it is necessary to develop a bench-scale separator that can achieve high Btu recoveries while maintaining the high degree of separation efficiencies. It is the objective of the present investigation to develop an efficient separator by studying the mechanisms of triboelectrification and investigating better ways of separating the charged particles. An important criterion for developing efficient separators is that they not only provide high separation efficiencies but also have high throughput capacities, which are essential ingredients for successful commercialization.

R.H. Yoon; G.H. Luttrell; E.S. Yan; A.D. Walters

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Imparied Water As Cooling Water in Coal-based Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nalco Company is partnering with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in this project to jointly develop advanced scale control technologies that will provide cost-effective solutions for coal-based power plants to operate recirculating cooling water systems at high cycles using impaired waters. The overall approach is to use combinations of novel membrane separations and scale inhibitor technologies that will work synergistically, with membrane separations reducing the scaling potential of the cooling water and scale inhibitors extending the safe operating range of the cooling water system. The project started on March 31, 2006 and ended in August 30, 2010. The project was a multiyear, multi-phase project with laboratory research and development as well as a small pilot-scale field demonstration. In Phase 1 (Technical Targets and Proof of Concept), the objectives were to establish quantitative technical targets and develop calcite and silica scale inhibitor chemistries for high stress conditions. Additional Phase I work included bench-scale testing to determine the feasibility of two membrane separation technologies (electrodialysis ED and electrode-ionization EDI) for scale minimization. In Phase 2 (Technology Development and Integration), the objectives were to develop additional novel scale inhibitor chemistries, develop selected separation processes, and optimize the integration of the technology components at the laboratory scale. Phase 3 (Technology Validation) validated the integrated system's performance with a pilot-scale demonstration. During Phase 1, Initial evaluations of impaired water characteristics focused on produced waters and reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents. Literature and new data were collected and evaluated. Characteristics of produced waters vary significantly from one site to another, whereas reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents have relatively more uniform characteristics. Assessment to date confirmed that calcite and silica/silicate are two common potential cycle-limiting minerals for using impaired waters. For produced waters, barium sulfate and calcium sulfate are two additional potential cycle-limiting minerals. For reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents, calcium phosphate scaling can be an issue, especially in the co-presence of high silica. Computational assessment, using a vast amount of Nalco's field data from coal fired power plants, showed that the limited use and reuse of impaired waters is due to the formation of deposit caused by the presence of iron, high hardness, high silica and high alkalinity in the water. Appropriate and cost-effective inhibitors were identified and developed - LL99B0 for calcite and gypsum inhibition and TX-15060 for silica inhibition. Nalco's existing dispersants HSP-1 and HSP-2 has excellent efficacy for dispersing Fe and Mn. ED and EDI were bench-scale tested by the CRADA partner Argonne National Laboratory for hardness, alkalinity and silica removal from synthetic make-up water and then cycled cooling water. Both systems showed low power consumption and 98-99% salt removal, however, the EDI system required 25-30% less power for silica removal. For Phase 2, the EDI system's performance was optimized and the length of time between clean-in-place (CIP) increased by varying the wafer composition and membrane configuration. The enhanced EDI system could remove 88% of the hardness and 99% of the alkalinity with a processing flux of 19.2 gal/hr/m{sup 2} and a power consumption of 0.54 kWh/100 gal water. Bench tests to screen alternative silica/silicate scale inhibitor chemistries have begun. The silica/silicate control approaches using chemical inhibitors include inhibition of silicic acid polymerization and dispersion of silica/silicate crystals. Tests were conducted with an initial silica concentration of 290-300 mg/L as SiO{sub 2} at pH 7 and room temperature. A proprietary new chemistry was found to be promising, compared with a current commercial product commonly used for silica/silicate control. Additional pilot cooling tower testing confirmed

Jasbir Gill

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

A Synergistic Combination of Advanced Separation and Chemical Scale Inhibitor Technologies for Efficient Use of Imparied Water As Cooling Water in Coal-based Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

Nalco Company is partnering with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in this project to jointly develop advanced scale control technologies that will provide cost-effective solutions for coal-based power plants to operate recirculating cooling water systems at high cycles using impaired waters. The overall approach is to use combinations of novel membrane separations and scale inhibitor technologies that will work synergistically, with membrane separations reducing the scaling potential of the cooling water and scale inhibitors extending the safe operating range of the cooling water system. The project started on March 31, 2006 and ended in August 30, 2010. The project was a multiyear, multi-phase project with laboratory research and development as well as a small pilot-scale field demonstration. In Phase 1 (Technical Targets and Proof of Concept), the objectives were to establish quantitative technical targets and develop calcite and silica scale inhibitor chemistries for high stress conditions. Additional Phase I work included bench-scale testing to determine the feasibility of two membrane separation technologies (electrodialysis ED and electrode-ionization EDI) for scale minimization. In Phase 2 (Technology Development and Integration), the objectives were to develop additional novel scale inhibitor chemistries, develop selected separation processes, and optimize the integration of the technology components at the laboratory scale. Phase 3 (Technology Validation) validated the integrated system's performance with a pilot-scale demonstration. During Phase 1, Initial evaluations of impaired water characteristics focused on produced waters and reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents. Literature and new data were collected and evaluated. Characteristics of produced waters vary significantly from one site to another, whereas reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents have relatively more uniform characteristics. Assessment to date confirmed that calcite and silica/silicate are two common potential cycle-limiting minerals for using impaired waters. For produced waters, barium sulfate and calcium sulfate are two additional potential cycle-limiting minerals. For reclaimed municipal wastewater effluents, calcium phosphate scaling can be an issue, especially in the co-presence of high silica. Computational assessment, using a vast amount of Nalco's field data from coal fired power plants, showed that the limited use and reuse of impaired waters is due to the formation of deposit caused by the presence of iron, high hardness, high silica and high alkalinity in the water. Appropriate and cost-effective inhibitors were identified and developed - LL99B0 for calcite and gypsum inhibition and TX-15060 for silica inhibition. Nalco's existing dispersants HSP-1 and HSP-2 has excellent efficacy for dispersing Fe and Mn. ED and EDI were bench-scale tested by the CRADA partner Argonne National Laboratory for hardness, alkalinity and silica removal from synthetic make-up water and then cycled cooling water. Both systems showed low power consumption and 98-99% salt removal, however, the EDI system required 25-30% less power for silica removal. For Phase 2, the EDI system's performance was optimized and the length of time between clean-in-place (CIP) increased by varying the wafer composition and membrane configuration. The enhanced EDI system could remove 88% of the hardness and 99% of the alkalinity with a processing flux of 19.2 gal/hr/m{sup 2} and a power consumption of 0.54 kWh/100 gal water. Bench tests to screen alternative silica/silicate scale inhibitor chemistries have begun. The silica/silicate control approaches using chemical inhibitors include inhibition of silicic acid polymerization and dispersion of silica/silicate crystals. Tests were conducted with an initial silica concentration of 290-300 mg/L as SiO{sub 2} at pH 7 and room temperature. A proprietary new chemistry was found to be promising, compared with a current commercial product commonly used for silica/silicate control. Additional pilot cooling tower testing confirmed

Jasbir Gill

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

231

Published in Geophysical Research Letters, 26, p. 21632166, 1999. Copyright AGU, 1999. The scaling of collisionless, magnetic reconnection for large systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Sauer2 1 Institute for Plasma Research and Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park

Shay, Michael

232

Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, February 2011 to January 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Williams, K.H. , 2010. Uranium 238U/235U Isotope Ratios asand measurement of reduced uranium phases for groundwaterInfluencing Field Scale Uranium Bioremediation. Environ.

Long, P.E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

MEtlORANDUM DATE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

---B-B TYPE OF OPERATION we s- --- Research & Development E Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale ti Bench Seal e Process 0 Theoretical...

234

Yc.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample s1 Analysis 0 Facility Type x Manufacturing q University IJ Research Organizatiqn 0 Government Sponsored...

235

Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, February 2011 to January 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Lezama, and J. Stubbs (SLAC); D. Alessi, and R. Bernier-to centimeter scales by the SLAC SFA program (Invited).specifically to support the SLAC SFAs need for naturally

Long, P.E.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Research guidance studies. Quarterly progress report, April--June 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to provide research guidance and quantification of research progress in the areas of direct and indirect coal liquefaction, coal/waste coprocessing, refining of coal-derived liquid fuels, and natural gas conversion. Specifically, the work is divided into two subtasks that relate to whether the technology application is direct or indirect. In subtask (a), Direct Coal Liquefaction technology is the subject of the analyses, and in subtask (b), Indirect Liquefaction, technologies will be evaluated in accordance with the priorities of the COR. Mitretek Systems has been developing detailed computer simulation models of direct and indirect coal and natural gas conversion systems for several years. These models are constantly being updated and improved as more data and better cost information becomes available. These models also include detailed refinery models based on bench-scale upgrading data of coal derived liquid fuels to specification transportation fuels. In addition to the simulation models of actual conversion system configurations, Mitretek is able to simulate innovative process configurations for coal and gas conversion to fuels, power, and chemicals. To supplement these system models and to provide a context to investigate expected energy use scenarios when alternate coal and natural gas based fuels will be needed, Mitretek`s staff has also developed world and country by country energy supply and demand models. This work will be accomplished by using the existing models where appropriate and by extending and modifying the system models where necessary.

Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

Research guidance studies. First quarterly progress report, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to provide research guidance and quantification of research progress in the areas of direct and indirect coal liquefaction, coal/waste coprocessing, refining of coal-derived liquid fuels, and natural gas conversion. Specifically, the work is divided into two subtasks that relate to whether the technology application is direct or indirect. In subtask (a), Direct Coal Liquefaction technology is the subject of the analyses, and in subtask (b), Indirect Liquefaction, technologies will be evaluated in accordance with the priorities of the COR. Mitretek Systems has been developing detailed computer simulation models of direct and indirect coal and natural gas conversion systems for several years. These models are constantly being updated and improved as more data and better cost information becomes available.. These models also include detailed refinery models based on bench-scale upgrading -data of coal derived liquid fuels to specification transportation fuels. In addition to the simulation models of actual conversion system configurations, Mitretek is able to simulate innovative process configurations for coal and gas conversion to fuels, power, and chemicals. To supplement these system models and to provide a context to investigate expected energy use scenarios when alternate coal and natural gas based fuels will be needed, Mitretek`s staff has also developed world and country by country energy supply and demand models. This work will be accomplished by using the existing models where appropriate and by extending and modifying the system models where necessary.

Gray, D.; Tomlinson, G. [Mitretek Systems, McLean, VA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Research In High Temperature Electrolysis For Hydrogen And Syngas Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA), in collaboration with Ceramatec, Inc. (Salt Lake City, Utah, USA), is actively researching the application of solid oxide fuel cell technology as electrolyzers for large scale hydrogen and syngas production. This technology relies upon electricity and high temperature heat to chemically reduce a steam or steam / CO2 feedstock. Single button cell tests, multi-cell stack, as well as multi-stack testing has been conducted. Stack testing used 10 x 10 cm cells (8 x 8 cm active area) supplied by Ceramatec and ranged from 10 cell short stacks to 240 cell modules. Tests were conducted either in a bench-scale test apparatus or in a newly developed 5 kW Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test facility. Gas composition, operating voltage, and operating temperature were varied during testing. The tests were heavily instrumented, and outlet gas compositions were monitored with a gas chromatograph. The ILS facility is currently being expanded to ~15 kW testing capacity (H2 production rate based upon lower heating value).

Carl M. Stoots; James E. O'Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Evaluation of the Research-Version TMPA Rainfall Estimate at Its Finest Spatial and Temporal Scales over the Rome Metropolitan Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this study is the evaluation of the research-version Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) rainfall product at its finest spatial and temporal resolutions (3-hourly and 0.25 0.25) ...

Gabriele Villarini

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Fish Scales  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Scales Name: Kaylee Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: Do all fish have scales? Replies: No, some like catfish and bullheads, have smooth skins. J. Elliott No,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Surface and Interface Research Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Research Group conducts research on the development of innovative metrologies and measurement protocols for micro/nano-scale heterosystems ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

POC-Scale Testing of Oil Agglomeration Techniques and Equipment for Fine Coal Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a Proof-of-Concept (POC) scale oil agglomeration technology capable of increasing the recovery and improving the quality of fine coal strearrts. Two distinct agglomeration devices will be tested, namely, a conventional high shear mixer and a jet processor. To meet the overall objective an eleven task work plan has been designed. The work ranges from batch and continuous bench-scale testing through the design, commissioning and field testing of POC-scale agglomeration equipment.

None

1998-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

243

Cover Images Front, from right: (1) Researchers obtained these diffraction patterns from more than 15,000 protein nanocrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). It will be unique among nuclear fuel irradiation at Idaho National Laboratory for fabrication of metallic nuclear fuels rods. A small bench scale caster and emission applications, and study their optical properties. Colloidal nanomaterials for light harvesting

Kemner, Ken

244

Hanford Waste Simulants Created to Support the Research and Development on the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of nonradioactive waste simulants to support the River Protection Project - Waste Treatment Plant bench and pilot-scale testing is crucial to the design of the facility. The report documents the simulants development to support the SRTC programs and the strategies used to produce the simulants.

Eibling, R.E.

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

245

BLENDING STUDY FOR SRR SALT DISPOSITION INTEGRATION: TANK 50H SCALE-MODELING AND COMPUTER-MODELING FOR BLENDING PUMP DESIGN, PHASE 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where 300,000-800,000 gallons of salt solution will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. Blending requires the miscible salt solutions from potentially multiple source tanks per batch to be well mixed without disturbing settled sludge solids that may be present in a Blend Tank. Disturbing solids may be problematic both from a feed quality perspective as well as from a process safety perspective where hydrogen release from the sludge is a potential flammability concern. To develop the necessary technical basis for the design and operation of blending equipment, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) completed scaled blending and transfer pump tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. A 94 inch diameter pilot-scale blending tank, including tank internals such as the blending pump, transfer pump, removable cooling coils, and center column, were used in this research. The test tank represents a 1/10.85 scaled version of an 85 foot diameter, Type IIIA, nuclear waste tank that may be typical of Blend Tanks used in SDI. Specifically, Tank 50 was selected as the tank to be modeled per the SRR, Project Engineering Manager. SRNL blending tests investigated various fixed position, non-rotating, dual nozzle pump designs, including a blending pump model provided by the blend pump vendor, Curtiss Wright (CW). Primary research goals were to assess blending times and to evaluate incipient sludge disturbance for waste tanks. Incipient sludge disturbance was defined by SRR and SRNL as minor blending of settled sludge from the tank bottom into suspension due to blending pump operation, where the sludge level was shown to remain constant. To experimentally model the sludge layer, a very thin, pourable, sludge simulant was conservatively used for all testing. To experimentally model the liquid, supernate layer above the sludge in waste tanks, two salt solution simulants were used, which provided a bounding range of supernate properties. One solution was water (H{sub 2}O + NaOH), and the other was an inhibited, more viscous salt solution. The research performed and data obtained significantly advances the understanding of fluid mechanics, mixing theory and CFD modeling for nuclear waste tanks by benchmarking CFD results to actual experimental data. This research significantly bridges the gap between previous CFD models and actual field experiences in real waste tanks. A finding of the 2009, DOE, Slurry Retrieval, Pipeline Transport and Plugging, and Mixing Workshop was that CFD models were inadequate to assess blending processes in nuclear waste tanks. One recommendation from that Workshop was that a validation, or bench marking program be performed for CFD modeling versus experiment. This research provided experimental data to validate and correct CFD models as they apply to mixing and blending in nuclear waste tanks. Extensive SDI research was a significant step toward bench marking and applying CFD modeling. This research showed that CFD models not only agreed with experiment, but demonstrated that the large variance in actual experimental data accounts for misunderstood discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. Having documented this finding, SRNL was able to provide correction factors to be used with CFD models to statistically bound full scale CFD results. Through the use of pilot scale tests performed for both types of pumps and available engineering literature, SRNL demonstrated how to effectively apply CFD results to salt batch mixing in full scale waste tanks. In other words, CFD models were in error prior to development of experimental correction factors determined during this research, which provided a technique to use CFD models fo

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

246

Technician's Perspective on an Ever-Changing Research Environment: Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The biomass thermochemical conversion platform at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develops and demonstrates processes for the conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals including gasification, pyrolysis, syngas clean-up, and catalytic synthesis of alcohol and hydrocarbon fuels. In this talk, I will discuss the challenges of being a technician in this type of research environment, including handling and working with catalytic materials and hazardous chemicals, building systems without being given all of the necessary specifications, pushing the limits of the systems through ever-changing experiments, and achieving two-way communication with engineers and supervisors. I will do this by way of two examples from recent research. First, I will describe a unique operate-to-failure experiment in the gasification of chicken litter that resulted in the formation of a solid plug in the gasifier, requiring several technicians to chisel the material out. Second, I will compare and contrast bench scale and pilot scale catalyst research, including instances where both are conducted simultaneously from common upstream equipment. By way of example, I hope to illustrate the importance of researchers 1) understanding the technicians' perspective on tasks, 2) openly communicating among all team members, and 3) knowing when to voice opinions. I believe the examples in this talk will highlight the crucial role of a technical staff: skills attained by years of experience to build and operate research and production systems. The talk will also showcase the responsibilities of NREL technicians and highlight some interesting behind-the-scenes work that makes data generation from NREL's thermochemical process development unit possible.

Thibodeaux, J.; Hensley, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

National Fire Research Laboratory Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... scale fire experiments is essential to understanding ... there is no research facility in the ... Facilities. National Fire Research Laboratory. staff_directory. ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

248

A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Material: Four turbine- based ventilators and nine conventional servo-valve compressed-gas ventilators were1 A Bench Study of Intensive Care Unit Ventilators: New versus Old and Turbine-Based versus Compressed Gas-Based Ventilators Arnaud W. Thille,1 MD; Aissam Lyazidi,1 Biomed Eng MS; Jean-Christophe M

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

249

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Act: Funding will support laboratory and bench-scale research and development on novel magnetic structures with distinct nanocompositionsthat realize high energy production with...

250

CX-009896: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Funding will support laboratory and bench-scale research and development on novel magnetic structures with distinct nanocompositions that realize high energy production...

251

PN1C.EF2a  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NUMBER: Description: B3.6 Siting, construction (or modification), operation, and decommissioning of facilities for indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional...

252

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: X - B3.6 Sitingconstructionoperationdecommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations,...

253

Office of Technology Transfer - ANL  

Using in-house bench-laboratories, and a pilot-scale plant, Argonne researchers evaluate the effectiveness of recycling strategies and how they may benefit

254

CX-003076: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Energy Funding will support laboratory and bench scale research and development on electronhole reduction oxidation processes for use in electrical energy storage for...

255

CX-003126: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

laboratory and bench scale research and development on metal-organic framework-based molecular sieves for use in carbon capture processes. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD...

256

DECONTAMINATING MICROBES TAX-FREE SHOPPING? BIAS ON THE BENCH MEASURING THE LIFESPAN OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Research Center Mapping Intimacy 28 Psychologists uncover the complexities of human relationships Bias from the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation (NSF) to help overhaul the US power grid. The Center for Ultra-wide-area Resilient Electric Energy Transmission Networks (CURENT) is directed by Electrical

Tennessee, University of

257

Co-combustion Character of Oil Shale and Its Semi-coke on CFB Bench  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Semi-coke is by-product from oil shale retorts and it is important to burn it in CFB furnace. But limited to the inflammable combustion traits, co-combustion of semi-coke with raw oil shale would be meaningful. Experimental research on co-combustion ... Keywords: combustion, distribution, semi-coke, temperature

Sun Baizhong; Huang Zhirong

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Research projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Yuan » Research projects Yuan » Research projects Research projects Research Interests Scientific computing, domain decomposition methods Linear solvers for sparse matrices Computational plasma physics Grid generation techniques GPU computing Current Research PDSLin: A hybrid linear solver for large-scale highly-indefinite linear systems The Parallel Domain decomposition Schur complement based Linear solver (PDSLin), which implements a hybrid (direct and iterative) linear solver based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition technique called chur complement method, and it has two levels of parallelism: a) to solve independent subdomains in parallel and b) to apply multiple processors per subdomain. In such a framework, load imbalance and excessive communication lead to the performance bottlenecks, and several techniques are developed

259

Field-Scale Evaluation of Biostimulation for Remediation of Uranium-Contaminated Groundwater at a Proposed NABIR Field Research Center in Oak Ridge, TN  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrologic, geochemical and microbial characterization of the Area 3 field site has been completed. The formation is fairly impermeable, but there is a region of adequate flow approximately 50 feet bgs. The experiment will be undertaken within that depth interval. Groundwater from that depth is highly acidic (pH 3.2), and has high levels of nitrate, aluminum, uranium, and other heavy metals, as well as volatile chlorinated solvents (VOCs). Accordingly, an aboveground treatment train has been designed to remove these contaminants. The train consists of a vacuum stripper to remove VOCs, two chemical precipitation steps to adjust pH and remove metals, and a fluidized bed bioreactor to remove nitrate. The aboveground system will be coupled to a belowground recirculation system. The belowground system will contain an outer recirculation cell and a nested inner recirculation cell: the outer cells will be continuously flushed with nitrate-free treated groundwater. The inner cell will receive periodic inputs of uranium, tracer, and electron donor. Removal of uranium will be determined by comparing loss rates of conservative tracer and uranium within the inner recirculation cell. Over the past year, a detailed workplan was developed and submitted for regulatory approval. The workplan was presented to the Field Research Advisory Panel (FRAP), and after some extensive revision, the FRAP authorized implementation. Detailed design drawings and numerical simulations of proposed experiments have been prepared. System components are being prefabricated as skid-mounted units in Michigan and will be shipped to Oak Ridge for assembly. One manuscript has been submitted to a peer reviewed journal. This paper describes a novel technique for inferring subsurface hydraulic conductivity values. Two posters on this project were presented at the March 2002 NABIR PI meeting. One poster was presented at the Annual conference of the American Society for Microbiology in Salt Lake City, UT in May 2002.

Criddle, Craig S.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Program on Technology Innovation: Biomass Leaching Pre-Treatment Technology Bench Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The leaching of biomass to remove or eliminate troublesome constituents such as alkali metals, chlorine, sulfur, and phosphorus presents an opportunity to solve many problems associated with firing and cofiring low-cost and low-grade agricultural biomass and waste materials to produce energy and biofuels. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has taken interest in fostering the development of this potentially game-changing technology. As part of this endeavor, EPRI, through the Technology Innovati...

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DECONTAMINATION SYSTEMS AND INFORMATION RESEARCH PROGRAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the five plus years this Cooperative Agreement existed, more than 45 different projects were funded. Most projects were funded for a one year period but there were some, deemed of such quality and importance, funded for multiple years. Approximately 22 external agencies, businesses, and other entities have cooperated with or been funded through the WVU Cooperative Agreement over the five plus years. These external entities received 33% of the funding by this Agreement. The scope of this Agreement encompassed all forms of hazardous waste remediation including radioactive, organic, and inorganic contaminants. All matrices were of interest; generally soil, water, and contaminated structures. Economic, health, and regulatory aspects of technologies were also within the scope of the agreement. The highest priority was given to small businesses funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) and Department of Energy (DOE) involved in research and development of innovative remediation processes. These projects were to assist in the removal of barriers to development and commercialization of these new technologies. Studies of existing, underdeveloped technologies, were preferred to fundamental research into remediation technologies. Sound development of completely new technologies was preferred to minor improvements in existing methods. Solid technological improvements in existing technologies or significant cost reduction through innovative redesign were the preferred projects. Development, evaluation, and bench scale testing projects were preferred for the WVU research component. In the effort to fill gaps in current remediation technologies, the worth of the WVU Cooperative Agreement was proven. Two great technologies came out of the program. The Prefabricated Vertical Drain Technology for enhancing soil flushing was developed over the 6-year period and is presently being demonstrated on a 0.10 acre Trichloroethylene contaminated site in Ohio. The SpinTek Centrifugal Membrane System was a unique separation process introduced through the Agreement that is now being used at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Based on the cost to the USDOE for both technologies and considering their usefulness in cleaning up contaminated sites, no other technologies developed through USDOE provide or have the propensity to provide as great a return on investment and impact on environmental remediation. These technologies alone make the $10.3 million USDOE investment in the WVU Cooperative Agreement a tremendous investment.

Echol E. Cook, Ph.D., PE.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Fabrication and Scale-up of Polybenzimidazole (PBI) Membrane Based System for Precombustion-Based Capture of Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The primary objectives of this project are to (1) demonstrate the performance and fabrication of a technically and economically viable pre-combustion-based CO{sub 2} capture system based on the high temperature stability and permeance of PBI membranes, (2) optimize a plan for integration of PBI capture system into an IGCC plant and (3) develop a commercialization plan that addresses technical issues and business issues to outline a clear path for technology transfer of the PBI membrane technology. This report describes research conducted from April 1, 2007 to March 30, 2012 and focused on achieving the above objectives. PBI-based hollow fibers have been fabricated at kilometer lengths and bundled as modules at a bench-scale level for the separation of CO{sub 2} from H{sub 2} at high temperatures and pressures. Long term stability of these fibers has been demonstrated with a relatively high H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} selectivity (35 to 50) and H{sub 2} permeance (80 GPU) at temperatures exceeding 225°C. Membrane performance simulations and systems analysis of an IGCC system incorporating a PBI hollow fiber membrane modules have demonstrated that the cost of electricity for CO{sub 2} capture (<10%) using such a high temperature separator. When the cost of transporting, storing, and monitoring the CO{sub 2} is accounted for, the increase in the COE is only 14.4%.

Gopala Krishnan; Indira Jayaweera; Angel Sanjrujo; Kevin O'Brien; Richard Callahan; Kathryn Berchtold; Daryl-Lynn Roberts; Will Johnson

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dust in the Wind... and the Clouds... and the Atmosphere Dust in the Wind... and the Clouds... and the Atmosphere Submitter: Sassen, K., University of Alaska, Fairbanks Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Sassen, K., P.J. DeMott, J.M. Propsero, and M.R. Poellot, Saharan Dust Storms and Indirect Aerosol Effects on Clouds: CRYSTAL-FACE Results, Geophys. Res. Ltt., 30(12), 1633, doi:10/1029/2003GL017371, 2003. PDL linear depolarization ratio (color scale on top) and relative returned power (in gray scale) of height versus time displays obtained on July 29, 2002, during the CRYSTAL-FACE experiment. Depicted are strong depolarizing upper tropospheric clouds (~10km), aerosols (δ ~.10 to .15) extending up to ~5.5km, and at lower right (scale adjusted to account for signal

264

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale Shows True Weight of Aerosol Effects on Clouds Scale Shows True Weight of Aerosol Effects on Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: McComiskey A and G Feingold. 2012. "The scale problem in quantifying aerosol indirect effects." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 12, doi:10.5194/acp-12-1031-2012. Differing values: Values derived from aircraft and surface observations, which represent disaggregated data, differ from those derived from satellite-based data, which represent data aggregated at a range of levels. Currently, many climate change models treat the two types of data the same. Aerosols-tiny airborne particles from sources like pollution or desert

265

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research: Target 2014 ASCRFrontcover.png Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for...

266

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structure of Cirrus Properties and Its Coupling with the State of the Structure of Cirrus Properties and Its Coupling with the State of the Large-Scale Atmosphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ivanova, K., Pennsylvania State University Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Ivanova K and TP Ackerman. 2009. "Tracking nucleation-growth-sublimation in cirrus clouds using ARM millimeter wavelength radar observations." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, , D06113, 10.1029/2008JD010271. Figure 1. Values of the drift and diffusion coefficients of the Fokker-Planck equation derived from the MMCR radar reflectivity observations. The diffusion coefficient characterizes the small scale, fast

267

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties in Cirrus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Comstock JM, R Lin, DO Starr, and P Yang. 2008. "Understanding ice supersaturation, particle growth, and number concentration in cirrus clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D23211, doi:10.1029/2008JD010332. Vertical velocity (Vm) derived from millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) Doppler velocity measurements in cirrus clouds observed over the ACRF SGP site. Cloud model simulations of cirrus clouds using large-scale forcing (left panel) and cloud-scale forcing (right panel).

268

Evaluation of Innovative Technologies for Remediation of an MGP Located at a Municipal Park: Bench Scale Treatability Testing and Fe asibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the evaluation of various remediation options in addressing the cleanup of an MGP site in southeastern Pennsylvania presently used as a municipal park. The site has many of the features typical of MGP sites. It is located in a suburban area on approximately 0.4 hectare (one acre) adjacent to a stream. It has areas of soil and groundwater impacted primarily by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and metals, and there is an area of non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) at ...

2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

269

Research Challenges for CMOS Scaling: Industry Directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... English French Russian German Italian Spanish Brazilian Portuguese Arabic Traditional Chinese Simplified Chinese Hindi Tamil Thai Korean

270

Nuclear scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear scales are discussed from the nuclear physics viewpoint. The conventional nuclear potential is characterized as a black box that interpolates nucleon-nucleon (NN) data, while being constrained by the best possible theoretical input. The latter consists of the longer-range parts of the NN force (e.g., OPEP, TPEP, the {pi}-{gamma} force), which can be calculated using chiral perturbation theory and gauged using modern phase-shift analyses. The shorter-range parts of the force are effectively parameterized by moments of the interaction that are independent of the details of the force model, in analogy to chiral perturbation theory. Results of GFMC calculations in light nuclei are interpreted in terms of fundamental scales, which are in good agreement with expectations from chiral effective field theories. Problems with spin-orbit-type observables are noted.

Friar, J.L.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Program Management for Large Scale Engineering Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this whitepaper is to summarize the LAI research that applies to program management. The context of most of the research discussed in this whitepaper are large-scale engineering programs, particularly in the ...

Oehmen, Josef

272

Parabolic Scaling and Curvelets Beyond Parabolic Scaling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parabolic Scaling and Curvelets Beyond Parabolic Scaling Cubic Scaling for Caustics and Tangential on Imaging Science Hart F. Smith Cubic Scaling for Caustics and Tangential Reflections #12;Parabolic Scaling and Curvelets Beyond Parabolic Scaling The Second Dyadic Decomposition Wave-Evolution of Curvelets Second Dyadic

Smith, Hart F.

273

Bioconversion of plant biomass to ethanol. Annual report and revised research plan, January 1977--January 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to demonstrate on a laboratory scale the technical feasibility of the direct microbial conversion of pretreated wood to ethanol. During the first year of this contract, we investigated the feasibility of biologically delignifying wood with C. pruinosum and directly fermenting the pretreated wood to ethanol with a mixed culture. Bench-top fermentations of a thermophilic bacillus growing on glucose and of a mixed culture of thermophilic sporocytophaga (US) and a thermophilic bacillus growing on microcrystalline and amorphous cellulose were evaluated for growth and ethanol production. In the mixed culture fermentation of amorphous and microcrystalline cellulose, the specific rate of substrate depletion was calculated to be 0.087 hr/sup -1/ and 0.0346 hr/sup -1/, respectively. However, defining the growth requirements of C. pruinosum and sporocytophaga (US) proved more difficult than originally anticipated. In order to achieve the program objectives within the contract period, a revised research plan was developed based upon chemical pretreatment and the direct fermentation of pretreated hardwood to ethanol. In place of the biological delignification pretreatment step, we have substituted a chemically supplemented steam pretreatment step to partially delignify wood and to enhance its accessibility to microbial utilization. Clostridium thermocellum, which ferments cellulose directly to ethanol and acetic acid, has replaced the mixed culture fermentation stage for ethanol production. Research on the production of ethanol from xylose by the thermophilic bacillus ZB-B2 is retained as one means of utilizing the hemicellulose fraction of hardwood. Work on the genetic improvement of the ethanol yields of both cultures by suppressing acetic acid production is also retained. The rationale, experimental approach, and economic considerations of this revised research plan are also presented.

Brooks, R.E.; Bellamy, W.D.; Su, T.M.

1978-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

274

IYPE-OF-CERAILEN  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IYPE-OF-CERAILEN &Research & Development E Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilct Scale 0 Manufacturing ,piI 0 University Bench Scale Process a Theoretical Studies 0...

275

MEMORANDUM TO: FILE DATE FROM: SUBJECT: I ALTERNATE NAME:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

yes, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATIkN ----------- 0 Research & Development' 0 Facility Type 0 Production scale tastinq Cl PiL'at Scale a Bench Scale Process a Theoretical...

276

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vertical Air Motion Measurements in Large-Scale Precipitation Vertical Air Motion Measurements in Large-Scale Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Giangrande, S., Brookhaven National Laboratory Luke, E., Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Giangrande SE, EP Luke, and P Kollias. 2010. "Automated retrievals of precipitation parameters using non-Rayleigh scattering at 95-GHz." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 27(9), 10.1175/2010JTECHA1343.1. Time-height mapping of the retrieved vertical air motion for the 1 May 2007 event at SGP. Simultaneous measurements of vertical air motion and raindrop size distribution parameters in precipitation are challenging. The ARM W-band radars (95-GHz), despite being used primarily for cloud sensing, offer

277

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sub-Grid Scale Cloud Variability Affects Vertical Structure of Clouds and Sub-Grid Scale Cloud Variability Affects Vertical Structure of Clouds and Radiative Heating Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: McFarlane, S. A., J. H. Mather, and T. P. Ackerman (2007), Analysis of tropical radiative heating profiles: A comparison of models and observations, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D14218, doi:10.1029/2006JD008290. Comparison of the distributions of cloud condensate for the ACRF TWP site at Manus using a) retrievals from the ACRF remote sensors, b) the CAM, c) all MMF columns, and d) MMF columns that do not contain precipitation. Note that the ARM observations do not include precipitation. Each panel consists

278

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

All Mixed Up-Probing Large and Small Scale Turbulence Structures in All Mixed Up-Probing Large and Small Scale Turbulence Structures in Continental Stratocumulus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fang, M., University of Miami Albrecht, B. A., University of Miami Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fang M, BA Albrecht, VP Ghate, and P Kollias. 2013. "Turbulence in continental stratocumulus, Part I: External forcings and turbulence structures." Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 149(454), doi:10.1007/s10546-013-9873-3. Coherent structures of the vertical velocity (left panels) and the energy dissipation rate (right panels) in updraft region during the day (a, b), night (c, d), and for entire 16 hours (e, f) of continental stratocumulus. Continental stratocumulus clouds are frequently observed in the cold side

279

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seasonal Case Studies Reveal Significant Variance in Large-Scale Forcing Seasonal Case Studies Reveal Significant Variance in Large-Scale Forcing Data Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S, R.T Cederwall, M. Zhang, and J.J. Yio, Comparison of SCM and CSRM forcing data derived from the ECMWF model and from objective analysis at the ARM SGP site, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D16), 4499, doi:10.1029/2003JD003541, 2003. Observed (left) and ECMWF-derived (right) forcing fields of time-height distributions of the derived (top) vertical velocity, (middle) total advective tendency and temperature, and (bottom) total advective tendency of moisture during the selected strong precipitation period during summer

280

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tropical Clouds: from Jekyll to Hyde Tropical Clouds: from Jekyll to Hyde Submitter: Hagos, S. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hagos SM and R Leung. 2012. "Large-scale environmental variables and transition to deep convection in cloud resolving model simulations: A vector representation." Journal of Advances in Modeling Earth Systems, 4(M11001), 2012MS000155, doi:10.1029/2012MS000155. The relationship between the mean 400hPa heating (Khr-1437 ) at time = 0 and the projection onto the favorable large-scale moisture profile at time = -1 hr. From Jekyll to Hyde, this anvil cloud is an example of tropical clouds that evolve from fair-weather to stormy. Scientists at PNNL used observational

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281

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Moistening by Clouds Sustains Madden-Julian Oscillation Atmospheric Moistening by Clouds Sustains Madden-Julian Oscillation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hagos, S. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR Wm-2) signals in the tropics averaged between 10°S and 10°N from (a) a regional simulation with moisture constrained by observations and (b) NOAA-CPC satellite observations. The lines mark the eastward MJO propagation speed of 4 m/s. The constrained model is able to reproduce the key OLR features in the observations. Originating over the Indian Ocean, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is an equatorial planetary-scale envelope of complex multi-scale cloud systems

282

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Bench-to-Bench Coordination Using OSTI Resources Bench-to-Bench Coordination Using OSTI Resources by David Wojick on Wed, 13 May, 2009 Coordination means increasing awareness of related and potentially useful research, especially across the basic and applied divide. Secretary Chu emphasizes the importance of bridging the basic and applied divide. DOE uses several large scale methods to foster coordination, such as workshops attended by hundreds of researchers. A complementary approach is described here, which we call "Bench-to-Bench Coordination". This approach uses analysis of OSTI resources to identify closely related research across the divide. The results can be used in a variety of ways to put individual (or "bench") researchers in touch with one another for coordination purposes.

283

Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Pilot-Scale Demonstration of Hybrid Zero-Valent Iron Water Treatment Technology: Removing Trace Metals from Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In previous laboratory- and field bench-scale tests, the hybrid zero-valent iron (hZVI) process had been demonstrated capable of removing selenium, mercury, nitrates, and other pollutants from flue gas desulfurization (FGD) wastewater. By incorporating zero-valent iron (ZVI) with magnetite and certain Fe(II) species, the hZVI technology creates a highly reactive mixture that can transform and immobilize various trace metals, oxyanions, and other impurities from aqueous streams. To further evaluate ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

285

BNL | Accelerators for Scientific Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Basic Research Brookhaven National Lab excels at the design, construction, and operation of large-scale accelerator facilities, a tradition that started with the Cosmotron and...

286

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Rosenfeld, D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Wang, H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Rosenfeld D, H Wang, and PJ Rasch. 2012. "The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine stratocumulus." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 39, doi:10.1029/2012GL052028. The dependence of rain rate on cloud drop effective radius (re) near cloud top. The color scale is for the median value of column maximum rain rate in each joint bin of CWP-re (cloud liquid water path and cloud-top re).

287

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploring Parameterization for Turbulent Entrainment-Mixing Processes in Exploring Parameterization for Turbulent Entrainment-Mixing Processes in Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, Y., Brookhaven National Laboratory Lu, C., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Lu C, S Niu, S Krueger, and T Wagner. 2013. "Exploring parameterization for turbulent entrainment-mixing processes in clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 118(1), doi:10.1029/2012JD018464. Relationships between the three microphysical measures of homogeneous mixing degree (ψ1, ψ2, ψ3) and the two transition scale numbers (NLa, NL0), respectively. The results shown here are from the EMPM simulations.

288

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 2006 Research Review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 2006 issue of the NREL Research Review again reveals just how vital and diverse our research portfolio has become. Our feature story looks at how our move to embrace the tenants of "translational research" is strengthening our ability to meet the nation's energy goals. By closing the gap between basic science and applied research and development (R&D)--and focusing a bright light on the valuable end uses of our work--translational research promises to shorten the time it takes to push new technology off the lab bench and into the marketplace. This issue also examines our research into fuels of the future and our computer modeling of wind power deployment, both of which point out the real-world benefits of our work.

Not Available

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 2006 Research Review  

SciTech Connect

This 2006 issue of the NREL Research Review again reveals just how vital and diverse our research portfolio has become. Our feature story looks at how our move to embrace the tenants of "translational research" is strengthening our ability to meet the nation's energy goals. By closing the gap between basic science and applied research and development (R&D)--and focusing a bright light on the valuable end uses of our work--translational research promises to shorten the time it takes to push new technology off the lab bench and into the marketplace. This issue also examines our research into fuels of the future and our computer modeling of wind power deployment, both of which point out the real-world benefits of our work.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Catalysis for Mixed Alcohol Synthesis from Biomass Derived Syngas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-292  

SciTech Connect

The Dow Chemical Company (Dow) developed and tested catalysts for production of mixed alcohols from synthesis gas (syngas), under research and development (R&D) projects that were discontinued a number of years ago. Dow possesses detailed laboratory notebooks, catalyst samples, and technical expertise related to this past work. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is conducting R&D in support of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) to develop methods for economically producing ethanol from gasified biomass. NREL is currently conducting biomass gasification research at an existing 1/2 ton/day thermochemical test platform. Both Dow and NREL believe that the ability to economically produce ethanol from biomass-derived syngas can be enhanced through collaborative testing, refinement, and development of Dow's mixed-alcohol catalysts at NREL's and/or Dow's bench- and pilot-scale facilities. Dow and NREL further agree that collaboration on improvements in catalysts as well as gasifier operating conditions (e.g., time, temperature, upstream gas treatment) will be necessary to achieve technical and economic goals for production of ethanol and other alcohols.

Hensley, J.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An atmospheric flash pyrolysis process, the Georgia Tech Entrained Flow Pyrolysis Process, for the production of liquid biofuels from oak hardwood is described. The development of the process began with bench-scale studies and a conceptual design in the 1978--1981 timeframe. Its development and successful demonstration through research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit (PDU), in the period of 1982--1989, is presented. Oil yields (dry basis) up to 60% were achieved in the 1.5 ton-per-day PDU, far exceeding the initial target/forecast of 40% oil yields. Experimental data, based on over forty runs under steady-state conditions, supported by material and energy balances of near-100% closures, have been used to establish a process model which indicates that oil yields well in excess of 60% (dry basis) can be achieved in a commercial reactor. Experimental results demonstrate a gross product thermal efficiency of 94% and a net product thermal efficiency of 72% or more; the highest values yet achieved with a large-scale biomass liquefaction process. A conceptual manufacturing process and an economic analysis for liquid biofuel production at 60% oil yield from a 200-TPD commercial plant is reported. The plant appears to be profitable at contemporary fuel costs of $21/barrel oil-equivalent. Total capital investment is estimated at under $2.5 million. A rate-of-return on investment of 39.4% and a pay-out period of 2.1 years has been estimated. The manufacturing cost of the combustible pyrolysis oil is $2.70 per gigajoule. 20 figs., 87 tabs.

Kovac, R.J.; Gorton, C.W.; Knight, J.A.; Newman, C.J.; O'Neil, D.J. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Research Inst.)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Device Scale Modeling Device Scale Modeling Device Scale Modeling (DSM) at NETL is helping to overcome technical barriers associated with developing next-generation fossil energy technologies and processes. This research facility uses state-of-the-art, high-speed computing resources to verify computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models used to study coal gasifiers, gas turbine combustors, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems, and liquefied natural gas plumes, as well as mercury capture technologies. DSM research is helping to move advanced visualization and high-performance computing models from researchers' computer screens to actual laboratory experiments and pilot testing. The DSM group develops models that can be integrated into a wide range of simulation technology, including Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) and Multiphase Flow with Interphase eXchanges (MFIX). These simulators are enabling researchers to model and understand the behavior of individual components within advanced power generation systems.

293

Particle Image Velocimetery (PIV) Diagnostics for Wind Energy and Energy Security Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Particle Image Velocimetery (PIV) is a laser based technique that involves correlation analysis of tracer particle images to estimate the velocity field in a fluid. High resolution velocity measurement capability and non-intrusive nature of PIV make it desirable for understanding complex fluid flow phenomena occurring in various scenarios. This presentation briefly describes the development of novel PIV diagnostics that forward Wind Energy research and advance scaling models to solve expensive maintenance issues of the Strategic Petroleum Reserves (SPR). Two new diagnostic implementations of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) are being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to facilitate understanding of wind turbine aerodynamics in unprecedented detail. It has been demonstrated that a Large-Field PIV (LF-PIV) diagnostic capable of measuring large scale flow fields of up to 4.3m x 2.8m per camera has been developed. This diagnostic, which represents a significant leap in the field of view of existing centimeter scale PIV systems, allows the measurement of velocity fields at multiple points with high accuracy for large scale flows, such as, flows around wind turbines. Further, to characterize the near blade boundary layer of wind turbines a rotating PIV system (R-PIV) is also under development at LANL (patent application in progress). Design considerations and results of bench top tests that confirm the reliability of PIV measurements obtained using the above diagnostics will be presented in this talk. PIV along with conductivity and temperature probe data has been useful to develop models that simulate the evolution of the layered structure of crude oil stored in the subterranean caverns of the Strategic Petroleum Reserves (SPR). Understanding the evolution of stratified layers of crude oil that are subjected to geothermal forcing is crucial in improving the efficiency of maintenance procedures carried out for the SPR and hence ensure Energy Security of the nation. Through analytical and experimental analysis it has been found that the dynamics of crude oil mixing are significantly affected by the presence of heating sidewalls of the storage caverns. Scaling laws that have been advanced for evolution of mixed layers for stratified fluid layers stored in slender containers will also be described in this presentation.

Pol, Suhas Uddhav [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

294

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multifractal Analysis of Radiation in Clouds: 5000km to 50cm Multifractal Analysis of Radiation in Clouds: 5000km to 50cm Submitter: Lovejoy, S., McGill University Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Lovejoy, S., D. Schertzer, J. D. Stanway, 2001: "Direct Evidence of planetary scale atmospheric cascade dynamics," Phys. Rev. Lett. 86(22): 5200-5203. Left: Power spectrum of the 5 different aircraft measured liquid water data sets from the FIRE experiment (averaged over 10 equally logarithmically spaced points on the k-axis and vertically offset). The absolute slopes with Β = 1.45 is indicated (straight line on top of graph) for reference. The number of sets used to compute the average from top to bottom: 4, 3, 1, 2, 5. A constant aircraft speed of 100m/s has been assumed. Right: Ensemble

295

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing Mixed-Phase Clouds from the Ground: a Status Report Characterizing Mixed-Phase Clouds from the Ground: a Status Report Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Shupe, MD, JS Daniel, G De Boer, EW Eloranta, P Kollias, E Luke, CN Long, DD Turner, and J Verlinde. 2008. "A focus on mixed-phase clouds: The status of ground-based observational methods." Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, accepted for publication in October 2008 issue. Figure 1. Retrieved cloud properties for 9 October 2004 at Barrow: (a) Multisensor cloud phase classification, (b) radar Doppler spectra cloud phase classification, (c) ice water content, (d) ice particle effective radius, (e) adiabatic liquid water content scaled to the microwave

296

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Out with the Old, in with the New: McICA to Replace Traditional Cloud Out with the Old, in with the New: McICA to Replace Traditional Cloud Overlap Assumptions Submitter: Pincus, R., NOAA - CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Pincus, R., R. Hemler, and S.A. Klein, 2006: Using Stochastically Generated Subcolumns to Represent Cloud Structure in a Large-Scale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev., 134, 3644-3656. As shown by the difference between the two panels, the standard way (AM2, top panel) of mixing solar reflection and transmission differs systematically from the Independent Column Approximation approach. Because cloud-radiation interactions depend critically on the vertical amount of clouds, different assumptions about how this alignment occurs

297

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When It Rains, It Doesn't Always Pour When It Rains, It Doesn't Always Pour Download a printable PDF Submitter: Penide, G., Laboratoire d\\\'Optique Atmospherique Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Penide G, V Kumar, A Protat, and P May. 2013. "Statistics of drop size distribution parameters and rain rates for stratiform and convective precipitation during the North Australian wet season." Monthly Weather Review, 141(9), 10.1175 /mwr-d-12-00262.1. Measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement facility at Darwin, Australia, helped scientists determine how drop size distribution and rain rates are affected by larger-scale weather patterns. Rainfall comes in a variety of forms: mist, drizzle, showers, downpours. The type and frequency of rainfall usually depends on the season and

298

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparing Global Atmospheric Model Simulations of Tropical Convection Comparing Global Atmospheric Model Simulations of Tropical Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Lin, Y., Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Mean profiles of (first column) total precipitation normalized Q1, (second column) convective precipitation normalized convective heating, (third column) stratiform heating, and (fourth column) convective mass flux for the (top) wet, (middle) dry, and (bottom) break period from models and available observational estimates. Dashed lines are fine resolution model results. Note the different x axis scale for the third and fourth columns. An intercomparison of global atmospheric model simulations of tropical

299

Research Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Research Opportunities. ... NRC Postdoctoral Research Associateships Program; NIST NRC Program Description. ...

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

300

A Collaborative Informatics Infrastructure for Multi-Scale Science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Collaboratory for Multi-scale Chemical Science (CMCS) is developing a powerful informatics-based approach to synthesizing multi-scale information in support of systems-based research and is applying it within combustion science. An open source multi-scale ... Keywords: collaboratory, community data, cyberenvironment, knowledge grid, multi-scale data, provenance, system science

James D. Myers; Thomas C. Allison; Sandra Bittner; Brett Didier; Michael Frenklach; William H. Green, Jr.; Yen-Ling Ho; John Hewson; Wendy Koegler; Carina Lansing; David Leahy; Michael Lee; Renata Mccoy; Michael Minkoff; Sandeep Nijsure; Gregor Von Laszewski; David Montoya; Luwi Oluwole; Carmen Pancerella; Reinhardt Pinzon; William Pitz; Larry A. Rahn; Branko Ruscic; Karen Schuchardt; Eric Stephan; A. Wagner; Theresa Windus; Christine Yang

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Computer Simulation of Scale Formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes results of recent analyses performed by Battelle-Northwest in EPRI project RP 653-3: Computer Simulation of Scaling in Geothermal Systems. The results reported here are drawn primarily from case evaluations performed over the 12 months since the preceding EPRI Geothermal Symposium held in Monterey in June 1979. The present project is a continuation of a previous project designated RP 653-1. The ultimate objective of research performed in this project is to develop analytical tools (computer codes) and the supporting thermophysical and chemical data base that can be used to predict scaling and corrosion in geothermal power generating systems.

Lessor, D.L.; Kreid, D.K.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Relating Pore-Scale Uranium Aquatic Speciation to Intermediate-Scale Aquifer Heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect

The speciation and transport of uranium (VI) through porous media is highly dependent on solution conditions, the presence of complexing ligands, and the nature of the porous media. The dependency on many variables makes prediction of U transport in bench-scale experiments and in the field difficult. In particular, the identification of colloidal U phases poses a technical challenge. Transport of U in the presence and absence of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic acid, SRHA) through silica sand and hematite coated silica sand was tested at pH 4 and 5 using static columns, where flow is controlled by gravity and residence time between advective pore volume exchanges can be strictly controlled. The column effluents were characterized by traditional techniques including ICPMS quantification of total [U] and [Fe], TOC analysis of [DOC], and pH analysis, and also by non-traditional techniques: flow field flow fractionation with online ICPMS detection (FlFFF-ICPMS) and specific UV absorbance (SUVA) characterization of effluent fractions. Key results include that the transport of U through the columns was enhanced by pre-equilibration with SRHA, and previously deposited U was remobilized by the addition of SRHA. The advanced techniques yielded important insights on the mechanisms of transport: FlFFF-ICPMS identified a U?SRHA complex as the mobile U species and directly quantified relative amounts of the complex, while specific UV absorbance (SUVA) measurements indicated a composition-based fractionation onto the porous media.

Ranville, James

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Genome sequencing reveals fine scale diversification and reticulation history during speciation in Sus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as: Frantz et al. : Genome sequencing reveals fine scaleThornton K, Presgraves DC: Genome sequencing reveals complexRESEARCH Open Access Genome sequencing reveals fine scale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Building Scale DC Microgrids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale DC Microgrids Title Building Scale DC Microgrids Publication Type Conference Proceedings LBNL Report Number LBNL-5729E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Marnay, Chris, Steven...

305

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially...

306

Research - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Our research is outlined our research proposals below. Samples of completed research may be found under "Sample Papers" and under "Project Highlights" on ...

307

Scaling Laws in the Distribution of Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research done during the previous century established our Standard Cosmological Model. There are many details still to be filled in, but few would seriously doubt the basic premise. Past surveys have revealed that the large-scale distribution of galaxies in the Universe is far from random: it is highly structured over a vast range of scales. To describe cosmic structures, we need to build mathematically quantifiable descriptions of structure. Identifying where scaling laws apply and the nature of those scaling laws is an important part of understanding which physical mechanisms have been responsible for the organization of clusters, superclusters of galaxies and the voids between them. Finding where these scaling laws are broken is equally important since this indicates the transition to different underlying physics. In describing scaling laws we are helped by making analogies with fractals: mathematical constructs that can possess a wide variety of scaling properties. We must beware, however, of saying that ...

Jones, B J T; Saar, E; Trimble, V; Jones, Bernard J. T.; Martinez, Vicent J.; Saar, Enn; Trimble, Virginia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

BNL | Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven's Research Facilities Brookhaven's Research Facilities Tools of Discovery Brookhaven National Lab excels at the design, construction, and operation of large-scale, cutting-edge research facilities-some available nowhere else in the world. Each year, thousands of scientists from laboratories, universities, and industries around the world use these facilities to delve into the basic mysteries of physics, chemistry, biology, materials science, energy, and the environment-and develop innovative applications that arise, sometimes at the intersections of these disciplines. construction Brookhaven Lab is noted for the design, construction and operation of large-scale, cutting-edge research facilities that support thousands of scientists worldwide. RHIC tunnel Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

309

Research Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... industrial or academic partner perform joint research with outcomes ... these collaborations arise spontaneously and the researchers jointly pursue ...

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

310

PNNL: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Full Story Research at PNNL Home Featured Highlights Archive Research Directorates Energy & Environment Fundamental & Computational Sciences National Security Facilities...

311

Guest Researchers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... If confidentiality of cooperative research results are desired a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) may be appropriate. ...

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

312

Small-Scale Reactor for the Production of Medical Isotopes  

Small-Scale Reactor for the Production of Medical Isotopes IP Home; Search/Browse Technology ... Drawing upon proven technology with minimal research effort required;

313

Optimization of Preprocessing and Densification of Sorghum Stover at Full-scale Operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transportation costs can be a prohibitive step in bringing biomass to a preprocessing location or biofuel refinery. One alternative to transporting biomass in baled or loose format to a preprocessing location, is to utilize a mobile preprocessing system that can be relocated to various locations where biomass is stored, preprocess and densify the biomass, then ship it to the refinery as needed. The Idaho National Laboratory has a full scale 'Process Demonstration Unit' PDU which includes a stage 1 grinder, hammer mill, drier, pellet mill, and cooler with the associated conveyance system components. Testing at bench and pilot scale has been conducted to determine effects of moisture on preprocessing, crop varieties on preprocessing efficiency and product quality. The INLs PDU provides an opportunity to test the conclusions made at the bench and pilot scale on full industrial scale systems. Each component of the PDU is operated from a central operating station where data is collected to determine power consumption rates for each step in the process. The power for each electrical motor in the system is monitored from the control station to monitor for problems and determine optimal conditions for the system performance. The data can then be viewed to observe how changes in biomass input parameters (moisture and crop type for example), mechanical changes (screen size, biomass drying, pellet size, grinding speed, etc.,), or other variations effect the power consumption of the system. Sorgum in four foot round bales was tested in the system using a series of 6 different screen sizes including: 3/16 in., 1 in., 2 in., 3 in., 4 in., and 6 in. The effect on power consumption, product quality, and production rate were measured to determine optimal conditions.

Neal A. Yancey; Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; Craig C. Conner; Christopher T. Wright

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

EFRT M-12 Issue Resolution: Comparison of Filter Performance at PEP and CUF Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities to resolve technical issues identified for the Pretreatment Facility (PTF). The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) was designed and constructed and is to be operated as part of a plan to respond to issue M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes. The PEP is a 1/4.5-scale test platform designed to simulate the WTP pretreatment caustic leaching, oxidative leaching, ultrafiltration solids concentration, and slurry washing processes. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching processes using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The PEP also includes non-prototypic ancillary equipment to support the core processing. Two operating scenarios are currently being evaluated for the ultrafiltration process (UFP) and leaching operations. The first scenario has caustic leaching performed in the UFP-2 ultrafiltration feed vessels (i.e., vessel UFP-VSL-T02A in the PEP and vessels UFP-VSL-00002A and B in the WTP PTF). The second scenario has caustic leaching conducted in the UFP-1 ultrafiltration feed-preparation vessels (i.e., vessels UFP-VSL-T01A and B in the PEP; vessels UFP-VSL-00001A and B in the WTP PTF). In both scenarios, 19-M sodium hydroxide solution (NaOH, caustic) is added to the waste slurry in the vessels to leach solid aluminum compounds (e.g., gibbsite, boehmite). Caustic addition is followed by a heating step that uses direct injection of steam to accelerate the leach process. Following the caustic leach, the vessel contents are cooled using vessel cooling jackets and/or external heat exchangers. The main difference between the two scenarios is that for leaching in UFP1, the 19-M NaOH is added to un-concentrated waste slurry (3 to 8 wt% solids), while for leaching in UFP2, the slurry is concentrated to nominally 20 wt% solids using cross-flow ultrafiltration before the addition of caustic. The work described in this report presents filter flux results obtained at two different scales based on tests performed with a Hanford tank waste simulant. The tests were made at the lab-bench scale on a cold (i.e., designated for non-radioactive simulant test materials) Cells Unit Filter [CUF]) and in the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP), which is a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of key PTF process equipment. One set of tests was conducted with the simulant feed (low solids), and one test was conducted at a relatively high solids concentration. The results of these tests are compared to support a scale factor for use in the WTP.

Daniel, Richard C.; Billing, Justin M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Brown, Christopher F.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Hanson, Brady D.; Huckaby, James L.; Karri, Naveen K.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Minette, Michael J.

2009-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

315

Scaling Laws in the Distribution of Galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research done during the previous century established our Standard Cosmological Model. There are many details still to be filled in, but few would seriously doubt the basic premise. Past surveys have revealed that the large-scale distribution of galaxies in the Universe is far from random: it is highly structured over a vast range of scales. To describe cosmic structures, we need to build mathematically quantifiable descriptions of structure. Identifying where scaling laws apply and the nature of those scaling laws is an important part of understanding which physical mechanisms have been responsible for the organization of clusters, superclusters of galaxies and the voids between them. Finding where these scaling laws are broken is equally important since this indicates the transition to different underlying physics. In describing scaling laws we are helped by making analogies with fractals: mathematical constructs that can possess a wide variety of scaling properties. We must beware, however, of saying that the Universe is a fractal on some range of scales: it merely exhibits a specific kind of fractal-like behavior on those scales. We exploit the richness of fractal scaling behavior merely as an important supplement to the usual battery of statistical descriptors. We review the history of how we have learned about the structure of the Universe and present the data and methodologies that are relevant to the question of discovering and understanding any scaling properties that structure may have. The ultimate goal is to have a complete understanding of how that structure emerged. We are getting close!

Bernard J. T. Jones; Vicent J. Martinez; Enn Saar; Virginia Trimble

2004-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

316

Research in elementary particle physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses research in the following areas of high energy physics: B meson mixing; CDF response to low energy jets; jet scaling behavior; search for pair produced leptoquarks at CDF; SSC program; quantum field theory; and neural networks. (LSP).

Kirsch, L.E.; Schnitzer, H.J.; Bensinger, J.R.; Blocker, C.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Energy systems integration optimizes the design and performance of electrical, thermal, and fuel systems at different but interrelated scales, ranging from...

318

Research Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer & Radiation Radiochemistry & Instrumentation Genome Dynamics BioenergyGTL Technology Centers Resources Research Research in the Life Sciences Division contributes to...

319

Research Gallery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Gallery Research Gallery Inside the Museum Exhibitions Norris Bradbury Museum Lobby Defense Gallery Research Gallery History Gallery TechLab Virtual Exhibits invisible utility element Research Gallery Science serving society The Laboratory conducts leading-edge research in many areas of science and technology to help solve national problems related to energy, the environment, infrastructure, and health. Basic research conducted here enhances national defense and economic security. Exhibits you'll find in this gallery: Understanding Radiation LANSCE: Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Space Science Research Viewspace Environmental Monitoring and Research Nanotechnology: The Science of the Small Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum Living with Wildfire: A Shared Community Experience

320

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Highlights Summaries Modeling the Sensitivity of Convection to Tropospheric Humidity Download a printable PDF Submitter: Del Genio, A. D., NASA Area of Research: General...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Research Library  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL Research Library: delivering essential knowledge services for national security sciences since 1947 About the Research Library The Basics Mission We deliver agile, responsive...

322

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effective Diameter in Ice Clouds and Its Application to Terrestrial Radiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research:...

323

Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLEX lab image, windows testing lab, scientist inside a lab, Research Facilities EETD maintains advanced research and test facilities for buildings, energy technologies, air...

324

Extreme Scale Visual Analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Extreme-scale visual analytics (VA) is about applying VA to extreme-scale data. The articles in this special issue examine advances related to extreme-scale VA problems, their analytical and computational challenges, and their real-world applications.

Wong, Pak C.; Shen, Han-Wei; Pascucci, Valerio

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

325

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamental Combustion Laboratory Fundamental Combustion Laboratory To help meet a national strategic commitment to clean power generation, NETL is developing a technology base for tomorrow's highly efficient, near-zero-emissions power plants. At NETL, combustion science research is helping to provide the basis for a new generation of advanced fossil fuel conversion technologies that are needed to meet future demands for efficient, clean, and cost-effective energy production. Combustion science researchers are able to study fundamental combustion processes and properties at a laboratory scale, using advanced laser-based systems. Researchers also use a natural gas combustion apparatus that has been adapted to study a variety of fuel types and power systems. Taking this fundamental research the next step, researchers find that, when applied to reciprocating engines, laser-induced spark ignition can achieve leaner air/fuel running conditions by significantly lowering combustion temperatures, which reduces the amount of pollutants produced such as NOx.

326

NETL: Onsite Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluidization Research: Multiphase Flow/Gas-Solid Transport Laboratory Fluidization Research: Multiphase Flow/Gas-Solid Transport Laboratory NETL's research, development, and demonstration initiatives are leading to improved operations of coal-based power systems, and future power supplies that are environmentally clean and economically affordable. One method NETL researchers are using is advanced computational and experimental research, which is helping to develop novel technologies, including transport gasifiers, circulating fluidized-bed combustors, and hot gas desulfurization. Enhanced computational capabilities are leading to major improvements in power plant efficiency, and therefore to reduced emissions. Transport gasifier and MFIX showing particle trajectories and oxygen concentration. MFIX simulations complement testing and development at the DOE demonstration Power System Development Facility (PSDF) in Wilsonville, Alabama (shown above). Coal and recycled materials feed into the lower mixing zone of the plant's circulating fluidized-bed. The validated simulation model is currently being used to design a commercial-scale unit.

327

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Research and Development (R&D) Project DOE Research and Development (R&D) Project Summaries Topic Bench-to-Bench Coordination Using OSTI Resources by David Wojick 13 May, 2009 in Products and Content Coordination means increasing awareness of related and potentially useful research, especially across the basic and applied divide. Secretary Chu emphasizes the importance of bridging the basic and applied divide. DOE uses several large scale methods to foster coordination, such as workshops attended by hundreds of researchers. A complementary approach is described here, which we call "Bench-to-Bench Coordination". This approach uses analysis of OSTI resources to identify closely related research across the divide. The results can be used in a variety of ways to put individual (or "bench") researchers in touch with one another for coordination purposes. This process can operate on an ongoing basis, in contrast to episodic workshops.

328

Planet-scale Human Mobility Measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research into, and design and construction of mobile systems and algorithms requires access to large-scale mobility data. Unfortunately, the wireless and mobile research community lacks such data. For instance, the largest available human contact traces contain only 100 nodes with very sparse connectivity, limited by experimental logistics. In this paper we pose a challenge to the community: how can we collect mobility data from billions of human participants? We re-assert the importance of large-scale datasets in communication network design, and claim that this could impact fundamental studies in other academic disciplines. In effect, we argue that planet-scale mobility measurements can help to save the world. For example, through understanding large-scale human mobility, we can track and model and contain the spread of epidemics of various kinds.

Pan Hui; Richard Mortier; Tristan Henderson; Jon Crowcroft

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

329

Agile Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the application of agile software development methods in software-based research environments.

Cunningham, Hamish

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Building Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... the ceramic coating inside a gas turbine or how ... What do gas pumps, truck scales, blood cholesterol tests ... of solids, liquids or gases characterized by ...

331

Modeling scaleup effects on a small pilot-scale fluidized-bed reactor for fuel ethanol production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Domestic ethanol use and production are presently undergoing significant increases along with planning and construction of new production facilities. Significant efforts are ongoing to reduce ethanol production costs by investigating new inexpensive feedstocks (woody biomass) and by reducing capital and energy costs through process improvements. A key element in the development of advanced bioreactor systems capable of very high conversion rates is the retention of high biocatalyst concentrations within the bioreactor and a reaction environment that ensures intimate contact between substrate and biocatalyst. One very effective method is to use an immobilized biocatalyst that can be placed into a reaction environment that provides effective mass transport, such as a fluidized bed. Mathematical descriptions are needed based on fundamental principles and accepted correlations that describe important physical phenomena. We describe refinements and semi-quantitatively extend the predictive model of Petersen and Davison to a multiphase fluidized-bed reactor (FBR) that was scaled-up for ethanol production. Axial concentration profiles were evaluated by solving coupled differential equations for glucose and carbon dioxide. The pilot-scale FBR (2 to 5 m tall, 10.2-cm ID, and 23,000 L month{sup -1} capacity) was scaled up from bench-scale reactors (91 to 224 cm long, 2.54 to 3.81 cm ID, and 400 to 2,300 L month{sup -1} capacity). Significant improvements in volumetric productivites (50 to 200 g EtOH h{sup -1} L{sup -1} compared with 40 to 110 for bench-scale experiments and 2 to 10 for reported industrial benchmarks) and good operability were demonstrated.

Webb, O.F.; Davison, B.H.; Scott, T.C.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlights Members of ARM's science team are major contributors to radiation and cloud research. ARM investigators publish about 150 refereed journal articles per year, and ARM data are used in many studies published by other scientific organizations. These documented research efforts represent tangible evidence of ARM's contribution to advances in almost all areas of atmospheric radiation and cloud research. Below is a selection of summaries highlighting recently-published ARM research. The entire collection of ARM

333

PetaScale Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

focus on applications that benefit energy research, those supported by other Recovery Act funding and Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs). The initiative pairs post-doctoral...

334

NREL: Biomass Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff NREL's biomass research staff includes: Management team Technology and research areas Research support areas. Search the NREL staff directory to contact any of the research staff listed below. Management Team The biomass management team is composed of: Thomas Foust, National Bioenergy Center Director Robert Baldwin, Principal Scientist, Thermochemical Conversion Phil Pienkos, Applied Science Principal Group Manager Kim Magrini, Catalysis and Thermochemical Sciences and Engineering R&D Principal Group Manager Jim McMillan, Biochemical Process R&D Principal Group Manager Rich Bain, Principal Engineer, Thermochemical Sciences Mark Davis, Thermochemical Platform Lead Richard Elander, Biochemical Platform Lead Dan Blake, Emeritus Back to Top Technology and Research Areas

335

Large-Scale PV Integration Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research effort evaluates the impact of large-scale photovoltaic (PV) and distributed generation (DG) output on NV Energys electric grid system in southern Nevada. It analyzes the ability of NV Energys generation to accommodate increasing amounts of utility-scale PV and DG, and the resulting cost of integrating variable renewable resources. The study was jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy and NV Energy, and conducted by a project team comprised of industry experts and research scientists from Navigant Consulting Inc., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and NV Energy.

Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin; Hafen, Ryan P.; Jin, Chunlian; Kirkham, Harold; Shlatz, Eugene; Frantzis, Lisa; McClive, Timothy; Karlson, Gregory; Acharya, Dhruv; Ellis, Abraham; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford; Chadliev, Vladimir; Smart, Michael; Salgo, Richard; Sorensen, Rahn; Allen, Barbara; Idelchik, Boris

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

336

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Silica Scaling Removal Process Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have developed a novel technology to remove both dissolved and colloidal silica using small gel particles. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Silica Scaling Removal Process Applications: Cooling tower systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits: Reduces scaling in cooling towers by up to 50% Increases the number of cycles of concentration substantially Reduces the amount of antiscaling chemical additives needed Decreases the amount of makeup water and subsequent discharged water (blowdown) Enables considerable cost savings derived from reductions in

337

Scaling Issues for Large-Scale Grids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· ESNet Can Play a Very Important Role in the Science Grid ? Security Aspects of Grids · ESNet Can Provide will be important and very useful for managing large-scale virtual org. structures #12;·ESNet Can Play a Very Important Role in the Science Grid · ESNet can provide a rooted and managed namespace, and a place to home

338

CX-001381: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

381: Categorical Exclusion Determination 381: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001381: Categorical Exclusion Determination Indoor Bench-Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/05/2010 Location(s): Illinois Office(s): Science, Argonne Site Office All proposed actions will be indoor bench-scale research projects and conventional laboratory operations conducted in existing buildings at Argonne. Specifically, bench-scale chemical, biological, and physical studies, experiments and related activities including the assembly/disassembly of experimental instrumentation and research equipment are within the scope of the proposed actions. However, construction work including the installation of utilities and minor modifications in existing laboratory spaces needed to prepare for bench-scale research must be

339

NETL F 451.1/1-1, Categorical Exclusion Designation Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for New and Retrofit Coal-Fired Power Plants - Phase II Phase II efforts will consist of paper studies, bench-scale research of assessing properties of limestone powders, cold...

340

CX-008817: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Indoor Bench Scale Research Projects and Conventional Laboratory Operations CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/08/2012 Location(s): Illinois Offices(s): New Brunswick Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Thermodynamics and scale relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown how the fractal paths of scale relativity (following Nottale) can be introduced into a thermodynamical context (following Asadov-Kechkin).

Carroll, Robert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Silica Scaling Removal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

systems Water treatment systems Water evaporation systems Potential mining applications (produced water) Industry applications for which silica scaling must be prevented Benefits:...

343

RESEARCH TITLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Wilmington 35 Eidgenssische Technische Hochschule, Switzerland 36 Emory University School of Medicine 37 ExxonMobil Research and ...

2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

344

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations: Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Science Engineering Science The Engineering Science Research Foundation is leading engineering transitions in advanced, highly critical systems by integrating theory development, experimental discovery and diagnostics, modeling, and computational approaches to refine our understanding of complex behavior in engineered systems. Why our work matters Revolutionizing the fundamental understanding of complex engineered systems can lead to enhancements that will bolster our national security stance for decades to come. Our unique value Leading-edge work on physical phenomena at the continuum and near-continuum scale Engineering expertise in national security systems that is second to none Foundational knowledge across multiple disciplines, including solid mechanics, fluid mechanics of reacting and nonreacting systems, structural

345

Enhancements in SCALE 6.1  

SciTech Connect

The SCALE code system developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory provides a comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly tool set for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a 'plug-and-play' framework with 89 computational modules, including three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that are selected based on the desired solution. SCALE's graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.1 builds on the existing capabilities and ease-of-use of SCALE and provides several new features such as enhanced lattice physics capabilities and multigroup Monte Carlo depletion, improved options and capabilities for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis calculations, improved flexibility in shielding and criticality accident alarm system calculations with automated variance reduction, and new options for the definition of group structures for depletion calculations. The SCALE 6.1 development team has focused on improved robustness via substantial additional regression testing and verification for new and existing features, providing improved performance relative to SCALE 6.0, especially in reactor physics calculations and in the nuclear data used for source term characterization and shielding calculations.

Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Petrie Jr, Lester M [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Jessee, Matthew Anderson [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL; Lefebvre, Robert A [ORNL; Lefebvre, Jordan P [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Goluoglu, Sedat [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

OVERVIEW OF SCALE 6.2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SCALE is an industry-leading suite of tools for nuclear systems modeling and simulation that provides comprehensive, verified and validated, user-friendly capabilities for criticality safety, reactor physics, radiation shielding, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. For more than 30 years, regulators, licensees, and research institutions around the world have used SCALE for nuclear safety analysis and design. SCALE provides a plug-and-play framework that includes three deterministic and three Monte Carlo radiation transport solvers that are selected based on the desired solution. SCALE includes the latest nuclear data libraries for continuous-energy and multigroup radiation transport as well as activation, depletion, and decay calculations. SCALE s graphical user interfaces assist with accurate system modeling, visualization, and convenient access to desired results. SCALE 6.2 provides several new capabilities and significant improvements in many existing features, especially with expanded CE Monte Carlo capabilities for criticality safety, shielding, depletion, and sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. A brief overview of SCALE capabilities is provided with emphasis on new features for SCALE 6.2.

Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL; Dunn, Michael E [ORNL; Wiarda, Dorothea [ORNL; Celik, Cihangir [ORNL; Bekar, Kursat B [ORNL; Williams, Mark L [ORNL; Peplow, Douglas E. [ORNL; Perfetti, Christopher M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Wieselquist, William A [ORNL; Lefebvre, Jordan P [ORNL; Lefebvre, Robert A [ORNL; Havluj, Frantisek [Nuclear Research Institute, Rez, Czech Republic; Skutnik, Steven [The University of Tennessee; Dugan, Kevin [Texas A& M University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Neuroimaging Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Neuroimaging Research Neuroimaging Research (NIAAA Intramural & NIH) Neuroimaging research at Brookhaven is a prime example of transdisciplinary research where the expertise of chemists, physicists, and biological and medical scientists blend to apply new imaging tools to problems in human health. Brookhaven has a network of complementary brain-imaging tools: PET Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Micro MRI MicroMRI Awake Animal Imaging Awake Animal Imaging Using these imaging tools, human neuroscience research has focused on understanding how the brain effects, and is affected by: obesity and eating disorders ADHD depression Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuroimaging, and Neuropsychoimaging enrich investigations of the relationships between brain chemistry and behavior. Top of Page

348

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Conference Proceedings Topic Science Conference Proceedings Topic Bench-to-Bench Coordination Using OSTI Resources by David Wojick 13 May, 2009 in Products and Content Coordination means increasing awareness of related and potentially useful research, especially across the basic and applied divide. Secretary Chu emphasizes the importance of bridging the basic and applied divide. DOE uses several large scale methods to foster coordination, such as workshops attended by hundreds of researchers. A complementary approach is described here, which we call "Bench-to-Bench Coordination". This approach uses analysis of OSTI resources to identify closely related research across the divide. The results can be used in a variety of ways to put individual (or "bench") researchers in touch with one another for coordination purposes. This process can operate on an ongoing basis, in contrast to episodic workshops.

349

Research departments Materials Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research reactor and X- radiation from the synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Grenoble. In this con- nection, work is carried out on develop- ing advanced methods, as well as theory and computer simulation numerical simulation. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department The department carries out research

350

Electromagnetic Composites at the Compton Scale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new class of electromagnetic composite particles is proposed. The composites are very small (the Compton scale), potentially long-lived, would have unique interactions with atomic and nuclear systems, and, if they exist, could explain a number of otherwise anomalous and conflicting observations in diverse research areas.

Frederick J. Mayer; John R. Reitz

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

PLASMA: a PLAnetary scale monitoring architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While sensor networks continue to attract significant interest in various research communities, high impact applications still have a long list of challenges to be addressed. An individual sensor system can provide important observations within a local ... Keywords: planetary scale monitoring, sensor networks

Demet Aksoy

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Research Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

My research is in the area of network control and management, with a research goal of improving the robustness and manageability of networked systems, and contributing to the design of future network architectures. Benefiting from my cross-disciplinary background in electrical engineering, telecommunications, and computer science, I try to bring a comprehensive viewpoint in my contributions to networking research. My vision is to facilitate the design of networks that are scalable, evolvable, and can work smartly with minimal human involvement.

Hammad Iqbal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scientists then measured how the particles were distributed in the vapor using a mobility scanner that determined particle sizes. In the other approach, researchers...

354

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Secondary Organic Aerosol (SOA) and Sulfate Download a printable PDF Submitter: Martin, S. T., Harvard University Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s):...

355

Research Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Physics to simulate a next generation light sources based on x-ray free electron lasers. My research includes: Designing parallel algorithms for numerical optimization....

356

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Brass Ring of Climate Modeling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s):...

357

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Into Radiative Transfer in Cloudy Conditions Submitter: Min, Q., State University of New York, Albany Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working Group(s):...

358

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Altering Cloud Microphysics and Precipitation Submitter: Min, Q., State University of New York, Albany Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal...

359

Operations Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 1, 2005 ... Operations Research. Report 2005-01. On a closedness theorem. Mikls Ujvri. Marc 2005. Etvs Lornd University of Sciences. Department...

360

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) UV-B Monitoring and Research Program, National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

UNIRIB: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mission focus of the University Radioactive Ion Beam (UNIRIB) consortium is to perform nuclear physics research, and provide training and education. UNIRIB member universities...

362

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status and Analysis Results: 1998 Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes...

363

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference:...

364

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions...

365

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contributor to Low-Level Cloud Reflectivity Submitter: Penner, J. E., University of Michigan Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference:...

366

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stratocumulus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Penner, J. E., University of Michigan Lee, S., University of Michigan Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working...

367

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and validation of a black carbon mixing state resolved three-dimensional model: Aging processes and radiative impact." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, ,...

368

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Ice Crystals on Ice Sedimentation Rates in Cirrus Clouds and GCM Simulations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Rasch, P., Pacific...

369

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Predicting Arctic Sea Ice Loss Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, X., University of Wyoming Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s):...

370

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterizing the Co-Existence of Water and Ice in Arctic Clouds Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations...

371

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nailing Down Ice in a Cloud Model Download a printable PDF Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s):...

372

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On Thin Ice: Retrieval Algorithms for Ice Clouds Examined for Improvements Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions...

373

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollution + Storm Clouds Warmer Atmosphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fan, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation...

374

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM-Funded Algorithms Lead to Marked Improvements in Global Weather Forecast Model Submitter: Morcrette, J. J., European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Area of Research:...

375

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Many Forecast Errors Are Climate Errors Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column...

376

PNNL: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cutting Air Pollution Got Boost from Weather Cutting Air Pollution Got Boost from Weather View full sized image New research suggests that China's impressive feat of cutting...

377

PNNL: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by PNNL and researchers from the University of Washington and Oregon Health & Science University shows how using a relatively simple method for engineering nanoparticle...

378

PNNL: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To achieve higher power levels, researchers now are turning their attention to advanced fuel designs. PNNL is developing a new metal fuel for light water reactors intended...

379

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Aerosols and the Third Polar Ice Cap Submitter: Menon, S., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models...

380

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Relative Humidity on Aerosols-Implications for Climate Submitter: Lacis, A. A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Diffusivity and Viscosity of Secondary Organic Aerosols Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zelenyuk-Imre, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research:...

382

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Dance of Aerosols Download a printable PDF Submitter: Song, C., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle...

383

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Atmospheric Aerosols Using MFRSR Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Alexandrov, M. D., Columbia University Area of Research: Aerosol Properties...

384

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K-Distribution Method for a SW Radiative Transfer Model Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models...

385

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arctic Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Earle, M., Environment Canada Liu, P., Environment Canada Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations...

386

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Boundary Detection and Analysis from Micro Pulse Lidar Submitter: Spinhirne, J., University of Arizona Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working...

387

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mexico City Carbon-Containing Particle Composition Simulated Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zaveri, R., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation...

388

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facility sites. For many years now, vertically pointing ARM instruments in Oklahoma, Alaska, and Manus Island in the Pacific Ocean (in Papua New Guinea) have...

389

Welcome - Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dynamometers bench-top engine exhaust simulators unique diagnostic and measurement tools fuel cell characterization systems There are many ways to work with FEERC including a...

390

Digital scale converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digital scale converter is provided for binary coded decimal (BCD) conversion. The converter may be programmed to convert a BCD value of a first scale to the equivalent value of a second scale according to a known ratio. The value to be converted is loaded into a first BCD counter and counted down to zero while a second BCD counter registers counts from zero or an offset value depending upon the conversion. Programmable rate multipliers are used to generate pulses at selected rates to the counters for the proper conversion ratio. The value present in the second counter at the time the first counter is counted to the zero count is the equivalent value of the second scale. This value may be read out and displayed on a conventional seven-segment digital display.

Upton, Richard G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Large-Scale Hydropower  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Large-scale hydropower plants are generally developed to produce electricity for government or electric utility projects. These plants are more than 30 MW in size, and there is more than 80,000 MW...

392

Fish scales and growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish scales and growth Name: Belinda Clark Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: In my daughter's book about fish, it states that fish continue to get bigger as they age...

393

Lightning Scaling Relations Revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scaling relations connecting storm electrical generator power (and hence lightning flash rate) to charge transport velocity and storm geometry were originally posed by Vonnegut in the 1960s. These were later simplified to yield simple ...

Dennis J. Boccippio

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Final report for the pilot-scale thermal treatment of Lower East Fork Poplar Creek floodplain soils  

SciTech Connect

IT Corporation (IT) was contracted by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) to perform a pilot-scale demonstration of the effectiveness of thermal desorption as a remedial technology for removing mercury from the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) floodplain soil. Previous laboratory studies by Energy Systems suggested that this technology could reduce mercury to very low levels. This pilot-scale demonstration study was initiated to verify on an engineering scale the performance of thermal desorption. This report includes the details of the demonstration study, including descriptions of experimental equipment and procedures, test conditions, sampling and analysis, quality assurance (QA), detailed test results, and an engineering assessment of a conceptual full-scale treatment facility. The specific project tasks addressed in this report were performed between October 1993 and June 1994. These tasks include soil receipt, preparation, and characterization; prepilot (bench-scale) desorption tests; front-end materials handling tests; pilot tests; back-end materials handling tests; residuals treatment; and engineering scale-up assessment.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

SunShot Initiative: Scaling Up Nascent Photovoltaics AT Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scaling Up Nascent Photovoltaics Scaling Up Nascent Photovoltaics AT Home to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Scaling Up Nascent Photovoltaics AT Home on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Scaling Up Nascent Photovoltaics AT Home on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Scaling Up Nascent Photovoltaics AT Home on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Scaling Up Nascent Photovoltaics AT Home on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Scaling Up Nascent Photovoltaics AT Home on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Scaling Up Nascent Photovoltaics AT Home on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Research & Development Competitive Awards Diversity in Science and Technology Advances National Clean Energy in Solar Grid Engineering for Accelerated Renewable Energy Deployment

396

Operations research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Evita, Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice wrote: Politics, the Art of the Possible. To those of us in the operations research community, we postulate: Operations Research, the Science of Better - (i.e. better processes, better systems and better decisions). ...

William P. Pierskalla

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

NREL: Wind Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff Here you will find contact information for NREL's research and support staff at the National Wind Technology Center. To learn more about us and our expertise, view our organizational charts and read the staff's biographies. Below is a listing of the research and support staff at the National Wind Technology Center. View organizational charts. Lab Program Manager, Wind and Water Power Program Brian Smith Program Integration, Wind and Water Power Program Elise DeGeorge Albert LiVecchi Dana Scholbrock Teresa Thadison Director, National Wind Technology Center Fort Felker, Center Director Laura Davis Kim Domenico Deputy Center Director, National Wind Technology Center Jim Green, Acting Research Fellow Bob Thresher Chief Engineer Paul Veers Wind Technology Research and Development

398

Lab-scale Methods to Enable the Selection of Nuclear Fuel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors III ... from the lab bench to preliminary qualification with irradiation testing.

399

Basic Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 II Basic Research The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) office within the DOE Office of Science supports the DOE Hydrogen Program by providing basic, fundamental research in those technically challenging areas facing the Program, complementing the applied research and demonstration projects conducted by the Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Fossil Energy; and Nuclear Engineering, Science and Technology. In May 2005 Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced the selection of over $64 million in BES research and development projects aimed at making hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and refueling stations available, practical and affordable for American consumers by 2020. A total of 70 hydrogen research projects were selected to focus on fundamental science and enable

400

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, C Flynn, J Redemann, B Schmid, PB Russell, and A Sinyuk. 2012. "Initial assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-based aerosol retrieval: Sensitivity study." Atmosphere, 3, doi:10.3390/atmos3040495. The 4STAR instrument. The 4STAR instrument (inset) is installed through the upper hull of the PNNL G-1 research aircraft, for in-flight sun-tracking and sky light-scanning. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with colleagues at NASA Ames Research Center, developed a next-generation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Sensors Download a printable PDF Submitter: Cady-Pereira, K. E., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Shephard, M. W., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, S. A., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Cady-Pereira, K, M Shephard, E Mlawer, D Turner, S Clough, and T Wagner. 2008. "Improved daytime column-integrated precipitable water vapor from Vaisala radiosonde humidity sensors." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology doi: 10.1175/2007JTECHA1027.1.

402

A cross-cultural validation of the web usage-related lifestyle scale: An empirical investigation in china  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research discusses a cross-cultural validation in China of the Internet user lifestyle scale developed by Smith and Swinyard (2001). The scale was initially validated for United States online users in 2001 and later for European Union online users ... Keywords: China, Cross-cultural research, Electronic shopping, Empirical research, Instrument validity, Internet user segmentation, Online lifestyles, User lifestyle scale

Qiang Ye; Guoxin Li; Bin Gu

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

METC Combustion Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) high pressure combustion facility is to provide a mid-scale facility for combustion and cleanup research to support DOE`s advanced gas turbine, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion, and hot gas cleanup programs. The facility is intended to fill a gap between lab scale facilities typical of universities and large scale combustion/turbine test facilities typical of turbine manufacturers. The facility is now available to industry and university partners through cooperative programs with METC. High pressure combustion research is also important to other DOE programs. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems and second-generation, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) systems use gas turbines/electric generators as primary power generators. The turbine combustors play an important role in achieving high efficiency and low emissions in these novel systems. These systems use a coal-derived fuel gas as fuel for the turbine combustor. The METC facility is designed to support coal fuel gas-fired combustors as well as the natural gas fired combustor used in the advanced turbine program.

Halow, J.S.; Maloney, D.J.; Richards, G.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Experimental Research on the Scale and Corrosion Inhibition of the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characteristics of Stamp Charging Cokes with Different Reactivity to CO2 ... Assessment of a Retired Cast Austentic Stainless Steel Hydrogen Reformer Tube .

405

Research Article Interpreting Resource Selection at Different Scales  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science University British Columbia Vancouver, V6T Canada {swyang,mrg}@cs.ubc.ca Abstract. This paper is abstract. Hopefully, won't abstract time submit Introduction Fig. Synchronous Pipeline Stage Surfing Figure 1 shows typical synchronous pipeline stage. For proper operation, clock period must longer than

Gillingham, Michael

406

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iowa State University) NERSC Repository: m94 10.2.2.1 Joseph Carlson (LANL) NERSC Repository: m308 10.2.3.1 Scientific Objectives This NERSC repository supports NP-

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

day experimental fusion devices and in nuclear reactors thatnuclear energy both for next-generation fission reactors and for fusion reactors

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Research on the Carbothermic Reduction Conditions of Mill Scale ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How to Control Strength and Grain Structure of 304L Stainless Steel during Forging Improved ... Process Modeling and Reduction of Copper Loss in Smelting Slag ... Use of Polymeric Residues from the Footwear Industry in Layers of Asphalt...

409

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

personnel from Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), ThomasIon Collider at Brookhaven National Lab. Participation in

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proceedings of High Performance Computing 2011 (HPC-2011)In recent years, high performance computing has becomeNERSC is the primary high-performance computing facility for

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fusion, vortices in the crusts of neutron stars, and even dynamics in nonnuclear systems such as cold

Gerber, Richard A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fish Scales and Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fish Scales and Science Fish Scales and Science Name: Amanda Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: In special education class.Science project time.Topic choosen is HOW DO SCALES HELP FISH? Any suggestions or information would be of help. Replies: Wait a minute. Why do you think the scales help the fish? How do you know they do? Have you talked to a fish lately? Maybe they are useless, or even a problem. Maybe the fish wishes it didn't have scales! I say this only to emphasize two things: First of all, when you think scientifically, the MOST IMPORTANT thing is to be very careful not to assume you know something when you really don't. What I mean by that is: don't think you know the answer before you are dead positive absolutely for-sure 100% certain that you do. Why? Why make a big fuss over being so very careful? Well, I hate to tell you this (but you probably already know it), it's just SO EASY for human beings to fool themselves, to think they know the answers when they really don't know AT ALL what they are talking about. If you have a brother or sister, you know EXACTLY what I mean, I expect.

413

Defects and Faults in Quantum Cellular Automata at Nano Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been considerable research on quantum dotcellular automata (QCA) as a new computing schemein the nano-scale regimes. The basic logic element ofthis technology is majority voter. In this paper, a detailedsimulation-based characterization of ...

Mehdi Baradaran Tahoori; Mariam Momenzadeh; Jing Huang; Fabrizio Lombardi

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Infrastructure for large-scale tests in marine autonomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on the development of infrastructure for research with large-scale autonomous marine vehicle fleets and the design of sampling trajectories for compressive sensing (CS). The newly developed infrastructure ...

Hummel, Robert A. (Robert Andrew)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Clean Coal Technology Nears Pilot-Scale Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Posted on: 2/13/2013 12:00:00 AM... A new form of clean coal technology reached an important milestone, with the successful operation of a research- scale...

416

The AROME-France Convective-Scale Operational Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After six years of scientific, technical developments and meteorological validation, the Application of Research to Operations at Mesoscale (AROME-France) convective-scale model became operational at Mto-France at the end of 2008. This paper ...

Y. Seity; P. Brousseau; S. Malardel; G. Hello; P. Bnard; F. Bouttier; C. Lac; V. Masson

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Design of a digitally actuated, micro-scale Cartesian nanopositioner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this research is to generate the design knowledge required to produce a small-scale, low-cost precision positioning device. Accurate motion manipulation on the nanometer level is one of the main challenges ...

DiBiasio, Christopher M. (Christopher Michael)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

919 919 Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale An EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop Workshop Date: February 19-21, 2013 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale iii Executive Summary As part of the Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale workshop, an Environmental Molecular

419

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Dedecker, R.G., Feltz, W.F., Revercomb, H.E., and Tobin, D.C., 2004: "10 Years of AERI Data from the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site," In Proceedings from the Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy,Washington, D.C. Figure 1 Figure 2 From the unassuming farmlands of north-central Oklahoma comes a milestone for the global climate research community. March 2004 marked the 10-year anniversary for an instrument that now holds the prestigious distinction of providing the longest set of continuous atmospheric interferometer data

420

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Advanced Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

05/2007 05/2007 NitrogeN evolutioN aNd CorrosioN MeChaNisMs With oxyCoMbustioN of Coal Description Under a grant from the University Coal Research (UCR) program, Brigham Young University (BYU) is leading a three-year research effort to investigate the physical processes that several common types of coal undergo during oxy-fuel combustion. Specifically, research addresses the mixture of gases emitted from burning, particularly such pollutants as nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), and the potential for corrosion at the various stages of combustion. The UCR program is administered by the Advanced Research Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of

422

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Morrison H, G de Boer, G Feingold, J Harrington, M Shupe, and...

423

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Del Genio, A. D., NASA Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Del Genio AD, J Wu, and Y Chen. 2012. "Characteristics of...

424

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Catch Aerosols in the Act Download a printable PDF Submitter: Wang, M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life...

425

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Nucleation Link to Aerosols for Global Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: DeMott, P. J., Colorado State University Liu, X., University of Wyoming Area of Research:...

426

A Survey of Methods for Scaling Up Inductive Algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the defining challenges for the KDD research community is to enable inductive learning algorithms to mine very large databases. This paper summarizes, categorizes, and compares existing work on scaling up inductive algorithms. We concentrate ... Keywords: decision trees, inductive learning, rule learning, scaling up

Foster Provost; Venkateswarlu Kolluri

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Compile-time dynamic voltage scaling settings: opportunities and limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With power-related concerns becoming dominant aspects of hardware and software design, significant research effort has been devoted towards system power minimization. Among run-time power-management techniques, dynamic voltage scaling (DVS) has emerged ... Keywords: analytical model, compiler, dynamic voltage scaling, low power, mixed-integer linear programming

Fen Xie; Margaret Martonosi; Sharad Malik

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Explicit Cloud-Scale Models for Operational Forecasts: A Note of Caution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As computational capacity has increased, cloud-scale numerical models are slowly being modified from pure research tools to forecast tools. Previous studies that used cloud-scale models as explicit forecast tools, in much the same way as a ...

Kimberly L. Elmore; David J. Stensrud; Kenneth C. Crawford

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Angular Scaling In Jets  

SciTech Connect

We introduce a jet shape observable defined for an ensemble of jets in terms of two-particle angular correlations and a resolution parameter R. This quantity is infrared and collinear safe and can be interpreted as a scaling exponent for the angular distribution of mass inside the jet. For small R it is close to the value 2 as a consequence of the approximately scale invariant QCD dynamics. For large R it is sensitive to non-perturbative effects. We describe the use of this correlation function for tests of QCD, for studying underlying event and pile-up effects, and for tuning Monte Carlo event generators.

Jankowiak, Martin; Larkoski, Andrew J.; /SLAC

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

430

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Topics  

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Topics to someone by E-mail Share EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Topics on Facebook Tweet about EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Topics on Twitter Bookmark...

431

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Mentors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mentors to someone by E-mail Share EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Mentors on Facebook Tweet about EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Mentors on Twitter...

432

EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Proposals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposals on Twitter Bookmark EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Proposals on Google Bookmark EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards: Research Proposals on Delicious Rank EERE...

433

NIST Time Scale Data Archive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Time Scale Data Archive. ... The AT1 scale is run in real time using data from an ensemble of cesium standards and hydrogen masers. ...

2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

434

Lab Scale Hydraulic Parameter Estimation .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydraulic tomography has been tested at the field scale, lab scale and in synthetic experiments. Recently Illman and Berg have conducted studies at the lab (more)

Hartz, Andrew Scott

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Scaled Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product Scaled Solar manufacturers and markets utility-grade, concentrated photovoltaic solar energy systems to commercial customers References Scaled Solar1 LinkedIn...

436

Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal -- Task 3.8, Pressurized fluidized-bed combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the PFBC activity is to generate fundamental process information that will further the development of an economical and environmentally acceptable second-generation PFBC. The immediate objectives focus on generic issues, including the performance of sulfur sorbents, fate of alkali, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) heavy metals in PFBC. A great deal of PFBC performance relates to the chemistry of the bed and the contact between gas and solids that occurs during combustion. These factors can be studied in a suitably designed bench-scale reactor. The present studies are focusing on the emission control strategies applied in the bed, rather than in hot-gas cleaning. Emission components include alkali and heavy metals in addition to SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, N{sub 2}O, and CO. The report presents: a description of the pressurized fluidized-bed reactor (PFBR); a description of the alkali sampling probe; shakedown testing of the bench-scale PFBR; results from alkali sampling; results from sulfur sorbent performance tests; and results from refuse-derived fuel and lignite combustion tests.

Mann, M.D.; Henderson, A.K.; Swanson, M.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Scaling Relationships Based on Scaled Tank Mixing and Transfer Test Results  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the statistical analyses performed (by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for Washington River Protection Solutions) on data from 26 tests conducted using two scaled tanks (43 and 120 inches) in the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration platform. The 26 tests varied several test parameters, including mixer-jet nozzle velocity, base simulant, supernatant viscosity, and capture velocity. For each test, samples were taken pre-transfer and during five batch transfers. The samples were analyzed for the concentrations (lbs/gal slurry) of four primary components in the base simulants (gibbsite, stainless steel, sand, and ZrO2). The statistical analyses including modeling the component concentrations as functions of test parameters using stepwise regression with two different model forms. The resulting models were used in an equivalent performance approach to calculate values of scaling exponents (for a simple geometric scaling relationship) as functions of the parameters in the component concentration models. The resulting models and scaling exponents are displayed in tables and graphically. The sensitivities of component concentrations and scaling exponents to the test parameters are presented graphically. These results will serve as inputs to subsequent work by other researchers to develop scaling relationships that are applicable to full-scale tanks.

Piepel, Gregory F.; Holmes, Aimee E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

438

Multiphase Flow Modeling Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Chris Guenther, Director Computational Science Division RUA Spring Meeting, Morgantown, WV March 2013 2 NETL's Multiphase Flow Science Team * The Multiphase Flow Science Team develops physics-based simulation models to conduct applied scientific research. - Development of new theory - Extensive on-site and collaborative V&V efforts and testing - Engages in technology transfer - Applies the models to industrial scale problems. 3 Why is Multiphase Flow Science Needed? * Industry is increasingly relying on multiphase technologies to produce clean and affordable energy with carbon capture. * Unfortunately, the presence of a solid phase reduces the operating capacity of a typical energy device from its original design on average by 40% [1].

439

Energy Department, NREL Announce New Research Center to Boost...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. energy mix, including research into next generation building technologies, microgrids, energy storage batteries and utility-scale renewable energy. As the cost of clean...

440

Building America System Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inverse Modeling Data-Driven, Physics-Based Simulation and Optimization Software Community scale optimization Community scale energy savings potential Targeted deployment at scale...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Putting the Pieces Together Putting the Pieces Together Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fan, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fan J, S Ghan, M Ovchinnikov, X Liu, P Rasch, and A Korolev. 2011. "Representation of arctic mixed-phase clouds and the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen process in climate models: Perspectives from a cloud-resolving study." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T07, doi:10.1029/2010JD015375. PNNL's Arctic mixed-phase cloud research was augmented with field observations from the 2008 Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC) in Northern Alaska. Photo courtesy of A. Korolev, Environment Canada. Vertical cross sections of (a) the vertical velocity (the contour lines)

442

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parameterizing the Ice Fall Speed in Climate Models: Results from TC4 and Parameterizing the Ice Fall Speed in Climate Models: Results from TC4 and ISDAC Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Mishra, S., NOAA - Coop. Inst. for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mitchell DL, S Mishra, and RP Lawson. 2011. "Representing the ice fall speed in climate models: Results from Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) and the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC)." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T03, doi:10.1029/2010JD015433. Relationship between De and Vm for all tropical cirrus cloud types (solid

443

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Raman Lidar Observations of Aerosol Humidification Near Clouds Raman Lidar Observations of Aerosol Humidification Near Clouds Submitter: Ferrare, R. A., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Ferrare, R., et al., Evaluation of Daytime Measurements of Aerosols and Water Vapor Made by an Operational Raman Lidar over the Southern Great Plains, J. Geophys. Res., 111, D05S08, doi:10.1029/2005JD005836, 2006. Relative humidity profiles derived from the Raman lidar during the ALIVE 2005 field experiment. Aerosol extinction profiles derived from the Raman lidar during the ALIVE 2005 field experiment. Aerosol humidification factor f(RH) from Raman lidar measured profiles of aerosol extinction and relative humidity. Upgrades to the Raman lidar at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF)

444

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

445

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Oreopoulos L, E Mlawer, J Delamere, T Shippert, J Cole, B Fomin, M Iacono, Z Jin, J Li, J Manners, P Raisanen, F Rose, Y Zhang, MJ Wilson, and WB Rossow. 2012. "The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: results from Phase I." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, doi:10.1029/2011JD016821. The total error of each participating radiation code for all LW (left) and SW (right) cases in the CIRC intercomparison. The identity of each participating code can be found in the paper; codes built due to ARM

446

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modified Climate Model Better Replicates Global Rainfall Modified Climate Model Better Replicates Global Rainfall Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Song X, GJ Zhang, and JF Li. 2012. "Evaluation of microphysics parameterization for convective clouds in the NCAR Community Atmosphere Model CAM5." Journal of Climate, 25(24), doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00563.1. Rainfall in the tropics. By improving an existing, sophisticated, global climate model, scientists can now simulate cloud and rainfall more accurately. Supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric System Research program, a research team from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography and

447

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Simulation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD, A Merrelli, D Vimont, and EJ Mlawer. 2012. "Impact of modifying the longwave water vapor continuum absorption model on community Earth system model simulations." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D04106, doi:10.1029/2011JD016440. The mean difference profiles (experiment minus control) for clear-sky longwave radiative heating (QRLC); shortwave clear-sky radiative heating (QRSC); the longwave cloud radiative forcing (QRLCF); the precipitation

448

For Researchers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Export Control Export Control Berkeley Lab policy is to comply with all applicable state and federal laws, including those relating to Export Control. Berkeley Lab's Export Control Program is designed to support Berkeley Lab's and the University of California's international activities by ensuring compliance with U.S. export laws and regulations in the context of our fundamental research mission. Much of the Lab's compliance with U.S. export laws and regulations is based on our remaining within the "fundamental research" exception, i.e. performing basic or applied research for which the resulting information is ordinarily published and shared broadly within the scientific community. Do not sign non-disclosure or confidentiality agreements. Contact Parul Jain at 495-2306 or the Tech Transfer Department if you need or are

449

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chinese Researchers Report Reliable Method for Monitoring Soil Moisture Chinese Researchers Report Reliable Method for Monitoring Soil Moisture Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Sun L, R Sun, XW Li, SL Liang, and RH Zhang. 2012. "Monitoring surface soil moisture status based on remotely sensed surface temperature and vegetation index information." Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 166, doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2012.07.015. Shown here is the SGP Central Facility, where the most comprehensive instrument suite is hosted. Moisture trapped in soil provides water necessary for vegetation and crops, but how much of that moisture makes its way into the atmosphere and influences regional meteorology? The poor understanding of the role of soil

450

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: The QME AERI LBLRTM: A closure experiment for downwelling high spectral resolution infrared radiance. D.D. Turner, D.C. Tobin, S.A. Clough, P.D. Brown, R.G. Ellingson, E.J. Mlawer, R.O. Knuteson, H.E. Revercomb, T.R. Shippert, and W.L. Smith. 2004. Journal of Atmospheric Science, 61, 2657-2675. Top panels: Examples of downwelling infrared radiance observed by the AERI for two different clear sky cases with different amounts of water vapor. Bottom panels: Differences between the AERI observations and calculations

451

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed by ARM SWS Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Knyazikhin, Y., Boston University Chiu, J., University of Reading Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2009. "Spectral invariant behavior of zenith radiance around cloud edges observed by ARM SWS." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L16802, doi:10.1029/2009GL039366. (top) Time-wavelength color contour plot of ARM shortwave spectrometer (SWS) spectra measured from 21:35:24 to 21:40:24 UTC on 18 May 2007 at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in

452

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of a New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with Evaluation of a New Mixed-Phase Cloud Microphysics Parameterization with SCAM, CAPT Forecasts and M-PACE Observations Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, X., University of Wyoming Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Liu, X, S Xie, and SJ Ghan. 2007. "Evaluation of a new mixed-Phase cloud microphysics parameterization with the NCAR single column climate model (SCAM) and ARM M-PACE observations." Geophysical Research Letters 34, L23712, doi:10.1029/2007GL031446. Xie, S, J Boyle, SA Klein, X Liu and S Ghan. 2008. "Simulations of arctic mixed-phase clouds in forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research, in press.

453

NREL: Wind Research - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications The NREL wind research program develops publications about its R&D activities in wind energy technologies. Below you'll find links to recently published publications, links to the NREL Avian Literature and Publications Databases, and information about the Technical Library at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The NWTC's quarterly newsletter, @NWTC, contains articles on current wind energy research projects and highlights the latest reports, papers, articles, and events published or sponsored by NREL. Subscribe to @NWTC. Selected Publications Featured Publication Large-scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States: Assessment of Opportunities and Barriers Here are some selected NWTC publications: 2011 Cost of Wind Energy Review Built-Environment Wind Turbine Roadmap

454

CFN | Research Highlights Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center for Functional Nanomaterials Research Highlights Archives Center for Functional Nanomaterials Research Highlights Archives Measurement of Spin Torque Non-adiabaticity in Magnetic Vortices Tuesday, December 10, 2013 Thermopower of Highly Conducting Au-C Bonded Single-molecule Circuits Tuesday, October 22, 2013 Resolution Limits of Electron-beam Lithography Pushed Towards the Atomic Scale Tuesday, October 22, 2013 Polymer Solar Cells Employing Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Monday, August 19, 2013 Mesoscale Linear Assembly of Nanostructures Monday, July 8, 2013 Sub 15-nm Patterns for Magnetic Recording Using Block Copolymers Monday, July 8, 2013 Engineering Catalytic Contacts with Binary Nanocrystal Superlattices Sunday, April 7, 2013 Chemical Modification of Self-Assembled Block Copolymers for Area-Selective Formation of Metal Oxide Nanostructures

455

A pilot plant scale reactor/separator for ethanol from cellulosics. Quarterly report No. 1 & 2, October 1, 1997--March 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect

The basic objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a continuous, low energy process for the conversion of cellulosics to ethanol. This process involves a pretreatment step followed by enzymatic release of sugars and the consecutive saccharification/fermentation of cellulose (glucans) followed by hemi-cellulose (glucans) in a multi-stage continuous stirred reactor separator (CSRS). During year 1, pretreatment and bench scale fermentation trials will be performed to demonstrate and develop the process, and during year 2, a 130 L or larger process scale unit will be operated to demonstrate the process using straw or cornstalks. Co-sponsors of this project include the Indiana Biomass Grants Program, Bio-Process Innovation, Xylan Inc as a possible provider of pretreated biomass.

Dale, M.C.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Argonne CNM: 2007 Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Highlights 7 Highlights CNM Research Featured in Journal (November 2007) Heavier hydrogen on the atomic scale reduces friction (November 2007) High-performance, flexible nanotechnology hydrogen sensors (Nanowerk Spotlight, October 11, 2007) CNM Research Highlighted in Scientific Journal (September 2007) Researchers improve ability to write and store information on electronic devices (September 2007) Palladium Nanoparticle Electrodeposition on Nanotubes Results in New Flexible Hydrogen Sensors (August 2007) Nano-boric acid makes motor oil more slippery (August 2007) Nanotechnology helps scientists make bendy sensors for hydrogen vehicles (July 2007) Tightly Packed Molecules Lend Unexpected Strength to Nanothin Sheet of Material (July 2007) Getting the 'Hole' Picture Up Close (photonics.com, June 2007)

457

Research Focus  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Focus Work at FEERC is centered on three interrelated areas of research: fuels, engines, and emis- sions. FEERC scientists study the impacts of fuel properties on advanced combustion processes as well as on emissions and emission control strategies and devices. The range of fuels studied includes gaseous (natural gas) and liquid fuels from conventional and unconventional fossil- based sources, as well as non-petroleum fuels from synthetic and renewable sources. The FEERC conducts research on innovative internal combustion engine technologies and control systems for improved efficiency. Combining novel diagnostic and experimental methods with modeling, the Center's scientists also develop improved understanding of the functions and key mechanisms of emission control devices

458

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Classifying Cloud Phase Classifying Cloud Phase Download a printable PDF Submitter: Shupe, M., University of Colorado Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Shupe, MD. 2007. "A ground-based multisensory cloud phase classifier." Geophysical Research Letters 34, L22809, doi:10.1029/2007GL031008. Observations of (a) lidar backscatter, (b) lidar depolarization ratio, (c) radar reflectivity, (d) radar mean Doppler velocity, (e) radar Doppler spectrum width, (f) microwave radiometer-derived liquid water path, and (g) the resulting multisensor cloud-phase classification mask. Cloud phase identification is a necessary prerequisite to performing cloud property retrievals from remote sensor measurements. Most retrieval

459

Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Extreme Scale Computing, Co-design Informing system design, ensuring productive and efficient code Project Description To address the increasingly complex problems of the modern world, scientists at Los Alamos are pushing the scale of computing to the extreme, forming partnerships with other national laboratories and industry to develop supercomputers that can achieve "exaflop" speeds-that is, a quintillion (a million trillion) calculations per second. To put such speed in perspective, it is equivalent to 50 million laptops all working together at the same time. Researchers are also developing the interacting components of a computational system as a whole. This approach, known as computational co-design, may facilitate revolutionary designs in the next generation of supercomputers.

460

Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Turbine Design Cost Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model L. Fingersh, M. Hand, and A. Laxson Technical Report NREL/TP-500-40566 December 2006 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Wind Turbine Design Cost and Scaling Model L. Fingersh, M. Hand, and A. Laxson Prepared under Task No. WER6.0703 Technical Report NREL/TP-500-40566 December 2006 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bench scale research" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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461

Monetary Awards Scale  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MONETARY AWARDS SCALE FOR INTANGIBLE BENEFITS FROM MONETARY AWARDS SCALE FOR INTANGIBLE BENEFITS FROM SUGGESTIONS, INVENTIONS, SPECIAL ACTS OR SERVICES VALUE OF BENEFIT EXTENT OF APPLICATION Limited Affects functions, mission, or personnel of one office (e.g., field site office or one office within a HQ Departmental element). Affects a small area of science or technology. Extended Affects functions, mission, or personnel of a several field site offices or HQ office within a Departmental element (e.g., more than one). Affects an important area of science or technology. Broad Affects functions, mission, or personnel of an entire Departmental element or Departmental element with multiple site offices. Affects a broad area of science or technology. General Affects functions, mission, or personnel

462

VHF and UHF Doppler Radars as Tools for Synoptic Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applications of VHF and UHF Doppler radars to research in synoptic meteorology are reviewed. We find that these radars show great potential for studies of large scales, but the area of research where the instruments really excel is in studying ...

M. F. Larsen; J. Rttger

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff Our silicon group members have backgrounds in physics, chemistry, mathematics, materials science, and electrical engineering. Russell Bauer Howard Branz Sachit Grover Vincenzo LaSalvia Benjamin Lee William Nemeth Matt Page Lorenzo Roybal Pauls Stradins, (Acting Group Manager) Charles Teplin Qi Wang David Young Hao-Chih Yuan Photo of 21 people standing in front of a building with a silver, cylinder-shaped structure on one side. Photo of Pauls Stradins Pauls Stradins Senior Scientist II Group Manager Primary Research Interests High-efficiency silicon photovoltaics: advanced passivation techniques and industrially-relevant processes Interfacing Si cell with other materials for high-efficiency tandem Nanostructured semiconductor materials for photovoltaics: Si quantum

464

NREL: Continuum Magazine - The Utility-Scale Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility-Scale Future Utility-Scale Future Issue 1 Print Version Share this resource Continuum Magazine Dan Says New Facility to Transform U.S. Energy Infrastructure New Facility to Transform U.S. Energy Infrastructure The nation's electricity infrastructure needs an overhaul. NREL's newest research facility will lead the way. Wind Innovation Enables Utility-Scale Wind Innovation Enables Utility-Scale NREL research will enable wind energy to make major contributions to meeting the nation's electrical demand. Leading Solar Expertise-A Launch Pad to the Future Leading Solar Expertise- A Launch Pad to the Future NREL is speeding solar devices from the lab to utility-scale operation. Paint it Black: One-Step Etch Cuts Solar Cell Costs Paint It Black: One-Step Etch Cuts Solar Cell Costs NREL's technique provides the solar cell manufacturing industry with a

465

Field Research Challenge Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

466

Catalyzed steam gasification of biomass. Phase II. Final research report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wright-Malta gasification process is characterized by low-temperature, catalyzed steam gasification in a pressurized rotary kiln. Fresh biomass moves slowly and continuously through the kiln, where it is gradually heated to around 1200/sup 0/F in an atmosphere of 300 psi steam. During its traverse, pyrolysis and reaction of steam with the nascent char convert nearly all of the organic solids to the gaseous phase. The volatile pyrolysis products pass through the kiln co-currently with the solids and are similarly cracked and steam-reformed within the kiln to fixed gases. Heat for the gasification process is provided by sensible heat recovered from the product gas and the wood decomposition exotherm, making the process inherently very energy-efficient. This report summarizes the work done during the experimental, laboratory-scale phase of development of the W-M biomass gasification process. Two bench-scale experimental gasifiers were constructed and tested: the ''minikiln'', a batch-feed, rotating autoclave; and the ''biogasser'', a stationary, continuous-feed, tubular reactor with zone heating and auger transport. Studies were carried out in these reactors to determine the extent of conversion of biomass solids to gas, and the makeup of the product gas, over a wide range of process conditions. The process variables that were investigated included reactor pressure and temperature, catalyst type and concentration, moisture content and type of biomass feed.

Hooverman, R.H.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

ADVANCED VITRIFICATION SYSTEM (RIC AVS) RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this AVS testing program is to use bench-scale test equipment to produce a vitrified product at maximum waste loading from the specified AZ-101 waste simulant and conduct a TTT analysis using laboratory scale melts to show compliance with the DOE Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms (WAPS). The vitrified product complies with the following WAPS. A borosilicate glass with a waste loading of 60.9-wt% was produced from a slurry feed of AZ101 simulant. Glass durability testing, glass characterization testing, and testing methodology were performed in accordance with the Department of Energy approved Test Plan. The glass has two crystalline phases and good uniformity of composition. The Product Consistency Test on the 6 location-specific samples are at least 1 to 2 orders of magnitude below the mean PCT results for the EA glass. Standard deviations were less than 10% of measured values. The glass transition temperature averaged 658 {+-} 9 C. A TTT diagram was produced. There was measured cesium loss of about 2%, and compliance with the Universal Treatment Standards.

J.R. Powell; M. Reich

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

468

Advancing Global-and Continental-Scale Hydrometeorology: Contributions of GEWEX Hydrometeorology Panel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past 9 years, the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX), under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), has coordinated the activities of the Continental Scale Experiments (CSEs) and other related research ...

R. G. Lawford; R. Stewart; J. Roads; H-J. Isemer; M. Manton; J. Marengo; T. Yasunari; S. Benedict; T. Koike; S. Williams

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantifying the Impact of Dust on Ice Generation in Supercooled Stratiform Quantifying the Impact of Dust on Ice Generation in Supercooled Stratiform Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Wang, Z., University of Wyoming Zhang, D., University of Wyoming Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Zhang D, Z Wang, A Heymsfield, J Fan, D Liu, and M Zhao. 2012. "Quantifying the impact of dust on heterogeneous ice generation in midlevel supercooled stratiform clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 39, L18805, doi:10.1029/2012GL052831. An example of dusty MSSC: (a) CALIOP TAB profiles at 532nm; (b) CALIOP depolarization profiles at 532nm; (c) CloudSat CPR radar reflectivity profiles; (d) Identified dust layers and MSSC; (e) Global distribution of

470

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wide Angle Imaging Lidar: Active Optical Sensor Technology for Ground-Based Wide Angle Imaging Lidar: Active Optical Sensor Technology for Ground-Based Probing of Dense Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Davis, A. B., Jet Propulsion Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Davis, AB. 2008. "Multiple-scattering lidar from both sides of the clouds: Addressing internal structure." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D14S10, doi:10.1029/2007JD009666. Figure 1. Lidar observations of a dense cloud. Left: standard (single-scattering/on-beam) lidar. Right: multiple-scattering/off-beam lidar. Note the extreme narrowness of the FOV in the standard case, as is required to restrict as much as possible the signal to a single backscatter. Also note the weak penetration, O(1) MFP, of the two-way

471

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Mitchell, D.L., A.J. Baran, W.P. Arnott, C. Schmitt, 2006: Testing and comparing the anomalous diffraction approximation. J. Atmos. Sci., 63, 2948-2962. Comparison of MADA and T-matrix with measured Qext. Regions without data were contaminated by water vapor or CO2 absorption. MADA and T-matrix calculations are based on the measured PSD of hexagonal columns having an effective diameter of 14 microns. Comparison of the PSD weighted Qabs predicted by FDTD and MADA for a tunneling efficiency corresponding to aggregates. Cirrus clouds play a large role in the Earth's radiation budget and the way

472

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vertical Variation of Cloud Droplet Size Using Ship and Space-borne R/S Vertical Variation of Cloud Droplet Size Using Ship and Space-borne R/S Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Chen, R., University of Maryland Wood, R., University of Washington Chang, F., Science Systems and Applications, Inc. Ferraro, R., NOAA/NESDIS, WWBG Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Chen, R, R Wood, Z Li, R Ferraro, and F Chang. 2008. "Studying the vertical variation of cloud droplet effective radius using ship and space-borne remote sensing data." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, doi:10.1029/2007JD009596. Figure 1. Coincident images of C-band radar reflectivity and MODIS cloud profile at UTC 15:55, Oct. 18, 2001. a) RHB C-band radar reflectivity

473

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Long, CN, and DD Turner. 2008. "A method for continuous estimation of clear-sky downwelling longwave radiative flux developed using ARM surface measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D18206, doi:10.1029/2008JD009936. Comparison of clear-sky RT model calculations (black) and our estimates (gray) with detected LW effective clear-sky measurements from the ACRF SGP site from 1 March through 31 May 2003, showing that our LW estimates do as well as detailed model calculations in comparison with actual LW

474

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models Progress in Understanding Water Vapor's Role in Models Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Time-height cross sections of water vapor mixing ratio, which is observed directly by the ARM Raman lidar at 10-min and approximately 100 m resolution, and relative humidity for 29 November through 2 December 2002. The bottom panel shows the comparison of the precipitable water vapor observed by the Raman lidar and the collocated microwave radiometer. The time-height cross sections, as well as the integrated field, show the large variability in water vapor that exists over the ARM Southern Great Plains site. After years of sustained research efforts into the accuracy of atmospheric

475

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM M-PACE Data Used to Evaluate and Improve Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds ARM M-PACE Data Used to Evaluate and Improve Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Simulated in Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S, J Boyle, SA Klein, X Liu, and S Ghan. 2008. "Simulations of Arctic mixed-phase clouds in forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D04211, doi:10.1029/2007JD009225. Time-height cross sections of active remote sensing cloud layer (ARSCL) cloud frequency (a) and modeled cloud fraction (b) CAM3, (c) AM2, and (d) CAM3LIU at Barrow during M-PACE. The unit is %. Liquid fraction as a function of cloud height. (a) UND citation data, (b)

476

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus How Aerosols Affect Cloud Properties in Arctic Mixed-Phase Stratocumulus Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Jackson RC, GM McFarquhar, AV Korolev, ME Earle, PS Liu, RP Lawson, S Brooks, M Wolde, A Laskin, and M Freer. 2012. "The dependence of ice microphysics on aerosol concentration in arctic mixed-phase stratus clouds during ISDAC and M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, D15207, doi:10.1029/2012JD017668. Cloud mean ice crystal concentration Nice(D ≥ 50 micrometers) versus mean aerosol concentration (NPCASP) above cloud for all 41 vertical profiles