Sample records for belarus cr coral

  1. Coral contact dermatitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jefferson, Julie; Thompson, Curtis; Hinshaw, Molly; Rich, Phoebe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    skin reaction to Red Sea coral injury showing superficial11736921] 5. Addy JH. Red sea coral contact dermatitis. Inthypersensitivity reaction to coral. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2005

  2. Microbial diversity and transcriptome profiling in coral holobionts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sunagawa, Shinichi

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Corals as Threatened Bacterial Habitats 2.11.2.3 Coral bleachingand coral diseases . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  3. Degradation and recovery of Caribbean coral reefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paredes, Gustavo Adolfo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Causes of coral reef degradation: Response. Science, 302,E. (2008) Baselines and Degradation of Coral Reefs in theCauses of coral reef degradation - Response. Science, 302,

  4. Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardt, Marah Justine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tissue biomass of common Caribbean reef corals. xv VITAJackson, JBC. “Structure of Caribbean coral reef communitiesHuman impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems by Marah

  5. Competition between coral and algal holobionts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barott, Katie Lynn

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    al. Baselines and degradation of coral reefs in the northernfish communities ameliorate coral disease. PNAS. 2009; 106(changing trophic structures on coral reefs. In: Dubinsky Z,

  6. Linking coral reef health and human welfare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Sheila Marie

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Baselines and degradation of coral reefs in the northernBaselines and degradation of coral reefs in the northern2006) Fisheries Resources: Coral ReefFishes. Solomon Islands

  7. Human impacts on Caribbean coral reef ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardt, Marah Justine

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    359. Sheppard,CRC (1982) Coral populations on reef slopesin text. Benthic Groups Coral Acropora cervicornis Acroporatube Non Living Sand Dead coral Bare Urchins Echinometra

  8. The ecology of coral-microbe interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marhaver, Kristen Laura

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antagonistic interactions among coral- associated bacteria.of a scleractinian coral in response to microbial biofilms.impacts, and the resilience of coral reefs. Science 301:929-

  9. "We will die and become science" : the production of invisibility and public knowledge about Chernobyl radiation effects in Belarus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuchinskaya, Olga

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    16 let spustya [Life after Chernobyl: 16 years later]. 2002.Press. Belarus and Chernobyl: The Second Decade. 1998. Ed.Alexievich, S. 1997. Chernobyl’skaya molitva. Hronika

  10. Pennsylvanian lophophyllidid corals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffords, Russell M.

    1947-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    of carborundum powder and water. Theaddition of liquid soap or glycerine to the mixture aids appreciably in keeping the powder in suspen-sion during sawing. A thin-bladed diamond saw was used for several dozen corals. The band saw is moresatisfactory... of carborundum powder and water. Theaddition of liquid soap or glycerine to the mixture aids appreciably in keeping the powder in suspen-sion during sawing. A thin-bladed diamond saw was used for several dozen corals. The band saw is moresatisfactory...

  11. Degradation and recovery of Caribbean coral reefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paredes, Gustavo Adolfo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the long-term decline of coral reef ecosystems. Science,E. 2005. Ecology - Are US coral reefs on the slippery slopeAndrefouet, H. M. Guzman, Coral Reefs 24, 31 (2005). N. G.

  12. Dynamics of the radiation situation on the territory of the Republic of Belarus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matveyenko, I.I.; Zhukova, O.M. [Republic Centre of Radiation and Environment Monitoring, Minsk (Belarus). Belarus State Dept. for Hydrometerology

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines the environmental contamination in Belarus before the Chernobyl accident and after it. The soil concentration was determined for iodine-131 in 1986, cerium-144 in 1986, and cesium-137 in 1993. Surface water contamination was determined for cesium-137 from 1987-1991. The vertical migration of cesium 137 was determined in soil.

  13. Microbes versus fish : the bioenergetics of coral reef systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDole, Tracey Shannon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    versus Fish: The Bioenergetics of Coral Reef Systems Aversus Fish: The Bioenergetics of Coral Reef Systems bywas to investigate the bioenergetics of coral reef systems

  14. Historical change in coral reef communities in Caribbean Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cramer, Katie Lynn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    persistence interrupted in Caribbean coral reefs. EcologyJBC. Ecological change on Caribbean coral reefs before coraland extinctions in the Caribbean reef-coral fauna. In

  15. Molecules and fossils reveal punctuated diversification in Caribbean "faviid" corals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Sonja A; Budd, Ann F; Carlon, David B

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Caribbean “faviid” corals. BMC Evolutionary Biology 2012data for all individual corals. Samples and multilocusIs Concentrated at the Edge of Coral Species Distributions.

  16. Microbial responses and coral reef resilience to organic matter inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garren, Melissa Sara

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Antagonistic interactions among coral-associated bacteria.environmental drivers of coral communities at Palmyra Atoll:growth rates, and primary production made in coral reef

  17. Blanchard Cr JohnsonGulch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirt yfaceCr Sheep Cr Essex Cr Dic key Cr Paola Cr Cr ystalCr Deerlick Cr Howe Cr M id dle Fork FlatheadRiver Mid dle Fork Bowl C r So u th Fork Scalp Cr West Fork WhistlerCr GraniteCr DodgeCr Flathea d

  18. Coral Reef Genomics: Developing tools for functional genomics of coral symbiosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarz, Jodi; Brokstein, Peter; Manohar, Chitra; Coffroth, Mary Alice; Szmant, Alina; Medina, Monica

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and P.W. Glynn. 2004. Corals’ adaptive response to climate430: 741. Brown, B.E. 1997. Coral bleaching: causes andconsequences. Coral Reefs 16: 129-138 Chalker, B. E. and D.

  19. Coral calcification : insights from inorganic experiments and coral responses to environmental variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holcomb, Michael (Michael C.)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanisms involved in the formation of coral skeletons are examined using a laboratory model for coral calcification and the growth of living corals under different environmental conditions. Abiogenic aragonite was ...

  20. Coral Reef Genomics: Developing tools for functional genomics of coral symbiosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarz, Jodi; Brokstein, Peter; Manohar, Chitra; Coffroth, Mary Alice; Szmant, Alina; Medina, Monica

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coral Reef Genomics: Developing toolsfor functional genomics of coral symbiosis Jodi SCHWARZ 1 ,symbiosis functional genomics cDNA microarray ABSTRACT

  1. arctic soft coral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the surroundings. Keywords Artificial reefs ? Coral reefs ? Biodiversity ? Multivariate analysis ? Red Sea Introduction Coral reefs worldwide Benayahu, Yehuda 10...

  2. Degradation and recovery of Caribbean coral reefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paredes, Gustavo Adolfo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    54th Annual Gulf and Caribbean Fisheries Institute, Cancun,Jackson. 2006. Structure of Caribbean coral reef communities86, 2055-2060 Munro J.L. (1983) Caribbean coral reef fishery

  3. The ecology of coral-microbe interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marhaver, Kristen Laura

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    algal symbioses. Molecular Ecology 18:1823-1833. Webster, N.F. Rohwer. 2008. Microbial ecology of four coral atolls inin Caribbean coral reefs. Ecology Letters 9:818-826. Porter,

  4. CORAL Name: STS 1 Model Number: ICP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    CORAL Name: STS 1 Model Number: ICP Location: TRL What it does: Deep Silicon Etch Introduction prior to use and to ENGAGE MACHINE prior to starting your process in CORAL. Venting and Loading a Wafer

  5. CORAL Name: STS 2 Model Number: ICP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    CORAL Name: STS 2 Model Number: ICP Location: TRL Introduction: The ST Systems Multiplex ICP tool prior to starting your process in CORAL. Loading a Wafer: The wafer is loaded into the system using of the tool. #12;If there are any issues with the tool post a comment in CORAL and contact Donal 2-2983. #12;

  6. PLASMAQUEST STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE CORAL Name: Plasmaquest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    PLASMAQUEST STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE CORAL Name: Plasmaquest Model Number: 145 Location: TRL. PROCEDURE: Check reservations in CORAL to insure that you reserved the correct machine in the correct, if this is the case. `Engage' the machine in CORAL for the equipment that you are about to use; use this command

  7. CORAL Server and CORAL Server Proxy: Scalable Access to Relational Databases from CORAL Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valassi, A.; /CERN; Bartoldus, R.; /SLAC; Kalkhof, A.; /CERN; Salnikov, A.; /SLAC; Wache, M.; /Mainz U., Inst. Phys.

    2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The CORAL software is widely used at CERN by the LHC experiments to access the data they store on relational databases, such as Oracle. Two new components have recently been added to implement a model involving a middle tier 'CORAL server' deployed close to the database and a tree of 'CORAL server proxies', providing data caching and multiplexing, deployed close to the client. A first implementation of the two new components, released in the summer 2009, is now deployed in the ATLAS online system to read the data needed by the High Level Trigger, allowing the configuration of a farm of several thousand processes. This paper reviews the architecture of the software, its development status and its usage in ATLAS.

  8. Climate controls on coral growth in the Caribbean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosshart, Sara A. (Sara Allison)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate predictions of Caribbean coral reef responses to global climate change are currently limited by a lack of knowledge of the dominant environmental controls on coral growth. Corals exhibit significant responses to ...

  9. Early Bomb Radiocarbon Detected in Palau Archipelago Corals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glynn, Danielle; Druffel, Ellen; Griffin, Sheila; Dunbar, R. B.; Osbourne, M.; Sanchez-Cabeza, J.-A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by a high-resolution coral ? 14 C record. Journal of Geo-con- sistent calibrations of coral proxy records from Palau,Radiocarbon in annual coral rings of Florida. Geophysical

  10. Microbes versus fish : the bioenergetics of coral reef systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDole, Tracey Shannon

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P. , et al. 2012 Assessing Coral Reefs on a Pacific-WideAssessing evidence of phase shifts from coral to macroalgaldominance on coral reefs. Ecology 90, 1478–1484. 17. Kelly,

  11. Fish, fishing, diving and the management of coral reefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Ayana Elizabeth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010) Reducing bycatch in coral reef trap fisheries: escape2010) Release of eggs from tentacles in a Caribbean coral.Coral Reefs 29(2): 411. West, J. , Julius, S. , Kareiva,

  12. Are mangroves a limiting resource for two coral reef fishes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halpern, B S

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of reef fish. Proc 6th Int Coral Reef Symp 1:149–155 Wilsona limiting resource for two coral reef fishes? Benjamin S.of adult populations of 2 coral reef fish species (the

  13. Vortical ciliary flows actively enhance mass transport in reef corals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Orr H.

    The exchange of nutrients and dissolved gasses between corals and their environment is a critical determinant of the growth of coral colonies and the productivity of coral reefs. To date, this exchange has been assumed to ...

  14.  EARLY BOMB RADIOCARBON DETECTED IN PALAU ARCHIPELAGO CORALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glynn, Danielle S; Druffel, Ellen R.M.; Griffin, Sheila; Dunbar, Robert; Osborne, Michael; Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan Albert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by a high-resolution coral ? 14 C record. Journal of Geo-con- sistent calibrations of coral proxy records from Palau,Radiocarbon in annual coral rings of Florida. Geophysical

  15. Ecological significance of bacteria associated with coral reef fish feces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smriga, Steven Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assemblages associated with coral reef fish guts and feces.and their effect on coral reef microbes. EnvironmentalMicrobial ecology of four coral atolls in the Northern Line

  16. Historical change in coral reef communities in Caribbean Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cramer, Katie Lynn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in threatened staghorn corals. PLoS ONE 3:e3718. doi:interrupted in Caribbean coral reefs. Ecology Letters 9(7):scale patterns in Pleistocene coral reef communities. In

  17. Systematics of merulinidae (Scleractinia) and conservation phylogenetics of reef corals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Danwei; Huang, Danwei

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One-third of reef-building corals face elevated extinctionand the resilience of coral reefs. Science, 301, 929–933.of Indo-Pacific reef corals. Journal of Biogeography, 19,

  18. Brevard shrimpers: Coral plan could

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    in the coffin of the commercial fishing industry in #12;Port Canaveral," said Laurilee Thompson, owner of Dixie Crossroads Seafood Restaurant in Titusville. Shrimpers don't fish in the area where the coral is. Fishing for or possessing rock shrimp is prohibited within the current closed area, which runs from about

  19. Coral reef microbes : : the influences of benthic primary producers, nutrient availability, and anthropogenic stressors on community structure and metabolism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Linda Ellen Wegley

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analysis of stressed coral holobionts. Environmentalgenes associated with corals. Applied & Environmentalwith reef-building corals. Environmental Microbiology 6 (

  20. 2. GENERAL BACKGROUND ON CORALS AND CORAL REEFS 2.1 Taxonomy and Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 2. GENERAL BACKGROUND ON CORALS AND CORAL REEFS 2.1 Taxonomy and Distribution 2.1.1 Taxonomy or the differentiation of gene pools when identifying and categorizing organisms in the ocean. Rather, classical taxonomy

  1. Stealthy slugs and communicating corals: polyp withdrawal by an aggregating soft coral in response to injured neighbors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard, JHR

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    capture rates of a soft coral: advantages of being a smallin a temperate soft coral. Ecology, 72: 1849–1866. McFadden,in the clonal soft coral, Alcyonium rudyi. Evolution, 51:

  2. Blanchard Cr West Fk Clearwater R

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirt yfaceCr Sheep Cr Essex Cr Dick ey Cr Paola Cr Cry stalCr Deerlick Cr Howe Cr M id dle Fork FlatheadRiver Mid dle Fork Bowl Cr So u th Fork Scalp Cr West Fork WhistlerCr GraniteCr DodgeCr Flathead

  3. Lipid biomarkers of coral stress : calibration and exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneeland, Jessie M. (Jessie Mary)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corals are increasingly threatened by warming sea surface temperatures and other anthropogenic changes. The delicate symbiosis between corals and their algal endosymbionts (zooxanthellae) is easily disrupted by thermal ...

  4. Press Materials for Argonne CORAL announcement | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Press Materials for Argonne CORAL announcement Under the joint Collaboration of Oak Ridge, Argonne, and Lawrence Livermore (CORAL) initiative, the U.S. Department of Energy...

  5. Abundance and distribution of nocturnal fishes over a coral reef during the night

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holzman, Roi; Ohavia, Moty; Vaknin, Royi; Genin, Amatzia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    nocturnal fishes over a coral reef during the night Authors:nocturnal fishes Abstract Coral reefs are characterized byand reproduction of coral reefs inhabitants. Despite the

  6. Coral fluorescence and symbiosis : photoacclimation, thermal shock, life history changes, and implications for reef monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roth, Melissa Susan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diversity and evolution of coral fluorescent proteins. PLoSB. (2008). Climate change and coral reef bleaching: Anpigment in reef-building corals. Mar. Ecol. Prog. Ser. 364,

  7. Seasonal radiocarbon and oxygen isotopes in a Galapagos coral: Calibration with climate indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druffel, Ellen R. M; Griffin, Sheila; Glynn, Danielle S; Dunbar, Robert B; Mucciarone, David A; Toggweiler, J. Robert

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stable isotopes in Palmyra corals during the past century,radiocarbon content of corals from the Galapagos Islands,1981), Radiocarbon in annual coral rings from the eastern

  8. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9346-0 Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Managementactions. Habitats such as coral reefs are especiallyissue of cli- mate change, coral reef resilience, and marine

  9. Rapid Evolution of Coral Proteins Responsible for Interaction with the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voolstra, Christian R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dinoflagellates: A determinant of coral bleaching. Proc NatlO (1999) Climate change, coral bleaching and the futureof the world’s coral reefs. Marine and Freshwater Research

  10. Radiocarbon in annual coral rings from the eastern Tropical Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druffel, Ellen M

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. Buddemeier and S. V. Smith, Coral chronometers: SeasonalLinick, Radiocarbon in annual coral rings and con- stitutedgraphic studies of reef coral exoskeletons, J. Exp. Mar.

  11. Decadal timescale shift in the 14C record of a central equatorial Pacific coral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grottoli, A; Gille, S; Druffel, Ellen R M; Dunbar, R

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    South-Central Pacific coral records. Geophysical Research1981. Radiocarbon in annual coral rings from the easterntemperature from banded coral records: implications for the

  12. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSantis, Todd

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico. More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/02/02/coral-reefs/

  13. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    DeSantis, Todd

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico. More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2009/02/02/coral-reefs/

  14. Regional calibration of coral-based climate reconstructions from Palau, West Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, Michael C; Dunbar, Robert B; Mucciarone, David A; Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert; Druffel, Ellen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for assistance with coral drilling as well as Captain Jimabout coral drilling targets as well as temperature logger

  15. Temperature calibration of Gulf of Mexico corals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jennifer Mae

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for measurement of extension, density, and isotopes ([]¹?O, []¹³C). The coral oxygen isotope signature was calibrated against high-resolution daily temperature and salinity data sets spanning 1990-1997. Coralline estimates of water temperature demonstrate only...

  16. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd DeSantis

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico.

  17. PhyloChip Tackles Coral Disease

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Todd DeSantis

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists at Berkeley Lab and the University of California, Merced are using an innovative DNA array developed at Berkeley Lab to catalog the microbes that live among coral in the tropical waters off the coast of Puerto Rico.

  18. Historical change in coral reef communities in Caribbean Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cramer, Katie Lynn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reef corals: A tracer of oil pollution in Panama. Ambio 25:chronic oil, heavy metal, and mercury pollution, that have

  19. Remote Sensing of Western-Caribbean Coral Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Remote Sensing of Western-Caribbean Coral Communities Introduction: Despite the fact that coral. Remote sensing has been suggested as a potential tool for monitoring the spatial extent, health the Spectral Reflectance of Corals In-Situ. GIScience and Remote Sensing. Maeder, J., Narumalani, S., Rundquist

  20. Implementation of the CORAL Deductive Database System Raghu Ramakrishnan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudarshan, S.

    Implementation of the CORAL Deductive Database System Raghu Ramakrishnan Univ. of Wisconsin Seshadri Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison Abstract CORAL is a deductive database system that provides a modu- lar, declarative query language/programming language. CORAL is a deductive system that supports a rich

  1. Digital Moorea Cyberinfrastructure for Coral Reef Tony Fountain #1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    Digital Moorea Cyberinfrastructure for Coral Reef Monitoring Tony Fountain #1 , Sameer Tilak #2 of a coral reef ecosystem instrumented with real-time sensors connected to high-performance backend resources to reality at the Moorea Coral Reef site (MCR LTER, www.mcr.lternet.edu) of the U.S. National Science

  2. Implementation of the CORAL Deductive Database System \\Lambda Raghu Ramakrishnan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudarshan, S.

    Implementation of the CORAL Deductive Database System \\Lambda Raghu Ramakrishnan Univ. of Wisconsin Seshadri Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison Abstract CORAL is a deductive database system that provides a modu­ lar, declarative query language/programming language. CORAL is a deductive system that supports a rich

  3. ACOEL on CORAL A COmponent Requirement and Abstraction Language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leavens, Gary T.

    ACOEL on CORAL A COmponent Requirement and Abstraction Language An Extended Abstract Vugranam C. Sreedhar IBM TJ Watson Research Center Hawthorne, NY 10532 sreedhar@watson.ibm.com ABSTRACT CORAL is a language for specifying properties of ACOEL, a component-oriented extensional language. The design of CORAL

  4. Unsupervised Learning of Terrain Appearance for Automated Coral Reef Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Gregory

    Unsupervised Learning of Terrain Appearance for Automated Coral Reef Exploration Philippe Giguere above a coral reef, without the need to maintain pose estimates. We tested the technique in simulation autonomously above a coral reef during a 20 minutes period. 1. Introduction Underwater marine environments

  5. Near-surface enrichment of zooplankton over a shallow back reef: implications for coral reef food webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alldredge, A. L.; King, J. M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distribution and grazing near coral reefs. Limnol Oceanogrbottom depletion of zooplankton over coral reefs: I. diurnaland size distribution. Coral Reefs 24:75–85 Yen J, Rasberry

  6. An integrated cyberinfrastructure for real-time data acquisition and decision making in smart buildings and coral reef monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shin, Peter Hongsuck

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6.2 Coral reef monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .This figure illustrates the coral reef monitoring systemMCR09] Moorea Coral Reef (MCR) Long Term Ecological

  7. Coral Health and Disease: A Comparison of Cook's and Opunohu Bays in Mo'orea,French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shea, Alessandra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lagoon  on  New  Caledonia.   Coral  Reef  Initiatives  for Predictive  Modeling  of  Coral  Disease  Distribution natural  disturbances  on  coral  assemblages  in  French 

  8. A comparative study of Scleractinian coral diversity in Mo'orea, French Polynesia, and the Great Barrier Reef, Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title, Alexandra C

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plot showing Scleractinian coral species at Temae asa proportion of total hard coral cover, ranked from mostthe structure of fish and coral communities at Tiahura Reef,

  9. CORAL HEALTH AND DISEASE: A COMPARISON OF COOK’S AND ‘OPUNOHU BAYS IN MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shea, Alessandra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictive  Modeling  of  Coral  Disease  Distribution Baseline levels of coral disease  in  the  northwestern 2011.   Patterns  of  Coral  Disease  across  Hawaiian 

  10. Century-scale Records of Coral Growth and Water Quality from the Mesoamerican Reef Reveal Increasing Anthropogenic Stress and Decreasing Coral Resilience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carilli, Jessica E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12 Figure 1-4. Drilling a coral core inX-radiographs of various coral cores showing the differentReef with locations of coral collections as black

  11. A survey of mushroom corals and the effects of water flow on sediment removal in Fungia species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginsberg, Benjamin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior of mushroom corals.  Coral Reefs  Gilmour J.  P.  recruitment of mushroom corals  contributes little to of Body Size  in Mushroom Corals (Scleractinia  Fungiidae) 

  12. The threatened Atlantic elkhorn coral, Acropora palmata : population dynamics and their policy implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardi, Tali

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clarke, editors. The State of Coral Reef Ecosystems of theC. 1997. Reefs since Columbus. Coral Reefs 16 (suppl. ):S23-1989. Modification of coral reef zonation by terrigenous

  13. Radiocarbon in the Weddell Sea as observed in a deep-sea coral and in Krill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Robert L; Druffel, Ellen M

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    isotopic growth record in a reef coral from the Florida keysand a deep-sea coral from Blake Plateau, Science, thelower Suess. in banded corals: Conclusions Weddell of meters

  14. Spatial and temporal variability of internal wave forcing on a coral reef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leichter, James J; Deane, G B; Stokes, M D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    19–31. Brown, B. E. , 1997: Coral bleaching: Causes andconsequences. Coral Reefs, 16, S129–S138. Cacchione, D. A. ,waves on a Florida (USA) coral reef: A plankton pump at

  15. Oceanographic Controls on Coral Reef Habitats in Present and Future Climates /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Lauren Amelia

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kilometer-wide variation in coral reef communities. MarineJA and Yates KK (2009) Coral reefs and ocean acidification.impacts, and global change on coral reefs. PLoS biology 6(

  16. Regional calibration of coral-based climate reconstructions from Palau, West Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, Michael C; Dunbar, Robert B; Mucciarone, David A; Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert; Druffel, Ellen

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M. , 2001. El Niño related coral bleaching in Palau, WesternCaroline Islands. Coral Reefs 20, 127–136. Carton, J.A. ,of tropical paleoclimates from corals. Quaternary Science

  17. FRESHWATER RUNOFF EFFECTS ON THE DIVERSITY AND COLONIZATION OF CORAL RUBBLE-INHABITING CRUSTACEAN MICROCOMMUNITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Nicholas K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tus and conservation of South Pacif ic coral reefs. Proc.5th int. Coral Reef Congr. 6:509-513 Erdmann MV, Caldwell RLthe Seventh International Coral Reefs Symposium, Guam, 1992

  18. The recovery of coral genetic diversity in the Sunda Strait following the 1883 eruption of Krakatau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Starger, C. J.; Barber, P. H.; Ambariyanto,; Baker, A. C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coral Reefs (2010) 29:547–565 DOI 10.1007/s00338-0609-2 REPORT The recovery of coral genetic diversity in thein two reef-building corals, Pocillopora damicornis and

  19. Oceanic climate and circulation changes during the past four centuries from radiocarbon in corals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druffel, Ellen R. M; Griffin, Sheila; Beaupré, Steven R; Dunbar, Robert B

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    signal in a 335-year coral record from New Caledonia,1981), Radiocarbon in annual coral rings from the east- ernthe 1760s in monthly corals from the Gala´pagos Islands,

  20. The Threatened Atlantic Elkhorn Coral, Acropora palmata: Population Dynamics and Their Policy Implications.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardi, Tali

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005. Ecology. Are U.S. coral reefs on the slippery slope to2006. Indirect effects of algae on coral: Algae- mediated,microbe-induced coral mortality. Ecology Letters 9:835-845.

  1. Mass Spectrometric 14C and U-Th Measurements in Coral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burr, G S; Edwards, R L; Donahue, D J; Druffel, Ellen R M; Taylor, F W

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C AND U-Th MEASUREMENTS IN CORAL G. S. BURR', R. L.Th and “C measurements in coral. Samples with U-Th dates inU-Th ages from Barbados corals. Nature 345: 405-410. Bard,

  2. Temescal FC-2000 Electron Beam Evaporator CORAL NAME = EbeamFP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    Temescal FC-2000 Electron Beam Evaporator CORAL NAME = EbeamFP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE immediately, via CORAL. Operating the System 1. Engage the machine in Coral 2. From the Monitor's main Screen

  3. Community Structure, Ciculation and Seawater pH in a Coral Reef Ecosystem (Moorea, French Polynesia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frei, Olivier

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a mesocosm investigation. Coral Reefs 27:473-483. Kawahata,Suzuki, and K. Goto. 1997. Coral reef ecosystems as a sourceof surface waters. Coral Reefs 16:261-266. McNeil, B. I. and

  4. Acute effects of removing large fish from a near-pristine coral reef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wsh from a near-pristine coral reef Douglas J. McCauley ·other benthic growth (excluding corals). Asterisks mark thelarge Wsh from a near-pristine coral reef at Palmyra Atoll,

  5. Coral records of central tropical Pacific radiocarbon variability during the last millennium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radio- carbon in annual coral rings of Florida, Geo- phys.2007), A review of modern coral d 18 O and D 14 C proxyof the radiocarbon of corals from the Galapagos Islands,

  6. Low reservoir ages for the surface ocean from mid-Holocene Florida corals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Druffel, Ellen R. M; Robinson, Laura F; Griffin, Sheila; Halley, Robert B; Southon, John R; Adkins, Jess F

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Druffel, E. M. (1982), Banded corals: Changes in oceanic 14Radio- carbon in annual coral rings of Florida, Geo- phys.Radiocarbon in annual coral rings of Belize and Florida,

  7. Coral records of central tropical Pacific radiocarbon variability during the last millennium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2007), A review of modern coral d 18 O and D 14 C proxyof the radiocarbon of corals from the Galapagos Islands,and U?Th measure- ments in coral, Radiocarbon, 34, 611–618.

  8. Texture and Color Distribution-basedTexture and Color Distribution-based Classification for Live Coral DetectionClassification for Live Coral Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stough, Joshua

    Coral DetectionClassification for Live Coral Detection Joshua V. Stough, Lisa Greer, Matt BensonJoshua V, ... · Coral benthic studiesCoral benthic studies ­ NCC/LBP with NN ­NCC/LBP with NN ­ [Marcos et al., Optics

  9. Coral records of central tropical Pacific radiocarbon variability during the last millennium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and B. Lazar (2000), Diagenesis in live corals from the Gulf2001), Early marine diagenesis in corals and geochemicalafter moderate to severe diagenesis for these relatively

  10. Coral records of central tropical Pacific radiocarbon variability during the last millennium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and B. Lazar (2000), Diagenesis in live corals from the Gulf2001), Early marine diagenesis in corals and geochemicalafter moderate to severe diagenesis for these relatively

  11. Molecules and fossils reveal punctuated diversification in Caribbean "faviid" corals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Sonja A; Budd, Ann F; Carlon, David B

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    punctuated diversification in Caribbean “faviid” corals. BMCRanges of the Fossil Caribbean Faviidae. Compiled firstand notes for all Caribbean fossil faviid species. Competing

  12. Patterns of coral recruitment at the East Flower Garden Bank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baggett, Larry Scott

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the continental shelf than on the mid-shelf. Rogers et al. (1984) studied coral recruitment patterns at four different depths at Salt River submarine canyon, St. Croix, U. S. Virgin Islands by ~tion of coral settling plates along with reef gd t. th lych h ttld...~1 ~ t SO 150 1. 00 0. 50 0. 00 Spu 5 5 Fo ll ~stM ol E*paaU Figure 2b. Distribution of type II coral spat by quarter and plate disposition for arrays A and B. Table 5. ~ number of coral spat by season aggregated over dispositions for each...

  13. Measurement and comparison of individual external doses of high-school students living in Japan, France, Poland and Belarus -- the "D-shuttle" project --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adachi, N; Adjovi, Y; Aida, K; Akamatsu, H; Akiyama, S; Akli, A; Ando, A; Andrault, T; Antonietti, H; Anzai, S; Arkoun, G; Avenoso, C; Ayrault, D; Banasiewicz, M; Bana?kiewicz, M; Bernandini, L; Bernard, E; Berthet, E; Blanchard, M; Boreyko, D; Boros, K; Charron, S; Cornette, P; Czerkas, K; Dameron, M; Date, I; De Pontbriand, M; Demangeau, F; Dobaczewski, ?; Dobrzy?ski, L; Ducouret, A; Dziedzic, M; Ecalle, A; Edon, V; Endo, K; Endo, T; Endo, Y; Etryk, D; Fabiszewska, M; Fang, S; Fauchier, D; Felici, F; Fujiwara, Y; Gardais, C; Gaul, W; Guérin, L; Hakoda, R; Hamamatsu, I; Handa, K; Haneda, H; Hara, T; Hashimoto, M; Hashimoto, T; Hashimoto, K; Hata, D; Hattori, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, R; Higasi, H; Hiruta, M; Honda, A; Horikawa, Y; Horiuchi, H; Hozumi, Y; Ide, M; Ihara, S; Ikoma, T; Inohara, Y; Itazu, M; Ito, A; Janvrin, J; Jout, I; Kanda, H; Kanemori, G; Kanno, M; Kanomata, N; Kato, T; Kato, S; Katsu, J; Kawasaki, Y; Kikuchi, K; Kilian, P; Kimura, N; Kiya, M; Klepuszewski, M; Kluchnikov, E; Kodama, Y; Kokubun, R; Konishi, F; Konno, A; Kontsevoy, V; Koori, A; Koutaka, A; Kowol, A; Koyama, Y; Kozio?, M; Kozue, M; Kravtchenko, O; Krucza?a, W; Kud?a, M; Kudo, H; Kumagai, R; Kurogome, K; Kurosu, A; Kuse, M; Lacombe, A; Lefaillet, E; Magara, M; Malinowska, J; Malinowski, M; Maroselli, V; Masui, Y; Matsukawa, K; Matsuya, K; Matusik, B; Maulny, M; Mazur, P; Miyake, C; Miyamoto, Y; Miyata, K; Miyata, K; Miyazaki, M; Mol?da, M; Morioka, T; Morita, E; Muto, K; Nadamoto, H; Nadzikiewicz, M; Nagashima, K; Nakade, M; Nakayama, C; Nakazawa, H; Nihei, Y; Nikul, R; Niwa, S; Niwa, O; Nogi, M; Nomura, K; Ogata, D; Ohguchi, H; Ohno, J; Okabe, M; Okada, M; Okada, Y; Omi, N; Onodera, H; Onodera, K; Ooki, S; Oonishi, K; Oonuma, H; Ooshima, H; Oouchi, H; Orsucci, M; Paoli, M; Penaud, M; Perdrisot, C; Petit, M; Piskowski, A; P?ocharski, A; Polis, A; Polti, L; Potsepnia, T; Przybylski, D; Pytel, M; Quillet, W; Remy, A; Robert, C; Sadowski, M; Saito, M; Sakuma, D; Sano, K; Sasaki, Y; Sato, N; Schneider, T; Schneider, C; Schwartzman, K; Selivanov, E; Sezaki, M; Shiroishi, K; Shustava, I; ?nieci?ska, A; Stalchenko, E; Staro?, A; Stromboni, M; Studzi?ska, W; Sugisaki, H; Sukegawa, T; Sumida, M; Suzuki, Y; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, R; Suzuki, H; Suzuki, K; ?widerski, W; Szudejko, M; Szymaszek, M; Tada, J; Taguchi, H; Takahashi, K; Tanaka, D; Tanaka, G; Tanaka, S; Tanino, K; Tazbir, K; Tcesnokova, N; Tgawa, N; Toda, N; Tsuchiya, H; Tsukamoto, H; Tsushima, T; Tsutsumi, K; Umemura, H; Uno, M; Usui, A; Utsumi, H; Vaucelle, M; Wada, Y; Watanabe, K; Watanabe, S; Watase, K; Witkowski, M; Yamaki, T; Yamamoto, J; Yamamoto, T; Yamashita, M; Yanai, M; Yasuda, K; Yoshida, Y; Yoshida, A; Yoshimura, K; ?mijewska, M; Zuclarelli, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Twelve high schools in Japan (of which six are in Fukushima Prefecture), four in France, eight in Poland and two in Belarus cooperated in the measurement and comparison of individual external doses in 2014. In total 216 high-school students and teachers participated in the study. Each participant wore an electronic personal dosimeter "D-shuttle" for two weeks, and kept a journal of his/her whereabouts and activities. The distributions of annual external doses estimated for each region overlap with each other, demonstrating that the personal external individual doses in locations where residence is currently allowed in Fukushima Prefecture and in Belarus are well within the range of estimated annual doses due to the background radiation level of other regions/countries.

  14. Planktivorous Fish Link Coral Reef and Oceanic Food Webs: Causes and Consequences of Landscape-Scale Patterns in Fish Behavior, Diet and Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Katherine Mary W.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structure and Distribution of Coral Reefs. Smith, Elder andPreliminary observations on coral reef plankton. Limnology1973. Ecology of a Caribbean Coral Reef. The Porites Reef-

  15. Evaluating the transcriptome of the settled polyp of the robust coral, Montastraea faveolata when infected with the competent symbiont, by microarray analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, Aubrie Elise

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ball EE (2011) The biology of coral metamorphosis: Molecularin the scleractinian coral Fungia scutaria. BiologicalE. and V. M. Weis (2010) Coral larvae exhibit few measurable

  16. Planktivorous fish link coral reef and oceanic food webs : causes and consequences of landscape-scale patterns in fish behavior, diet and growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanson, Katharine Mary Winston

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structure and Distribution of Coral Reefs. Smith, Elder andPreliminary observations on coral reef plankton. Limnology1973. Ecology of a Caribbean Coral Reef. The Porites Reef-

  17. OVERLAP OF PREDICTED COLD-WATER CORAL HABITAT AND BOTTOM-CONTACT FISHERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OVERLAP OF PREDICTED COLD-WATER CORAL HABITAT AND BOTTOM-CONTACT FISHERIES IN BRITISH COLUMBIA of Resource Management Title of Thesis: Overlap of predicted cold-water coral habitat and bottom- contact-contact fishing on cold-water corals (class Anthozoa) due to the role corals play in providing biogenic habitat

  18. Democratizing content publication with Coral Michael J. Freedman, Eric Freudenthal, David Mazi`eres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badrinath, B. R.

    Democratizing content publication with Coral Michael J. Freedman, Eric Freudenthal, David Mazi`eres New York University http://www.scs.cs.nyu.edu/coral/ Abstract CoralCDN is a peer-to-peer content, all for the price of a cheap broadband Internet connection. Volunteer sites that run Coral

  19. Impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs Perspectives from a field study in Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumway, John

    Impacts of ocean acidification on coral reefs Perspectives from a field study in Mexico Adina (c) Foraminifera (d) Reef-building coral (e) Deep-water coral (f ) Bryozoans (g) Mollusks (h) Various Larva #12;Coral Reefs ­ The Rain Forests of the Ocean Rich Ecosystems that Provide Important

  20. Electronics I 4 cr with Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    ECE 332 Electronics I 4 cr with Lab ECE 370 Signals & Systems 3 cr co ECE 225 Electric Circuits 3 106 - 4 cr General Physics with Calculus CS 116 - 1 cr Intro to Comp. Program. Lab co MATH 227 4 cr cr Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering -- Department of Physics and Astromony

  1. Early molecular responses of coral larvae to hyperthermal stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    suggests that heat stress might compromise some components of the coral immune defence and therefore might oxidative stress showed little response at the early hours to heat stress, supporting the proposal that upEarly molecular responses of coral larvae to hyperthermal stress MAURICIO RODRIGUEZ-LANETTY,* SAKI

  2. Extreme Longevity in Proteinaceous Deep-Sea Corals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roark, E B; Guilderson, T P; Dunbar, R B; Fallon, S J; Mucciarone, D A

    2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep-sea corals are found on hard substrates on seamounts and continental margins world-wide at depths of 300 to {approx}3000 meters. Deep-sea coral communities are hotspots of deep ocean biomass and biodiversity, providing critical habitat for fish and invertebrates. Newly applied radiocarbon age date from the deep water proteinaceous corals Gerardia sp. and Leiopathes glaberrima show that radial growth rates are as low as 4 to 35 {micro}m yr{sup -1} and that individual colony longevities are on the order of thousands of years. The management and conservation of deep sea coral communities is challenged by their commercial harvest for the jewelry trade and damage caused by deep water fishing practices. In light of their unusual longevity, a better understanding of deep sea coral ecology and their interrelationships with associated benthic communities is needed to inform coherent international conservation strategies for these important deep-sea ecosystems.

  3. ARM - Lesson Plans: Rate of Coral Growth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, Alaska OutreachMakingPast SeaRate of Coral

  4. Black Coral Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in CarbonofBiotins Energia Jump to: navigation,BirahiCoral Capital

  5. UCRL-CR-104544

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron Spin TransitionProgram | Department HomeDialoguet e d N a tf^CR-104544

  6. A new coral disease from the southern Arabian Gulf During an ecological survey of coral communities at Jebel Ali in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, a high incidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at Jebel Ali in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, a high incidence of coral diseases was observed. Although

  7. Connectivity and resilience of coral reef metapopulations in marine protected areas: matching empirical efforts to predictive needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coral Reefs (2009) 28:327–337 DOI 10.1007/s00338-Connectivity and resilience of coral reef metapopulations inpro- tected areas (MPAs) on coral reefs require prediction

  8. Long-term implications of coral use in the construction of royal coastal marae on Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickard, Alexandria E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the structure of fish and coral communities at Tiahura Reef,Moorea. Coral Reefs 25: Chesher, R, and Faulkner, D.1979. Living Corals. Crown Publishers, Inc. , New York. Di

  9. THE ASSOCIATION AND DIVERSIFICATION OF TRAPEZIA CRABS WITH THEIR OBLIGATE POCILLOPORA CORAL HOSTS IN MO’OREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ly, Vickie

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trajectories, and resilience of coral assemblages on a SouthCentral Pacific reef. Coral Reefs. 28:775– Castro, P. 1996.symbiotic with reef corals. Bulletin of Marine Science. 58(

  10. Habitat selection, facilitation, and biotic settlement cues affect distribution and performance of coral recruits in French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Nichole

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prob- ably because the coral grew away from or over the pre-increased dimensionality of the coral could have exposed thea contribution of the Moorea Coral Reef Long-term Ecological

  11. Consistent long-term spatial gradients in replenishment for an island population of a coral reef fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, S L; White, J W; Caselle, J E; Swearer, S E; Warner, R R

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an island population of a coral reef fish Scott L. Hamiltonsurveys of a common coral reef fish, the bluehead wrasseReyns & Sponaugle 1999), and coral reef fishes (reviewed by

  12. Stable isotopic records of bleaching and endolithic algae blooms in the skeleton of the boulder forming coral Montastraea faveolata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, A. C.; Carilli, J. E.; Norris, R. D.; Charles, C. D.; Deheyn, D. D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coral Reefs (2010) 29:1079–1089 DOI 10.1007/s00338-010-0667-of the boulder forming coral Montastraea faveolata A. C.Within boulder forming corals, ?xation of dis- solved

  13. A map of human impacts to a “pristine” coral reef ecosystem, the Papah?naumoku?kea Marine National Monument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coral Reefs (2009) 28:635–650 DOI 10.1007/s00338-009-0490-impacts to a ‘‘pristine’’ coral reef ecosystem, the Papahasmall to be visible here Coral Reefs (2009) 28:635–650 1.

  14. ameliorate coral disease: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Functionally diverse reef-fish communities ameliorate coral disease Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  15. Evolutionary insights into scleractinian corals using comparative genomic hybridizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aranda, Manuel; DeSalvo, Michael K; Bayer, Till; Medina, Monica; Voolstra, Christian R

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transcriptomic responses to heat stress and bleaching in theof the response to heat stress in hepatopancreas tissue ofearly gene response to heat stress in a coral reef fish. Mol

  16. Behaviour of settling coral reef fishes and supplementary mamagement tools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heenan, Adel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coral reef fish larvae take an active role in selecting their settlement site and sensory cues may help them to orientate during this process. As settlement is a period of transition through which the majority of individuals ...

  17. EECBG Success Story: Cape Coral Youth Center Helps Light the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The city of Cape Coral, Florida -- a town of located on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico -- is using funding from the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG)...

  18. Gametogenesis of the warm water coral Astrangia astreiformis (Anthozoa: Scleractinia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St. Pierre, Lauren Jean

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 19g6 Major Subject: Zoology GAMETOGENESIS OF THE WARM WATER CORAL ASTRANGIA ASTREIFORMIS (ANTHOZOA: SCLERACTINIA) A Thesis by LAUREN 3EAN ST. PIERRE Approved as to style and content by: ary K. Wicksten Chair of Committee... Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Mary K. Wicksten ~At t f (?th: I t ) h tyy (non-reef building) coral naturally occurring with and without symbiotic zooxanthellae (endosymbiotic dfnoflagellates). It has a recorded range from Massachusetts, along...

  19. Fish assemblages on coral reefs in Guanaja, Bay Islands, Honduras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahendran, Christopher Kandiah

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FISH ASSEMBLAGES ON CORAL REEFS IN GUANAJA, BAY ISLANDS, HONDURAS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER KANDIAH MAHENDRAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1999 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences FISH ASSEMBLAGES ON CORAL REEFS IN GUANAJA, BAY ISLANDS, HONDURAS A Thesis by CHRISTOPHER KANDIAH MAHENDRAN Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

  20. Development and implementation of a coral health assessment tool for St. John, USVI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detlefsen, William Robert

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coral health in St. John, US Virgin Islands, has shown tremendous declines in recent years, with more than 50% declines in live coral cover. As one component of a group project to assess the possible impacts of anthropogenic ...

  1. Corals Subject Review 1. ____________ organisms are composed of hundreds to hun-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corals Subject Review 1. ____________ organisms are composed of hundreds to hun- dreds of thousands powerful, often lethal, _____________. WORD BANKalgae anthropogenic asexual atoll barrier basal plate below tidal emersions tourism toxins weather zooplankton zooxanthellae Corals Subject Review oceanservice

  2. Land Use Planning to Promote Marine Conservation of Coral reef Ecosystems in Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timothy Duane

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goreau, T. F. , N. I. Goreau, and T. J. Goreau. 1979. Coralsand Coral Reefs. Scienti?c American, 241:124- 3 UN System-www. ispf.pf 7 Moorea Coral Reef LTER website, accessed

  3. Crystallographic Evidence for Water-assisted Photo-induced Peptide Cleavage in the Stony Coral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikura, Mitsuhiko

    Crystallographic Evidence for Water-assisted Photo-induced Peptide Cleavage in the Stony Coral 3-2, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan A coral fluorescent protein from Trachyphyllia geoffroyi, Kaede

  4. Paleoecology, structure, and distribution of Triassic coral buildups in western North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, G. D., Jr.

    1979-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    and cold-water coral banks that could easily be mistaken for shallow, tropical reefs if preserved in the rock record. The Triassic buildups of North America are domi- nated by astrocoeniid, montlivaltiid, and thamnasteriid corals that differ little over... with modern coral reefs, Smith (1927) inferred tropical climates for North America during the Triassic and cited broader climatic belts to explain the present-day distribu- tional data. Muller (1936a, b), in discussing Triassic coral reefs from Nevada...

  5. Long prereproductive selection and divergence by depth in a Caribbean candelabrum coral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellberg, Michael E.

    Long prereproductive selection and divergence by depth in a Caribbean candelabrum coral Carlos of the candelabrum coral Eunicea flexuosa across the Caribbean. Eunicea is endemic to the Caribbean and all sister: How can new marine species emerge without obvious geographic isolation? Caribbean coral reefs

  6. Coral Reefs DOI 10.1007/s00338-007-0270-6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liere, Robert van

    Coral Reefs DOI 10.1007/s00338-007-0270-6 123 REPORT A computational method for quantifying morphological variation in scleractinian corals K. J. Kruszyjski · J. A. Kaandorp · R. van Liere Received: 16 corals obtained with X-ray Computed Tomog- raphy scanning techniques. The advantage of Computed

  7. Modelling by percolation theory of the behaviour of natural coral used as bone substitute.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Modelling by percolation theory of the behaviour of natural coral used as bone substitute. Y the resorption and ossification of natural coral implanted in bones. The first step of the process.barbotteau@qse.tohoku.ac.jp) #12;Modelling by percolation theory of the behaviour of natural coral used as bone substitute.2 1

  8. STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for XeF2 Etcher Coral Name: XeF2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE for XeF2 Etcher Coral Name: XeF2 Model #: SE Tech ES-2000XM Location this system you must RESERVE the equipment in CORAL. It is mandatory to ENGAGE the machine before you start processing. Please enter etch rate data in CORAL and the logbook by the tool If you encounter any problems

  9. CRISP Economic Workshop "Investing in Coral Reefs: Is it worth it?"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 CRISP Economic Workshop "Investing in Coral Reefs: Is it worth it?" Noumea, New Caledonia hal-00549031,version1-21Dec2010 Author manuscript, published in ""Investing in Coral Reefs : coral reef, seagrass bed, mangrove forest, limestone forest and tropical rainforest, food-plain mire

  10. Short Communication CORAL: QSPR model of water solubility based on local and global SMILES attributes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gini, Giuseppina

    Short Communication CORAL: QSPR model of water solubility based on local and global SMILES 17910, Jackson, MS 39217, USA h i g h l i g h t s " The CORAL software for the building up of QSPR/QSAR models is suggested. " The SMILES is used as the representation of the molecular structure. " The CORAL

  11. A comparison between coral colonies of the genus Madracis and simulated forms.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liere, Robert van

    ForReview Only A comparison between coral colonies of the genus Madracis and simulated forms Keywords: scleractinian corals, simulation, morphology, Madracis, Computed Tomography scans, morphogenesis of the Royal Society B #12;ForReview Only A comparison between coral colonies of the genus1 Madracis

  12. The Response of Developing Island Economies to Coral1 Bleaching Events2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Dana Marie

    The Response of Developing Island Economies to Coral1 Bleaching Events2 James George Baldwin1 bleaching induced coral reef degradation and the economies of the U.N. defined small island developing and the health of the reef. Our findings highlight the striking need for better management of coral reef

  13. What's the Damage? Assessing the Costs of Spatial Closures to Protect Corals and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What's the Damage? Assessing the Costs of Spatial Closures to Protect Corals and Sponges from.: 588 Title of Project: What's the damage? Assessing the costs of spatial closures to protect corals for protecting corals and sponges from potential damage by bottom trawling. However, closures can be challenging

  14. Global assessment of coral bleaching and required rates of adaptation under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppenheimer, Michael

    Global assessment of coral bleaching and required rates of adaptation under climate change S I M O, Australia Abstract Elevated ocean temperatures can cause coral bleaching, the loss of colour from reef- building corals because of a breakdown of the symbiosis with the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium. Recent

  15. Coral reefs reduce tsunami impact in model simulations Catherine M. Kunkel,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppenheimer, Michael

    Coral reefs reduce tsunami impact in model simulations Catherine M. Kunkel,1 Robert W. Hallberg,2 14 December 2006. [1] Significant buffering of the impact of tsunamis by coral reefs is suggested against tsunamis. Citation: Kunkel, C. M., R. W. Hallberg, and M. Oppenheimer (2006), Coral reefs reduce

  16. Chemically stimulated behavior of the Hermit Crab Calcinus latens (Randall 1840) and the role of chemical signaling as a mode of sensory perception within the coral rubble habitat of Moorea, French Polynesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesias, Ilysa S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dwellers (coelobites) beneath coral rubble in the Floridaand diversity of Conus on coral reefs. Oecologia. 60: (293-modes of Calcinus latens in the coral rubble microhabitat.

  17. Proc. 5th Minsk International Seminar (Heat Pipes, Heat Pumps and Refrigerators), Minsk, Belarus, 2003. 21 7+( '(),1,7,21 2) 38/6$7,1* +($7 3,3(6 $1 29(59,(

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandekar, Sameer

    Proc. 5th Minsk International Seminar (Heat Pipes, Heat Pumps and Refrigerators), Minsk, Belarus)-711-685-2142, Fax: (+49)-711-685-2010, E-mail: khandekar@ike.uni-stuttgart.de $EVWUDFW Pulsating heat pipes (PHPs) have emerged as interesting alternatives to conventional heat transfer technologies. These simple

  18. Improvement of SOFC Electrodes through Catalyst Infiltration & Control of Cr Volatilization from FeCr Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Visco, S.J.; Jacobson, C.; Kurokawa, H.; Sholklapper, T.; Lu, C.; De Jonghe, L.

    2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses the improvement of SOFC electrodes through catalyst infiltration and control of Cr volatilization from FeCr components.

  19. Underpinning Mathematics/Science: (min 40 cr) Mathematics (16 cr)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Materials Science and Engineering BS Degree Requirements for students beginning in or after Fall 2011 04 324 Introductory Applied Statistics for Engineers Physics (10 cr) Phys 201 or Phys 207 or Phys 247 Modern Physics for Engineers Phys 235 Introduction to Solid State Electronics Phys 241 Intro to Modern

  20. THE EFFECT OF HERBIVORY BY THE LONG-SPINED SEA URCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS OF MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoey, Jennifer

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between corals and algae on coral reefs: a review of4: 16-24. Wilder, R.M. Algae-Herbivore Interactions on theURCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS

  1. Method development for 234U and 230Th determination and application to fossil deep-water coral and authigenic carbonate dating from the Campos Basin - Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vivone, Ronaldo J; Godoy, Maria Luiza D. P; Godoy, José Marcus; Santos, Guaciara M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petrobras) for the fossil coral and the authigenic carbonateto Fossil Deep- Water Coral and Authigenic Carbonate DatingFor the fossil deep-water corals samples from Campos Basin,

  2. THE EFFECT OF HERBIVORY BY THE LONG-SPINED SEA URCHIN, DIADEMA SAVIGNYI, ON ALGAE GROWTH IN THE CORAL REEFS OF MOOREA, FRENCH POLYNESIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoey, Jennifer

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and G.C. Williams. 1996. Coral Reef Animals of the Indo-antillarum Philippi on living coral. Oecologia 20: Bak,structure as a response of coral communities to global

  3. al cd cr: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    junctions with CrFe and CrFeCr barriers. Although the exact... Robinson, J. W. A.; Banerjee, N.; Blamire, M. G. 2014-03-05 134 SEM CR GRADE Intro to Chem Eng 1 Engineering...

  4. al cr fe: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    junctions with CrFe and CrFeCr barriers. Although the exact... Robinson, J. W. A.; Banerjee, N.; Blamire, M. G. 2014-03-05 15 Cavitation erosion of laser processed Fe-Cr-Mn and...

  5. Oceanographic Controls on Coral Reef Habitats in Present and Future Climates /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Lauren Amelia

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    animal secretes a calcium carbonate skeleton, which overCoral reefs deposit calcium carbonate skeletons as thethe white underlying calcium carbonate skeleton, hence the

  6. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    009-9346-0 Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, andresult- ing from climate change, as evidenced by massmore suscep- tible to climate change stressors (Hughes and

  7. Functional connectivity of coral reef fishes in a tropical seascape assessed by compound-specific stable isotope analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McMahon, Kelton Wells

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ecological integrity of tropical habitats, including mangroves, seagrass beds and coral reefs, is coming under increasing pressure from human activities. Many coral reef fish species are thought to use mangroves and ...

  8. Attacking the Asokan-Ginzboorg Protocol for Key Distribution in an Ad-Hoc Bluetooth Network Using CORAL 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steel, G.; Maidl, M.; Bundy, Alan

    We describe Coral, a counterexample finder for incorrect inductive conjectures. By devising a first-order version of Paulson's formalism for cryptographic protocol analysis, we are able to use Coral to attack protocols which may have an unbounded...

  9. Local lattice distortions and thermal transport in perovskite manganites Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33124

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 33124 J. J. Neumeier Department of Physics, Florida, Coral Gables, Florida 33124 K. J. McClellan Materials Science and Technology Division, Los Alamos

  10. Dissepimental rugose corals of Upper Pennsylvanian (Missourian) rocks of Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cocke, J. M.

    1970-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    limestone and shale for- mations. Each limestone formation is divided into 1) a normal facies belt of thin limestones generally containing abundant invertebrates and few phylloid algae, and 2) at least one phylloid algal mound complex belt which... corals belonging to Dibunophyllum, Neokoninckophyllum, Caninia, and Geyerophyllum are described from both carbonate facies belts but not from thick shale formations. Family Aulophyllidae is represented by 17 species of Dibunophyllum and Neokoninckophyllum...

  11. Epifaunal Assemblages on Deep-water Corals in Roatan, Honduras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavelle, Katherine

    2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    45 Discussion 48 References 51 Summary 53 Appendices 57 v List of Tables Table 1. Absolute abundance of coral morphospecies at study sites (AKR= Anthony?s Key, GBB= Gibson Bight..., HMB= Half Moon Bay, LBE= Luna Beach, LWR= Lawson?s Rock, OLS= Old Loafer?s, SDM= Sueno del Mar, SDR= Sueno del Bahia). Table 2. Absolute abundance of epifaunal species at study sites (AKR= Anthony?s Key, GBB= Gibson Bight, HMB= Half Moon Bay, LBE...

  12. Coral Extension Rate Analysis Using Computed Axial Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yudelman, Eleanor Ann

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    CORAL EXTENSION RATE ANALYSIS USING COMPUTED AXIAL TOMOGRAPHY A Thesis by ELEANOR ANN YUDELMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE Chair of Committee, Niall Slowey Committee Members, Deborah Thomas Benjamin Giese George P. Schmahl Head of Department, Deborah Thomas May 2014 Major Subject: Oceanography Copyright 2014 Eleanor Ann Yudelman ii ABSTRACT...

  13. Coral Vision 1.0 uses histograms on hue trained over the positive and negative user clicks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stough, Joshua

    Coral Vision 1.0 uses histograms on hue trained over the positive and negative user clicks. The initial pixel-wise decision is culled and smoothed using image morphological operations Coral Vision: Software for Improving Efficiency in Coral Monitoring Cory L. Walker, Joshua V. Stough Lisa Greer

  14. Novel application of the CORAL software to model cytotoxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles to bacteria Escherichia coli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gini, Giuseppina

    Novel application of the CORAL software to model cytotoxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles 39217, USA h i g h l i g h t s " The CORAL software for the building up of QSPR/QSAR models is suggested. " The CORAL model for cytotoxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles is demonstrated. " The model is a mathematical

  15. Paytan_Answers 113.pdf Student questions: Adina Paytan colloquium on "Impacts of Ocean Acidification on Coral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumway, John

    Acidification on Coral Reefs - Perspectives from a Field Study in Mexico" 1/16/13 In your presentation is happening in the real situation? The corals that are moved from their natural environment and exposed. Finally, it is possible that the corals in the field are better aclimated to the conditions

  16. The influence of habitat selection and density on the population dynamics of stony coral species of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

    The influence of habitat selection and density on the population dynamics of stony coral species of Biology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL, 33124 USA *Corresponding author: K. Semon Phone: 1-305-284-3013, Fax: 1-305-284-3039, e-mail: ksemon@bio.miami.edu Abstract Although stony corals are most frequently

  17. To appear: 2007 International Conference on Computer Vision Theory and Applications, Barcelona, Spain. CORAL REEF TEXTURE CLASSIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribeiro, Eraldo

    , Spain. CORAL REEF TEXTURE CLASSIFICATION USING SUPPORT VECTOR MACHINES Anand Mehtaa, Eraldo Ribeiroa Sciences Florida Institute of Technology Melbourne, FL 32901 Email: eribeiro@cs.fit.edu Keywords: Coral Abstract: The development of tools to examine the ecological parameters of coral reefs is seriously lagging

  18. Decadal cyclicity of regional mid-Holocene precipitation: Evidence from Dominican coral proxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greer, Lisa

    Decadal cyclicity of regional mid-Holocene precipitation: Evidence from Dominican coral proxies of four Holocene specimens of Montastraea sp. and Siderastrea sp. coral skeletons from the Dominican Republic were analyzed to examine decadal-scale fluctuations in regional precipitation. The specimens range

  19. Fractal patterns of coral communities: evidence from remote sensing (Arabian Gulf, Dubai, U.A.E.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    Fractal patterns of coral communities: evidence from remote sensing (Arabian Gulf, Dubai, U to power-law distributions over several orders of magnitude to an extent that suggests fractal behaviour, fractal, IKONOS Introduction It has long been recognized that the processes driving coral reef dynamics

  20. Movement of Deep-Sea Coral Populations on Climatic Timescales 3.1 ABSTRACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    the distributions and rates of deep-water mass shifts during times of past climate change has largely been informed by several millennial scale rapid climate change events. Here we investigate the ecological response of deep-sea coral communities to both glaciation and rapid climate change. We find that the deep-sea coral

  1. Which Environmental Factors Predict Seasonal Variation in the Coral Health of Acropora digitifera and Acropora

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Ming

    of Western Australia, Perth,Western Australia, Australia Abstract The impact of physico-chemical factors. digitifera and A. spicifera, at Ningaloo Reef (north-western Australia) in the southeast Indian Ocean. Coral address: CSIRO Marine and Atmopheric Research, Perth, Western Australia, Australia Introduction Coral

  2. The State of Coral Reef Ecosystems of the Republic of the Marshall Islands MarshallIslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    The State of Coral Reef Ecosystems of the Republic of the Marshall Islands 387 MarshallIslands The State of Coral Reef Ecosystems of the Republic of the Marshall Islands Maria Beger1 , Dean Jacobson22 (1,940,000 mi2 ), the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) is comprised of 1,225 islands

  3. Coral Isotope Record of Environmental Change in the Northwest Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miner, Adrian

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon and oxygen isotopes in coral skeletal material must be well understood. We have studied a Montastrea faveolata coral core from the Flower Garden Banks deposited over the 161 year period from 1844 to 2005. Annual growth bands revealed by X...

  4. Enhancing the detection and classification of coral reef and associated benthic habitats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rundquist, Donald C.

    Enhancing the detection and classification of coral reef and associated benthic habitats. Rundquist, M. Lawson, and R. Perk (2007), Enhancing the detection and classification of coral reef and Atkinson, 2000]. Holden and LeDrew [1999] have shown that a high-resolution in situ spectral library can

  5. Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro Yael), which facilitates controlled deposition of a calcium carbonate skeleton; and (iii) the calcium carbonate to nematocysts, mucous glands, and sensory or nerve cells (2, 3). Many corals also precipitate calcium carbonate

  6. Geochemistry of slow-growing corals : reconstructing sea surface temperature, salinity and the North Atlantic Oscillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodkin, Nathalie Fairbank

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 225-year old coral from the south shore of Bermuda (64°W, 320N) provides a record of decadal-to-centennial scale climate variability. The coral was collected live, and sub-annual density bands seen in x-radiographs ...

  7. Deep-Sea Coral Evidence for Rapid Change in Ventilation of the Deep North Atlantic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adkins, Jess F.

    Deep-Sea Coral Evidence for Rapid Change in Ventilation of the Deep North Atlantic 15,400 Years Ago radiocarbon and thorium-230 dates from benthic coral species reveal that the ventilation rate of the North to interstadials of longer dura- tion (5). One problem has been that the time resolution of sediments is limited

  8. Cr Atom Alignment in Cr-Delta-Doped GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, S.; Emura, S.; Zhou, Y. K.; Choi, S. W.; Yamauchi, Y.; Hasegawa, S.; Asahi, H. [Institute of Scientific and Industrial Research, Osaka University, 8-1, Mihogaoka, Osaka, 567-0047 (Japan); Ofuchi, H. [SPring-8 / Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Nakata, Y. [College of Science and Engineering, Iwaki Meisei University, Iwaki, Fukushima 970-8551 (Japan)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural properties and Cr atom alignments in Cr-delta doped GaN grown by molecular beam epitaxy are studied with transmission electron microscopy and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements. It is found that the environment around Cr atoms in delta-doped samples is dramatically changed under various growth conditions. The XAFS analysis of these synthesized layers suggests that new Cr-related complexes are grown.

  9. SEM CR GRADE Intro to Chem Eng 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Elective Option Elective 2 SEM CR GRADE 4 CHE 705 or CHE 712 Fossil Fuels or Nuclear Engineering SEM CR GRADE 4 CHE 712 or CHE 705 Nuclear Engineering or Fossil Fuels STUDENT NAME ADVISOR NAME #12;Chemical Chemistry SEM CR GRADE 3 CHE 601 Fluid Mechanics SEM CR GRADE 3 CHE 604 ChE Thermodynamics SEM CR GRADE 4

  10. SEM CR GRADE Intro to Chem Eng 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    or Nuclear Engineering SEM CR GRADE 4 CHE 712 or CHE 705 Nuclear Engineering or Fossil Fuels Sem: 16 Cum: 132 students see "Advising Notes" on back page SEM CR GRADE 3 CHE 601 Fluid Mechanics SEM CR GRADE 3 CHE 604 Ch of 3 SEM CR GRADE 4 CHE 761 Biochemical Engineering SEM CR GRADE 4 CHE 705 or CHE 712 Fossil Fuels

  11. SEM CR GRADE Intro to Chem Eng 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    E Majors Energy Option Page 1 of 3 SEM CR GRADE 4 CHE 705 or CHE 712 Fossil Fuels or Nuclear Engineering Chemistry SEM CR GRADE 3 CHE 601 Fluid Mechanics SEM CR GRADE 3 CHE 604 ChE Thermodynamics SEM CR GRADE 3 Energy Option Elective Option Elective 2 SEM CR GRADE 4 CHE 712 or CHE 705 Nuclear Engineering or Fossil

  12. EA-212 Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197EFinding ofMulti-FamilyEA-212 Coral Power, LLC EA-212

  13. EA-212-A Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197EFinding ofMulti-FamilyEA-212 Coral Power, LLC

  14. EA-212-D Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197EFinding ofMulti-FamilyEA-212 Coral Power, LLC12-C

  15. EA-213 Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197EFinding ofMulti-FamilyEA-212 Coral Power, LLC12-CEA-213

  16. EA-213-A Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197EFinding ofMulti-FamilyEA-212 Coral Power,

  17. EA-212 Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015 Business42.1Energy |Final Site-WideBPA issuedNFSCY-12PP&LEnergy Coral

  18. EA-212-A Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015 Business42.1Energy |Final Site-WideBPA issuedNFSCY-12PP&LEnergy Coral-A

  19. EA-213 Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015 Business42.1Energy |Final Site-WideBPA issuedNFSCY-12PP&LEnergy Coral

  20. EA-213-A Coral Power, LLC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015 Business42.1Energy |Final Site-WideBPA issuedNFSCY-12PP&LEnergy Coral-A

  1. EA-253-A Coral Canada US Inc | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015 Business42.1Energy |Final Site-WideBPAPower Marketing, IncAESto exportCoral

  2. EA-293-A Coral Energy Management, LLC | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015 Business42.1Energy |Final Site-WideBPAPowerEE US No. 1 to exportEnergy,Coral

  3. Coral Gables, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, clickInformationNew| ExplorationCooperstown, Wisconsin:NewCopperCoral

  4. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and magnetization interaction reversal. Watermelon-like iron nanoparticles: Cr doping effect on magnetism and...

  5. CR-B-02-02.PUB

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CR-B-02-02 AUDIT REPORT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES PROCUREMENT ADMINISTRATION AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY AUGUST 2002 U....

  6. CORE BUSINESS COURSES ACCT 210 ACCOUNTING CR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihadeh, Alan

    P.O.Box: CORE BUSINESS COURSES ACCT 210 ACCOUNTING CR ACCT 215 ACCT 217 to ACCT 250 3 BUSS 200 ACCT 217 to ACCT 250 3 BUSS 211 ACCT 217 to ACCT 250 3 BUSS 230 ACCT 217 to ACCT 250 3 BUSS 239 Any business elective 3 BUSS 240 Total Crs 15 BUSS 245 BIDS CR BUSS 248 INFO 205 3 BUSS 249 DCSN 205 3 DCSN 200

  7. Climate Change, Coral Reef Ecosystems, and Management Options for Marine Protected Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the pH of ocean surface waters has decreased by about 0.1of CO 2 in cooler waters, reefs at the latitudinal marginsand ?shes Sea urchins, cold-water corals, coralline algae,

  8. Continental Shelf Research 26 (2006) 194205 Characterizing the deep insular shelf coral reef habitat of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    (Gardner et al., 2003). Pollution, sedimentation, hurricanes and coral disease are all contributors and acoustic sensing (Singh et al., 2004). The Seabed was tested over the insular shelf slope off southwestern

  9. Modelling Potential Fishery Pressures Facing Western Scotland's Cold Water Coral Reefs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broughton, Caroline

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold water coral reefs are of enormous importance to science and society, being hotspots of biodiversity, indicators of past climate and a potential source of new medicines. However, their existence is under threat from pressures including climate...

  10. Exploring the climate change refugia potential of equatorial Pacific coral reefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drenkard, Elizabeth Joan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global climate models project a 21st century strengthening of the Pacific Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC). The consequent increase in topographic upwelling of cool waters onto equatorial coral reef islands would mitigate ...

  11. Radiocarbon and stable isotopes in Palmyra corals during the past century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. and Lazar B. (2000) Diagenesis in live corals from thesignatures only when the diagenesis was moderate to severe (They concluded that minor diagenesis did not change the D 14

  12. F. J. Wild A. C. Jones A. W. Tudhope Investigation of luminescent banding in solid coral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    REPORT F. J. Wild á A. C. Jones á A. W. Tudhope Investigation of luminescent banding in solid coral-Verlag 2000 F. J. Wild á A. C. Jones (&) Department of Chemistry, The University of Edinburgh, King

  13. Coral facies and diagenesis of a Pleistocene patch reef, Ambergris Cay, Belize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Karen Lee

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /swash zone cementation, as well as abundant primary and secondary porosity and well-preserved skeletal mineralogy. Pleistocene submarine cements include acicular aragonite and magnesium-calcite peloids. Many corals were encrusted by dense, intercalated... microporosity that is partially filled by anhedral submicrocrystalline calcite. Some porosity is lined by isopachous, subhedral to euhedral microcrystalline calcite (possibly once submarine magnesium calcite). Rarely, coral sclerodermites are replaced...

  14. Phytoplankton Responses to Mass Coral Spawning in the Flower Garden Banks, Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, Courtney Leigh

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    the building of reef skeletal structure. Coral framework can be broken down into sediments and make up an important fraction of the inorganic carbon pathway. Reef systems also provide ecosystem services such as sustaining commercial fisheries, protecting... beaches and coastlines from storm surges, and supporting nurseries and cultural services. Coral reefs are critically important for the ecosystem goods and services they provide to maritime tropical and subtropical nations. Reefs are in serious decline...

  15. A dinoflagellate symbiont of the coral Oculina diffusa Lamarck (Cnidaria : Anthozoa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gouldy, Ralph Roland

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oculina diffusa Lam. was collected from three sites along the Texas coast. The algal symbiont of this coral was studied directly from the living tissues of th coral and from isolations of the alga in three different media maintained at different culture... of Specimens The Algal Symbiont Culture Media Inoculation and Culture Condition Staining . RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Distribution of Oculina diffusa Lam. in Texas Growth and Life Cycle of the Alga . Histochemistry of the Alga Comparison of the Algal...

  16. Investigation of microstructure and mechanical properties of multi-layer Cr/Cr2O3 coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    as a selective solar ray collector and for other applications as a protective coating against wear, corrosionInvestigation of microstructure and mechanical properties of multi-layer Cr/Cr2O3 coatings Xiaolu-layer Microstructure Fracture toughness Adhesion Single and multi-layer Cr/Cr2O3 coatings were deposited by reactive

  17. Stable isotopic records of bleaching and endolithic algae blooms in the skeleton of the boulder forming coral Montastraea faveolata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, A. C.; Carilli, J. E.; Norris, R. D.; Charles, C. D.; Deheyn, D. D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of bleaching and endolithic algae blooms in the skeleton ofa lesser extent, endolithic algae within the coral skeleton.Endolithic algae produce distinctive green bands in the

  18. 1999 Ph.D. Chemistry University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 1994 M.Sc. Chemistry Sun Yat-sen University, P.R. China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leuenberger, Michael N.

    1 EDUCATION 1999 Ph.D. Chemistry University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida 1994 M.Sc. Chemistry University of Miami, Coral Gables, Florida HONORS AND AWARDS 2008-present National Institute of Health (NIH

  19. Multireference Ab Initio Study of the Ground and Low-Lying Excited States of Cr(CO)2 and Cr(CO)3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    Multireference Ab Initio Study of the Ground and Low-Lying Excited States of Cr(CO)2 and Cr(CO)3 chromium carbonyls, Cr(CO)2 and Cr(CO)3, using multiconfigurational ab initio perturbation theory. Unlike of the ground states of Cr(CO)2 and Cr(CO)3. From multireference ab initio calculations considering the full

  20. Rapid Evolution of Coral Proteins Responsible for Interaction with the Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voolstra, Christian R.; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Matz, Mikhail V.; Bayer, Till; Aranda, Manuel; Buschiazzo, Emmanuel; DeSalvo, Michael K.; Lindquist, Erika; Szmant, Alina M.; Coffroth, Mary Alice; Medina, Monica

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Corals worldwide are in decline due to climate change effects (e.g., rising seawater temperatures), pollution, and exploitation. The ability of corals to cope with these stressors in the long run depends on the evolvability of the underlying genetic networks and proteins, which remain largely unknown. A genome-wide scan for positively selected genes between related coral species can help to narrow down the search space considerably. Methodology/Principal Findings: We screened a set of 2,604 putative orthologs from EST-based sequence datasets of the coral species Acropora millepora and Acropora palmata to determine the fraction and identity of proteins that may experience adaptive evolution. 7percent of the orthologs show elevated rates of evolution. Taxonomically-restricted (i.e. lineagespecific) genes show a positive selection signature more frequently than genes that are found across many animal phyla. The class of proteins that displayed elevated evolutionary rates was significantly enriched for proteins involved in immunity and defense, reproduction, and sensory perception. We also found elevated rates of evolution in several other functional groups such as management of membrane vesicles, transmembrane transport of ions and organic molecules, cell adhesion, and oxidative stress response. Proteins in these processes might be related to the endosymbiotic relationship corals maintain with dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium. Conclusion/Relevance: This study provides a birds-eye view of the processes potentially underlying coral adaptation, which will serve as a foundation for future work to elucidate the rates, patterns, and mechanisms of corals? evolutionary response to global climate change.

  1. A research tool for long-term and continuous analysis of fish assemblage in coral-reefs using underwater camera footage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Bob

    A research tool for long-term and continuous analysis of fish assemblage in coral-reefs using a better understanding of a complex environment such as a coral reef, collecting data for long-term monitoring of these environments is essential. Long-term monitoring of a coral reef environment can however

  2. 1. Check Equipment Reservations in Coral to ensure that you reserved the correct machine, in the correct facility, for the correct date. Another user may

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    1. Check Equipment Reservations in Coral to ensure that you reserved the correct machine to honor them, if this is the case. 2. Engage the tool in Coral for the equipment that you are about to use protectors and acid gloves. 5. Perform pre-check of wet bench 1. Check the Coral indicator LED in the upper

  3. -delayed proton emission branches in 43Cr

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomorski, M. [University of Warsaw; Miernik, K. [University of Warsaw; Dominik, W. [University of Warsaw; Janas, Z. [University of Warsaw; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Czyrkowski, H. [University of Warsaw; Cwiok, Mikolaj [Warsaw University; Darby, Iain [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Dabrowski, Ryszard [Warsaw University; Ginter, T. N. [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz [ORNL; Karny, M. [University of Warsaw; Korgul, A. [University of Warsaw; Kusmierz, W. [University of Warsaw; Liddick, Sean [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rajabali, M. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Stolz, A. [Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The + decay of very neutron-deficient 43Cr was studied by means of an imaging time projection chamber that allowed recording tracks of charged particles. Events of -delayed emission of one, two, and three protons were clearly identified. The absolute branching ratios for these channels were determined to be (81 4)%, (7.1 0.4)%, and (0.08 0.03)%, respectively. 43Cr is thus established as the second case in which the -3p decay occurs. Although the feeding to the proton-bound states in 43V is expected to be negligible, the large branching ratio of (12 4)% for decays without proton emission is found.

  4. Observations and HighObservations and High--Resolution Modeling of SmallResolution Modeling of Small--Scale FlowScale Flow--TopographyTopography Interactions Near Caribbean Coral ReefsInteractions Near Caribbean Coral Reefs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ezer,Tal

    of Small--Scale FlowScale Flow--TopographyTopography Interactions Near Caribbean Coral ReefsInteractions Near Caribbean Coral Reefs Tal Ezer Center for Coastal Physical Oceanography, Old Dominion University wave-induced mixing and dispersion, providing a possible explanation why many species of Caribbean fish

  5. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Hydrogenation of CpCr(CO)3•/[CpCr(CO)3]2 Equilibrium to CpCr(CO)3H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, Jack R.; Spataru, Tudor; Camaioni, Donald M.; Lee, Suh-Jane; Li, Gang; Choi, Jongwook; Franz, James A.

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics of the hydrogenation of 2 CpCr(CO)3•/[CpCr(CO)3]2 to CpCr(CO)3H has been investigated. The reaction is second-order in Cr and first-order in H2, with a rate constant of 45 M 2s 1 at 25 °C in benzene. DFT calculations rule out an H2 complex as an intermediate, and suggest (a) end-on approach of H2 to one Cr of [CpCr(CO)3]2 as the Cr-Cr bond undergoes heterolytic cleavage, (b) heterolytic cleavage of the coordinated H2 between O and Cr, and (c) isomerization of the resulting O-protonated CpCr(CO)2(COH) to CpCr(CO)3H. The work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences; Battelle operates PNNL for DOE.

  6. Pleistocene hinterland evolution of the active Banda Arc: Surface uplift and neotectonic deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia AND Hinterland emergence of the active Banda arc-continent collision: Metamorphism, geochronology, and structure of the uplifted Kisar Atoll, Indonesia and related Banda Arc: surface uplift and neotectonic deformation recorded by coral terraces at Kisar, Indonesia

  7. Modulation of Light-Enhancement to Symbiotic Algae by Light-Scattering in Corals and Evolutionary Trends in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottino, Julio M.

    Modulation of Light-Enhancement to Symbiotic Algae by Light-Scattering in Corals and Evolutionary that the cost of enhancing light-amplification to the algae is revealed in decreased resilience) Modulation of Light-Enhancement to Symbiotic Algae by Light-Scattering in Corals and Evolutionary Trends

  8. Dual-phase Cr-Ta alloys for structural applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chain T. (Oak Ridge, TN); Brady, Michael P. (Oak Ridge, TN); Zhu, Jiahong (Knoxville, TN); Tortorelli, Peter F. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual phase alloys of chromium containing 2 to 11 atomic percent tantalum with minor amounts of Mo, Cr, Ti, Y, La, Cr, Si and Ge are disclosed. These alloys contain two phases including Laves phase and Cr-rich solid solution in either eutectic structures or dispersed Laves phase particles in the Cr-rich solid solution matrix. The alloys have superior mechanical properties at high temperature and good oxidation resistance when heated to above 1000.degree. C. in air.

  9. 15/07/12 5:47 AMA World Without Coral Reefs -NYTimes.com Page 1 of 3http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/14/opinion/a-world-without-coral-reefs.html?_r=2&hpw&pagewanted=print

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    15/07/12 5:47 AMA World Without Coral Reefs - NYTimes.com Page 1 of 3http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/14/opinion/a-world-without-coral-reefs.html?_r=2&hpw&pagewanted=print July 13, 2012 A World Without Coral of the world's coral reefs, the nurseries of tropical coastal fish stocks. They have become zombie ecosystems

  10. Sediments and reef corals of Cayo Arenas, Campeche Bank, Yucatan, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busby, Roswell Franklyn

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEDIMENTS AND REEF CORALS OF CAYO ARENAS, CAMPECHE BANK) YUCATAN, MEXICO A Thesis By ROSWELL F. BUSBY Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas AbM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... January 1965 Maj or Sub)cot: OCEANOGRAPHY SEDIMENTS AND REEF CORALS OF CAYO ARENAS, CAMPECHE BANK, YUCATAN, MEXICO A Thesis By ROSWELL F, BUSBY Approved as to style and content by: a o omm ttee Mem er Hea o pa t t em er January 1965 4...

  11. Magnetic coupling in neutral and charged Cr{sub 2}, Mn{sub 2}, and CrMn dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desmarais, N. [Institut de Physique Experimentale, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, PHB-Ecublens, CH-1015 Lausanne, (Switzerland)] [Institut de Physique Experimentale, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, PHB-Ecublens, CH-1015 Lausanne, (Switzerland); Reuse, F. A. [Institut de Physique Experimentale, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, PHB-Ecublens, CH-1015 Lausanne, (Switzerland)] [Institut de Physique Experimentale, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, PHB-Ecublens, CH-1015 Lausanne, (Switzerland); Khanna, S. N. [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284-2000 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284-2000 (United States)

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical ab initio studies of neutral, cationic and anionic Cr{sub 2}, Mn{sub 2}, and CrMn dimers have been carried out to explore the progression of magnetic coupling with the number of electrons. It is shown that while Cr{sub 2} and Cr{sub 2}{sup -} have antiferromagnetically coupled atomic spins, Cr{sub 2}{sup +} has a ferromagnetic ground state closely followed by an antiferromagnetic state. On the other hand, all Mn{sub 2} dimers are ferromagnetic, irrespective of the charge. The neutral CrMn is ferrimagnetic while the charged CrMn are antiferromagnetic. In all cases, the charged dimers are found to be more stable than the neutral ones. The results are compared with available calculations and experiments and the difficulties associated with theoretical description and the experimental interpretations are discussed. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  12. Sediments and reef corals of Cayo Arenas, Campeche Bank, Yucatan, Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Busby, Roswell Franklyn

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for confirming and suPplying iden- tification of various reef coral specimens, and the latter for taking the photo-micrographs used in this report. Special thanks are extended to Ing. Guillermo P. Salas, Director, Instituto de Geologia, University of Mexico...

  13. threatened by a welter of problems that destroy corals, ruin reef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghazanfar, Asif

    threatened by a welter of problems that destroy corals, ruin reef ecosystems and imperil fishing of restoring ecosystem health and increasing fish populations [6]. Broadscale implementation of such protected of adults and larvae [7]. Adult neighborhoods, that is, the way adult fish and invertebrates use habitat

  14. Primary U distribution in scleractinian corals and its implications for U series dating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adkins, Jess F.

    microsampling techniques to explore diagenetic processes in carbonates. These processes are important. Keywords: uranium; diagenesis; coral; dating. Index Terms: 1040 Geochemistry: Radiogenic isotope]. In addition to dating, the uranium concen- tration ([U]) in carbonates has been used to con- strain past water

  15. Shimrit Perkol-Finkel Yehuda Benayahu Community structure of stony and soft corals on vertical unplanned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benayahu, Yehuda

    reefs Ã? Biodiversity Ã? Multivariate analysis Ã? Red Sea Introduction Coral reefs worldwide reef ecosystems, artificial reefs (AR) have become permanent additions to the area, sustaining well. The results suggest that AR may increase local heterogeneity and space availability by adding novel habitats

  16. Major Cellular and Physiological Impacts of Ocean Acidification on a Reef Building Coral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be facing a significant increase in local and global stressors [1,3]. Global warming and ocean acidification, Townsville, Queensland, Australia, 5 Global Change Institute, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia Abstract As atmospheric levels of CO2 increase, reef-building corals are under greater

  17. Food supply mechanisms for cold-water corals along a continental shelf edge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiem, Øyvind

    similar to what is found outside parts of the Norwegian coast. In the simulations the model is first-water coral reefs of the species Lophelia pertusa are a major benthic habitat in Norwegian waters. However documented in the North-East Atlantic, especially in Norwegian waters (Fosså et al., 2004). The distribution

  18. Energy reserves and metabolism as indicators of coral recovery from bleaching Lisa J. Rodrigues1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grottoli, Andréa G.

    Energy reserves and metabolism as indicators of coral recovery from bleaching Lisa J. Rodrigues1. Grottoli School of Earth Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 Abstract With reduced of energy reserves (i.e., lipid, carbohydrate, protein) and heterotrophy to survive and recover

  19. NOAA Technical Report NESDIS 143 NOAA Coral Reef Watch 50 km Satellite Sea Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and solar-terrestrial sciences. From these sources, it develops and disseminates environmental data, energy development and distribution, global food supplies, and the development of natural resources. Mark Eakin1 William Skirving2,3 Tyler R. L. Christensen1,2 Alan E. Strong1,2 Jianke Li1,2 1 NOAA Coral

  20. Ocean acidification causes bleaching and productivity loss in coral reef builders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will show delayed and mixed responses. climate change global warming carbon dioxide Great Barrier ReefOcean acidification causes bleaching and productivity loss in coral reef builders K. R. N. Anthony1 with warming. Here, we report on an 8-week study that compared bleaching, productivity, and calcification

  1. Hydro International Corals and Water Column Study for Gulf Oil Spill Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    of NOAA's response to the Deepwater Horizon/BP oil spill. "This is a major catastrophe," said Nelson of Mexico to gather baseline data against which to measure change if oil from the Deepwater Horizon spillHydro International Corals and Water Column Study for Gulf Oil Spill Response 14/07/2010 A science

  2. Accepted Manuscript Comment on "Ccl2, Cx3cr1 and Ccl2/Cx3cr1 chemokine deficiencies are not sufficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Accepted Manuscript Comment on "Ccl2, Cx3cr1 and Ccl2/Cx3cr1 chemokine deficiencies on "Ccl2, Cx3cr1 and Ccl2/Cx3cr1 chemokine deficiencies are not sufficient to cause age- related retinal on "Ccl2, Cx3cr1 and Ccl2/Cx3cr1 chemokine deficiencies are not sufficient to cause age- related retinal

  3. Growth and recovery of three Caribbean scleractinian coral species following the severe thermally-mediated bleaching event of 2005 /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neal, Benjamin Paul

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to bleaching during heat stress, and there may be other asaffects coral response to heat stress. PLoS One 7:e34418responses to light, heat-stress and irradiance exposure,

  4. The following 24 credits are required. Course Cr Semester Course Cr Semester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Fundamentals of Pest Management 3 Soil and Water Science Minor 15 credits required Course Cr Required SWS SWS3023L Soil Judging 2 SWS4116 Environmental Nutrient Management 3 SWS4223 Environmental Biogeochemistry 3 SWS4231C Soil, Water, and Land Use 3 SWS4244 Wetlands 3 SWS4245 Water Resource Sustainability 3

  5. Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks. Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel...

  6. Common CX3CR1 alleles are associated with a reduced risk of headaches Short title: CX3CR1 gene polymorphisms and headaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Common CX3CR1 alleles are associated with a reduced risk of headaches Short title: CX3CR1 gene Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 in headaches and migraine. Methods: Distribution of two polymorphisms of the chemokine receptor CX3CR1 (V249I and T280M

  7. NUREG/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NUREG/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption Models in a Field Setting U.S. Geological Survey U/CR-6911 Tests of Uranium (VI) Adsorption Models in a Field Setting Manuscript Completed: August 2006 Date observations clearly demonstrated that in aquifers where U(VI) concentrations are controlled by adsorption

  8. CR Systems Engineering and Design March 2003 COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    CR Systems Engineering and Design March 2003 UCDAVIS COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCES CONFINED SPACE ENTRY to a combustible particulate is defined as a concentration greater than 20 percent of the minimum explosive as the atmospheric concentration immediately hazardous to life or health (IDLH). 1 #12;CR Systems Engineering

  9. Coral Radiocarbon Records of Indian Ocean Water Mass Mixing and Wind-Induced Upwelling Along the Coast of Sumatra, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilderson, T P; Grumet, N S; Abram, N J; Beck, J W; Dunbar, R B; Gagan, M K; Hantoro, W S; Suwargadi, B W

    2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) in the skeletal aragonite of annually banded corals track radiocarbon concentrations in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in surface seawater. As a result of nuclear weapons testing in the 1950s, oceanic uptake of excess {sup 14}C in the atmosphere has increased the contrast between surface and deep ocean {sup 14}C concentrations. We present accelerator mass spectrometric (AMS) measurements of radiocarbon isotope ({Delta}{sup 14}C) in Porites corals from the Mentawai Islands, Sumatra (0 S, 98 E) and Watamu, Kenya (3 S, 39 E) to document the temporal and spatial evolution of the {sup 14}C gradient in the tropical Indian Ocean. The rise in {Delta}{sup 14}C in the Sumatra coral, in response to the maximum in nuclear weapons testing, is delayed by 2-3 years relative to the rise in coral {Delta}{sup 14}C from the coast of Kenya. Kenya coral {Delta}{sup 14}C values rise quickly because surface waters are in prolonged contact with the atmosphere. In contrast, wind-induced upwelling and rapid mixing along the coast of Sumatra entrains {sup 14}C-depleted water from the subsurface, which dilutes the effect of the uptake of bomb-laden {sup 14}C by the surface-ocean. Bimonthly AMS {Delta}{sup 14}C measurements on the Mentawai coral reveal mainly interannual variability with minor seasonal variability. The interannual signal may be a response to changes in the Walker circulation, the development of easterly wind anomalies, shoaling of the eastern thermocline, and upwelling of {sup 14}C-depleted water along the coast of Sumatra. Singular spectrum analysis of the Sumatra coral {Delta}{sup 14}C record reveals a significant 3-year periodicity. The results lend support to the concept that ocean atmosphere interactions between the Pacific and Indian Oceans operate in concert with the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  10. Journal of Systems and Software, Vol. 82(1) pp. 131-143 (January 2009). http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jss.2008.06.036 CoRAL: A Transparent Fault-Tolerant Web Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamir, Yuval

    .jss.2008.06.036 CoRAL: A Transparent Fault-Tolerant Web Service Navid Aghdaie1 and Yuval Tamir * Concurrent is increasingly used for critical applications and services. We present a client-transparent mechanism, called CoRAL, that provides high reliability and availability for Web service. CoRAL provides fault tolerance even

  11. Usnesen ze 4. zasedn Vdeck rady AV CR konanho dne 10. z 1. Oven a kontrola zpisu z 3. zasedn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tebbens, Jurjen Duintjer

    reform terciárního vzdlávání. Vdecká rada AV CR bere se souhlasem na vdomí stanovisko AR AV CR k reform

  12. THE CORALREEF SOFTWARE SUITE AS A TOOL FOR SYSTEM AND NETWORK ADMINISTRATORS 1 The CoralReef software suite as a tool for system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    flexible enough for rapid in-house customization. Existing passive data collection tools are typically to real-time report gen- eration. CoralReef provides a convenient set of passive data tools for a diverse increasingly difficult and impor- tant. To this end we have created the CoralReef passive traffic monitoring

  13. THE CORALREEF SOFTWARE SUITE AS A TOOL FOR SYSTEM AND NETWORK ADMINISTRATORS 1 The CoralReef software suite as a tool for system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    exible enough for rapid in-house customization. Existing passive data collection tools are typically to ows analysis to real-time report gen- eration. CoralReef provides a convenient set of passive data networks has become increasingly diÆcult and impor- tant. To this end we have created the CoralReef passive

  14. Isochronicity Correction in the CR Storage Ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Litvinov; D. Toprek; H. Weick; A. Dolinskii

    2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A challenge for nuclear physics is to measure masses of exotic nuclei up to the limits of nuclear existence which are characterized by low production cross sections and short half-lives. The large acceptance Collector Ring (CR) at FAIR tuned in the isochronous ion-optical mode offers unique possibilities for measuring short-lived and very exotic nuclides. However, in a ring designed for maximal acceptance, many factors limit the resolution. One point is a limit in time resolution inversely proportional to the transverse emittance. But most of the time aberrations can be corrected and others become small for large number of turns. We show the relations of the time correction to the corresponding transverse focusing and that the main correction for large emittance corresponds directly to the chromaticity correction for transverse focusing of the beam. With the help of Monte-Carlo simulations for the full acceptance we demonstrate how to correct the revolution times so that in principle resolutions of dm/m=1E-6 can be achieved. In these calculations the influence of magnet inhomogeneities and extended fringe fields are considered and a calibration scheme also for ions with different mass-to-charge ratio is presented.

  15. NASA/CR2003212153 A Stochastic Collocation Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathelin, Lionel

    NASA Center for AeroSpace Information 7121 Standard Drive Hanover, MD 21076­1320 #12;NASA/CR­2003 Information Service (NTIS) 7121 Standard Drive 5285 Port Royal Road Hanover, MD 21076­1320 Springfield, VA

  16. 9 Cr-- 1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jablonski, Paul D; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    One or more embodiments relates to a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel has a tempered martensite microstructure and is comprised of both large (0.5-3 .mu.m) primary titanium carbides and small (5-50 nm) secondary titanium carbides in a ratio of. from about 1:1.5 to about 1.5:1. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel may be fabricated using exemplary austenizing, rapid cooling, and tempering steps without subsequent hot working requirements. The 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibits improvements in total mass gain, yield strength, and time-to-rupture over ASTM P91 and ASTM P92 at the temperature and time conditions examined.

  17. AVTA: 2010 Honda CR-Z Hybrid Downloadable Dynamometer Database...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at Argonne National Laboratory under the funding and guidance of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Honda CR-Z Hybrid (2010) More Documents & Publications AVTA: 2012 Chevrolet...

  18. Phase stability and elastic properties of Cr-V alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, M. C.; Suzuki, Y.; Schweiger, H.; Do?an, Ö.N.; Hawk, J.; Widom M.

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    V is the only element in the periodic table that forms a complete solid solution with Cr and thus is particularly important in alloying strategy to ductilize Cr. This study combines first-principles density functional theory calculations and experiments to investigate the phase stability and elastic properties of Cr–V binary alloys. The cluster expansion study reveals the formation of various ordered compounds at low temperatures that were not previously known. These compounds become unstable due to the configurational entropy of bcc solid solution as the temperature is increased. The elastic constants of ordered and disordered compounds are calculated at both T = 0 K and finite temperatures. The overall trends in elastic properties are in agreement with measurements using the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy method. The calculations predict that addition of V to Cr decreases both the bulk modulus and the shear modulus, and enhances the Poisson’s ratio, in agreement with experiments. Decrease in the bulk modulus is correlated to decrease in the valence electron density and increase in the lattice constant. An enhanced Poisson’s ratio for bcc Cr–V alloys (compared to pure Cr) is associated with an increased density of states at the Fermi level. Furthermore, the difference charge density in the bonding region in the (110) slip plane is highest for pure Cr and decreases gradually as V is added. The present calculation also predicts a negative Cauchy pressure for pure Cr, and it becomes positive upon alloying with V. The intrinsic ductilizing effect from V may contribute, at least partially, to the experimentally observed ductilizing phenomenon in the literature.

  19. Roles of Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cr3+ Surface Sites in the Oxidation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fe3+, and Cr3+ Surface Sites in the Oxidation of NO on the (Fe,Cr)3O4(1 1 1) Surface Termination of an -(Fe,Cr Roles of Fe2+, Fe3+, and Cr3+ Surface Sites in the Oxidation of NO...

  20. BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOLOGY (UNOFFICIAL) CATALOG 129 Fall (Th-Pr) Cr Spring (Th-Pr) Cr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BACHELOR OF ARTS IN GEOLOGY (UNOFFICIAL) CATALOG 129 Fall (Th-Pr) Cr Spring (Th-Pr) Cr Freshman Geology (3-3) 4 GEOL 106 Historical Geology (3-3) 4 MATH 166 Topics in Cont. Math II 1 (3-0) 3 MATH 131-3) 4 GEOP 341 Introduction to Global Geophysics (3-0) 3 GEOL 309 Introduction to Geologic Field Methods

  1. Characterization of the CR-39 neutron track etch dosimeter and evaluation of a combination CR-39/thermoluminescent dosimeter badge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoover, Paul Steven

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . Objectives . THEORY 2 5 9 12 14 Charged Particle Interactions and Damage Track Formation Neutron Converters The Etching Process Background Effects The Quality Factor MATERIALS AND METHODS 14 16 18 21 22 31 CR-39 Supply . CR-39... effectiveness and used for calculating the dose equivalent (H) of exposed personnel, do not offer the same margin of safety for all radiations, including neutrons. The result is a proposed increase in applied Q values to assure comparable safety in all...

  2. The effects of ferrochrome lignosulfonate on the respiration and excretion of the coral, Madracis mirabilis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westerhaus, Mary Joanne

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    review of this manuscript. Gary Wolff and Fain Hubbard are due thanks for the drafting of the figures. Thanks also go to the men at the Naval Coastal Systems Laboratory, Panama City, Florida, and to the people at Potomac Research, Incorporated, Panama... seawater. The platform is a 100 x 100 i' t. structure located 12 miles West-Southwest of Panama City, Florida in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. OXygen (0 ) consumption and ammonium (NH4+) excretion of the 2 coral~ Madracis mirabilis, were determined...

  3. http://www-cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp/gakubu/P6.html http://www-cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp/gakubu/P6.html

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011 P6 http://www-cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp/gakubu/P6.html web #12;http://www-cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp/gakubu/P6.html () ( #12;http://www-cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp/gakubu/P6.html X MeV X Astro-H 2013 TeV10m) #12;http://www-cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp/gakubu/P6.html 2010 ASTRO-H CCD X (2) () (2) (2

  4. Chromium Isotope Fractionation During Reduction of Cr(VI) Under Saturated Flow Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H.; Gibson, Blair D.; Lindsay, Matthew B.J.; Kim, Yeongkyoo; Ptacek, Carol J.; Blowes, David W. (Waterloo); (Kyungpook National University)

    2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium isotopes are potentially useful indicators of Cr(VI) reduction reactions in groundwater flow systems; however, the influence of transport on Cr isotope fractionation has not been fully examined. Laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to evaluate isotopic fractionation of Cr during Cr(VI) reduction under both static and controlled flow conditions. Organic carbon was used to reduce Cr(VI) in simulated groundwater containing 20 mg L{sup -1} Cr(VI) in both batch and column experiments. Isotope measurements were performed on dissolved Cr on samples from the batch experiments, and on effluent and profile samples from the column experiment. Analysis of the residual solid-phase materials by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and by X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy confirmed association of Cr(III) with organic carbon in the column solids. Decreases in dissolved Cr(VI) concentrations were coupled with increases in {delta}{sup 53}Cr, indicating that Cr isotope enrichment occurred during reduction of Cr(VI). The {delta}{sup 53}Cr data from the column experiment was fit by linear regression yielding a fractionation factor ({alpha}) of 0.9979, whereas the batch experiments exhibited Rayleigh-type isotope fractionation ({alpha} = 0.9965). The linear characteristic of the column {delta}{sup 53}Cr data may reflect the contribution of transport on Cr isotope fractionation.

  5. Effect of Cr concentration on resistance switching in Cr-doped SrZrO3 films and surface accumulation of Cr ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Se-Jung

    of Physics and Astronomy, CSCMR & FPRD, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747, South Korea 2 Université the film and the electrode. © 2010 American Institute of Physics. doi:10.1063/1.3499626 Recently, Cr of high-density integration, and high-speed write-erase operations.1­3 However, despite nu- merous

  6. Shifting base-lines, declining coral cover, and the erosion of reef resilience: comment on Sweatman et al. (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno, John F.

    complacency or denial. Keywords Shifting base-lines Á Climate change Á Monitoring Á Coral cover In recent- mental degradation from overfishing, pollution, and cli- mate change, calls for action rather than changes on land following the arrival of Europeans and their livestock, and from land clearing

  7. Journal of Indonesia Coral Reefs 1(3) (2012) 147-159 Printed ISSN : 2089-8231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvell, Catherine Drew

    Journal of Indonesia Coral Reefs 1(3) (2012) 147-159 Printed ISSN : 2089-8231 *Corresponding Author, Australia 5 Department of Marine Science dan Fisheries, Hasanuddin University, Indonesia 6 The Nature Conservatory, Indonesia Marine Program, Indonesia 7 Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell

  8. Chronology of mercury enrichment factors in reef corals from western Venezuela Ruth Ramos a,*, Roberto Cipriani b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    Keywords: Reef corals Sclerochronology Metal pollution Enrichment factors Mercury Petrochemical industry a b s t r a c t Mining and deforestation in the early 20th century, the development of petrochemical). Petrochemical plants, which usually are built on the coast for immediate access to ships, are one of the most

  9. Grain boundary depletion and migration during selective oxidation of Cr in a Ni-5Cr binary alloy exposed to high-temperature hydrogenated water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schreiber, Daniel K.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Bruemmer, Stephen M.

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-resolution microscopy of a high-purity Ni-5Cr alloy exposed to 360°C hydrogenated water reveals intergranular selective oxidation of Cr accompanied by local Cr depletion and diffusion-induced grain boundary migration (DIGM). The corrosion-product oxide consists of a porous, interconnected network of Cr2O3 platelets with no further O ingress into the metal ahead. Extensive grain boundary depletion of Cr (to <0.05at.%) is observed typically 20–100 nm wide as a result of DIGM and reaching depths of many micrometers beyond the oxidation front.

  10. Exchange bias in Fe/Cr double superlattices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, J. S.; Felcher, G. P.; Inomata, A.; Goyette, R.; Nelson, C.; Bader, S. D.

    1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing the oscillatory interlayer exchange coupling in Fe/Cr superlattices, we have constructed ''double superlattice'' structures where a ferromagnetic (F) and an antiferromagnetic (AF) Fe/Cr superlattice are coupled through a Cr spacer. The minor hysteresis loops in the magnetization are shifted from zero field, i.e., the F superlattice is exchange biased by the AF one. The double superlattices are sputter-deposited with (211) epitaxy and possess uniaxial in-plane magnetic anisotropy. The magnitude of the bias field is satisfactorily described by the classic formula for collinear spin structures. The coherent structure and insensitivity to atomic-scale roughness makes it possible to determine the spin distribution by polarized neutron reflectivity, which confirms that the spin structure is collinear. The magnetic reversal behavior of the double superlattices suggests that a realistic model of exchange bias needs to address the process of nucleating local reverse domains.

  11. Supernova 1996cr: SN 1987A's Wild Cousin?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. E. Bauer; V. V. Dwarkadas; W. N. Brandt; S. Immler; S. Smartt; N. Bartel; M. F. Bietenholz

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on new VLT optical spectroscopic and multi-wavelength archival observations of SN1996cr, a previously identified ULX known as Circinus Galaxy X-2. Our optical spectrum confirms SN1996cr as a bona fide type IIn SN, while archival imaging isolates its explosion date to between 1995-02-28 and 1996-03-16. SN1996cr is one of the closest SNe (~3.8 Mpc) in the last several decades and in terms of flux ranks among the brightest radio and X-ray SNe ever detected. The wealth of optical, X-ray, and radio observations that exist for this source provide relatively detailed constraints on its post-explosion expansion and progenitor history, including an preliminary angular size constaint from VLBI. The archival X-ray and radio data imply that the progenitor of SN1996cr evacuated a large cavity just prior to exploding: the blast wave likely expanded for ~1-2 yrs before eventually striking the dense circumstellar material which surrounds SN1996cr. The X-ray and radio emission, which trace the progenitor mass-loss rate, have respectively risen by a factor of ~2 and remained roughly constant over the past 7 yr. This behavior is reminiscent of the late rise of SN1987A, but 1000 times more luminous and much more rapid to onset. Complex Oxygen line emission in the optical spectrum further hints at a possible concentric shell or ring-like structure. The discovery of SN1996cr suggests that a substantial fraction of the closest SNe observed in the last several decades have occurred in wind-blown bubbles. An Interplanetary Network position allows us to reject a tentative GRB association with BATSE 4B960202. [Abridged

  12. Nitrate Enhanced Microbial Cr(VI) Reduction-Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. Stolz

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A major challenge for the bioremediation of radionuclides (i.e., uranium, technetium) and metals (i.e., Cr(VI), Hg) is the co-occurrence of nitrate as it can inhibit metal transformation. Denitrification (nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas) is considered the most important ecological process. For many metal and metalloid reducing bacteria, however, ammonia is the end product through respiratory nitrate reduction (RNRA). The focus of this work was to determine how RNRA impacts Cr(VI) transformation. The goal was to elucidate the specific mechanism(s) that limits Cr(VI) reduction in the presence of nitrate and to use this information to develop strategies that enhance Cr(VI) reduction (and thus detoxification). Our central hypothesis is that nitrate impacts the biotransformation of metals and metalloids in three ways 1) as a competitive alternative electron acceptor (inhibiting transformation), 2) as a co-metabolite (i.e., concomitant reduction, stimulating transformation), and 3) as an inducer of specific proteins and pathways involved in oxidation/reduction reactions (stimulating transformation). We have identified three model organisms, Geobacter metallireducens (mechanism 1), Sulfurospirillum barnesii, (mechasism 2), and Desulfovibrio desulfuricans (mechanisms 3). Our specific aims were to 1) investigate the role of Cr(VI) concentration on the kinetics of both growth and reduction of nitrate, nitrite, and Cr(VI) in these three organisms; 2) develop a profile of bacterial enzymes involved in nitrate transformation (e.g., oxidoreductases) using a proteomic approach; 3) investigate the function of periplasmic nitrite reductase (Nrf) as a chromate reductase; and 4) develop a strategy to maximize microbial chromium reduction in the presence of nitrate. We found that growth on nitrate by G. metallireducens was inhibited by Cr(VI). Over 240 proteins were identified by LC/MS-MS. Redox active proteins, outer membrane heavy metal efflux proteins, and chemotaxis sensory proteins (Gmet_2478 and Gmet_1641) were up-regulated with exposure to Cr(VI). A nine-heme cytochrome C was purified that could reduce nitrite and could be oxidized by Cr(VI). For D. desulfuricans, we found that confirmed that Cr(VI) induced a prolonged lag period when Cr(VI) was reduced. Over three hundred proteins were unequivocally identified by LC/MS-MS and a significant number of down-regulated proteins for which the levels were changed >2 fold compared to control. Sulfite reductase levels were similar, however, nitrate and nitrite reductase were down-regulated. The supernatant of spent cultures was found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI). In addition, desulfoviridin was purified from nitrate grown cells and shown to have nitrite reductase activity that was inhibited by Cr(VI). For S. barnesii, periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap), nitrite reductase (Nrf), and the metalloid reductase (Rar) were purified and characterized. The supernatant of spent cultures was also found to contain a filterable, heat stable compound that rapidly reduced Cr(VI) but that Rar also reduced Cr(VI). Our results from specific aims 1 through 3 indicate that for G. metallireducens, Cr(VI) inhibits nitrate respiration as it oxidizes cytochromes involved in nitrate respiration. Iron reduction is apparently not affected and the inhibitory affects of Cr(VI) may be attenuated by the addition of sufficient Fe(III) to generate Fe(II) that abiotically reduces the chromium. For S. barnesii, although the enzyme assays indicate that the components of the respiratory pathway for nitrate (e.g. Nap and Nrf) are inhibited by chromate, the organism has a mechanism to prevent this from actually occurring. Our current hypothesis is that the non-specific metalloid reductase (Rar) is providing resistance by reducing the Cr(VI). The strategy here would be to enhance its growth and metabolism in the natural setting. Lactate is a suitable electron donor for S. barnesii but other donors are possible. Although the version of the Phylochip used for monitoring the microb

  13. Belarus: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon,

  14. Math 5654 4cr Spring 2010 Prediction and Filtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Nicolai

    Math 5654 4cr Spring 2010 Syllabus Prediction and Filtering Lectures: 10:10am-12:05pm TTh, VinH 364: Saturday, May 15, 4 pm-6 pm. A few homeworks wil be assigned and the grades for them will enter as 2-dimensional case 133 2:2. Multidimensional case 137 3. Linear filtering 147 Chapter 6. Wiener process

  15. CR Mission BREST 05 09 juin 2000 ATELIER DE CALIBRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillard, Jean

    CR Mission BREST 05 ­ 09 juin 2000 ATELIER DE CALIBRATION Jean GUILLARD Dans la semaine du 05 au 09 juin 2000, un atelier de calibration a été organisé par l'IRD (U.S. « Hydroacoustique appliquée à l'IFREMER. La calibration des sondeurs est difficile à réaliser dans le milieu naturel, lors des

  16. ESTUDIOS GENERALES: Cdigo Asignatura CR Requisitos Profesor Bloq Horario Resumen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vásquez, Carlos

    cuyas implicaciones de carácter social, ético y legal deben ser del conocimiento de nuestros estudiantes. Con el fin de entender y manejar moléculas esenciales para la existencia, bienestar y supervivencia de CIENCIAS SOCIALES Y HUMANIDADES Departamento: CIENCIAS SOCIALES Código Asignatura CR Requisitos Profesor

  17. Giri Narasimhan CAP 5510: Introduction to Bioinformatics (3 cr)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, Giri

    , and the Internet · Overview of Bioinformatics, Computational Biology and Biotechnology · (*) Databases and Software Bioinformatics Computer Skills, Gibas & Jambeck, O'Reilly Publishers. · Algorithm on Strings, TreesGiri Narasimhan CAP 5510: Introduction to Bioinformatics (3 cr) Spring 2006: Tu Thu 11-12:15 in ECS

  18. Giri Narasimhan CAP 5510: Introduction to Bioinformatics (3 cr)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, Giri

    , and the Internet · Overview of Bioinformatics, Computational Biology and Biotechnology · (*) Databases and Software] · Developing Bioinformatics Computer Skills, Gibas & Jambeck, O'Reilly Publishers. · Algorithm on StringsGiri Narasimhan CAP 5510: Introduction to Bioinformatics (3 cr) Spring 2007: Tu Thu 11-12:15 in ECS

  19. Reversible nano-structuring of SrCrO3-? through oxidization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nano-structuring of SrCrO3- through oxidization and reduction at low temperatures. Reversible nano-structuring of SrCrO3- through oxidization and reduction at low temperatures....

  20. Thermal stability and oxidation resistance of TiCrAlYO coatings...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stability and oxidation resistance of TiCrAlYO coatings on SS430 for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications. Thermal stability and oxidation resistance of TiCrAlYO...

  1. Excited Carrier Dynamics of ?-Cr2O3/?-Fe2O3 Core...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Excited Carrier Dynamics of ?-Cr2O3?-Fe2O3 Core-Shell Nanostructures. Excited Carrier Dynamics of ?-Cr2O3?-Fe2O3 Core-Shell Nanostructures. Abstract: In...

  2. Epitaxial Cr on n-SrTiO3(001)—An ideal Ohmic contact ....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beam epitaxy are shown to result in an ordered interface with Cr bound to O in the terminal TiO2 layer, no reduction of the SrTiO3, and a near-perfect Ohmic contact. Cr...

  3. Surface structure of ?-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface structure of ?-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen exposure. Surface structure of ?-Cr2O3(0001) after activated oxygen exposure. Abstract: The surface structure...

  4. Growth of Cr-doped TiO Films in the Rutile and Anatase Structures...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Cr-doped TiO Films in the Rutile and Anatase Structures by Oxygen Plasma Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy . Growth of Cr-doped TiO Films in the Rutile and Anatase Structures by...

  5. Synthesis of Room-Temperature Ferromagnetic Cr-doped TiO(110...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room-Temperature Ferromagnetic Cr-doped TiO(110) Rutile Single Crystals using Ion Implantation. Synthesis of Room-Temperature Ferromagnetic Cr-doped TiO(110) Rutile Single Crystals...

  6. Reduction of Health Risks Due to Chromium(VI)Using Mesquite: A Potential Cr Phytoremediator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L.; Aldrich, Mary V.; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Parsons, Jason G.

    2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium is a transition metal extensively used in industry. Cr mining and industrial operations account for chromium wastes at Superfund sites in the United States. A study was performed to investigate the possibility of using mesquite (Prosopis spp.), which is an indigenous desert plant species, to remove Cr from contaminated sites. In this study, mesquite plants were grown in an agar-based medium containing 75 mg L-1 and 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI). The Cr content of leaf tissue (992 mg kg-1 of dry weight, from 125 mg L-1 of Cr(VI)) indicated that mesquite could be classified as a chromium hyperaccumulator. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies performed to experimental samples showed that mesquite roots absorbed some of the supplied Cr(VI). However, the data analyses of plant tissues demonstrated that the absorbed Cr(VI) was fully reduced to Cr(III) in the leaf tissue.

  7. Local-Orbital Ordering on Cr{sup 3+} Ions Doped in GaN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emura, S.; Kimura, S.; Tokuda, K.; Zhou, Yi-Kai; Hasegawa, S.; Asahi, H. [The Institute of Scientific and Industrial research, Osaka University, Mihogaoka 8-1, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-ray linear dichroism (XLD) at the pre-peaks of Cr K-edge, which corresponds to the transition from 1s to 3d orbital, is explicitly observed for cubic GaCrN and hexagonal GaCrN. This observation of XLD in the cubic structure of GaCrN indicates that CrN{sub 4} tetrahedron in the local coordination suffers inhomogeneous or anisotropic deformation. This deformation is also confirmed through the analysis of the X-ray absorption fine structure of Cr K-edge of the hexagonal GaCrN, indicating the shift of Cr{sup +3} ion along the <111> direction.

  8. CSC444-2001-CR-01A Page 1 14 November, 2001 Change Request #001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Easterbrook, Steve

    CSC444-2001-CR-01A Page 1 14 November, 2001 Change Request #001 for the CSC444 Graph Editor Document # CSC444-2001-CR-01A Revision A 14th November 2001 #12;CSC444-2001-CR-01A Page 2 14 November, 2001 ...................................................................................................... 5 #12;CSC444-2001-CR-01A Page 3 14 November, 2001 1 Scope This change request refers to the Graph

  9. Lightest Isotope of Bh Produced Via the 209Bi(52Cr,n)260Bh Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    models. For many years, “cold fusion” reactions utilizingproduced via the new “cold fusion” reaction 209 Bi( 52 Cr,

  10. G. J. Snyder Page 1 of 6 THERMOELECTRIC PROPERTIES OF CR3S4-TYPE SELENIDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    extremely low thermal conductivity [2, 3]. For instance, the magnetic semiconductor FeCr2Se4 has been

  11. Expression of CX3CR1 chemokine receptors on neurons and their role in neuronal survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meucci, Olimpia

    Expression of CX3CR1 chemokine receptors on neurons and their role in neuronal survival Olimpia expression of CX3CR1, the only known receptor for fractalkine, has been demonstrated exclusively on microglia, that hippocampal neurons also express CX3CR1. Receptor activation by soluble fractalkine induces activation

  12. austenitnoj cr-mn stali: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cr-mn stali First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Cavitation erosion of laser processed Fe-Cr-Mn and Fe-Cr-Co alloys CiteSeer Summary: Received...

  13. CVP EDR CrIS Barnet Public Release September 2009.doc NATIONAL POLAR-ORBITTING OPERATIONAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CVP EDR CrIS Barnet Public Release September 2009.doc NATIONAL POLAR-ORBITTING OPERATIONAL Project CrIS/ATMS EDRs DATE: 15 September No. I30004 VER. 1 REV. B PREPARED BY) Page 1 of 75 #12;CVP EDR CrIS Barnet Public Release September 2009.doc Table of Contents TABLE

  14. Non-classical nuclei and growth kinetics of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys during ageing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yulan; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Zhang, Lei; Sun, Xin

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this manuscript, we quantitatively calculated the thermodynamic properties of critical nuclei of Cr precipitates in FeCr alloys. The concentration profiles of the critical nuclei and nucleation energy barriers were predicted by the constrained shrinking dimer dynamics (CSDD) method. It is found that Cr concentration distribution in the critical nuclei strongly depend on the overall Cr concentration as well as temperature. The critical nuclei are non-classical because the concentration in the nuclei is smaller than the thermodynamic equilibrium value. These results are in agreement with atomic probe observation. The growth kinetics of both classical and non-classical nuclei was investigated by the phase field approach. The simulations of critical nucleus evolution showed a number of interesting phenomena: 1) a critical classical nucleus first shrinks toward its non-classical nucleus and then grows; 2) a non-classical nucleus has much slower growth kinetics at its earlier growth stage compared to the diffusion-controlled growth kinetics. 3) a critical classical nucleus grows faster at the earlier growth stage than the non-classical nucleus. All of these results demonstrate that it is critical to introduce the correct critical nuclei in order to correctly capture the kinetics of precipitation.

  15. Radiation effects on interface reactions of U/Fe, U/(Fe + Cr), and U/(Fe + Cr + Ni)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KUn Shao; Di Chen; Chaochen Wei; Michael S. Martin; Xuemei Wang; Youngjoo Park; Ed Dein; Kevin R. Coffey; b , Yongho Sohn; Bulent H. Sencer; J. Rory Kennedy

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effects of radiation damage on interdiffusion and intermetallic phase formation at the interfaces of U/Fe, U/(Fe + Cr), and U/(Fe + Cr + Ni) diffusion couples. Magnetron sputtering is used to deposit thin films of Fe, Fe + Cr, or Fe + Cr + Ni on U substrates to form the diffusion couples. One set of samples are thermally annealed under high vacuum at 450 C or 550 C for one hour. A second set of samples are annealed identically but with concurrent 3.5 MeV Fe++ ion irradiation. The Fe++ ion penetration depth is sufficient to reach the original interfaces. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry analysis with high fidelity spectral simulations is used to obtain interdiffusion profiles, which are used to examine differences in U diffusion and intermetallic phase formation at the buried interfaces. For all three diffusion systems, Fe++ ion irradiations enhance U diffusion. Furthermore, the irradiations accelerate the formation of intermetallic phases. In U/Fe couples, for example, the unirradiated samples show typical interdiffusion governed by Fick’s laws, while the irradiated ones show step-like profiles influenced by Gibbs phase rules.

  16. Surface half-metallicity of CrS thin films and perfect spin filtering and spin diode effects of CrS/ZnSe heterostructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, G. Y., E-mail: guoying-gao@mail.hust.edu.cn; Yao, K. L., E-mail: klyao@mail.hust.edu.cn [School of Physics and Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, ferromagnetic zinc-blende Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}S thin films (above x?=?0.5) were fabricated experimentally on ZnSe substrate, which confirmed the previous theoretical prediction of half-metallic ferromagnetism in zinc-blende CrS. Here, we theoretically reveal that both Cr- and S-terminated (001) surfaces of the CrS thin films retain the half-metallicity. The CrS/ZnSe(001) heterogeneous junction exhibits excellent spin filtering and spin diode effects, which are explained by the calculated band structure and transmission spectra. The perfect spin transport properties indicate the potential applications of half-metallic CrS in spintronic devices. All computational results are obtained by using the density functional theory combined with nonequilibrium Green's function.

  17. Surface water processes in the Indonesian Throughflow as documented by a high-resolution coral (Delta)14C record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fallon, S J; Guilderson, T P

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To explore the seasonal to decadal variability in surface water masses that contribute to the Indonesian Throughflow we have generated a 115-year bi-monthly coral-based radiocarbon time-series from a coral in the Makassar Straits. In the pre-bomb (pre-1955) era from 1890 to 1954, the radiocarbon time series occasionally displays a small seasonal signal (10-15{per_thousand}). After 1954 the radiocarbon record increases rapidly, in response to the increased atmospheric {sup 14}C content caused by nuclear weapons testing. From 1957 to 1986 the record displays clear seasonal variability from 15 to 60{per_thousand} and the post-bomb peak (163 per mil) occurred in 1974. The seasonal cycle of radiocarbon can be attributed to variations of surface waters passing through South Makassar Strait. Southern Makassar is under the influence of the Northwest Monsoon, which is responsible for the high Austral summer radiocarbon (North Pacific waters) and the Southeast Monsoon that flushes back a mixture of low (South Pacific and upwelling altered) radiocarbon water from the Banda Sea. The coral record also shows a significant {sup 14}C peak in 1955 due to bomb {sup 14}C water advected into this region in the form of CaCO{sub 3} particles (this implies that the particles were advected intact and then become entrapped in the coral skeleton--is this what we really mean? Wouldn't even fine particles settle out over the inferred transit time from Bikini to MAK?) or water particles with dissolved labeled CO{sub 2} produced during fallout from the Castle tests in 1954.

  18. Grain boundary migration induced segregation in V-Cr-Ti alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H. [Univ. of Hokkaido (Japan)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical electron microscopy results are reported for a series of vanadium alloys irradiated in the HFIR JP23 experiment at 500{degrees}C. Alloys were V-5Cr-5Ti and pure vanadium which are expected to have transmuted to V-15Cr-5Ti and V-10Cr following irradiation. Analytical microscopy confirmed the expected transmutation occurred and showed redistribution of Cr and Ti resulting from grain boundary migration in V-5Cr-5Ti, but in pure V, segregation was reduced and no clear trends as a function of position near a boundary were identified.

  19. Partially filled intermediate band of Cr-doped GaN films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonoda, S. [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the band structure of sputtered Cr-doped GaN (GaCrN) films using optical absorption, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, and charge transport measurements. It was found that an additional energy band is formed in the intrinsic band gap of GaN upon Cr doping, and that charge carriers in the material move in the inserted band. Prototype solar cells showed enhanced short circuit current and open circuit voltage in the n-GaN/GaCrN/p-GaN structure compared to the GaCrN/p-GaN structure, which validates the proposed concept of an intermediate-band solar cell.

  20. Improving thermostability of CrO{sub 2} thin films by doping with Sn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Yi; Wang, Ziyu; Liu, Shuo; Shi, Jing; Yin, Di, E-mail: dyin@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Yuan, Cheng; Lu, Zhihong, E-mail: zludavid@live.com [School of Materials and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Xiong, Rui, E-mail: xiongrui@whu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium dioxide (CrO{sub 2}) is an ideal material for spin electronic devices since it has almost 100% spin polarization near Fermi level. However, it is thermally unstable and easily decomposes to Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} even at room temperature. In this study, we try to improve the thermal stability of CrO{sub 2} thin films by doping with Sn whose oxide has the same structure as CrO{sub 2}. High quality epitaxial CrO{sub 2} and Sn-doped CrO{sub 2} films were grown on single crystalline TiO{sub 2} (100) substrates by chemical vapor deposition. Sn{sup 4+} ions were believed to be doped into CrO{sub 2} lattice and take the lattice positions of Cr{sup 4+}. The magnetic measurements show that Sn-doping leads to a decrease of magnetocrystalline anisotropy. The thermal stabilities of the films were evaluated by annealing the films at different temperatures. Sn-doped films can withstand a temperature up to 510?°C, significantly higher than what undoped films can do (lower than 435?°C), which suggests that Sn-doping indeed enhances the thermal stability of CrO{sub 2} films. Our study also indicates that Sn-doping may not change the essential half metallic properties of CrO{sub 2}. Therefore, Sn-doped CrO{sub 2} is expected to be very promising for applications in spintronic devices.

  1. Cr{sub 2}Nb-based alloy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C.T.; Horton, J.A.; Carmichael, C.A.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes recent progress in developing Cr{sub 2}Nb/Cr(Nb) alloys for structural use in advanced fossil energy conversion systems. Alloy additions were added to control the microstructure and mechanical properties. Two beneficial elements have been identified among all alloying additions added to the alloys. One element is effective in refining the coarse eutectic structure and thus substantially improves the compressive strength and ductility of the alloys. The other element enhances oxidation resistance without sacrificing the ductility. The tensile properties are sensitive to cast defects, which can not be effectively reduced by HIPping at 1450-1580{degrees}C and/or directionally solidifying via a floating zone remelting method.

  2. NEGLIGIBLE CREEP CONDITIONS FOR MOD 9 CR 1 MO STEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Riou, Bernard [AREVA Group; Escaravage, Claude [AREVA Group; Swindeman, Robert W [ORNL; Cabrillat, Marie-Th?r?se [CEA Cadarache, St. Paul lex Durance, France; Allais, Lucien [CEA, Saclay, France

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mod 9 Cr 1 Mo Steel (grade 91) is one of the materials envisaged for the Reactor Pressure Vessel of Very High Temperature Reactors. To avoid the implementation of a surveillance program covering the monitoring of the creep damage throughout the whole life of the reactor, it is recommended to operate the Reactor Pressure Vessel in the negligible creep regime. In this paper, the background of negligible creep criteria available in nuclear Codes is first recalled and their limitations were analyzed. Then, guidance for deriving criteria more appropriate for mod 9 Cr 1 Mo steel is provided. Finally, R&D actions in the U. S. and France to support the new approaches are discussed and recommended.

  3. Gestion d'un cache Loris Marchal CR08 ordonnancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchal, Loris

    Gestion d'un cache Loris Marchal ­ CR08 ordonnancement 30 novembre 2011 1 Introduction On s'int´eresse au probl`eme de la gestion d'une m´emoire temporaire, couramment ap- pel´ee cache. Plut^ot qu´etitivit´e On consid`ere le cas offline, c'est-`a-dire qu'on conna^it `a l'avance toute la s´equence des requ

  4. Gestion d'un cache Loris Marchal CR07 ordonnancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchal, Loris

    Gestion d'un cache Loris Marchal ­ CR07 ordonnancement 17 d´ecembre 2012 1 Introduction On s'int´eresse au probl`eme de la gestion d'une m´emoire temporaire, couramment ap- pel´ee cache. Plut^ot qu´etitivit´e On consid`ere le cas offline, c'est-`a-dire qu'on conna^it `a l'avance toute la s´equence des requ

  5. Long-term corrosion of Cr-Mo steels in superheated steam at 482 and 538/sup 0/C. [21/4 Cr-1 Mo; 9 Cr-1 Mo; Sumitomo 9 Cr-2 Mo; Sandvik HT-9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griess, J.C.; DeVan, J.H.; Maxwell, W.A.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The corrosion of several Cr-Mo ferritic steels was investigated in superheated steam at an operating power plant. Tests were conducted at 482 and 538/sup 0/C (900 and 1000/sup 0/F) in a once-through loop for times up to 28,000 h. Chromium concentrations ranged from 2.0 to 11.3%, and the effect of surface preparation on corrosion was investigated. Only one of many specimens showed evidence of exfoliation at 482/sup 0/C, but at 538/sup 0/C exfoliation occurred on at least some of the specimens of most materials; the exceptions were the alloy with the highest chromium content (Sandvik HT-9), one heat of 9 Cr-1 Mo steel with the highest silicon content, and Sumitomo 9 Cr-2 Mo steel, which was in test for only 19,000 h. Parabolic oxidation kinetics adequately described the corrosion process for about the first year, after which corrosion rates were constant and lower than predicted from extrapolation of the initial part of the penetration versus time curves. With chromium concentrations between 2 and 9%, corrosion behavior was independent of chromium content, and corrosion was only slightly less with Sandvik HT-9. Corrosion was nearly independent of surface preparation, but in two cases the presence of mill scale on the surface prior to steam exposure seemed to retard oxidation in steam. 11 figures, 5 tables.

  6. Low-cost, highly efficient, and tunable ultrafast laser technology based on directly diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirbas, Umit

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This doctoral project aims to develop robust, ultra low-cost ($5,000-20,000), highly-efficient, and tunable femtosecond laser technology based on diode-pumped Cr:Colquiriite gain media (Cr:LiCAF, Cr3+:LiSAF and Cr:LiSGaF). ...

  7. Role of Embedded Clustering in Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors: Cr Doped GaN X. Y. Cui,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medvedeva, Julia E.

    Role of Embedded Clustering in Dilute Magnetic Semiconductors: Cr Doped GaN X. Y. Cui,1 J. E provide direct evidence that Cr atoms in Cr:GaN have a strong tendency to form embedded clusters, to date, the ma- jority of first-principles investigations into DMS--and Cr:GaN, Mn:GaN, and Mn

  8. Effect of Processing and Microalloying Elements on the Thermal Stability of Cr-Cr3Si and NiAl-Mo Eutectic Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gali, Aravind [ORNL; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL; George, Easo P [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal stability of multiphase intermetallics at temperatures to 1400 C was investigated by studying two model eutectic systems: Cr-Cr{sub 3}Si having a lamellar microstructure and NiAl-Mo having a fibrous microstructure. In drop cast Cr-Cr{sub 3}Si, coarsening was found to be interface controlled. The coarsening rate could be reduced by microalloying with Ce and Re, two elements which were chosen because they were expected to segregate to the Cr-Cr{sub 3}Si interfaces and decrease their energies. Similarly, directional solidification, which is also expected to lower the Cr-Cr{sub 3}Si interfacial energy, was found to dramatically decrease the coarsening rate. In the case of NiAl-Mo, coarsening was found to occur by fault migration and annihilation. Microalloying with B was found to significantly decrease the coarsening rate. The fiber density in the B-doped alloy was smaller than in the undoped alloy, suggesting that B affects the coarsening rate by lowering the fault density.

  9. r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr100290v |Chem. Rev. XXXX, XXX, 000000 pubs.acs.org/CR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    r XXXX American Chemical Society A dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr100290v |Chem. Rev. XXXX, XXX, 000 emission regulations Received: September 1, 2010 #12;B dx.doi.org/10.1021/cr100290v |Chem. Rev. XXXX, XXX

  10. The electronic bands of CrD, CrH, MgD and MgH: application to the "deuterium test"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ya. V. Pavlenko; G. J. Harris; J. Tennyson; H. R. A. Jones; J. M. Brown; C. Hill; L. A. Yakovina

    2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute opacities for the electronic molecular band systems A 6Sigma+ -- X 6Sigma+ of CrH and CrD, and A 2Pi -- X 2Sigma+ of MgH and MgD. The opacities are computed by making use of existing spectroscopic constants for MgH and CrH. These constants are adjusted for the different reduced masses of MgD and CrD. Frank-Condon factors are used to provide intensities for the individual vibronic bands. These results are used in the computation of synthetic spectra between Tef = 1800 and 1200 K with an emphasis on the realisation of ``deuterium test'', first proposed by Bejar et al. (1999) to distinguish brown dwarfs from planetary mass objects. We discuss the possible use of CrD and MgD electronic bands for the "deuterium test". We find CrD to be the more promising of the two deuterides, potentially, the most useful bands of CrH/CrD are the Delta v = +1 and Delta v = -1 at 0.795 and 0.968 micron.

  11. The electronic bands of CrD, CrH, MgD and MgH: application to the "deuterium test"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlenko, Ya V; Tennyson, J; Jones, H R A; Brown, J M; Hill, C; Yakovina, L A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute opacities for the electronic molecular band systems A 6Sigma+ -- X 6Sigma+ of CrH and CrD, and A 2Pi -- X 2Sigma+ of MgH and MgD. The opacities are computed by making use of existing spectroscopic constants for MgH and CrH. These constants are adjusted for the different reduced masses of MgD and CrD. Frank-Condon factors are used to provide intensities for the individual vibronic bands. These results are used in the computation of synthetic spectra between Tef = 1800 and 1200 K with an emphasis on the realisation of ``deuterium test'', first proposed by Bejar et al. (1999) to distinguish brown dwarfs from planetary mass objects. We discuss the possible use of CrD and MgD electronic bands for the "deuterium test". We find CrD to be the more promising of the two deuterides, potentially, the most useful bands of CrH/CrD are the Delta v = +1 and Delta v = -1 at 0.795 and 0.968 micron.

  12. Microstructural analyses of Cr(VI) speciation in chromite ore processing Residue (COPR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHRYSOCHOOU, MARIA; FAKRA, SIRINE C .; Marcus, Matthew A.; Moon, Deok Hyun; Dermatas, Dimitris

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The speciation and distribution of Cr(VI) in the solid phase was investigated for two types of chromite ore processing residue (COPR) found at two deposition sites in the United States: gray-black (GB) granular and hard brown (HB) cemented COPR. COPR chemistry and mineralogy were investigated using micro-X-ray absorption spectroscopy and micro-X-ray diffraction, complemented by laboratory analyses. GB COPR contained 30percent of its total Cr(VI) (6000 mg/kg) as large crystals(>20 ?m diameter) of a previously unreported Na-rich analog of calcium aluminum chromate hydrates. These Cr(VI)-rich phases are thought to be vulnerable to reductive and pH treatments. More than 50percent of the Cr(VI) was located within nodules, not easily accessible to dissolved reductants, and bound to Fe-rich hydrogarnet, hydrotalcite, and possibly brucite. These phases are stable over a large pH range, thus harder to dissolve. Brownmilleritewasalso likely associated with physical entrapment of Cr(VI) in the interior of nodules. HB COPR contained no Cr(VI)-rich phases; all Cr(VI) was diffuse within the nodules and absent from the cementing matrix, with hydrogarnet and hydrotalcite being the main Cr(VI) binding phases. Treatment ofHBCOPRis challenging in terms of dissolving the acidity-resistant, inaccessible Cr(VI) compounds; the same applies to ~;;50percent of Cr(VI) in GB COPR.

  13. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1–9 MeV protons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; et al

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak®) to protons in the energy range of 0.92–9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. Effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather than themore »age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.« less

  14. The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector to 1–9 MeV protons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Manuel, M.; McDuffee, S. C.; Casey, D. T.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of CR-39 nuclear track detector (TasTrak®) to protons in the energy range of 0.92–9.28 MeV has been studied. Previous studies of the CR-39 response to protons have been extended by examining the piece-to-piece variability in addition to the effects of etch time and etchant temperature; it is shown that the shape of the CR-39 response curve to protons can vary from piece-to-piece. Effects due to the age of CR-39 have also been studied using 5.5 MeV alpha particles over a 5-year period. Track diameters were found to degrade with the age of the CR-39 itself rather than the age of the tracks, consistent with previous studies utilizing different CR-39 over shorter time periods.

  15. Improved oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, K.; Baxter, D.J.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1 to 8 wt % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C.

  16. Oxidation sulfidation resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Natesan, Ken (Naperville, IL); Baxter, David J. (Woodridge, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High temperature resistance of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy compositions to oxidative and/or sulfidative conditions is provided by the incorporation of about 1-8 wt. % of Zr or Nb and results in a two-phase composition having an alloy matrix as the first phase and a fine grained intermetallic composition as the second phase. The presence and location of the intermetallic composition between grains of the matrix provides mechanical strength, enhanced surface scale adhesion, and resistance to corrosive attack between grains of the alloy matrix at temperatures of 500.degree.-1000.degree. C.

  17. SF6432-CR (02-01-13) Cost Reimbursement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobs RunningSEABRV 148002/01/12CR xx-xxxx)

  18. SF6432-CR (02-01-13) Cost Reimbursement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements RecentlyElectronicResourcesjobs RunningSEABRV 148002/01/12CR

  19. Bulk and track etch properties of CR-39 SSNTD etched in NaOH/ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    Bulk and track etch properties of CR-39 SSNTD etched in NaOH/ethanol K.F. Chan, F.M.F. Ng, D. described the use of NaOH/ethanol as an etchant for the CR-39 detector, and have determined the corre and track etch properties of CR- 39 in NaOH/ethanol were derived from direct measurements. The bulk etch

  20. Species composition and population levels of scleractinean corals within the Diploria-Montastrea-Porites Zone of the East Flower Garden Bank, northwest Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viada, Stephen Tomas

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Levels of Scleractinean Corals Within the Diploria-Montastrea-Porites Zone of the East Flower Garden Bank, Northwest Gulf of Mexico. (December 1980) Stephen Tomas Viada, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Thomas J. Bright... Population levels of scleractinean corals at "top-reef" and "reef edge" sites within the Di ploria-Montastrea-Pori tes Zone of the East Flower Garden Bank were determined at two sites by means of a series of 34 stratified random photographic line transects...

  1. Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Romy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ecogenomics study for bioremediation of Cr(VI) at HanfordRegenesis In-situ bioremediation at Hanford 100H area ??

  2. Proton spectroscopy of 48Ni, 46Fe, and 44Cr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Pomorski; M. Pfützner; W. Dominik; R. Grzywacz; A. Stolz; T. Baumann; J. S. Berryman; H. Czyrkowski; R. D?browski; A. Fija?kowska; T. Ginter; J. Johnson; G. Kami?ski; N. Larson; S. N. Liddick; M. Madurga; C. Mazzocchi; S. Mianowski; K. Miernik; D. Miller; S. Paulauskas; J. Pereira; K. P. Rykaczewski; S. Suchyta

    2014-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of decay spectroscopy on nuclei in vicinity of the doubly magic 48Ni are presented. The measurements were performed with a Time Projection Chamber with optical readout which records tracks of ions and protons in the gaseous volume. Six decays of 48Ni including four events of two-proton ground-state radioactivity were recorded. An advanced reconstruction procedure yielded the 2p decay energy for 48Ni of Q2p = 1.29(4) MeV. In addition, the energy spectra of \\b{eta}-delayed protons emitted in the decays of 44Cr and 46Fe, as well as half-lives and branching ratios were determined. The results were found to be consistent with the previous measurements made with Si detectors. A new proton line in the decay of 44Cr corresponding to the decay energy of 760 keV is reported. The first evidence for the \\b{eta}2p decay of 46 Fe, based on one clear event, is shown.

  3. Postirradiation deformation of ferritic Fe-Cr binary alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six binary Fe-Cr alloys ranging from 3 to 18% chromium were irradiated in the form of miniature tensile specimens in the Fast Flux Test Facility and tested at room temperature. The irradiation conditions produced 7 to 30 dpa at 365 to 574{degrees}C. The major purpose of the experiment was to compare the behavior of these simple alloys with that of more complex commercial alloys, The tensile data obtained on these specimens at room temperature are discussed with appropriate fractographic and microstructural support. Previous studies on similar materials had revealed the presence of a feature typically exhibited in channel fractures: elongated voids were evident in shear bands of an irradiated and deformed TEM disk of a binary Fe-6Cr alloy. An additional purpose of the experiment was therefore to provide a better understanding of the potential contribution of channel fracture to deformation in ferritic alloys. No evidence for channel fracture was found, however. 14 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Corrosion resistance evaluation of 22Cr duplex stainless steel weldments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopliku, A. [AGIP S.p.A., Milan (Italy); Bell, D. [AGIP UK, London (United Kingdom); Barteri, M. [C.S.M., Rome (Italy); Fowler, C. [CAPCIS, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the alternatives for the materials to be used for the construction of two flowlines 22Cr duplex stainless steel was taken into consideration. Corrosion resistance of the welds when exposed to the produced sour fluids was considered as the most critical point, so a program of corrosion testing on the 22Cr duplex stainless steel welds was developed. Three different welding procedures were used and tested in two different laboratories; specimens belonging to one of the welding procedures were also tested after a pre-strain to assess the effect of the deformation induced in the pipe by the wrapping in a reel. Tests were performed in an environment simulating the expected flowlines internal service conditions. Several testing procedures were used. Pitting test according to ASTM G48 Standard were carried out in order to rank welds and exposure tests in simulated field conditions were performed to assess stress corrosion and localized corrosion resistance. Test results showed that all the welds passed the tests and were applicable as corrosion resistant in the service environment. A ranking of the weld procedure based on their corrosion resistance has been determined.

  5. Sublethal metabolic responses of the hermatypic coral Madracis decactis exposed to drilling mud enriched with ferrochrome lignosulfonate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krone, Michael August

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were conducted at Stage-l, a three tiered 100' by 100' research platform locateri 12 miles offshore from Panama City, Florida. This offshore laboratory is managed by the Naval Coasta'I Systems Center. The laboratory seawa'er system in- take at a... south of Galveston, Texas on the out r edge of the continental shelf at 93 48. 5' west longitude and 27 52. 3' north la. itude (see Figure 2), At the collection site the coral s were placed in aer;ter! !G! 00 aquaria for transport to Fre port...

  6. Oxygen and Carbon Isotopes and Coral Growth in the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean Sea as Environmental and Climate Indicators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Amy Jo

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    thanks goes to the crew of the M/V Fling; the Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary (FGBNMS) staff, E. Hickerson, G.P. Schmal, L. Kurjelja; the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary staff, J. Halas, B. Causey, A. Massey; U.S. Geological Survey... OXYGEN AND CARBON ISOTOPES AND CORAL GROWTH IN THE GULF OF MEXICO AND CARIBBEAN SEA AS ENVIRONMENTAL AND CLIMATE INDICATORS A Dissertation by AMY JO WAGNER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

  7. Effect of Cr2O3 on the 18O Tracer Incorporation in SOFC Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterbusch, M.; Lussier, A; Negusse, E; Zhu, Z; Smith, R; Schaefer, J; Idzerda, Y

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations of the impact of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayers on the oxygen self diffusion in two SOFC materials were conducted to gain insight into the Cr poisoning mechanism at the cathode side of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with stainless steel interconnects. High density Y{sub 0.15}Zr{sub 0.85}O{sub 2} (YSZ) and La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF) sintered pellets were covered with 3 to 30 nm Cr overlayers that were subsequently oxidized, forming Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Standard {sup 18}O tracer diffusion experiments at 800 C were performed and ToF-SIMS profiling revealed that the oxygen ion diffusion coefficients were unaffected by the thin Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayers, which is predictable since they are a bulk property, but the extracted effective surface exchange coefficients varied with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} overlayer thickness. Solid-state reaction measurements and electronic structure considerations concerning the surface exchange, led to the conclusion that the observed oxygen uptake hindrance for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} capped LSCF and the slight increase of the surface exchange coefficient for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} capped YSZ can be attributed to the electronic properties of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A critical thickness for Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} was determined to be 12 nm where the transition from decreasing cathode-performance to a Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}-property-governed regime occurs.

  8. Effect of Cr2O3 on the O-18 Tracer Incorporation in SOFC Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finsterbusch, Martin; Lussier, Alexandre; Negusse, Ezana; Zhu, Zihua; Smith, Richard J.; Schaefer, Jurgen A.; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    To gain insight into the Cr poisoning mechanism at the cathode side of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with stainless steel interconnects, we conducted an investigation of the impact of Cr2O3 overlayers on oxygen diffusion in various SOFC electrolyte and cathode materials. High density Gd0.10Ce0.90O2 (GDC), Y0.15Zr0.85O2 (YSZ) and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O2 (LSCF) sintered pellets were covered with 3 to 30 nm Cr - overlayers that were subsequently oxidized, forming Cr2O3. Standard 18O tracer diffusion experiments at 800°C were performed and TOFSIMS profiling revealed a Cr2O3 thickness-dependent oxygen uptake process. The oxygen ion diffusion coefficients were found to be unaffected by the Cr2O3 overlayers, which is predictable since they are a bulk property. The extracted surface exchange coefficients however varied with Cr2O3 overlayer thickness. Solid state reaction measurements of Cr2O3 with the three materials of interest, and electronic structure considerations concerning the surface exchange, led to the conclusion that the observed oxygen uptake hindrance for LSCF and the slight increase of the surface exchange coefficient for YSZ can be attributed to the electronic properties of Cr2O3. The rate limitation of the oxygen incorporation into the materials is therefore strongly dependent on the surface electronic properties. A critical thickness of Cr2O3 was determined where the transition from decreased cathode-performance to a Cr2O3-property-governed regime occurs.

  9. ENDOR study of Cr3 centers substituting for lithium in lithium niobate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malovichko, Galina

    ENDOR study of Cr3¿ centers substituting for lithium in lithium niobate G. Malovichko,1, * V centers in lithium niobate crystals were investigated with the help of electron nuclear double resonance and the parameters of hyperfine and quadrupole interactions were determined. It is found that Cr3 substitutes for Li

  10. NASA/CR-2002-211759 ICASE Report No. 2002-26

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lüttgen, Gerald

    7121 Standard Drive Hanover, MD 21076-1320 #12;NASA/CR-2000- ICASE Report No. NASA/CR-2002-211759 ICASE 5285 Port Royal Road Hanover, MD 21076-1320 Springfield, VA 22161-2171 (301) 621-0390 (703) 487

  11. Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E. Brodie; S.; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; M.; P. E. Long; Resch, C.T.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

    2005-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this paper is to carry out field investigations to assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford 100H site.

  12. Precipitation in a Cu–Cr–Zr–Mg alloy during aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, J.Y., E-mail: bigchengjianyi@163.com; Shen, B.; Yu, F.X.

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The precipitation processes in a Cu-0.69Cr-0.10Zr-0.02Mg alloy aged at 450 °C and 550 °C have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The precipitation sequence in this alloy aged at 450 °C is: supersaturated solid solution ? Guinier–Preston zone (fcc Cr-rich phase) ? ordered fcc Cr-rich phase ? ordered bcc Cr-rich phase. The precipitation sequence in this alloy aged at 550 °C is: supersaturated solid solution ? ordered fcc Cr-rich phase ? ordered bcc Cr-rich phase. In the evolution of decomposition, the orientation relationship between the precipitates and the Cu matrix changes from cube-on-cube to Nishiyama–Wassermann orientation. The ordering of Cr-rich precipitates facilitates the formation of the bcc precipitates and promotes the development of Nishiyama–Wassermann orientation. - Highlights: • Two different precipitation sequences in the Cu–Cr–Zr–Mg alloy are proposed. • The changes in orientation relationship of the precipitates are presented. • The roles of ordering and coherent interface of the precipitates are discussed.

  13. Strain rate dependence of deformation mechanisms in a NiTiCr shape-memory alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    Strain rate dependence of deformation mechanisms in a Ni­Ti­Cr shape-memory alloy Sia Nemat of a Ni­Ti­Cr shape-memory alloy is investigated at various initial temperatures, over a wide range significantly affects the superelastic and yielding behavior of this shape-memory alloy within the superelastic

  14. Corrosion Behavior of Solution-Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    ! ! ! Corrosion Behavior of Solution- Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant Alloys Pooja Panigrahi University June 6, 2011 #12;! ! ""! Corrosion Behavior of Solution-Annealed CoCrMo Medical Implant Alloys and Applied Sciences Northwestern University June 6, 2011 Abstract Corrosion behavior of solution annealed

  15. FINITE JET DETERMINATION OF LOCAL CR AUTOMORPHISMS THROUGH RESOLUTION OF DEGENERACIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    FINITE JET DETERMINATION OF LOCAL CR AUTOMORPHISMS THROUGH RESOLUTION OF DEGENERACIES BERNHARD real-analytic CR automorphisms of M are uniquely determined by their k-jets (at p). To prove special class of nonminimal hypersurfaces for which one may use known techniques to prove the finite jet

  16. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2004.06.033 U ages from a Single Fossil Coral Fragment by Multi-collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairbanks, Richard G.

    /238 Uinitial values close to seawater, there is a need for age validation. Redundant 230 Th/234 U/238 chemistry, modified to permit the separation of uranium, thorium, and protactinium isotopes from a single. INTRODUCTION Uranium series age dating of corals, by high-precision and high-accuracy mass spectrometric

  17. 5.1 Overview In evaluating the 82 candidate coral species, the BRT first assessed whether the taxonomic units in the candidate list

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Endangered Species Act. Next, to estimate extinction risk for each of the candidate species, the BRT relied to reach a final BRT determination on extinction risk. 5.2 The Species Question The BRT first examined 99 5. METHODS 5.1 Overview In evaluating the 82 candidate coral species, the BRT first

  18. Addressing the dilemma of development on a coral reef atoll: A case study of Agatti atoll, in the Lakshadweep archipelago of India. ? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajwade, Aparajita

    of literature based on coral reef atoll management using co-managed MPAs. Second, a case study approach was used to analyse documents pertinent to Agatti’s socio-ecological system (SES). After careful analysis of the Agatti atoll and its parent archipelago...

  19. Solid state phase equilibria and intermetallic compounds of the Al-Cr-Ho system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, Mingjun [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China) [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); SAIC-GM-Wuling Automobile Co., Ltd., Liuzhou, Guangxi 545007 (China); Zhan, Yongzhong, E-mail: zyzmatres@yahoo.com.cn [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China)] [Laboratory of Nonferrous Metal Materials and New Processing Technology, Ministry of Education, Guangxi University, Nanning, Guangxi 530004 (China); Du, Yong [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid state phase equilibria of the Al-Cr-Ho ternary system at 500 Degree-Sign C were experimentally investigated. The phase relations at 500 Degree-Sign C are governed by 14 three-phase regions, 29 two-phase regions and 15 single-phase regions. The existences of 10 binary compounds and 2 ternary phases have been confirmed. Al{sub 11}Cr{sub 2}, Al{sub 11}Cr{sub 4} and Al{sub 17}Ho{sub 2} were not found at 500 Degree-Sign C. Crystal structures of Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} and Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho were determined by the Rietveld X-ray powder data refinement. Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} was found to exhibit cubic structure with space group I4-bar 3m (no. 217) and lattice parameters a=0.9107(5) nm. Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho crystallizes in ThMn{sub 12} structure type with space group I4/mmm (no. 139) and lattice parameters a=0.8909(4) nm, c=0.5120(5) nm. It is concluded that the obtained Al{sub 4}Cr phase in this work should be {mu}-Al{sub 4}Cr by comparing with XRD pattern of the hexagonal {mu}-Al{sub 4}Mn compound. - Graphical abstract: The solid state phase equilibria of the Al-Cr-Ho ternary system at 500 Degree-Sign C. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al-Cr-Ho system has been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 9}Cr{sub 4} has cubic structure with space group I4-bar 3m. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 8}Cr{sub 4}Ho crystallizes in ThMn{sub 12} type with space group I4/mmm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Al{sub 4}Cr phase is {mu}-type at 500 Degree-Sign C.

  20. Helical spin-density wave in Fe/Cr trilayers with perfect interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishman, R.S.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the presence of only collinear, commensurate (C) and incommensurate (I) spin-density waves (SDW`s) in bulk Cr, the interfacial steps in Fe/Cr multilayers are now believed to stabilize a helical (H) SDW within the Cr spacer. Yet H SDW`s were first predicted in an Fe/Cr trilayer with perfect interfaces when the orientation of the Fe moments does not favor C ordering: if the number of Cr monolayers is even (odd) and the Fe moments are pointing in the same (opposite) direction, then a C SDW does not gain any coupling energy. Under these circumstances, a simple model verifies that H ordering is indeed favored over 1 ordering provided that the Fermi surface mismatch is sufficiently small or the temperature sufficiently high.

  1. Mesoporous carbon -Cr2O3 composite as an anode material for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Bingkun [ORNL; Chi, Miaofang [ORNL; Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoporous carbon-Cr2O3 (M-C-Cr2O3) composite was prepared by co-assembly of in-situ formed phenolic resin, chromium precursor, and Pluronic block copolymer under acidic conditions, followed by carbonization at 750oC under Argon. The TEM results confirmed that the Cr2O3 nanoparticles, ranging from 10 to 20 nm, were well dispersed in the matrix of mesoporous carbon. The composite exhibited an initial reversible capacity of 710 mAh g-1 and good cycling stability, which is mainly due to the synergic effects of carbons within the composites, i.e. confining the crystal growth of Cr2O3 during the high temperature treatment step and buffering the volume change of Cr2O3 during the cycling step. This composite material is a promising anode material for lithium ion batteries.

  2. Void swelling resistance in Fe-Cr alloys at 200 dpa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructural examinations have been performed on a serious of binary Fe-cr alloys irradiated to 200 dpa at 425 C in a fast breeder reactor. The alloy compositions ranged from 3% to 18% Cr in 3% Cr increments, and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. Density measurements showed swelling levels as high as 7.4%, with the highest swelling found in the Fe-9Cr and Fe-6Cr alloys. Microstructural examinations revealed that the highest swelling conditions contained well-developed voids, often as large as 100 nm, and a dislocation network comprised of both a/2<111> and a<100> Burgers vectors. Swelling was lower in the other alloys, and the swelling reduction could be correlated with increased precipitation. These results are considered in light of the current theories for low swelling in ferritic alloys, but no theory is available to completely explain the results.

  3. The resistance to cavitation erosion of CrMnN stainless steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, W.T. [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering] [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering; [Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China); Jing, T.F.; Zheng, Y.Z. [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering] [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Yang, Y.B. [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering] [Yanshan Univ., Qinhuangdao (China). Dept. of Materials Engineering; [Bohai Aluminum Industries Co., Ltd., Qinhuangdao (China); Yao, M. [Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China)] [Harbin Inst. of Tech. (China)

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The resistance to cavitation erosion (CE) was measured using a magnetostrictive device and a rotating disk device for some CrMnN stainless steels (Chinese patent ZL 90 1 02197.0). The microstructural changes in the surface layer before and after CE were analyzed by use of Mossbauer spectra. Results show that the resistance to CE of duplex austenitic-martensitic CrMnN stainless steels is much better than that of ZG0Cr13Ni4-6Mo and ZG0Cr16Ni5Mo steel, which are in common use for hydraulic turbine runners. The metastable austenite and its changes in the process of CE are the key factors why the CrMnN stainless steels have excellent resistance to cavitation erosion.

  4. Postirradiation deformation behavior in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, VA (United States); Gardner, P.L. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been demonstrated that fast neutron irradiation produces significant hardening in simple Fe(3-18)Cr binary alloys irradiated to about 35 dpa in the temperature range 365 to 420{degrees}C, whereas irradiation at 574{degrees}C produces hardening only for 15% or more chromium. The irradiation-induced changes in tensile properties are discussed in terms of changes in the power law work hardening exponent. The work hardening exponent of the lower chromium alloys decreased significantly after low temperature irradiation ({le}420{degrees}C) but increased after irradiation at 574{degrees}C. The higher chromium alloys failed either in cleavage or in a mixed ductile/brittle fashion. Deformation microstructures are presented to support the tensile behavior.

  5. Postirradiation deformation behavior in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Gardner, P.L. [Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States)

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been demonstrated that fast-neutron irradiation produces significant hardening in simple Fe-(3-18)Cr binary alloys irradiated to about 35 dpa in the temperature range 365 to 420{degrees}C, whereas irradiation at 574{degrees}C produces hardening only for 15% or more chromium. The irradiation-induced changes in tensile properties are discussed in terms of changes in the power law work-hardening exponent. The work-hardening exponent of the lower chromium alloys decreased significantly after low-temperature irradiation ({le} 420{degrees}C) but increased after irradiation at 574{degrees}C. The higher chromium alloys failed either in cleavage or in a mixed ductile/brittle fashion. Deformation microstructures are presented to support the tensile behavior.

  6. Postirradiation deformation behavior in ferritic Fe-Cr alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Gardner, P.L. (Missouri Univ., Rolla, MO (United States))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been demonstrated that fast-neutron irradiation produces significant hardening in simple Fe-(3-18)Cr binary alloys irradiated to about 35 dpa in the temperature range 365 to 420[degrees]C, whereas irradiation at 574[degrees]C produces hardening only for 15% or more chromium. The irradiation-induced changes in tensile properties are discussed in terms of changes in the power law work-hardening exponent. The work-hardening exponent of the lower chromium alloys decreased significantly after low-temperature irradiation ([le] 420[degrees]C) but increased after irradiation at 574[degrees]C. The higher chromium alloys failed either in cleavage or in a mixed ductile/brittle fashion. Deformation microstructures are presented to support the tensile behavior.

  7. STARDUST INVESTIGATION INTO THE CR CHONDRITE GROVE MOUNTAIN 021710

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Xuchao; Lin Yangting [Key Laboratory of the Earth's Deep Interior, Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Beituchengxi Road, Beijing 100029 (China); Floss, Christine [Laboratory for Space Sciences and Physics Department, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Bose, Maitrayee, E-mail: linyt@mail.igcas.ac.cn [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871604, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the presolar grain inventory of the CR chondrite Grove Mountain 021710. A total of 35 C-anomalous grains ({approx}236 ppm) and 112 O-anomalous grains ({approx}189 ppm) were identified in situ using NanoSIMS ion imaging. Of 35 C-anomalous grains, 28 were determined to be SiC grains by Auger spectroscopy. Seven of the SiC grains were subsequently measured for N and Si isotopes, allowing classification as one nova grain, one Y grain, one Z grain, and four mainstream grains. Eighty-nine out of 112 O-anomalous grains belong to Group 1, indicating origins in low-to-intermediate-mass red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars. Twenty-one are Group 4 grains and have origins in supernovae. Auger spectroscopic elemental measurements of 35 O-anomalous grains show that 33 of them are ferromagnesian silicates. They have higher Mg/(Mg+Fe) ratios than those reported in other meteorites, suggesting a lower degree of alteration in the nebula and/or asteroid parent bodies. Only two oxide grains were identified, with stoichiometric compositions of MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} and SiO{sub 2}, respectively. The presolar silicate/oxide ratio of GRV 021710 is comparable with those of the CR3 chondrites (QUE 99177 and MET 00426) and primitive interplanetary dust particles. In order to search for presolar sulfides, the meteorite was also mapped for S isotopes. However, no presolar sulfides were found, suggesting a maximum abundance of 2 ppm. The scarcity of presolar sulfides may be due to their much faster sputtering rate by cosmic rays compared to silicates.

  8. Integrated Ecogenomics Study for Bioremediation of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Romy; Chakraborty, Romy

    2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hexavalent chromium is a widespread contaminant found in groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially mediated Cr(VI)-reduction, a poly-lactate compound was injected into Cr(VI)-contaminated aquifers at site 100H at Hanford. Investigation of bacterial community composition using high-density DNA microarray analysis of 16S rRNA gene products revealed a stimulation of Pseudomonas, Desulfovibrio and Geobacter species amongst others. Enrichment of these organisms coincided with continued Cr(VI) depletion. Functional gene-array analysis of DNA from monitoring well indicated high abundance of genes involved in nitrate-reduction, sulfate-reduction, iron-reduction, methanogenesis, chromium tolerance/reduction. Clone-library data revealed Psedomonas was the dominant genus in these samples. Based on above results, we conducted lab investigations to study the dominant anaerobic culturable microbial populations present at this site and their role in Cr(VI)-reduction. Enrichments using defined anaerobic media resulted in isolation of an iron-reducing, a sulfate-reducing and a nitrate-reducing isolate among several others. Preliminary 16S rDNA sequence analysis identified the isolates as Geobacter metallireducens, Pseudomonas stutzeri and Desulfovibrio vulgaris species respectively. The Pseudomonas isolate utilized acetate, lactate, glycerol and pyruvate as alternative carbon sources, and reduced Cr(VI). Anaerobic washed cell suspension of strain HLN reduced almost 95?M Cr(VI) within 4 hr. Further, with 100?M Cr(VI) as sole electron-acceptor, cells grew to 4.05 x 107 /ml over 24 h after an initial lag, demonstrating direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction coupled to growth. These results demonstrate that Cr(VI)-immobilization at Hanford 100H site could be mediated by direct microbial metabolism in addition to indirect chemical reduction of Cr(VI) by end-products of microbial activity.

  9. Electron concentration and phase stability in NbCr2-based Laves phase alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, J.H.; Liaw, P.K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Liu, C.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.

    1997-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase stability in NbCr{sub 2}-based transition-metal Laves phases was studied, based on the data reported for binary X-Cr, Nb-X, and ternary Nb-Cr-X phase diagrams. It was shown that when the atomic size ratios are kept identical, the average electron concentration factor, e/a, is the dominating factor in controlling the phase stability of NbCr{sub 2}-based transition-metal Laves phases. The e/a ratios for different Laves polytypes were determined as followed: with e/a < 5.76, the C15 structure is stabilized; at an e/a range of 5.88--7.53, the C14 structure is stabilized; with e/a > 7.65, the C15 structure is stabilized again. A further increase in the electron concentration factor (e/a > 8) leads to the disordering of the alloy. The electron concentration effect on the phase stability of Mg-based Laves phases and transition-metal A{sub 3}B intermetallic compounds is also reviewed and compared with the present observations in transition-metal Laves phases. In order to verify the e/a/phase stability relationship experimentally, additions of Cu (with e/a = 11) were selected to replace Cr in the NbCr{sub 2} Laves phase. Experimental results for the ternary Nb-Cr-Cu system are reported and discussed in terms of the correlation between the e/a ratio and phase stability in NbCr{sub 2}-based Laves phases. A new phase was found, which has an average composition of Nb-47Cr-3Cu. Within the solubility limit, the electron concentration and phase stability relationship is obeyed in the Nb-Cr-Cu system.

  10. Simulation of Reduction of Cr(VI) by Fe(II) Produced Electrochemically in a Parallel-Plate Electrochemical Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the cathode, electrocoagulation uses electricity to produce a reducing agent ferrous ions from an iron anode the reduction of Cr VI by permeable reactive barriers. Gheju and Lovi7 reported that the re- duction of Cr VI

  11. Implementation of scattering pinhole diagnostic for detection of fusion products on CR-39 at high particle fluence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orozco, David, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments use solid-state nuclear track detector CR-39 as a means to detect different types of nuclear products. Until recently, it was difficult to use CR-39 in experiments with ...

  12. Cr-Ga-N materials for negative electrodes in Li rechargeable batteries : structure, synthesis and electrochemical performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Miso

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrochemical performances of two ternary compounds (Cr2GaN and Cr3GaN) in the Cr-Ga-N system as possible future anode materials for lithium rechargeable batteries were studied. Motivation for this study was dealt in ...

  13. Lipid bloated subretinal microglial cells are at the origin of Drusen appearance in CX3CR1 deficient mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Lipid bloated subretinal microglial cells are at the origin of Drusen appearance in CX3CR1 of sizeable dome-shaped material below the RPE. We show that aged CX3CR1-/- mice present with drusen,version1-1Sep2008 #12;shaped sub-RPE debris of an equivalent size (7). We recently demonstrated that CX3CR

  14. Phase equilibria of an Al0.5CrFeCoNiCu High Entropy Alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, N. G.; Frezza, A.; Stone, H. J.

    2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    /Co/Fe with Cr exhibit multiphase regions, the solubility of Cr in each Ni/Co/Fe binary solid solutions at elevated temperatures is always significant [22,34–36]. The Fig. 4. BSEI micrographs of Al0.5CrFeCoNiCu following 1000 h heat treatment at (a) 700 1C, (b...

  15. Differential isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by an aquifer-derived bacterium under arobic versus denitrifying conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, R.; Qin, L.; Brown, S. T.; Christensen, J. N.; Beller, H. R.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied Cr isotopic fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by Pseudomonas stutzeri strain RCH2. Despite the fact that strain RCH2 reduces Cr(VI) co-metabolically under both aerobic and denitrifying conditions and at similar specific rates, fractionation was markedly different under these two conditions (ε ~2? aerobically and ~0.4? under denitrifying conditions).

  16. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study of Cr-doped GaN Surface Grown by RF Plasma Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on sapphire substrate [2]. Park et al. performed the growth of Cr doped GaN single crystal by sodium fluxScanning Tunneling Microscopy Study of Cr-doped GaN Surface Grown by RF Plasma Molecular Beam Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148, USA Abstract: Cr doped GaN was grown by rf N-plasma molecular beam epitaxy

  17. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy Study of Cr-doped GaN Surface Grown by RF Plasma Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    doped MOCVD grown GaN on sapphire substrate [2]. Park et al. performed the growth of Cr doped GaN singleScanning Tunneling Microscopy Study of Cr-doped GaN Surface Grown by RF Plasma Molecular Beam Orleans, New Orleans, LA 70148, USA Abstract: Cr doped GaN was grown by rf N-plasma molecular beam epitaxy

  18. doi:10.1016/j.gca.2005.06.011 Early diagenesis impact on precise U-series dating of deep-sea corals: Example of a 100

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    /Ba ratios of ambient-seawater changed over time or that a diagenetic phenomenon have affected the U. INTRODUCTION Uranium-series dating of surface reef corals by thermal ion- ization mass spectrometry (TIMS

  19. Probe Mössbauer spectroscopy of mechanical alloying in binary Cr?{sup 57}Fe(1 at%) system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elsukov, Evgeny P., E-mail: e-yelsukov@mail.ru; Kolodkin, Denis A., E-mail: e-yelsukov@mail.ru; Ul'yanov, Alexander L., E-mail: e-yelsukov@mail.ru; Porsev, Vitaly E., E-mail: e-yelsukov@mail.ru [Physical-Technical Institute UrB RAS, Izhevsk (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state reactions during mechanical alloying (MA) in a binary mixture of powdered Cr and {sup 57}Fe in atomic ratio of 99:1 have been studied using {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Auger spectrometry. The proposed model of MA includes formation of Cr(Fe){sub x}O{sub y} oxides at the contact places of Cr and Fe particles, formation of nanostructure with simultaneous dissolution of the oxides, penetration of Fe atoms along grain boundaries in close-to-boundary distorted zones of interfaces in a substitutional position, formation of the substitutional solid solution of Fe in Cr in the body of grains. It was shown that the increase in the BCC lattice parameter on increasing the milling time is due to the dissolution of oxides and formation of interstitial solid solution of O in Cr. There were established substantial differences in consumption of BCC Fe in a Mg ? Al ? Si ? Cr sequence due to the major role of chemical interaction of Mg(Al,Si,Cr) with Fe.

  20. Nanoscale Phase Separation In Epitaxial Cr-Mo and Cr-V Alloy Thin Films Studied Using Atom Probe Tomography: Comparison Of Experiments And Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devaraj, Arun; Kaspar, Tiffany C.; Ramanan, Sathvik; Walvekar, Sarita K.; Bowden, Mark E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Tailored metal alloy thin film-oxide interfaces generated using molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) deposition of alloy thin films on a single crystalline oxide substrate can be used for detailed studies of irradiation damage response on the interface structure. However presence of nanoscale phase separation in the MBE grown alloy thin films can impact the metal-oxide interface structure. Due to nanoscale domain size of such phase separation it is very challenging to characterize by conventional techniques. Therefor laser assisted atom probe tomography (APT) was utilized to study the phase separation in epitaxial Cr0.61Mo0.39, Cr0.77Mo0.23, and Cr0.32V0.68 alloy thin films grown by MBE on MgO(001) single crystal substrates. Statistical analysis, namely frequency distribution analysis and Pearson coefficient analysis of experimental data was compared with similar analyses conducted on simulated APT datasets with known extent of phase separation. Thus the presence of phase separation in Cr-Mo films, even when phase separation was not clearly observed by x-ray diffraction, and the absence of phase separation in the Cr-V film were thus confirmed.

  1. High temperature oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr-Al foils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, C.S.; Jha, B. [Texas Instruments, Inc., Attleboro, MA (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic catalytic converters for automotive emission control is becoming an important application for heat resistant alloys as more design opportunities are realized. The service conditions and design of metallic catalytic converters require the alloy to be highly oxidation resistant at gauges typically at 50 microns or less. For conventional heat resistant alloy design the goal is to form a well adherent scale on the alloy surface to protect the alloy matrix from being oxidized. However, the thin gauge results in a limited supply of alloying elements that can form the protective scale on the surface. The alloy chemistry has to be optimized to have the minimum oxidation while maintaining processing characteristics. Furthermore, the ratio of scale thickness to foil gauge is significant and the stress state between them introduces measurable permanent distortion of the foil. In this study, the effect of alloying elements on the oxidation behavior of commonly used Fe-Cr-Al alloys was quantified by the oxidation weight gain and length change measurements.

  2. The Optical - Infrared Colors of CORALS QSOs: Searching for Dust Reddening Associated With High Redshift Damped Lyman Alpha Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sara L. Ellison; Patrick B. Hall; Paulina Lira

    2005-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of dust in quasar absorbers, such as damped Lyman alpha (DLA) systems, may cause the background QSO to appear reddened. We investigate the extent of this potential reddening by comparing the optical-to-infrared (IR) colors of QSOs with and without intervening absorbers. Our QSO sample is based on the Complete Optical and Radio Absorption Line System (CORALS) survey of Ellison et al (2001). We have obtained near-simultaneous B and K band magnitudes for subset of the CORALS sample and supplemented our observations with further measurements published in the literature. To account for redshift-related color changes, the B-K colors are normalized using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) QSO composite. The mean normalized B-K color of the DLA sub-sample is +0.12, whereas the mean for the no-DLA sample is -0.10; both distributions have RMS scatters ~0.5. Neither a student's T-test nor a KS test indicate that there is any significant difference between the two color distributions. Based on simulations which redden the colors of QSOs with intervening DLAs, we determine a reddening limit which corresponds to E(B-V) < 0.04 (SMC-like extinction) at 99% confidence (3 sigma), assuming that E(B-V) is the same for all DLAs. Finally, we do not find any general correlation between absorber properties (such as [Fe/Zn] or neutral hydrogen column density) and B-K color. One of these two QSOs shows evidence for strong associated absorption from X-ray observations, an alternative explanation for its very red color. We conclude that the presence of intervening galaxies causes a minimal reddening of the background QSO.

  3. CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, B.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potent.ials Encountered in Coal Conversion Systems", NASA TNof Illinois #6 ash and coal char. Figure 1. Cross sectionsof Fe-lOAl-Cr Alloys by Coal Char B. A. Gordon and V.

  4. A few-cycle Cr??:YAG laser and optical studies of photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ripin, Daniel Jacob, 1973-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A prismless Cr4+:YAG laser was used to generate 20 fs pulses at 1450 nm with a bandwidth of 190 nm FWHM. Intracavity group velocity dispersion was compensated with double-chirped mirrors. Pulse spectrum was observable from ...

  5. Al2O3 ADHERENCE ON CoCrAl ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kingsley, L.M.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in a one percent aluminum alloy. After an aluminizing treat­oxidation, most alloys contained enough aluminum to preventof a dilute Co-Cr alloy with no aluminum or hafnium, and

  6. NASA/CR-2001-211271 ICASE Interim Report No. 39

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    Center for AeroSpace Information 712 ! Standard Drive Hanover, MD 21076- ! 320 #12;NASA/CR-2001 Hanover. MD 21076-1320 (301) 621-0390 National Technical Intormation Service (NTIS) 5285 Port Royal Road

  7. NASA/CR-2001-210853 ICASE Report No. 2001-7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    Center for AeroSpace Information 7121 Standard Drive Hanover, MD 21076-1320 #12;NASA/CR-2001-210853 ICASE Center for AeroSpace hffomlation (CASI) 7121 Standard Drive Hanover, MD 21076 1320 (301) 621 0390

  8. NASA/CR-2007-214863 NIA Report No. 2007-06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    Center for AeroSpace Information 7115 Standard Drive Hanover, MD 21076-1320 #12;NASA/CR-2007-214863 NIA) National Technical Information Service (NTIS) 7115 Standard Drive 5285 Port Royal Road Hanover, MD 21076

  9. Photochemistry of Methyl Bromide on the ?-Cr2O3(0001) Surface...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    formed. In contrast, pre-oxidation of the surface (using an oxygen plasma source) led to capping of surface Cr3+ sites and near complete removal of CH3Br TPD states above...

  10. Oxygen Plasma Activation of Cr(CO)(6) on ?-Fe2O3(0001)...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on ?-Fe2O3(0001). Abstract: The chemistry of Cr(CO)6 on the Fe3O4(111) surface termination of ?-Fe2O3(0001) was explored using temperature programmed desorption (TPD),...

  11. NOAA Technical Report NESDIS TBD Cross Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NOAA Technical Report NESDIS TBD Cross Track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) Sensor Data Record (SDR) User. NESDIS 114 Satellite Rainfall Estimation Over South America: Evaluation of Two Major Events. Daniel A

  12. CORROSION OF Fe-10Al-Cr ALLOYS BY COAL CHAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, B.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    owned rights. LBL-6946 Corrosion of Fe-lOAl-Cr Alloys byOctober, 1977 Abstract Corrosion of iron-base alloys at 982°high-temperature induced corrosion are probably sulfides and

  13. Flat panel display using Ti-Cr-Al-O thin film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Schmid, Anthony P. (Solan Beach, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of Ti--Cr--Al--O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti--Cr--Al--O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti--Cr--Al--O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti--Cr--Al--O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

  14. Process for producing Ti-Cr-Al-O thin film resistors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Schmid, Anthony P. (Solana Beach, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thin films of Ti-Cr-Al-O are used as a resistor material. The films are rf sputter deposited from ceramic targets using a reactive working gas mixture of Ar and O.sub.2. Resistivity values from 10.sup.4 to 10.sup.10 Ohm-cm have been measured for Ti-Cr-Al-O film <1 .mu.m thick. The film resistivity can be discretely selected through control of the target composition and the deposition parameters. The application of Ti-Cr-Al-O as a thin film resistor has been found to be thermodynamically stable, unlike other metal-oxide films. The Ti-Cr-Al-O film can be used as a vertical or lateral resistor, for example, as a layer beneath a field emission cathode in a flat panel display; or used to control surface emissivity, for example, as a coating on an insulating material such as vertical wall supports in flat panel displays.

  15. Structure, Magnetism, and Transport of CuCr2Se4 Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structure, Magnetism, and Transport of CuCr 2 Se 4 Thindichroism shows that the magnetism persists to the surfacesuch as the nature of magnetism at surfaces and interfaces.

  16. Attosecond Resolution Timing Jitter Characterization of Diode Pumped Femtosecond Cr:Lisaf Lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirbas, Umit

    Two diode pumped Cr:LiSAF lasers are synchronized using a balanced nonlinear optical cross correlator. An integrated timing jitter of less than 156 as in the 10 kHz to 10 MHz range is measured.

  17. Cr(VI) reduction in aqueous solutions by using copper smelter slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiyak, B.; Oezer, A.; Altundogan, H.S.; Erdem, M.; Tuemen, F. (Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey))

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of Copper Smelter Slag (CSS) to reduce Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions has been investigated. The extent of reduction if dependent on the amounts of acid and reductant, contact time, Cr(VI) concentration, temperature of the solution and particle size of CSS. The amount of acid is the most important variable affecting the reduction process. When twice the amount of acid required with respect to Cr(VI) was used, Cr(VI) in 100 ml solution (100 mg/l) was completely reduced in a contact period less than 5 min by a 10 g/l dosage of CSS. Reduction efficiency increased with increase in temperature of solution, showing that the process is endothermic. Reduced chromium, and iron and other metals dissolved from CSS were effectively precipitated by using NaOH or calcinated carbonation sludge from sugar plant.

  18. Cr(VI) reduction in aqueous solutions by using copper smelter slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiyak, B.; Oezer, A.; Altundogan, H.S.; Erdem, M.; Tuemen, F. [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)] [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey)

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of Copper Smelter Slag (CSS) to reduce Cr(VI) in aqueous solutions has been investigated. The extent of reduction if dependent on the amounts of acid and reductant, contact time, Cr(VI) concentration, temperature of the solution and particle size of CSS. The amount of acid is the most important variable affecting the reduction process. When twice the amount of acid required with respect to Cr(VI) was used, Cr(VI) in 100 ml solution (100 mg/l) was completely reduced in a contact period less than 5 min by a 10 g/l dosage of CSS. Reduction efficiency increased with increase in temperature of solution, showing that the process is endothermic. Reduced chromium, and iron and other metals dissolved from CSS were effectively precipitated by using NaOH or calcinated carbonation sludge from sugar plant.

  19. Event-by-event study of CR composition with the SPHERE experiment using the 2013 data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonov, R A; Bonvech, E A; Chernov, D V; Dzhatdoev, T A; Finger, Mich; Finger, Mir; Galkin, V I; Podgrudkov, D A; Roganova, T M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an event-by-event study of cosmic ray (CR) composition with the reflected Cherenkov light method. The fraction of CR light component above 5 PeV was reconstructed using the 2013 run data of the SPHERE experiment which observed optical Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation of extensive air showers, reflected from snow surface of Lake Baikal. Additionally, we discuss a possibility to improve the elemental groups separability by means of multidimensional criteria.

  20. PVD synthesis and high-throughput property characterization of Ni?Fe?Cr alloy libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rar, A.; Frafjord, J.J.; Fowlkes, Jason D.; Specht, E.D.; Rack, P.D.; Santella, M.L.; Bei, H.; George, E.P.; Pharr, G.M. (Tennessee-K); (Tennessee-K); (ORNL)

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Three methods of alloy library synthesis, thick-layer deposition followed by interdiffusion, composition-spread codeposition and electron-beam melting of thick deposited layers, have been applied to Ni-Fe-Cr ternary and Ni-Cr binary alloys. Structural XRD mapping and mechanical characterization by means of nanoindentation have been used to characterize the properties of the libraries. The library synthesis methods are compared from the point of view of the structural and mechanical information they can provide.

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Property Studies on Neutron-Irradiated Ferritic Fe-Cr Model Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jian Gan; Maria Okuniewski; Wei-Ying Chen; Yinbin Miao; Carolyn A. Tomchik; James F. Stubbins; Y. Q. Wu; Stu A. Maloy

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model Fe, Fe-10Cr and Fe-14Cr alloys were irradiated in Advanced Test Reactor at 300°C and 450°C to target doses of 0.01, 0.1 and 1 dpa. The microstructure and the mechanical property of irradiated specimens were investigated using TEM, APT and hardness measurements. The irradiation-induced hardening was consistent with the observed microstructures. For lower doses of 0.01 and 0.1 dpa, the formation of dislocation loops was the primarily contributor to the hardening; no a’ precipitates of resolvable sizes were observed. By 1 dpa, additional increase in hardening were attributed to the formation of a high density of 1-2 nm a' precipitates. In Fe, the hardness increased less as a function of irradiation dose compared to Fe-Cr alloys because of the lack of a' precipitation and differences in loop structures. Three single-parameter effects have been studied: the Cr content, the irradiation temperature and the grain size. The addition of Cr reduced the mobility of both ½<111> and <100> dislocation loops, leading to a smaller loop size and higher loop density. Also, the Cr contents were positively correlated to the density of a' precipitates, but were less relevant to the precipitate size. Higher irradiation temperature of 450°C resulted in a preferential production of the immobile <100> loops over the mobile ½<111> loops (ex. a ratio of 8:1 in Fe-10Cr irradiated 450°C to 0.01 dpa). At lower temperature of 300°C, heterogeneous formation of dislocation loops at the vicinity of line dislocations frequently. In Fe, the development of dislocation loops was suppressed (compared to Fe-Cr alloys) due to a combination of smaller grain size, high initial dislocation density and high defect mobility.

  2. Influences of Water Vapor on Cr(VI) Reduction by Gaseous Hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Baolin

    Columbia, Columbia, Missouri 65211 In Situ Gaseous Reduction (ISGR) using hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a technology the contaminants, H2S, and various soil components. In this study, Cr(VI) reduction by gaseous H2S was examined under various relative humidities (0-96.7%), concentrations of Cr(VI) (127-475 µg/g of solid), and H2S

  3. Surface modification to improve fireside corrosion resistance of Fe-Cr ferritic steels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Jong-Hee (Clarendon Hills, IL); Natesan, Krishnamurti (Naperville, IL); Rink, David L. (Mokena, IL)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An article of manufacture and a method for providing an Fe--Cr ferritic steel article of manufacture having a surface layer modification for corrosion resistance. Fe--Cr ferritic steels can be modified to enhance their corrosion resistance to liquid coal ash and other chemical environments, which have chlorides or sulfates containing active species. The steel is modified to form an aluminide/silicide passivating layer to reduce such corrosion.

  4. Heat treatment of NiCrFe alloy to optimize resistance to intergrannular stress corrosion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steeves, Arthur F. (Schenectady, NY); Bibb, Albert E. (Clifton Park, NY)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of producing a NiCrFe alloy having a high resistance to stress corrosion cracking comprising heating a NiCrFe alloy to a temperature sufficient to enable the carbon present in the alloy body in the form of carbide deposits to enter into solution, rapidly cool the alloy body, and heat the cooled body to a temperature between 1100.degree. to 1500.degree. F. for about 1 to 30 hours.

  5. Optimizing Cr(VI) and Tc(VII) remediation through nano-scale biomineral engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutting, R. S.; Coker, V. S.; Telling, N. D.; Kimber, R. L.; Pearce, C. I.; Ellis, B.; Lawson, R; van der Laan, G.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Vaughan, D.J.; Arenholz, E.; Lloyd, J. R.

    2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To optimize the production of biomagnetite for the bioremediation of metal oxyanion contaminated waters, the reduction of aqueous Cr(VI) to Cr(III) by two biogenic magnetites and a synthetic magnetite was evaluated under batch and continuous flow conditions. Results indicate that nano-scale biogenic magnetite produced by incubating synthetic schwertmannite powder in cell suspensions of Geobacter sulfurreducens is more efficient at reducing Cr(VI) than either biogenic nano-magnetite produced from a suspension of ferrihydrite 'gel' or synthetic nano-scale Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} powder. Although X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) measurements obtained from post-exposure magnetite samples reveal that both Cr(III) and Cr(VI) are associated with nanoparticle surfaces, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism (XMCD) studies indicate that some Cr(III) has replaced octahedrally coordinated Fe in the lattice of the magnetite. Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) measurements of total aqueous Cr in the associated solution phase indicated that, although the majority of Cr(III) was incorporated within or adsorbed to the magnetite samples, a proportion ({approx}10-15 %) was released back into solution. Studies of Tc(VII) uptake by magnetites produced via the different synthesis routes also revealed significant differences between them as regards effectiveness for remediation. In addition, column studies using a {gamma}-camera to obtain real time images of a {sup 99m}Tc(VII) radiotracer were performed to visualize directly the relative performances of the magnetite sorbents against ultra-trace concentrations of metal oxyanion contaminants. Again, the magnetite produced from schwertmannite proved capable of retaining more ({approx}20%) {sup 99m}Tc(VII) than the magnetite produced from ferrihydrite, confirming that biomagnetite production for efficient environmental remediation can be fine-tuned through careful selection of the initial Fe(III) mineral substrate supplied to Fe(III)-reducing bacteria.

  6. Determination of mechanical properties of Ni-Cr-P amorphous alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondlapudi, Swaroop Kumar R

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    unstable as they tend to relax to a more stable state. An amorphous alloy becomes fully stable only when it crystallizes. Metallic glasses are generally produced by the melt- spinning process. In this process a molten alloy stream impinging on a... materials of Ni~P, CrP, Ni and Cr powders and then produced in the amorphous phase using the melt-spinner. The density, crystallization temperatures, microhardness, tensile fracture strength and dynamic Young's modulus were determined so...

  7. Oxidation behavior of arc evaporated Al-Cr-Si-N thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tritremmel, Christian; Daniel, Rostislav; Mitterer, Christian; Mayrhofer, Paul H.; Lechthaler, Markus; Polcik, Peter [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Advanced Hard Coatings, Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Application Oriented Coating Development, Department of Physical Metallurgy and Materials Testing, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, A-8700 Leoben (Austria); OC Oerlikon Balzers AG, Iramali 18, LI-9496 Balzers (Liechtenstein); PLANSEE Composite Materials GmbH, Siebenbuergerstrasse 23, D-86983 Lechbruck am See (Germany)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of Al and Si on the oxidation behavior of Al-Cr-(Si)-N thin films synthesized by arc evaporation of powder metallurgically prepared Al{sub x}Cr{sub 1-x} targets with x = Al/(Al + Cr) of 0.5, 0.6, and 0.7 and (Al{sub 0.5}Cr{sub 0.5}){sub 1-z}Si{sub z} targets with Si contents of z = 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 in N{sub 2} atmosphere was studied in detail by means of differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Dynamical measurements in synthetic air (up to 1440 Degree-Sign C) revealed the highest onset temperature of pronounced oxidation for nitride coatings prepared from the Al{sub 0.4}Cr{sub 0.4}Si{sub 0.2} target. Isothermal TGA at 1100, 1200, 1250, and 1300 Degree-Sign C highlight the pronounced improvement of the oxidation resistance of Al{sub x}Cr{sub 1-x}N coatings by the addition of Si. The results show that Si promotes the formation of a dense coating morphology as well as a dense oxide scale when exposed to air.

  8. Proxy Records of the Indonesian Low and the El Ni{tilde n}o-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) from Stable Isotope Measurements of Indonesian Reef Corals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, M.D.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Earth`s largest atmospheric convective center is the Indonesian Low. It generates the Australasian monsoon, drives the zonal tropospheric Walker Circulation, and is implicated in the genesis of the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO). The long-term variability of the Indonesian Low is poorly characterized, yet such information is crucial for evaluating whether changes in the strength and frequency of ENSO events are a possible manifestation of global warming. Stable oxygen isotope ratios ({delta}{sup 18}O) in shallow-water reef coral skeletons track topical convective activity over hundreds of years because the input of isotopically-depleted rainwater dilutes seawater {delta}{sup 18}O. Corals also impose a temperature-dependent fractionation on {delta}{sup 18}O, but where annual rainfall is high and sea surface temperature (SST) variability is low the freshwater flux effect dominates.

  9. A First-principles Study onA First-principles Study on Fe Substituted CrFe Substituted Cr2323CC66

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    halpy of FeCr22C6. #12;Creep Resistant Steel Steam Power Plant Efficiency ~42 % Goal Efficiency 45 common power plant steels (MTDAT A, SGTE database, 565 °C) [Bhadeshia, 2001] M23C6 in Power Plant Steels % Anticipated efficiency improvements for changes in pow er plant operating conditions [Wachter and Ennis, 1995

  10. Stephan Klemme Hugh St.C. O'Neill The reaction MgCr2O4 + SiO2 = Cr2O3 + MgSiO3 and the free energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    bar and 298 K (J molA1 ) DG Gibbs free energy change for a reaction among pure end membersStephan Klemme á Hugh St.C. O'Neill The reaction MgCr2O4 + SiO2 = Cr2O3 + MgSiO3 and the free energy of formation of magnesiochromite (MgCr2O4) Received: 9 May 1997 / Accepted: 28 July 1997 Abstract

  11. Comparative studies of etching mechanisms of CR-39 in NaOH/H2O and NaOH/ethanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    Comparative studies of etching mechanisms of CR-39 in NaOH/H2O and NaOH/ethanol K.C.C. Tse, D Avenue, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong Available online 13 May 2007 Abstract The bulk etch rate for CR-39 in NaOH/ethanol accumulates on the surface of CR-39 detector during etching in NaOH/ethanol, which is absent during etching

  12. Void swelling in binary Fe-Cr alloys at 200 dpa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructural examinations have been performed on a series of binary Fe-Cr alloys irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA at 425{degrees}C to 200 dpa. The data represent the highest swelling levels reported in neutron irradiated ferritic alloys. The alloy compositions ranged from 3% to 18% Cr in 3% Cr increments, and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. Density measurements showed swelling levels as high as 7.4%, with the highest swelling found in the Fe-9Cr and Fe-6Cr alloys. Microstructural examinations revealed that the highest swelling conditions contained well-developed voids, often as large as 100 nm, and a dislocation network comprised of both a/2<111> and a<100> Burgers vectors. Swelling was lower in the other alloys, and the swelling reduction could be correlated with increased precipitation. These results are considered in light of the current theories for low swelling in ferritic alloys, but no theory is available to completely explain the results.

  13. Void swelling in binary Fe-Cr alloys at 200 DPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructural examinations have been performed on a series of binary Fe-Cr alloys irradiated in the FFTF/MOTA at 425C to 200 dpa. The data represent the highest swelling levels reported in neutron irradiated ferritic alloys. The alloy compositions ranged from 3 to 18% Cr in 3% Cr increments, and the irradiation temperature corresponded to the peak swelling condition for this alloy class. Density measurements showed swelling levels as high as 7.4%, with the highest swelling found in the Fe-9Cr and Fe-6Cr alloys. Microstructural examinations revealed that the highest swelling conditions contained well-developed voids, often as large as 100 nm, and a dislocation network comprised of both {sub 2}{sup a}<111> and a<100> Burgers vectors. Swelling was lower in the other alloys, and the swelling reduction could be correlated with increased precipitation. These results are considered in light of current theories for low swelling in ferritic alloys, but no theory is available to completely explain the results.

  14. Reduced-activation austenitic stainless steels: The Fe--Mn--Cr--C system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nickel-free manganese-stabilized steels are being developed for fusion-reactor applications. As the first part of this effort, the austenite-stable region in the Fe--Mn--Cr--C system was determined. Results indicated that the Schaeffler diagram developed for Fe--Ni--Cr--C alloys cannot be used to predict the constituents expected for high-manganese steels. This is true because manganese is not as strong an austenite stabilizer relative to delta-ferrite formation as predicted by the diagram, but it is a stronger austenite stabilizer relative to martensite than predicted. Therefore, the austenite-stable region for Ne--Mn--Cr--C alloys occurs at lower chromium and hugher combinations of manganese and carbon than predicted by the Schaeffler diagram. Development of a manganese-stabilized stainless steel should be possible in the composition range of 20 to 25% Mn, 10 to 15% Cr, and 0.01 to 0.25%C. Tensile behavior of an Fe--20%Mn--12%Cr--0.25%C alloy was determined. The strength and ductility of this possible base composition was comparable to type 316 stainless steel in both the solution-annealed and cold-worked condition.

  15. Response of 9Cr-ODS Steel to Proton Irradiation at 400 °C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jianchao He; Farong Wan; Kumar Sridharan; Todd R. Allen; A. Certain; Y. Q. Wu

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of Y–Ti–O nanoclusters, dislocation structure, and grain boundary segregation in 9Cr-ODS steels has been investigated following proton irradiation at 400 °C with damage levels up to 3.7 dpa. A slight coarsening and a decrease in number density of nanoclusters were observed as a result of irradiation. The composition of nanoclusters was also observed to change with a slight increase of Y and Cr concentration in the nanoclusters following irradiation. Size, density, and composition of the nanoclusters were investigated as a function of nanocluster size, specifically classified to three groups. In addition to the changes in nanoclusters, dislocation loops were observed after irradiation. Finally, radiation-induced enrichment of Cr and depletion of W were observed at grain boundaries after irradiation.

  16. Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) pilot study, ambient water toxicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clinch River - Environmental Restoration Program (CR-ERP) personnel and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) personnel conducted a pilot study during the week of April 22-29, 1993, prior to initiation of CR-ERP Phase II Sampling and Analysis activities as described in the Statement of Work (SOW) document. The organisms specified for testing were larval fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, and the daphnid, Ceriodaphnia dubia. Surface water samples were collected by TVA Field Engineering personnel from Clinch River Mile 9.0 and Poplar Creek Kilometer 1.6 on April 21, 23, and 26. Samples were split and provided to the CR-ERP and TVA toxicology laboratories for testing. Exposure of test organisms to these samples resulted in no toxicity (survival, growth, or reproduction) to either species in testing conducted by TVA.

  17. Testing of welded 13% Cr grades martensitic stainless steels for sour service applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogne, T.; Bjordal, M. [SINTEF Materials Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of 13% Cr grade stainless steels is increasing mainly due to the introduction of higher alloyed and weldable grades with carbon content as low as 0.01 %, and the very favorable costs compared to alternative materials as the 22Cr duplex stainless steel. Therefore these steels now have been subject to a major evaluation for transport of oil and gas offshore in the North Sea. This paper discusses aspects of testing required to assess their corrosion properties and their susceptibility to environment assisted cracking (EAC), caused by both H{sub 2}S internally and cathodic protection externally. Testing is discussed with emphasis on test parameters for welded 13% Cr steel using different types of consumables.

  18. The Effect of Water Vapor on Cr Depletion in Advanced Recuperator Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, Bruce A [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Durable alloy foils are needed for gas turbine recuperators operating at 650--700 C. It has been established that water vapor in the exhaust gas causes more rapid consumption of Cr in austenitic stainless steels leading to a reduction in operating lifetime of these thin-walled components. Laboratory testing at 650--800 C of commercial and model alloys is being used to develop a better understanding of the long-term rate of Cr consumption in these environments. Results are presented for commercial alloys 709, 120 and 625. After 10,000h exposures at 650 C and 700 C in humid air, grain boundary Cr depletion was observed near the surface of all these materials. In the Fe-base alloys, 709 and 120, this depletion led to localized Fe-rich nodule formation. This information then can be used to develop low-cost alternatives to currently available candidate materials.

  19. Independent Verification Survey of the Clean Coral Storage Pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson-Nichols, M.J.; Egidi, P.V.; Roemer, E.K.; Schlosser, R.M.

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    f I The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Environmental Technology Section conducted an independent verification (IV) survey of the clean storage pile at the Johnston Atoll Plutonium Contaminated Soil Remediation Project (JAPCSRP) from January 18-25, 1999. The goal of the JAPCSRP is to restore a 24-acre area that was contaminated with plutonium oxide particles during nuclear testing in the 1960s. The selected remedy was a soil sorting operation that combined radiological measurements and mining processes to identify and sequester plutonium-contaminated soil. The soil sorter operated from about 1990 to 1998. The remaining clean soil is stored on-site for planned beneficial use on Johnston Island. The clean storage pile currently consists of approximately 120,000 m3 of coral. ORNL conducted the survey according to a Sampling and Analysis Plan, which proposed to provide an IV of the clean pile by collecting a minimum number (99) of samples. The goal was to ascertain wi th 95% confidence whether 97% of the processed soil is less than or equal to the accepted guideline (500-Bq/kg or 13.5-pCi/g) total transuranic (TRU) activity.

  20. Repassivation of 13% Cr steel dependent on brine pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skogsberg, J.W.; Walker, M.L.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A joint laboratory project, involving an oil production and oil well service company, investigated repassivation of martensitic 13% Cr steel. The rate at which this alloy is repassivated after losing its protective passive oxide layer to hydrochloric acid (HCI) depended on the pH of the spent acid returns. Test samples of 13% Cr cut from oilfield tubing were subjected to a fluid sequence of (1) initial brine, (2) HCI, (3) spent acid, and (4) final brine. In 9 days, the samples regained their passive oxide layers. When spent acid was taken out of the fluid sequence, the samples regained passive oxide layers in 3 days.

  1. Anodonta imbecillis QA Test 4, Clinch River - Environmental restoration program (CR-ERP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simbeck, D.J.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Toxicity testing of split whole sediment samples using juvenile freshwater mussels (Anodonta imbecillis) was conducted by TVA to provide a quality assurance mechanism for test organism quality and overall performance of the test being conducted by CR-ERP personnel as part of the CR-ERP biomonitoring study of Clinch River sediments. Testing of sediment samples collected September 8 from Poplar Creek Miles 6.0 and 1.0 was conducted September 13-22, 1994. Results from this test showed no toxicity (survival effects) to fresh-water mussels during a 9-day exposure to the sediments.

  2. Audit Report: CR-FS-96-03 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA NewslettersPartnership1/08 AttendanceCR-B-98-02 AuditCR-FS-96-03 Audit

  3. Audit Report: CR-B-99-01 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from TarasaName Affiliation3 Audit Report: CR-B-95-03CR-B-99-01

  4. Changes induced in a ZnS:Cr-based electroluminescent waveguide structure by intrinsic near-infrared laser radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlasenko, N. A., E-mail: vlasenko@isp.kiev.ua; Oleksenko, P. F.; Mukhlyo, M. A.; Veligura, L. I. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkarev Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)] [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lashkarev Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The causes of changes that occur in a thin-film electroluminescent metal-insulator-semiconductor-insulator-metal waveguide structure based on ZnS:Cr (Cr concentration of {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3}) upon lasing ({lambda} Almost-Equal-To 2.6 {mu}m) and that induce lasing cessation are studied. It is established that lasing ceases because of light-scattering inhomogeneities formed in the structure and, hence, optical losses enhance. The origin of the inhomogeneities and the causes of their formation are clarified by studying the surface topology and the crystal structure of constituent layers of the samples before and after lasing. The studies are performed by means of atomic force microscopy and X-ray radiography. It is shown that a substantial increase in the sizes of grains on the surface of the structure is the manifestation of changes induced in the ZnS:Cr film by recrystallization. Recrystallization is initiated by local heating by absorbed laser radiation in existing Cr clusters and quickened by a strong electric field (>1 MV cm{sup -1}). The changes observed in the ZnS:Cr film are as follows: the textured growth of ZnS crystallites, an increase in the content of Cr clusters, and the appearance of some CrS and a rather high ZnO content. Some ways for improving the stability of lasing in the ZnS:Cr-based waveguide structures are proposed.

  5. Effect of Elastic Stress on Phase Separation in Fe-20%Cr-6%Al-0.5%Ti ODS alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Effect of Elastic Stress on Phase Separation in Fe- 20%Cr-6%Al-0.5%Ti ODS alloy C. Capdevila1, M. K Aldazabal from CEIT; and Monica Campos from Carlos III University (UC3) for their help with ODS for nuclear applications Acknowledgements Effect of Elastic Stress on Phase Separation in Fe-Cr-Al-Ti ODS alloy by C

  6. Understanding the solidification and microstructure evolution during CSC-MIG welding of Fe–Cr–B-based alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorour, A.A., E-mail: ahmad.sorour@mail.mcgill.ca; Chromik, R.R., E-mail: richard.chromik@mcgill.ca; Gauvin, R., E-mail: raynald.gauvin@mcgill.ca; Jung, I.-H., E-mail: in-ho.jung@mcgill.ca; Brochu, M., E-mail: mathieu.brochu@mcgill.ca

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present is a study of the solidification and microstructure of Fe–28.2%Cr–3.8%B–1.5%Si–1.5%Mn (wt.%) alloy deposited onto a 1020 plain carbon steel substrate using the controlled short-circuit metal inert gas welding process. The as-solidified alloy was a metal matrix composite with a hypereutectic microstructure. Thermodynamic calculation based on the Scheil–Gulliver model showed that a primary (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase formed first during solidification, followed by an eutectic formation of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase and a body-centered cubic Fe-based solid solution matrix, which contained Cr, Mn and Si. Microstructure analysis confirmed the formation of these phases and showed that the shape of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B phase was irregular plate. As the welding heat input increased, the weld dilution increased and thus the volume fraction of the (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates decreased while other microstructural characteristics were similar. - Highlights: • We deposit Fe–Cr–B-based alloy onto plain carbon steel using the CSC-MIG process. • We model the solidification behavior using thermodynamic calculation. • As deposited alloy consists of (Cr,Fe){sub 2}B plates embedded in Fe-based matrix. • We study the effect of the welding heat input on the microstructure.

  7. Dual and Triple Ion-Beam Irradiations of Fe, Fe(Cr) and Fe(Cr)-ODS Final Report: IAEA SMoRE CRP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fluss, M J; Hsiung, L L; Marian, J

    2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Structures of nanoparticles in Fe-16Cr-4.5Al-0.3Ti-2W-0.37Y2O3 (K3) and Fe-20Cr-4.5Al-0.34Ti-0.5Y2O3 (MA956) oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels produced by mechanical alloying (MA) and followed by hot extrusion have been studied using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques to gain insight about the formation mechanism of nanoparticles in MA/ODS steels. The observations of Y-Al-O complex-oxide nanoparticles in both ODS steels imply that decomposition of Y2O3 in association with internal oxidation of Al occurred during mechanical alloying. While the majority of oxide nanoparticles formed in both steels is Y4Al2O9, a few oxide particles of YAlO3 are also occasionally observed. These results reveal that Ti (0.3 wt %) plays an insignificant role in forming oxide nanoparticles in the presence of Al (4.5 wt %). HRTEM observations of crystalline nanoparticles larger than {approx}2 nm and amorphous or disordered cluster domains smaller than {approx}2 nm provide an insight into the formation mechanism of oxide nanoparticle in MA/ODS steels, which we believe from our observations involves a solid-state amorphous precursor followed by recrystallization. Dual ion-beam irradiations using He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions were employed to gain more detailed insight about the role of nanoparticles in suppressing radiation-induced swelling. This is elaborated through TEM examinations of cavity distributions in ion-irradiated Fe-14Cr and K3-ODS ferritic steels. HRTEM observations of helium-filled cavities (helium bubbles) preferably trapped at nanoscale oxide particles and clusters in ion-irradiated K3-ODS are presented. Finally, we describe the results from triple ion-beam irradiations using H{sup +} + He{sup +} + Fe{sup +8} ions to emulate fusion first wall radiation effects. Preliminary work is reported that confirms the existence of significant hydrogen synergistic effects described earlier by Tanaka et al., for Fe(Cr) and by Wakai et al., for F82H reduced activation ferritic martensitic (RAF/M) steel. These previous results combined with our data suggest a complex new 'catalytic' mechanism whereby H interacts with the steady state population of defects and the embryonic cavities so as to accelerated cavity (void) growth in both Fe(Cr) and under special conditions in ODS steels.

  8. Structural alterations in SiC as a result of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ implantation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.M.; McHargue, C.J.; Appleton, B.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion scattering and channeling techniques were used to study production of disorder and randomization of SiC by implantation of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ at doses of up to 3 x 10/sup 16/ /cm/sup 2/ for Cr/sup +/ and 8 x 10/sup 16/ /cm/sup 2/ for N/sup +/. Experiments were designed so that the calculated damage energy profiles would be well matched for the two ion species. The results were compared for the degree of effectiveness of Cr/sup +/ and N/sup +/ in producing disorder. At higher doses, Cr/sup +/ was much more effective than N/sup +/ for a given damage energy using the same calculational method for Cr/sup +/ as for N/sup +/. In correlated studies of swelling, both species had about the same effectiveness in producing swelling.

  9. Species composition and population levels of scleractinean corals within the Diploria-Montastrea-Porites Zone of the East Flower Garden Bank, northwest Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viada, Stephen Tomas

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SPECIES COMPOSITION AND POPULATION LEVELS OF SCLERACTINEAN CORALS WITHIN THE DIPLORIA-MONTASTREA-PORITES ZONE OF THE EAST FLOWER GA~IIK, I w MEXICO A Thesis by STEPHEN TOMAS VIADA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University...~A1IN, MEXICO A Thesis by STEPHEN TOMAS VIADA Approved as to style and content by: Chairman o Com 'ttee Thomas J. Bright Mem er Richard Rezak Member Merrill H. Sweet a Department December 1980 ABSTRACT Species Composition and Population...

  10. Thermodynamic modelling of Cr-bearing garnets with implications for diamond inclusions and peridotite xenoliths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Zürich, Switzerland e Geological Survey of Western Australia, Mineral House, 100 Plain Street, East Perth, WA 6004, Australia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 8 September 2008 using free energy minimization techniques. Here we present calculated phase relations in Cr-rich mantle

  11. Magnetic anisotropy in Fe-25Cr-12Co-1Si alloy induced by external magnetic field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Lu-Chang

    Magnetic anisotropy in Fe-25Cr-12Co-1Si alloy induced by external magnetic field ZHEN Liang( )1 of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001, China; 2. Department 27599-3255, USA Received 29 June 2006; accepted 15 January 2007 Abstract: Structural and magnetic

  12. Diode-Pumped Gigahertz Repetition Rate Femtosecond Cr:Lisaf Laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Duo

    We report a low-cost, 1 GHz repetition-rate, diode-pumped, saturable Bragg reflectors mode-locked Cr:LiSAF laser, which generates nearly transform-limited 103-fs long pulses around 866 nm, with a record high peak power of 1.45 kW.

  13. Clostridium chromiireducens sp. nov., isolated from Cr(VI)-contaminated soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    by its ability to reduce Cr(VI) in low concentrations. Mixed acid fermentation during growth on glucose resulted in accumulation of acetate, butyrate, formate and lactate. Morphological studies indicated the presence of peritrichous flagella, pili and an S-layer. The major cellular fatty acids (.5 %) were C16 : 0

  14. Transmission electron microscopy of oxide development on 9Cr ODS steel in supercritical water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    is on the ferritic­martensitic 9Cr ODS steel, which was originally developed by JAEA for use in sodium-cooled fast. Ó 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) is one of the Generation- IV nuclear reactor concepts, currently being studied to help meet future

  15. Effect of Cr2O3 on the O-18 Tracer Incorporation in SOFC Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gd0.10Ce0.90O2 (GDC), Y0.15Zr0.85O2 (YSZ) and La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O2 (LSCF) sintered pellets were covered with 3 to 30 nm Cr - overlayers that were subsequently oxidized, forming...

  16. NASA/CR-2002-211637 ICASE Report No. 2002-12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    Hanover, MD 21076-1320 #12;NASA/CR-2002-211637 ICASE Report No. 2002-12 y Air Traffic Conflict Resolution Hanover, MD 21076-1320 (301) 621-0390 National Technical Information Service (NTIS) 5285 Port Royal Road

  17. NASA/CR-2007-214546 NIA Report No. 2007-03

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, César A.

    Space Information 7115 Standard Drive Hanover, MD 21076-1320 #12;NASA/CR-2007-214546 NIA Report No. 2007-03 Batch 5285 Port Royal Road Hanover, MD 21076-1320 Springfield, VA 22161-2171 (301) 621-0390 (703) 605

  18. Limitations for the application of 13Cr steel in oil and gas production environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huizinga, S.; Liek, W.E. [Shell International Oil Products BV, Amsterdam (Netherlands). Shell Research and Technology Centre

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory investigation of application limits of 13Cr steel was carried out for sweet downhole environments in the CO{sub 2} partial pressure regime up to about 10 bar (1 MPa). Two grades of 13Cr steel were studied, one complying with the API 5CT specification and the other a higher carbon version. Polarization curves, taken at various times after immersion of the specimens in simulated brine, revealed an increasing pitting tendency for the higher chloride levels and indicated better performance for the API 5CT grade. This was in agreement with evidence for chromium depleted zones in the higher carbon grade, obtained from polarization curves in sulfuric acid. Weight loss exposure tests, in which the corrosion rate was also monitored by polarization resistance measurements, were performed at temperatures of 100 and 125 C and supplemented with literature data to extend the temperature range. A mathematical formula was derived to describe the corrosion rate as a function of temperature and chloride content. For instance, if 0.1 mm/y is taken as an acceptable corrosion rate, 13Cr steel could be applied up to 125 C in the presence of 150 g/L Cl{sup {minus}}. In the exposure tests, the API 5CT 13Cr steel did not show pitting at the 0.1 mm/y boundary but the higher carbon grade did suffer from this form of attack.

  19. CREEP STRENGTH OF HIGH CR FERRITIC STEELS DESIGNED USING NEURAL NETWORKS AND PHASE STABILITY CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    on experience and test results of creep data obtained after long-term creep tests for several years or moreCREEP STRENGTH OF HIGH CR FERRITIC STEELS DESIGNED USING NEURAL NETWORKS AND PHASE STABILITY of Materials Science and Metallurgy Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ, U.K. Abstract The highest creep rupture

  20. advanced corrosion-resistant fe-cr-ni: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advanced corrosion-resistant fe-cr-ni First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 NUCLEAR...

  1. Long-term measurements of equilibrium factor with electrochemically etched CR-39 SSNTD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, K.N.

    .60 Keywords: Radon progeny concentration; Equilibrium factor; CR-39 1. Introduction Inhaled radon (222 Rn cancer [3]. Methods for long-term monitoring of the concentrations of radon progeny, or the equilibrium factor (which surro- gates the ratios of concentrations of radon progeny to the concentration of the 222

  2. Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Relation between thermal expansion and interstitial formation energy in pure Fe and Cr Janne potentials give lower interstitial formation energy, but predict too small thermal expansion. We also show University, Uppsala, Sweden Abstract By fitting a potential of modified Finnis­Sinclair type to the thermal

  3. Investigations of HRC®-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E.Brodie; S. Hubbard; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; Long, P.E.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

    2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypothesis: Lactate (Hydrogen Release Compound-HRC{trademark}) injection into chromium contaminated groundwater through an injection well will cause indirect or direct bioreduction of chromate [Cr(VI)] and precipitation of insoluble species of [Cr(III)] on soil particles, probably catalyzed at oxide surfaces, at the field scale. Objective: Assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford Site's 100-H Area field site. Types of Research: A three-well system (injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells) was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation and monitoring. To assess the pre- and post-injection test groundwater conditions, we used an integrated monitoring approach, involving hydraulic, geochemical, microbial, and geophysical techniques and analytical methods, as well as conducted five Br-tracer injection tests and four pumping tests (concurrently with the Br-tracer tests). Groundwater biostimulation was conducted by injection of 40 lbs of {sup 13}C-labeled HRC into the injection well (over the depth interval from 44-50 ft) on 8/3/2004, followed by low-flow pumping (1.2 to 2.5 l/min) through the downgradient well (to ensure capture of groundwater flow lines passing through the injection well) for 27 days. Main Results: Although the total microbial population in sediments is relatively low (<10{sup 5} cells g-1) under background conditions, which is likely insufficient for direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction, several types of bacteria, e.g., Bacillus/Arthrobacter and Geobacter, are present in the Hanford sediments, which are known to reduce or sorb hexavalent chromium. The HRC injection stimulated microbial cell counts to reach the maximum of 2 x 10{sup 7} cells g{sup -1} 13-17 days after the injection, and generated highly reducing conditions. Geochemical and isotopic observations confirmed microbial metabolism of HRC. The Cr(VI) concentration in the monitoring and pumping wells decreased below drinking water minimum contaminant limits and remained below background concentrations even after 1.5 years, when redox conditions and microbial densities had returned to background levels. Fe(II) levels have remained high and may account for the continued reduction of Cr(VI).

  4. Investigations of HRC®-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Joyner, D.; Borglin, S.; Brodie, E.; Hubbard, S.; Williams, K.; Peterson, J.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T.; Firestone, M.; Long, P.E.; Resch, C.T.; Cantrell, K.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A.

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypothesis: Lactate (Hydrogen Release Compound-HRC{trademark}) injection into chromium contaminated groundwater through an injection well will cause indirect or direct bioreduction of chromate [Cr(VI)] and precipitation of insoluble species of [Cr(III)] on soil particles, probably catalyzed at oxide surfaces, at the field scale. Objective: Assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford Site's 100-H Area field site. Types of Research: A three-well system (injection well and upgradient and downgradient monitoring wells) was used for conducting the in situ biostimulation and monitoring. To assess the pre- and post-injection test groundwater conditions, we used an integrated monitoring approach, involving hydraulic, geochemical, microbial, and geophysical techniques and analytical methods, as well as conducted five Br-tracer injection tests and four pumping tests (concurrently with the Br-tracer tests). Groundwater biostimulation was conducted by injection of 40 lbs of {sup 13}C-labeled HRC into the injection well (over the depth interval from 44-50 ft) on 8/3/2004, followed by low-flow pumping (1.2 to 2.5 l/min) through the downgradient well (to ensure capture of groundwater flow lines passing through the injection well) for 27 days. Main Results: Although the total microbial population in sediments is relatively low (<10{sup 5} cells g{sup -1}) under background conditions, which is likely insufficient for direct enzymatic Cr(VI) reduction, several types of bacteria, e.g., Bacillus/Arthrobacter and Geobacter, are present in the Hanford sediments, which are known to reduce or sorb hexavalent chromium. The HRC injection stimulated microbial cell counts to reach the maximum of 2 x 10{sup 7} cells g{sup -1} 13-17 days after the injection, and generated highly reducing conditions. Geochemical and isotopic observations confirmed microbial metabolism of HRC. The CR(VI) concentration in the monitoring and pumping wells decreased below drinking water minimum contaminant limits and remained below background concentrations even after 1.5 years, when redox conditions and microbial densities had returned to background levels. Fe(II) levels have remained high and may account for the continued reduction of Cr(VI).

  5. Originally presented at Photomask Japan '94, Kanagawa Science Park, April, 1994 Attenuated phase-shifting photomasks fabricated from Cr-based embedded shifter blanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    the cathode powers and gas mixture. Cr-based films' flexible properties are suitable for several applications

  6. Single-Cell Imaging and Spectroscopic Analyses of Cr(VI) Reduction on the Surface of Bacterial Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuanmin; Sevinc, Papatya C.; Belchik, Sara M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Shi, Liang; Lu, H. Peter

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate single-cell reduction of toxic Cr(VI) by the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), an important bioremediation process, using Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Our experiments indicate that the toxic and highly soluble Cr(VI) can be efficiently reduced to the less toxic and non-soluble Cr2O3 nanoparticles by MR-1. Cr2O3 is observed to emerge as nanoparticles adsorbed on the cell surface and its chemical nature is identified by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy. Co-localization of Cr2O3 and cytochromes by EDX imaging and Raman spectroscopy suggests a terminal reductase role for MR-1 surface-exposed cytochromes MtrC and OmcA. Our experiments revealed that the cooperation of surface proteins OmcA and MtrC makes the reduction reaction most efficient, and the sequence of the reducing reactivity of the MR-1 is: wild type > single mutant @mtrC or mutant @omcA > double mutant (@omcA-@mtrC). Moreover, our results also suggest that the direct microbial Cr(VI) reduction and Fe(II) (hematite)-mediated Cr(VI) reduction mechanisms may co-exist in the reduction processes.

  7. * Address for correspondence: Dr. J. C. O'Reilly, Department of Biology, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33124-0421, USA. E-mail: oreilly@bio.miami.edu.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishikawa, Kiisa

    Behavior in Adult Amphibians James C. O'Reilly 1* , Stephen M. Deban 2 & Kiisa C. Nishikawa 3 1 Department* Address for correspondence: Dr. J. C. O'Reilly, Department of Biology, University of Miami, Coral Morphology, pp. 153-190. P. Aerts, K. D'Août, A. Herrel & R. Van Damme, Eds. © Shaker Publishing 2002, ISBN

  8. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)Hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial “Solid Solution”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y.; Zhang, L.; Michel, F.M.; Harrington, R.; Parise, J.B.; Reeder, R.J.

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of {approx}27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of {approx}10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  9. Structural Properties of the Cr(III)-Fe(III) (Oxy)hydroxide Compositional Series: Insights for a Nanomaterial "Solid Solution"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, Y.; Michel, F; Zhang, L; Harrington, R; Parise, J; Reeder, R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromium(III) (oxy)hydroxide and mixed Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxides are environmentally important compounds for controlling chromium speciation and bioaccessibility in soils and aquatic systems and are also industrially important as precursors for materials and catalyst synthesis. However, direct characterization of the atomic arrangements of these materials is complicated because of their amorphous X-ray properties. This study involves synthesis of the complete Cr(III)-Fe(III) (oxy)hydroxide compositional series, and the use of complementary thermal, microscopic, spectroscopic, and scattering techniques for the evaluation of their structural properties. Thermal analysis results show that the Cr end member has a higher hydration state than the Fe end member, likely associated with the difference in water exchange rates in the first hydration spheres of Cr(III) and Fe(III). Three stages of weight loss are observed and are likely related to the loss of surface/structural water and hydroxyl groups. As compared to the Cr end member, the intermediate composition sample shows lower dehydration temperatures and a higher exothermic transition temperature. XANES analysis shows Cr(III) and Fe(III) to be the dominant oxidation states. XANES spectra also show progressive changes in the local structure around Cr and Fe atoms over the series. Pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray total scattering data shows that the Fe end member is nanocrystalline ferrihydrite with an intermediate-range order and average coherent domain size of 27 {angstrom}. The Cr end member, with a coherent domain size of 10 {angstrom}, has only short-range order. The PDFs show progressive structural changes across the compositional series. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) results also show the loss of structural order with increasing Cr content. These observations provide strong structural evidence of chemical substitution and progressive structural changes along the compositional series.

  10. Studies on the structural, electrical and magnetic properties of LaCrO{sub 3}, LaCr{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} and LaCr{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} by sol–gel method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nithya, V.D.; Jacob Immanuel, R.; Senthilkumar, S.T. [Solid State Ionics and Energy Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India)] [Solid State Ionics and Energy Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Sanjeeviraja, C. [School of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003 (India)] [School of Physics, Alagappa University, Karaikudi 630 003 (India); Perelshtein, I.; Zitoun, D. [Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel)] [Bar-Ilan Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Department of Chemistry, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900 (Israel); Kalai Selvan, R., E-mail: selvankram@buc.edu.in [Solid State Ionics and Energy Devices Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? LaCr{sub 0.5}M{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} (M = Cr{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}) was synthesized by simple sol–gel technique with subsequent heat treatment. ? The compound formation temperature was optimized through XRD analysis. ? The effects of Cu{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} on the electrical properties of LaCrO{sub 3} were studied using impedance spectroscopy. ? The temperature dependence of electrical conductivity was discussed for LaCr{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}. ? The magnetization was found to be enhanced in the LaCr{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}. -- Abstract: The structural, electrical and magnetic properties of LaCr{sub 0.5}M{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} (M = Cr{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}) synthesized by a sol–gel technique were studied. The X-ray diffraction pattern shows the structure to be orthorhombic and the size of the particles is around 100 nm as seen from the TEM images. The effects of Cu{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} on the electrical properties of LaCrO{sub 3} were studied using impedance spectroscopy at room temperature (RT). The properties of LaCr{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} were studied over a wide range of temperature from RT to 533 K. A maximum conductivity of 1.7 × 10{sup ?3} S cm{sup ?1} was observed for LaCr{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5}O{sub 3} at a measured temperature of 533 K. The impedance spectra indicate a negative temperature coefficient of resistance (NTCR) and also imply the conduction is through bulk of the material. The magnetic studies performed using a SQUID magnetometer interpret the antiferromagnetically ordered LaCrO{sub 3} to behave ferromagnetically on the addition of Cu{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}, and the magnetization was found to be enhanced in the LaCr{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}.

  11. Magnetization switching of rare earth orthochromite CeCrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Yiming; Cao, Shixun, E-mail: sxcao@shu.edu.cn; Ren, Wei; Feng, Zhenjie; Yuan, Shujuan; Kang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jincang [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Lu, Bo [Laboratory for Microstructures, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the synthesis of single phase rare earth orthochromite CeCrO{sub 3} and its magnetic properties. A canted antiferromagnetic transition with thermal hysteresis at T?=?260?K is observed, and a magnetic compensation (zero magnetization) near 133?K is attributed to the antiparallel coupling between Ce{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 3+} moments. At low temperature, field induced magnetization reversal starting from 43?K for H?=?1.2 kOe reveals the spin flip driven by Zeeman energy between the net moments and the applied field. These findings may find potential uses in magnetic switching devices such as nonvolatile magnetic memory which facilitates two distinct states of magnetization.

  12. Creep behavior of commercial FeCrAl foils: beneficial and detrimental effect of oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dryepondt, Sebastien N [ORNL; Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Creep tests were performed at 875 and 1050 C on commercially available FeCrAl foils (~50 m, 2 mil thickness) over a wide range of stress and duration to characterize their creep behavior. The oxide scales formed on the creep specimens were analyzed and compared to those that formed on unstressed specimens to assess the effect of stress and strain on oxide growth mechanisms. Below a specific stress threshold, creep rate and lifetime become independent of the applied load and rupture occurs due to the onset of breakaway oxidation. A creep rate model based on the strengthening of the FeCrAl foils due to load-bearing by the thermally-grown alumina scale was observed to be in good agreement with the experimental results.

  13. Irradiation effects on base metal and welds of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) martensitic steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alamo, A.; Seran, J.L.; Rabouille, O.; Brachet, J.C.; Maillard, A.; Touron, H.; Royer, J. [CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    9Cr martensitic steels are being developed for core components (wrapper tubes) of fast breeder reactors as well as for fusion reactor structures. Here, the effects of fast neutron irradiation on the mechanical behavior of base metal and welds of 9Cr-1Mo (EM10) martensitic steel have been studied. Two types of weldments have been produced by TIG and electron beam techniques. Half of samples have been post-weld heat treated to produce a stress-relieved structure. The irradiation has been conducted in the Phenix reactor to doses of 63--65 dpa in the temperature range 450--459 C. The characterization of the welds, before and after irradiation, includes metallographic observations, hardness measurements, tensile and Charpy tests. It is shown that the mechanical properties of the welds after irradiation are in general similar to the characteristics obtained on the base metal, which is little affected by neutron irradiation.

  14. The MSFR as a flexible CR reactor: the viewpoint of safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiorina, C.; Cammi, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20136 Milan (Italy); Franceschini, F. [Westinghouse Electric Company LL, 1000 Westinghouse Dr., Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States); Krepel, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, PSI WEST, 5234 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the possibility has first been discussed of using the liquid-fuelled Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) as a flexible conversion ratio (CR) reactor without design modification. By tuning the reprocessing rate it is possible to determine the content of fission products in the core, which in turn can significantly affect the neutron economy without incurring in solubility problems. The MSFR can thus be operated as U-233 breeder (CR>1), iso-breeder (CR=1) and burner reactor (CR<1). In particular a 40 year doubling time can be achieved, as well as a considerable Transuranics and MA (minor actinide) burning rate equal to about 150 kg{sub HN}/GWE-yr. The safety parameters of the MSFR have then been evaluated for different fuel cycle strategies. Th use and a softer spectrum combine to give a strong Doppler coefficient, one order of magnitude higher compared to traditional fast reactors (FRs). The fuel expansion coefficient is comparable to the Doppler coefficient and is only mildly affected by core compositions, thus assisting the fuel cycle flexibility of the MSFR. ?eff and generation time are comparable to the case of traditional FRs, if a static fuel is assumed. A notable reduction of ?eff is caused by salt circulation, but a low value of this parameter is a limited concern in the MSFR thanks to the lack of a burnup reactivity swing and of positive feedbacks. A simple approach has also been developed to evaluate the MSFR capabilities to withstand all typical double-fault accidents, for different fuel cycle options.

  15. The energy distribution of beta CrB for the specific stellar abundances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Castelli

    1998-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The comparison of the observed and computed energy distributions of beta CrB has shown that a model with the specific chemical composition of the star can account for the visual enery distribution, while it is still unable to reproduce ultraviolet observations shortward of 1700 A. Furthermore, the predicted absorption of strong Fe II and Mg II UV lines is much larger than the observed one.

  16. MICROSTRUCTURAL EXAMINATION OF V-4CR-4TI PRESSURIZED THERMAL CREEP TUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, David S.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two further failed thermal creep pressurized tubes of V-4Cr-4Ti tested at 700 and 800 degrees C have been examined using optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy in order to understand failure and creep mechanisms. These conditions represent lower stress states than were previously examined. Creep deformation at lower stress is shown to be controlled by sub-boundary formation and mis-orientation between sub-grains arising from climb of dislocations within the boundary.

  17. A High-resolution Spectrum of the R CrB Star V2552 Ophiuchi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Kameswara Rao; David L. Lambert

    2003-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Photometry and low-resolution spectroscopy have added V2552 Oph to the rare class of R Coronae Borealis variables. We confirm this classification of V2552 Oph through a comparison of our high-resolution optical spectrum of this star and that of R CrB and other F-type members of the class. We show that V2552 Oph most closely resembles Y Mus and FH Sct, stars in which Sr, Y, and Zr are enhanced.

  18. High pressure synthesis of a new chromite, ScCrO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, J.H.; Parise, J.B. [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)] [State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new compound, ScCrO{sub 3} has been synthesized at 45 kbar and 1,200 C using the cylindrical type press (USCA-1000). It has Pbnm symmetry with a = 5.0329(2) {angstrom}, b = 5.3602(3) {angstrom}, and c = 7.3790(4) {angstrom}, and its structure has been refined using the Rietveld technique and the synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data.

  19. Ferromagnetic ordering of Cr and Fe doped p-type diamond: An ab initio study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benecha, E. M. [Department of Physics, University of South Africa, P.O Box 392, UNISA 0003, Pretoria (South Africa); Lombardi, E. B. [College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa, P.O Box 392, UNISA 0003, Pretoria (South Africa)

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Ferromagnetic ordering of transition metal dopants in semiconductors holds the prospect of combining the capabilities of semiconductors and magnetic systems in single hybrid devices for spintronic applications. Various semiconductors have so far been considered for spintronic applications, but low Curie temperatures have hindered room temperature applications. We report ab initio DFT calculations on the stability and magnetic properties of Fe and Cr impurities in diamond, and show that their ground state magnetic ordering and stabilization energies depend strongly on the charge state and type of co-doping. We predict that divacancy Cr{sup +2} and substitutional Fe{sup +1} order ferromagnetically in p-type diamond, with magnetic stabilization energies (and magnetic moment per impurity ion) of 16.9 meV (2.5 ?{sub B}) and 33.3 meV (1.0 ?{sub B}), respectively. These magnetic stabilization energies are much larger than what has been achieved in other semiconductors at comparable impurity concentrations, including the archetypal dilute magnetic semiconductor GaAs:Mn. In addition, substitutional Fe{sup +1} exhibits a strong half-metallic character, with the Fermi level crossing bands in only the spin down channel. These results, combined with diamond’s extreme properties, demonstrate that Cr or Fe dopedp-type diamond may successfully be considered in the search for room temperature spintronic materials.

  20. Effect of heat treatment on the mechanical properties of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sultan F. Alsagabi; Triratna Shrestha; Indrajit Charit; Gabriel P. Potirniche; Michael V. Glazoff

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (Grade 91) is a material of choice in fossil-fuel-fired power plants with increased efficiency, service life, and reduction in emission of greenhouse gases. It is also considered a prospective material for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant for application in reactor pressure vessels at temperatures up to 650°C. In this paper, heat treatment of the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel was studied by normalizing and tempering the steel at various temperatures and times, with the ultimate goal of improving its creep resistance and optimizing material hardness. The microstructural evolution of the heat treated steels was correlated with the differential scanning calorimetric results. Optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with microhardness profiles and calorimetric plots were used to understand the evolution of microstructure including precipitate structures in modified 9Cr-1Mo steel and relate it to the mechanical behavior of the steel. Thermo- CalcTM calculations were used to support experimental work and provide guidance in terms of the precipitate stability and microstructural evolution. Furthermore, the carbon isopleth and temperature dependencies of the volume fraction of different precipitates were constructed. The predicted and experimentally observed results were found to be in good agreement.

  1. MICROBEAM SYNCHROTRON RADIATION DIFFRACTION AND FLUORESCENCE STUDY OF OXIDE LAYERS FORMED ON 9Cr ODS STEEL IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    ODS STEEL IN SUPERCRITICAL WATER Arthur T. Motta1 , Andrew D. Siwy1 , Jamie M. Kunkle1 , Jeremy B is presented for an oxide formed on 9Cr ODS steel after exposure to supercritical water for 667 hours

  2. Attribute Cr. Course Name Prereq 4 BIOL 220 (204) Principles of Biology: Organisms, Ecology, Evolution Plus Lab and discussion (Fall)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Robert Michael

    Attribute Cr. Course Name Prereqs Prereq 4 BIOL 220 (204) Principles of Biology: Organisms, Ecology Foundations of Learning and Memory (Fall, Spr) Beh. Elec. 3 PSYC 317 Sensation and Perception (Fall) Beh

  3. Coordination and Haptotropic Rearrangement of Cr(CO)3 on (n,0) Nanotube Sidewalls: A Dynamical Density Functional Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannozzi, Paolo

    them ideal candidates for use in fuel cells (batteries), electron devices (semiconductors), catalysts optimizations have been performed on the Cr(CO)3-(C72H12) complex, pointing out the preferred coordination sites

  4. Auger Nanoprobe analysis of presolar ferromagnesian silicate grains from primitive CR chondrites QUE 99177 and MET 00426

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auger Nanoprobe analysis of presolar ferromagnesian silicate grains from primitive CR chondrites inventories are dominated by ferromagnesian silicates with group 1 oxygen isotopic compositions, indicative interstellar silicates have stoichiometries between olivine and pyroxene type silicates. Although structural

  5. Cr-W-V bainitic/ferritic steel with improved strength and toughness and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klueh, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN); Maziasz, Philip J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high strength, high toughness Cr-W-V ferritic steel composition suitable for fast induced-radioactivity (FIRD) decay after irradiation in a fusion reactor comprises 2.5-3.5 wt % Cr, 2. This invention was made with Government support under contract DE-AC05-840R21400 awarded by the U.S. Department of Energy to Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. and the Government has certain rights in this invention.

  6. Structure of multilayered Cr(Al)N/SiO{sub x} nanocomposite coatings fabricated by differential pumping co-sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro [JEOL USA Inc., 11 Dearborn Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 01960 (United States)] [JEOL USA Inc., 11 Dearborn Road, Peabody, Massachusetts 01960 (United States); Nose, Masateru [Faculty of Art and Design, University of Toyama, 180 Futagami-machi, Takaoka 933-8588 (Japan)] [Faculty of Art and Design, University of Toyama, 180 Futagami-machi, Takaoka 933-8588 (Japan); Onishi, Ichiro [JEOL Ltd. 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan)] [JEOL Ltd. 3-1-2 Musashino, Akishima, Tokyo 196-8558 (Japan); Shiojiri, Makoto [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)] [Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A Cr(Al)N/38 vol. % SiO{sub x} hard coating was prepared on a (001) Si substrate at 250 °C in a differential pumping co-sputtering system, which has two chambers for radio frequency (RF) sputtering and a substrate holder rotating on the chambers. The composite coating was grown by alternate sputter-depositions from CrAl and SiO{sub 2} targets with flows of N{sub 2}+Ar and Ar at RF powers of 200 and 75 W, respectively, on transition layers grown on the substrate. Analytical electron microscopy reveled that the Cr(Al)N/SiO{sub x} coating had a multilayered structure of Cr(Al)N crystal layers ?1.6 nm thick and two-dimensionally dispersed amorphous silicon oxide (a-SiO{sub x}) particles with sizes of ?1 nm or less. The a-SiO{sub x} particles were enclosed with the Cr(Al)N layers. The coating had a low indentation hardness of ?25 GPa at room temperature, due to a high oxide fraction of 38 vol. % and a low substrate rotational speed of 1 rpm. Faster rotation and lower oxide fraction would make a-SiO{sub x} particles smaller, resulting in the formation of Cr(Al)N crystal including the very fine a-SiO{sub x} particles with small number density. They would work as obstacles for the lattice deformation of the Cr(Al)N crystals. We have fabricated a superhard coating of Cr(Al)N/17 vol. % SiO{sub x} with a hardness of 46 GPa prepared at 12 rpm.

  7. Characterization of Cr poisoning in a solid oxide fuel cell cathode using a high-energy x-ray microbeam.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, D. J.; Almer, J.; Cruse, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A key feature of planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is the feasibility of using metallic interconnects made of high temperature ferritic stainless steels, which reduce system cost while providing excellent electric conductivity. Such interconnects, however, contain high levels of chromium, which has been found to be associated with SOFC cathode performance degradation at SOFC operating temperatures; a phenomenon known as Cr poisoning. Here, we demonstrate an accurate measurement of the phase and concentration distributions of Cr species in a degraded SOFC, as well as related properties including deviatoric strain, integrated porosity, and lattice parameter variation, using high energy microbeam X-ray diffraction and radiography. We unambiguously identify (MnCr){sub 3}O{sub 4} and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the two main contaminant phases and find that their concentrations correlate strongly with the cathode layer composition. Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition within the active cathode region reduces porosity and produces compressive residual strains, which hinders the reactant gas percolation and can cause structural breakdown of the SOFC cathode. The information obtained through this study can be used to better understand the Cr-poisoning mechanism and improve SOFC design.

  8. Synthesis and characterization of Cr-doped ZnO nanorod-array photocatalysts with improved activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Chi-Jung, E-mail: changcj@fcu.edu.tw; Yang, Tsung-Lin; Weng, Yu-Ching

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Immobilized photocatalysts with high catalytic activity under UV light were prepared by growing Cr-doped ZnO nanorods on glass substrates by a hydrothermal method. The effects of Cr dopant on the surface texture, crystallinity, surface chemistry, and photoinduced charge separation and their relation with the photocatalytic degradation of Cr-doped ZnO were investigated by scanning electron microscopy, diffuse reflectance spectra, photoelectrochemical scanning electrochemical microscopy, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Adding the appropriate amount of Cr dopant is a powerful way to enhance the separation of charge carriers in ZnO photocatalyst. The photocatalytic activity was improved due to the increase in surface oxygen vacancies, the separation of charge carriers, modification of the band gap, and the large surface area of the doped ZnO nanorod photocatalyst. - Graphical abstract: Photoinduced charge separation and its relation with the photocatalytic degradation activity of Cr-doped ZnO were investigated by photoelectrochemical scanning electrochemical microscopy. - Highlights: • Cr dopant enhances separation of charge carries in ZnO nanorod photocatalyst. • Photoinduced charge carries separation monitored by PEC-SECM. • The higher the photocurrent is, the higher the photocatalytic activity is. • Degradation of DB86 dye solutions under visible light finished within 50 min. • Higher activity due to more oxygen vacancy, tuned band gap and more surface area.

  9. Transmission electron microscopy of RSP Fe/Cr/Mn/Mo/C alloy. [Fe-3 wt % Cr-2 wt % Mn-0. 5 wt % Mo, -0. 3 wt % C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rayment, J.J.; Thomas, G.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid solidification processing (RSP) has been carried out on an Fe/Cr/Mn/Mo/C alloy using both electron-beam melting and piston-and-anvil techniques. Preliminary TEM results show RSP produces a refined duplex microstructure of ferrite and martensite, with a typical ferrite grain size of 0.50 - 3.0 microns. This RSP microstructure is significantly different from that observed in the conventionally austenitized and quenched alloys - a lath martensitic microstructure with thin films of retained interlath austenite. The morphological change produced by RSP is accompanied by an increase in hardness from 48R/sub c/ to 61R/sub c/ (approx. 480 to 720 VHN). It is intended to use electron-beam specimens to examine the potential beneficial effect of RSP upon sliding wear resistance and, by careful TEM studies, it will be possible to characterize the microstructure and its role in the hardness and wear behavior of the RSP alloy.

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF PRESOLAR MATERIAL IN THE CR CHONDRITE NORTHWEST AFRICA 852

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, J.; Hoppe, P. [Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Particle Chemistry Department, P.O. Box 3060, 55020 Mainz (Germany); Vollmer, C. [Institut fuer Mineralogie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Zipfel, J., E-mail: jan.leitner@mpic.de [Forschungsinstitut und Naturmuseum Senckenberg, Sektion Meteoritenforschung, Senckenberganlage 25, 60325 Frankfurt (Germany)

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the inventory of presolar silicate, oxide, and silicon carbide (SiC) grains in the CR2 chondrite Northwest Africa (NWA) 852. Thirty-one O-anomalous grains were detected: 24 were identified as silicates ({approx}78 ppm); the remaining 7 are Al-rich oxides ({approx}38 ppm). NWA 852 is the first C2 chondrite containing O-anomalous presolar dust in concentrations comparable to other more primitive meteorites. Eight presolar SiC grains have been found, representing the highest abundance ({approx}160 ppm) observed so far in primitive meteorites. {sup 15}N-enriched matter is also present, although very heterogeneously distributed. Twenty-six of the O-anomalous grains are enriched in {sup 17}O, originating from the outflows of low-mass asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars. We calculate a silicate/oxide abundance ratio of {approx}2, which indicates a higher degree of aqueous alteration than observed for other presolar-grain-rich meteorites. NWA 852 thus stands between the presolar-grain-rich CR3 chondrites (MET 00426, QUE 99177) and CR2 chondrites with low presolar grain abundances (Renazzo, NWA 530). We calculate an initial presolar silicate abundance of {approx}800 ppm for NWA 852, if silicate destruction by aqueous alteration is taken into account. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) investigation of one presolar Al-rich grain of an AGB star origin revealed that the grain mainly consists of a single crystal of hibonite with slightly varying orientations. A distinct subgrain (d < 100 nm) with a Ca/Ti ratio of {approx}1 is located in the central region, most likely indicating a perovskite-like phase. Our data suggest this phase to be a primary condensate and not an alteration product.

  11. Letter Report Documenting Progress of Second Generation ATF FeCrAl Alloy Fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamamoto,, Y. [ORNL] [ORNL; Yang, Y. [ORNL] [ORNL; Field, K. G. [ORNL] [ORNL; Terrani, K. [ORNL] [ORNL; Pint, B. A. [ORNL] [ORNL; Snead, L. L. [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of the 2nd generation ATF FeCrAl alloy has been initiated, and a candidate alloy was selected for trial tube fabrication through hot-extrusion and gun-drilling processes. Four alloys based on Fe-13Cr-4.5Al-0.15Y in weight percent were newly cast with minor alloying additions of Mo, Si, Nb, and C to promote solid-solution and second-phase precipitate strengthening. The alloy compositions were selected with guidance from computational thermodynamic tools. The lab-scale heats of ~ 600g were arc-melted and drop-cast, homogenized, hot-forged and -rolled, and then annealed producing plate shape samples. An alloy with Mo and Nb additions (C35MN) processed at 800°C exhibits very fine sub-grain structure with the sub-grain size of 1-3?m which exhibited more than 25% better yield and tensile strengths together with decent ductility compared to the other FeCrAl alloys at room temperature. It was found that the Nb addition was key to improving thermal stability of the fine sub-grain structure. Optimally, grains of less than 30 microns are desired, with grains up to and order of magnitude in desired produced through Nb addition. Scale-up effort of the C35MN alloy was made in collaboration with a commercial cast company who has a capability of vacuum induction melting. A 39lb columnar ingot with ~81mm diameter and ~305mm height (with hot-top) was commercially cast, homogenized, hot-extruded, and annealed providing 10mm-diameter bar-shape samples with the fine sub-grain structure. This commercial heat proved consistent with materials produced at ORNL at the lab-scale. Tubes and end caps were machined from the bar sample and provided to another work package for the ATF-1 irradiation campaign in the milestone M3FT-14OR0202251.

  12. Microstructural examination of V-(4-5%) Cr-(4-5%)Ti irradiated in X530

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Chung, H.M. [Argonne Natinonal Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructural examination results are reported for two heats of V-(4-5%)Cr-(4-5%)Ti irradiated in the X530 experiment to {approximately}400{degrees}C to provide an understanding of the microstructural evolution that may be associated with degradation of mechanical properties. Fine precipitates were observed in high density intermixed with small defect clusters for all conditions examined following the irradiation. The irradiation-induced precipitation does not appear to be affected by preirradiation heat treatment at 950-1125{degrees}C. There was no evidence for a significant density of large (diameter >10 nm) dislocation loops or network dislocations.

  13. Oxidation Characteristics of Fe-18Cr-18Mn-stainless alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Rawers

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air oxidation studies of Fe-18Cr-18Mn stainless steels were conducted at 525°C, 625°C, and 725°C. Alloys were evaluated with respect to changes in oxidation properties as a result of interstitial additions of nitrogen and carbon and of minor solute additions of silicon, molybdenum, and nickel. Interstitial concentrations possibly had a small, positive effect on oxidation resistance. Minor solute additions significantly improved oxidation resistance but could also reduce interstitial solubility resulting in formation of chromium carbides. Loss of solute chromium resulted in a slight reduction in oxidation protection. Oxidation lasting over 500 hours produced a manganese rich, duplex oxide structure: an outer sesquioxide and an inner spinel oxide.

  14. Audit Report: CR-B-95-06 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  15. Audit Report: CR-B-97-01 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  16. Audit Report: CR-B-97-04 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  17. Audit Report: CR-B-97-04 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  18. Audit Report: CR-B-98-02 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA NewslettersPartnership1/08 AttendanceCR-B-98-02 Audit Report:

  19. Audit Report: CR-B-99-02 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0 ARRA NewslettersPartnership1/08 AttendanceCR-B-98-02 Audit

  20. Audit Report: CR-B-97-03 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  1. Microsoft Word - CR-091 Primary Basis of Cost Savings and Cost Savings Amount Custom Fields

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  2. Audit Report: CR-B-02-02 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  3. Audit Report: CR-B-95-03 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  4. Audit Report: CR-B-95-05 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  5. Audit Report: CR-B-97-02 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from TarasaName Affiliation3 Audit Report: CR-B-95-03

  6. Audit Report: CR-FS-99-01 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureComments from TarasaName Affiliation3 Audit Report:FS-97-02CR-FS-99-01

  7. Corrosion property of 9Cr-ODS steel in nitric acid solution for spent nuclear fuel reprocessing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takeuchi, M.; Koizumi, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Inoue, M.; Koyama, S.I. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Oarai-machi, Higashi-ibaraki-gun, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion tests of oxide dispersion strengthened with 9% Cr (9Cr-ODS) steel, which is one of the desirable materials for cladding tube of sodium-cooled fast reactors, in pure nitric acid solution, spent FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution were performed to understand the corrosion behavior in a spent nuclear fuel reprocessing. In this study, the 9Cr-ODS steel with lower effective chromium content was evaluated to understand the corrosion behavior conservatively. As results, the tube-type specimens of the 9Cr-ODS steels suffered severe weight loss owing to active dissolution at the beginning of the immersion test in pure nitric acid solution in the range from 1 to 3.5 M. In contrast, the weight loss was decreased and they showed a stable corrosion in the higher nitric acid concentration, the dissolved FBR fuel solution, and its simulated solution by passivation. The corrosion rates of the 9Cr-ODS steel in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and its simulated solution were 1-2 mm/y and showed good agreement with each other. The passivation was caused by the shift of corrosion potential to noble side owing to increase in nitric acid concentration or oxidative ions in the dissolved FBR fuel solution and the simulated spent fuel solution. (authors)

  8. Effect of V and Ta on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Xiang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Guoquan, E-mail: g.liu@ustb.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Hu, Benfu; Wang, Jinsan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Ullah, Asad [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Department of Mathematics, Karakoram International University, Gilgit-Baltistan (Pakistan)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steels are promising candidate materials for good corrosion and irradiation resistance used for supercritical water-cooled reactor cladding and in-core components. V and Ta are considered to have improved the creep strength of high Cr steels by precipitating as MX phase. In this paper, a series of trial products microalloyed with V and V–Ta are produced, and the microstructure is characterized after quenching at 1050 °C and tempering at 780 °C by using TEM method to investigate the effect of these elements on the precipitation behavior of 12%Cr reduced activation ferrite/martensite steel. The results from both the experimental observations and thermodynamic and kinetic calculations reveal that V and V–Ta can promote the stable MX precipitation instead of M{sub 2}X, thus increasing the volume fraction of M{sub 23}C{sub 6}. Two-phase separation behavior of the (Ta, V)(C, N) carbonitride into a Ta(V)C(N) phase and a V(Ta)N(C) phase in 12Cr3WVTa steel is observed and further discussed. - Highlights: • Microalloyed with V and V-Ta can promote the precipitation of MX instead of M{sub 2}X. • The presence of delta-ferrite in microstructure affects the morphology of MX. • Two-phase separation of MX carbonitride was observed in 12Cr3WVTa steel.

  9. On the peculiar properties of triangular-chain EuCr{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} antiferromagnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gondek, ?., E-mail: lgondek@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Szytu?a, A. [M. Smoluchowski Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Przewo?nik, J.; ?ukrowski, J. [AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Prokhorov, A.; Chernush, L.; Zubov, E. [A.A. Galkin Donetsk Physico-Technical Institute, NANU, 83114 Donetsk, R. Luxembourg str. 72 (Ukraine); Dyakonov, V. [A.A. Galkin Donetsk Physico-Technical Institute, NANU, 83114 Donetsk, R. Luxembourg str. 72 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics, PAS, 02-668 Warsaw, Al. Lotników 32/46 (Poland); Duraj, R. [Institute of Physics Technical University of Cracow, Podchorazych 1, 30-084 Krakow (Poland); Tyvanchuk, Yu. [Analytical Chemistry Department, Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kyryla and Mephodiya 6, 79005 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we report studies on EuCr{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} compound, that is a member of newly discovered family of huntite-related specimens for non-linear optics. For the first time, the uncommon temperature dependence of the EuCr{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} lattice parameters is reported. Additionally, the magnetism of this compound is extremely interesting. Namely, a possible interplay in between potentially magnetic rare-earth ions and 3d metal stacked within quasi-1D chain that can lead to a great variety of magnetic behaviour. Indeed, in our studies we have found 3D-long range ordering with metamagnetic behaviour, while at higher temperature the magnetic chains become uncoupled. - Graphical abstract: Torsion-like vibrations are the key to understand negative thermal expansion along the a-axis. Display Omitted - Highlights: • EuCr{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 4} is a peculiar triangular-chain antiferromagnet. • Rare earth sublattice is non-magnetic with Eu{sup 3+} configuration. • Cr{sup 3+} magnetic moments show 1-D behaviour along with spin fluctuations. • Torsion vibrations of Cr triangular tubes lead to anomalous expansion of unit cell.

  10. Stud. Geophys. Geod., 56 (2012), 677-704, DOI: 10.1007/s11200-011-9005-9 677 2012 Inst. Geophys. AS CR, Prague

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . AS CR, Prague Magnetic susceptibility and its relationship with paleoenvironments, diagenesis, diagenesis 1. INTRODUCTION The use of initial magnetic susceptibility (in) records for high

  11. {ital Ab-initio} calculation of excited state absorption of Cr{sup 4+} in Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ching, W.Y.; Xu, Y. [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri 64110 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, Missouri 64110 (United States); Brickeen, B.K. [Allied Signal FM T, Kansas City, Missouri 64141 (United States)] [Allied Signal FM T, Kansas City, Missouri 64141 (United States)

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cr{sup 3+} and Cr{sup 4+} impurity states in Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (YAG) crystal are studied by {ital ab-initio} supercell calculations using the density-functional theory. Calculations are carried out with Cr substitutions at the octahedral and tetrahedral Al sites including the effect of Ca co-doping. Optical transitions between various levels and to conduction band states are also calculated. A model for excited state absorption for Cr{sup 4+} in YAG is proposed. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  12. ARM - Coral Reef Cores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. Oxidation Resistant, Cr Retaining, Electrically Conductive Coatings on Metallic Alloys for SOFC Interconnects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vladimir Gorokhovsky

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes significant results from an on-going, collaborative effort to enable the use of inexpensive metallic alloys as interconnects in planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) through the use of advanced coating technologies. Arcomac Surface Engineering, LLC, under the leadership of Dr. Vladimir Gorokhovsky, is investigating filtered-arc and filtered-arc plasma-assisted hybrid coating deposition technologies to promote oxidation resistance, eliminate Cr volatility, and stabilize the electrical conductivity of both standard and specialty steel alloys of interest for SOFC metallic interconnect (IC) applications. Arcomac has successfully developed technologies and processes to deposit coatings with excellent adhesion, which have demonstrated a substantial increase in high temperature oxidation resistance, stabilization of low Area Specific Resistance values and significantly decrease Cr volatility. An extensive matrix of deposition processes, coating compositions and architectures was evaluated. Technical performance of coated and uncoated sample coupons during exposures to SOFC interconnect-relevant conditions is discussed, and promising future directions are considered. Cost analyses have been prepared based on assessment of plasma processing parameters, which demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed surface engineering process for SOFC metallic IC applications.

  14. Influence of fatigue on the nanohardness of NiTiCr-wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frotscher, M. [Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany; Young, M. L. [Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany; Bei, Hongbin [ORNL; George, Easo P [ORNL; Neuking, K. [Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany; Eggeler, G. [Ruhr University, Bochum, Germany

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing parameters, such as rotational speed and bending radius, have a strong influence on the fatigue life of pseudoelastic NiTi shape-memory alloys during bending rotation fatigue (BRF) experiments [M. F. X. Wagner, Int. J. Mat. Res. 97 (2006), p. 1687-1696. and M. Frotscher, et al., Thermomechanical processing, microstructure and bending rotation fatigue of ultra-fine grained NiTiCr-wires, Proceedings of the International Conference for Shape Memory and Superelastic Technologies (SMST 2007), Tsukuba, Japan, ASM International, (2008), p. 149-158.]. Previous studies showed a decrease in the fatigue life for smaller bending radius (i.e. higher equivalent strain) and larger rotational speed. This observation is associated with an increase of dislocation density, the stabilization of stressinduced martensite during cycling, and an increase of the plateau stresses due to self-heating. In the present study, we examine the influence of these fatigue parameters on the nanohardness and shape recovery of pseudoelastic NiTiCr shape-memory alloy wires by nanoindentation. We show that nanoindentation is a suitable method for the characterization of fatigue-related microstructural changes, which affect the mechanical properties.

  15. Discovery of Optical Bursts from MS1603.6+2600 = UW CrB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. I. Hynes; E. L. Robinson; E. Jeffery

    2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the discovery of several optical burst-like events from the low-mass X-ray binary MS1603.6+2600 (UW CrB). The events last for a few tens of seconds, exhibit a very fast rise and slow decay, and involve optical brightening of a factor of 2-3. The flares appear distinct from the lower level flickering and instead strongly resemble reprocessed type-I X-ray bursts as seen in a number of other neutron star low-mass X-ray binaries. In conjunction with the previously reported candidate X-ray burst, these confirm that the compact object in UW CrB is a neutron star. We examine the optical burst brightness and recurrence times and discuss how the nature of the system can be constrained. We conclude that the source is most likely an accretion disk corona source at an intermediate distance, rather than a nearby quiescent system or very distant dipper.

  16. Solidification characterization of a new rapidly solidified Ni-Cr-Co based superalloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Kai, E-mail: wk-ustb@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Liu, Guoquan [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China) [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Hu, Benfu [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Feng [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom)] [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Zhang, Yiwen [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China) [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); High Temperature Materials Research Institution, CISRI, Beijing 100081 (China); Tao, Yu; Liu, Jiantao [High Temperature Materials Research Institution, CISRI, Beijing 100081 (China)] [High Temperature Materials Research Institution, CISRI, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The solidification characterization of a new rapidly solidified Ni-Cr-Co based superalloy prepared by plasma rotating electrode process was investigated by means of optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, and transmission electron microscope. The results show that the solidification microstructure changes from dendrites to cellular and microcrystal structures with decreasing powder size. The elements of Co, Cr, W and Ni are enriched in the dendrites, while Mo, Nb and Ti are higher in the interdendritic regions. The relationships between powder size with the average solid-liquid interface moving rate, the average interface temperature gradient and the average cooling rate are established. Microsegregation is increased with larger powder size. The geometric integrity of MC Prime type carbides in the powders changes from regular to diverse with decreasing powder size. The morphology and quantity of carbides depend on the thermal parameters and non-equilibrium solute partition coefficients during rapid solidification. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relations of solidification thermal parameters with powder size are established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relation of non-equilibrium solute partition with powder size is investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The solidification microstructure is related to thermal parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The segregation behavior is linked to non-equilibrium partition coefficients. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The morphology and quantity of carbides depend on the above combined factors.

  17. Effect of prior cold work on age hardening of Cu-3Ti-1Cr alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markandeya, R. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, College of Engineering, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University, Kukatpally, Hyderabad-500 072 (India); Nagarjuna, S. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad-500 058 (India)]. E-mail: snagarjuna1@rediffmail.com; Sarma, D.S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi-221 005 (India)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of 50%, 75% and 90% cold work on the age hardening behavior of Cu-3Ti-1Cr alloy has been investigated by hardness and tensile tests, and light optical and transmission electron microscopy. Hardness increased from 118 Hv in the solution-treated condition to 373 Hv after 90% cold work and peak aging. Cold deformation reduced the peak aging time and temperature of the alloy. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength reached a maximum of 1090 and 1110 MPa, respectively, following 90% deformation and peak aging. The microstructure of the deformed alloy exhibited elongated grains and deformation twins. The maximum strength on peak aging was obtained due to precipitation of the ordered, metastable and coherent {beta}'-Cu{sub 4}Ti phase, in addition to high dislocation density and deformation twins. Over-aging resulted in decreases in hardness and strength due to the formation of incoherent and equilibrium {beta}-Cu{sub 3}Ti phase in the form of a cellular structure. However, the morphology of the discontinuous precipitation changed to a globular form on high deformation. The mechanical properties of Cu-3Ti-1Cr alloy are superior to those of Cu-2.7Ti, Cu-3Ti-1Cd and the commercial Cu-0.5Be-2.5Co alloys in the cold-worked and peak-aged condition.

  18. Microbial community changes during sustained Cr(VI) reduction at the 100H site in Hanford, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, Romy; Brodie, Eoin L; Faybishenko, Boris; Piceno, Yvette M; Tom, Lauren; Choudhuri, Swati; Beller, Harry R; Liu, Jenny; Torok, Tamas; Joyner, Dominique C; Joachimiak, Marcin P; Zhou, Aifen; Van Nostrand, Joy D; Zhou, Joe; Long, Phil E; Newcomer, Darrell R; Andersen, Gary L; Hazen, Terry C.

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Hexavalent Chromium is a widespread contaminant found in soil, sediment, and groundwater. In order to stimulate microbially-mediated reduction of Cr(VI), a poly-lactate compound (HRC) was injected into the Chromium-contaminated aquifer at the Hanford (WA) 100H site in 2004. Cr(VI) concentrations rapidly declined to below the detection limit and remained so for more than three years after injection. Based on the results of the bacterial community composition using high-density DNA 16S rRNA gene microarrays, we observed the community to transition through denitrifying, ironreducing and sulfate-reducing populations. As a result, we specifically focused isolation efforts on three bacterial species that were significant components of the community. Positive enrichments in defined anaerobic media resulted in the isolation of an iron-reducing Geobacter metallireducens-like isolate, a sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vukgaris-like strain and a nitrate-reducing Pseudomonas stutzeri-like isolate among several others. All of these isolates were capable of reducing Cr(VI) anoxically and have been submitted for genome sequencing to JGI. To further characterize the microbial, and geochemical mechanisms associated with in situ Cr(VI) reduction at the site, additional HRC was injected in 2008. The goal was to restimulate the indigenous microbial community and to regenerate the reducing conditions necessary for continued Cr(VI) bio-immobilization in the groundwater. Analysis of the microbial populations post-injection revealed that they recovered to a similar density as after the first injection in 2004. In this study, we present the results from our investigation into microbially-mediated Cr(VI) reduction at Hanford, and a comparison of the microbial community development following two HRC injections four years apart.

  19. Temperature dependence of dynamic Young's modulus and internal friction in three plasma sprayed NiCrAlY coating alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Lloyd Steven

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF DYNAM'IIC YOUNG'S MODULUS AND INTERNAL FRICTION IN THREE PLASMA SPRAYED NiCrAlY COATING -ALLOYS A Thesis LLOYD STEVEN COOK Submitted to the 08ice of Graduate Studies of Texas AE M University in part. al full...'illment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Itiajor Subject: l'dechanical Engineering TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF DYNAMIC YOUNG'S MODULUS AND INTERNAL FRICTION IN THREE PLASMA SPRAYED NiCrAIY COATING ALLOYS A Thesis by LLOYD STEVEN COOK...

  20. Development of a New Class of Fe-3Cr-W(V) Ferritic Steels for Industrial Process Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jawad, Mann; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The project described in this report dealt with improving the materials performance and fabrication for hydrotreating reactor vessels, heat recovery systems, and other components for the petroleum and chemical industries. These reactor vessels can approach ship weights of about 300 tons with vessel wall thicknesses of 3 to 8 inches. They are typically fabricated from Fe-Cr-Mo alloy steels, containing 1.25 to 12% chromium and 1 to 2% molybdenum. The goal of this project was to develop Fe-Cr-W(V) steels that can perform similar duties, in terms of strength at high temperatures, but will weigh less and thereby save energy.

  1. CX3CR1 Is Expressed by Prostate Epithelial Cells and Androgens Regulate the Levels of CX3CL1/Fractalkine in the Bone Marrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatatis, Alessandro

    CX3CR1 Is Expressed by Prostate Epithelial Cells and Androgens Regulate the Levels of CX3CL1 human osteoblasts in vitro. Thus, the interaction of fractalkine with its receptor CX3CR1 could play a crucial role in vivo by directing circulating prostate cancer cells to the bone. We found that although CX

  2. Quantitative measurement of Cr segregation in Co0.8xCrxPt0.1B0.1 recording media by scatter diagram analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnan, Kannan M.

    - trometry or electron energy-loss spectrometry EELS data at each point. In most cases this technique diagram analysis of chemically resolved energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy EFTEM images the Cr enrichment is suf- ficiently high as to render the local Co­Cr composition non- magnetic

  3. Impact of a Mixed Oxide’s Surface Composition and Structure on Its Adsorptive Properties: Case of the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) Termination of the ?-(Fe,Cr)2O3(0001) Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, Michael A.; Engelhard, Mark H.

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of an ?-(Fe0.75,Cr0.25)2O3(0001) mixed oxide single crystal surface was conducted using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). After sputter/anneal cleaning in ultra-high vacuum (UHV), the mixed oxide surface became terminated with a magnetite-(111) structure based on the presence of (2x2) spots in LEED and Fe2+ in XPS. The composition of the surface was close to that of M3O4 based on XPS, with the metal (M) content of Fe2+/3+ and Cr3+ being close to 1.4:1, despite the fact that the film’s bulk was 3:1 with respect to the metal cations. The enrichment of the surface with Cr was not altered by high temperature oxidation in UHV, but could be returned to that of the bulk film composition by exposure to the ambient. Adsorption of various probe molecules (NO, O2, CO2 and H2O) was used to identify the active cation sites present in the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) terminated surface. Although XPS and SIMS both indicated that the near-surface region was enriched in Cr3+, no adsorption states typically associated with Cr3+ sites on ?-Cr2O3 single crystal surfaces were detected. Instead, the TPD behaviors of O2 and CO2 pointed toward the main active sites being Fe2+ and Fe3+, with O2 preferentially adsorbing at the former and CO2 at the latter. NO was observed to bind at both Fe2+ and Fe3+ sites, and H2O TPD looked nearly identical to that for H2O on the Fe3O4(111) surface. Competition for adsorption sites between coadsorbed combinations of CO2, O2, H2O and NO corroborated these assignments. These results indicate that the surface composition of a mixed oxide can vary significantly from its bulk composition depending on the treatment conditions. Even then, the surface composition does not necessarily provide direct insight into the active adsorption sites. In the case of the (Fe,Cr)3O4(111) termination of the ?-(Fe0.75,Cr0.25)2O3(0001) surface, Cr3+ cations in the near-surface region appear to be fully coordinated and unavailable for adsorbing molecules. The authors thank Drs. Sara Chamberlin and Scott Chambers for supplying the film used in this work. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. The research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  4. Thermodynamic modeling and experimental validation of the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo alloy system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teng, Zhenke [ORNL; Zhang, F [CompuTherm LLC, Madison, WI; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Liu, Chain T [Hong Kong Polytechnic University; Huang, Shenyan [ORNL; Chou, Y.T. [Multi-Phase Services Inc., Knoxville; Tien, R [Multi-Phase Services Inc., Knoxville; Chang, Y A [ORNL; Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NiAl-type precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels have been known as potential materials for the steam turbine applications. In this study, thermodynamic descriptions of the B2-NiAl type nano-scaled precipitates and body-centered-cubic (BCC) Fe matrix phase for four alloys based on the Fe-Al-Ni-Cr-Mo system were developed as a function of the alloy composition at the aging temperature. The calculated phase structure, composition, and volume fraction were validated by the experimental investigations using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and atom probe tomography. With the ability to accurately predict the key microstructural features related to the mechanical properties in a given alloy system, the established thermodynamic model in the current study may significantly accelerate the alloy design process of the NiAl-strengthened ferritic steels.

  5. Mn-Fe base and Mn-Cr-Fe base austenitic alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brager, Howard R. (Richland, WA); Garner, Francis A. (Richland, WA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Manganese-iron base and manganese-chromium-iron base austenitic alloys designed to have resistance to neutron irradiation induced swelling and low activation have the following compositions (in weight percent): 20 to 40 Mn; up to about 15 Cr; about 0.4 to about 3.0 Si; an austenite stabilizing element selected from C and N, alone or in combination with each other, and in an amount effective to substantially stabilize the austenite phase, but less than about 0.7 C, and less than about 0.3 N; up to about 2.5 V; up to about 0.1 P; up to about 0.01 B; up to about 3.0 Al; up to about 0.5 Ni; up to about 2.0 W; up to about 1.0 Ti; up to about 1.0 Ta; and with the remainder of the alloy being essentially iron.

  6. The influence of temperature on the color of TiO{sub 2}:Cr pigments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomes Vieira, Fagner Ticiano; Silva Melo, Danniely [LACOM, Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias Exatas e da Natureza, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Cidade Universitaria, Campus I, CEP:58059 900, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Jackson Guedes de Lima, Severino [LSR, Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Longo, Elson [CMDMC-LIEC, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Paskocimas, Carlos Alberto [Departamento de Engenharia Mecanica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN (Brazil); Silva Junior, Wilson [Icra Produtos para Ceramica, Mogi Guacu, SP (Brazil); Gouveia de Souza, Antonio [LACOM, Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias Exatas e da Natureza, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Cidade Universitaria, Campus I, CEP:58059 900, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil); Garcia dos Santos, Ieda Maria [LACOM, Departamento de Quimica, Centro de Ciencias Exatas e da Natureza, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Cidade Universitaria, Campus I, CEP:58059 900, Joao Pessoa, PB (Brazil)], E-mail: ieda@quimica.ufpb.br

    2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    TiO{sub 2}:Cr brown pigments were prepared via a polymeric precursor derived from the Pechini method. The pigments were analyzed by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, ultraviolet-vis spectroscopy, and colorimetry. The increase of the calcination temperature from 700 to 1000 deg. C led to a decrease in the L* values, corresponding to darkening of the pigments. The pigments obtained in this work are darker than those produced by a solid-state reaction method reported before. The change in the pigment color is due to the anatase-rutile phase transition, which leads to a shift in the charge transfer bond (Ti{sup 4+} {r_reversible} O{sup 2-}) due to a change in the crystal field around the chromophore ions. Moreover, the oxidation state of chromium was observed to change, and this also alters the color of the pigments.

  7. 2011 Honda CR-Z 4466 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler Gray; Matthew Shirk; Jeffrey Wishart

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing traction batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Honda CR-Z (VIN JHMZF1C67BS004466). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Microstructural examination of irradiated V-(4-5%)Cr-(4-5%)Ti.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D. S.

    1998-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructural examination results are reported for two heats of V-(4-5%) Cr-(4-5%)Ti irradiated in the EBR-II X530 experiment to 4.5 dpa at {approximately}400 C to provide an understanding of the microstructural evolution that may be associated with degradation of mechanical properties. Fine precipitates were observed in high density intermixed with small defect clusters for all conditions examined following the irradiation. The irradiation-induced precipitation does not appear to be affected by preirradiation heat treatment at 950-1125 C. There was no evidence for a significant density of large (diameter >10 nm) dislocation loops or network dislocations. Analytical investigations successfully demonstrated that the precipitates were enriched in titanium, depleted in vanadium and contained no nitrogen. These results are discussed in terms of future alloy development options.

  9. FURTHER OBSERVATIONS ON V-4Cr-4Ti PRESSURIZED CREEP TUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, David S.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Thomas, Larry E.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Further observations are provided for pressurized thermal creep tubes of V-4Cr-4Ti examined following testing in the range 650 to 800°C for tests lasting up to ~104 h. Precipitate particles have been analyzed by EELS to define interstitial contents, and are shown to be either C or O rich with only minor N contents. Grain shape aspect ratios as a function of strain have been measured and these data shows shape change as a result of effective mid-wall strains as high as 12.7%. Deformation mechanisms are considered to explain Newtonian viscous flow response at 800°C below effective midwall stresses of 70 MPa, and it is concluded that grain boundary sliding probably is the predominant mechanism based on the microstructural information presented here, but there is evidence that Harper-Dorn creep may also be a contributing creep mechanism under these conditions.

  10. Microstructural examination of irradiated V-(4-5%)Cr-(4-5%)Ti

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rice, P.M.; Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chung, H.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microstructural examination results are reported for two heats of V-(4-5%)Cr-(4-5%)Ti irradiated in the EBR-II X530 experiment to {approximately}4 dpa at {approximately}400 C to provide an understanding of the microstructural evolution that may be associated with degradation of mechanical properties. Fine precipitates were observed in high density intermixed with small defect clusters for all conditions examined following the irradiation. The irradiation-induced precipitation does not appear to b affected by preirradiation heat treatment at 950--1125 C. There was no evidence for a significant density of large (diameter >10 nm) dislocation loops or network dislocations. Analytical investigators successfully demonstrated that the precipitates were enriched in titanium, depleted in vanadium and contained no nitrogen.

  11. Heat treated 9 Cr-1 Mo steel material for high temperature application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David; Dogan, Omer; Holcomb, Gordon; Cowen, Christopher

    2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to a composition and heat treatment for a high-temperature, titanium alloyed, 9 Cr-1 Mo steel exhibiting improved creep strength and oxidation resistance at service temperatures up to 650.degree. C. The novel combination of composition and heat treatment produces a heat treated material containing both large primary titanium carbides and small secondary titanium carbides. The primary titanium carbides contribute to creep strength while the secondary titanium carbides act to maintain a higher level of chromium in the finished steel for increased oxidation resistance, and strengthen the steel by impeding the movement of dislocations through the crystal structure. The heat treated material provides improved performance at comparable cost to commonly used high-temperature steels such as ASTM P91 and ASTM P92, and requires heat treatment consisting solely of austenization, rapid cooling, tempering, and final cooling, avoiding the need for any hot-working in the austenite temperature range.

  12. 2011 HONDA CR-Z 2982 - HYBRID ELECTRIC VEHICLE BATTERY TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, Tyler [Interek; Shirk, Matthew [Idaho National Laboratory; Wishart, Jeffrey [Interek

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing traction batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Honda CR-Z (VIN JHMZF1C64BS002982). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. The X-ray emission of the most luminous 3CR radio sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Salvati; G. Risaliti; P. Veron; L. Woltjer

    2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the X-ray properties of the most luminous radio sources in the 3CR catalogue, in order to assess if they are similar to the most luminous radio quiet quasars, for instance in the X-ray normalization with respect to the optical luminosity, or in the distribution of the absorption column density. We have selected the (optically identified) 3CR radio sources whose 178-MHz monochromatic luminosity lies in the highest factor-of-three bin. The 4 most luminous objects had already been observed in X rays. Of the remaining 16, we observed with XMM-Newton 4 randomly chosen, optical type 1s, and 4 type 2s. All targets have been detected. The optical-to-Xray spectral index, alphaox, can be computed only for the type 1s and, in agreement with previous studies, is found to be flatter than in radio quiet quasars of similar luminosity. However, the Compton thin type 2s have an absorption corrected X-ray luminosity systematically lower than the type 1s, by a factor which makes them consistent with the radio quiet alphaox. Within the limited statistics, the Compton thick objects seem to have a reflected component more luminous than the Compton thin ones. The extra X-ray component observed in type 1 radio loud quasars is beamed for intrinsic causes, and is not collimated by the absorbing torus as is the case for the (intrinsically isotropic) disk emission. The extra component can be associated with a relativistic outflow, provided that the flow opening angle and the Doppler beaming factor are 1/5 - 1/7 radians.

  14. The CR 2.0mm (.079") insulation displacement connector features a mounting height as low as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedeward, Kevin

    7 The CR 2.0mm (.079") insulation displacement connector features a mounting height as low as 6.9mm") pitch insulation displacement connector allows automatic harness production for connection of UL1007 of misinsertion without being permanently distorted. · Twin U-slot insulation displacement section The insulation

  15. Abstract--Chemiresistive (CR) sensors and sensor arrays coated with thiolate-monolayer-protected gold nanoparticle (MPN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    . II. THIOLATE-MONOLAYER-PROTECTED GOLD NANOPARTICLE SENSORS AND SENSOR ARRAYS MPN-coated CRs wereAbstract--Chemiresistive (CR) sensors and sensor arrays coated with thiolate-monolayer-protected gold nanoparticle (MPN) interfaces show great promise for high-sensitivity multi-vapor analysis

  16. High temperature mechanical strength and microstructural stability of advanced 9-12%Cr steels and ODS steels.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and ODS steels. B. Fournier,1 M. Salvi1 , C. Caës1 , J. Malaplate1 , F. Dalle1 , M. Sauzay1 , Y. de Carlan. In the framework of Generation IV nuclear reactors and for fusion reactors, oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS. In the present article advanced 9-12%Cr steels, including their ODS grades, are tested under creep, fatigue

  17. Modulation of physical and photocatalytic properties of (Cr, N) codoped TiO{sub 2} nanorods using soft solution processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Wen-Chung [Institute of Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Nguyen, Hoang-Diem; Wu, Chun-Yi [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Chang, Kao-Shuo, E-mail: kschang@mail.ncku.edu.tw; Yoshimura, Masahiro [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China); Promotion Center for Global Materials Research (PCGMR), National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan City 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Facile polymerized complex reactions together with a hydrothermal reaction were implemented to make single crystalline TiO{sub 2} nanorods for the first time. Chromium (Cr) and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) co-doping was performed to tailor the physical properties. Transmission electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction study illustrated that highly reactive facets of (101), (111), and (001) dominated rutile TiO{sub 2} nanorods. A growth model, based on formation of complex species, was proposed to elucidate effectiveness of the soft solution processing in making TiO{sub 2} nanorods. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and consideration of fundamentals of charge neutrality showed N{sub 2} doping could inhibit formation of Cr{sup 6+} and oxygen vacancies (V{sub O}{sup 2+}). An investigation of the photocatalytic properties exhibited high efficiency of photodegradation of methylene blue in 15?min under pH?=?10, using a nanocomposite of (7% Cr, 0.0021% N) codoped and 3% Cr doped TiO{sub 2} nanorods.

  18. Tunable blue light source by intracavity frequency doubling of a Cr-LiSrAIF6 laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Tunable blue light source by intracavity frequency doubling of a Cr- LiSrAIF6 laser Franqois-switched operation at 10 kHz was intracavity frequency doubled by using a LiIOl crystal. The 230 ns tunable blue lasers emitting in the blue-green wavelength range are expected to be the key components for optical

  19. Sputter-Deposited Pt/CrN Nanoparticle PEM Fuel Cell Cathodes: Limited Proton Conductivity Through Electrode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gall, Daniel

    and power density.1 One obstacle to the widespread commercialization of fuel cells is the high cost activity than Pt,10 but is an attractive can- didate to supplement or replace Pt in lower cost fuel cellSputter-Deposited Pt/CrN Nanoparticle PEM Fuel Cell Cathodes: Limited Proton Conductivity Through

  20. Characterization of Gas Metal Arc Welding welds obtained with new high Cr-Mo ferritic stainless steel filler wires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Characterization of Gas Metal Arc Welding welds obtained with new high Cr-Mo ferritic stainless Several compositions of metal cored filler wire were manufactured to define the best welding conditions for homogeneous welding, by Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) process, of a modified AISI 444 ferritic stainless steel

  1. Directed-energy electron-beam processing of a hypoeutectic Cr/sub 90/Ta/sub 10/ alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, J.S.; Kaufmann, E.N.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hypoeutectic Cr/sub 90/Ta/sub 10/ alloy was processed using a directed-energy electron-beam surface melting and resolidification technique to study its microstructure evolution during rapid solidification. The power of the electron beam was 2500 W and the scan speed ranged from 0.13 to 2.0 m/sec. Microstructure characteristics such as transitions from planar front to dendritic growth, and from cellular to dendritic growth were observed. At low solidification rate, the interdendritic regions are characterized by the Cr/Cr/sub 2/Ta eutectic, and at high solidification rate the intercellular regions are characterized by a Cr/sub 2/Ta phase. For the latter, the distribution of Ta-solute across the interior of a cell is very uniform. In a given sample, the primary cell spacing increases as the solidification front moves from the substrate/regrowth interface toward the surface. The solidification parameters, i.e., temperature gradient and growth velocity, were determined with finite-element heat flow analyses. The observed microstructure characteristics were correlated to these parameters using available theoretical models. 9 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  2. On the Relation Between Oxide Ridge Evolution and Alloy Surface Grain Boundary Disorientation in Fe22 wt % Cr Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    high temperature corrosion or oxidation can lead to the failure of the cell. Also, volatile CrO3 andOn the Relation Between Oxide Ridge Evolution and Alloy Surface Grain Boundary Disorientation in Fe Technology Laboratory, Albany, Oregon 97321-2198, USA Oxide ridges formed during the transient stage

  3. Magnetic behavior in Cr{sub 2}@Ge{sub n} (1?n?12) clusters: A density functional investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhaka, Kapil, E-mail: kapil.dhaka@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Trivedi, Ravi, E-mail: kapil.dhaka@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in; Bandyopadhyay, Debashis, E-mail: kapil.dhaka@pilani.bits-pilani.ac.in [Physics Department, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani-333031, Rajasthan (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    With a goal to produce magnetic moment in Cr{sub 2} Doped Ge{sub n} clusters which will be useful for practical applications, we have considered the structure and magnetic properties of Pure Germanium clusters and substitutionally doped it with Cr dimer to produce Cr{sub 2}@Ge{sub n} clusters. As the first step of calculation, geometrical optimizations of the nanoclusters have been done. These optimized geometries have been used in calculate the average binding energy per atom (BE), HOMO-LUMO gap and hence the relative stability of the clusters. These parameters have been demonstrated as structural and electronic properties of the clusters. Gap between highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital indicate cluster to be a potential motif for generating magnetic cluster assembled materials. Based on these values a comparative study on different sized clusters has been done in order to understand the origin of structures, electronic and magnetic properties of Cr{sub 2}@Ge{sub n} nanoclusters.

  4. Targeting Cancer More Effectively CR@B brings together researchers from across the University and the Royal United Hospital, Bath.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Geoffrey R.

    Targeting Cancer More Effectively CR@B brings together researchers from across the University to find a cure for various types of cancer. 40 academic groups from nearly every department to bedside and back again. Drug Discovery The discovery of a new family of anti-cancer drugs called steroid

  5. The Impact of Weld Metal Creep Strength on the Overall Creep Strength of 9% Cr Steel Weldments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayr, Peter

    In this work, three joints of a X11CrMoWVNb9-1-1 (P911) pipe were welded with three filler metals by conventional arc welding. The filler metals varied in creep strength level, so that one overmatched, one undermatched, ...

  6. Kinetics of oxidation of an organic amine with a Cr(V) salen complex in homogeneous aqueous solution and on the surface of mesoporous silica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szajna-Fuller, Ewa; Huang, Yulin; Rapp, Jennifer L.; Chaka, Gezhegn; Lin, Victor S.Y.; Pruski, Marek; Bakac, Andreja

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative study of catalytic activity under homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions was carried out using the (salen)Cr{sup III}-catalyzed oxidation of tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) with iodosobenzene as a model reaction. Amine-functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) were synthesized in a co-condensation reaction and functionalized with salen via a covalent Si-C bond. A Cr(III) complex of this supported ligand, MSN-(salen)Cr{sup III}, was prepared and characterized. Data from powder XRD, BET isotherms and BJH pore size distribution all showed that MSN-(salen)Cr{sup III} still had the typical MSN high surface area, narrow pore size distribution, and ordered hexagonal pore structure, which were further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images. {sup 13}C and {sup 29}Si solid-state NMR data provided structural information about the catalyst and verified successful functionalization of the salen ligand and coordination to Cr(III). No unreacted salen or Cr(III) were observed. The loadings of salen and salen-Cr{sup III} complex were determined via TGA and EDX, respectively. Both measurements indicated that approximately 0.5 mmol/g of catalyst was loaded on the surface of MSN. The oxidation of TMB with iodosobenzene using MSN-(salen)Cr{sup III} as a heterogeneous catalyst exhibited both similarities and differences with the analogous homogeneous reaction using (salen)Cr{sup III}(H{sub 2}O){sup +} as a catalyst in aqueous acetonitrile. In the presence of 0.10 M HClO{sub 4}, the two catalytic reactions proceeded at similar rates and generated the doubly oxidized product TMB{sup 2+}. In the absence of acid, the radical cation TMB{sup +} was produced. The kinetics of the heterogeneous reaction in the absence of added acid responded to concentrations of all three reagents, i.e. (salen)Cr{sup III}, TMB, and PhIO.

  7. Influence of alloy content and a cerium surface treatment on the oxidation behavior of Fe-Cr ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cost of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) can be significantly reduced by using interconnects made from ferritic stainless steels. In fact, several alloys have been developed specifically for this application (Crofer 22APU and Hitachi ZMG323). However, these steels lack environmental stability in SOFC environments, and as a result, degrade the performance of the SOFC. A steel interconnect can contribute to performance degradation through: (i) Cr poisoning of electrochemically active sites within the cathode; (ii) formation of non-conductive oxides, such as SiO2 or Al2O3 from residual or minor alloying elements, at the base metal-oxide scale interface; and/or (iii) excessive oxide scale growth, which may also retard electrical conductivity. Consequently, there has been considerable attention on developing coatings to protect steel interconnects in SOFC environments and controlling trace elements during alloy production. Recently, we have reported on the development of a Cerium surface treatment that improves the oxidation behavior of a variety alloys, including Crofer 22APU [1-5]. Initial results indicated that the treatment may improve the performance of Crofer 22APU for SOFC application by: (i) retarding scale growth resulting in a thinner oxide scale; and (ii) suppressing the formation of a deleterious continuous SiO2 layer that can form at the metal-oxide scale interface in materials with high residual Si content [5]. Crofer 22 APU contains Fe-22Cr-0.5Mn-0.1Ti (weight percent). Depending on current market prices and the purity of raw materials utilized for ingot production, Cr can contribute upwards of 90 percent of the raw materials cost. The present research was undertaken to determine the influence of Cr content and minor element additions, especially Ti, on the effectiveness of the Ce surface treatment. Particular emphasis is placed on the behavior of low Cr alloys.

  8. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1-5.5 MeV alphas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; et al

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics #12;fielded at inertial con#12;nement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-K?#11; and K#12;? x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed tomore »x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0#6; ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± #6;2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± #6;1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± #6;5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual eff#11;ect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.« less

  9. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1-5.5 MeV alphas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics #12;fielded at inertial con#12;nement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-K?#11; and K#12;? x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0#6; ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± #6;2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± #6;1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± #6;5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual eff#11;ect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.

  10. High field magnetotransport and point contact Andreev reflection measurements on CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Br—Degenerate magnetic semiconductor single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisov, K., E-mail: borisovk@tcd.ie; Coey, J. M. D.; Stamenov, P. [School of Physics and CRANN, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Alaria, J. [Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Single crystals of the metallically degenerate fully magnetic semiconductors CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 4} and CuCr{sub 2}Se{sub 3}Br have been prepared by the Chemical Vapour Transport method, using either Se or Br as transport agents. The high-quality, millimetre-sized, octahedrally faceted, needle- and platelet-shaped crystals are characterised by means of high field magnetotransport (?{sub 0}H? 14?T) and Point Contact Andreev Reflection. The relatively high spin polarisation observed |P|>0.56, together with the relatively low minority carrier effective mass of 0.25 m{sub e}, and long scattering time  10{sup ?13}?s, could poise these materials for integration in low- and close-to-room temperature minority injection bipolar heterojunction transistor demonstrations.

  11. Phase diagram and magnetocaloric effects in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15} and (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x})NiGe{sub 1.05} alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quetz, Abdiel, E-mail: anorve2002@yahoo.com; Muchharla, Baleeswaraiah; Dubenko, Igor; Talapatra, Saikat; Ali, Naushad [Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois 62901 (United States); Samanta, Tapas; Stadler, Shane [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetocaloric and thermomagnetic properties of Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15} and (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}) NiGe{sub 1.05} systems for 0???x???0.105 and 0???x???0.1, respectively, have been studied by x-ray diffraction, differential scanning calorimetry, and magnetization measurements. Partial substitution of Cr for Mn in (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x})NiGe{sub 1.05} results in a first order magnetostructural transition from a hexagonal paramagnetic to an orthorhombic paramagnetic phase near T{sub M}???380?K (for x?=?0.07). Partial substitution of Cr for In in Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15} shifts the magnetostructural transition to a higher temperature (T?=?T{sub M}???450?K) for x?=?0.1. Large magnetic entropy changes of ?S?=??12 (J/(kgK)) and ?S?=??11 (J/(kgK)), both for a magnetic field change of 5?T, were observed in the vicinity of T{sub M} for (Mn{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x})NiGe{sub 1.05} and Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}(In{sub 1?x}Cr{sub x}){sub 15}, respectively.

  12. High-temperature phase transformation in Cr added TiAl base alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe, E.; Niinobe, K.; Nobuki, M.; Nakamura, M.; Tsujimoto, T.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have investigated a microstructure evolution of a Ti-48Al-3.5Cr (in at.%) alloy at high-temperatures ({gt} 1,473K). In the alloy annealed at 1673K for 1.8ks, followed by air-cooling, a characteristic microstructure with a feathery fashion was uniformly formed. From a cooling-rate-controlling study, it was found that formation of the feathery structure is accomplished during continuous cooling from 1673K to 1573K, within the {alpha} + {gamma} two-phase region. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the feathery structure is composed of lamellar colonies (5--10{micro}m) which are crystallographically tilted slightly (a few degree) with their neighbors. A surprising fact is that lamellae in each colony are mostly the {gamma} phase with few {alpha}{sub 2} phase less than 5% in volume. This suggests that the feathery structure is a metastable product and has not resulted from the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {alpha} + {gamma} transformation above 1,573 K. Instead, the feathery structure formation should be attributed to the non-equilibrium {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} transformation which occurs at high-temperatures with a small degree of supercooling. The authors discuss this interesting phase transformation in terms of the {alpha} {r{underscore}arrow} {gamma} massive transformation, based on the continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram constructed for the present alloy.

  13. Effect of heat treatment on precipitation on V-5Cr-5Ti heat BL63

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, D.S.; Li, H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructures of V-5Cr-5Ti heat BL63 are compared following heat treatments at 1125{degrees}C for 1 h and 1125{degrees}C for 1 h followed by 890{degrees}C for 24 h. Following the 890{degrees}C treatment, precipitate density was increased due to the presence of a moderate density of highly elongated particles. Microchemical analysis showed that these particles often contained both Ti and V, some particles showed minor amounts of Si, S, and P, but it was also possible to show that these precipitates were enriched in O rather than C or N. Following the 1125{degrees}C heat treatment, only Si was found as a minor impurity in large particles, but S could be identified at grain boundaries, which were coated with a fine distribution of precipitates. The embrittlement observed is ascribed to a combination of interstitial solid solution hardening and grain boundary embrittlement, with interstitial hardening likely the dominant factor.

  14. FURTHER MICROSTRUCTURAL EXAMINATIONS OF V-4Cr-4Ti PRESSURIZED CREEP TUBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, David S.; Kurtz, Richard J.

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressurized thermal creep tubes of V-4Cr-4Ti have been examined following testing in the range 650 to 800°C for tests lasting ~104 h. Creep deformation was found to be controlled by climb-controlled dislocation glide at all temperatures below 800°C whereas at 800°C, sub-grain boundary structure predominated and represented the main obstacle for dislocation motion. At 650 and 700°C after ~104 h an increased density of (Ti,V) oxy-carbo-nitride precipitates near the outer surface extending inwards a distance of 30 and 70 µm, respectively, was found. At 800°C, enhanced (Ti,V) oxy-carbo-nitride precipitation was observed across the entire tube wall thickness and may have affected creep response. Also, evidence for internal precipitation associated with the dislocation structure could be identified. The discussion section addresses differences in the controlling creep mechanisms between grain boundary sliding, sub-grain boundary controlled dislocation climb and individual dislocation climb processes.

  15. Spatial fractal characteristic of spinodal decomposition in Fe-Cr-Ni duplex stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shek, C.H.; Wong, K.W.; Lai, J.K.L. [City Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Physics and Materials Science] [City Univ. of Hong Kong (Hong Kong). Dept. of Physics and Materials Science; Shao, Y.Z. [Zhongshan Univ., Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Physics] [Zhongshan Univ., Guangzhou (China). Dept. of Physics

    1997-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Owing to the extensive use of duplex stainless steels in areas like chemical and petrochemical industries, considerable interest has arisen concerning the thermal degradation of these materials during service, and the consequent changes on the mechanical properties. The embrittlement of these steels is basically due to the decomposition of the ferrite phase at elevated temperatures, and duplex steels are seldom used at temperatures above 300 C. Although the microstructure of spinodal decomposition has been studied extensively using atom probe, it is interesting to investigate the development of fractal characteristics in the microstructure during spinodal decomposition. In this paper the authors present part of their recent results in this aspect on a duplex stainless steel. The {alpha} and {alpha}{prime} domains evolved from the primary ferrite phase during spinodal decomposition have different morphologies. The {alpha} (Fe-rich) forms the matrix while the {alpha}{prime} (Cr-rich) domains are developed in the form of discrete regions embedded within the {alpha} matrix. The distribution of these domains follows the fractal-growth characteristics with fractal dimensions ranging from 0.1 to 0.2. In addition, there exists a lower critical dimension beyond which the self-similarity of the domains breaks down.

  16. Application of NUREG/CR-5999 interim fatigue curves to selected nuclear power plant components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ware, A.G.; Morton, D.K.; Nitzel, M.E. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent test data indicate that the effects of the light water reactor (LWR) environment could significantly reduce the fatigue resistance of materials used in the reactor coolant pressure boundary components of operating nuclear power plants. Argonne National Laboratory has developed interim fatigue curves based on test data simulating LWR conditions, and published them in NUREG/CR-5999. In order to assess the significance of these interim fatigue curves, fatigue evaluations of a sample of the components in the reactor coolant pressure boundary of LWRs were performed. The sample consists of components from facilities designed by each of the four U.S. nuclear steam supply system vendors. For each facility, six locations were studied, including two locations on the reactor pressure vessel. In addition, there are older vintage plants where components of the reactor coolant pressure boundary were designed to codes that did not require an explicit fatigue analysis of the components. In order to assess the fatigue resistance of the older vintage plants, an evaluation was also conducted on selected components of three of these plants. This report discusses the insights gained from the application of the interim fatigue curves to components of seven operating nuclear power plants.

  17. Magnetic interactions in CoCrPt-oxide based perpendicular magnetic recording media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, H. K.; Varghese, B.; Piramanayagam, S. N., E-mail: prem-SN@dsi.a-star.edu.sg [Data Storage Institute, Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A-STAR), Singapore 117608 (Singapore)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    First order reversal curves (FORC) method has been reported to be an efficient tool to study interaction between grains and layers of magnetic materials. Although a few studies have been carried out on perpendicular recording media in the past, a study on the effect of systematic variation of exchange interaction in granular perpendicular magnetic recording media on FORC contours has not been carried out in detail. Such a study will help to understand the use of FORC better. In this paper, we have made a systematic set of samples in order to study the variation in exchange coupling and its effect on FORC contours. The pressure during the deposition of the second ruthenium layer and the magnetic layer was varied to alter the separation between the grains and hence the exchange interaction between the grains in the CoCrPt-oxide recording layer. In addition, the thickness of Co-alloy cap layer was used as an additional tool to control the exchange interaction between the magnetic grains. The results indicated that the interaction field obtained from the FORC does not vary in a significant manner when the changes in exchange interaction are small. In comparison, the peak intensity of the FORC shows a clear trend as the exchange coupling is varied, making it a more suitable parameter to study the exchange and magnetostatic interactions in systems such as magnetic recording media.

  18. Using CrAIN Multilayer Coatings to Improve Oxidation Resistance of Steel Interconnects for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Richard J.; Tripp, C.; Knospe, Anders; Ramana, C. V.; Gorokhovsky, Vladimir I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Gelles, David S.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The requirements of low cost and high-tempurature corrosion resistance for bipolar interconnect plates in solid oxide fuel cell stacks has directed attention to the use of metal plates with oxidation resistant coatings. We have investigatedt he performance of steel plates with multilayer coatings consisting of CrN for electrical conductivity and CrAIN for oxidation resistance. The coatings were deposited usin large area filterd arc deposition technolgy, and subsequently annealed in air for up to 25 hours at 800 degrees celsius. The composition, structer and morphology of the coated plates were characterized using RBS, nuclear reaction analysis, AFM and TEM techniques. By altering the architecture of the layers within the coatings, the rate of oxidation was reduced by more than an order of magnitute. Electrical resistance was measured at room temperature.

  19. Fine structure of Fe-Co-Ga and Fe-Cr-Ga alloys with low Ga content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleinerman, Nadezhda M., E-mail: kleinerman@imp.uran.ru; Serikov, Vadim V., E-mail: kleinerman@imp.uran.ru; Vershinin, Aleksandr V., E-mail: kleinerman@imp.uran.ru; Mushnikov, Nikolai V., E-mail: kleinerman@imp.uran.ru; Stashkova, Liudmila A., E-mail: kleinerman@imp.uran.ru [Institute of Metal Physics UB RAS, S. Kovalevskaya str. 18, 620990 Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigation of Ga influence on the structure of Fe-Cr and Fe-Co alloys was performed with the use of {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction methods. In the alloys of the Fe-Cr system, doping with Ga handicaps the decomposition of solid solutions, observed in the binary alloys, and increases its stability. In the alloys with Co, Ga also favors the uniformity of solid solutions. The analysis of Mössbauer experiments gives some grounds to conclude that if, owing to liquation, clusterization, or initial stages of phase separation, there exist regions enriched in iron, some amount of Ga atoms prefer to enter the nearest surroundings of iron atoms, thus forming binary Fe-Ga regions (or phases)

  20. Surface structure and electrochemical characteristics of Ti-V-Cr bcc-type solid solution alloys sintered with Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuji, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Osamu; Matsuda, Hiromu; Toyoguchi, Yoshinori

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ti-V-Cr bcc-type solid solution alloys can absorb a large amount of hydrogen and be applied to active materials of the negative electrode in Ni-MH batteries. However, because of the insolubility of Ni into these alloys, the electrochemical characteristics like discharge capacity and cycle life were poor. In order to increase the discharge capacity of hydrogen absorbing alloy electrodes, Ti-V-Cr bcc-type alloy powders were sintered with Ni in order to form Ni contained surface layer on the alloy surface. As sintering temperature rose up, the surface composition changed from TiNi to Ti{sub 2}Ni. TiNi surface layer showed better electrochemical characteristics. For the Ni adding method, Ni electroless plating was preferred because of good adhesion. As a result of optimized conditions, a discharge capacity of 570 mAh/g and an improvement of cycle life were achieved.