Sample records for beam position monitor

  1. Photon beam position monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuzay, T.M.; Shu, D.

    1995-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A photon beam position monitor is disclosed for use in the front end of a beamline of a high heat flux and high energy photon source such as a synchrotron radiation storage ring detects and measures the position and, when a pair of such monitors are used in tandem, the slope of a photon beam emanating from an insertion device such as a wiggler or an undulator inserted in the straight sections of the ring. The photon beam position monitor includes a plurality of spaced blades for precisely locating the photon beam, with each blade comprised of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond with an outer metal coating of a photon sensitive metal such as tungsten, molybdenum, etc., which combination emits electrons when a high energy photon beam is incident upon the blade. Two such monitors are contemplated for use in the front end of the beamline, with the two monitors having vertically and horizontally offset detector blades to avoid blade ''shadowing''. Provision is made for aligning the detector blades with the photon beam and limiting detector blade temperature during operation. 18 figs.

  2. Beam position monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alkire, Randy W.; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for determining the position of an x-ray beam relative to a desired beam axis. Where the apparatus is positioned along the beam path so that a thin metal foil target intersects the x-ray beam generating fluorescent radiation. A PIN diode array is positioned so that a portion of the fluorescent radiation is intercepted by the array resulting in an a series of electrical signals from the PIN diodes making up the array. The signals are then analyzed and the position of the x-ray beam is determined relative to the desired beam path.

  3. A Two Bunch Beam Position Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medvedko, E.; Aiello, R.; Smith, S.; /SLAC

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new beam position monitor digitizer module has been designed, tested and tuned at SLAC. This module, the electron-positron beam position monitor (epBPM), measures position of single electron and positron bunches for the SLC, LINAC, PEPII injections lines and final focus. The epBPM has been designed to improve resolution of beam position measurements with respect to existing module and to speed feedback correction. The required dynamic range is from 5 x 10{sup 8} to 10{sup 11} particles per bunch (46dB). The epBPM input signal range is from {+-}2.5 mV to {+-}500 mV. The pulse-to-pulse resolution is less than 2 {mu}m for 5 x 10{sup 10} particles per bunch for the 12 cm long striplines, covering 30{sup o} at 9 mm radius. The epBPM module has been made in CAMAC standard, single width slot, with SLAC type timing connector. 45 modules have been fabricated. The epBPM module has four input channels X{sup +}, X{sup -}, Y{sup +}, Y{sup -} (Fig. 1), named to correspond with coordinates of four striplines - two in horizontal and two in vertical planes, processing signals to the epBPM inputs. The epBPM inputs are split for eight signal processing channels to catch two bunches, first - the positron, then the electron bunch in one cycle of measurements. The epBPM has internal and external trigger modes of operations. The internal mode has two options - with or without external timing, catching only first bunch in the untimed mode. The epBPM has an on board calibration circuit for measuring gain of the signal processing channels and for timing scan of programmable digital delays to synchronize the trigger and the epBPM input signal's peak. There is a mode for pedestal measurements. The epBPM has 3.6 {mu}s conversion time.

  4. Beam Position Monitor Test Stand Christopher D. Chan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffstaetter, Georg

    electron beams will demand better accuracy in measuring the position of the beam. Current BPM designs with improved accuracy may not be enough and entirely new designs of BPMs may be needed. This BPM test stand will help with current BPM testing and future BPM design efforts. II. CURRENT BEAM POSTION MONITORING

  5. Beam Position Monitor Electronics Upgrade for Fermilab Switchyard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stabile, P; Fitzgerald, J A; Liu, N; Morris, D K; Prieto, P S; Seraphin, J P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam position monitor (BPM) system for Fermilab Switchyard (SY) provides the position, intensity and integrated intensity of the 53.10348 MHz RF bunched resonant extracted beam from the Main Injector over 4 seconds of spill. The total beam intensity varies from 1x10^11 to 1x10^13 protons. The spill is measured by stripline beam postion monitors and resonant circuit. The BPMs have an external resonant circuit tuned to 53.10348 MHz. The corresponding voltage signal out of the BPM has been estimated to be between -110 dBm and -80 dBm.

  6. Beam Position and Phase Monitor - Wire Mapping System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, Heath A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shurter, Robert B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) deploys many cylindrical beam position and phase monitors (BPPM) throughout the linac to measure the beam central position, phase and bunched-beam current. Each monitor is calibrated and qualified prior to installation to insure it meets LANSCE requirements. The BPPM wire mapping system is used to map the BPPM electrode offset, sensitivity and higher order coefficients. This system uses a three-axis motion table to position the wire antenna structure within the cavity, simulating the beam excitation of a BPPM at a fundamental frequency of 201.25 MHz. RF signal strength is measured and recorded for the four electrodes as the antenna position is updated. An effort is underway to extend the systems service to the LANSCE facility by replacing obsolete electronic hardware and taking advantage of software enhancements. This paper describes the upgraded wire positioning system's new hardware and software capabilities including its revised antenna structure, motion control interface, RF measurement equipment and Labview software upgrades. The main purpose of the wire mapping system at LANSCE is to characterize the amplitude response versus beam central position of BPPMs before they are installed in the beam line. The wire mapping system is able to simulate a beam using a thin wire and measure the signal response as the wire position is varied within the BPPM aperture.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS FROM A MICROWAVE CAVITY BEAM POSITION MONITOR.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BALAKIN,V.; BAZHAN,A.; LUNEV,P.; SOLYAK,N.; VOGEL,V.; ZHOGOLEV,P.; LISITSYN,A.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Future Linear Colliders have hard requirements for the beam transverse position stability in the accelerator. A beam Position Monitor (BPM) with the resolution better than 0.1 micron in the single bunch regime is needed to control the stability of the beam position along the linac. Proposed BPM is based on the measurement of the asymmetrical mode excited by single bunch in the cavity. Four stages of signal processing (space-, time-, frequency- and phase-filtering providing the required signal-to-noise ratio) are used to obtain extremely high resolution. The measurement set-up was designed by BINP and installed at ATF/BNL to test experimentally this concept. The set-up includes three two-coordinates BPM's at the frequency of 13.566 GHz, and reference intensity/phase cavity. BPM's were mounted on support table. The two-coordinates movers allow to move and align BPM's along the straight line, using the signals from the beam. The position of each monitor is controlled by the sensors with the accuracy 0.03 micron. The information from three monitors allows to exclude angle and position jitter of the beam and measure BPM resolution. In the experiments the resolution of about 0.15 micron for 0.25 nC beam intensity was obtained, that is close to the value required.

  8. Single Crystal Diamond Beam Position Monitors with Radiofrequency Electronic Readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solar, B.; Graafsma, H.; Potdevin, G.; Trunk, U. [Hasylab, Deutsches Elektronen Synchroton, Hamburg (Germany); Morse, J.; Salome, M. [Instrumentation Services and Development Division, European Synchroton Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the energy range 5{approx}30 keV a suitably contacted, thin ({approx}100 {mu}m) diamond plate can be operated in situ as a continuous monitor of X-ray beam intensity and position as the diamond absorbs only a small percentage of the incident beam. Single crystal diamond is a completely homogeneous material showing fast (ns), spatially uniform signal response and negligible (beams. We report on tests made at ESRF and DESY using diamond beam position monitors of simple quadrant electrode designs with metal contacts, operated using wideband electronic readout corresponding to the RF accelerator frequency. The instrumentation for these monitors must cover a large range of operating conditions: different beam sizes, fluxes, energies and time structure corresponding to the synchrotron fill patterns. Sophisticated new RF sampling electronics can satisfy most requirements: using a modified Libera Brilliance readout system, we measured the center of gravity position of a 25 {mu}m beam at the DORIS III F4 beam line at a rate of 130 Msample/s with narrowband filtering of a few MHz bandwidth. Digitally averaging the signal further provided a spatial resolution {approx}20 nm.

  9. Performance of a High Resolution Cavity Beam Position Monitor System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walston, S; Boogert, S; Chung, C; Fitsos, P; Frisch, J; Gronberg, J; Hayano, H; Honda, Y; Kolomensky, Y; Lyapin, A; Malton, S; May, J; McCormick, D; Meller, R; Miller, D; Orimoto, T; Ross, M; Slater, M; Smith, S; Smith, T; Terunuma, N; Thomson, M; Urakawa, J; Vogel, V; Ward, D; White, G

    2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been estimated that an RF cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) could provide a position measurement resolution of less than one nanometer. We have developed a high resolution cavity BPM and associated electronics. A triplet comprised of these BPMs was installed in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. The three BPMs were each rigidly mounted inside an alignment frame on six variable-length struts which could be used to move the BPMs in position and angle. We have developed novel methods for extracting the position and tilt information from the BPM signals including a robust calibration algorithm which is immune to beam jitter. To date, we have demonstrated a position resolution of 15.6 nm and a tilt resolution of 2.1 {micro}rad over a dynamic range of approximately {+-} 20 {micro}m.

  10. Performance of a High Resolution Cavity Beam Position Monitor System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walston, Sean; Boogert, Stewart; Chung, Carl; Fitsos, Joe; Frisch, Joe; Gronberg, Jeff; Hayano, Hitoshi; Honda, Yosuke; Kolomensky, Yury; Lyapin, Alexey; Malton, Stephen; May, Justin; McCormick, Douglas; Meller, Robert; Miller, David John; Orimoto, Toyoko; Ross, Marc; Slater, Mark; Smith, Steve; Smith, Tonee; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; /Fermilab /UC,

    2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been estimated that an RF cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) could provide a position measurement resolution of less than one nanometer. We have developed a high resolution cavity BPM and associated electronics. A triplet comprised of these BPMs was installed in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. The three BPMs were each rigidly mounted inside an alignment frame on six variable-length struts which could be used to move the BPMs in position and angle. We have developed novel methods for extracting the position and tilt information from the BPM signals including a robust calibration algorithm which is immune to beam jitter. To date, we have demonstrated a position resolution of 15.6 nm and a tilt resolution of 2.1 {mu}rad over a dynamic range of approximately {+-} 20 {mu}m.

  11. Resolution of a High Performance Cavity Beam Position Monitor System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walston, S; Chung, C; Fitsos, P; Gronberg, J; Ross, M; Khainovski, O; Kolomensky, Y; Loscutoff, P; Slater, M; Thomson, M; Ward, D; Boogert, S; Vogel, V; Meller, R; Lyapin, A; Malton, S; Miller, D; Frisch, J; Hinton, S; May, J; McCormick, D; Smith, S; Smith, T; White, G; Orimoto, T; Hayano, H; Honda, Y; Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J

    2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    International Linear Collider (ILC) interaction region beam sizes and component position stability requirements will be as small as a few nanometers. It is important to the ILC design effort to demonstrate that these tolerances can be achieved - ideally using beam-based stability measurements. It has been estimated that RF cavity beam position monitors (BPMs) could provide position measurement resolutions of less than one nanometer and could form the basis of the desired beam-based stability measurement. We have developed a high resolution RF cavity BPM system. A triplet of these BPMs has been installed in the extraction line of the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. A metrology system for the three BPMs was recently installed. This system employed optical encoders to measure each BPM's position and orientation relative to a zero-coefficient of thermal expansion carbon fiber frame and has demonstrated that the three BPMs behave as a rigid-body to less than 5 nm. To date, we have demonstrated a BPM resolution of less than 20 nm over a dynamic range of +/- 20 microns.

  12. Integral window/photon beam position monitor and beam flux detectors for x-ray beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Kuzay, Tuncer M. (Naperville, IL)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitor/detector assembly in a synchrotron for either monitoring the position of a photon beam or detecting beam flux may additionally function as a vacuum barrier between the front end and downstream segment of the beamline in the synchrotron. A base flange of the monitor/detector assembly is formed of oxygen free copper with a central opening covered by a window foil that is fused thereon. The window foil is made of man-made materials, such as chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and in certain configurations includes a central opening through which the beams are transmitted. Sensors of low atomic number materials, such as aluminum or beryllium, are laid on the window foil. The configuration of the sensors on the window foil may be varied depending on the function to be performed. A contact plate of insulating material, such as aluminum oxide, is secured to the base flange and is thereby clamped against the sensor on the window foil. The sensor is coupled to external electronic signal processing devices via a gold or silver lead printed onto the contact plate and a copper post screw or alternatively via a copper screw and a copper spring that can be inserted through the contact plate and coupled to the sensors. In an alternate embodiment of the monitor/detector assembly, the sensors are sandwiched between the window foil of chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and a front foil made of similar material.

  13. Cavity Beam Position Monitor System for ATF2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boogert, Stewart; /Oxford U., JAI; Boorman, Gary; /Oxford U., JAI; Swinson, Christina; /Oxford U., JAI; Ainsworth, Robert; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Molloy, Stephen; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Aryshev, Alexander; /KEK, Tsukuba; Honda, Yosuke; /KEK, Tsukuba; Tauchi, Toshiaki; /KEK, Tsukuba; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; /KEK, Tsukuba; Urakawa, Junji; /KEK, Tsukuba; Frisch, Josef; /SLAC; May, Justin; /SLAC; McCormick, Douglas; /SLAC; Nelson, Janice; /SLAC; Smith, Tonee; /SLAC; White, Glen; /SLAC; Woodley, Mark; /SLAC; Heo, Ae-young; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Kim, Eun-San; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Kim, Hyoung-Suk; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Kim, Youngim; /Kyungpook Natl. U. /University Coll. London /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Fermilab /Pohang Accelerator Lab.

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) in KEK, Japan, is a prototype scaled demonstrator system for the final focus required for a future high energy lepton linear collider. The ATF2 beam-line is instrumented with a total of 38 C and S band resonant cavity beam position monitors (CBPM) with associated mixer electronics and digitizers. The current status of the BPM system is described, with a focus on operational techniques and performance. The ATF2 C-band system is performing well, with individual CBPM resolution approaching or at the design resolution of 50 nm. The changes in the CBPM calibration observed over three weeks can probably be attributed to thermal effects on the mixer electronics systems. The CW calibration tone power will be upgraded to monitor changes in the electronics gain and phase. The four S-band CBPMs are still to be investigated, the main problem associated with these cavities is a large cross coupling between the x and y ports. This combined with the large design dispersion in that degion makes the digital signal processing difficult, although various techniques exist to determine the cavity parameters and use these coupled signals for beam position determination.

  14. Architecture of a Silicon Strip Beam Position Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Angstadt; W. Cooper; M. Demarteau; J. Green; S. Jakubowski; A. Prosser; R. Rivera; M. Turqueti; M. Utes; Xiao Cai

    2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A collaboration between Fermilab and the Institute for High Energy Physics (IHEP), Beijing, has developed a beam position monitor for the IHEP test beam facility. This telescope is based on 5 stations of silicon strip detectors having a pitch of 60 microns. The total active area of each layer of the detector is about 12x10 cm2. Readout of the strips is provided through the use of VA1` ASICs mounted on custom hybrid printed circuit boards and interfaced to Adapter Cards via copper-over-kapton flexible circuits. The Adapter Cards amplify and level-shift the signal for input to the Fermilab CAPTAN data acquisition nodes for data readout and channel configuration. These nodes deliver readout and temperature data from triggered events to an analysis computer over gigabit Ethernet links.

  15. Applying EVM principles to Tevatron Beam Position Monitor Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Bakul; /Fermilab

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), the Tevatron high energy particle collider must meet the increasing scientific demand of higher beam luminosity. To achieve this higher luminosity goal, U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored a major upgrade of capabilities of Fermilab's accelerator complex that spans five years and costs over fifty million dollars. Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system upgrade is a part of this project, generally called RunII upgrade project. Since the purpose of the Tevatron collider is to detect the smashing of proton and anti-protons orbiting the circular accelerator in opposite directions, capability to detect positions of both protons and antiprotons at a high resolution level is a desirable functionality of the monitoring system. The original system was installed during early 1980s, along with the original construction of the Tevatron. However, electronic technology available in 1980s did not allow for the detection of significantly smaller resolution of antiprotons. The objective of the upgrade project is to replace the existing BPM system with a new system utilizing capabilities of modern electronics enhanced by a front-end software driven by a real-time operating software. The new BPM system is designed to detect both protons and antiprotons with increased resolution of up to an order of magnitude. The new system is capable of maintaining a very high-level of data integrity and system reliability. The system consists of 27 VME crates installed at 27 service buildings around the Tevatron ring servicing 236 beam position monitors placed underground, inside the accelerator tunnel. Each crate consists of a single Timing Generator Fanout module, custom made by Fermilab staff, one MVME processor card running VxWorks 5.5, multiple Echotek Digital Receiver boards complimented by custom made Filter Board. The VxWorks based front-end software communicates with the Main Accelerator Control software via a special-purpose network called ACNET. New software algorithms are designed to decouple antiproton signals from the mixed proton and antiproton signals. Along with many technical challenges, it was necessary to meet various project management challenges as well. Since 1999, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has taken various measures to improve project management of the acquisition of capital assets. U.S. National Laboratories, with their charter of driving scientific efforts of DOE, have put into place project management methodologies recommended by DOE. One of the outcomes of such measures is the deployment of a formal project management system for large projects. This recommendation is detailed in the DOE order M 413.3. The Tevatron BPM Upgrade project, as a part of the Run II Upgrade project, used the methodology prescribed in the DOE order. Particular attention was concentrated on the performance management since the accelerator complex will be in operation for several years in the future. Because of the cost and schedule constraints on the project, it was also important to deploy Earned Value Management (EVM) methodology recommended by the DOE orders. In this paper, we discuss how the earned value project management methodology was implemented using a work breakdown structure based on system life cycle phases. Tevatron BPM upgrade project, now nearing completion, has been a significant learning experience for the organization. We discuss important lessons learned from the phase-dependant earned value management project model. Hardware and software co-design along with simultaneously developed high-precision algorithm was a major challenge. Since formal project management process is not fully ingrained into the cultural environment of the laboratory dedicated to high-energy physics research, we also gained significant experience with the planning for schedule and cost in this environment. We also present a set of earned value project management data that may serve as a baseline for future projects.

  16. LS-266 OPTIMIZATION OF FOUR-BUTTON BEAM POSITION MONITOR CONFIGURATION...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LS-266 OPTIMIZATION OF FOUR-BUTTON BEAM POSITION MONITOR CONFIGURATION FOR SMALL-GAP VACUUM CHAMBERS S. H. Kim March 27, 1998 Summary - Induced charges on a four-button beam...

  17. Hybrid monitor for both beam position and tilt of pulsed high-current beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, J., E-mail: jpang-caep@foxmail.com; He, X.; Ma, C.; Zhao, L.; Li, Q.; Dai, Z. [Key Laboratory of Pulsed Power, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-106, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A Hybrid beam monitor, integrated with both azimuthal and axial B-dot probes, was designed for simultaneous measurement of both beam position and beam angle for pulsed high-current beams at the same location in beam pipe. The output signals of axial B-dot probes were found to be mixed with signals caused by transverse position deviation. In order to eliminate the unwanted signals, an elimination method was developed and its feasibility tested on a 50-? coaxial line test stand. By this method, a waveform, shape-like to that of input current and proportional to the tilt angle, was simulated and processed by following integration step to achieve the tilt angle. The tests showed that the measurement error of displacement and tilt angle less than 0.3 mm and 1.5 mrad, respectively. The latter error could be reduced with improved probes by reducing the inductance of the axial B-dot probe, but the improvement reached a limit due to some unknown systemic mechanism.

  18. TESLA-FEL 2003-04 Waveguide Monitors -a New Type of Beam Position

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TESLA-FEL 2003-04 Waveguide Monitors - a New Type of Beam Position Monitors for the TTF FEL U. Hahn Laser (FEL) at the TESLA Test Facilty (TTF) requires the electron trajectory to be aligned bench in the laboratory and with beam. TTF FEL measurement results are also presented and possible

  19. Design of a subnanometer resolution beam position monitor for dielectric laser accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    of the first laser-powered particle accel- erators "on a chip" [1,2]. These devices are specifically designed present a new concept for a beam position monitor with the unique ability to map particle beam position, this device is ideal for future x-ray sources and laser-driven particle accelerators "on a chip." © 2012

  20. Evaluation and Correction of the Non-linear Distortion of CEBAF Beam Position Monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Spata, T.L. Allison, K.E. Cole, J. Musson, J. Yan

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam position monitors at CEBAF have four antenna style pickups that are used to measure the location of the beam. There is a strong nonlinear response when the beam is far from the electrical center of the device. In order to conduct beam experiments at large orbit excitation we need to correct for this nonlinearity. The correction algorithm is presented and compared to measurements from our stretched wire BPM test stand.

  1. Development of Electronics for the ATF2 Interaction Point Region Beam Position Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Youngim; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Heo, Ae-young; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Kim, Eun-San; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Boogert, Stewart; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Honda, Yosuke; /KEK, Tsukuba; Tauchi, Toshiaki; /KEK, Tsukuba; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; /KEK, Tsukuba; May, Justin; /SLAC; McCormick, Douglas; /SLAC; Smith, Tonee; /SLAC

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanometer resolution beam position monitors have been developed to measure and control beam position stability at the interaction point region of ATF2. The position of the beam has to be measured to within a few nanometers at the interaction point. In order to achieve this performance, electronics for the low-Q IP-BPM was developed. Every component of the electronics have been simulated and checked on the bench and using the ATF2 beam. We will explain each component and define their working range. Then, we will show the performance of the electronics measured with beam signal. ATF2 is a final focus test beam line for ILC in the framework of the ATF international collaboration. The new beam line was constructed to extend the extraction line at ATF, KEK, Japan. The first goal of ATF2 is the acheiving of a 37 nm vertical beam size at focal point (IP). The second goal is to stabilize the beam at the focal point at a few nanometer level for a long period in order to ensure the high luminosity. To achieve these goals a high resolution IP-BPM is essential. In addition for feedback applications a low-Q system is desirable.

  2. A wire scanner system for characterizing the BNL energy recovery LINAC beam position monitor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michnoff R.; Biscardi, C.; Cerniglia, P.; Degen, C.; Gassner, D.; Hoff, L.; Hulsart, R.

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A stepper motor controlled wire scanner system has recently been modified to support testing of the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Collider-Accelerator department's Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) beam position monitor (BPM) system. The ERL BPM consists of four 9.33 mm diameter buttons mounted at 90 degree spacing in a cube with 1.875 inch inside diameter. The buttons were designed by BNL and fabricated by Times Microwave Systems. Libera brilliance single pass BPM electronic modules with 700 MHz bandpass filter, manufactured by Instrumentation Technologies, will be used to measure the transverse beam positions at 14 locations around the ERL. The wire scanner assembly provides the ability to measure the BPM button response to a pulsed wire, and evaluate and calibrate the Libera position measurement electronics. A description of the wire scanner system and test result data will be presented.

  3. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y.I.; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Ainsworth, R.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Aryshev, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Boogert, S.T.; Boorman, G.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Frisch, J.; /SLAC; Heo, A.; /Kyungpook Natl. U.; Honda, Y.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Hwang, W.H.; Huang, J.Y.; /Pohang Accelerator Lab.; Kim, E-S.; /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Pohang Accelerator Lab. /Royal Holloway, U. of London /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM) system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1 {mu}m for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  4. Noninterceptive method to measure longitudinal Twiss parameters of a beam in a hadron linear accelerator using beam position monitors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shishlo, A.; Aleksandrov, A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method of measuring of the rms longitudinal Twiss parameters of a beam in linear accelerators is presented. It is based on using sum signals from beam position monitors sensitive to the longitudinal charge distribution in the bunch. The applicability of the method is demonstrated on the superconducting section of the Oak Ridge Spallation Neutron Source linear accelerator. The results are compared to a direct measurement of the bunch longitudinal profiles using an interceptive bunch shape monitor in the linac warm section of the same accelerator. Limitations of the method are discussed. The method is fast and simple, and can be used to obtain the initial parameters for the longitudinal matching in linear accelerators where interceptive diagnostics are not desirable.

  5. Dual AC Dipole Excitation for the Measurement of Magnetic Multipole Strength from Beam Position Monitor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Spata, G.A. Krafft

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment was conducted at Jefferson Lab's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility to develop a technique for characterizing the nonlinear fields of the beam transport system. Two air-core dipole magnets were simultaneously driven at two different frequencies to provide a time-dependent transverse modulation of the electron beam. Fourier decomposition of beam position monitor data was then used to measure the amplitude of these frequencies at different positions along the beamline. For a purely linear transport system one expects to find solely the frequencies that were applied to the dipoles with amplitudes that depend on the phase advance of the lattice. In the presence of nonlinear fields one expects to also find harmonics of the driving frequencies that depend on the order of the nonlinearity. The technique was calibrated using one of the sextupole magnets in a CEBAF beamline and then applied to a dipole to measure the sextupole and octupole strength of the magnet. A comparison is made between the beam-based measurements, results from TOSCA and data from our Magnet Measurement Facility.

  6. Optimisation of NSLS-II Blade X-ray Beam Position Monitors: from Photoemission type to Diamond Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ILINSKI P.

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimisation of blade type x-ray beam position monitors (XBPM) was performed for NSLS-II undulator IVU20. Blade material, con and #64257;guration and operation principle was analysed in order to improve XBPM performance. Optimisation is based on calculation of the XBPM signal spatial distribution. Along with standard photoemission type XBPM a Diamond Detector Blades (DDB) were analysed as blades for XBPMs. DDB XBPMs can help to overcome drawbacks of the photoemission blade XBPMs.

  7. Orbit and optics improvement by evaluating the nonlinear beam position monitor response in the Cornell Electron Storage Ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffstaetter, Georg

    by inverting the nonlinear functions, giving us beam position as a function of the pickup signals, and how signals as nonlinear functions of beam position using Greens reciprocity theorem with a two this is also used to improve our calculation of the betatron phase advance. Measurements are presented

  8. Fluorescence-type Monochromatic X-ray Beam-position Monitor with High-spatial Resolution for the NSLS-II Beamlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Phil S. [Experimental Facility Division, NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Siddons, D. Peter [Experimental Systems, NSLS, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed a fluorescence-type monochromatic X-ray beam-position monitor (X-BPM) with high-spatial resolution for end-station experiments at the initial project beamlines of the NSLS-II. We designed a ring array of multi-segmented Si PIN-junction photodiodes to use as a position sensor. Further, we integrated a low-noise charge-preamplification HERMES4 ASIC chip into an electronic readout system for photon-counting application. A series of precision measurements to characterize electronically the Si-photodiode sensor and the ASIC chip demonstrated that the inherent noise from the detector system is sufficiently low to meet our stringent requirements. Using a Gaussian beam, we parametrically modeled the optimum working distance to ensure the detector's best performance. Based upon the results from the parametric modeling, prototypes of the next versions of the X-BPM are being developed. In this paper, we describe the methodology for developing the new compact monochromatic X-ray BPM, including its instrumentation, detector modeling, and future plan.

  9. A Prototype Wire Position Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wire Position Monitoring System (WPM) will track changes in the transverse position of LCLS Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) to 1{micro}m over several weeks. This position information will be used between applications of beam based alignment to correct for changes in component alignment. The WPM system has several requirements. The sensor range must be large enough so that precision sensor positioning is not required. The resolution needs to be small enough so that the signal can be used to monitor motion to 1{micro}m. The system must be stable enough so that system drift does not mimic motion of the component being monitored. The WPM sensor assembly consists of two parts, the magnetic sensor and an integrated lock-in amplifier. The magnetic sensor picks up a signal from the alternating current in a stretched wire. The voltage v induced in the sensor is proportional to the wire displacement from the center of the sensor. The integrated lock-in amplifier provides a DC output whose magnitude is proportional to the AC signal from the magnetic sensor. The DC output is either read on a digital voltmeter or digitized locally and communicated over a computer interface.

  10. Design and evaluation of a wide bandwidth logarithmic-ratio beam position monitor processor for the Proton Storage Ring at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Hamilton Blalock

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Proton Storage Ring (PSR) is a facility used for high intensity neutron studies at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility(LAWF), located at the Los Alamos National Laboratories, Los Alamos, New Mexico. A wide bandwidth beam position processor...

  11. PRECISE TUNE MEASUREMENTS FROM MULTIPLE BEAM POSITION , J. Laskar, IMCCEObservatoire de Paris, Paris, France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skokos, Charalampos "Haris"

    , New Mexico, USA FRPMN013 05 Beam Dynamics and Electromagnetic Fields 1-4244-0917-9/07/$25.00 c 2007PRECISE TUNE MEASUREMENTS FROM MULTIPLE BEAM POSITION MONITORS Ch. Skokos , J. Laskar, IMCCE, on measurements from several beam position monitors, a fast and accurate determination of the real tune

  12. A High Count Rate Beam Monitor for Thermal Neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, Amanda [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Crow, Lowell [ORNL; Diawara, Yacouba [ORNL; Funk, Loren L [ORNL; Hayward, J P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Menhard, Kocsis [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF); Sedov, Vladislav N [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam monitors are an important diagnostic tool in neutron science facilities. Present beam monitors use either ionization chambers in integration mode, which are slow and have no timing information, or pulse counters which can easily be saturated by high beam intensities. Neutron beam monitors indicate the number of neutrons incident on a scattering sample and allow neutron experimental data to be analyzed even when the source strength varies with time. At high flux neutron scattering facilities, neutron beam monitors with very low efficiency (10-5) are presently selected to keep the counting rate within a feasible range, even when a higher efficiency would improve the counting statistics and yield a better measurement of the incident beam. In this work, we report on a high count rate neutron beam monitor which also offers position sensitivity to provide a beam profile. This beam monitor offers good timing (less than 1 s) in addition to position resolution and will therefore improve the counting statistics at neutron energies up to 10 eV and allow moderator studies. The detector s main characteristics will be presented including its background rate, its count rate capability which is an order of magnitude higher than present counting monitors, and its efficiency for thermal neutrons.

  13. Beam Profile Monitor With Accurate Horizontal And Vertical Beam Profiles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Havener, Charles C [Knoxville, TN; Al-Rejoub, Riad [Oak Ridge, TN

    2005-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A widely used scanner device that rotates a single helically shaped wire probe in and out of a particle beam at different beamline positions to give a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is modified by the addition of a second wire probe. As a result, a pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a first beamline position, and a second pair of mutually perpendicular beam profiles is obtained at a second beamline position. The simple modification not only provides more accurate beam profiles, but also provides a measurement of the beam divergence and quality in a single compact device.

  14. Application of Diamond and Sapphire Sensors in the Beam Halo Monitor for FLASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ionization chambers, a beam halo monitor (BHM) and beam position monitors (BPM) has been installed. The BHM, a BHM system and a magnetic BPM (also called "in-air" BPM) [8] operating in conjunction in order not hit the beam pipe downstream from the exit window. The BPM detects the center of gravity of the beam

  15. Semiconductor spectrometer for beams of low-energy positive pions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaisak, I.I.; Gornov, M.G.; Gurov, Yu.B.; Merzlyakov, S.I.; Oganesyan, K.O.; Osipenko, B.P.; Pasyuk, E.A.; Porokhovoi, S.Yu.; Rudenko, A.I.; Khomutov, A.A.; Shishkov, A.V.

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for measurement of the momentum distribution of a beam of low-energy positive pions is described. A spectrum is determined by measurement of the energies of associated heavy charged particles (p, d, t, and ..cap alpha..) in a thin semiconductor detector. The accuracy of determination of average beam momentum is less than or less than or equal to 10/sup -3/. The proposed method permits real-time monitoring and correction of the parameters of a pion beam in an accelerator experiment.

  16. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KESSELMAN, M.

    2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) to be constructed at ORNL is a collaboration of six laboratories. Beam current monitors for SNS will be used to monitor H-minus and H-plus beams ranging from the 15 mA (tune-up in the Front End and Linac) to over 60 A fully accumulated in the Ring. The time structure of the beams to be measured range from 645 nsec ''mini'' bunches, at the 1.05 MHz ring revolution rate, to an overall 1 mS long macro pulse. Beam current monitors (BCMs) for SNS have requirements depending upon their location within the system. The development of a general approach to satisfy requirements of various locations with common components is a major design objective. This paper will describe the development of the beam current monitors and electronics.

  17. A scanning wire beam profile monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinbach, Ch.; van Rooij, M.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transverse profile of the circulating beam of the CERN PS is obtained from the interaction between the particles and a thin wire rapidly moving through it. The signal from a secondary particles monitor or the secondary emission current of the wire is sampled against the wire position every four beam revolutions in the machine. A stand-alone desk computer performs the real-time control of the wire displacement as well as the acquisitions and calculations necessary to display the profiles and the corresponding emittances. A traversing speed of 20 m/s in the measurement area is reached, using a high torque motor rigidly linked to a U shaped wire holder. All elements are carefully designed and chosen for low inertia and minimum load on the wire. This enables measurements of high energy beams of more than 10/sup 13/ p/p in the PS with negligible emittance blow-up due to multiple scattering. This blow-up is still acceptable at injection energy. A link to the PS main computer allows operation from any one of the main consoles.

  18. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osterhoff, Jens

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    beam position monitor (BPM) will be presented. Knowledge ofdiscussed. The deployed BPM [16, 17] consists of a microwaveimportant to note that such a BPM by itself cannot be used

  19. SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE BEAM CURRENT MONITOR ELECTRONICS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KESSELMAN,M.; DAWSON,W.C.

    2002-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will discuss the present electronics design for the beam current monitor system to be used throughout the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The beam is composed of a micro-pulse structure due to the 402.5MHz RF, and is chopped into mini-pulses of 645ns duration with a 300ns gap, providing a macro-pulse of 1060 mini-pulses repeating at a 60Hz rate. Ring beam current will vary from about 15ma peak during studies, to about 50Amps peak (design to 100 amps). A digital approach to droop compensation has been implemented and initial test results presented.

  20. Advanced Light Source Beam Position Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinkson, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems is done in C or PLM languages, generally by thetranslated BASIC code to PLM, Chris Timossi built and coded

  1. Advanced Light Source Beam Position Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinkson, J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 Diagram of storage ring BPM button test set. The 290 ohmmodules. Fig. 6 Drawing of BPM modules and bin. The chassis7 Basic signal flow between BPM plug-in modules. Throughout

  2. Conceptual design of elliptical cavities for intensity and position sensitive beam measurements in storage rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanjari, M S; Hülsmann, P; Litvinov, Yu A; Nolden, F; Piotrowski, J; Steck, M; Stöhlker, Th

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Position sensitive beam monitors are indispensable for the beam diagnostics in storage rings. Apart from their applications in the measurements of beam parameters, they can be used in non-destructive in-ring decay studies of radioactive ion beams as well as enhancing precision in the isochronous mass measurement technique. In this work, we introduce a novel approach based on cavities with elliptical cross-section, in order to compensate for existing limitations in ion storage rings. The design is aimed primarily for future heavy ion storage rings of the FAIR project. The conceptual design is discussed together with simulation results.

  3. Transport and Non-Invasive Position Detection of Electron Beams from Laser-Plasma Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osterhoff, Jens; Sokollik, Thomas; Nakamura, Kei; Bakeman, Michael; Weingartner, R; Gonsalves, Anthony; Shiraishi, Satomi; Lin, Chen; vanTilborg, Jeroen; Geddes, Cameron; Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Toth, Csaba; DeSantis, Stefano; Byrd, John; Gruner, F; Leemans, Wim

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The controlled imaging and transport of ultra-relativistic electrons from laser-plasma accelerators is of crucial importance to further use of these beams, e.g. in high peak-brightness light sources. We present our plans to realize beam transport with miniature permanent quadrupole magnets from the electron source through our THUNDER undulator. Simulation results demonstrate the importance of beam imaging by investigating the generated XUV-photon flux. In addition, first experimental findings of utilizing cavity-based monitors for non-invasive beam-position measurements in a noisy electromagnetic laser-plasma environment are discussed.

  4. STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING IN A BUCKLED BEAM USING VOLTERRA SERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING IN A BUCKLED BEAM USING VOLTERRA SERIES Cristian Hansen1, Sidney Bruce-buckling, etc. [1, 2]. If the system is monitored for structural health using some linear metric, the detection procedures for structural health monitoring can fail when the system monitored is highly nonlinear

  5. THE CEBAF BEAM SCRAPING MONITOR* , J. Sage, M. Wissmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE CEBAF BEAM SCRAPING MONITOR* T. Allison , J. Sage, M. Wissmann TJNAF, Newport News, VA 23606's Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF). The BSM acts as an early warning system that alerts CEBAF operators when the beam loss exceeds 10 to 20 nA. This allows the CEBAF operators to adjust

  6. Wire Position Monitoring with FPGA based Electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, N.; Lysenko, O.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fall the first Tesla-style cryomodule cooldown test is being performed at Fermilab. Instrumentation department is preparing the electronics to handle the data from a set of wire position monitors (WPMs). For simulation purposes a prototype pipe with a WMP has been developed and built. The system is based on the measurement of signals induced in pickups by 320 MHz signal carried by a wire through the WPM. The wire is stretched along the pipe with a tensioning load of 9.07 kg. The WPM consists of four 50 {Omega} striplines spaced 90{sup o} apart. FPGA based digitizer scans the WPM and transmits the data to a PC via VME interface. The data acquisition is based on the PC running LabView. In order to increase the accuracy and convenience of the measurements some modifications were required. The first is implementation of an average and decimation filter algorithm in the integrator operation in the FPGA. The second is the development of alternative tool for WPM measurements in the PC. The paper describes how these modifications were performed and test results of a new design. The last cryomodule generation has a single chain of seven WPMs (placed in critical positions: at each end, at the three posts and between the posts) to monitor a cold mass displacement during cooldown. The system was developed in Italy in collaboration with DESY. Similar developments have taken place at Fermilab in the frame of cryomodules construction for SCRF research. This fall preliminary cryomodule cooldown test is being performed. In order to prepare an appropriate electronic system for the test a prototype pipe with a WMP has been developed and built, figure 1. The system is based on the measurement of signals induced in pickups by 320 MHz signal carried by a wire through the WPM. The 0.5 mm diameter Cu wire is stretched along the pipe with a tensioning load of 9.07 kg and has a length of 1.1 m. The WPM consists of four 50 {Omega} striplines spaced 90{sup o} apart. An FPGA based digitizer collects the WPM data and transmits it to the VME controller. The VME front-end processes the raw data to calculate positions and perform FFT. It is also provides the raw data to LabView running on a PC upon request. In order to increase the accuracy and convenience of the measurements some modifications were required. The first is connected with realization of average and decimation filter algorithm in the integrator operation in the FPGA. The second is connected with development of alternative tool for WPM measurements in the PC. We will discuss how these modifications were performed and test results of a new design.

  7. A non-invasive beam profile monitor for charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzoganis, Vasilis, E-mail: vasileios.tzoganis@cockcroft.ac.uk [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Sci-Tech, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom); RIKEN Nishina Centre, Hirosawa 2-1, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Welsch, Carsten P. [Cockcroft Institute, Daresbury Sci-Tech, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 7ZE (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-interceptive beam profile monitors are highly desirable in almost all particle accelerators. Such techniques are especially valuable in applications where real time monitoring of the beam properties is required while beam preservation and minimal influence on the vacuum are of the greatest importance. This applies to many kinds of accelerators such as high energy machines where the normal diagnostics cannot withstand the beam's power, medical machines where treatment time is valuable and cannot be allocated to diagnostics and also low energy, low intensity accelerators where the beam's properties are difficult to measure. This paper presents the design of a gas-jet based beam profile monitor which was developed and commissioned at the Cockcroft Institute and can operate in a very large background pressure range from 10{sup ?7} down to below 10{sup ?11} millibars. The functioning principle of the monitor is described and the first experimental results obtained using a 5?keV electron beam are discussed.

  8. Overview of nonintercepting beam-size monitoring with optical diffraction radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumpkin, Alex H.; /Fermilab

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial demonstrations over the last several years of the use of optical diffraction radiation (ODR) as nonintercepting electron-beam-parameter monitors are reviewed. Developments in both far-field imaging and near-field imaging are addressed for ODR generated by a metal plane with a slit aperture, a single metal plane, and two-plane interferences. Polarization effects and sensitivities to beam size, divergence, and position will be discussed as well as a proposed path towards monitoring 10-micron beam sizes at 25 GeV.

  9. Development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavez, Isaac; Huang Rongxin; Henderson, Kevin; Florin, Ernst-Ludwig; Raizen, Mark G. [Center for Nonlinear Dynamics and Department of Physics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the development of a fast position-sensitive laser beam detector. The detector uses a fiber-optic bundle that spatially splits the incident beam, followed by a fast balanced photodetector. The detector is applied to the study of Brownian motion of particles on fast time scales with 1 A spatial resolution. Future applications include the study of molecule motors, protein folding, as well as cellular processes.

  10. Beam Loss Monitors in the NSLS Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer,S.L.; Fedurin, M.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam loss monitors (BLM) have been used for more than two decades in the VUV ring at the NSLS. These have proved useful for optimizing injection and operation of the ring. Recently similar monitors have been installed in the X-ray ring and are being used to better understand injection, as well as operation of the ring. These units have been compared with the Bergoz BLMs, which have been mostly useful for understanding operating beam losses.

  11. Using time separation of signals to obtain independent proton and antiproton beam position measurements around the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webber, R.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Independent position measurement of the counter-circulating proton and antiproton beams in the Tevatron, never supported by the original Tevatron Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system, presents a challenge to upgrading that system. This paper discusses the possibilities and complications of using time separation of proton and antiproton signals at the numerous BPM locations and for the dynamic Tevatron operating conditions. Results of measurements using one such method are presented.

  12. Ultraviolet laser beam monitor using radiation responsive crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCann, Michael P. (Oliver Springs, TN); Chen, Chung H. (Knoxville, TN)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for monitoring an ultraviolet laser beam includes disposing in the path of an ultraviolet laser beam a substantially transparent crystal that will produce a color pattern in response to ultraviolet radiation. The crystal is exposed to the ultraviolet laser beam and a color pattern is produced within the crystal corresponding to the laser beam intensity distribution therein. The crystal is then exposed to visible light, and the color pattern is observed by means of the visible light to determine the characteristics of the laser beam that passed through crystal. In this manner, a perpendicular cross sectional intensity profile and a longitudinal intensity profile of the ultraviolet laser beam may be determined. The observation of the color pattern may be made with forward or back scattered light and may be made with the naked eye or with optical systems such as microscopes and television cameras.

  13. Precision monitoring of relative beam intensity for Mu2e

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, N.J.; Kopp, S.E.; /Texas U.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For future experiments at the intensity frontier, precise and accurate knowledge of beam time structure will be critical to understanding backgrounds. The proposed Mu2e experiment will utilize {approx}200 ns (FW) bunches of 3 x 10{sup 7} protons at 8 GeV with a bunch-to-bunch period of 1695 ns. The out-of-bunch beam must be suppressed by a factor of 10{sup -10} relative to in-bunch beam and continuously monitored. I propose a Cerenkov-based particle telescope to measure secondary production from beam interactions in a several tens of microns thick foil. Correlating timing information with beam passage will allow the determination of relative beam intensity to arbitrary precision given a sufficiently long integration time. The goal is to verify out-of-bunch extinction to the level 10{sup -6} in the span of several seconds. This will allow near real-time monitoring of the initial extinction of the beam resonantly extracted from Fermilabs Debuncher before a system of AC dipoles and collimators, which will provide the final extinction. The effect on beam emittance is minimal, allowing the necessary continuous measurement. I will present the detector design and some concerns about bunch growth during the resonant extraction.

  14. Apparatus for monitoring X-ray beam alignment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1991-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-contained, hand-held apparatus is provided for monitoring alignment of an X-ray beam in an instrument employing an X-ray source. The apparatus includes a transducer assembly containing a photoresistor for providing a range of electrical signals responsive to a range of X-ray beam intensities from the X-ray beam being aligned. A circuit, powered by a 7.5 VDC power supply and containing an audio frequency pulse generator whose frequency varies with the resistance of the photoresistor, is provided for generating a range of audible sounds. A portion of the audible range corresponds to low X-ray beam intensity. Another portion of the audible range corresponds to high X-ray beam intensity. The transducer assembly may include an a photoresistor, a thin layer of X-ray fluorescent material, and a filter layer transparent to X-rays but opaque to visible light. X-rays from the beam undergoing alignment penetrate the filter layer and excite the layer of fluorescent material. The light emitted from the fluorescent material alters the resistance of the photoresistor which is in the electrical circuit including the audio pulse generator and a speaker. In employing the apparatus, the X-ray beam is aligned to a complete alignment by adjusting the X-ray beam to produce an audible sound of the maximum frequency. 2 figures.

  15. A laser-wire beam-energy and beam-profile monitor at the BNL linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, R.; Degen, C.; DeSanto, L.; Meng, W.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.; Nayak, S.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009 a beam-energy monitor was installed in the high energy beam transport (HEBT) line at the Brookhaven National Lab linac. This device measures the energies of electrons stripped from the 40mA H{sup -} beam by background gas. Electrons are stripped by the 2.0x10{sup -7}torr residual gas at a rate of {approx}1.5x10{sup -8}/cm. Since beam electrons have the same velocities as beam protons, the beam proton energy is deduced by multiplying the electron energy by m{sub p}/m{sub e}=1836. A 183.6MeV H{sup -} beam produces 100keV electrons. In 2010 we installed an optics plates containing a laser and scanning optics to add beam-profile measurement capability via photodetachment. Our 100mJ/pulse, Q-switched laser neutralizes 70% of the beam during its 10ns pulse. This paper describes the upgrades to the detector and gives profile and energy measurements.

  16. Composition monitoring of electron beam melting processes using diode lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berzins, L.V.

    1991-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam melting processes are used to produce high purity alloys for a wide range of applications. Real time monitoring of the alloy constituents, however, has historically been difficult. Absorption spectroscopy using diode lasers provides a means for measuring constituent densities, and hence alloy composition, in real time. Diode lasers are suggested because they are inexpensive and require little maintenance. There is increasing interest in the composition and quality control of titanium alloys used in aircraft parts. For this reason we describe a proposed system for composition monitoring of titanium alloys. Performance and cost of the proposed system is addressed. We discuss the applicability of this approach to other alloys.

  17. Configuration and Validation of the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamantzas, C; Emery, J; Fitzek, J; Follin, F; Jackson, S; Kain, V; Kruk, G; Misiowiec, M; Roderick, C; Sapinski, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHC Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is one of the most complex instrumentation systems deployed in the LHC. As well as protecting the machine, the system is also used as a means of diagnosing machine faults, and providing feedback of losses to the control room and several systems such as the Collimation, the Beam Dump and the Post-Mortem. The system has to transmit and process signals from over 4’000 monitors, and has approaching 3 million configurable parameters. This paper describes the types of configuration data needed, the means used to store and deploy all the parameters in such a distributed system and how operators are able to alter the operating parameters of the system, particularly with regard to the loss threshold values. The various security mechanisms put in place, both at the hardware and software level, to avoid accidental or malicious modification of these BLM parameters are also shown for each case.

  18. Accelerator Physics Experiments with Beam Loss Monitors at BESSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuske, P

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extended use of beam loss monitoring has led to a better understanding of the linear and non-linear physics involved in the single and multiple particle dynamics at BESSY. This knowledge has been used for improving the performance of the light source in terms of lifetime, beam stability, and stability of the energy. The key to these experiments are loss monitors placed at strategic locations of the ring with high sensitivity to Touschek or Coulomb scattered particles. Coulomb-scattering depends strongly on the transverse dynamics which is determined by the magnetic guiding fields. Losses occur primarily at the vertical aperture restrictions imposed by the flat insertion device vacuum chambers. Tune scan measurements clearly show resonances produced by the lattice magnets and by some of the insertion devices. Touschek scattering depends on the 3-dimensional electron density and the spins of the colliding particles. In transfer function type experiments these dependencies have been used to observe the effec...

  19. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Connolly, R [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Summers, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  20. Considerations on ODR beam-size monitoring for gamma = 1000 beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lumpkin, A.H.; /Fermilab; Yao, C.-Y.; /Argonne; Chiadroni, E.; Castellano, M.; /LNF, Dafne Light; Cianchi, A.; /Rome U.,Tor Vergata

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the feasibility of monitoring the beam size of {gamma} = 1000 beams with 3000 times more charge in a video frame time and with a more sensitive 12- to 16-bit camera than were used in the previous electron beam studies at 7 GeV at the Advanced Photon Source. Such a beam would be generated at Fermilab in a new facility in the coming years. Numerical integrations of our base model show beam size sensitivity for {+-} 20% level changes at 200- and 400-{micro}m base beam sizes. We also evaluated impact parameters of 5 {sigma}{sub y} and 12 {sigma}{sub y} for both 800-nm and 10-{micro}m observation wavelengths. The latter examples are related to a proposal to apply the technique to an {approx}0.98 TeV proton beam, and this study shows there are trades on photon intensity and beam size sensitivity to be considered at such gammas. In addition, we report on first results at {gamma} = 1800 on a superconducting rf linac.

  1. Extracting source parameters from beam monitors on a chopper spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Niedziela, Jennifer L [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intensity distributions of beam monitors in direct-geometry time-of-flight neutron spectrometers provide important information about the instrument resolution. For short-pulse spallation neutron sources in particular, the asymmetry of the source pulse may be extracted and compared to Monte Carlo source simulations. An explicit formula using a Gaussian-convolved Ikeda-Carpenter distribution is given and compared to data from the ARCS instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source.

  2. antinucleon beams: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced...

  3. automatic beam alignment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced...

  4. accidental beam loss: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced...

  5. antiparticle beams: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interaction of fields induced by the beam with their environment. Beam current transformers as well as beam position monitors are based on this principle. The signals induced...

  6. DATA ACQUISITION FOR SNS BEAM LOSS MONITOR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    YENG,Y.GASSNER,D.HOFF,L.WITKOVER,R.

    2003-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor system uses VME based electronics to measure the radiation produced by lost beam. Beam loss signals from cylindrical argon-filled ion chambers and neutron detectors will be conditioned in analog front-end (AFE) circuitry. These signals will be digitized and further processed in a dedicated VME crate. Fast beam inhibit and low-level, long-term loss warnings will be generated to provide machine protection. The fast loss data will have a bandwidth of 35kHz. While the low level, long-term loss data will have much higher sensitivity. This is further complicated by the 3 decade range of intensity as the Ring accumulates beam. Therefore a bandwidth of 100kHz and dynamic range larger than 21 bits data acquisition system will be required for this purpose. Based on the evaluation of several commercial ADC modules in preliminary design phase, a 24 bits Sigma-Delta data acquisition VME bus card was chosen as the SNS BLM digitizer. An associated vxworks driver and EPICS device support module also have been developed at BNL. Simulating test results showed this system is fully qualified for both fast loss and low-level, long-term loss application. The first prototype including data acquisition hardware setup and EPICS software (running database and OPI clients) will be used in SNS Drift Tube Linac (DTL) system commissioning.

  7. Active Position Control of a Shape Memory Alloy Wire Actuated Composite Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Active Position Control of a Shape Memory Alloy Wire Actuated Composite Beam Gangbing Songa, Bth the design and experiment results of active position control of a shape memory alloy (SMA) wires actuated composite beam. The composite beam is honeycomb structured with shape memory alloy wires embedded in one

  8. A real-time intercepting beam-profile monitor for a medical cyclotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendriks, C.; Uittenbosch, T.; Cameron, D.; Kellogg, S.; Gray, D.; Buckley, K.; Schaffer, P.; Verzilov, V.; Hoehr, C. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada)] [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a lack of real-time continuous beam-diagnostic tools for medical cyclotrons due to high power deposition during proton irradiation. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a profile monitor that is capable of providing continuous feedback about beam shape and current in real time while it is inserted in the beam path. This enables users to optimize the beam profile and observe fluctuations in the beam over time with periodic insertion of the monitor.

  9. A High Count Rate Neutron Beam Monitor for Neutron Scattering Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, Amanda [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Crow, Lowell [ORNL; Diawara, Yacouba [ORNL; Hayward, J P [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Hayward, Jason P [ORNL; Menhard, Kocsis [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF); Sedov, Vladislav N [ORNL; Funk, Loren L [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract Beam monitors are an important diagnostic tool in neutron science facilities. Present beam monitors use either ionization chambers in integration mode, which are slow and have no timing information, or pulse counters which can easily be saturated by high beam intensities. At high flux neutron scattering facilities, neutron beam monitors with very low intrinsic efficiency (10-5) are presently selected to keep the counting rate within a feasible range, even when a higher efficiency would improve the counting statistics and yield a better measurement of the incident beam. In this work, we report on a high count rate neutron beam monitor. This beam monitor offers good timing with an intrinsic efficiency of 10-3 and a counting rate capability of over 1,000,000 cps without saturation.

  10. The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor Readout System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dusatko, John; Browne, M.; Fisher, A.S.; Kotturi, D.; Norum, S.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor System is required to detect any loss radiation seen by the FEL undulators. The undulator segments consist of permanent magnets which are very sensitive to radiation damage. The operational goal is to keep demagnetization below 0.01% over the life of the LCLS. The BLM system is designed to help achieve this goal by detecting any loss radiation and indicating a fault condition if the radiation level exceeds a certain threshold. Upon reception of this fault signal, the LCLS Machine Protection System takes appropriate action by either halting or rate limiting the beam. The BLM detector consists of a PMT coupled to a Cherenkov radiator located near the upstream end of each undulator segment. There are 33 BLMs in the system, one per segment. The detectors are read out by a dedicated system that is integrated directly into the LCLS MPS. The BLM readout system provides monitoring of radiation levels, computation of integrated doses, detection of radiation excursions beyond set thresholds, fault reporting and control of BLM system functions. This paper describes the design, construction and operational performance of the BLM readout system.

  11. Position Stability Monitoring of THEthe LCLS Undulator Quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuhn, Heinz Dieter; Gassner, Georg; Peters, Franz; /SLAC

    2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray FELs demand that the positions of undulator components be stable to less than 1 {mu}m per day. Simultaneously, the undulator length increases significantly in order to saturate at x-ray wavelengths. To minimize the impact of the outside environment, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) undulator is placed underground, but reliable data about ground motion inside such a tunnel was not available in the required stability range during the planning phase. Therefore, a new position monitor system had been developed and installed with the LCLS undulator. This system is capable of measuring x, y, roll, pitch and yaw of each of the 33 undulator quadrupoles with respect to stretched wires. Instrument resolution is about 10 nm and instrument drift is negligible. Position data of individual quadrupoles can be correlated along the entire 132-m long undulator. The system has been under continuous operation since 2009. This report describes long term experiences with the running system and the observed positional stability of the undulator quadrupoles.

  12. COMMUNITY SPACE MONITOR (CSM) APPLICATION Thank you for applying for the Community Space Monitor position with the Residence Life department.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMMUNITY SPACE MONITOR (CSM) APPLICATION Thank you for applying for the Community Space Monitor, .docx) and PDF (.pdf) format only. #12;Residence Life Updated August 2014 -1 of 3- Community Space Monitor: Job Description IDENTIFICATION Position Title: Community Space Monitor Department: Residence Life

  13. HIGH ACCURACY BEAM CURRENT MONITOR SYSTEM FOR CEBAF'S EXPERIMENTAL HALL A *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HIGH ACCURACY BEAM CURRENT MONITOR SYSTEM FOR CEBAF'S EXPERIMENTAL HALL A * J.-C. Denard , A. Saha CEBAF accelerator delivers continuous wave (CW) electron beams to three experimental Halls. In Hall A is described. 1 INTRODUCTION The CEBAF accelerator delivers continuous wave (CW) electron beams to three

  14. Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitors for the Superconducting Magnets of the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartosik, MR; Sapinski, M; Kurfuerst, C; Griesmayer, E; Eremin, V; Verbitskaya, E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Beam Loss Monitor detectors close to the interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider are currently located outside the cryostat, far from the superconducting coils of the magnets. In addition to their sensitivity to lost beam particles, they also detect particles coming from the experimental collisions, which do not contribute significantly to the heat deposition in the superconducting coils. In the future, with beams of higher energy and brightness resulting in higher luminosity, distinguishing between these interaction products and dangerous quench-provoking beam losses from the primary proton beams will be challenging. The system can be optimised by locating beam loss monitors as close as possible to the superconducting coils, inside the cold mass in a superfluid helium environment, at 1.9 K. The dose then measured by such Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitors would more precisely correspond to the real dose deposited in the coil. The candidates under investigation for such detectors are based on p+-n-n+ si...

  15. Operation of the intensity monitors in beam transport lines at Fermilab during Run II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crisp, J; Fellenz, B; Fitzgerald, J; Heikkinen, D; Ibrahim, M A.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intensity of charged particle beams at Fermilab must be kept within pre-determined safety and operational envelopes in part by assuring all beam within a few percent has been transported from any source to destination. Beam instensity monitors with toroidial pickups provide such beam intensity measurements in the transport lines between accelerators at FNAL. During Run II, much effort was made to continually improve the resolution and accuracy of the system.

  16. STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BEAM USING PIEZOELECTRIC ENERGY HARVESTING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING OF REINFORCED CONCRETE BEAM USING PIEZOELECTRIC ENERGY HARVESTING in the creation of smart, wireless sensor networks for the purposes of Structural Health Monitoring of large scale of using an energy harvesting system for use in this dual role. KEYWORDS : Structural Health Monitoring

  17. Position-sensitive radiation monitoring (surface contamination monitor). Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Shonka Research Associates, Inc. Position-Sensitive Radiation Monitor both detects surface radiation and prepares electronic survey map/survey report of surveyed area automatically. The electronically recorded map can be downloaded to a personal computer for review and a map/report can be generated for inclusion in work packages. Switching from beta-gamma detection to alpha detection is relatively simple and entails moving a switch position to alpha and adjusting the voltage level to an alpha detection level. No field calibration is required when switching from beta-gamma to alpha detection. The system can be used for free-release surveys because it meets the federal detection level sensitivity limits requires for surface survey instrumentation. This technology is superior to traditionally-used floor contamination monitor (FCM) and hand-held survey instrumentation because it can precisely register locations of radioactivity and accurately correlate contamination levels to specific locations. Additionally, it can collect and store continuous radiological data in database format, which can be used to produce real-time imagery as well as automated graphics of survey data. Its flexible design can accommodate a variety of detectors. The cost of the innovative technology is 13% to 57% lower than traditional methods. This technology is suited for radiological surveys of flat surfaces at US Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facility decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) sites or similar public or commercial sites.

  18. Non-intrusive beam power monitor for high power pulsed or continuous wave lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawsey, Robert A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Scudiere, Matthew B. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for monitoring the output of a laser is provided in which the output of a photodiode disposed in the cavity of the laser is used to provide a correlated indication of the laser power. The photodiode is disposed out of the laser beam to view the extraneous light generated in the laser cavity whose intensity has been found to be a direct correlation of the laser beam output power level. Further, the system provides means for monitoring the phase of the laser output beam relative to a modulated control signal through the photodiode monitor.

  19. Ion Chambers for Monitoring the NuMI Neutrino Beam at FNAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Indurthy; R. Keisler; S. Kopp; S. Mendoza; M. Proga; Z. Pavlovich; R. Zwaska; D. Harris; A. Marchionni; J. Morfin; A. Erwin; H. Ping; C. Velissaris; D. Naples; D. Northacker; J. McDonald; M. Diwan; B. Viren

    2004-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline will deliver an intense muon neutrino beam by focusing a beam of mesons into a long evacuated decay volume. The beam must be steered with 1 mRad angular accuracy toward the Soudan Underground Laboratory in northern Minnesota. We have built 4 arrays of ionization chambers to monitor the neutrino beam direction and quality. The arrays are located at 4 stations downstream of the decay volume, and measure the remnant hadron beam and tertiary muons produced along with neutrinos in meson decays. We review how the monitors will be used to make beam quality measurements, and as well we review chamber construction details, radiation damage testing, calibration, and test beam results.

  20. Method and system for controlling the position of a beam of light

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinkraus, Jr., Robert F. (San Francisco, CA); Johnson, Gary W. (Livermore, CA); Ruggiero, Anthony J. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An method and system for laser beam tracking and pointing is based on a conventional position sensing detector (PSD) or quadrant cell but with the use of amplitude-modulated light. A combination of logarithmic automatic gain control, filtering, and synchronous detection offers high angular precision with exceptional dynamic range and sensitivity, while maintaining wide bandwidth. Use of modulated light enables the tracking of multiple beams simultaneously through the use of different modulation frequencies. It also makes the system resistant to interfering light sources such as ambient light. Beam pointing is accomplished by feeding back errors in the measured beam position to a beam steering element, such as a steering mirror. Closed-loop tracking performance is superior to existing methods, especially under conditions of atmospheric scintillation.

  1. HIGH ACCURACY BEAM CURRENT MONITOR SYSTEM FOR CEBAF'S EXPERIMENTAL HALL A *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    HIGH ACCURACY BEAM CURRENT MONITOR SYSTEM FOR CEBAF'S EXPERIMENTAL HALL A * J.-C. Denard , A. Saha, Université Blaise Pascal IN2P3-CNRS Abstract CEBAF accelerator delivers continuous wave (CW) electron beams for measuring accurately the linearity is described. 1 INTRODUCTION The CEBAF accelerator delivers continuous

  2. Passive torque wrench and angular position detection using a single-beam optical trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Michelle

    Passive torque wrench and angular position detection using a single-beam optical trap James Inman,1 August 26, 2010 The recent advent of angular optical trapping techniques has allowed for rotational torsional measurements across a wide range of biological systems. © 2010 Optical Society of America OCIS

  3. Diamond detector for high rate monitors of fast neutrons beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacomelli, L.; Rebai, M.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Fazzi, A.; Andreani, C.; Pietropaolo, A.; Frost, C. D.; Rhodes, N.; Schooneveld, E.; Gorini, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, and Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano (Italy); Energy Department, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Centro NAST, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Roma (Italy); STFC, ISIS facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton Didcot Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, and Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Milano (Italy)

    2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast neutron detection system suitable for high rate measurements is presented. The detector is based on a commercial high purity single crystal diamond (SDD) coupled to a fast digital data acquisition system. The detector was tested at the ISIS pulsed spallation neutron source. The SDD event signal was digitized at 1 GHz to reconstruct the deposited energy (pulse amplitude) and neutron arrival time; the event time of flight (ToF) was obtained relative to the recorded proton beam signal t{sub 0}. Fast acquisition is needed since the peak count rate is very high ({approx}800 kHz) due to the pulsed structure of the neutron beam. Measurements at ISIS indicate that three characteristics regions exist in the biparametric spectrum: i) background gamma events of low pulse amplitudes; ii) low pulse amplitude neutron events in the energy range E{sub dep}= 1.5-7 MeV ascribed to neutron elastic scattering on {sup 12}C; iii) large pulse amplitude neutron events with E{sub n} < 7 MeV ascribed to {sup 12}C(n,{alpha}){sup 9}Be and 12C(n,n')3{alpha}.

  4. Integrating and automating the software environment for the Beam and Radiation Monitoring for CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Filyushkina, Olga; Juslin, J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The real-time online visualization framework used by the Beam and Radiation Monitoring group at the Compact Muon Solenoid at Large Hadron Collider, CERN. The purpose of the visualization framework is to provide real-time diagnostic of beam conditions, which defines the set of the requirements to be met by the framework. Those requirements include data quality assurance, vital safety issues, low latency, data caching, etc. The real-time visualization framework is written in the Java programming language and based on JDataViewer--a plotting package developed at CERN. At the current time the framework is run by the Beam and Radiation Monitoring, Pixel, Tracker groups, Run Field Manager and others. It contributed to real-time data analysis during 2009-2010 runs as a stable monitoring tool. The displays reflect the beam conditions in a real-time with the low latency level, thus it is the first place at the CMS detector where the beam collisions are observed.

  5. Active Sensor Wave Propagation Health Monitoring of Beam and Plate Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 Active Sensor Wave Propagation Health Monitoring of Beam and Plate Structures Victor Giurgiutiu, Jingjing Bao, Wei Zhao University of South Carolina ABSTRACT Active sensor wave propagation technique is a relatively new method for in-situ nondestructive evaluation (NDE). Elastic waves propagating in material

  6. Diamond pixel detector for beam profile monitoring in COMET experiment at J-PARC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cerv; P. Sarin; H. Pernegger; P. Vageesvaran; E. Griesmayer

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the design and initial prototype results of a pixellized proton beam profile monitor for the COMET experiment at J-PARC. The goal of COMET is to look for charged lepton flavor violation by direct muon to electron conversion at a sensitivity of $0^{-19}$. An 8 GeV proton beam pulsed at 100 ns with $10^{10}$ protons/s will be used to create muons through pion production and decay. In the final experiment, the proton flux will be raised to $10^{14}$ protons/sec to increase the sensitivity. These requirements of harsh radiation tolerance and fast readout make diamond a good choice for constructing a beam profile monitor in COMET. We present first results of the characterization of single crystal diamond (scCVD) sourced from a new company, 2a systems Singapore. Our measurements indicate excellent charge collection efficiency and high carrier mobility down to cryogenic temperatures.

  7. A sub nrad beam pointing monitoring and stabilization system for controlling input beam jitter in GW interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canuel, Benjamin; Mantovani, Maddalena; Marque, Julien; Ruggi, Paolo; Tacca, Matteo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a simple and very effective control system to monitor and suppress the beam jitter noise at the input of an optical system, called Beam Pointing Control (BPC) system, will be described showing the theoretical principle and an experimental demonstration for the application of large scale gravitational wave interferometers, in particular for the Advanced Virgo detector. For this purpose the requirements for the control accuracy and the sensing noise will be computed by taking into account the Advanced Virgo optical configuration and the outcomes will be compared with the experimental measurement obtained in the laboratory. The system has shown unprecedented performance in terms of control accuracy and sensing noise. The BPC system has achieved a control accuracy of ~ $10^{-8}$ rad for the tilt and ~ $10^{-7}$ m for the shift and a sensing noise of less than 1 nrad/$\\sqrt{Hz}$ resulting compliant with the Advance Virgo gravitational wave interferometer requirements.

  8. Characteristics of flattening filter free beams at low monitor unit settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akino, Yuichi [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan and Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan and Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Ota, Seiichi; Inoue, Shinichi; Mizuno, Hirokazu [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Department of Radiology, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Sumida, Iori; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Isohashi, Fumiaki [Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Oncology Center, Osaka University Hospital, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Newer linear accelerators (linacs) have been equipped to deliver flattening filter free (FFF) beams. When FFF beams are used for step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), the stability of delivery of small numbers of monitor units (MU) is important. The authors developed automatic measurement techniques to evaluate the stability of the dose profile, dose linearity, and consistency. Here, the authors report the performance of the Artiste™ accelerator (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) in delivering low-MU FFF beams.Methods: A 6 MV flattened beam (6X) with 300 MU/min dose rate and FFF beams of 7 (7XU) and 11 MV (11XU), each with a 500 MU/min dose rate, were measured at 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, and 20 MU settings. For the 2000 MU/min dose rate, the 7 (7XUH) and 11 MV (11XUH) beams were set at 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 MU because of the limits of the minimum MU settings. Beams with 20 × 20 and 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} field sizes were alternately measured ten times in intensity modulated (IM) mode, with which Siemens linacs regulate beam delivery for step-and-shoot IMRT. The in- and crossplane beam profiles were measured using a Profiler™ Model 1170 (Sun Nuclear Corporation, Melbourne, FL) in multiframe mode. The frames of 20 × 20 cm{sup 2} beams were identified at the off-axis profile. The 6X beam profile was normalized at the central axis. The 7 and 11 MV FFF beam profiles were rescaled to set the dose at the central axis at 145% and 170%, respectively. Point doses were also measured using a Farmer-type ionization chamber and water-equivalent solid phantom to evaluate the linearity and consistency of low-MU beam delivery. The values displayed on the electrometer were recognized with a USB-type camera and read with open-source optical character recognition software.Results: The symmetry measurements of the 6X, 7XU, and 11XU beam profiles were better than 2% for beams ?2 MU and improved with increasing MU. The variations in flatness of FFF beams ?2 MU were ±5%. The standard deviation of the symmetry and flatness also decreased with increasing MU. The linearity of the 6X beam was ±1% and ±2% for the beams of ?5 and ?3 MU, respectively. The 7XU and 11XU beams of ?2 MU showed linearity with ±2% except the 7XU beam of 8 MU (+2.9%). The profiles of the FFF beams with 2000 and 500 MU/min dose rate were similar.Conclusions: The characteristics of low-MU beams delivered in IM mode were evaluated using an automatic measurement system developed in this study. The authors demonstrated that the profiles of FFF beams of the Artiste™ linac were highly stable, even at low MU. The linearity of dose output was also stable for beams ?2 MU.

  9. Range and modulation dependencies for proton beam dose per monitor unit calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsi, Wen C.; Schreuder, Andries N.; Moyers, Michael F.; Allgower, Chris E.; Farr, Jonathan B.; Mascia, Anthony E. [Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and University Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, Inc., Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); Proton Therapy, Inc., Colton, California 92324 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and Westdeutsches Protonentherapiezentrum, Universitaetsklinikum, Hufelandstrasse 55, 45147 Essen (Germany); Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute, Bloomington, Indiana 47408 (United States)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Calculations of dose per monitor unit (D/MU) are required in addition to measurements to increase patient safety in the clinical practice of proton radiotherapy. As in conventional photon and electron therapy, the D/MU depends on several factors. This study focused on obtaining range and modulation dependence factors used in D/MU calculations for the double scattered proton beam line at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute. Three dependencies on range and one dependency on modulation were found. A carefully selected set of measurements was performed to discern these individual dependencies. Dependencies on range were due to: (1) the stopping power of the protons passing through the monitor chamber; (2) the reduction of proton fluence due to nuclear interactions within the patient; and (3) the variation of proton fluence passing through the monitor chamber due to different source-to-axis distances (SADs) for different beam ranges. Different SADs are produced by reconfigurations of beamline elements to provide different field sizes and ranges. The SAD effect on the D/MU varies smoothly as the beam range is varied, except at the beam range for which the first scatterers are exchanged and relocated to accommodate low and high beam ranges. A geometry factor was devised to model the SAD variation effect on the D/MU. The measured D/MU variation as a function of range can be predicted within 1% using the three modeled dependencies on range. Investigation of modulated beams showed that an analytical formula can predict the D/MU dependency as a function of modulation to within 1.5%. Special attention must be applied when measuring the D/MU dependence on modulation to avoid interplay between range and SAD effects.

  10. Damage monitoring in sandwich beams by modal parameter shifts: A comparative study of burst random and sine dwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    1 Damage monitoring in sandwich beams by modal parameter shifts: A comparative study of burst Abstract: This paper presents an experimental study on the effects of multi-site damage on the vibration response of honeycomb sandwich beams, damaged by two different ways i.e., impact damage and core

  11. A Wire Position Monitor System for the 1.3 FHZ Tesla-Style Cryomodule at the Fermilab New-Muon-Lab Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eddy, N.; Fellenz, B.; Prieto, P.; Semenov, A.; Voy, D.C.; Wendt, M.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The first cryomodule for the beam test facility at the Fermilab New-Muon-Lab building is currently under RF commissioning. Among other diagnostics systems, the transverse position of the helium gas return pipe with the connected 1.3 GHz SRF accelerating cavities is measured along the {approx}15 m long module using a stretched-wire position monitoring system. An overview of the wire position monitor system technology is given, along with preliminary results taken at the initial module cooldown, and during further testing. As the measurement system offers a high resolution, we also discuss options for use as a vibration detector. An electron beam test facility, based on superconducting RF (SRF) TESLA-style cryomodules is currently under construction at the Fermilab New-Muon-Lab (NML) building. The first, so-called type III+, cryomodule (CM-1), equipped with eight 1.3 GHz nine-cell accelerating cavities was recently cooled down to 2 K, and is currently under RF conditioning. The transverse alignment of the cavity string within the cryomodule is crucial for minimizing transverse kick and beam break-up effects, generated by the high-order dipole modes of misaligned accelerating structures. An optimum alignment can only be guaranteed during the assembly of the cavity string, i.e. at room temperatures. The final position of the cavities after cooldown is uncontrollable, and therefore unknown. A wire position monitoring system (WPM) can help to understand the transverse motion of the cavities during cooldown, their final location and the long term position stability after cryo-temperatures are settled, as well as the position reproducibility for several cold-warm cycles. It also may serve as vibration sensor, as the wire acts as a high-Q resonant detector for mechanical vibrations in the low-audio frequency range. The WPM system consists out of a stretched-wire position detection system, provided with help of INFN-Milano and DESY Hamburg, and RF generation and read-out electronics, developed at Fermilab.

  12. A real-time applicator position monitoring system for gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Junyi, E-mail: junyi-xia@uiowa.edu; Waldron, Timothy; Kim, Yusung [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To develop a real-time applicator position monitoring system (RAPS) for intracavitary brachytherapy using an infrared camera and reflective markers. Methods: 3D image-guided brachytherapy requires high accuracy of applicator localization; however, applicator displacement can happen during patient transfer for imaging and treatment delivery. No continuous applicator position monitoring system is currently available. The RAPS system was developed for real-time applicator position monitoring without additional radiation dose to patients. It includes an infrared camera, reflective markers, an infrared illuminator, and image processing software. After reflective markers are firmly attached to the applicator and the patient body, applicator displacement can be measured by computing the relative change in distance between the markers. The reflective markers are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) compatible, which is suitable for MRI-guided HDR brachytherapy paradigm. In our prototype, a Microsoft Kinect sensor with a resolution of 640 by 480 pixels is used as an infrared camera. A phantom study was carried out to compare RAPS' measurements with known displacements ranging from ?15 to +15 mm. A reproducibility test was also conducted. Results: The RAPS can achieve 4 frames/s using a laptop with Intel{sup ®} Core™2 Duo processor. When the pixel size is 0.95 mm, the difference between RAPS' measurements and known shift values varied from 0 to 0.8 mm with the mean value of 0.1 mm and a standard deviation of 0.44 mm. The system reproducibility was within 0.6 mm after ten reposition trials. Conclusions: This work demonstrates the feasibility of a real-time infrared camera based gynecologic intracavitary brachytherapy applicator monitoring system. Less than 1 mm accuracy is achieved when using an off-the-shelf infrared camera.

  13. Intelligent Low-level RF System by Non-destructive Beam Monitoring Device for Cyclotrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malafeh, M S Sharifi Asadi; Afarideh, H; Chai, J S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project of a10MeV PET cyclotron accelerator for medical diagnosis and treatment was started at Amirkabir University of Technology in 2012. The low-level RF system of cyclotron accelerator is designed to stabilize acceleration voltage and control the resonance frequency of the cavity. In this work Intelligent Low Level Radio Frequency Circuit or ILLRF suitable for Most of the AVF cyclotron accelerators was designed by the beam monitoring device and narrow band tunable band-pass filter. In this design, for the RF phase detection does not need to signal processing by microcontroller

  14. Calibration and performance of a secondary emission chamber as a beam intensity monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sivertz, M.; Chiang, I-H,; Rusek, A.

    2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a study of the behavior of a secondary emission chamber (SEC). We show the dependence of the SEC signal on the charge and velocity of the primary beam for beams of protons, and heavy ions including Helium, Neon, Chlorine and Iron. We fill the SEC with a selection of different gases including Hydrogen, Helium, Nitrogen, Argon, and air, studying the SEC response when it is acting as an ion chamber. We also investigate the behavior of the SEC at intermediate pressures between 10{sup -8} torr and atmospheric pressure. The SEC uses thin conducting foils as the source and collector of electrons in a vacuum chamber. When charged particles traverse the vacuum chamber, they pass through a series of thin conducting foils, alternating anode and cathode. Ionization produced in the cathode foils travels across the intervening gap due to an applied high voltage and is collected on the anode foils. Electron production is very inefficient because most of the ionization in the foils remains trapped within the foil due to the short range of most delta-rays and the work function of the foil. It is this inefficiency that allows the SEC to operate at high dose rates and short pulse duration where the standard ion chambers cannot function reliably. The SEC was placed in the NSRL ion beam to receive a variety of heavy ion beams under different beam conditions. We used these ion beams to study the response of the SEC to different species of heavy ion, comparing with proton beams. We studied the response to beam of different energies, and as a function of different counting rate. We compared the behaviour of the SEC when operating under positive and negative high voltage. The SEC can operate as an ion chamber if it is filled with gas. We measured the response of the SEC when filled with a variety of gases, from Hydrogen to Helium, Nitrogen, Argon and air. The performance of the SEC as an ion chamber is compared with the standard NSRL ion chamber, QC3. By evacuating the SEC and filling it with Nitrogen through an adjustable leak valve, we were able to measure the response of the SEC to beam as a function of gas pressure. Many interesting features of the SEC were revealed in these tests.

  15. Gap and stripline combined monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yin, Yan (Palo Alto, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A combined gap and stripline monitor device (10) for measuring the intensity and position of a charged particle beam bunch in a beam pipe of a synchotron radiation facility. The monitor has first and second beam pipe portions (11a, 11b) with an axial gap (12) therebetween. An outer pipe (14) cooperates with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a gap enclosure, while inner strips (23a-d) cooperate with the first beam pipe portion (11a) to form a stripline monitor, with the stripline length being the same as the gap enclosure length.

  16. Computer lab monitors for MB 136. The position will be a category Student IT Assistant 1. Please see the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Computer lab monitors for MB 136. The position will be a category Student IT Assistant 1. Please-schedule/ and the pay rates at http://career.boisestate.edu/compensation-structure-student-pay-grades/ Computer Lab Monitors will provide support to Mathematics students within MB136, facilitating the use of computer

  17. Measurements of remanent fields in TQG quadrupoles by means of beam position measurements in FLASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . 2 und. 3 Q5UND3 und. 4 Q5UND4 und. 5 Q5UND5 und. 6 Q5UND6 . BPM 21SEED BPM 5UND1 BPM 5UND2 BPM 5UND3 BPM 5UND4 BPM 5UND5 BPM 5UND6 . Figure 1: Schematic layout (not to scale) of the undulator system in FLASH. The electron beam enters from the left side. Quadrupole names begin with 'Q'. BPM stands for beam

  18. Shifting the Position of Focal Point of Proton Beam Relative to Intersection Point with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    .5 cm, then we can estimate the Twiss parameters at z = 37.5 from = L/*, = *+ L2/*, = *sqrt(1+L2, with the estimated Twiss parameters at z = 37.5 cm without the HG target in the IDS120h configuration, back to find the beam distribution at different planes in z, and calculate the corresponding Twiss parameters in each

  19. Experimental validation of the dual positive and negative ion beam acceleration in the plasma propulsion with electronegative gases thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro, E-mail: dmytro.rafalskyi@lpp.polytechnique.fr; Popelier, Lara; Aanesland, Ane [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris-Sud, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The PEGASES (Plasma Propulsion with Electronegative Gases) thruster is a gridded ion thruster, where both positive and negative ions are accelerated to generate thrust. In this way, additional downstream neutralization by electrons is redundant. To achieve this, the thruster accelerates alternately positive and negative ions from an ion-ion plasma where the electron density is three orders of magnitude lower than the ion densities. This paper presents a first experimental study of the alternate acceleration in PEGASES, where SF{sub 6} is used as the working gas. Various electrostatic probes are used to investigate the source plasma potential and the energy, composition, and current of the extracted beams. We show here that the plasma potential control in such system is key parameter defining success of ion extraction and is sensitive to both parasitic electron current paths in the source region and deposition of sulphur containing dielectric films on the grids. In addition, large oscillations in the ion-ion plasma potential are found in the negative ion extraction phase. The oscillation occurs when the primary plasma approaches the grounded parts of the main core via sub-millimetres technological inputs. By controlling and suppressing the various undesired effects, we achieve perfect ion-ion plasma potential control with stable oscillation-free operation in the range of the available acceleration voltages (±350?V). The measured positive and negative ion currents in the beam are about 10?mA for each component at RF power of 100?W and non-optimized extraction system. Two different energy analyzers with and without magnetic electron suppression system are used to measure and compare the negative and positive ion and electron fluxes formed by the thruster. It is found that at alternate ion-ion extraction the positive and negative ion energy peaks are similar in areas and symmetrical in position with +/? ion energy corresponding to the amplitude of the applied acceleration voltage.

  20. Resolution study of higher-order-mode-based beam position diagnostics using custom-built electronics in strongly coupled 3.9-GHz multi-cavity accelerating module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, P.; Baboi, N.; Jones, R.M.; Eddy, N.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOMs) can provide remote diagnostics information of the beam position and cavity misalignment. In this paper we report on recent studies on the resolution with specially selected series of modes with custom-built electronics. This constitutes the first report of measurements of these cavities in which we obtained a resolution of 20 micron in beam offset. Details of the setup of the electronics and HOM measurements are provided.

  1. Monitor unit calculations for external photon and electron beams: Report of the AAPM Therapy Physics Committee Task Group No. 71

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbons, John P., E-mail: john.gibbons@marybird.com [Department of Physics, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70809 (United States); Antolak, John A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States); Followill, David S. [Department of Radiation Physics, UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, UT M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Huq, M. Saiful [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15232 (United States); Klein, Eric E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Lam, Kwok L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Palta, Jatinder R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Roback, Donald M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Centers of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Centers of North Carolina, Raleigh, North Carolina 27607 (United States); Reid, Mark [Department of Medical Physics, Fletcher-Allen Health Care, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, Fletcher-Allen Health Care, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States); Khan, Faiz M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A protocol is presented for the calculation of monitor units (MU) for photon and electron beams, delivered with and without beam modifiers, for constant source-surface distance (SSD) and source-axis distance (SAD) setups. This protocol was written by Task Group 71 of the Therapy Physics Committee of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) and has been formally approved by the AAPM for clinical use. The protocol defines the nomenclature for the dosimetric quantities used in these calculations, along with instructions for their determination and measurement. Calculations are made using the dose per MU under normalization conditions, D{sub 0}{sup ?}, that is determined for each user's photon and electron beams. For electron beams, the depth of normalization is taken to be the depth of maximum dose along the central axis for the same field incident on a water phantom at the same SSD, where D{sub 0}{sup ?} = 1 cGy/MU. For photon beams, this task group recommends that a normalization depth of 10 cm be selected, where an energy-dependent D{sub 0}{sup ?} ? 1 cGy/MU is required. This recommendation differs from the more common approach of a normalization depth of d{sub m}, with D{sub 0}{sup ?} = 1 cGy/MU, although both systems are acceptable within the current protocol. For photon beams, the formalism includes the use of blocked fields, physical or dynamic wedges, and (static) multileaf collimation. No formalism is provided for intensity modulated radiation therapy calculations, although some general considerations and a review of current calculation techniques are included. For electron beams, the formalism provides for calculations at the standard and extended SSDs using either an effective SSD or an air-gap correction factor. Example tables and problems are included to illustrate the basic concepts within the presented formalism.

  2. Ana KARABATIC: Precise Point Positioning (PPP) An alternative technique for ground based GNSS troposphere monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuh, Harald

    Ana KARABATIC: Precise Point Positioning (PPP) ­ An alternative technique for ground and computational demands, an alternative processing technique has to be applied Precise Point Positioning (PPP). PPP is a technique that uses undifferenced single or dualfrequency pseudorange and carrier phase

  3. LAPP-TECH-2013-01 DRIVE BEAM STRIPLINE BPM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 LAPP-TECH-2013-01 DRIVE BEAM STRIPLINE BPM ELECTRONICS AND ACQUISITION. Jean-Marc Nappa, Jean- around acquisition and components tests for drive beam stripline BPM read-out. The choice of the presented stripline BPM as the drive beam position monitor is not definitive. The aim of this study

  4. Method and apparatus for monitoring armature position in direct-current solenoids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyers, John C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the position of an armature of a dc-powered solenoid. Electrical circuitry is provided to introduce a small alternating current flow through the coil. As a result, the impedance and resistance of the solenoid coil can be measured to provide information indicative of the armature's position.

  5. Improvements on the accuracy of beam bugs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.J.; Fessenden, T.

    1998-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    At LLNL resistive wall monitors are used to measure the current and position used on ETA-II show a droop in signal due to a fast redistribution time constant of the signals. This paper presents the analysis and experimental test of the beam bugs used for beam current and position measurements in and after the fast kicker. It concludes with an outline of present and future changes that can be made to improve the accuracy of these beam bugs. of intense electron beams in electron induction linacs and beam transport lines. These, known locally as ''beam bugs'', have been used throughout linear induction accelerators as essential diagnostics of beam current and location. Recently, the development of a fast beam kicker has required improvement in the accuracy of measuring the position of beams. By picking off signals at more than the usual four positions around the monitor, beam position measurement error can be greatly reduced. A second significant source of error is the mechanical variation of the resistor around the bug.

  6. TESLA Report 2004-03 Comparison of Stripline and Cavity Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    characteristics of a beam position monitor (BPM) are position and time resolutions. Position resolution is the smallest deflection of the beam which a BPM can sense. Time resolution is the time which a BPM needs be performed, the BPM time resolution should be shorter than the distance between bunches. Different types

  7. LIMITATIONS ON THE RESOLUTION OF YAG:CE BEAM PROFILE MONITOR...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x-ray wire scan measurements. The target was positioned on the motorized mount inside the Compton scattering beamline 10, allowing fast switching between the diagnostics. .50...

  8. Solar Eclipse Monitoring for Solar Energy Applications Using the Solar and Moon Position Algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report includes a procedure for implementing an algorithm (described by Jean Meeus) to calculate the moon's zenith angle with uncertainty of +/-0.001 degrees and azimuth angle with uncertainty of +/-0.003 degrees. The step-by-step format presented here simplifies the complicated steps Meeus describes to calculate the Moon's position, and focuses on the Moon instead of the planets and stars. It also introduces some changes to accommodate for solar radiation applications.

  9. Intelligent portal monitor for fast suppression of false positives due to radiopharmaceuticals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.W.; Butterfield, K.B.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring the movement of radioactive material through secure or sensitive areas may be complicated by the existence of unanticipated sources of radiation carried by individuals passing through the area. Typical of such sources are radiopharmaceuticals prescribed for a medical procedure. We report here on an apparatus designed to quickly discriminate between in-vivo radiopharmaceuticals and other nuclear materials, based on a pattern-recognition algorithm and a microcomputer. Principles of operation are discussed, and the data base for the pattern-recognition algorithm is displayed. Operating experience with the apparatus in a trial location is also discussed. Our apparatus correctly identifies in-vivo radiopharmaceuticals in over 80% of all trials; challenges with radioisotopes other than radiopharmaceuticals have led the apparatus, without exception, to reject the challenge isotope as incompatible with medical practice. The apparatus thus rapidly discriminates between individuals bearing radiopharmaceuticals and those bearing illicit sources, such as special nuclear materials. Examples of applications are presented. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Dose monitoring and output correction for the effects of scanning field changes with uniform scanning proton beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Qingya [IU Health Proton Therapy Center (IUHPTC, formerly known as Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute), Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and School of Health Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indianapolis, Indiana 47907 (United States); Wu, Huanmei [Purdue School of Engineering and Technology, IUPUI, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States); Cheng, Chee-Wai; Das, Indra J. [IU Health Proton Therapy Center (IUHPTC, formerly known as Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute), Bloomington, Indiana 47408 and Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The output of a proton beam is affected by proton energy, Spread-Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) width, aperture size, dose rate, and the point of measurement. In a uniform scanning proton beam (USPB), the scanning field size is adjusted (including the vertical length and the horizontal width) according to the treatment field size with appropriate margins to reduce secondary neutron production. Different scanning field settings result in beam output variations that are investigated in this study. Methods: The measurements are performed with a parallel plate Markus chamber at the center of SOBP under the reference condition with 16 cm range, 10 cm SOBP, and 5 cm air gap. The effect of dose rate on field output is studied by varying proton beam current from 0.5 to 7 nA. The effects of scanning field settings are studied by varying independently the field width and length from 12 x 12 to 30 x 30 cm{sup 2}. Results: The results demonstrate that scanning field variations can produce output variation up to 3.80%. In addition, larger output variation is observed with scanning field changes along the stem direction of the patient dose monitor (PDM). By investigating the underlying physics of incomplete charge collection and the stem effects of the PDM, an analytical model is proposed to calculate USPB output with consideration of the scanning field area and the PDM stem length that is irradiated. The average absolute difference between the measured output and calculated output using our new correction model are within 0.13 and 0.08% for the 20 and 30 cm snouts, respectively. Conclusions: This study proposes a correction model for accurate USPB output calculation, which takes account of scanning field settings and the PDM stem effects. This model may be used to extend the existing output calculation model from one snout size to other snout sizes with customized scanning field settings. The study is especially useful for calculating field output for treatment without individualized patient specific measurements.

  11. Fast Beam-Based BPM Calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertsche, K.; Loos, H.; Nuhn, H.-D.; Peters, F.; /SLAC

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Alignment Diagnostic System (ADS) of the LCLS undulator system indicates that the 33 undulator quadrupoles have extremely high position stability over many weeks. However, beam trajectory straightness and lasing efficiency degrade more quickly than this. A lengthy Beam Based Alignment (BBA) procedure must be executed every two to four weeks to re-optimize the X-ray beam parameters. The undulator system includes RF cavity Beam Position Monitors (RFBPMs), several of which are utilized by an automatic feedback system to align the incoming electron-beam trajectory to the undulator axis. The beam trajectory straightness degradation has been traced to electronic drifts of the gain and offset of the BPMs used in the beam feedback system. To quickly recover the trajectory straightness, we have developed a fast beam-based procedure to recalibrate the BPMs. This procedure takes advantage of the high-precision monitoring capability of the ADS, which allows highly repeatable positioning of undulator quadrupoles. This report describes the ADS, the position stability of the LCLS undulator quadrupoles, and some results of the new recovery procedure.

  12. The Straightness Monitor System at ATF2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hildreth, Michael; /Notre Dame U.; Aryshev, Alexander; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Boogert, Stewart; /Oxford U., JAI; Honda, Yosuke; /KEK, Tsukuba; Tauchi, Toshiaki; /KEK, Tsukuba; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; /KEK, Tsukuba; White, Glen; /SLAC

    2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The demonstration of absolute stability of the position of the focused beam is the primary goal of the ATF2 commissioning effort. We have installed a laser interferometer system that will eventually correct the measurement of high-precision Beam Position Monitors used in the ATF2Final Focus Steering Feedback for mechanical motion or vibrations. Here, we describe the installed system and present preliminary data on the short- and long-term mechanical stability of the BPM system.

  13. Monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides apparatus and methods which facilitate movement of an instrument relative to an item or location being monitored and/or the item or location relative to the instrument, whilst successfully excluding extraneous ions from the detection location. Thus, ions generated by emissions from the item or location can successfully be monitored during movement. The technique employs sealing to exclude such ions, for instance, through an electro-field which attracts and discharges the ions prior to their entering the detecting location and/or using a magnetic field configured to repel the ions away from the detecting location.

  14. Dependence of ion beam current on position of mobile plate tuner in multi-frequencies microwaves electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurisu, Yosuke; Kiriyama, Ryutaro; Takenaka, Tomoya; Nozaki, Dai; Sato, Fuminobu; Kato, Yushi; Iida, Toshiyuki [Division of Electrical, Electronic and Information Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We are constructing a tandem-type electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS). The first stage of this can supply 2.45 GHz and 11-13 GHz microwaves to plasma chamber individually and simultaneously. We optimize the beam current I{sub FC} by the mobile plate tuner. The I{sub FC} is affected by the position of the mobile plate tuner in the chamber as like a circular cavity resonator. We aim to clarify the relation between the I{sub FC} and the ion saturation current in the ECRIS against the position of the mobile plate tuner. We obtained the result that the variation of the plasma density contributes largely to the variation of the I{sub FC} when we change the position of the mobile plate tuner.

  15. LBNL-46223, CBP Note 350 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS IN THE LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, Miguel

    LBNL-46223, CBP Note 350 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS IN THE LHC M. A. Furman, W. C. Turner, Center for Beam Physics, LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract We present beam-beam simulation of simulations: (a) to as- sess undesirable effects from LBNL's luminosity monitor- ing scheme for the LHC [2

  16. LBNL-45363, CBP Note 333 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, Miguel

    LBNL-45363, CBP Note 333 BEAM-BEAM SIMULATIONS FOR SEPARATED BEAMS Miguel A. Furman, Center for Beam Physics, LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720 Abstract We present beam-beam simulation results from a strong undesirable effects from LBNL's sweeping lumi- nosity monitoring scheme for the LHC [1], and (b) to assess

  17. Automated beam steering using optimal control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, C. K. (Christopher K.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a steering algorithm which, with the aid of a model, allows the user to specify beam behavior throughout a beamline, rather than just at specified beam position monitor (BPM) locations. The model is used primarily to compute the values of the beam phase vectors from BPM measurements, and to define cost functions that describe the steering objectives. The steering problem is formulated as constrained optimization problem; however, by applying optimal control theory we can reduce it to an unconstrained optimization whose dimension is the number of control signals.

  18. Four-Button BPM Coefficients in Cylindrical and Elliptic Beam Chambers February 17, 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Four-Button BPM Coefficients in Cylindrical and Elliptic Beam Chambers S. H. Kim February 17, 1999 Beam position monitor (BPM) coefficients are calculated from induced charges on four-button BPMs ring is different from an exact elliptic geometry, numerical values of the BPM coefficients

  19. A novel digitization scheme with FPGA-base TDC for beam loss monitors operating at cryogenic temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jinyuan; Warner, Arden; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recycling integrators are common current-to-frequency converting circuits for measurements of low current such as that produced by Fermilab's cryogenic ionization chambers. In typical digitization/readout schemes, a counter is utilized to accumulate the number of pulses generated by the recycling integrator to adequately digitize the total charge. In order to calculate current with reasonable resolution (e.g., 7-8 bits), hundreds of pulses must be accumulated which corresponds to a long sampling period, i.e., a very low sampling rate. In our new scheme, an FPGA-based Time-to-Digital Convertor (TDC) is utilized to measure the time intervals between the pulses output from the recycling integrator. Using this method, a sample point of the current can be made with good resolution (>10 bits) for each pulse. This effectively increases the sampling rates by hundreds of times for the same recycling integrator front-end electronics. This scheme provides a fast response to the beams loss and is potentially suitable for accelerator protection applications. Moreover, the method is also self-zero-suppressed, i.e., it produces more data when the beam loss is high while it produces significantly less data when the beam loss is low.

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF EROSIONAL HOTSPOTS AND SHORELINE POSITION UTILIZING AN ALONGSHORE SHORELINE MONITORING SYSTEM: GALVESTON ISLAND’S WEST END

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McInnes, Andrew J.

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    database. The quantification of offsets was conducted in ArcMap after the creation of polyline shapefiles using the MATLAB output of mean x and y points for the period of interest. An additional shapefile was created composed of a grid of shore... at the same position alongshore for any wetline of interest (figure 5). After the importing of the shapefiles of the surveys under consideration, the reference line of interest is imported (for this project the baseline was the meanline of the second...

  1. Comparison of 2D Radiographic Images and 3D Cone Beam Computed Tomography for Positioning Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Heng [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)], E-mail: xrzhu@mdanderson.org; Zhang Lifei; Dong Lei; Tung, Sam [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Ahamad, Anesa M.D.; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Morrison, William H.; Rosenthal, David I.; Schwartz, David L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess the positioning accuracy using two-dimensional kilovoltage (2DkV) imaging and three-dimensional cone beam CT (CBCT) in patients with head and neck (H and N) cancer receiving radiation therapy. To assess the benefit of patient-specific headrest. Materials and Methods: All 21 patients studied were immobilized using thermoplastic masks with either a patient-specific vacuum bag (11 of 21, IMA) or standard clear plastic (10 of 21, IMB) headrests. Each patient was imaged with a pair of orthogonal 2DkV images in treatment position using onboard imaging before the CBCT procedure. The 2DkV and CBCT images were acquired weekly during the same session. The 2DkV images were reviewed by oncologists and also analyzed by a software tool based on mutual information (MI). Results: Ninety-eight pairs of assessable 2DkV-CBCT alignment sets were obtained. Systematic and random errors were <1.6 mm for both 2DkV and CBCT alignments. When we compared shifts determined by CBCT and 2DkV for the same patient setup, statistically significant correlations were observed in all three major directions. Among all CBCT couch shifts, 4.1% {>=} 0.5 cm and 18.7% {>=} 0.3 cm, whereas among all 2DkV (MI) shifts, 1.7% {>=} 0.5 cm and 11.2% {>=} 0.3 cm. Statistically significant difference was found on anteroposterior direction between IMA and IMB with the CBCT alignment only. Conclusions: The differences between 2D and 3D alignments were mainly caused by the relative flexibility of certain H and N structures and possibly by rotation. Better immobilization of the flexible neck is required to further reduce the setup errors for H and N patients receiving radiotherapy.

  2. A study of respiration-correlated cone-beam CT scans to correct target positioning errors in radiotherapy of thoracic cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santoro, J. P.; McNamara, J.; Yorke, E.; Pham, H.; Rimner, A.; Rosenzweig, K. E.; Mageras, G. S. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: There is increasingly widespread usage of cone-beam CT (CBCT) for guiding radiation treatment in advanced-stage lung tumors, but difficulties associated with daily CBCT in conventionally fractionated treatments include imaging dose to the patient, increased workload and longer treatment times. Respiration-correlated cone-beam CT (RC-CBCT) can improve localization accuracy in mobile lung tumors, but further increases the time and workload for conventionally fractionated treatments. This study investigates whether RC-CBCT-guided correction of systematic tumor deviations in standard fractionated lung tumor radiation treatments is more effective than 2D image-based correction of skeletal deviations alone. A second study goal compares respiration-correlated vs respiration-averaged images for determining tumor deviations. Methods: Eleven stage II-IV nonsmall cell lung cancer patients are enrolled in an IRB-approved prospective off-line protocol using RC-CBCT guidance to correct for systematic errors in GTV position. Patients receive a respiration-correlated planning CT (RCCT) at simulation, daily kilovoltage RC-CBCT scans during the first week of treatment and weekly scans thereafter. Four types of correction methods are compared: (1) systematic error in gross tumor volume (GTV) position, (2) systematic error in skeletal anatomy, (3) daily skeletal corrections, and (4) weekly skeletal corrections. The comparison is in terms of weighted average of the residual GTV deviations measured from the RC-CBCT scans and representing the estimated residual deviation over the treatment course. In the second study goal, GTV deviations computed from matching RCCT and RC-CBCT are compared to deviations computed from matching respiration-averaged images consisting of a CBCT reconstructed using all projections and an average-intensity-projection CT computed from the RCCT. Results: Of the eleven patients in the GTV-based systematic correction protocol, two required no correction, seven required a single correction, one required two corrections, and one required three corrections. Mean residual GTV deviation (3D distance) following GTV-based systematic correction (mean {+-} 1 standard deviation 4.8 {+-} 1.5 mm) is significantly lower than for systematic skeletal-based (6.5 {+-} 2.9 mm, p= 0.015), and weekly skeletal-based correction (7.2 {+-} 3.0 mm, p= 0.001), but is not significantly lower than daily skeletal-based correction (5.4 {+-} 2.6 mm, p= 0.34). In two cases, first-day CBCT images reveal tumor changes-one showing tumor growth, the other showing large tumor displacement-that are not readily observed in radiographs. Differences in computed GTV deviations between respiration-correlated and respiration-averaged images are 0.2 {+-} 1.8 mm in the superior-inferior direction and are of similar magnitude in the other directions. Conclusions: An off-line protocol to correct GTV-based systematic error in locally advanced lung tumor cases can be effective at reducing tumor deviations, although the findings need confirmation with larger patient statistics. In some cases, a single cone-beam CT can be useful for assessing tumor changes early in treatment, if more than a few days elapse between simulation and the start of treatment. Tumor deviations measured with respiration-averaged CT and CBCT images are consistent with those measured with respiration-correlated images; the respiration-averaged method is more easily implemented in the clinic.

  3. Optical Transition Radiation Monitor for the T2K Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sampa Bhadra; Mircea Cadabeschi; Patrick de Perio; Vyacheslav Galymov; Mark Hartz; Brian Kirby; Akira Konaka; Alysia D. Marino; John F. Martin; David Morris; Leif Stawnyczy

    2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An Optical Transition Radiation monitor has been developed for the proton beam-line of the T2K long base-line neutrino oscillation experiment. The monitor operates in the highly radioactive environment in proximity to the T2K target. It uses optical transition radiation, the light emitted from a thin metallic foil when the charged beam passes through it, to form a 2D image of a 30 GeV proton beam. One of its key features is an optical system capable of transporting the light over a large distance out of the harsh environment near the target to a lower radiation area where it is possible to operate a camera to capture this light. The monitor measures the proton beam position and width with a precision of better than 500 {\\mu}m, meeting the physics requirements of the T2K experiment.

  4. Comparison of LHC collimator beam-based alignment to BPM-Interpolated centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentino, G; Assmann, R W; Bruce, R; Muller, G J; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Lari, L

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam centers at the Large Hadron Collider collimators are determined by beam-based alignment, where both jaws of a collimator are moved in separately until a loss spike is detected on a Beam LossMonitor downstream. Orbit drifts of more than a few hundred micrometers cannot be tolerated, as they would compromise the performance of the collimation system. Beam Position Monitors (BPMs) are installed at various locations around the LHC ring, and a linear interpolation of the orbit can be obtained at the collimator positions. In this paper, the results obtained from beam-based alignment are compared with the orbit interpolated from the BPM data throughout the 2011 and 2012 LHC proton runs.

  5. Electron beam dynamics in the DARHT-II linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Epifanio O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Rita [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cook, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esquibel, Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallegos, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garnett, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harrison, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Jeffrey B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jacquez, Edward B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccuistian, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Nicholas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nath, Subrata [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nielsen, Kurt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prichard, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rowton, Lawrence [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Manolito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scarpetti, Raymond [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schauer, Martin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seitz, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulze, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bender, Howard A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broste, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frayer, Daniel K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Douglas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tom, C Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trainham, C [NSTEC/STL; Williams, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Genoni, Thomas [VOSS; Hughes, Thomas [VOSS; Toma, Carsten [VOSS

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DARHT-II linear induction accelerator (LIA) accelerates a 2-kA electron beam to more than 17 MeV. The beam pulse has a greater than 1.5-microsecond flattop region over which the electron kinetic energy is constant to within 1%. The beam dynamics are diagnosed with 21 beam-position monitors located throughout the injector, accelerator, and after the accelerator exit, where we also have beam imaging diagnostics. We discuss the tuning of the injector and accelerator, and present data for the resulting beam dynamics. We discuss the tuning procedures and other methods used to minimize beam motion, which is undesirable for its application as a bremsstrahlung source for multi-pulse radiography of exlosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. We also present beam stability measurements, which we relate to previous stability experiments at lower current and energy.

  6. Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg F. (Livermore, CA); Moore, Thomas R. (Rochester, NY)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

  7. Beam Profile Measurement in MTA Beam Line for High Pressure RF Cavity Beam Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jana, M.R.; Bross, A.; Chung, M.; Greer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Schwartz, T.; /Fermilab /IIT, Chicago /PDT, Torino

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent High Pressure RF (HPRF) cavity experiment at MuCool Test Area (MTA) has used 400 MeV Linac proton beam to study the beam loading effect. When the energetic proton beam passes through the cavity, it ionizes the inside gas and produces the electrons. These electrons consume RF power inside the cavity. Number of electrons produced per cm inside the cavity (at 950 psi Hydrogen gas) per incident proton is {approx} 1200. The measurement of beam position and profile are necessary. MTA is flammable gas (Hydrogen) hazard zone so we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrument using Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper presents quantitative information about beam position and beam profile. Neutral density filter was used to avoid saturation of CCD camera. Image data is filtered and fitted with Gaussian function to compute the beam size. The beam profile obtained from scintillation screen shall be compared with multi-wire beam profile.

  8. Method and apparatus for calibrating a particle emissions monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flower, William L. (Livermore, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA)

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The instant invention discloses method and apparatus for calibrating particulate emissions monitors, in particular, and sampling probes, in general, without removing the instrument from the system being monitored. A source of one or more specific metals in aerosol (either solid or liquid) or vapor form is housed in the instrument. The calibration operation is initiated by moving a focusing lens, used to focus a light beam onto an analysis location and collect the output light response, from an operating position to a calibration position such that the focal point of the focusing lens is now within a calibration stream issuing from a calibration source. The output light response from the calibration stream can be compared to that derived from an analysis location in the operating position to more accurately monitor emissions within the emissions flow stream.

  9. Method and apparatus for calibrating a particle emissions monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flower, W.L.; Renzi, R.F.

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention discloses a method and apparatus for calibrating particulate emissions monitors, in particular, sampling probes, and in general, without removing the instrument from the system being monitored. A source of one or more specific metals in aerosol (either solid or liquid) or vapor form is housed in the instrument. The calibration operation is initiated by moving a focusing lens, used to focus a light beam onto an analysis location and collect the output light response, from an operating position to a calibration position such that the focal point of the focusing lens is now within a calibration stream issuing from a calibration source. The output light response from the calibration stream can be compared to that derived from an analysis location in the operating position to more accurately monitor emissions within the emissions flow stream. 6 figs.

  10. Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

  11. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

  12. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  13. Cone-Beam Computed Tomography–Guided Positioning of Laryngeal Cancer Patients with Large Interfraction Time Trends in Setup and Nonrigid Anatomy Variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangsaas, Anne, E-mail: a.gangsaas@erasmusmc.nl; Astreinidou, Eleftheria; Quint, Sandra; Levendag, Peter C.; Heijmen, Ben

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate interfraction setup variations of the primary tumor, elective nodes, and vertebrae in laryngeal cancer patients and to validate protocols for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided correction. Methods and Materials: For 30 patients, CBCT-measured displacements in fractionated treatments were used to investigate population setup errors and to simulate residual setup errors for the no action level (NAL) offline protocol, the extended NAL (eNAL) protocol, and daily CBCT acquisition with online analysis and repositioning. Results: Without corrections, 12 of 26 patients treated with radical radiation therapy would have experienced a gradual change (time trend) in primary tumor setup ?4 mm in the craniocaudal (CC) direction during the fractionated treatment (11/12 in caudal direction, maximum 11 mm). Due to these trends, correction of primary tumor displacements with NAL resulted in large residual CC errors (required margin 6.7 mm). With the weekly correction vector adjustments in eNAL, the trends could be largely compensated (CC margin 3.5 mm). Correlation between movements of the primary and nodal clinical target volumes (CTVs) in the CC direction was poor (r{sup 2}=0.15). Therefore, even with online setup corrections of the primary CTV, the required CC margin for the nodal CTV was as large as 6.8 mm. Also for the vertebrae, large time trends were observed for some patients. Because of poor CC correlation (r{sup 2}=0.19) between displacements of the primary CTV and the vertebrae, even with daily online repositioning of the vertebrae, the required CC margin around the primary CTV was 6.9 mm. Conclusions: Laryngeal cancer patients showed substantial interfraction setup variations, including large time trends, and poor CC correlation between primary tumor displacements and motion of the nodes and vertebrae (internal tumor motion). These trends and nonrigid anatomy variations have to be considered in the choice of setup verification protocol and planning target volume margins. eNAL could largely compensate time trends with minor prolongation of fraction time.

  14. Method and apparatus for real time weld monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leong, Keng H. (Lemont, IL); Hunter, Boyd V. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method and apparatus are provided for real time weld monitoring. An infrared signature emitted by a hot weld surface during welding is detected and this signature is compared with an infrared signature emitted by the weld surface during steady state conditions. The result is correlated with weld penetration. The signal processing is simpler than for either UV or acoustic techniques. Changes in the weld process, such as changes in the transmitted laser beam power, quality or positioning of the laser beam, change the resulting weld surface features and temperature of the weld surface, thereby resulting in a change in the direction and amount of infrared emissions. This change in emissions is monitored by an IR sensitive detecting apparatus that is sensitive to the appropriate wavelength region for the hot weld surface.

  15. Beam characteristics of energy-matched flattening filter free beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paynter, D.; Weston, S. J.; Cosgrove, V. P. [St James Institute of Oncology The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Medical Physics, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom)] [St James Institute of Oncology The Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, Medical Physics, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Evans, J. A. [LIGHT Institute University of Leeds Leeds LS2 9JT, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom)] [LIGHT Institute University of Leeds Leeds LS2 9JT, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds (United Kingdom); Thwaites, D. I. [LIGHT Institute University of Leeds Leeds LS2 9JT, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds, United Kingdom and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney (Australia)] [LIGHT Institute University of Leeds Leeds LS2 9JT, Division of Medical Physics, Leeds, United Kingdom and Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney (Australia)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) linear accelerators can increase treatment efficiency and plan quality. There are multiple methods of defining a FFF beam. The Elekta control system supports tuning of the delivered FFF beam energy to enable matching of the percentage depth-dose (PDD) of the flattened beam at 10 cm depth. This is compared to FFF beams where the linac control parameters are identical to those for the flattened beam. All beams were delivered on an Elekta Synergy accelerator with an Agility multi-leaf collimator installed and compared to the standard, flattened beam. The aim of this study is to compare “matched” FFF beams to both “unmatched” FFF beams and flattened beams to determine the benefits of matching beams. Methods: For the three modes of operation 6 MV flattened, 6 MV matched FFF, 6 MV unmatched FFF, 10 MV flattened, 10 MV matched FFF, and 10 MV unmatched FFF beam profiles were obtained using a plotting tank and were measured in steps of 0.1 mm in the penumbral region. Beam penumbra was defined as the distance between the 80% and 20% of the normalized dose when the inflection points of the unflattened and flattened profiles were normalized with the central axis dose of the flattened field set as 100%. PDD data was obtained at field sizes ranging from 3 cm × 3 cm to 40?cm × 40 cm. Radiation protection measurements were additionally performed to determine the head leakage and environmental monitoring through the maze and primary barriers. Results: No significant change is made to the beam penumbra for FFF beams with and without PDD matching, the maximum change in penumbra for a 10 cm × 10 cm field was within the experimental error of the study. The changes in the profile shape with increasing field size are most significant for the matched FFF beam, and both FFF beams showed less profile shape variation with increasing depth when compared to flattened beams, due to consistency in beam energy spectra across the radiation field. The PDDs of the FFF beams showed less variation with field size, the d{sub max} value was deeper for the matched FFF beam than the FFF beam and deeper than the flattened beam for field sizes greater than 5 cm × 5 cm. The head leakage when using the machine in FFF mode is less than half that for a flattened beam, but comparable for both FFF modes. The radiation protection dose-rate measurements show an increase of instantaneous dose-rates when operating the machines in FFF mode but that increase is less than the ratio of MU/min produced by the machine. Conclusions: The matching of a FFF beam to a flattened beam at a depth of 10 cm in water by increasing the FFF beam energy does not reduce any of the reported benefits of FFF beams. Conversely, there are a number of potential benefits resulting from matching the FFF beam; the depth of maximum dose is deeper, the out of field dose is potentially reduced, and the beam quality and penetration more closely resembles the flattened beams currently used in clinical practice, making dose distributions in water more alike. Highlighted in this work is the fact that some conventional specifications and methods for measurement of beam parameters such as penumbra are not relevant and further work is required to address this situation with respect to “matched” FFF beams and to determine methods of measurement that are not reliant on an associated flattened beam.

  16. Polarization of fast particle beams by collisional pumping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, J. Warren (Castro Valley, CA); Kaplan, Selig N. (El Cerrito, CA); Pyle, Robert V. (Berkeley, CA); Anderson, L. Wilmer (Madison, WI); Ruby, Lawrence (Berkeley, CA); Schlachter, Alfred S. (Oakland, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for highly polarizing a fast beam of particles by collisional pumping, including generating a fast beam of particles, and also generating a thick electron-spin-polarized medium positioned as a target for the beam. The target is made sufficiently thick to allow the beam to interact with the medium to produce collisional pumping whereby the beam becomes highly polarized.

  17. Model Independent Analysis of Beam Centroid Dynamics in Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chun-xi

    2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamental issues in Beam-Position-Monitor (BPM)-based beam dynamics observations are studied in this dissertation. The major topic is the Model-Independent Analysis (MIA) of beam centroid dynamics. Conventional beam dynamics analysis requires a certain machine model, which itself of ten needs to be refined by beam measurements. Instead of using any particular machine model, MIA relies on a statistical analysis of the vast amount of BPM data that often can be collected non-invasively during normal machine operation. There are two major parts in MIA. One is noise reduction and degrees-of-freedom analysis using a singular value decomposition of a BPM-data matrix, which constitutes a principal component analysis of BPM data. The other is a physical base decomposition of the BPM-data matrix based on the time structure of pulse-by-pulse beam and/or machine parameters. The combination of these two methods allows one to break the resolution limit set by individual BPMs and observe beam dynamics at more accurate levels. A physical base decomposition is particularly useful for understanding various beam dynamics issues. MIA improves observation and analysis of beam dynamics and thus leads to better understanding and control of beams in both linacs and rings. The statistical nature of MIA makes it potentially useful in other fields. Another important topic discussed in this dissertation is the measurement of a nonlinear Poincare section (one-turn) map in circular accelerators. The beam dynamics in a ring is intrinsically nonlinear. In fact, nonlinearities are a major factor that limits stability and influences the dynamics of halos. The Poincare section map plays a basic role in characterizing and analyzing such a periodic nonlinear system. Although many kinds of nonlinear beam dynamics experiments have been conducted, no direct measurement of a nonlinear map has been reported for a ring in normal operation mode. This dissertation analyzes various issues concerning map measurements and shows that it is possible to measure the Poincare section map (in terms of Taylor series) of a circular accelerator to a surprisingly high order and accuracy based on present BPM technology. MIA can overcome the inherent limit of BPM resolution. Nonlinear map measurements will advance understanding of the beam dynamics of a ring.

  18. Offered: Offered: Position(s): Position(s)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    Company: Industry: Website: Majors: Offered: Offered: Position(s): Position(s): Description the future for streamlined operations. B2W Software solutions effectively leverage the latest technologies into a unified system approach for estimating and bidding, field tracking and analysis, resource planning

  19. ANNOUNCEMENT NUCLEAR ENGINEERING FACULTY POSITION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    ANNOUNCEMENT NUCLEAR ENGINEERING FACULTY POSITION The Department of Nuclear Engineering at the Assistant or Associate Professor level. These areas include, but are not limited to, nuclear system instrumentation & controls, monitoring and diagnostics, reactor dynamics, nuclear security, nuclear materials

  20. Luminosity and beam-beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papotti, G; Trad, G

    We report on observations on luminosity evolution and beam-beam interaction from the 2011 physics run. Extrapolations for 2012 are attempted and a list of desired studies and machine developments is included.

  1. Lateral stability of long precast concrete beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgoyne, Chris

    buckling L length of beam vx lateral de¯ection measured in the minor- axis direction (which rotates with yLateral stability of long precast concrete beams T. J. Stratford, BA, BEng, and C. J. Burgoyne, BA, making them more susceptible to buckling failure. This paper shows that once the beam is positioned

  2. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  3. Determination of neutral beam energy fractions from collisional radiative measurements on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D. M.; Van Zeeland, M. A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Grierson, B. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Munoz Burgos, J. M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutral beams based on positive ion source technology are a key component of contemporary fusion research. An accurate assessment of the injected beam species mix is important for determining the actual plasma heating and momentum input as well as proper interpretation of beam-based diagnostics. On DIII-D, the main ion charge-exchange spectroscopy system is used to extract well-resolved intensity ratios of the Doppler-shifted D{sub {alpha}} emission from the full, half, and third energy beam components for a variety of beam operational parameters. In conjunction with accurate collisional-radiative modeling, these measurements indicate the assumed species mix and power fractions can vary significantly and should be regularly monitored and updated for the most accurate interpretation of plasma performance. In addition, if stable active control of the power fractions can be achieved through appropriate source tuning, the resulting control over the deposition profile can serve as an additional experimental knob for advanced tokamak studies, e.g., varying the off axis beam current drive without altering the beam trajectory.

  4. Position Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1992-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The order prescribes the policies, responsibilities, and procedures for position management within (DOE). Canceled by DOE N 1321.140. Cancels DOE 3510.1

  5. Impact of Dynamic Magnetic fields on the CLIC Main Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snuverink, J; Jach, C; Jeanneret, JB; Schulte, D; Stulle, F

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) accelerator has strong precision requirements on the position of the beam. The beam position will be sensitive to external dynamic magnetic fields (stray fields) in the nanotesla regime. The impact of these fields on the CLIC main beam has been studied by performing simulations on the lattices and tolerances have been determined. Several mitigation techniques will be discussed.

  6. SU-E-J-72: Geant4 Simulations of Spot-Scanned Proton Beam Treatment Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanehira, T; Sutherland, K; Matsuura, T; Umegaki, K; Shirato, H [Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate density inhomogeneities which can effect dose distributions for real-time image gated spot-scanning proton therapy (RGPT), a dose calculation system, using treatment planning system VQA (Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo) spot position data, was developed based on Geant4. Methods: A Geant4 application was developed to simulate spot-scanned proton beams at Hokkaido University Hospital. A CT scan (0.98 × 0.98 × 1.25 mm) was performed for prostate cancer treatment with three or four inserted gold markers (diameter 1.5 mm, volume 1.77 mm3) in or near the target tumor. The CT data was read into VQA. A spot scanning plan was generated and exported to text files, specifying the beam energy and position of each spot. The text files were converted and read into our Geant4-based software. The spot position was converted into steering magnet field strength (in Tesla) for our beam nozzle. Individual protons were tracked from the vacuum chamber, through the helium chamber, steering magnets, dose monitors, etc., in a straight, horizontal line. The patient CT data was converted into materials with variable density and placed in a parametrized volume at the isocenter. Gold fiducial markers were represented in the CT data by two adjacent voxels (volume 2.38 mm3). 600,000 proton histories were tracked for each target spot. As one beam contained about 1,000 spots, approximately 600 million histories were recorded for each beam on a blade server. Two plans were considered: two beam horizontal opposed (90 and 270 degree) and three beam (0, 90 and 270 degree). Results: We are able to convert spot scanning plans from VQA and simulate them with our Geant4-based code. Our system can be used to evaluate the effect of dose reduction caused by gold markers used for RGPT. Conclusion: Our Geant4 application is able to calculate dose distributions for spot scanned proton therapy.

  7. Commissioning of output factors for uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yuanshui; Ramirez, Eric; Mascia, Anthony; Ding Xiaoning; Okoth, Benny; Zeidan, Omar; Hsi Wen; Harris, Ben; Schreuder, Andries N.; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Current commercial treatment planning systems are not able to accurately predict output factors and calculate monitor units for proton fields. Patient-specific field output factors are thus determined by either measurements or empirical modeling based on commissioning data. The objective of this study is to commission output factors for uniform scanning beams utilized at the ProCure proton therapy centers. Methods: Using water phantoms and a plane parallel ionization chamber, the authors first measured output factors with a fixed 10 cm diameter aperture as a function of proton range and modulation width for clinically available proton beams with ranges between 4 and 31.5 cm and modulation widths between 2 and 15 cm. The authors then measured the output factor as a function of collimated field size at various calibration depths for proton beams of various ranges and modulation widths. The authors further examined the dependence of the output factor on the scanning area (i.e., uncollimated proton field), snout position, and phantom material. An empirical model was developed to calculate the output factor for patient-specific fields and the model-predicted output factors were compared to measurements. Results: The output factor increased with proton range and field size, and decreased with modulation width. The scanning area and snout position have a small but non-negligible effect on the output factors. The predicted output factors based on the empirical modeling agreed within 2% of measurements for all prostate treatment fields and within 3% for 98.5% of all treatment fields. Conclusions: Comprehensive measurements at a large subset of available beam conditions are needed to commission output factors for proton therapy beams. The empirical modeling agrees well with the measured output factor data. This investigation indicates that it is possible to accurately predict output factors and thus eliminate or reduce time-consuming patient-specific output measurements for proton treatments.

  8. Broad-band beam buncher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldberg, David A. (Walnut Creek, CA); Flood, William S. (Berkeley, CA); Arthur, Allan A. (Martinez, CA); Voelker, Ferdinand (Orinda, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

  9. Monitoring materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for effectively implementing alpha and/or beta and/or gamma monitoring of items or locations as desired. Indirect alpha monitoring by detecting ions generated by alpha emissions, in conjunction with beta and/or gamma monitoring is provided. The invention additionally provides for screening of items prior to alpha monitoring using beta and/or gamma monitoring, so as to ensure that the alpha monitoring apparatus is not contaminated by proceeding direct to alpha monitoring of a heavily contaminated item or location. The invention provides additional versatility in the emission forms which can be monitored, whilst maintaining accuracy and avoiding inadvertent contamination.

  10. Performance Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Optimization Performance Monitoring Performance Monitoring A redirector page has been set up without anywhere to redirect to. Last edited: 2014-08-25 14:37:27...

  11. A laser speckle based position sensing technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shilpiekandula, Vijay, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and development of a novel laser-speckle-based position sensing technique. In our prototype implementation, a He-Ne laser beam is directed at the surface of an air-bearing spindle. An imaging ...

  12. Frictional cooling of positively charged particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Greenwald; Allen Caldwell

    2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the focuses of research and development towards the construction of a muon collider is muon beam preparation. Simulation of frictional cooling shows that it can achieve the desired emittance reduction to produce high-luminosity muon beams. We show that for positively charged particles, charge exchange interactions necessitate significant changes to schemes previously developed for negatively charged particles. We also demonstrate that foil-based schemes are not viable for positive particles.

  13. The beam diagnostic instruments in Beijing radioactive ion-beam facilities isotope separator on-line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Y., E-mail: yjma@ciae.ac.cn; Cui, B.; Ma, R.; Tang, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Jiang, W. [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)] [China Institute of Atomic Energy, Beijing 102413 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam diagnostic instruments for Beijing Radioactive Ion-beam Facilities Isotope Separator On-Line are introduced [B. Q. Cui, Z. H. Peng, Y. J. Ma, R. G. Ma, B. Tang, T. Zhang, and W. S. Jiang, Nucl. Instrum. Methods 266, 4113 (2008); T. J. Zhang, X. L. Guan, and B. Q. Cui, in Proceedings of APAC 2004, Gyeongju, Korea, 2004, http://www.jacow.org , p. 267]. For low intensity ion beam [30–300 keV/1 pA–10 ?A], the beam profile monitor, the emittance measurement unit, and the analyzing slit will be installed. For the primary proton beam [100 MeV/200 ?A], the beam profile scanner will be installed. For identification of the nuclide, a beam identification unit will be installed. The details of prototype of the beam diagnostic units and some experiment results will be described in this article.

  14. Beams 92: Proceedings. Volume 2, Ion beams, electron beams, diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosher, D.; Cooperstein, G. [eds.] [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] [eds.; Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics. Ion beam papers; electron beam papers; and these papers have been indexed separately elsewhere.

  15. Polarization of fast particle beams by collisional pumping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, J.W.; Kaplan, S.N.; Pyle, R.V.; Anderson, L.W.; Schlachter, A.S.; Ruby, L.

    1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates to method and apparatus for polarizing a fast beam of particles by collisional pumping, including generating a fast beam of particles, and generating a thick electron-spin-polarized medium positioned as a target for said beam, said medium being sufficiently thick to allow said beam to interact with said medium to produce collisional pumping whereby said particle beam becomes highly polarized.

  16. Ion Chamber Arrays for the Numi Beam at Fermilab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Indurthy; Z. Pavlovic; R. Zwaska; R. Keisler; S. Mendoza; S. Kopp; M. Proga; D. Harris; A. Marchionni; J. Morfin; A. Erwin; H. Ping; C. Velissaris; M. Bishai; M. Diwan; B. Viren; D. Naples; D. Northacker; J. McDonald

    2005-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline will deliver an intense muon neutrino beam by focusing a beam of mesons into a long evacuated decay volume. We have built 4 arrays of ionization chambers to monitor the neutrino beam direction and quality. The arrays are located at 4 stations downstream of the decay volume, and measure the remnant hadron beam and tertiary muons produced along with neutrinos in meson decays.

  17. Diffraction encoded position measuring apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tansey, R.J.

    1991-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    When a lightwave passes through a transmission grating, diffracted beams appear at the output or opposite side of the grating that are effectively Doppler shifted in frequency (phase) whereby a detector system can compare the phase of the zero order and higher order beams to obtain an indication of position. Multiple passes through the grating increase resolution for a given wavelength of a laser signal. The resolution can be improved further by using a smaller wavelength laser to generate the grating itself. Since the grating must only have a pitch sufficient to produce diffracted orders, inexpensive, ultraviolet wavelength lasers can be utilized and still obtain high resolution detection. 3 figures.

  18. Fluctuation of an ion beam extracted from an AC filament driven Bernas-type ion source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miyamoto, N., E-mail: nmiyamot@mail.doshisha.ac.jp; Okajima, Y.; Wada, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyotanabe, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Argon ion beam fluctuation from an AC filament driven Bernas-type ion source is observed. The ion beam was measured by an 8 measurement elements beam profile monitor. The amplitude of the beam current fluctuation stayed in the same level from 100 Hz to 1 kHz of the filament heating frequency. The beam current fluctuation frequency measured by the beam profile monitor was equal to the frequency of the AC filament operation. The fluctuation amplitudes of the beam current by AC operation were less than 7% and were in the same level of the DC operation.

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring properties of particle beams using thermo-resistive material properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V. (Williamsburg, VA); Dotson, Danny Wayne (Gloucester, VA)

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A beam position detector for measuring the properties of a charged particle beam, including the beam's position, size, shape, and intensity. One or more absorbers are constructed of thermo-resistive material and positioned to intercept and absorb a portion of the incoming beam power, thereby causing local heating of each absorber. The local temperature increase distribution across the absorber, or the distribution between different absorbers, will depend on the intensity, size, and position of the beam. The absorbers are constructed of a material having a strong dependence of electrical resistivity on temperature. The beam position detector has no moving parts in the vicinity of the beam and is especially suited to beam areas having high ionizing radiation dose rates or poor beam quality, including beams dispersed in the transverse direction and in their time radio frequency structure.

  20. Techniques for evaluation of e-beam evaporative processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, T.C.; Nelson, C.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to evaluate and characterize electron beam evaporative processes at LLNL have produced a number of techniques and capabilities which have proven useful in advancing the process understanding. One of these diagnostic tools, high dynamic range video imaging of the molten pool surface, has provided insight regarding process responses at the melt pool liquid-vapor interface. A water cooled video camera provides continuous high resolution imaging of the pool surface from a low angle position within 20 cm of the liquid-vapor interface. From this vantage point, the e-beam footprint is clearly defined and melt pool free surface shape can be observed. Effects of changes in e-beam footprint, power distribution and sweep frequency on pool surface shape and stability of vaporization are immediately shown. Other electron beam melting and vaporization events have been observed and recorded. These include: formation of the pool and dissipation of {open_quotes}rafts{close_quotes} on the pool surface during startup, behavior of feed material as it enters the pool, effects of feed configuration changes on the mixing of feed entering the pool volume and behaviors of co-evaporated materials of different vapor pressures at the feed/pool boundary. When used in conjunction with laser vapor monitoring capabilities (presented at the 1994 Electron Beam Melting and Refining Conference, Reno, NV), correlation between pool surface phenomena and vaporizer performance has been identified. This video capability was used in verifying the titanium evaporation model results presented at this conference by confirming the calculated melt pool surface deformations caused by vapor pressure of the departing evaporant at the liquid-vapor interface.

  1. High energy laser beam dump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Halpin, John (Tracy, CA)

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser beam dump is positioned in a housing. An absorbing glass plate means is operatively connected to the housing. A heat sync means for extracting heat from the absorbing glass plate means is operatively connected to the housing and operatively connected to the absorbing glass plate means.

  2. Accelerator beam profile analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Godel, Julius B. (Bayport, NY); Guillaume, Marcel (Grivegnee, BE); Lambrecht, Richard M. (East Quogue, NY); Withnell, Ronald (East Setauket, NY)

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A beam profile analyzer employing sector or quadrant plates each servo controlled to outline the edge of a beam.

  3. Investigation of a direction sensitive sapphire detector stack at the 5 GeV electron beam at DESY-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Karacheban; K. Afanaciev; M. Hempel; H. Henschel; W. Lange; J. L. Leonard; I. Levy; W. Lohmann; S. Schuwalow

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremely radiation hard sensors are needed in particle physics experiments to instrument the region near the beam pipe. Examples are beam halo and beam loss monitoring systems at the Large Hadron Collider, FLASH or XFEL. Artificial diamond sensors are currently widely used as sensors in these systems. In this paper single crystal sapphire sensors are considered as a promising alternative. Industrially grown sapphire wafers are available in large sizes, are of low cost and, like diamond sensors, can be operated without cooling. Here we present results of an irradiation study done with sapphire sensors in a high intensity low energy electron beam. Then, a multichannel direction-sensitive sapphire detector stack is described. It comprises 8 sapphire plates of 1 cm^2 size and 525 micrometer thickness, metallized on both sides, and apposed to form a stack. Each second metal layer is supplied with a bias voltage, and the layers in between are connected to charge-sensitive preamplifiers. The performance of the detector was studied in a 5 GeV electron beam. The charge collection efficiency of the sensors was measured as a function of the bias voltage. It rises with the voltage, reaching about 10 % at 950 V. The signal size obtained from an electron crossing the stack at this voltage is about 22000 e, where e is the unit charge. Using the EUDET beam telescope, beam electrons trajectories where reconstructed, allowing to determine the position of the hits on the detector. The signal size is measured as a function of the hit position, showing variations of up to 20 % in the direction perpendicular to the beam and to the electric field. The measurement of the signal size as a function of the coordinate parallel to the electric field confirms the prediction that mainly electrons contribute to the signal. Also evidence for the presence of a polarization field was observed.

  4. High speed x-ray beam chopper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McPherson, Armon (Oswego, IL); Mills, Dennis M. (Naperville, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast, economical, and compact x-ray beam chopper with a small mass and a small moment of inertia whose rotation can be synchronized and phase locked to an electronic signal from an x-ray source and be monitored by a light beam is disclosed. X-ray bursts shorter than 2.5 microseconds have been produced with a jitter time of less than 3 ns.

  5. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, J.D.

    1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments. 14 figs.

  6. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, Jonathan David (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments.

  7. Mass spectrometer with electron source for reducing space charge effects in sample beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houk, Robert S.; Praphairaksit, Narong

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass spectrometer includes an ion source which generates a beam including positive ions, a sampling interface which extracts a portion of the beam from the ion source to form a sample beam that travels along a path and has an excess of positive ions over at least part of the path, thereby causing space charge effects to occur in the sample beam due to the excess of positive ions in the sample beam, an electron source which adds electrons to the sample beam to reduce space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the sample beam, thereby reducing the space charge effects in the sample beam and producing a sample beam having reduced space charge effects, and a mass analyzer which analyzes the sample beam having reduced space charge effects.

  8. Beam Status

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms About Batteries Batteries An error occurred. TryRing CurrentBeam

  9. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historian ...BESFor Users LiveBattling birdBeam

  10. Beam History

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historian ...BESFor Users LiveBattlingBeam

  11. Beam geometry selection using sequential beam addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popple, Richard A., E-mail: rpopple@uabmc.edu; Brezovich, Ivan A.; Fiveash, John B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Alabama at Birmingham, 1720 2nd Avenue South, Birmingham, Alabama 35294 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The selection of optimal beam geometry has been of interest since the inception of conformal radiotherapy. The authors report on sequential beam addition, a simple beam geometry selection method, for intensity modulated radiation therapy. Methods: The sequential beam addition algorithm (SBA) requires definition of an objective function (score) and a set of candidate beam geometries (pool). In the first iteration, the optimal score is determined for each beam in the pool and the beam with the best score selected. In the next iteration, the optimal score is calculated for each beam remaining in the pool combined with the beam selected in the first iteration, and the best scoring beam is selected. The process is repeated until the desired number of beams is reached. The authors selected three treatment sites, breast, lung, and brain, and determined beam arrangements for up to 11 beams from a pool comprised of 25 equiangular transverse beams. For the brain, arrangements were additionally selected from a pool of 22 noncoplanar beams. Scores were determined for geometries comprised equiangular transverse beams (EQA), as well as two tangential beams for the breast case. Results: In all cases, SBA resulted in scores superior to EQA. The breast case had the strongest dependence on beam geometry, for which only the 7-beam EQA geometry had a score better than the two tangential beams, whereas all SBA geometries with more than two beams were superior. In the lung case, EQA and SBA scores monotonically improved with increasing number of beams; however, SBA required fewer beams to achieve scores equivalent to EQA. For the brain case, SBA with a coplanar pool was equivalent to EQA, while the noncoplanar pool resulted in slightly better scores; however, the dose-volume histograms demonstrated that the differences were not clinically significant. Conclusions: For situations in which beam geometry has a significant effect on the objective function, SBA can identify arrangements equivalent to equiangular geometries but using fewer beams. Furthermore, SBA provides the value of the objective function as the number of beams is increased, allowing the planner to select the minimal beam number that achieves the clinical goals. The method is simple to implement and could readily be incorporated into an existing optimization system.

  12. Respiratory correlated cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Zijp, Lambert; Remeijer, Peter; Herk, Marcel van [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital, Plesmanlaan 121, 1066 CX Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanner integrated with a linear accelerator is a powerful tool for image guided radiotherapy. Respiratory motion, however, induces artifacts in CBCT, while the respiratory correlated procedures, developed to reduce motion artifacts in axial and helical CT are not suitable for such CBCT scanners. We have developed an alternative respiratory correlated procedure for CBCT and evaluated its performance. This respiratory correlated CBCT procedure consists of retrospective sorting in projection space, yielding subsets of projections that each corresponds to a certain breathing phase. Subsequently, these subsets are reconstructed into a four-dimensional (4D) CBCT dataset. The breathing signal, required for respiratory correlation, was directly extracted from the 2D projection data, removing the need for an additional respiratory monitor system. Due to the reduced number of projections per phase, the contrast-to-noise ratio in a 4D scan reduced by a factor 2.6-3.7 compared to a 3D scan based on all projections. Projection data of a spherical phantom moving with a 3 and 5 s period with and without simulated breathing irregularities were acquired and reconstructed into 3D and 4D CBCT datasets. The positional deviations of the phantoms center of gravity between 4D CBCT and fluoroscopy were small: 0.13{+-}0.09 mm for the regular motion and 0.39{+-}0.24 mm for the irregular motion. Motion artifacts, clearly present in the 3D CBCT datasets, were substantially reduced in the 4D datasets, even in the presence of breathing irregularities, such that the shape of the moving structures could be identified more accurately. Moreover, the 4D CBCT dataset provided information on the 3D trajectory of the moving structures, absent in the 3D data. Considerable breathing irregularities, however, substantially reduces the image quality. Data presented for three different lung cancer patients were in line with the results obtained from the phantom study. In conclusion, we have successfully implemented a respiratory correlated CBCT procedure yielding a 4D dataset. With respiratory correlated CBCT on a linear accelerator, the mean position, trajectory, and shape of a moving tumor can be verified just prior to treatment. Such verification reduces respiration induced geometrical uncertainties, enabling safe delivery of 4D radiotherapy such as gated radiotherapy with small margins.

  13. Method For Enhanced Gas Monitoring In High Density Flow Streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Von Drasek, William A. (Oak Forest, IL); Mulderink, Kenneth A. (Countryside, IL); Marin, Ovidiu (Lisle, IL)

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for conducting laser absorption measurements in high temperature process streams having high levels of particulate matter is disclosed. An impinger is positioned substantially parallel to a laser beam propagation path and at upstream position relative to the laser beam. Beam shielding pipes shield the beam from the surrounding environment. Measurement is conducted only in the gap between the two shielding pipes where the beam propagates through the process gas. The impinger facilitates reduced particle presence in the measurement beam, resulting in improved SNR (signal-to-noise) and improved sensitivity and dynamic range of the measurement.

  14. Beam Size Measurement by Optical Diffraction Radiation and Laser System for Compton Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuyu Liu

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam diagnostics is an essential constituent of any accelerator, so that it is named as "organs of sense" or "eyes of the accelerator." Beam diagnostics is a rich field. A great variety of physical effects or physical principles are made use of in this field. Some devices are based on electro-magnetic influence by moving charges, such as faraday cups, beam transformers, pick-ups; Some are related to Coulomb interaction of charged particles with matter, such as scintillators, viewing screens, ionization chambers; Nuclear or elementary particle physics interactions happen in some other devices, like beam loss monitors, polarimeters, luminosity monitors; Some measure photons emitted by moving charges, such as transition radiation, synchrotron radiation monitors and diffraction radiation-which is the topic of the first part of this thesis; Also, some make use of interaction of particles with photons, such as laser wire and Compton polarimeters-which is the second part of my thesis. Diagnostics let us perceive what properties a beam has and how it behaves in a machine, give us guideline for commissioning, controlling the machine and indispensable parameters vital to physics experiments. In the next two decades, the research highlight will be colliders (TESLA, CLIC, JLC) and fourth-generation light sources (TESLA FEL, LCLS, Spring 8 FEL) based on linear accelerator. These machines require a new generation of accelerator with smaller beam, better stability and greater efficiency. Compared with those existing linear accelerators, the performance of next generation linear accelerator will be doubled in all aspects, such as 10 times smaller horizontal beam size, more than 10 times smaller vertical beam size and a few or more times higher peak power. Furthermore, some special positions in the accelerator have even more stringent requirements, such as the interaction point of colliders and wigglor of free electron lasers. Higher performance of these accelerators increases the difficulty of diagnostics. For most cases, intercepting measurements are no longer acceptable, and nonintercepting method like synchrotron radiation monitor can not be applied to linear accelerators. The development of accelerator technology asks for simutanous diagnostics innovations, to expand the performance of diagnostic tools to meet the requirements of the next generation accelerators. Diffraction radiation and inverse Compton scattering are two of the most promising techniques, their nonintercepting nature avoids perturbance to the beam and damage to the instrumentation. This thesis is divided into two parts, beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation and Laser system for Compton polarimeter. Diffraction radiation, produced by the interaction between the electric field of charged particles and the target, is related to transition radiation. Even though the theory of diffraction radiation has been discussed since 1960s, there are only a few experimental studies in recent years. The successful beam size measurement by optical diffraction radiation at CEBAF machine is a milestone: First of all, we have successfully demonstrated diffraction radiation as an effective nonintercepting diagnostics; Secondly, the simple linear relationship between the diffraction radiation image size and the actual beam size improves the reliability of ODR measurements; And, we measured the polarized components of diffraction radiation for the first time and I analyzed the contribution from edge radiation to diffraction radiation.

  15. Ion Monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for significantly reducing capacitance effects in detector electrodes arising due to movement of the instrument relative to the item/location being monitored in ion detection based techniques. The capacitance variations are rendered less significant by placing an electrically conducting element between the detector electrodes and the monitored location/item. Improved sensitivity and reduced noise signals arise as a result. The technique also provides apparatus and method suitable for monitoring elongate items which are unsuited to complete enclosure in one go within a chamber. The items are monitored part by part as the pass through the instrument, so increasing the range of items or locations which can be successfully monitored.

  16. Measurement of transmission efficiency for 400 MeV proton beam through collimator at Fermilab MuCool Test Area using Chromox-6 scintillation screen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jana, M. R.; Chung, M.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Palmer, M.; Schwarz, T.; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Freemire, B.; Hanlet, P.; Torun, Y. [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, Illinois 60616 (United States)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, feasibility studies of various types of RF cavities in a high magnetic field environment are in progress. As a unique approach, we have tested a RF cavity filled with a high pressure hydrogen gas with a 400 MeV proton beam in an external magnetic field (B = 3 T). Quantitative information about the number of protons passing through this cavity is an essential requirement of the beam test. The MTA is a flammable gas (hydrogen) hazard zone. Due to safety reasons, no active (energized) beam diagnostic instrument can be used. Moreover, when the magnetic field is on, current transformers (toroids) used for beam intensity measurements do not work due to the saturation of the ferrite material of the transformer. Based on these requirements, we have developed a passive beam diagnostic instrumentation using a combination of a Chromox-6 scintillation screen and CCD camera. This paper describes details of the beam profile and position obtained from the CCD image with B = 0 T and B = 3 T, and for high and low intensity proton beams. A comparison is made with beam size obtained from multi-wires detector. Beam transmission efficiency through a collimator with a 4 mm diameter hole is measured by the toroids and CCD image of the scintillation screen. Results show that the transmission efficiency estimated from the CCD image is consistent with the toroid measurement, which enables us to monitor the beam transmission efficiency even in a high magnetic field environment.

  17. Electrostatic monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Cumbria, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Cumbria, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Cumbria, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide a technique for more simply measuring alpha and/or beta emissions arising from items or locations. The technique uses indirect monitoring of the emissions by detecting ions generated by the emissions, the ions being attracted electrostatically to electrodes for discharge of collection. The apparatus and method employ a chamber which is sealed around the item or location during monitoring with no air being drawn into or expelled from the chamber during the monitoring process. A simplified structure and operations arises as a result, but without impairing the efficiency and accuracy of the detection technique.

  18. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  19. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A; Beloussov, Alexandre V; Bakir, Julide; Armon, Deganit; Olsen, Howard B; Salem, Dana

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  20. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Redlands, CA); Olsen, Howard B. (Colton, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  1. Proton beam therapy control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baumann, Michael A. (Riverside, CA); Beloussov, Alexandre V. (San Bernardino, CA); Bakir, Julide (Alta Loma, CA); Armon, Deganit (Longmeadow, MA); Olsen, Howard B. (Irvine, CA); Salem, Dana (Riverside, CA)

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A tiered communications architecture for managing network traffic in a distributed system. Communication between client or control computers and a plurality of hardware devices is administered by agent and monitor devices whose activities are coordinated to reduce the number of open channels or sockets. The communications architecture also improves the transparency and scalability of the distributed system by reducing network mapping dependence. The architecture is desirably implemented in a proton beam therapy system to provide flexible security policies which improve patent safety and facilitate system maintenance and development.

  2. Techniques for evaluation of E-beam evaporative processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, T.C.; Nelson, C.M.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High dynamic range video imaging of the molten pool surface has provided insight regarding process responses at the melt pool liquid-vapor interface. A water-cooled video camera provides continuous high resolution imaging of the pool surface from a low angle position within 20 cm of the liquid-vapor interface. From the vantage point, the e-beam footprint is clearly defined and melt pool free surface shape can be observed. Effects of changes in a beam footprint, power distribution, and sweep frequency on pool surface shape and stability of vaporization are immediately shown. Other events observed and recorded include: formation of the pool and dissipation of ``rafts`` on the pool surface during startup, behavior of feed material as it enters the pool, effects of feed configuration changes on mixing of feed entering the pool volume and behaviors of co-evaporated materials of different vapor pressures at the feed/pool boundary. When used in conjunction with laser vapor monitoring, correlation between pool surface phenomena and vaporizer performance has been identified. This video capability was used in verifying the titanium evaporation model results presented at this conference by confirming the calculated melt pool surface deformations caused by vapor pressure of the departing evaporant at the liquid-vapor interface.

  3. Monte Carlo Simulations of Beam Losses in the Test Beam Line of CTF3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebot Del Busto, E; Branger, E; Holzer, E B; Doebert, S; Lillestol, R L; Welsch, C P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Test Beam Line (TBL) of the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) aims to validate the drive beam deceleration concept of CLIC, in which the RF power requested to boost particles to multi-TeV energies is obtained via deceleration of a high current and low energy drive beam (DB). Despite a TBL beam energy (150-80 MeV) significantly lower than the minimum nominal energy of the CLIC DB (250 MeV), the pulse time structure of the TBL provides the opportunity to measure beam losses with CLIC-like DB timing conditions. In this contribution, a simulation study on the detection of beam losses along the TBL for the commissioning of the recently installed beam loss monitoring system is presented. The most likely loss locations during stable beam conditions are studied by considering the beam envelope defined by the FODO lattice as well as the emittance growth due to the deceleration process. Moreover, the optimization of potential detector locations is discussed. Several factors are considered, namely: the distance to the bea...

  4. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  5. Relating to monitoring ion sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Christopher Henry (Calderbridge, GB); Luff, Craig Janson (Calderbridge, GB); Dockray, Thomas (Calderbridge, GB); Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John Alan (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The apparatus and method provide techniques for monitoring the position on alpha contamination in or on items or locations. The technique is particularly applicable to pipes, conduits and other locations to which access is difficult. The technique uses indirect monitoring of alpha emissions by detecting ions generated by the alpha emissions. The medium containing the ions is moved in a controlled manner frog in proximity with the item or location to the detecting unit and the signals achieved over time are used to generate alpha source position information.

  6. Slit disk for modified faraday cup diagnostic for determining power density of electron and ion beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA); Elmer; John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (State College, PA)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A diagnostic system for characterization of an electron beam or an ion beam includes an electrical conducting disk of refractory material having a circumference, a center, and a Faraday cup assembly positioned to receive the electron beam or ion beam. At least one slit in the disk provides diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam. The at least one slit is located between the circumference and the center of the disk and includes a radial portion that is in radial alignment with the center and a portion that deviates from radial alignment with the center. The electron beam or ion beam is directed onto the disk and translated to the at least one slit wherein the electron beam or ion beam enters the at least one slit for providing diagnostic characterization of the electron beam or ion beam.

  7. The STAR Vertex Position Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Llope; J. Zhou; T. Nussbaum; G. W. Hoffmann; K. Asselta; J. D. Brandenburg; J. Butterworth; T. Camarda; W. Christie; H. J. Crawford; X. Dong; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; F. Geurts; J. Hammond; E. Judd; D. L. McDonald; C. Perkins; L. Ruan; J. Scheblein; J. J. Schambach; R. Soja; K. Xin; C. Yang

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2x3 channel pseudo Vertex Position Detector (pVPD) in the STAR experiment at RHIC has been upgraded to a 2x19 channel detector in the same acceptance, called the Vertex Position Detector (VPD). This detector is fully integrated into the STAR trigger system and provides the primary input to the minimum-bias trigger in Au+Au collisions. The information from the detector is used both in the STAR Level-0 trigger and offline to measure the location of the primary collision vertex along the beam pipe and the event "start time" needed by other fast-timing detectors in STAR. The offline timing resolution of single detector channels in full-energy Au+Au collisions is ~100 ps, resulting in a start time resolution of a few tens of picoseconds and a resolution on the primary vertex location of ~1 cm.

  8. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

  9. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

  10. Quantitative experiments with electrons in a positively charged Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phys. Plasmas 12, P. K. Roy, S. S. Yu, E. Henestroza, etLett. 95, 234801 (2005). P. K. Roy, S. S. Yu, S. Eylon, etW. Molvik, L. Prost, P. K. Roy, P. A. Seidl, G. Westenskow,

  11. BEAMS3D Neutral Beam Injection Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazerson, Samuel

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of applied 3D fi elds in Tokamaks and modern high performance stellarators, a need has arisen to address non-axisymmetric effects on neutral beam heating and fueling. We report on the development of a fully 3D neutral beam injection (NBI) model, BEAMS3D, which addresses this need by coupling 3D equilibria to a guiding center code capable of modeling neutral and charged particle trajectories across the separatrix and into the plasma core. Ionization, neutralization, charge-exchange, viscous velocity reduction, and pitch angle scattering are modeled with the ADAS atomic physics database [1]. Benchmark calculations are presented to validate the collisionless particle orbits, neutral beam injection model, frictional drag, and pitch angle scattering effects. A calculation of neutral beam heating in the NCSX device is performed, highlighting the capability of the code to handle 3D magnetic fields.

  12. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    interactions, ultra-high intensity lasers, 3D Laser Imagingconcepts, ultra-high intensity lasers, x-ray generation,interests: Ultra-high vacuum, particle beam and laser beam

  13. Electron-beam furnace with magnetic stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harker, H.R.; Knecht, J.A. II

    1986-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an electron-beam comprising: a. An evacuable chamber having a port for coupling the chamber to vacuum pump means; b. a trough-shaped hearth within the chamber for holding material to be melted, the hearth having a spout for issuing a flow of molten material therefrom; c. a crucible positioned within the chamber for receiving molten material flowing from the hearth; d. one or more electron guns each for producing an energetic beam of electrons, each electron gun being positioned a relatively large distance away from the hearth and the crucible; e. magnetic beam deflection means forming an integral part of each electron gun for scanning and shaping the beam produced thereby across the hearth or the crucible; and f. magnetic means adjacent to the hearth and the crucible for producing a relatively weak magnetic field in the vicinity of the hearth and the crucible for preventing erratic deflections of the scanning electron beams without significantly altering the trajectories of such beams.

  14. High power linear pulsed beam annealer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strathman, Michael D. (Concord, CA); Sadana, Devendra K. (Berkeley, CA); True, Richard B. (Sunnyvale, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high power pulsed electron beam is produced in a system comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid, focus ring, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube is maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring and to thereby eliminate space charge. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube and imparts motion on electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. The curvature of the tube is selected so there is no line of sight between the cathode and a target holder positioned within a second drift tube spaced coaxially from the curved tube. The second tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage that decelerates the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube and compresses the electron beam to the area of the target. The target holder can be adjusted to position the target where the cross section of the beam matches the area of the target.

  15. Center for Beam Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FEL Collaboration: Photocathode/SCRF Collaboration: Two-BeamUniversity on Photocathode/ SCRF technology, LBNL-BNL on

  16. Beam Dynamics for ARIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam dynamics issues are assessed for a new linear induction electron accelerator being designed for flash radiography of large explosively driven hydrodynamic experiments. Special attention is paid to equilibrium beam transport, possible emittance growth, and beam stability. It is concluded that a radiographic quality beam will be produced possible if engineering standards and construction details are equivalent to those on the present radiography accelerators at Los Alamos.

  17. DEVICE CONTROL TOOL FOR CEBAF BEAM DIAGNOSTICS SOFTWARE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavel Chevtsov

    2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuously monitoring the beam quality in the CEBAF accelerator, a variety of beam diagnostics software created at Jefferson Lab makes a significant contribution to very high availability of the machine for nuclear physics experiments. The interface between this software and beam instrumentation hardware components is provided by a device control tool, which is optimized for beam diagnostics tasks. As a part of the device/driver development framework at Jefferson Lab, this tool is very easy to support and extend to integrate new beam instrumentation components. All device control functions are based on the configuration (ASCII text) files that completely define the used hardware interface standards (CAMAC, VME, RS-232, GPIB, etc.) and communication protocols. The paper presents the main elements of the device control tool for beam diagnostics software at Jefferson Lab.

  18. Beam Test of a Segmented Foil SEM Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kopp; D. Indurthy; Z. Pavlovich; M. Proga; R. Zwaska; S. Childress; R. Ford; C. Kendziora; T. Kobilarcik; C. Moore; G. Tassotto

    2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototype Secondary-electron Emission Monitor (SEM) was installed in the 8 GeV proton transport line for the MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab. The SEM is a segmented grid made with 5 um Ti foils, intended for use in the 120 GeV NuMI beam at Fermilab. Similar to previous workers, we found that the full collection of the secondary electron signal requires a bias voltage to draw the ejected electrons cleanly off the foils, and this effect is more pronounced at larger beam intensity. The beam centroid and width resolutions of the SEM were measured at beam widths of 3, 7, and 8 mm, and compared to calculations. Extrapolating the data from this beam test, we expect a centroid and width resolutions of 20um and 25 um, respectively, in the NuMI beam which has 1 mm spot size.

  19. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  20. Positional reference system for ultraprecision machining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jones B. (Knoxville, TN); Burleson, Robert R. (Clinton, TN); Pardue, Robert M. (Knoxville, TN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stable positional reference system for use in improving the cutting tool-to-part contour position in numerical controlled-multiaxis metal turning machines is provided. The reference system employs a plurality of interferometers referenced to orthogonally disposed metering bars which are substantially isolated from machine strain induced position errors for monitoring the part and tool positions relative to the metering bars. A microprocessor-based control system is employed in conjunction with the plurality of position interferometers and part contour description data inputs to calculate error components for each axis of movement and output them to corresponding axis drives with appropriate scaling and error compensation. Real-time position control, operating in combination with the reference system, makes possible the positioning of the cutting points of a tool along a part locus with a substantially greater degree of accuracy than has been attained previously in the art by referencing and then monitoring only the tool motion relative to a reference position located on the machine base.

  1. Positional reference system for ultraprecision machining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arnold, J.B.; Burleson, R.R.; Pardue, R.M.

    1980-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A stable positional reference system for use in improving the cutting tool-to-part contour position in numerical controlled-multiaxis metal turning machines is provided. The reference system employs a plurality of interferometers referenced to orthogonally disposed metering bars which are substantially isolated from machine strain induced position errors for monitoring the part and tool positions relative to the metering bars. A microprocessor-based control system is employed in conjunction with the plurality of positions interferometers and part contour description data input to calculate error components for each axis of movement and output them to corresponding axis driven with appropriate scaling and error compensation. Real-time position control, operating in combination with the reference system, makes possible the positioning of the cutting points of a tool along a part locus with a substantially greater degree of accuracy than has been attained previously in the art by referencing and then monitoring only the tool motion relative to a reference position located on the machine base.

  2. Apparatus and method for monitoring of gas having stable isotopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clegg, Samuel M; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna E

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas having stable isotopes is monitored continuously by using a system that sends a modulated laser beam to the gas and collects and transmits the light not absorbed by the gas to a detector. Gas from geological storage, or from the atmosphere can be monitored continuously without collecting samples and transporting them to a lab.

  3. Tritium monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

  4. Tritium monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, P.

    1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

  5. Linear Tuning and Estimates for the Initial Beam Based Alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the magnetic centre of the magnets with respect to the local BPM (i.e. determination of BPM offsets), and 2 is "zeroed" at each down stream BPM. The position of the beam with respect to the magnet centres is then given by the accuracy to which the BPM offset was determined (point 1 above.) After beam-based alignment

  6. arranged transverse beams: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    motion within the SPS proton bunches, captured and accelerated in a 200 MHz bucket. We present the electro-magnetic design of transverse beam position pick-up options...

  7. Position estimation of transceivers in communication networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kent, Claudia A. (Pleasanton, CA); Dowla, Farid (Castro Valley, CA)

    2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention provides a system and method using wireless communication interfaces coupled with statistical processing of time-of-flight data to locate by position estimation unknown wireless receivers. Such an invention can be applied in sensor network applications, such as environmental monitoring of water in the soil or chemicals in the air where the position of the network nodes is deemed critical. Moreover, the present invention can be arranged to operate in areas where a Global Positioning System (GPS) is not available, such as inside buildings, caves, and tunnels.

  8. The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spädtke, Peter, E-mail: p.spaedtke@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)] [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

  9. Study on electron beam in a low energy plasma focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Muhammad Zubair, E-mail: mzubairkhan-um76@yahoo.com [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Department of Physics, Federal Urdu University of Arts, Science and Technology, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan); Ling, Yap Seong; San, Wong Chiow [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam emission was investigated in a low energy plasma focus device (2.2 kJ) using copper hollow anode. Faraday cup was used to estimate the energy of the electron beam. XR100CR X-ray spectrometer was used to explore the impact of the electron beam on the target observed from top-on and side-on position. Experiments were carried out at optimized pressure of argon gas. The impact of electron beam is exceptionally notable with two different approaches using lead target inside hollow anode in our plasma focus device.

  10. Simulation of BPM and DC-monitor assembly for the NESTOR storage ring by CST Studio Suite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Androsov, V P; Telegin, Yu N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The piece of NESTOR vacuum chamber with the ceramic insertion for DC-monitor and RF-shields was simulated by using both transient and wake field solvers of CST Studio Suite. For a 6 mm gap between two RF-shields the contributions of the assembly considered to the longitudinal broadband (BB) impedance Z/n and the loss factor kloss are 0.71 Ohm and 0.21 V/pC, correspondingly. These estimates are the second largest after those of the RF-cavity that were obtained till now for the NESTOR ring components. Contributions from a beam position monitor (BPM) are also obtained by simulation and compared with analytical estimates obtained earlier. We also present in the paper the frequency content of longitudinal impedance in the frequency range from 0 to 16 GHz for all ring components considered.

  11. Drift distance survey in DPIS for high current beam production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanesue,T.; Okamura, M.; Kondo, K.; Tamura, J.; Kashiwagi, H.; Zhang, Z.

    2009-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In a laser ion source, plasma drift distance is one of the most important design parameters. Ion current density and beam pulse width are defined by plasma drift distance between laser target and beam extraction position. In direct plasma injection scheme (DPIS), which uses a laser ion source and Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) linac, we can apply relatively higher electric field at the beam extraction due to the unique shape of a positively biased electrode. However, when we aim at very high current acceleration like several tens of mA, we observed mismatched beam extraction conditions. We tested three different ion current at ion extraction region by changing plasma drift distance to study better extraction condition. In this experiment, C{sup 6+} beam was accelerated. We confirmed that the matching condition can be improved by controlling plasma drift distance.

  12. Patient Positioning Based on a Radioactive Tracer Implanted in Patients With Localized Prostate Cancer: A Performance and Safety Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruijf, Willy J.M. de, E-mail: kruijf.de.w@bvi.nl [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Verstraete, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Neustadter, David [Navotek Medical Ltd, Yokneam (Israel)] [Navotek Medical Ltd, Yokneam (Israel); Corn, Benjamin W. [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel)] [Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Hol, Sandra; Venselaar, Jack L.M. [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands); Davits, Rob J.; Wijsman, Bart P. [TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [TweeSteden Hospital, Tilburg (Netherlands); Van den Bergh, Laura; Budiharto, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Oyen, Raymond [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Haustermans, Karin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Poortmans, Philip M.P. [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)] [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands)

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate the performance and safety of a radiation therapy positioning system (RealEye) based on tracking a radioactive marker (Tracer) implanted in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a single-arm multi-institutional trial in 20 patients. The iridium-192 ({sup 192}Ir)-containing Tracer was implanted in the patient together with 4 standard gold seed fiducials. Patient prostate-related symptoms were evaluated with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire. Computed tomography (CT) was performed for treatment planning, during treatment, and after treatment to evaluate the migration stability of the Tracer. At 5 treatment sessions, cone beam CT was performed to test the positioning accuracy of the RealEye. Results: The Tracer was successfully implanted in all patients. No device or procedure-related adverse events occurred. Changes in IPSS scores were limited. The difference between the mean change in Tracer-fiducial distance and the mean change in fiducial-fiducial distance was -0.39 mm (95% confidence interval [CI] upper boundary, -0.22 mm). The adjusted mean difference between Tracer position according to RealEye and the Tracer position on the CBCT for all patients was 1.34 mm (95% CI upper boundary, 1.41 mm). Conclusions: Implantation of the Tracer is feasible and safe. Migration stability of the Tracer is good. Prostate patients can be positioned and monitored accurately by using RealEye.

  13. Electromagnetic Tracking of Intrafraction Prostate Displacement in Patients Externally Immobilized in the Prone Position

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bittner, Nathan [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, WA (United States); Butler, Wayne M.; Reed, Joshua L.; Murray, Brian C.; Kurko, Brian S. [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.or [Schiffler Cancer Center and Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate intrafraction prostate displacement among patients immobilized in the prone position using real-time monitoring of implanted radiofrequency transponders. Methods and Materials: The Calypso localization system was used to track prostate motion in patients receiving external beam radiation therapy (XRT) for prostate cancer. All patients were treated in the prone position and immobilized with a thermoplastic immobilization device. Real-time measurement of prostate displacement was recorded for each treatment fraction. These measurements were used to determine the duration and magnitude of displacement along the three directional axes. Results: The calculated centroid of the implanted transponders was offset from the treatment isocenter by >=2 mm, >=3 mm, and >=4 mm for 38.0%, 13.9%, and 4.5% of the time. In the lateral dimension, the centroid was offset from the treatment isocenter by >=2 mm, >=3 mm, and >=4 mm for 2.7%, 0.4%, and 0.06% of the time. In the superior-inferior dimension, the centroid was offset from the treatment isocenter by >=2 mm, >=3 mm, and >=4 mm for 16.1%, 4.7%, and 1.5% of the time, respectively. In the anterior-posterior dimension, the centroid was offset from the treatment isocenter by >=2 mm, >=3 mm, and >=4 mm for 13.4%, 3.0%, and 0.5% of the time. Conclusions: Intrafraction prostate displacement in the prone position is comparable to that in the supine position. For patients with large girth, in whom the supine position may preclude accurate detection of implanted radiofrequency transponders, treatment in the prone position is a suitable alternative.

  14. Methods of Beam Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, A. M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Optical Stochastic Cooling", presented at PAC, (1995).1991). Hangst, J. , "Laser Cooling of a Stored Ion Beam - ATheorem and Phase Space Cooling", Proceedings of the

  15. Broad beam ion implanter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

  16. Courses on Beam Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is an incomplete listing of course available for beam physics. United States Particle Accelerator School The US Particle Accelerator School provides educational programs in the...

  17. JOB DESCRIPTION POSITION DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    JOB DESCRIPTION POSITION DATA Position Number: Title Description: Title Code: Title Level: Employee: _____ Job Summary: Overview of position and its purpose. Select One Select One Select One Select One Select One Select One Select One Select One Select One Select One #12;Office of Human Resource Management Job

  18. Temescal FC-2000 Electron Beam Evaporator CORAL NAME = EbeamFP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, Rafael

    Temescal FC-2000 Electron Beam Evaporator CORAL NAME = EbeamFP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE immediately, via CORAL. Operating the System 1. Engage the machine in Coral 2. From the Monitor's main Screen

  19. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bogomilov, M. [University of Sofia (Bulgaria); et al.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  20. The MICE Muon Beam on ISIS and the beam-line instrumentation of the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MICE Collaboration

    2012-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The international Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), which is under construction at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL), will demonstrate the principle of ionization cooling as a technique for the reduction of the phase-space volume occupied by a muon beam. Ionization cooling channels are required for the Neutrino Factory and the Muon Collider. MICE will evaluate in detail the performance of a single lattice cell of the Feasibility Study 2 cooling channel. The MICE Muon Beam has been constructed at the ISIS synchrotron at RAL, and in MICE Step I, it has been characterized using the MICE beam-instrumentation system. In this paper, the MICE Muon Beam and beam-line instrumentation are described. The muon rate is presented as a function of the beam loss generated by the MICE target dipping into the ISIS proton beam. For a 1 V signal from the ISIS beam-loss monitors downstream of our target we obtain a 30 KHz instantaneous muon rate, with a neglible pion contamination in the beam.

  1. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  2. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  3. Miniature modified Faraday cup for micro electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA); Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (Livermore, CA); Walton, Chris C. (Berkeley, CA)

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro beam Faraday cup assembly includes a refractory metal layer with an odd number of thin, radially positioned traces in this refractory metal layer. Some of the radially positioned traces are located at the edge of the micro modified Faraday cup body and some of the radially positioned traces are located in the central portion of the micro modified Faraday cup body. Each set of traces is connected to a separate data acquisition channel to form multiple independent diagnostic networks. The data obtained from the two diagnostic networks are combined and inputted into a computed tomography algorithm to reconstruct the beam shape, size, and power density distribution.

  4. Refrigeration monitor and alarm system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branz, M.A.; Renaud, P.F.

    1986-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitor is described for a refrigeration system including a heat reclaiming system coupled therewith, comprising: a sensor positioned to detect the level of liquid state refrigerant in the system and provide an electrical output signal therefrom; a digital display for displaying the refrigerant level; first circuit means coupling the digital display to the sensor for actuating the digital display; and lockout means coupled with the sensor for deactivating the heat reclaiming system when a preselected refrigerant level is reached.

  5. First Beam to FACET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, R.; Clarke, C.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.; Kalsi, S.; Lipkowitz, N.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; Schuh, P.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, H.; Smith, T.; Stanek, M.; Turner, J.; Warren, J.; Weathersby, S.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been reconfigured to provide a beam of electrons to the new Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) while simultaneously providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). On June 23, 2011, the first electron beam was transported through this new facility. Commissioning of FACET is in progress. On June 23, 2011, an electron beam was successfully transported through the new FACET system to a dump in Sector 20 in the linac tunnel. This was achieved while the last third of the linac, operating from the same control room, but with a separate injector system, was providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), demonstrating that concurrent operation of the two facilities is practical. With the initial checkout of the new transport line essentially complete, attention is now turning toward compressing the electron bunches longitudinally and focusing them transversely to support a variety of accelerator science experiments.

  6. Steam trap monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, M.J.

    1987-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (a hot finger) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellow in providing an indication of total energy (steam + condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the hot and cold fingers subtracts the former from the latter to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning. 2 figs.

  7. STOCHASTIC COOLING OF BUNCHED BEAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bisognano, J.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    March 11-13, 1981 STOCHASTIC COOLING OF BUNCHED BEAMS J.J.W-7406-BW-48 STOCHASTIC COOLING OF BUNCHED BEAMS* J.J.longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched particle beams.

  8. Operational experience with synchrotron light interferometers for CEBAF experimental beam lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavel Chevtsov

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam size and energy spread monitoring systems based on Synchrotron Light Interferometers (SLI) have been in operations at Jefferson Lab for several years. A non-invasive nature and a very high (a few mm) resolution of SLI make these instruments valuable beam diagnostic tools for the CEBAF accelerator. This presentation describes the evolution of the Synchrotron Light Interferometer at Jefferson Lab and highlights our extensive experience in the installation and operation of the SLI for CEBAF experimental beam lines.

  9. Synchrotron radiation based beam diagnostics at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thurman-Keup, R.; Cheung, H. W.K.; Hahn, A.; Hurh, P.; Lorman, E.; Lundberg, C.; Meyer, T.; Miller, D.; Pordes, S.; Valishev, A.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation has been used for many years as a beam diagnostic at electron accelerators. It is not normally associated with proton accelerators as the intensity of the radiation is too weak to make detection practical. However, if one utilizes the radiation originating near the edge of a bending magnet, or from a short magnet, the rapidly changing magnetic field serves to enhance the wavelengths shorter than the cutoff wavelength, which for more recent high energy proton accelerators such as Fermilab's Tevatron, tends to be visible light. This paper discusses the implementation at the Tevatron of two devices. A transverse beam profile monitor images the synchrotron radiation coming from the proton and antiproton beams separately and provides profile data for each bunch. A second monitor measures the low-level intensity of beam in the abort gaps which poses a danger to both the accelerator's superconducting magnets and the silicon detectors of the high energy physics experiments. Comparisons of measurements from the profile monitor to measurements from the flying wire profile systems are presented as are a number of examples of the application of the profile and abort gap intensity measurements to the modelling of Tevatron beam dynamics.

  10. Position Management and Classification

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes Departmental requirements and responsibilities for classifying positions using the General Schedule (GS) and the Federal Wage System (FWS) standards.

  11. Fourier relationship between angular position and optical orbital angular momentum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Yao; Sonja Franke-Arnold; Johannes Courtial; Stephen Barnett; Miles Padgett

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the Fourier relationship between angular position and angular momentum for a light mode. In particular we measure the distribution of orbital angular momentum states of light that has passed through an aperture and verify that the orbital angular momentum distribution is given by the complex Fourier-transform of the aperture function. We use spatial light modulators, configured as diffractive optical components, to define the initial orbital angular momentum state of the beam, set the defining aperture, and measure the angular momentum spread of the resulting beam. These measurements clearly confirm the Fourier relationship between angular momentum and angular position, even at light intensities corresponding to the single photon level.

  12. Patient position verification using small IMRT fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bol, G. H.; Heide, U. A. van der; Nederveen, A. J.; Kotte, A. N. T. J.; Lagendijk, J. J. W. [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A commonly used approach to quantify and minimize patient setup errors is by using electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs). The position of the tumor can be verified indirectly by matching the bony anatomy to a reference image containing the same structures. In this paper we present two off-line methods for detecting the position of the bony anatomy automatically, even if every single portal image of each segment of an IMRT treatment beam contains insufficient matching information. Extra position verification fields will no longer be necessary, which reduces the total dose to the patient. The first method, the stack matching method (SMM), stacks the portal image of each segment of a beam to a three dimensional (3D) volume, and this volume is subsequently used during the matching phase. The second method [the averaged projection matching method (APMM)], is a simplification of the first one, since the initially created volume is reduced again to a 2D artificial image, which speeds up the matching procedure considerably, without a significant loss of accuracy. Matching is based on normalized mutual information. We demonstrate our methods by comparing them to existing matching routines, such as matching based on the largest segment. Both phantom and patient experiments show that our methods are comparable with the results obtained from standard position verification methods. The matches are verified by means of visual inspection. Furthermore, we show that when a distinct area of 40-60 cm{sup 2} of the EPID is exposed during one treatment beam, both SMM and APMM are able to deliver a good matching result.

  13. Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

  14. Ion beam lithography system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A maskless plasma-formed ion beam lithography tool provides for patterning of sub-50 nm features on large area flat or curved substrate surfaces. The system is very compact and does not require an accelerator column and electrostatic beam scanning components. The patterns are formed by switching beamlets on or off from a two electrode blanking system with the substrate being scanned mechanically in one dimension. This arrangement can provide a maskless nano-beam lithography tool for economic and high throughput processing.

  15. Optical Beam Timing Monitor Experiments at the Advanced Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Wilcox, Rusell; Yan, Yin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    compensated fiber TT>- -T BPM (Z~ Fig.2. Experimental setuplocked Laser E.O. Mod. BPM Scope PD Fig.4. Block diagram ofpossible bandwidth out of our BPM's. INITIAL E X P E R I M E

  16. Positioning and locking apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayward, M.L.; Harper, W.H.

    1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A positioning and locking apparatus including a fixture having a rotatable torque ring provided with a plurality of cam segments for automatically guiding a container into a desired location within the fixture. Rotation of the ring turns the container into a final position in pressure sealing relation against a hatch member.

  17. Position Management and Classification

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes departmental requirements and responsibilities for classifying positions using general schedule (GS) and federal wage system (FWS) standards and for developing and administering a sound position management and classification program within the Department. Cancels Chapter VII of DOE O 320.1.

  18. System for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheldon, P.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary or rotating substrates includes a combination of some or all of the elements including a photodiode sensor for detecting the intensity of incoming light and converting it to a measurable current, a lens for focusing the RHEED pattern emanating from the phosphor screen onto the photodiode, an interference filter for filtering out light other than that which emanates from the phosphor screen, a current amplifier for amplifying and convening the current produced by the photodiode into a voltage, a computer for receiving the amplified photodiode current for RHEED data analysis, and a graphite impregnated triaxial cable for improving the signal to noise ratio obtained while sampling a stationary or rotating substrate. A rotating stage for supporting the substrate with diametrically positioned electron beam apertures and an optically encoded shaft can also be used to accommodate rotation of the substrate during measurement. 16 figs.

  19. System for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheldon, P.

    1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for monitoring the growth of crystalline films on stationary or rotating substrates includes a combination of some or all of the elements including a photodiode sensor for detecting the intensity of incoming light and converting it to a measurable current, a lens for focusing the RHEED pattern emanating from the phosphor screen onto the photodiode, an interference filter for filtering out light other than that which emanates from the phosphor screen, a current amplifier for amplifying and converting the current produced by the photodiode into a voltage, a computer for receiving the amplified photodiode current for RHEED data analysis, and a graphite impregnated triaxial cable for improving the signal-to-noise ratio obtained while sampling a stationary or rotating substrate. A rotating stage for supporting the substrate with diametrically positioned electron beam apertures and an optically encoded shaft can also be used to accommodate rotation of the substrate during measurement. 16 figs.

  20. Coherent beam-beam mode in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffat, X; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; White, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of single bunch beam-beam coherent modes during dedicated experiments in the LHC are presented. Their role in standard operation for physics is discussed and, in particular, candidates of beam-beam coherent mode driven unstable by the machine impedance are presented.

  1. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  2. Focused ion beam system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  3. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  4. LHC beam behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herr, W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt is made to extract information on the LHC beam behaviour and dynamics from the observations made during the first runs in 2009. Although no systematic studies have been made, some basic properties can be established and in particular the observations in the presence of two beams and in collision are studied. They are analyzed in view of the foreseen runs at higher energy and possible improvements are proposed.

  5. Circular modes for flat beams in the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burov, A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typically x/y optical coupling is considered as unwanted and thus suppressed; particular exclusions are electron and ionization coolers. Could some special coupled modes be effectively applied for the LHC complex? Perhaps, the answer is positive: use of the circular modes in the injectors with their transformation into planar modes in the LHC allows both the space charge and beam-beam luminosity limitations to be significantly reduced, if not practically eliminated.

  6. Real-time monitoring of homoepitaxial and heteroepitaxial processes by p-polarized reflectance spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietz, Nikolaus

    of heteroepitaxial and the homoepitaxial growth. Tertiary-butylphosphine TBP and triethylgallium TEG beams of the epilayer due to the pyrolysis of the TBP and TEG molecules.1 For the real-time monitoring of GaP growth we

  7. Single element laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

  8. Sustainability Peer Educator Positions Position: Sustainability Peer Educator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonstra, Rudy

    Sustainability Peer Educator Positions Position: Sustainability Peer Educator Available Positions 2013 ­ April 2014 Position Summary: Working with the Sustainability Project Coordinator, this team of students will be responsible for enhancing and educating UTSC students, staff and faculty on sustainability

  9. HP Steam Trap Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascone, S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STEAM MONITORING HP Steam Trap Monitoring HP Steam Trap Monitoring ? 12-18 months payback! ? 3-5% permanent reduction in consumption ? LEED Pt.? Innovation in Operations EB O&M ? Saved clients over $1,000,000 Annual consumption... Steam Trap Monitoring ? Real-time monitoring for high-pressure critical traps (>15 PSIG) ? Average total system cost $25K - $50K ? Web-Based or Modbus/BMS Integration Basic Installation Wireless Signal Transmitter Receiver Repeater...

  10. Measurement of Neutral Particle Contamination in the MICE Muon Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rob Roy Fletcher; Linda Coney; Gail Hanson

    2011-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is being built at the ISIS proton synchrotron at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) to measure ionization cooling of a muon beam. During recent data-taking, it was determined that there is a significant background contamination of neutral particles populating the MICE muon beam. This contamination creates unwanted triggers in MICE, thus reducing the percentage of useful data taken during running. This paper describes the analysis done with time-of-flight detectors, used to measure and identify the source of the contamination in both positive and negative muon beams.

  11. Positron lifetime spectrometer using a DC positron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Moxom, Jeremy

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An entrance grid is positioned in the incident beam path of a DC beam positron lifetime spectrometer. The electrical potential difference between the sample and the entrance grid provides simultaneous acceleration of both the primary positrons and the secondary electrons. The result is a reduction in the time spread induced by the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. In addition, the sample, sample holder, entrance grid, and entrance face of the multichannel plate electron detector assembly are made parallel to each other, and are arranged at a tilt angle to the axis of the positron beam to effectively separate the path of the secondary electrons from the path of the incident positrons.

  12. Position Summary Employee Details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    services for faculty and staff. Catalogue and compile assessment resource materials and results and make readily available to faculty and staff by contributing to an assessment resources website; provide STUDIES - 061003 Position: DIRECTOR OF ACADEMIC ASSESSMENT, STUDENT LEARNING ASSESSMENT HEERA

  13. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  14. HTP in Positive Characteristic HTP in Positive Characteristic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlapentokh, Alexandra

    HTP in Positive Characteristic HTP in Positive Characteristic Alexandra Shlapentokh East Carolina University April 2012 #12;HTP in Positive Characteristic Prologue Outline 1 Prologue 2 Fields of Positive Function Fields of Positive Characteristic 7 p-th Powers #12;HTP in Positive Characteristic Prologue

  15. ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

  16. A bipolar integrator for secondary emission profile monitors at the SSCL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datte, P.; Beechy, D.; Webber, R.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many invasive techniques for monitoring beam profile and intensity require secondary emission signals in order to make the measurement. Signal acquisition and processing can take many forms. This paper describes a bipolar integration technique which uses the Burr-Brown ACF2101 Dual Switched Integrator chip and applications for accelerator beam instrumentation.

  17. Grazing incidence beam expander

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akkapeddi, P.R.; Glenn, P.; Fuschetto, A.; Appert, Q.; Viswanathan, V.K.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Grazing Incidence Beam Expander (GIBE) telescope is being designed and fabricated to be used as an equivalent end mirror in a long laser resonator cavity. The design requirements for this GIBE flow down from a generic Free Electron Laser (FEL) resonator. The nature of the FEL gain volume (a thin, pencil-like, on-axis region) dictates that the output beam be very small. Such a thin beam with the high power levels characteristic of FELs would have to travel perhaps hundreds of meters or more before expanding enough to allow reflection from cooled mirrors. A GIBE, on the other hand, would allow placing these optics closer to the gain region and thus reduces the cavity lengths substantially. Results are presented relating to optical and mechanical design, alignment sensitivity analysis, radius of curvature analysis, laser cavity stability analysis of a linear stable concentric laser cavity with a GIBE. Fabrication details of the GIBE are also given.

  18. Development of conformal respirator monitoring technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shonka, J.J.; Weismann, J.J.; Logan, R.J. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a Small Business Innovative Research Phase II project to develop a modular, surface conforming respirator monitor to improve upon the manual survey techniques presently used by the nuclear industry. Research was performed with plastic scintillator and gas proportional modules in an effort to find the most conducive geometry for a surface conformal, position sensitive monitor. The respirator monitor prototype developed is a computer controlled, position-sensitive detection system employing 56 modular proportional counters mounted in molds conforming to the inner and outer surfaces of a commonly used respirator (Scott Model 801450-40). The molds are housed in separate enclosures and hinged to create a {open_quotes}waffle-iron{close_quotes} effect so that the closed monitor will simultaneously survey both surfaces of the respirator. The proportional counter prototype was also designed to incorporate Shonka Research Associates previously developed charge-division electronics. This research provided valuable experience into pixellated position sensitive detection systems. The technology developed can be adapted to other monitoring applications where there is a need for deployment of many traditional radiation detectors.

  19. Article mounting and position adjustment stage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutburth, Ronald W. (Tracy, CA); Silva, Leonard L. (Livermore, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved adjustment and mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A ring sensor holder has locating pins on a first side thereof which are positioned within a linear keyway in a surrounding housing for permitting reciprocal movement of the ring along the keyway. A rotatable ring gear is positioned within the housing on the other side of the ring from the linear keyway and includes an oval keyway which drives the ring along the linear keyway upon rotation of the gear. Motor-driven single-stage and dual (x, y) stage adjustment systems are disclosed which are of compact construction and include a large laser transmission hole.

  20. Article mounting and position adjustment stage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cutburth, R.W.; Silva, L.L.

    1988-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved adjustment and mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A ring sensor holder has locating pins on a first side thereof which are positioned within a linear keyway in a surrounding housing for permitting reciprocal movement of the ring along the keyway. A rotatable ring gear is positioned within the housing on the other side of the ring from the linear keyway and includes an oval keyway which drives the ring along the linear keyway upon rotation of the gear. Motor-driven single-stage and dual (x, y) stage adjustment systems are disclosed which are of compact construction and include a large laser transmission hole. 6 figs.

  1. Turbine nozzle positioning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norton, P.F.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine. 9 figs.

  2. Turbine nozzle positioning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norton, Paul F. (San Diego, CA); Shaffer, James E. (Maitland, FL)

    1996-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A nozzle guide vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The nozzle guide vane assembly includes an outer shroud having a mounting leg with an opening defined therein, a tip shoe ring having a mounting member with an opening defined therein, a nozzle support ring having a plurality of holes therein and a pin positioned in the corresponding opening in the outer shroud, opening in the tip shoe ring and the hole in the nozzle support ring. A rolling joint is provided between metallic components of the gas turbine engine and the nozzle guide vane assembly. The nozzle guide vane assembly is positioned radially about a central axis of the gas turbine engine and axially aligned with a combustor of the gas turbine engine.

  3. Observation of Coherent Beam-beam Effects in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffat, X; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Calaga, R; White, S M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early collisions in the LHC with a very limited number of bunches with high intensities indicated the presence of coherent beam-beam driven oscillations. Here we discuss the experimental results and compare with the expectations.

  4. Electron beam dynamics for the ISIS bremsstrahlung beam generation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block, Robert E. (Robert Edward)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron beam transport system was designed for use in the Bremsstrahlung Beam Generation System of the Integrated Stand-off Inspection System (ISIS). The purpose of this electron transport system was to provide for ...

  5. Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Daegil

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    hydrocarbons. Second, we studied the energy transfer mechanism of E-Beam upgrading to optimize the process. Third, we conducted a preliminary economic analysis based on energy consumption and compared the economics of E-Beam upgrading with conventional...

  6. Portal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

  7. APS Building Monitors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building Monitors For non-401 Building Monitors, select: LOMs Other APS Buildings 401 West WCtr Lab Wing ECtr East 5th Floor Yiying Ge na na na na 4th Floor Rick Fenner Karen...

  8. Corrosion monitoring apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Hugh S. (Shoreham, NY); Weeks, John R. (Stony Brook, NY)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion monitoring device in an aqueous system which includes a formed crevice and monitoring the corrosion of the surfaces forming the crevice by the use of an a-c electrical signal.

  9. Review of HRP Positions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Reliability Studies

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Human Reliability Program (HRP), published as 10 CFR Part 712, is currently being reviewed and revised to address concerns identified during its implementation. Although these ''page changes'' primarily incorporate clarification of terms and language, the following discussion relates to broadening the definition of positions that require HRP certification that is found in {section}712.10.

  10. Position Summary Employee Details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    and/or colleges. Positions Supervised: N/A Essential Responsibilities: 40% PROPOSALS Review proposals-recipient. Interpret sponsor guidelines, policies and regulations and ensure proper retention and timely disposition the Office of Sponsored Programs. Assist with special projects as assigned. Physical Demands: W

  11. Position Summary Employee Details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    . Positions Supervised: N/A Essential Responsibilities: 40% Proposals: Review proposals and related documents-recipient. Interpret sponsor guidelines, policies and regulations and ensure proper retention and timely disposition the Office of Sponsored Programs. Assist with special projects as assigned. Physical Demands: Work

  12. Vapor spill pipe monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

    1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

  13. Steam trap monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryan, Michael J. (Plainfield, IL)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A steam trap monitor positioned downstream of a steam trap in a closed steam system includes a first sensor (the combination of a hot finger and thermocouple well) for measuring the energy of condensate and a second sensor (a cold finger) for measuring the total energy of condensate and steam in the line. The hot finger includes one or more thermocouples for detecting condensate level and energy, while the cold finger contains a liquid with a lower boiling temperature than that of water. Vapor pressure from the liquid is used to do work such as displacing a piston or bellows in providing an indication of total energy (steam+condensate) of the system. Processing means coupled to and responsive to outputs from the thermocouple well hot and cold fingers subtracts the condensate energy as measured by the hot finger and thermocouple well from the total energy as measured by the cold finger to provide an indication of the presence of steam downstream from the trap indicating that the steam trap is malfunctioning.

  14. Colliding beams of light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Ivanov

    2002-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The stationary gravitational field of two identical counter-moving beams of pure radiation is found in full generality. The solution depends on an arbitrary function and a parameter which sets the scale of the energy density. Some of its properties are studied. Previous particular solutions are derived as subcases.

  15. Ion-beam technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenske, G.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This compilation of figures and diagrams reviews processes for depositing diamond/diamond-like carbon films. Processes addressed are chemical vapor deposition (HFCVD, PACVD, etc.), plasma vapor deposition (plasma sputtering, ion beam sputtering, evaporation, etc.), low-energy ion implantation, and hybrid processes (biased sputtering, IBAD, biased HFCVD, etc.). The tribological performance of coatings produced by different means is discussed.

  16. Characterization and performances of a monitoring ionization chamber dedicated to IBA-universal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an Ionization Chamber in col- laboration with the company IBA (Ion Beam Applications). This monitoring deviceCharacterization and performances of a monitoring ionization chamber dedicated to IBA patented and five IC2/3 chambers were de- Preprint submitted to Elsevier June 28, 2013 in2p3

  17. The Cooling of Particle Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    67, 15. Hangst, J "Laser Cooling of a Stored Ion Beam - ATheorem an.d Phase Space Cooling", Proceedings of theWorkshop on Beam Cooling and Related Topics, Montreaux, CERN

  18. Hadron beams session-summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, K.M. (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1120, USA (US))

    1989-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The status of presently operating polarized beams at Fermilab, the AGS, and KEK is discussed. Other schemes such as Siberian Snakes and self-polarization of a beam in situ are briefly analyzed.(AIP)

  19. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  20. High power linear pulsed beam annealer. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strathman, M.D.; Sadana, D.K.; True, R.B.

    1980-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A high power pulsed electron beam system for annealing semiconductors is comprised of an electron gun having a heated cathode, control grid and focus ring for confining the pulsed beam of electrons to a predetermined area, and a curved drift tube. The drift tube and an annular Faraday shield between the focus ring and the drift tube are maintained at a high positive voltage with respect to the cathode to accelerate electrons passing through the focus ring, thereby eliminating space charge limitations on the emission of electrons from said gun. A coil surrounding the curved drift tube provides a magnetic field which maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the tube. The magnetic field produced by the coil around the curved tube imparts motion to electrons in a spiral path for shallow penetration of the electrons into a target. It also produces a scalloped profile of the electron beam. A second drift tube spaced a predetermined distance from the curved tube is positioned with its axis aligned with the axis of the first drift tube. The second drift tube and the target holder are maintained at a reference voltage between the cathode voltage and the curved tube voltage to decelerate the electrons. A second coil surrounding the second drift tube, maintains the electron beam focused about the axis of the second drift tube. The magnetic field of the second coil comprises the electron beam to the area of the semiconductor on the target holder.

  1. OTR measurements and modeling of the electron beam optics at the E-cooling facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, A.; Burov, Alexey V.; Carlson, K.; Kazakevich, G.; Nagaitsev, S.; Prost, L.; Sutherland, M.; Tiunov, M.; /Fermilab /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optics of the electron beam accelerated in the Pelletron, intended for the electron cooling of 8.9 GeV antiprotons in the Fermilab recycler storage ring, has been studied. The beam profile parameters were measured under the accelerating section using Optical Transition Radiation (OTR) monitor. The monitor employs a highly-reflective 2 inch-diameter aluminum OTR-screen with a thickness of 5 {micro}m and a digital CCD camera. The measurements were done in a pulse-signal mode in the beam current range of 0.03-0.8 A and at pulse durations ranging from 1 {micro}s to 4 {micro}s. Differential profiles measured in pulsed mode are compared with results obtained by modeling of the DC beam dynamics from the Pelletron cathode to the OTR monitor. The modeling was done with SAM, ULTRASAM and BEAM programs. An adjustment of the magnetic fields in the lenses of the accelerating section was done in the simulations. The simulated electron beam optics downstream of the accelerating section was in good agreement with the measurements made with pulsed beam.

  2. Energy Spread of the Proton Beam in the Fermilab Booster at its Injection Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhat, C M; Chaurize, S J; Garcia, F G; Seiya, K; Pellico, W A; Sullivan, T M; Triplett, A K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the total energy spread (99 persent energy spread) of the Booster beam at its injection energy of 400 MeV by three different methods - 1) creating a notch of about 40 nsec wide in the beam immediately after multiple turn injection and measuring the slippage time required for high and low momentum particles for a grazing touch in line-charge distribution, 2) injecting partial turn beam and letting it to debunch, and 3) comparing the beam profile monitor data with predictions from MAD simulations for the 400 MeV injection beam line. The measurements are repeated under varieties of conditions of RF systems in the ring and in the beam transfer line.

  3. Seismic Imaging and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

  4. Relativistic Positioning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartolomé Coll

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory of relativistic {\\em location systems} is sketched. An interesting class of these systems is that of relativistic {\\em positioning systems,} which consists in sets of four clocks broadcasting their proper time. Among them, the more important ones are the {\\em auto-located positioning systems,} in which every clock broadcasts not only its proper time but the proper times that it receives from the other three. At this level, no reference to any exterior system (the Earth surface, for example) and no synchronization are needed. Some properties are presented. In the SYPOR project, such a structure is proposed, eventually anchored to a classical reference system on the Earth surface, as the best relativistic structure for Global Navigation Satellite Systems.

  5. Means for the focusing and acceleration of parallel beams of charged particles. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maschke, A.W.

    1980-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for focusing beams of charged particles comprising planar arrays of electrostatic quadrupoles. The array may be assembled from a single component which comprises a support plate containing uniform rows of poles. Each pole is separated by a hole through the plate designed to pass a beam. Two such plates may be positioned with their poles intermeshed to form a plurality of quadrupoles.

  6. Proposal of thermal neutron flux monitors based on vibrating wire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arutunian, S G; Chung, M; Harutyunyan, G S; Lazareva, E G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two types of neutron monitors with fine spatial resolution are proposed based on vibrating wire. In the first type, neutrons interact with the vibrating wire, heat it, and lead to the change of natural frequency, which can be precisely measured. To increase the heat deposition during the neutron scattering, use of gadolinium layer which has the highest thermal neutron capture cross section among all elements is proposed. The second type of the monitor uses vibrating wire as a resonant target. Besides the measurement of beam profile according to the average signal, the differential signal synchronized with the wire oscillations defines the gradient of beam profile. Spatial resolution of the monitor is defined by the diameter of the wire.

  7. PPPL delivers a plasma source that will enable high-power beam...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    line. Negatively charged electrons in the plasma will neutralize the positively charged ion beam after it leaves the accelerator and zips through the drift line on its way to the...

  8. Environmental Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

  9. Recent advances of strong-strong beam-beam simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiang, Ji; Furman, Miguel A.; Ryne, Robert D.; Fischer, Wolfram; Ohmi,Kazuhito

    2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we report on recent advances in strong-strong beam-beam simulation. Numerical methods used in the calculation of the beam-beam forces are reviewed. A new computational method to solve the Poisson equation on nonuniform grid is presented. This method reduces the computational cost by a half compared with the standard FFT based method on uniform grid. It is also more accurate than the standard method for a colliding beam with low transverse aspect ratio. In applications, we present the study of coherent modes with multi-bunch, multi-collision beam-beam interactions at RHIC. We also present the strong-strong simulation of the luminosity evolution at KEKB with and without finite crossing angle.

  10. Metallic beam development for the Facility for Rare Isotope Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machicoane, Guillaume, E-mail: machicoa@nscl.msu.edu; Cole, Dallas; Leitner, Daniela; Neben, Derek; Tobos, Larry [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)] [Facility for Rare Isotope Beam, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) at Michigan State University (MSU) will accelerate a primary ion beam to energies beyond 200 MeV/u using a superconducting RF linac and will reach a maximum beam power of 400 kW on the fragmentation target. The beam intensity needed from the ECR ion source is expected to be between 0.4 and 0.5 emA for most medium mass to heavy mass elements. Adding to the challenge of reaching the required intensity, an expanded list of primary beams of interest has been established based on the production rate and the number of isotope beams that could be produced with FRIB. We report here on the development done for some of the beam in the list including mercury (natural), molybdenum ({sup 98}Mo), and selenium ({sup 82}Ser)

  11. Electron vortex beams in a magnetic field and spin filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debashree Chowdhury; Banasri Basu; Pratul Bandyopadhyay

    2015-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the propagation of electron vortex beams in a magnetic field. It is pointed out that when electron vortex beams carrying orbital angular momentum propagate in a magnetic field, the Berry curvature associated with the scalar electron moving in a cyclic path around the vortex line is modified from that in free space. This alters the spin-orbit interaction, which affects the propagation of nonparaxial beams. The electron vortex beams with tilted vortex lead to spin Hall effect in free space. In presence of a magnetic field in time space we have spin filtering such that either positive or negative spin states emerge in spin Hall currents with clustering of spin $\\frac{1}{2}$ states.

  12. Measurements of Beam Ion Loss from the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Darrow, M. Isobe, Takashi Kondo, M. Sasao, and the CHS Group National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, Japan

    2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam ion loss from the Compact Helical System (CHS) has been measured with a scintillator-type probe. The total loss to the probe, and the pitch angle and gyroradius distributions of that loss, have been measured as various plasma parameters were scanned. Three classes of beam ion loss were observed at the probe position: passing ions with pitch angles within 10o of those of transition orbits, ions on transition orbits, and ions on trapped orbits, typically 15o or more from transition orbits. Some orbit calculations in this geometry have been performed in order to understand the characteristics of the loss. Simulation of the detector signal based upon the following of orbits from realistic beam deposition profiles is not able to reproduce the pitch angle distribution of the losses measured. Consequently it is inferred that internal plasma processes, whether magnetohydrodynamic modes, radial electric fields, or plasma turbulence, move previously confined beam ions to transition orbits, resulting in their loss.

  13. Sandia Energy - Structural Health Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Health Monitoring Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Wind Energy Materials, Reliability, & Standards Structural Health Monitoring Structural Health...

  14. Results of long-range beam-beam studies - scaling with beam separation and intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assmann, R; Buffat, X; Calaga, R; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Metral, E; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Roy, G; Trad, G; Kaltchev, D; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied possible limitations due to the long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC. With a large number of bunches and collisions in all interaction points, we have reduced the crossing angles to enhance long-range beam-beam effects to evaluate their influence on dynamic aperture and losses. Different beta* and intensities have been used in two dedicated experiments and allow the test of the expected scaling laws.

  15. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); Galvin, James (2 Commodore #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

  16. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.

    1987-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. 10 figs.

  17. Stationary nonlinear Airy beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Matematica, Universita del'Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Faccio, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Matematica, Universita del'Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, SUPA, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Couairon, A. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Papazoglou, D. G. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Materials Science and Technology Department, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Panagiotopoulos, P.; Tzortzakis, S. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Abdollahpour, D. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Physics Department, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the existence of an additional class of stationary accelerating Airy wave forms that exist in the presence of third-order (Kerr) nonlinearity and nonlinear losses. Numerical simulations and experiments, in agreement with the analytical model, highlight how these stationary solutions sustain the nonlinear evolution of Airy beams. The generic nature of the Airy solution allows extension of these results to other settings, and a variety of applications are suggested.

  18. Axion beams at HERA?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Piotrzkowski

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    If the recently observed anomaly in the PVLAS experiment is due to the axion, then the powerful beams of synchrotron photons, propagating through high magnetic field of the HERA beamline, become strong axion sources. This gives a unique opportunity of detection of the axion-photon interactions by installing a small detector in the HERA tunnel, and to corroborate the axion hypothesis within a few days of running.

  19. Ph.D. Positions in "ICT for Sustainable Energy Management"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    -edge applications for energy efficiency. We are developing and evaluating distributed systems for monitoring of complex systems Background in energy management and power systems is considered a plus Interest Ph.D. Positions in "ICT for Sustainable Energy Management" Key words: distributed information

  20. Understanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam RunUnderstanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam Run 2004 Straw Test beam results2004 Straw Test beam results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Understanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam RunUnderstanding the Poor Resolution from Test Beam Run aah #12;2 2004 Straw Test beam results2004 Straw Test beam results ! Doc # 3308 v#3 by A. Ledovskoy " Using Data from 2004 Test Beam " Used "triplet" method for beam nominally perpendicular to Straw

  1. Design and Prototyping of an Ionization Profile Monitor for the SNS Accumulator Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartkoski, Dirk A [ORNL; Deibele, Craig E [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ionization profile monitor (IPM) has been designed for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. Utilizing ionized electrons produced by beam-gas ionization, the SNS IPM uses a 120 kV bias potential to overcome beam space charge and accelerate electrons towards a movable particle detector. A 300 G magnetic field is used to confine the transverse electron motion, resulting in profile errors at the estimated 7% level. With a system bandwidth of 17.5 MHz. The SNS IPM is capable of measuring turn-by-turn beam profiles for a fully accumulated beam. This paper presents a description of the system and design.

  2. A Novel Thermal Position Sensor Integrated On A Plastic Substrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Petropoulos; G. Kaltsas; D. Goustouridis; A. G. Nassiopoulou

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal position sensor was fabricated and evaluated. The device consists of an array of temperature sensing elements, fabricated entirely on a plastic substrate. A novel fabrication technology was implemented which allows direct integration with read out electronics and communication to the macro-world without the use of wire bonding. The fabricated sensing elements are temperature sensitive Pt resistors with an average TCR of 0.0024/C. The device realizes the detection of the position and the motion of a heating source by monitoring the resistance variation of the thermistor array. The application field of such a cost-effective position sensor is considered quite extensive.

  3. Plasma ion sources and ion beam technology inmicrofabrications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Lili

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For over decades, focused ion beam (FIB) has been playing a very important role in microscale technology and research, among which, semiconductor microfabrication is one of its biggest application area. As the dimensions of IC devices are scaled down, it has shown the need for new ion beam tools and new approaches to the fabrication of small-scale devices. In the meanwhile, nanotechnology has also deeply involved in material science research and bioresearch in recent years. The conventional FIB systems which utilize liquid gallium ion sources to achieve nanometer scale resolution can no longer meet the various requirements raised from such a wide application area such as low contamination, high throughput and so on. The drive towards controlling materials properties at nanometer length scales relies on the availability of efficient tools. In this thesis, three novel ion beam tools have been developed and investigated as the alternatives for the conventional FIB systems in some particular applications. An integrated focused ion beam (FIB) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) system has been developed for direct doping or surface modification. This new instrument employs a mini-RF driven plasma source to generate focused ion beam with various ion species, a FEI two-lens electron (2LE) column for SEM imaging, and a five-axis manipulator system for sample positioning. An all-electrostatic two-lens column has been designed to focus the ion beam extracted from the source. Based on the Munro ion optics simulation, beam spot sizes as small as 100 nm can be achieved at beam energies between 5 to 35 keV if a 5 {micro}m-diameter extraction aperture is used. Smaller beam spot sizes can be obtained with smaller apertures at sacrifice of some beam current. The FEI 2LE column, which utilizes Schottky emission, electrostatic focusing optics, and stacked-disk column construction, can provide high-resolution (as small as 20 nm) imaging capability, with fairly long working distance (25 mm) at 25 keV beam voltage. Such an integrated FIB/SEM dual-beam system will not only improve the accuracy and reproducibility when performing ion beam sculpting and direct implantation processes, but will also enable researchers to perform cross-sectioning, imaging, and analysis with the same tool. A major advantage of this approach is the ability to produce a wide variety of ion species tailored to the application.

  4. Plasma-beam traps and radiofrequency quadrupole beam coolers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maggiore, M., E-mail: mario.maggiore@lnl.infn.it; Cavenago, M.; Comunian, M.; Chirulotto, F.; Galatà, A.; De Lazzari, M.; Porcellato, A. M.; Roncolato, C.; Stark, S. [INFN-LNL, viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy)] [INFN-LNL, viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Caruso, A.; Longhitano, A. [INFN-LNS, via S. Sofia 54, 95123 Catania (Italy)] [INFN-LNS, via S. Sofia 54, 95123 Catania (Italy); Cavaliere, F.; Maero, G.; Paroli, B.; Pozzoli, R.; Romé, M. [INFN Sezione di Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)] [INFN Sezione di Milano and Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two linear trap devices for particle beam manipulation (including emittance reduction, cooling, control of instabilities, dust dynamics, and non-neutral plasmas) are here presented, namely, a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) beam cooler and a compact Penning trap with a dust injector. Both beam dynamics studies by means of dedicated codes including the interaction of the ions with a buffer gas (up to 3 Pa pressure), and the electromagnetic design of the RFQ beam cooler are reported. The compact multipurpose Penning trap is aimed to the study of multispecies charged particle samples, primarily electron beams interacting with a background gas and/or a micrometric dust contaminant. Using a 0.9 T solenoid and an electrode stack where both static and RF electric fields can be applied, both beam transport and confinement operations will be available. The design of the apparatus is presented.

  5. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, J.E.; Bolton, R.D.

    1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans. 4 figs.

  6. Radiation monitor for liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koster, James E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation monitor for use with liquids that utilizes air ions created by alpha radiation emitted by the liquids as its detectable element. A signal plane, held at an electrical potential with respect to ground, collects these air ions. A guard plane or guard rings is used to limit leakage currents. In one embodiment, the monitor is used for monitoring liquids retained in a tank. Other embodiments monitor liquids flowing through a tank, and bodies of liquids, such as ponds, lakes, rivers and oceans.

  7. Observations of beam-beam effects at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papotti, G; Herr, W; Giachino, R; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper introduces a list of observations related to the beam-beam interaction that were collected over the first years of LHC proton physics operation (2010-12). Beam-beam related effects not only have been extensively observed and recorded, but have also shaped the operation of the LHC for high-intensity proton running in a number of ways: the construction of the filling scheme, the choice of luminosity levelling techniques, measures to mitigate instabilities, and the choice of settings for improving performance (e.g. to reduce losses), among others.

  8. Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

  9. Neutral Beam Excitation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011 at3, Issue 30 NewNetworks,Beam

  10. Position detectors, methods of detecting position, and methods of providing positional detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weinberg, David M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harding, L. Dean (Chubbuck, ID); Larsen, Eric D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Position detectors, welding system position detectors, methods of detecting various positions, and methods of providing position detectors are described. In one embodiment, a welding system positional detector includes a base that is configured to engage and be moved along a curved surface of a welding work piece. At least one position detection apparatus is provided and is connected with the base and configured to measure angular position of the detector relative to a reference vector. In another embodiment, a welding system positional detector includes a weld head and at least one inclinometer mounted on the weld head. The one inclinometer is configured to develop positional data relative to a reference vector and the position of the weld head on a non-planar weldable work piece.

  11. Beam characterization by wavefront sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neal, D.R.; Alford, W.J.; Gruetzner, J.K.

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for characterizing an energy beam (such as a laser) with a two-dimensional wavefront sensor, such as a Shack-Hartmann lenslet array. The sensor measures wavefront slope and irradiance of the beam at a single point on the beam and calculates a space-beamwidth product. A detector array such as a charge coupled device camera is preferably employed. 21 figs.

  12. Beam emittance measurements at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendt, Manfred; Eddy, Nathan; Hu, Martin; Scarpine, Victor; Syphers, Mike; Tassotto, Gianni; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yang, Ming-Jen; Zagel, James; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We give short overview of various beam emittance measurement methods, currently applied at different machine locations for the Run II collider physics program at Fermilab. All these methods are based on beam profile measurements, and we give some examples of the related instrumentation techniques. At the end we introduce a multi-megawatt proton source project, currently under investigation at Fermilab, with respect to the beam instrumentation challenges.

  13. Global nuclear material monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, J.A.; Monlove, H.O.; Goulding, C.A.; Martinez, B.J.; Coulter, C.A.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project provided a detailed systems design for advanced integrated facility monitoring and identified the components and enabling technologies required to facilitate the development of the monitoring system of the future.

  14. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  15. Transmission Line Security Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Transmission Line Security Monitor is a multi-sensor monitor that mounts directly on high-voltage transmission lines to detect, characterize and communicate terrorist activity, human tampering and threatening conditions around support towers. For more information about INL's critical infrastructure protection research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. Low energy beta-beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cristina Volpe

    2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of a beta-beam facility is to determine the possible existence of CP violation in the lepton sector, the value of the third neutrino mixing angle and the mass hierarchy. Here we argue that a much broader physics case can be covered since the beta-beam concept can also be used to establish a low energy beta-beam facility. We discuss that the availability of neutrino beams in the 100 MeV energy range offers a unique opportunity to perform neutrino scattering experiments of interest for nuclear physics, for the study of fundamental interactions and of core-collapse supernova physics.

  17. First LHC Beams in ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krieger, P

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a talk on the ATLAS single beam running, to be given on February 9th at the Aspen Winter Conference.

  18. ANL Beams and Applications Seminar

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    characterization of the laser and electron beams of the Cornell Energy Recovery Linac Heng Li Cornell University June 18 Interbeam Scattering Studies at CesrTA Michael Ehrlichman...

  19. HTP in Positive Characteristic HTP in Positive Characteristic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlapentokh, Alexandra

    HTP in Positive Characteristic HTP in Positive Characteristic Alexandra Shlapentokh East Carolina University October 2007 #12;HTP in Positive Characteristic Table of Contents 1 A Brief History of Diophantine Diophantine Sets, Definitions and Models HTP over a Field vs. HTP over a Subring 3 A Brief History of HTP over

  20. HTP in Positive Characteristic HTP in Positive Characteristic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlapentokh, Alexandra

    HTP in Positive Characteristic HTP in Positive Characteristic Alexandra Shlapentokh East Carolina University November 2007 #12;HTP in Positive Characteristic Table of Contents 1 A Brief History are Done Diophantine Sets, Definitions and Models HTP over a Field vs. HTP over a Subring 3 A Brief History

  1. Effect of Body Mass Index on Intrafraction Prostate Displacement Monitored by Real-Time Electromagnetic Tracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, Wayne M., E-mail: wbutler@wheelinghospital.org [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Morris, Mallory N. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)] [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Merrick, Gregory S. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States) [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States); Kurko, Brian S.; Murray, Brian C. [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)] [Schiffler Cancer Center, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, West Virginia (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To evaluate, using real-time monitoring of implanted radiofrequency transponders, the intrafraction prostate displacement of patients as a function of body mass index (BMI). Methods and Materials: The motions of Beacon radiofrequency transponders (Calypso Medical Technologies, Seattle, WA) implanted in the prostate glands of 66 men were monitored throughout the course of intensity modulated radiation therapy. Data were acquired at 10 Hz from setup to the end of treatment, but only the 1.7 million data points with a 'beam on' tag were used in the analysis. There were 21 obese patients, with BMI {>=}30 and 45 nonobese patients in the study. Results: Mean displacements were least in the left-right lateral direction (0.56 {+-} 0.24 mm) and approximately twice that magnitude in the superior-inferior and anterior-posterior directions. The net vector displacement was larger still, 1.95 {+-} 0.47 mm. Stratified by BMI cohort, the mean displacements per patient in the 3 Cartesian axes as well as the net vector for patients with BMI {>=}30 were slightly less (<0.2 mm) but not significantly different than the corresponding values for patients with lower BMIs. As a surrogate for the magnitude of oscillatory noise, the standard deviation for displacements in all measured planes showed no significant differences in the prostate positional variability between the lower and higher BMI groups. Histograms of prostate displacements showed a lower frequency of large displacements in obese patients, and there were no significant differences in short-term and long-term velocity distributions. Conclusions: After patients were positioned accurately using implanted radiofrequency transponders, the intrafractional displacements in the lateral, superior-inferior, and anterior-posterior directions as well as the net vector displacements were smaller, but not significantly so, for obese men than for those with lower BMI.

  2. Positional Roots in Kaqchikel Maya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tummons, Emily Jane

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This work is the first in-depth investigation of the class of positional words in Kaqchikel (Mayan). Based on original fieldwork, I first establish the existence of a special class of positional roots in Kaqchikel. I show ...

  3. Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faculty Positions Heat Transfer and Thermal/Energy Sciences Naval Postgraduate School Monterey-track faculty position at the assistant professor level in the areas of Heat Transfer and Thermal/Fluid Sciences

  4. NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunkel, W.B.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in their physics and their technology, or in any case they are considered to be adequately covered by these other authors.

  5. High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7 4.4.4 High-temperature Pump Monitoring - High-temperature ESP Monitoring Presentation Number: 018 Investigator: Dhruva, Brindesh (Schlumberger Technology Corp.) Objectives: To...

  6. Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L. [and others

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

  7. Positioning Security from electronic warfare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhn, Markus

    Positioning Security from electronic warfare to cheating RFID and road-tax systems Markus Kuhn;Military positioning-security concerns Electronic warfare is primarily about denying or falsifying location of the importance of global positioning security has led to the military discipline of "navigation warfare". 5 #12

  8. Test of an LED Monitoring System for the PHOS Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blick, A M; Erin, S V; Kharlov, Yu V; Lobanov, M O; Mikhailov, Yu V; Minaev, N G; Petrov, V A; Sadovsky, S A; Samoylenko, V D; Suzdalev, V I; Senko, V A; Tikhonov, V V

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preprint submitted to Elsevier Print on 26th January 2000A prototype monitoring system for the Photon Spectrometer (PHOS) of the ALICE experiment at LHC is described in detail. The prototype consists of Control and Master modules. The first one is 8x8 matrix of Light Emitting Diodes coupled with stable generators of current pulses. The system provides an individual control for each of the 64 channels of PHOS prototype based on lead-tungstate crystals. A long term stability of order of 10-3 has been achieved in integral beam tests of the monitoring system and PHOS prototypes.

  9. Laser acceleration of ion beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Egorova; A. V. Filatov; A. V. Prozorkevich; S. A. Smolyansky; D. B. Blaschke; M. Chubaryan

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider methods of charged particle acceleration by means of high-intensity lasers. As an application we discuss a laser booster for heavy ion beams provided, e.g. by the Dubna nuclotron. Simple estimates show that a cascade of crossed laser beams would be necessary to provide additional acceleration to gold ions of the order of GeV/nucleon.

  10. Head-on beam-beam collisions with high intensities and long range beam-beam studies in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert, M; Assmann, R; Buffat, X; Calaga, R; Cornelis, K; Fitterer, M; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Miyamoto, R; Norman, L; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Ponce, L; Redaelli, S; Schaumann, M; Trad, G; Wollmann, D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In two experiments we studied possible limitations due to the beam-beam effects in the LHC. In the first experiment we collided high intensity bunches head-on to explore the region for high luminosity collisions. In the second test we reduced the crossing angle in the presence of long range encounters to increase their effects.

  11. Compact noninvasive electron bunch-length monitor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Roberts, B.; Mammei, R. R.; Poelker, M.; McCarter, J. L.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact rf cavity was constructed that simultaneously resonates at many harmonic modes when excited by a repetitive bunched electron beam passing through its bore. The excitation of these modes provides a Fourier description of the temporal characteristics of the bunch train. The cavity was used to noninvasively characterize electron bunches produced from thin and thick GaAs photocathodes inside a DC high voltage photogun illuminated with 37 ps (full width half maximum, FWHM) laser pulses at repetition rates near 1500 MHz, at average beam current from 5 to 500????A , and at beam energy from 75 to 195 keV. The cavity bunch-length monitor could detect electron bunches as short as 57 ps (FWHM) when connected directly to a sampling oscilloscope, and could clearly distinguish bunches with varying degrees of space-charge induced growth and with different tail signatures. Efforts are under way to detect shorter bunches by designing cavities with increased bandwidth. This demonstration lends credibility to the idea that these cavities could also be used for other applications, including bunching and shaping, when driven with external rf.

  12. Toward automated beam optics control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silbar, R.R.; Schultz, D.E.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have begun a program aiming toward automatic control of charged-particle beam optics using artificial intelligence programming techniques. In developing our prototype, we are working with LISP machines and the KEE expert system shell. Our first goal was to develop a ''mouseable'' representation of a typical beam line. This responds actively to changes entered from the mouse or keyboard, giving an updated display of the beam line itself, its optical properties, and the instrumentation and control devices as seen by the operater. We have incorporated TRANSPORT, written in Fortran but running as a callable procedure in the LISP environment, for simulation of the beam-line optics. This paper describes the experience gained in meeting our first goal and discusses plans to extend the work so that it is usable, in realtime, on an operating beam line. 11 refs.

  13. ORISE: Media Analysis and Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Media Analysis and Monitoring The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) uses comprehensive media analysis and monitoring tools to define media interest and the...

  14. The COMPASS Setup for Physics with Hadron Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abbon, Ph.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, M.G.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anosov, V.; Austregesilo, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Berlin, A.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E.R.; Bieling, J.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bodlak, M.; Boer, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Braun, C.; Bressan, A.; Buchele, M.; Burtin, E.; Capozza, L.; Ciliberti, P.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Cotte, D.; Crespo, M.L.; Curiel, Q.; Dafni, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Desforge, D.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Durand, D.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Elia, C.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; M. Finger jr; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; von Hohenesche, N. du Fresne; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Gatignon, L.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giganon, A.; Gnesi, I.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorzellik, M.; Grabmuller, S.; Grasso, A.; Gregori, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hahne, D.; Hashimoto, R.; Heinsius, F.H.; Herrmann, F.; Hinterberger, F.; Hoppner, Ch.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jary, V.; Jasinski, P.; Jorg, P.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kramer, M.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuchinski, N.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R.P.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G.K.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matousek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Menon, G.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Miyachi, Y.; Moinester, M.A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Novy, J.; Nowak, W.D.; Nunes, Ana Sofia; Olshevsky, A.G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Pesaro, V.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Pires, C.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Reymond, J-M.; Rocco, E.; Rossiyskaya, N.S.; Rousse, J.Y.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Rychter, A.; Samartsev, A.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I.A.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schluter, T.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schonning, K.; Schopferer, S.; Schott, M.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Steiger, L.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takekawa, S.; Wolbeek, J. ter; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Thibaud, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Uman, I.; Virius, M.; Wang, L.; Weisrock, T.; Weitzel, Q.; Wilfert, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zink, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main characteristics of the COMPASS experimental setup for physics with hadron beams are described. This setup was designed to perform exclusive measurements of processes with several charged and/or neutral particles in the final state. Making use of a large part of the apparatus that was previously built for spin structure studies with a muon beam, it also features a new target system as well as new or upgraded detectors. The hadron setup is able to operate at the high incident hadron flux available at CERN. It is characterised by large angular and momentum coverages, large and nearly flat acceptances, and good two and three-particle mass resolutions. In 2008 and 2009 it was successfully used with positive and negative hadron beams and with liquid hydrogen and solid nuclear targets. This article describes the new and upgraded detectors and auxiliary equipment, outlines the reconstruction procedures used, and summarises the general performance of the setup.

  15. Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    11 Delivering High IntensityDelivering High Intensity Proton Beam:Proton Beam: Lessons for the NextFACT08NuFACT08 ­­ 4 July4 July S. ChildressS. Childress ­­ Proton BeamsProton Beams 22 Presentation OutlinePresentation Outline Key Proton Beam ConsiderationsKey Proton Beam Considerations The First

  16. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Monitoring Manual Volume 2, Radiation Monitoring and Sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Aerial Measurement Systems

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The FRMAC Monitoring and Sampling Manual, Volume 2 provides standard operating procedures (SOPs) for field radiation monitoring and sample collection activities that are performed by the Monitoring group during a FRMAC response to a radiological emergency.

  17. Multidimensionality of parental monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Secrest, Laura A

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    whether the monitoring construct is unitary or multidimensional. The LISREL 8.3 program was used to perform confirmatory factor analyses and structural modeling analyses on the proposed theoretical models. A total of 419 elementary school children...

  18. Laser beam alignment apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruhn, Charles R. (Martinez, CA); Hammond, Robert B. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to an apparatus and method for laser beam alignment. Thermoelectric properties of a disc in a laser beam path are used to provide an indication of beam alignment and/or automatic laser alignment.

  19. Monitoring Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eulinger, R. D.

    control systems. Older power plants may have nothing but gauges and dials on a control board. Plants such as these are not typically candidates for a performance monitor unless they ere also being considered for a control system upgrade, including a... planned future control system upgrade. With this method, a utility can have the benefits of a performance monitor prior to a major control system upgrade. When the system is finally upgraded, the data logger can be moved to another unit and reused...

  20. Structure function monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGraw, John T. (Placitas, NM); Zimmer, Peter C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ackermann, Mark R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for a structure function monitor provide for generation of parameters characterizing a refractive medium. In an embodiment, a structure function monitor acquires images of a pupil plane and an image plane and, from these images, retrieves the phase over an aperture, unwraps the retrieved phase, and analyzes the unwrapped retrieved phase. In an embodiment, analysis yields atmospheric parameters measured at spatial scales from zero to the diameter of a telescope used to collect light from a source.

  1. Electrostatic wire stabilizing a charged particle beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prono, D.S.; Caporaso, G.J.; Briggs, R.J.

    1983-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In combination with a charged particle beam generator and accelerator, apparatus and method are provided for stabilizing a beam of electrically charged particles. A guiding means, disposed within the particle beam, has an electric charge induced upon it by the charged particle beam. Because the sign of the electric charge on the guiding means and the sign of the particle beam are opposite, the particles are attracted toward and cluster around the guiding means to thereby stabilize the particle beam as it travels.

  2. A Monitor of the Focusing Strength of Plasma Lenses Using MeV Synchrotron Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clive Field; Gholam Mazaheri; Johnny S. T. Ng

    2002-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The focusing strength of plasma lenses used with high energy electron or positron beams can give rise to synchrotron radiation with critical energies in the MeV range. A method is described for measuring the characteristic energy of this radiation as a way of monitoring the strength of the focus. The principle has been implemented in a plasma lens experiment with a 28.5 GeV positron beam.

  3. In situ tomography of femtosecond optical beams with a holographic knife-edge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strohaber, James; Kaya, G; N, Kay; Hart, Nathan; Kolomenskii, Alexander; Paulus, Gerhard; Schuessler, Hans

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    ? that are mechanically difficult or impossible to reproduce. We test our method by holographically knife-edging and tomographically reconstructing both continuous wave and broadband radiation in transverse optical modes. ?2011 Optical Society of America OCIS codes... the sign of the angular dispersion causing the dispersed broadband beam to exhibit a zero amount of spatial dispersion at the position of the second grating [13]. At all other positions within the setup, except at the position of the first grating...

  4. MEASUREMENT OF BEAM CHARACTERISTICS FOR PHOTO- ELECTRON BEAM...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electron beam is expected to be used in a wide field, such as X-ray generation by inverse Compton scattering, pulse radiolysis, etc. The laser driven photo cathode rf gun system is...

  5. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, J.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: (1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and (2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1,000 {micro}m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 {micro}m diameter of laser drilling. 5 figs.

  6. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Pleasanton, CA); O'Brien, Dennis W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: 1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and 2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1000 .mu.m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 .mu.m diameter of laser drilling.

  7. Alight a beam and beaming light: A theme with variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chattopadhyay, S. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)] [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California94720 (United States)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of light (coherent and incoherent) with charged particle beams is explored in various configurations: incoherent scattering of coherent light (laser) from an incoherent particle beam (high temperature), coherent scattering of coherent light (laser) from a {open_quotes}cold{close_quotes} (bunched) beam, femtosecond generation of particle and light beams via {open_quotes}optical slicing{close_quotes} and Thomson/Compton scattering techniques, etc. The domains of ultrashort temporal duration (femtoseconds) as well as ultrashort wavelengths (x rays and shorter), with varying degrees of coherence, are explored. The relevance to a few critical areas of research in the natural sciences, e.g., ultrafast material, chemical and biological processes, protein folding, particle phase space cooling, etc. are touched upon. All the processes discussed involve proper interpretation and understanding of coherent states of matter and radiation, as well as the quality and quantity of information and energy embedded in them. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Laser scanning system for object monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McIntyre, Timothy James [Knoxville, TN; Maxey, Lonnie Curtis [Powell, TN; Chiaro, Jr; John, Peter [Clinton, TN

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser scanner is located in a fixed position to have line-of-sight access to key features of monitored objects. The scanner rapidly scans pre-programmed points corresponding to the positions of retroreflecting targets affixed to the key features of the objects. The scanner is capable of making highly detailed scans of any portion of the field of view, permitting the exact location and identity of targets to be confirmed. The security of an object is verified by determining that the cooperative target is still present and that its position has not changed. The retroreflecting targets also modulate the reflected light for purposes of returning additional information back to the location of the scanner.

  9. Automatic monitoring of vibration welding equipment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, John Patrick; Chakraborty, Debejyo; Wincek, Michael Anthony; Wang, Hui; Abell, Jeffrey A; Bracey, Jennifer; Cai, Wayne W

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes vibration welding equipment having a welding horn and anvil, a host device, a check station, and a robot. The robot moves the horn and anvil via an arm to the check station. Sensors, e.g., temperature sensors, are positioned with respect to the welding equipment. Additional sensors are positioned with respect to the check station, including a pressure-sensitive array. The host device, which monitors a condition of the welding equipment, measures signals via the sensors positioned with respect to the welding equipment when the horn is actively forming a weld. The robot moves the horn and anvil to the check station, activates the check station sensors at the check station, and determines a condition of the welding equipment by processing the received signals. Acoustic, force, temperature, displacement, amplitude, and/or attitude/gyroscopic sensors may be used.

  10. Thermal stresses in laminated beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcano, Victor Manuel

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stresses Acting on a Section of the Laminated Beam -------- 15 5. Loading Geometry and Material Characteristics of the Test Problem 21 6. Simply-Supported Beam with a Sinusoidal Load--------- 30 7. Shear Stress Distribution for a Simply- Supported... 24. Normal Stress Distribution for a Cantilever Laminated Beam, T-Z sinzx/L --------------- 58 m. i 25. Axial Stress Distribution for a Cantilever Laminated Bearq, T-T (2z/8+1) 2 mi 27. Normal Stress Distribution for ("/L) ? ---- 6O 2 a...

  11. Thermal stresses in laminated beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcano, Victor Manuel

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stresses Acting on a Section of the Laminated Beam -------- 15 5. Loading Geometry and Material Characteristics of the Test Problem 21 6. Simply-Supported Beam with a Sinusoidal Load--------- 30 7. Shear Stress Distribution for a Simply- Supported... 24. Normal Stress Distribution for a Cantilever Laminated Beam, T-Z sinzx/L --------------- 58 m. i 25. Axial Stress Distribution for a Cantilever Laminated Bearq, T-T (2z/8+1) 2 mi 27. Normal Stress Distribution for ("/L) ? ---- 6O 2 a...

  12. Positivity of continuous piecewise polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaumann, Daniel

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real algebraic geometry provides certificates for the positivity of polynomials on semi-algebraic sets by expressing them as a suitable combination of sums of squares and the defining inequalitites. We show how Schm\\"udgen's theorem for strictly positive polynomials on compact sets can be applied in the case of strictly positive piecewise polynomials on a simplicial complex. In the 1-dimensional case, we improve this result to cover all non-negative piecewise polynomials.

  13. Monitoring: The missing piece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorkland, Ronald, E-mail: r_bjorkland@hotmail.com

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 heralded in an era of more robust attention to environmental impacts resulting from larger scale federal projects. The number of other countries that have adopted NEPA's framework is evidence of the appeal of this type of environmental legislation. Mandates to review environmental impacts, identify alternatives, and provide mitigation plans before commencement of the project are at the heart of NEPA. Such project reviews have resulted in the development of a vast number of reports and large volumes of project-specific data that potentially can be used to better understand the components and processes of the natural environment and provide guidance for improved and efficient environmental protection. However, the environmental assessment (EA) or the more robust and intensive environmental impact statement (EIS) that are required for most major projects more frequently than not are developed to satisfy the procedural aspects of the NEPA legislation while they fail to provide the needed guidance for improved decision-making. While NEPA legislation recommends monitoring of project activities, this activity is not mandated, and in those situations where it has been incorporated, the monitoring showed that the EIS was inaccurate in direction and/or magnitude of the impact. Many reviews of NEPA have suggested that monitoring all project phases, from the design through the decommissioning, should be incorporated. Information gathered though a well-developed monitoring program can be managed in databases and benefit not only the specific project but would provide guidance how to better design and implement future activities designed to protect and enhance the natural environment. -- Highlights: • NEPA statutes created profound environmental protection legislative framework. • Contrary to intent, NEPA does not provide for definitive project monitoring. • Robust project monitoring is essential for enhanced environmental management. • Adaptive database framework is needed to accommodate project-monitoring data.

  14. Preemptive scheduling with position costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In most scheduling models presented in the literature [3, 10], the cost for ... Preemptive scheduling in order to minimize the total position costs also stems.

  15. Using Polarimetry to Determine the CEBAF Beam Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higinbotham, Douglas W. [JLAB

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As Jefferson Lab begins operations with its upgraded CEBAF a ccelerator, the lab once again needs to experimentally determine the absolute beam energy of the machine. Previously, the CE- BAF beam energy was determined using precision measurement s of the bending magnet integral fields along with beam position information. The result obta ined from this technique was cross- checked with elastic scattering from hydrogen where knowle dge of the scattering angles of the electron and proton allow the beam energy to be determined. Wh ile the field integral method will still work with the upgraded machine, the elastic cross sect ion becomes too small to make preci- sion measurements at angles that are large enough to be easil y accessible; thus a new technique for energy determination has been sought. It will be shown th at by making use of polarimetry, one can use CEBAF’s polarized electrons’ g-2 spin precessio n to determine the absolute beam energy. This can be done in a single hall if the parameters of t he machine, such as the injector energy and linac imbalance, are known or with two halls witho ut any knowledge of the machine parameters

  16. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, R.W.; Dobelbower, M.C.

    1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location. 26 figs.

  17. Circular, confined distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnett, Robert W. (Los Alamos, NM); Dobelbower, M. Christian (Toledo, OH)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle beam line is formed with magnetic optics that manipulate the charged particle beam to form the beam having a generally rectangular configuration to a circular beam cross-section having a uniform particle distribution at a predetermined location. First magnetic optics form a charged particle beam to a generally uniform particle distribution over a square planar area at a known first location. Second magnetic optics receive the charged particle beam with the generally square configuration and affect the charged particle beam to output the charged particle beam with a phase-space distribution effective to fold corner portions of the beam toward the core region of the beam. The beam forms a circular configuration having a generally uniform spatial particle distribution over a target area at a predetermined second location.

  18. Diagnostic system for profiling micro-beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (Livermore, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA); Walton, Chris C. (Berkeley, CA)

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for characterization of a micro beam comprising a micro modified Faraday cup assembly including a first layer of material, a second layer of material operatively connected to the first layer of material, a third layer of material operatively connected to the second layer of material, and a fourth layer of material operatively connected to the third layer of material. The first layer of material comprises an electrical conducting material and has at least one first layer radial slit extending through the first layer. An electrical ground is connected to the first layer. The second layer of material comprises an insulating material and has at least one second layer radial slit corresponding to the first layer radial slit in the first layer of material. The second layer radial slit extends through the second layer. The third layer of material comprises a conducting material and has at least one third layer radial slit corresponding to the second layer radial slit in the second layer of material. The third layer radial slit extends through the third layer. The fourth layer of material comprises an electrical conducting material but does not have slits. An electrical measuring device is connected to the fourth layer. The micro modified Faraday cup assembly is positioned to be swept by the micro beam.

  19. Confined energy distribution for charged particle beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jason, Andrew J. (Los Alamos, NM); Blind, Barbara (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle beam is formed to a relatively larger area beam which is well-contained and has a beam area which relatively uniformly deposits energy over a beam target. Linear optics receive an accelerator beam and output a first beam with a first waist defined by a relatively small size in a first dimension normal to a second dimension. Nonlinear optics, such as an octupole magnet, are located about the first waist and output a second beam having a phase-space distribution which folds the beam edges along the second dimension toward the beam core to develop a well-contained beam and a relatively uniform particle intensity across the beam core. The beam may then be expanded along the second dimension to form the uniform ribbon beam at a selected distance from the nonlinear optics. Alternately, the beam may be passed through a second set of nonlinear optics to fold the beam edges in the first dimension. The beam may then be uniformly expanded along the first and second dimensions to form a well-contained, two-dimensional beam for illuminating a two-dimensional target with a relatively uniform energy deposition.

  20. High Performance Network Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez, Jesse E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Network Monitoring requires a substantial use of data and error analysis to overcome issues with clusters. Zenoss and Splunk help to monitor system log messages that are reporting issues about the clusters to monitoring services. Infiniband infrastructure on a number of clusters upgraded to ibmon2. ibmon2 requires different filters to report errors to system administrators. Focus for this summer is to: (1) Implement ibmon2 filters on monitoring boxes to report system errors to system administrators using Zenoss and Splunk; (2) Modify and improve scripts for monitoring and administrative usage; (3) Learn more about networks including services and maintenance for high performance computing systems; and (4) Gain a life experience working with professionals under real world situations. Filters were created to account for clusters running ibmon2 v1.0.0-1 10 Filters currently implemented for ibmon2 using Python. Filters look for threshold of port counters. Over certain counts, filters report errors to on-call system administrators and modifies grid to show local host with issue.

  1. STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR BUNCHED BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems associated with bunched beam stochastic cooling are reviewed. A longitudinal stochastic cooling system for RHIC is under construction and has been partially commissioned. The state of the system and future plans are discussed.

  2. REQUIREMENTS AND GUIDELINES FOR NSLS EXPERIMENTAL BEAM LINE VACUUM SYSTEMS-REVISION B.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FOERSTER,C.

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical beam lines are comprised of an assembly of vacuum valves and shutters referred to as a ''front end'', optical elements to monochromatize, focus and split the photon beam, and an experimental area where a target sample is placed into the photon beam and data from the interaction is detected and recorded. Windows are used to separate sections of beam lines that are not compatible with storage ring ultra high vacuum. Some experimental beam lines share a common vacuum with storage rings. Sections of beam lines are only allowed to vent up to atmospheric pressure using pure nitrogen gas after a vacuum barrier is established to protect ring vacuum. The front end may only be bled up when there is no current in the machine. This is especially true on the VUV storage ring where for most experiments, windows are not used. For the shorter wavelength, more energetic photons of the x-ray ring, beryllium windows are used at various beam line locations so that the monochromator, mirror box or sample chamber may be used in a helium atmosphere or rough vacuum. The window separates ring vacuum from the environment of the downstream beam line components. The stored beam lifetime in the storage rings and the maintenance of desirable reflection properties of optical surfaces depend upon hydrocarbon-free, ultra-high vacuum systems. Storage ring vacuum systems will operate at pressures of {approximately} 1 x 10{sup {minus}10} Torr without beam and {approximately} 1 x 10{sup {minus}9} Torr with beam. Systems are free of hydrocarbons in the sense that no pumps, valves, etc. containing organics are used. Components are all-metal, chemically cleaned and bakeable. To the extent that beam lines share a common vacuum with the storage ring, the same criteria will hold for beam line components. The design philosophy for NSLS beam lines is to use all-metal, hydrocarbon-free front end components and recommend that experimenters use this approach for common vacuum hardware downstream of front ends. O-ring-sealed valves, if used, are not permitted upstream of the monochromator exit aperture. It will be the responsibility of users to demonstrate that their experiment will not degrade the pressure or quality of the storage ring vacuum. As a matter of operating policy, all beam lines will be monitored for prescribed pressure and the contribution of high mass gases to this pressure each time a beam line has been opened to ring vacuum.

  3. Longitudinal bunch monitoring at the Fermilab Tevatron and Main Injector synchrotrons

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thurman-Keup, R; Bhat, C; Blokland, W; Crisp, J; Eddy, N; Fellenz, B; Flora, R; Hahn, A; Hansen, S; Kiper, T; Para, A

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of the longitudinal behavior of the accelerated particle beams at Fermilab is crucial to the optimization and control of the beam and the maximizing of the integrated luminosity for the particle physics experiments. Longitudinal measurements in the Tevatron and Main Injector synchrotrons are based on the analysis of signals from resistive wall current monitors. This article describes the signal processing performed by a 2 GHz-bandwidth oscilloscope together with a computer running a LabVIEW program which calculates the longitudinal beam parameters.

  4. Stability diagram of colliding beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffat, X; Mounet, N; Pieloni, T

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the beam-beam interactions on the stability of impedance mode is discussed. The detuning is evaluated by the means of single particle tracking in arbitrarily complex collision configurations, including lattice non-linearities, and used to numerically evaluate the dispersion integral. This approach also allows the effect of non-Gaussian distributions to be considered. Distributions modified by the action of external noise are discussed.

  5. Single lens laser beam shaper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Chuyu (Newport News, VA); Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA)

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A single lens bullet-shaped laser beam shaper capable of redistributing an arbitrary beam profile into any desired output profile comprising a unitary lens comprising: a convex front input surface defining a focal point and a flat output portion at the focal point; and b) a cylindrical core portion having a flat input surface coincident with the flat output portion of the first input portion at the focal point and a convex rear output surface remote from the convex front input surface.

  6. POSITION DESCRIPTION 2012 TRANSFER MENTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POSITION DESCRIPTION 2012 TRANSFER MENTOR TRANSFER MENTOR AS A STAFF MEMBER Thank you for your interest in the Transfer Mentor position with Orientation and Transition Programs' (OTP) Transfer Mentoring Program. The Transfer Mentor (TM) is a member of the Orientation and Transition Programs' staff

  7. Wireless Technologies for Structural Wireless Technologies for Structural Health MonitoringHealth Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wireless Technologies for Structural Wireless Technologies for Structural Health MonitoringHealth responses · Structural monitoring structural health monitoring: ­ Very few structural "health" monitoring and buildings · Future directions and technology trends Structural Monitoring SystemsStructural Monitoring

  8. Electron beam diagnostic for profiling high power beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Palmer, Todd A. (Livermore, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for characterizing high power electron beams at power levels of 10 kW and above is described. This system is comprised of a slit disk assembly having a multitude of radial slits, a conducting disk with the same number of radial slits located below the slit disk assembly, a Faraday cup assembly located below the conducting disk, and a start-stop target located proximate the slit disk assembly. In order to keep the system from over-heating during use, a heat sink is placed in close proximity to the components discussed above, and an active cooling system, using water, for example, can be integrated into the heat sink. During use, the high power beam is initially directed onto a start-stop target and after reaching its full power is translated around the slit disk assembly, wherein the beam enters the radial slits and the conducting disk radial slits and is detected at the Faraday cup assembly. A trigger probe assembly can also be integrated into the system in order to aid in the determination of the proper orientation of the beam during reconstruction. After passing over each of the slits, the beam is then rapidly translated back to the start-stop target to minimize the amount of time that the high power beam comes in contact with the slit disk assembly. The data obtained by the system is then transferred into a computer system, where a computer tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct the power density distribution of the beam.

  9. An experimental investigation of a large-flange, thin-web, tapered beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, John Van

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test Procedure 3 5 6 9 10 16 I6 20 V DISCUSSION-EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL RESULTS Deflectlons Stresses V I CONCLUS I ONS AND RECOMMENDAT I ONS APPEND IX SAMPLE CALCULATIONS Design . Fabrication Loads Web Stresses . Stiffener Design... functions of position on the beam. This suggests an iterative type of Integration for solution. l. owery has programmed Equation 4 for 6 the IBM 709 computer specifically for a three-span overhanging beam. (See Figure &) The results of a thorough design...

  10. An experimental investigation of a large-flange, thin-web, tapered beam 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, John Van

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test Procedure 3 5 6 9 10 16 I6 20 V DISCUSSION-EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL RESULTS Deflectlons Stresses V I CONCLUS I ONS AND RECOMMENDAT I ONS APPEND IX SAMPLE CALCULATIONS Design . Fabrication Loads Web Stresses . Stiffener Design... functions of position on the beam. This suggests an iterative type of Integration for solution. l. owery has programmed Equation 4 for 6 the IBM 709 computer specifically for a three-span overhanging beam. (See Figure &) The results of a thorough design...

  11. KTeV beam systems design report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bocean, V.; Childress, S.; Coleman, R. [and others

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary and secondary beams for the KTeV experiments E799-II and E832 are discussed. The specifications are presented and justified. The technical details of the implementation of the primary beam transport and stability are detailed. The target, beam dump, and radiation safety issues are discussed. The details of the collimation system for the pair of secondary beams are presented.

  12. Evaluation of delivered monitor unit accuracy of gated step-and-shoot IMRT using a two-dimensional detector array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheong, Kwang-Ho; Kang, Sei-Kwon; Lee, MeYeon; Kim, Su SSan; Park, SoAh; Hwang, Tae-Jin; Kim, Kyoung Ju; Oh, Do Hoon; Bae, Hoonsik; Suh, Tae-Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul, 431070 (Korea, Republic of) and Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137701 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul 431070 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul 137701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To overcome the problem of organ motion in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), gated IMRT is often used for the treatment of lung cancer. In this study, the authors investigated the accuracy of the delivered monitor units (MUs) from each segment during gated IMRT using a two-dimensional detector array for user-specific verification purpose. Methods: The authors planned a 6 MV photon, seven-port step-and-shoot lung IMRT delivery. The respiration signals for gated IMRT delivery were obtained from the one-dimensional moving phantom using the real-time position management (RPM) system (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). The beams were delivered using a Clinac iX (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with the Millennium 120 MLC. The MatriXX (IBA Dosimetry GmbH, Germany) was validated through consistency and reproducibility tests as well as comparison with measurements from a Farmer-type ion chamber. The authors delivered beams with varying dose rates and duty cycles and analyzed the MatriXX data to evaluate MU delivery accuracy. Results: There was quite good agreement between the planned segment MUs and the MUs computed from the MatriXX within {+-}2% error. The beam-on times computed from the MatriXX data were almost identical for all cases, and they matched well with the RPM beam-on and beam-off signals. A slight difference was observed between them, but it was less than 40 ms. The gated IMRT delivery demonstrated an MU delivery accuracy that was equivalent to ungated IMRT, and the delivered MUs with a gating signal agreed with the planned MUs within {+-}0.5 MU regardless of dose rate and duty cycle. Conclusions: The authors can conclude that gated IMRT is able to deliver an accurate dose to a patient during a procedure. The authors believe that the methodology and results can be transferred to other vendors' devices, particularly those that do not provide MLC log data for a verification purpose.

  13. POSITION DESCRIPTION ASSISTANT DIRECTOR FOR BUSINESS SERVICES Position Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    annually), financial reporting and human resource management. Conducts financial analysis and assists resource activities. Set clear staff expectations and provide direction using SMART goals and LEAD, enrollment data, operating and capital budgets, and 10 year financial projections, this position

  14. Proposal for continuously-variable neutrino beam energy for the NuMI facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostin, Mikhail; Kopp, Sacha; /Texas U.; Messier, Mark; /Harvard U.; Harris, Deborah A.; Hylen, Jim; Para, Adam; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NuMI Facility was intended to be flexibly changed between 3 energies of beams, LE, ME, and HE. However, the changeover requires extensive downtime to move and realign horns and the target. We propose to implement a flexible arrangement where the target can be remotely moved in the beamline direction to change the beam energy and the horns remain fixed. In addition to having the attractive feature of keeping the horn optics fixed, the motion of the target can be performed more quickly and hence on a more frequent basis. We discuss potential increases in statistics in the high energy region, systematic cross-checks available, and the improved beam monitoring capabilities with such variable energy beams.

  15. Head-on beam-beam tune shifts with high brightness beams in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemany, R; Calaga, R; Cornelis, K; Fitterer, M; Giachino, R; Herr, W; McPherson, A; Miyamoto, R; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Redaelli, S; Roncarolo, F; Schaumann, M; Suykerbuyk, R; Trad, G; Paret, S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this experiment (fills 1765, 1766) we have collided bunches with highest brightness, i.e. small emittances and high intensities, to explore the achievable beam-beam tune shift for head-on collisions. Different parameters and filling schemes have been used for this experiment and tune shifts above 0.015 have been achieved in single collisions and above 0.030 for two collision points.

  16. Measurements of neutron dose equivalent for a proton therapy center using uniform scanning proton beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng Yuanshui; Liu Yaxi; Zeidan, Omar; Schreuder, Andries Niek; Keole, Sameer [ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); INTEGRIS Cancer Insititute, 5911 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States); ProCure Treatment Centers, 420 North Walnut Street, Bloomington, Indiana 47404 (United States); ProCure Proton Therapy Center, 5901 West Memorial Road, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73142 (United States)

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Neutron exposure is of concern in proton therapy, and varies with beam delivery technique, nozzle design, and treatment conditions. Uniform scanning is an emerging treatment technique in proton therapy, but neutron exposure for this technique has not been fully studied. The purpose of this study is to investigate the neutron dose equivalent per therapeutic dose, H/D, under various treatment conditions for uniform scanning beams employed at our proton therapy center. Methods: Using a wide energy neutron dose equivalent detector (SWENDI-II, ThermoScientific, MA), the authors measured H/D at 50 cm lateral to the isocenter as a function of proton range, modulation width, beam scanning area, collimated field size, and snout position. They also studied the influence of other factors on neutron dose equivalent, such as aperture material, the presence of a compensator, and measurement locations. They measured H/D for various treatment sites using patient-specific treatment parameters. Finally, they compared H/D values for various beam delivery techniques at various facilities under similar conditions. Results: H/D increased rapidly with proton range and modulation width, varying from about 0.2 mSv/Gy for a 5 cm range and 2 cm modulation width beam to 2.7 mSv/Gy for a 30 cm range and 30 cm modulation width beam when 18 Multiplication-Sign 18 cm{sup 2} uniform scanning beams were used. H/D increased linearly with the beam scanning area, and decreased slowly with aperture size and snout retraction. The presence of a compensator reduced the H/D slightly compared with that without a compensator present. Aperture material and compensator material also have an influence on neutron dose equivalent, but the influence is relatively small. H/D varied from about 0.5 mSv/Gy for a brain tumor treatment to about 3.5 mSv/Gy for a pelvic case. Conclusions: This study presents H/D as a function of various treatment parameters for uniform scanning proton beams. For similar treatment conditions, the H/D value per uncollimated beam size for uniform scanning beams was slightly lower than that from a passive scattering beam and higher than that from a pencil beam scanning beam, within a factor of 2. Minimizing beam scanning area could effectively reduce neutron dose equivalent for uniform scanning beams, down to the level close to pencil beam scanning.

  17. eRHIC ring-ring design with head-on beam-beam compensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montag,C.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Pozdeyev, E.; Fischer, W.; MacKay, W. W.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The luminosity of the eRHIC ring-ring design is limited by the beam-beam effect exerted on the electron beam. Recent simulation studies have shown that the beam-beam limit can be increased by means of an electron lens that compensates the beam-beam effect experienced by the electron beam. This scheme requires proper design of the electron ring, providing the correct betatron phase advance between interaction point and electron lens. We review the performance of the eRHIC ring-ring version and discuss various parameter sets, based on different cooling schemes for the proton/ion beam.

  18. Laser beaming demonstrations to high-orbit satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipinski, R.J.; Meister, D.C.; Tucker, S. [and others

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser power beaming to satellites and orbital transfer vehicles requires the accurate pointing of a low-divergence laser beam to its target, whether the target is in the sunlight or the earth`s shadow. The Air Force Phillips Laboratory (AFPL) has demonstrated reduction in the image size of stars by a factor of 10 or more by using laser beacons and adaptive optics for atmospheric compensation. This same technology is applicable to reducing the divergence of laser beams propagated from earth to space. A team of Phillips Laboratory, COMSAT Laboratories, and Sandia National Laboratories plans to demonstrate the state of the art in this area with laser-beaming demonstrations to high-orbit satellites. The demonstrations will utilize the 1.5-m diameter telescope with adaptive optics at the AFPL Starfire Optical Range (SOR) and a ruby laser provided by the Air Force and Sandia (1--50 kill and 6 ms at 694.3 nm). The first targets will be corner-cube retro-reflectors left on the moon by the Apollo 11, 14, and 15 landings. We will attempt to use adaptive optics for atmospheric compensation to demonstrate accurate and reliable beam projection with a series of shots over a span of time and shot angle. We will utilize the return signal from the retro-reflectors to help determine the beam diameter on the moon and the variations in pointing accuracy caused by atmospheric tilt. This will be especially challenging because the retro-reflectors will need to be in the lunar shadow to allow detection over background light. If the results from this experiment are encouraging, we will at a later date direct the beam at a COMSAT satellite in geosynchronous orbit as it goes into the shadow of the earth. We will utilize an onboard monitor to measure the current generated in the solar panels on the satellite while the beam is present. A threshold irradiance of about 4 W/m{sup 2} on orbit is needed for this demonstration.

  19. Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Beta beam R&D status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Nufact 08 1 Beta beam R&D status Elena Wildner, CERN on behalf of the Beta Beam Study Group EURISOL/Euronu #12;Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP Nufact08Nufact08 Outline Recall, EURISOL Ion Production Loss Management Improvements New Program, EuroNu 2 #12;Nufact 2008 The Beta Beam WP

  20. Monitoring of vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for monitoring vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a high-temperature environment has an excitation source producing electromagnetic radiation, an optical path having an optical probe optically communicating the electromagnetic radiation received at a proximal end to a distal end, a spectrometer or polychromator, a detector, and a positioner coupled to the first optical path. The positioner can slidably move the distal end of the optical probe to maintain the distal end position with respect to an area of a material undergoing combustion. The emitted wavelength can be directed to a detector in a single optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration, in a dual optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration or in a dual optical probe 90.degree. side scattered configuration. The apparatus can be used to monitor an emitted wavelength of energy from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon as it fluoresces in a high temperature environment.

  1. Rack protection monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Stanley G. (Wheaton, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hardwired, fail-safe rack protection monitor utilizes electromechanical relays to respond to the detection by condition sensors of abnormal or alarm conditions (such as smoke, temperature, wind or water) that might adversely affect or damage equipment being protected. When the monitor is reset, the monitor is in a detection mode with first and second alarm relay coils energized. If one of the condition sensors detects an abnormal condition, the first alarm relay coil will be de-energized, but the second alarm relay coil will remain energized. This results in both a visual and an audible alarm being activated. If a second alarm condition is detected by another one of the condition sensors while the first condition sensor is still detecting the first alarm condition, both the first alarm relay coil and the second alarm relay coil will be de-energized. With both the first and second alarm relay coils de-energized, both a visual and an audible alarm will be activated. In addition, power to the protected equipment will be terminated and an alarm signal will be transmitted to an alarm central control. The monitor can be housed in a separate enclosure so as to provide an interface between a power supply for the protected equipment and the protected equipment.

  2. INTRODUCTION MONITORING SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jantsch, Axel

    , the heat level can be monitored in hotspot regions of the network. This is important for 3D systems consumption per cycle (based on the rate of packet flow) can be measured using the Energy meterC components and a single testbench simulation is performed by reading all input specification. Data samples

  3. Reactor Monitoring with Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Cribier

    2007-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The fundamental knowledge on neutrinos acquired in the recent years open the possibility of applied neutrino physics. Among it the automatic and non intrusive monitoring of nuclear reactor by its antineutrino signal could be very valuable to IAEA in charge of the control of nuclear power plants. Several efforts worldwide have already started.

  4. A network security monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heberlein, L.T.; Dias, G.V.; Levitt, K.N.; Mukherjee, B.; Wood, J.; Wolber, D. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of security in computer networks is a rapidly growing area of interest because of the proliferation of networks and the paucity of security measures in most current networks. Since most networks consist of a collection of inter-connected local area networks (LANs), this paper concentrates on the security-related issues in a single broadcast LAN such as Ethernet. Specifically, we formalize various possible network attacks and outline methods of detecting them. Our basic strategy is to develop profiles of usage of network resources and then compare current usage patterns with the historical profile to determine possible security violations. Thus, our work is similar to the host-based intrusion-detection systems such as SRI's IDES. Different from such systems, however, is our use of a hierarchical model to refine the focus of the intrusion-detection mechanism. We also report on the development of our experimental LAN monitor currently under implementation. Several network attacks have been simulated and results on how the monitor has been able to detect these attacks are also analyzed. Initial results demonstrate that many network attacks are detectable with our monitor, although it can surely be defeated. Current work is focusing on the integration of network monitoring with host-based techniques. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  5. The Position of the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horn, Berthold K.P.

    The appearance of a surface depends dramatically on how it is illuminated. In order to interpret properly satellite and aerial imagery, it is necessary to know the position of the sun in the sky. This is particularly ...

  6. Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices, and associated methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCown, Steven H; Derr, Kurt W; Rohde, Kenneth W

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless device monitoring systems and monitoring devices include a communications module for receiving wireless communications of a wireless device. Processing circuitry is coupled with the communications module and configured to process the wireless communications to determine whether the wireless device is authorized or unauthorized to be present at the monitored area based on identification information of the wireless device. Methods of monitoring for the presence and identity of wireless devices are also provided.

  7. Generate Uniform Transverse Distributed Electron Beam along a Beam Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been reported that transverse distribution shaping can help to further enhance the energy extraction efficiency in a terawatt, tapered X-ray free-electron laser. Thus, methods of creating and keeping almost uniform transverse distributed (UTD) beam within undulators are required. This study shows that a UTD electron beam can be generated within evenly distributed drift sections where undulators can be placed, by means of octupoles and particular optics. A concrete design is presented, and numerical simulations are done to verify the proposed method.

  8. Precision laser surveying instrument using atmospheric turbulence compensation by determining the absolute displacement between two laser beam components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric effects on sighting measurements are compensated for by adjusting any sighting measurements using a correction factor that does not depend on atmospheric state conditions such as temperature, pressure, density or turbulence. The correction factor is accurately determined using a precisely measured physical separation between two color components of a light beam (or beams) that has been generated using either a two-color laser or two lasers that project different colored beams. The physical separation is precisely measured by fixing the position of a short beam pulse and measuring the physical separation between the two fixed-in-position components of the beam. This precisely measured physical separation is then used in a relationship that includes the indexes of refraction for each of the two colors of the laser beam in the atmosphere through which the beam is projected, thereby to determine the absolute displacement of one wavelength component of the laser beam from a straight line of sight for that projected component of the beam. This absolute displacement is useful to correct optical measurements, such as those developed in surveying measurements that are made in a test area that includes the same dispersion effects of the atmosphere on the optical measurements. The means and method of the invention are suitable for use with either single-ended systems or a double-ended systems.

  9. H- Beam Loss and Evidence for Intrabeam Stripping in the LANSCE Linac

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelsey, Charles T. IV [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCrady, Rodney C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pang, Xiaoying [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The LANSCE accelerator complex is a multi-beam, multi-user facility that provides high-intensity H{sup +} and H{sup -} particle beams for a variety of user programs. At the heart of the facility is a room temperature linac that is comprised of 100-MeV drift tube and 800-MeV coupled cavity linac (CCL) structures. Although both beams are similar in intensity and emittance at 100 MeV, the beam-loss monitors along the CCL show a trend of increased loss for H{sup -} that is not present for H{sup +}. This difference is attributed to stripping mechanisms that affect H{sup -} and not H{sup +}. We present the results of an analysis of H{sup -} beam loss along the CCL that incorporates beam spill measurements, beam dynamics simulations, analytical models and radiation transport estimates using the MCNPX code. The results indicate a significant fraction of these additional losses result from intrabeam stripping.

  10. Optics measurement and correction during beam acceleration in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Marusic, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    To minimize operational complexities, setup of collisions in high energy circular colliders typically involves acceleration with near constant ?-functions followed by application of strong focusing quadrupoles at the interaction points (IPs) for the final beta-squeeze. At the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) beam acceleration and optics squeeze are performed simultaneously. In the past, beam optics correction at RHIC has taken place at injection and at final energy with some interpolation of corrections into the acceleration cycle. Recent measurements of the beam optics during acceleration and squeeze have evidenced significant beta-beats which if corrected could minimize undesirable emittance dilutions and maximize the spin polarization of polarized proton beams by avoidance of higher-order multipole fields sampled by particles within the bunch. In this report the methodology now operational at RHIC for beam optics corrections during acceleration with simultaneous beta-squeeze will be presented together with measurements which conclusively demonstrate the superior beam control. As a valuable by-product, the corrections have minimized the beta-beat at the profile monitors so reducing the dominant error in and providing more precise measurements of the evolution of the beam emittances during acceleration.

  11. Contribution of Gular Pumping to Lung Ventilation in Monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brainerd, Elizabeth

    Contribution of Gular Pumping to Lung Ventilation in Monitor Lizards Tomasz Owerkowicz,1 * Colleen that lizards are subject to a speed- dependent axial constraint that prevents effective lung ventilation during locomotion, varanids use a positive pressure gular pump to assist lung ventilation. Disabling the gular pump

  12. Positive Amplitudes In The Amplituhedron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nima Arkani-Hamed; Andrew Hodges; Jaroslav Trnka

    2014-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The all-loop integrand for scattering amplitudes in planar N = 4 SYM is determined by an "amplitude form" with logarithmic singularities on the boundary of the amplituhedron. In this note we provide strong evidence for a new striking property of the superamplitude, which we conjecture to be true to all loop orders: the amplitude form is positive when evaluated inside the amplituhedron. The statement is sensibly formulated thanks to the natural "bosonization" of the superamplitude associated with the amplituhedron geometry. However this positivity is not manifest in any of the current approaches to scattering amplitudes, and in particular not in the cellulations of the amplituhedron related to on-shell diagrams and the positive grassmannian. The surprising positivity of the form suggests the existence of a "dual amplituhedron" formulation where this feature would be made obvious. We also suggest that the positivity is associated with an extended picture of amplituhedron geometry, with the amplituhedron sitting inside a co-dimension one surface separating "legal" and "illegal" local singularities of the amplitude. We illustrate this in several simple examples, obtaining new expressions for amplitudes not associated with any triangulations, but following in a more invariant manner from a global view of the positive geometry.

  13. Longitudinal density monitor for the LHC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeff, A.; Andersen, M.; Boccardi, A.; Bozyigit, S.; Bravin, E.; Lefevre, T.; Rabiller, A.; Roncarolo, F.; Welsch, C. P.; Fisher, A. S.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The longitudinal density monitor (LDM) is primarily intended for the measurement of the particle population in nominally empty rf buckets. These so-called satellite or ghost bunches can cause problems for machine protection as well as influencing the luminosity calibration of the LHC. The high dynamic range of the system allows measurement of ghost bunches with as little as 0.01% of the main bunch population at the same time as characterization of the main bunches. The LDM is a single-photon counting system using visible synchrotron light. The photon detector is a silicon avalanche photodiode operated in Geiger mode, which allows the longitudinal distribution of the LHC beams to be measured with a resolution of 90 ps. Results from the LDM are presented, including a proposed method for constructing a 3-dimensional beam density map by scanning the LDM sensor in the transverse plane. In addition, we present a scheme to improve the sensitivity of the system by using an optical switching technique.

  14. Circuit breaker monitoring application using wireless communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ved, Nitin

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    synchronizes recorded data to a global time standard enabling system-wide applications to use the recorded data. ? Ease of installation: The circuit breaker monitoring system can be installed at a substation within minutes by one or two personnel. The system... is powered by a 130V DC source, usually a battery in the substation control house, called the supply volt- age. All elements of the circuit are connected between the positive and the negative terminals of the supply voltage.Another voltage source called...

  15. Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); McKinzie, II. Billy John (Houston, TX)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

  16. Physics Opportunities with Meson Beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briscoe, William J; Haberzettl, Helmut; Manley, D Mark; Naruki, Megumi; Strakovsky, Igor I; Swanson, Eric S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two decades, meson photo- and electro-production data of unprecedented quality and quantity have been measured at electromagnetic facilities worldwide. By contrast, the meson-beam data for the same hadronic final states are mostly outdated and largely of poor quality, or even nonexistent, and thus provide inadequate input to help interpret, analyze, and exploit the full potential of the new electromagnetic data. To reap the full benefit of the high-precision electromagnetic data, new high-statistics data from measurements with meson beams, with good angle and energy coverage for a wide range of reactions, are critically needed to advance our knowledge in baryon and meson spectroscopy and other related areas of hadron physics. To address this situation, a state of-the-art meson-beam facility needs to be constructed. The present paper summarizes unresolved issues in hadron physics and outlines the vast opportunities and advances that only become possible with such a facility.

  17. Divergence of optical vortex beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddy, Salla Gangi; Prabhakar, Shashi; Anwar, Ali; Banerji, J; Singh, R P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that the propagation of optical vortices in free space can be analysed by using the width ($w(z)$) of the host Gaussian beam and the inner and outer radii of the vortex beam at the source plane ($z=0$) as defined in \\textit{Optics Letters \\textbf{39,} 4364-4367 (2014)}. We also studied the divergence of vortex beams, considered as the rate of change of inner or outer radius with the propagation distance, and found that it varies with the order in the same way as that of the inner and outer radii at zero propagation distance. These results may be useful in designing optical fibers for orbital angular momentum modes that play a crucial role in quantum communication.

  18. Rulison Monitoring Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Project Rulison Monitoring Plan has been developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management's mission to protect human health and the environment. The purpose of the plan is to monitor fluids from gas wells for radionuclides that would indicate contamination is migrating from the Rulison detonation zone to producing gas wells, allowing action to be taken before the contamination could pose a risk. The Monitoring Plan (1) lists the contaminants present and identifies those that have the greatest potential to migrate from the detonation zone (radionuclide source term), (2) identifies locations that monitor the most likely transport pathways, (3) identifies which fluids will be sampled (gas and liquid) and why, (4) establishes the frequency of sampling, and (5) specifies the most practical analyses and where the analysis results will be reported. The plan does not affect the long-term hydrologic sampling conducted by DOE since 1972, which will continue for the purpose of sampling shallow groundwater and surface water near the site. The Monitoring Plan was developed in anticipation of gas wells being drilled progressively nearer the Rulison site. DOE sampled 10 gas wells in 1997 and 2005 at distances ranging from 2.7 to 7.6 miles from the site to establish background concentrations for radionuclides. In a separate effort, gas industry operators and the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) developed an industry sampling and analysis plan that was implemented in 2007. The industry plan requires the sampling of gas wells within 3 miles of the site, with increased requirements for wells within 1 mile of the site. The DOE plan emphasizes the sampling of wells near the site (Figure 1), specifically those with a bottom-hole location of 1 mile or less from the detonation, depending on the direction relative to the natural fracture trend of the producing formation. Studies indicate that even the most mobile radionuclides created by the test are unlikely to migrate appreciable distances (hundreds of feet) from the detonation zone (Cooper et al. 2007, 2009). The Monitoring Plan was developed to provide a cautious and comprehensive approach for detecting any potential contaminant migration from the Rulison test site. It also provides an independent confirmation of results from the industry sampling and analysis plan while effectively increasing the sampling frequency of wells near the site.

  19. Condition Monitoring System for Reinforced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    containing dissolved ionic species such as chlorides. Since concrete is a porous material, with timeCondition Monitoring System for Reinforced Concrete Structures PROBLEM THIS TECHNOLOGY SOLVES: Patent pending concrete condition monitoring system providing `real-time' information on temperature

  20. Enhanced modified faraday cup for determination of power density distribution of electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W. (Danville, CA); Teruya, Alan T. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved tomographic technique for determining the power distribution of an electron or ion beam using electron beam profile data acquired by an enhanced modified Faraday cup to create an image of the current density in high and low power ion or electron beams. A refractory metal disk with a number of radially extending slits, one slit being about twice the width of the other slits, is placed above a Faraday cup. The electron or ion beam is swept in a circular pattern so that its path crosses each slit in a perpendicular manner, thus acquiring all the data needed for a reconstruction in one circular sweep. The enlarged slit enables orientation of the beam profile with respect to the coordinates of the welding chamber. A second disk having slits therein is positioned below the first slit disk and inside of the Faraday cup and provides a shield to eliminate the majority of secondary electrons and ions from leaving the Faraday cup. Also, a ring is located below the second slit disk to help minimize the amount of secondary electrons and ions from being produced. In addition, a beam trap is located in the Faraday cup to provide even more containment of the electron or ion beam when full beam current is being examined through the center hole of the modified Faraday cup.

  1. On compensating tune spread induced by space charge in bunched beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litvinenko, V. N.; Wang, G.

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Space charge effects play significant role in modern-day accelerators. These effects frequently constrain attainable beam parameters in an accelerator, or, in an accelerator chain. They also could limit the luminosity of hadron colliders operating either at low energies or with a sub-TeV high brightness hadron beams. The latter is applied for strongly cooled proton and ion beams in eRHIC – the proposed future electron-ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A number of schemes for compensating space charge effects in a coasting (e.g. continuous) hadron beam were proposed and some of them had been tested. Using a proper transverse profile of the electron beam (or plasma column) for a coasting beam would compensate both the tune shift and the tune spread in the hadron beam. But all of these methods do not address the issue of tune spread compensation of a bunched hadron beam, e.g. the tune shift dependence on the longitudinal position inside the bunch. In this paper we propose and evaluate a novel idea of using a co-propagating electron bunch with miss-matched longitudinal velocity to compensate the space charge induced tune-shift and tune spread. We present a number of practical examples of such system.

  2. Advanced monitoring of machining operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teti, Roberto; Jemielniak, Krzysztof; O'Donnell, Garret; Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    However, the latest modern open control systems allow accesssystems and paradigms In monitoring and control activities for modern

  3. Advanced monitoring of machining operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teti, Roberto; Jemielniak, Krzysztof; O'Donnell, Garret; Dornfeld, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems and paradigms In monitoring and control activities for modernHowever, the latest modern open control systems allow access

  4. Molecular beam studies of reaction dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major thrust of this research project is to elucidate detailed dynamics of simple elementary reactions that are theoretically important and to unravel the mechanism of complex chemical reactions or photochemical processes that play important roles in many macroscopic processes. Molecular beams of reactants are used to study individual reactive encounters between molecules or to monitor photodissociation events in a collision-free environment. Most of the information is derived from measurement of the product fragment energy, angular, and state distributions. Recent activities are centered on the mechanisms of elementary chemical reactions involving oxygen atoms with unsaturated hydrocarbons, the dynamics of endothermic substitution reactions, the dependence of the chemical reactivity of electronically excited atoms on the alignment of excited orbitals, the primary photochemical processes of polyatomic molecules, intramolecular energy transfer of chemically activated and locally excited molecules, the energetics of free radicals that are important to combustion processes, the infrared-absorption spectra of carbonium ions and hydrated hydronium ions, and bond-selective photodissociation through electric excitation.

  5. SUMMARY OF WORKING GROUP ON COLLECTIVE INSTABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zisman, M.S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that beam position monitors (BPM's), bellows, and kickersBeam PositiOn Monitors The BPM's for RHIC are striplinesby: I = 50 n. Z) ( n and BPM = -I ·If . Z 2L (qlo)2 21t Z.L

  6. Structural health monitoring by ultrasonic guided waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartoli, Ivan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Viola, E. , “Structural Health Monitoring of Multi-wireEncyclopedia of Structural Health Monitoring, C. Boller, F-D.L. (2001) “Structural health monitoring system based on

  7. Guided wave monitoring of prestressing tendons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nucera, Claudio

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20] and for structural health monitoring of post-tensionedNDE) and Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) purposes [1].NDE) and the structural health monitoring (SHM) of solids

  8. Effective Health Monitoring Strategies for Complex Structures /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haynes, Colin Michael

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Optimization in Structural Health Monitoring, Proc. Worldaxioms of structural health monitoring, Proc. R. Soc. A.the future of structural health monitoring, Phil. Trans. R.

  9. Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Reliable and cost-effective monitoring, verification and accounting...

  10. Sandia Energy - Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Home Climate & Earth Systems WaterEnergy Nexus Water Monitoring & Treatment Technology Water Monitoring & Treatment Technologyashoter2015-0...

  11. Shimmed electron beam welding process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feng, Ganjiang (Clifton Park, NY); Nowak, Daniel Anthony (Alplaus, NY); Murphy, John Thomas (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modified electron beam welding process effects welding of joints between superalloy materials by inserting a weldable shim in the joint and heating the superalloy materials with an electron beam. The process insures a full penetration of joints with a consistent percentage of filler material and thereby improves fatigue life of the joint by three to four times as compared with the prior art. The process also allows variable shim thickness and joint fit-up gaps to provide increased flexibility for manufacturing when joining complex airfoil structures and the like.

  12. Finding beam focus errors automatically

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, M.J.; Clearwater, S.H.; Kleban, S.D.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated method for finding beam focus errors using an optimization program called COMFORT-PLUS. The steps involved in finding the correction factors using COMFORT-PLUS has been used to find the beam focus errors for two damping rings at the SLAC Linear Collider. The program is to be used as an off-line program to analyze actual measured data for any SLC system. A limitation on the application of this procedure is found to be that it depends on the magnitude of the machine errors. Another is that the program is not totally automated since the user must decide a priori where to look for errors. (LEW)

  13. Antineutrino monitoring for the Iranian heavy water reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Christensen; Patrick Huber; Patrick Jaffke; Thomas Shea

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this note we discuss the potential application of antineutrino monitoring to the Iranian heavy water reactor at Arak, the IR-40, as a non-proliferation measure. We demonstrate that an above ground detector positioned right outside the IR-40 reactor building could meet and in some cases significantly exceed the verification goals identified by IAEA for plutonium production or diversion from declared inventories. In addition to monitoring the reactor during operation, observing antineutrino emissions from long-lived fission products could also allow monitoring the reactor when it is shutdown. Antineutrino monitoring could also be used to distinguish different levels of fuel enrichment. Most importantly, these capabilities would not require a complete reactor operational history and could provide a means to re-establish continuity of knowledge in safeguards conclusions should this become necessary.

  14. Total Energy Monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, S

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The total energy monitor (TE) is a thermal sensor that determines the total energy of each FEL pulse based on the temperature rise induced in a silicon wafer upon absorption of the FEL. The TE provides a destructive measurement of the FEL pulse energy in real-time on a pulse-by-pulse basis. As a thermal detector, the TE is expected to suffer least from ultra-fast non-linear effects and to be easy to calibrate. It will therefore primarily be used to cross-calibrate other detectors such as the Gas Detector or the Direct Imager during LCLS commissioning. This document describes the design of the TE and summarizes the considerations and calculations that have led to it. This document summarizes the physics behind the operation of the Total Energy Monitor at LCLS and derives associated engineering specifications.

  15. Corrosion Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Russ Braunling

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Corrosion Monitoring System (CMS) program developed and demonstrated a continuously on-line system that provides real-time corrosion information. The program focused on detecting pitting corrosion in its early stages. A new invention called the Intelligent Ultrasonic Probe (IUP) was patented on the program. The IUP uses ultrasonic guided waves to detect small defects and a Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) algorithm to provide an image of the pits. Testing of the CMS demonstrated the capability to detect pits with dimensionality in the sub-millimeter range. The CMS was tested in both the laboratory and in a pulp and paper industrial plant. The system is capable of monitoring the plant from a remote location using the internet.

  16. Tritium monitoring techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVore, J.R.; Buckner, M.A.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of their operations, the U.S. Navy is required to store or maintain operational nuclear weapons on ships and at shore facilities. Since these weapons contain tritium, there are safety implications relevant to the exposure of personnel to tritium. This is particularly important for shipboard operations since these types of environments can make low-level tritium detection difficult. Some of these ships have closed systems, which can result in exposure to tritium at levels that are below normally acceptable levels but could still cause radiation doses that are higher than necessary or could hamper ship operations. This report describes the state of the art in commercial tritium detection and monitoring and recommends approaches for low-level tritium monitoring in these environments.

  17. Cycle isolation monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svensen, L.M. III; Zeigler, J.R.; Todd, F.D.; Alder, G.C. [Santee Copper, Moncks Corner, SC (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many factors to monitor in power plants, but one that is frequently overlooked is cycle isolation. Often this is an area where plant personnel can find 'low hanging fruit' with great return on investment, especially high energy valve leakage. This type of leakage leads to increased heat rate, potential valve damage and lost generation. The fundamental question to ask is 'What is 100 Btu/kW-hr of heat rate worth to your plant? On a 600 MW coal-fired power plant, a 1% leakage can lead to an 81 Btu/kW-hr impact on the main steam cycle and a 64 Btu/kW-hr impact on the hot reheat cycle. The article gives advice on methods to assist in detecting leaking valves and to monitor cycle isolation. A software product, TP. Plus-CIM was designed to estimate flow rates of potentially leaking valves.

  18. Texas Rangeland Monitoring: Level Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanselka, C. Wayne; Hart, Charles R.; McGinty, Allan

    2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    L-5455 10/06 Texas Rangeland Monitoring: Level Three C. Wayne Hanselka, Charles R. Hart and Allan McGinty* Monitoring is an essential tool in rangeland management. Monitoring is the way to determine whether goals are being achieved with current...

  19. Upright cone beam CT imaging using the onboard imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fave, Xenia, E-mail: xjfave@mdanderson.org; Martin, Rachael [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Yang, Jinzhong; Balter, Peter; Court, Laurence [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Carvalho, Luis [Varian Medical Systems, Zug 6303 (Switzerland)] [Varian Medical Systems, Zug 6303 (Switzerland); Pan, Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)] [Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Many patients could benefit from being treated in an upright position. The objectives of this study were to determine whether cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) could be used to acquire upright images for treatment planning and to demonstrate whether reconstruction of upright images maintained accurate geometry and Hounsfield units (HUs). Methods: A TrueBeam linac was programmed in developer mode to take upright CBCT images. The gantry head was positioned at 0°, and the couch was rotated to 270°. The x-ray source and detector arms were extended to their lateral positions. The x-ray source and gantry remained stationary as fluoroscopic projections were taken and the couch was rotated from 270° to 90°. The x-ray tube current was normalized to deposit the same dose (measured using a calibrated Farmer ion chamber) as that received during a clinical helical CT scan to the center of a cylindrical, polyethylene phantom. To extend the field of view, two couch rotation scans were taken with the detector offset 15 cm superiorly and then 15 cm inferiorly. The images from these two scans were stitched together before reconstruction. Upright reconstructions were compared to reconstructions from simulation CT scans of the same phantoms. Two methods were investigated for correcting the HUs, including direct calibration and mapping the values from a simulation CT. Results: Overall geometry, spatial linearity, and high contrast resolution were maintained in upright reconstructions. Some artifacts were created and HU accuracy was compromised; however, these limitations could be removed by mapping the HUs from a simulation CT to the upright reconstruction for treatment planning. Conclusions: The feasibility of using the TrueBeam linac to take upright CBCT images was demonstrated. This technique is straightforward to implement and could be of enormous benefit to patients with thoracic tumors or those who find a supine position difficult to endure.

  20. APS Technical Systems Monitoring Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photon Source Technical Systems Accelerator Systems Storage Ring Status for the past 24 hours with real Time of Day User beam delineated. Current, Lifetime, History with 24-hr...

  1. Electron Beam Transport in Advanced Plasma Wave Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Ronald L

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this grant was to develop a diagnostic for relativistic plasma wave accelerators based on injecting a low energy electron beam (5-50keV) perpendicular to the plasma wave and observing the distortion of the electron beam's cross section due to the plasma wave's electrostatic fields. The amount of distortion would be proportional to the plasma wave amplitude, and is the basis for the diagnostic. The beat-wave scheme for producing plasma waves, using two CO2 laser beam, was modeled using a leap-frog integration scheme to solve the equations of motion. Single electron trajectories and corresponding phase space diagrams were generated in order to study and understand the details of the interaction dynamics. The electron beam was simulated by combining thousands of single electrons, whose initial positions and momenta were selected by random number generators. The model was extended by including the interactions of the electrons with the CO2 laser fields of the beat wave, superimposed with the plasma wave fields. The results of the model were used to guide the design and construction of a small laboratory experiment that may be used to test the diagnostic idea.

  2. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  3. Thermographic calorimetry of the neutral beam injectors heating beams at TJ-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuentes, C.; Liniers, M.; Guasp, J.; Doncel, J.; Botija, J.; Wolfers, G.; Alonso, J.; Acedo, M.; Sanchez, E.; Marcon, G.; Weber, M.; Carrasco, R.; Sarasola, X.; Zurro, B.; Tera, J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion/Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new beam diagnostic based on infrared thermography has been developed for the neutral beam injectors of the stellarator TJ-II. A highly anisotropic movable target intercepts the beam at its entrance into the stellarator. The thermal print of the beam is captured with a high resolution infrared camera. The infrared images of the target can be translated, with the appropriate analysis, into power density patterns of the beam. The system is calibrated in situ with two thermocouples adiabatically mounted in the target. The two-dimensional beam power density distribution can be accurately characterized allowing beam optimization with respect to the different parameters involved in the beam formation and transport.

  4. Beatty Wind Monitoring Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurt, Rick

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER) and Valley Electric Association (VEA) worked with Kitty Shubert of the Beatty Economic Redevelopment Corporation (BERC) to install two wind monitoring stations outside the town of Beatty, Nevada. The following is a description of the two sites. The information for a proposed third site is also shown. The sites were selected from previous work by the BERC and Idaho National Laboratory. The equipment was provided by the BERC and installed by researchers from the UNLV CER.

  5. Scalable Node Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drotar, Alexander P. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Erin E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sutherland, Landon D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Project description is: (1) Build a high performance computer; and (2) Create a tool to monitor node applications in Component Based Tool Framework (CBTF) using code from Lightweight Data Metric Service (LDMS). The importance of this project is that: (1) there is a need a scalable, parallel tool to monitor nodes on clusters; and (2) New LDMS plugins need to be able to be easily added to tool. CBTF stands for Component Based Tool Framework. It's scalable and adjusts to different topologies automatically. It uses MRNet (Multicast/Reduction Network) mechanism for information transport. CBTF is flexible and general enough to be used for any tool that needs to do a task on many nodes. Its components are reusable and 'EASILY' added to a new tool. There are three levels of CBTF: (1) frontend node - interacts with users; (2) filter nodes - filters or concatenates information from backend nodes; and (3) backend nodes - where the actual work of the tool is done. LDMS stands for lightweight data metric servies. It's a tool used for monitoring nodes. Ltool is the name of the tool we derived from LDMS. It's dynamically linked and includes the following components: Vmstat, Meminfo, Procinterrupts and more. It works by: Ltool command is run on the frontend node; Ltool collects information from the backend nodes; backend nodes send information to the filter nodes; and filter nodes concatenate information and send to a database on the front end node. Ltool is a useful tool when it comes to monitoring nodes on a cluster because the overhead involved with running the tool is not particularly high and it will automatically scale to any size cluster.

  6. Scintillator spent fuel monitor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, C.E.; Nixon, K.V.; Bernard, W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitor for rapidly measuring the gross gamma-ray flux immediately above spent fuel assemblies in underwater storage racks has been developed. It consists of a plastic scintillator, photomultiplier, collimator, and a small battery-powered electronics package. The crosstalk from an isolated fuel assembly to an adjacent void is only about 2%. The mean difference between the measured gamma-ray flux and the flux estimated from the declared burnup and cooling time with a simple formula is 22%.

  7. MPS Vax monitor and control software architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, S.; Spencer, N.; Underwood, K.; VanOlst, D.; Zelanzy, M.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new Machine Protection System (MPS) now being tested at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) includes monitoring and controlling facilities integrated into the existing VAX control system. The actual machine protection is performed by VME micros which control the beam repetition rate on a pulse-by-pulse basis based on measurements from fault detectors. The VAX is used to control and configure the VME micros, configure custom CAMAC modules providing the fault detector inputs, monitor and report faults and system errors, update the SLC database, and interface with the user. The design goals of the VAX software include a database-driven system to allow configuration changes without code changes, use of a standard TCP/IP-based message service for communication, use of existing SLCNET micros for CAMAC configuration, security and verification features to prevent unauthorized access, error and alarm logging and display updates as quickly as possible, and use of touch panels and X-windows displays for the user interface.

  8. COMPARING TARGET POSITION WITH PRESENT POSITION: NEURAL VECTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossberg, Stephen

    in a head co- ordinate map. The calibration of intermodality movement signals, the attentional selection of a target position for an intentional movement, and the encoding of sequencesof predictive saccades can all then make use of the movement parameters that were learned in the visually reactive mode. We will argue

  9. Multi-position photovoltaic assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA)

    2003-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a PV assembly, for use on a support surface, comprising a base, a PV module, a multi-position module support assembly, securing the module to the base at shipping and inclined-use angles, a deflector, a multi-position deflector support securing the deflector to the base at deflector shipping and deflector inclined-use angles, the module and deflector having opposed edges defining a gap therebetween. The invention permits transport of the PV assemblies in a relatively compact form, thus lowering shipping costs, while facilitating installation of the PV assemblies with the PV module at the proper inclination.

  10. No hair theorems for positive ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sourav Bhattacharya; Amitabha Lahiri

    2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend all known black hole no-hair theorems to space-times endowed with a positive cosmological constant $\\Lambda.$ Specifically, we prove that static spherical black holes with $\\Lambda>0$ cannot support scalar fields in convex potentials and Proca-massive vector fields in the region between black hole and cosmic horizons. We also demonstrate the existence of at least one type of quantum hair, and of exactly one charged solution for the Abelian Higgs model. Our method of proof can be applied to investigate other types of quantum or topological hair on black holes in the presence of a positive $\\Lambda.$

  11. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We are requesting support for a postdoctoral person to participate in H{sup -} studies at Los Alamos. In addition, we are requesting funding for a state-of-the-art YAG laser system that would allow us to obtain data at three times our present rate with improved beam quality.

  12. Giga-bit optical data transmission module for Beam Instrumentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roedne, L T; Cenkeramaddi, L R; Jiao, L

    Particle accelerators require electronic instrumentation for diagnostic, assessment and monitoring during operation of the transferring and circulating beams. A sensor located near the beam provides an electrical signal related to the observable quantity of interest. The front-end electronics provides analog-to-digital conversion of the quantity being observed and the generated data are to be transferred to the external digital back-end for data processing, and to display to the operators and logging. This research project investigates the feasibility of radiation-tolerant giga-bit data transmission over optic fibre for beam instrumentation applications, starting from the assessment of the state of the art technology, identification of challenges and proposal of a system level solution, which should be validated with a PCB design in an experimental setup. Radiation tolerance of 10 kGy (Si) Total Ionizing Dose (TID) over 10 years of operation, Bit Error Rate (BER) 10-6 or better. The findings and results of th...

  13. Beam Pipe HOM Absorber for 750 MHz RF Cavity Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Rolland; Neubauer, Michael

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This joint project of Muons, Inc., Cornell University and SLAC was supported by a Phase I and Phase II grant monitored by the SBIR Office of Science of the DOE. Beam line HOM absorbers are a critical part of future linear colliders. The use of lossy materials at cryogenic temperatures has been incorporated in several systems. The design in beam pipes requires cylinders of lossy material mechanically confined in such a way as to absorb the microwave energy from the higher-order modes and remove the heat generated in the lossy material. Furthermore, the potential for charge build-up on the surface of the lossy material requires the conductivity of the material to remain consistent from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. In this program a mechanical design was developed that solved several design constraints: a) fitting into the existing Cornell load vacuum component, b) allowing the use of different material compositions, c) a thermal design that relied upon the compression of the lossy ceramic material without adding stress. Coating experiments were performed that indicated the design constraints needed to fully implement this approach for solving the charge build-up problem inherent in using lossy ceramics. In addition, the ACE3P program, used to calculate the performance of lossy cylinders in beam pipes in general, was supported by this project. Code development and documentation to allow for the more wide spread use of the program was a direct result of this project was well.

  14. Bunch length effects in the beam-beam compensation with an electron lens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.; Montag, C.

    2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron lenses for the head-on beam-beam compensation are under construction at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The bunch length is of the same order as the {beta}-function at the interaction point, and a proton passing through another proton bunch experiences a substantial phase shift which modifies the beam-beam interaction. We review the effect of the bunch length in the single pass beam-beam interaction, apply the same analysis to a proton passing through a long electron lens, and study the single pass beam-beam compensation with long bunches. We also discuss the beam-beam compensation of the electron beam in an electron-ion collider ring.

  15. accelerating beam stability: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particle beams (beam intercepting devices BIDs). For the design of BIDs, the increasing heat load onto these devices due to energetic and focused beams and - in most cases -...

  16. accelerated oxygen-14 beam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particle beams (beam intercepting devices BIDs). For the design of BIDs, the increasing heat load onto these devices due to energetic and focused beams and - in most cases -...

  17. accelerator school beam: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    particle beams (beam intercepting devices BIDs). For the design of BIDs, the increasing heat load onto these devices due to energetic and focused beams and - in most cases -...

  18. Electron gun for a multiple beam klystron with magnetic compression of the electron beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Tran, Hien T; Bui, Thuc; Attarian, Adam; Tallis, William; David, John; Forstall, Virginia; Andujar, Cynthia; Blach, Noah T; Brown, David B; Gadson, Sean E; Kiley, Erin M; Read, Michael

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-beam electron gun provides a plurality N of cathode assemblies comprising a cathode, anode, and focus electrode, each cathode assembly having a local cathode axis and also a central cathode point defined by the intersection of the local cathode axis with the emitting surface of the cathode. Each cathode is arranged with its central point positioned in a plane orthogonal to a device central axis, with each cathode central point an equal distance from the device axis and with an included angle of 360/N between each cathode central point. The local axis of each cathode has a cathode divergence angle with respect to the central axis which is set such that the diverging magnetic field from a solenoidal coil is less than 5 degrees with respect to the projection of the local cathode axis onto a cathode reference plane formed by the device axis and the central cathode point, and the local axis of each cathode is also set such that the angle formed between the cathode reference plane and the local cathode axis results in minimum spiraling in the path of the electron beams in a homogenous magnetic field region of the solenoidal field generator.

  19. Seeing the invisible: Direct visualization of therapeutic radiation beams using air scintillation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fahimian, Benjamin; Türkcan, Silvan; Kapp, Daniel S.; Pratx, Guillem, E-mail: pratx@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Ceballos, Andrew [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)] [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To assess whether air scintillation produced during standard radiation treatments can be visualized and used to monitor a beam in a nonperturbing manner. Methods: Air scintillation is caused by the excitation of nitrogen gas by ionizing radiation. This weak emission occurs predominantly in the 300–430 nm range. An electron-multiplication charge-coupled device camera, outfitted with an f/0.95 lens, was used to capture air scintillation produced by kilovoltage photon beams and megavoltage electron beams used in radiation therapy. The treatment rooms were prepared to block background light and a short-pass filter was utilized to block light above 440 nm. Results: Air scintillation from an orthovoltage unit (50 kVp, 30 mA) was visualized with a relatively short exposure time (10 s) and showed an inverse falloff (r{sup 2} = 0.89). Electron beams were also imaged. For a fixed exposure time (100 s), air scintillation was proportional to dose rate (r{sup 2} = 0.9998). As energy increased, the divergence of the electron beam decreased and the penumbra improved. By irradiating a transparent phantom, the authors also showed that Cherenkov luminescence did not interfere with the detection of air scintillation. In a final illustration of the capabilities of this new technique, the authors visualized air scintillation produced during a total skin irradiation treatment. Conclusions: Air scintillation can be measured to monitor a radiation beam in an inexpensive and nonperturbing manner. This physical phenomenon could be useful for dosimetry of therapeutic radiation beams or for online detection of gross errors during fractionated treatments.

  20. Autonomous monitoring of control hardware to predict off-normal conditions using NIF automatic Alignment Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awwal, A; Wilhelmsen, K; Leach, R; Kamm, V M; Burkhart, S; Lowe-Webb, R; Cohen, S

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high power laser system capable of supporting high-energy-density experimentation as a user facility for the next 30 years. In order to maximize the facility availability, preventive maintenance enhancements are being introduced into the system. An example of such an enhancement is a camera-based health monitoring system, integrated into the automated alignment system, which provides an opportunity to monitor trends in measurements such as average beam intensity, size of the beam, and pixel saturation. The monitoring system will generate alerts based on observed trends in measurements to allow scheduled pro-active maintenance before routine off-normal detection stops system operations requiring unscheduled intervention.

  1. Portal monitoring technology control process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    York, R.L.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Portal monitors are an important part of the material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) programs in Russia and the US. Although portal monitors are only a part of an integrated MPC and A system, they are an effective means of controlling the unauthorized movement of special nuclear material (SNM). Russian technical experts have gained experience in the use of SNM portal monitors from US experts ad this has allowed them to use the monitors more effectively. Several Russian institutes and companies are designing and manufacturing SNM portal monitors in Russia. Interactions between Russian and US experts have resulted in improvements to the instruments. SNM portal monitor technology has been effectively transferred from the US to Russia and should be a permanent part of the Russian MPC and A Program. Progress in the implementation of the monitors and improvements to how they are used are discussed.

  2. This paper published in Intense Position Beams, edited by E.H. Ottewitte and W. Kells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scientific, Singapore, 1988), p. 63. Ion Trapping Techniques: Laser Cooling and Sympathetic Cooling* J-q in a magnetic field of 1.4 T. A technique called sympathetic cooling can be used to transfer this cooling*2) years, however, the technique of laser cooling and compression has greatly increased the potential use

  3. Electrons in a positive-ion beam with solenoid or quadrupole magnetic transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molvik, A.W.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    E. Coleman, A. Faltens, P. K. Roy, J. L. Vay, LBNL L. Prost,E. Coleman, A. Faltens, P. K. Roy, J. L. Vay, L. Prost June

  4. Laser beam apparatus and method for analyzing solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staebler, David L. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser beam apparatus and method for analyzing, inter alia, the current versus voltage curve at the point of illumination on a solar cell and the open circuit voltage of a solar cell. The apparatus incorporates a lock-in amplifier, and a laser beam light chopper which permits the measurement of the AC current of the solar cell at an applied DC voltage at the position on the solar cell where the cell is illuminated and a feedback scheme which permits the direct scanning measurements of the open circuit voltage. The accuracy of the measurement is a function of the intensity and wavelength of the laser light with respect to the intensity and wavelength distribution of sunlight and the percentage the dark current is at the open circuit voltage to the short circuit current of the solar cell.

  5. An EUDET/AIDA Pixel Beam Telescope for Detector Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubinskiy, I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ahigh resolution(?future International Linear Collider providing test beam infrastructure to detector R&D groups. The telescope consists of six sensor planes with a pixel pitch of either 18.4 ?m or 10 ?mand canbe operated insidea solenoidal magnetic fieldofupto1.2T.Ageneral purpose cooling, positioning, data acquisition (DAQ) and offine data analysis tools are available for the users. The excellent resolution, readout rate andDAQintegration capabilities made the telescopea primary beam tests tool also for several CERN based experiments. In this report the performance of the final telescope is presented. The plans for an even more flexible telescope with three differentpixel technologies(ATLASPixel, Mimosa,Timepix) withinthenew European detector infrastructure project AIDA are presented.

  6. Impact of Concurrent Androgen Deprivation on Fiducial Marker Migration in External-beam Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiberi, David A.; Carrier, Jean-Francois; Beauchemin, Marie-Claude; Nguyen, Thu Van; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominic [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Taussky, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)] [Departement de Radio-Oncologie, Centre hospitalier de l'Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the extent of gold fiducial marker (FM) migration in patients treated for prostate cancer with concurrent androgen deprivation and external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Three or 4 gold FMs were implanted in 37 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) in conjunction with 70-78 Gy. Androgen deprivation therapy was started a median of 3.9 months before EBRT (range, 0.3-12.5 months). To establish the extent of FM migration, the distance between each FM was calculated for 5-8 treatments once per week throughout the EBRT course. For each treatment, the distance between FMs was compared with the distance from the digitally reconstructed radiographs generated from the planning CT. A total of 281 treatments were analyzed. Results: The average daily migration was 0.8 {+-} 0.3 mm, with distances ranging from 0.2 mm-2.6 mm. Two of the 281 assessed treatments (0.7%) showed migrations >2 mm. No correlation between FM migration and patient weight or time delay between ADT and start of EBRT was found. There was no correlation between the extent of FM migration and prostate volume. Conclusion: This is the largest report of implanted FM migration in patients receiving concomitant ADT. Only 0.7% of the 281 treatments studied had significant marker migrations (>2 mm) throughout the course of EBRT. Consequently, the use of implanted FMs in these patients enables accurate monitoring of prostate gland position during treatment.

  7. Transport of elliptic intense charged -particle beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, J. (Jing), 1978-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport theory of high-intensity elliptic charged-particle beams is presented. In particular, the halo formation and beam loss problem associated with the high space charge and small-aperture structure is addressed, ...

  8. Neutral particle beam sensing and steering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maier, II, William B. (Los Alamos, NM); Cobb, Donald D. (Los Alamos, NM); Robiscoe, Richard T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direction of a neutral particle beam (NPB) is determined by detecting Ly.alpha. radiation emitted during motional quenching of excited H(2S) atoms in the beam during movement of the atoms through a magnetic field. At least one detector is placed adjacent the beam exit to define an optical axis that intercepts the beam at a viewing angle to include a volume generating a selected number of photons for detection. The detection system includes a lens having an area that is small relative to the NPB area and a pixel array located in the focal plane of the lens. The lens viewing angle and area pixel array are selected to optimize the beam tilt sensitivity. In one embodiment, two detectors are placed coplanar with the beam axis to generate a difference signal that is insensitive to beam variations other than beam tilt.

  9. On Gaussian Beams Described by Jacobi's Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Steven T.

    Gaussian beams describe the amplitude and phase of rays and are widely used to model acoustic propagation. This paper describes four new results in the theory of Gaussian beams. (1) A new version of the ?ervený equations ...

  10. Autogenerator of beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, R.J.; Mazarakis, M.G.; Miller, R.M.; Shope, S.L.; Smith, D.L.

    1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

  11. Autogenerator of beams of charged particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adler, Richard J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mazarakis, Michael G. (Albuquerque, NM); Miller, Robert B. (Albuquerque, NM); Shope, Steven L. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, David L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An autogenerating apparatus provides secondary intense relativistic current beam pulses in response to an injected beam pulse. One or more electromagnetic energy storage devices are provided in conjunction with gaps along a beam propagation path for the injected beam pulse. For injected beam pulses which are no longer than double the transit time of electromagnetic waves within the storage devices (which may be resonant cavities), distinct secondary beam pulses are generated by each of the energy storage devices. The beam propagation path, together with the one or more gaps provided therein, operates as a pulse forming transmission line cavity, in which the separate cavities associated with the gaps provide delays for electromagnetic waves generated at the gaps. After doubly traversing the cavity, the electromagnetic waves cause the gap to generate the secondary beam pulses, which are thus delayed by a time interval equal to the double transit time for the induced wave within the cavity.

  12. Electron collisional detachment processes for a 250 keV D/sup -/ ion beam in a partially ionized hydrogen target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savas, S.E.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutral atom beams with energies above 200 keV may be required for various purposes in magnetic fusion devices following TFTR, JET and MFTF-B. These beams can be produced much more efficiently by electron detachment from negative ion beams than by electron capture by positive ions. We have investigated the efficiency with which such neutral atoms can be produced by electron detachment in partially ionized hydrogen plasma neutralizers.

  13. Faculty Positions Department of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    Faculty Positions Department of Physics Texas Tech University The Department of Physics at Texas condensed matter materials physics. Successful candidates at the senior level will be expected to transfer an existing successful research program to Texas Tech and instruct physics courses at all levels offered

  14. Information Updates: Position/Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Information Updates: Name: Position/Title: Business Mailing Address: Home Mailing Address: Phone of nurse involvement and patient education. She is an active nurse leader that brings thoughtful discussion be a chapter update for upcoming future events and plans for the future. Don't miss this exciting update! Beta

  15. International Potato Center POSITION ANNOUNCEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in 7 other African countries. CIP is launching a new going-to-scale project building on our successful research work on nutritious orange-fleshed sweetpotato in sub-Saharan Africa. We are looking for energetic reach farmers and consumers with new and innovative approaches and partnerships. The Position

  16. APPLICATION FOR EMPLOYMENT FACULTY POSITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gisele

    APPLICATION FOR EMPLOYMENT FACULTY POSITIONS GEORGIA INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0435 A Unit of the University System of Georgia An Equal Education and Employment Opportunity Institution sought ( ) Full-time ( ) Part-time How did you learn of employment opportunities at Georgia Tech? List

  17. Renewable Energy Positioning System: Energy Positioning: Control and Economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GENI Project: The University of Washington and the University of Michigan are developing an integrated system to match well-positioned energy storage facilities with precise control technologies so the electric grid can more easily include energy from renewable power sources like wind and solar. Because renewable energy sources provide intermittent power, it is difficult for the grid to efficiently allocate those resources without developing solutions to store their energy for later use. The two universities are working with utilities, regulators, and the private sector to position renewable energy storage facilities in locations that optimize their ability to provide and transmit electricity where and when it is needed most. Expanding the network of transmission lines is prohibitively expensive, so combining well-placed storage facilities with robust control systems to efficiently route their power will save consumers money and enable the widespread use of safe, renewable sources of power.

  18. Wide area augmentation of the Global Positioning System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enge, P.; Walter, T.; Pullen, S.; Kee, C.; Chao, Y.C.; Tsai, Y.J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Aeronautics and Astronautics

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) is being deployed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to augment the Global Positioning System (GPS). The WAAS will aid GPS with the following three services. First, it will broadcast spread-spectrum ranging signals from communication satellites. The airborne WAAS receiver will add these new ranging signals to the GPS constellation of measurements. By so doing, the augmented position fix will be less sensitive to the failure of individual system components, thus improving time availability and continuity of service. Second, the WAAS will use a nationwide ground network to monitor the health of all satellites over the airspace and flag situations which threaten flight safety. This data will be modulated on to the WAAS ranging signals and broadcast to the users, thereby guaranteeing the integrity of the airborne position fix. Third, the WAAS will use the ground network to develop corrections for the errors which currently limit the accuracy of unaugmented GPS. This data will also be included on the WAAS broadcast and will improve position accuracy from approximately 100 m to 8 m. When complete, the augmented system will provide an accurate position fix from satellites to an unlimited number of aircraft across the nation. It will be the primary navigation system for aircraft in oceanic routes, enroute over domestic airspace, in crowded metropolitan airspaces, and on airport approach.

  19. Maskless, resistless ion beam lithography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Qing

    2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    As the dimensions of semiconductor devices are scaled down, in order to achieve higher levels of integration, optical lithography will no longer be sufficient for the needs of the semiconductor industry. Alternative next-generation lithography (NGL) approaches, such as extreme ultra-violet (EUV), X-ray, electron-beam, and ion projection lithography face some challenging issues with complicated mask technology and low throughput. Among the four major alternative NGL approaches, ion beam lithography is the only one that can provide both maskless and resistless patterning. As such, it can potentially make nano-fabrication much simpler. This thesis investigates a focused ion beam system for maskless, resistless patterning that can be made practical for high-volume production. In order to achieve maskless, resistless patterning, the ion source must be able to produce a variety of ion species. The compact FIB system being developed uses a multicusp plasma ion source, which can generate ion beams of various elements, such as O{sub 2}{sup +}, BF{sub 2}{sup +}, P{sup +} etc., for surface modification and doping applications. With optimized source condition, around 85% of BF{sub 2}{sup +}, over 90% of O{sub 2}{sup +} and P{sup +} have been achieved. The brightness of the multicusp-plasma ion source is a key issue for its application to maskless ion beam lithography. It can be substantially improved by optimizing the source configuration and extractor geometry. Measured brightness of 2 keV He{sup +} beam is as high as 440 A/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} Sr, which represents a 30x improvement over prior work. Direct patterning of Si thin film using a focused O{sub 2}{sup +} ion beam has been investigated. A thin surface oxide film can be selectively formed using 3 keV O{sub 2}{sup +} ions with the dose of 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. The oxide can then serve as a hard mask for patterning of the Si film. The process flow and the experimental results for directly patterned poly-Si features are presented. The formation of shallow pn-junctions in bulk silicon wafers by scanning focused P{sup +} beam implantation at 5 keV is also presented. With implantation dose of around 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, the electron concentration is about 2.5 x 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3} and electron mobility is around 200 cm{sup 2}/V{center_dot}s. To demonstrate the suitability of scanning FIB lithography for the manufacture of integrated circuit devices, SOI MOSFET fabrication using the maskless, resistless ion beam lithography is demonstrated. An array of microcolumns can be built by stacking multi-aperture electrode and insulator layers. Because the multicusp plasma source can achieve uniform ion density over a large area, it can be used in conjunction with the array of microcolumns, for massively parallel FIB processing to achieve reasonable exposure throughput.

  20. Lithium niobate explosion monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bundy, Charles H. (Clearwater, FL); Graham, Robert A. (Los Lunas, NM); Kuehn, Stephen F. (Albuquerque, NM); Precit, Richard R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rogers, Michael S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring explosive devices is accomplished with a substantially z-cut lithium niobate crystal in abutment with the explosive device. Upon impact by a shock wave from detonation of the explosive device, the crystal emits a current pulse prior to destruction of the crystal. The current pulse is detected by a current viewing transformer and recorded as a function of time in nanoseconds. In order to self-check the crystal, the crystal has a chromium film resistor deposited thereon which may be heated by a current pulse prior to detonation. This generates a charge which is detected by a charge amplifier.

  1. Personal continuous air monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morgan, Ronald G. (Los Alamos, NM); Salazar, Samuel A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal continuous air monitor capable of giving immediate warning of the presence of radioactivity has a filter/detector head to be worn in the breathing zone of a user, containing a filter mounted adjacent to radiation detectors, and a preamplifier. The filter/detector head is connected to a belt pack to be worn at the waist or on the back of a user. The belt pack contains a signal processor, batteries, a multichannel analyzer, a logic circuit, and an alarm. An air pump also is provided in the belt pack for pulling air through the filter/detector head by way of an air tube.

  2. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, L.C.; Simpson, M.L.

    1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically. 4 figures.

  3. Monitoring of tritium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corbett, James A. (Turtle Creek, PA); Meacham, Sterling A. (Greensburg, PA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluid from a breeder nuclear reactor, which may be the sodium cooling fluid or the helium reactor-cover-gas, or the helium coolant of a gas-cooled reactor passes over the portion of the enclosure of a gaseous discharge device which is permeable to hydrogen and its isotopes. The tritium diffused into the discharge device is radioactive producing beta rays which ionize the gas (argon) in the discharge device. The tritium is monitored by measuring the ionization current produced when the sodium phase and the gas phase of the hydrogen isotopes within the enclosure are in equilibrium.

  4. Milliwave melter monitoring system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daniel, William E. (North Augusta, SC); Woskov, Paul P. (Bedford, MA); Sundaram, Shanmugavelayutham K. (Richland, WA)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A milliwave melter monitoring system is presented that has a waveguide with a portion capable of contacting a molten material in a melter for use in measuring one or more properties of the molten material in a furnace under extreme environments. A receiver is configured for use in obtaining signals from the melt/material transmitted to appropriate electronics through the waveguide. The receiver is configured for receiving signals from the waveguide when contacting the molten material for use in determining the viscosity of the molten material. Other embodiments exist in which the temperature, emissivity, viscosity and other properties of the molten material are measured.

  5. Monitoring international nuclear activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, R.B.

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The LBNL Table of Isotopes website provides primary nuclearinformation to>150,000 different users annually. We have developedthe covert technology to identify users by IP address and country todetermine the kinds of nuclear information they are retrieving. Wepropose to develop pattern recognition software to provide an earlywarning system to identify Unusual nuclear activity by country or regionSpecific nuclear/radioactive material interests We have monitored nuclearinformation for over two years and provide this information to the FBIand LLNL. Intelligence is gleaned from the website log files. Thisproposal would expand our reporting capabilities.

  6. Optical wet steam monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Simpson, Marc L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wet steam monitor determines steam particle size by using laser doppler velocimeter (LDV) device to produce backscatter light. The backscatter light signal is processed with a spectrum analyzer to produce a visibility waveform in the frequency domain. The visibility waveform includes a primary peak and a plurality of sidebands. The bandwidth of at least the primary frequency peak is correlated to particle size by either visually comparing the bandwidth to those of known particle sizes, or by digitizing the waveform and comparing the waveforms electronically.

  7. Sandia Energy - Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution Grid Integration Permalink Gallery MesaMonitoring Home Carbon

  8. Sandia Energy - Monitoring Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution Grid Integration Permalink Gallery MesaMonitoring Home

  9. WIPP Documents - Environmental Monitoring

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEureka AnalyticsLarge file sizeMonitoring

  10. Monitoring Jobs on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174 This manuscript hasMonitoring

  11. Monitoring Jobs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174 This manuscriptMonitoring Jobs

  12. Monitoring jobs with qs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174 This manuscriptMonitoringJobs »

  13. Monitoring your job

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTIONES2008-54174 This manuscriptMonitoringJobs

  14. High Gradient Two-Beam Electron Accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Y. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, 272 Whitney Ave., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Kazakov, S. Yu. [Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Kuzikov, S. V. [Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States); Institute of Applied Physics, Nizhny Novgorod, 603600 (Russian Federation); Hirshfield, J. L. [Beam Physics Laboratory, Yale University, 272 Whitney Ave., New Haven, CT 06511 (United States); Omega-P, Inc., 258 Bradley St., New Haven, CT 06510 (United States)

    2010-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-gradient two-beam electron accelerator structure using detuned cavities is described. A self-consistent theory based on a circuit model is presented to calculate idealized acceleration gradient, transformer ratio, and efficiency for energy transfer from the drive beam to the accelerated beam. Experimental efforts are being carried out to demonstrate this acceleration concept.

  15. Laser Telecommunication timeLaser beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    La Rosa, Andres H.

    Laser Telecommunication Experiment Laser time Laser beam intensity timeLaser beam Laser battery Laser connected to a circuit without a modulator. Bottom graph illustrates what happen when a modulating signal is superimposed to the DC voltage driving the laser Laser beam intensity DC Input voltage DC

  16. Nondestructive Damage Detection in General Beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dincal, Selcuk

    2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Representation of the First Damage Case on the Finite Element Mesh of the Slender Beam ...................................................... 41 Figure 3.12 Schematic Representation of the Second Damage Case on the Finite Element Mesh... of the Slender Beam ...................................................... 42 Figure 3.13 Schematic Representation of the Third Damage Case on the Finite Element Mesh of the Slender Beam ...................................................... 44...

  17. JET neutral beam power upgrade Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JET neutral beam power upgrade Introduction A tokamak is a complex assembly, a system of systems the challenging requirements that fusion demands. The neutral beam heating system and its upgrade for the JET systems) are the main plasma heating scheme on fusion devices such as JET and ITER. The JET neutral beam

  18. Beam heat load in superconducting wigglers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casalbuoni, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The beam heat load is a fundamental input parameter for the design of superconducting wigglers since it is needed to specify the cooling power. In this presentation I will review the possible beam heat load sources and the measurements of beam heat load performed and planned onto the cold vacuum chambers installed at different synchrotron light sources.

  19. Corrosion of Target and Structural Materials in Water Irradiated by an 800 MeV Proton Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corrosion of Target and Structural Materials in Water Irradiated by an 800 MeV Proton Beam Darryl P National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 U.S.A. Abstract Radiation enhanced, aqueous corrosion of solid. In this paper we briefly describe our current methods for control and in situ monitoring of corrosion

  20. Results of long range beam-beam studies and observations during operation in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alemany, R; Buffat, X; Calaga, R; Fitterer, M; Giachino, R; Hemelsoet, GH; Herr, W; Papotti, G; Pieloni, T; Poyer, M; Schaumann, M; Trad, G; Wollmann, D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied possible limitations due to the long range beam-beam effects in the LHC. With a larger number of bunches and collisions in all interaction points, we have reduced the crossing angles to enhance long range beam-beam effects to evaluate their influence on dynamic aperture and losses. Experience from operation with reduced separation was analysed and provides additional evidence.

  1. Systems and methods for detecting an image of an object by use of an X-ray beam having a polychromatic distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parham, Christopher; Zhong, Zhong; Pisano, Etta; Connor, Dean; Chapman, Leroy D.

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for detecting an image of an object using an X-ray beam having a polychromatic energy distribution are disclosed. According to one aspect, a method can include detecting an image of an object. The method can include generating a first X-ray beam having a polychromatic energy distribution. Further, the method can include positioning a single monochromator crystal in a predetermined position to directly intercept the first X-ray beam such that a second X-ray beam having a predetermined energy level is produced. Further, an object can be positioned in the path of the second X-ray beam for transmission of the second X-ray beam through the object and emission from the object as a transmitted X-ray beam. The transmitted X-ray beam can be directed at an angle of incidence upon a crystal analyzer. Further, an image of the object can be detected from a beam diffracted from the analyzer crystal.

  2. Technologies and R&D for a High Resolution Cavity BPM for the CLIC Main Beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towler, J R; Soby, L; Wendt, M; Boogert, S T; Cullinan, F J; Lyapin, A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Main Beam (MB) linac of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) requires a beam orbit measurement system with high spatial (50 nm) and high temporal resolution (50 ns) to resolve the beam position within the 156 ns long bunch train, traveling on an energy-chirped, minimum dispersive trajectory. A 15 GHz prototype cavity BPM has been commissioned in the probe beam-line of the CTF3 CLIC Test Facility. We discuss performance and technical details of this prototype installation, including the 15 GHz analogue downconverter, the data acquisition and the control electronics and software. An R&D outlook is given for the next steps, which requires a system of 3 cavity BPMs to investigate the full resolution potential.

  3. Electron beam diagnostic for space charge measurement of an ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Yu, Simon S.; Henestroza, Enrique; Eylon, Shmuel; Shuman, Derek B.; Ludvig, Jozsef; Bieniosek, Frank M.; Waldron, William L.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Vanecek, David L.; Hannink, Ryan; Amezcua, Monserrat

    2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A non-perturbing electron beam diagnostic system for measuring the charge distribution of an ion beam is developed for Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) beam physics studies. Conventional diagnostics require temporary insertion of sensors into the beam, but such diagnostics stop the beam, or significantly alter its properties. In this diagnostic a low energy, low current electron beam is swept transversely across the ion beam; the measured electron beam deflection is used to infer the charge density profile of the ion beam. The initial application of this diagnostic is to the Neutralized Transport Experiment (NTX), which is exploring the physics of space-charge-dominated beam focusing onto a small spot using a neutralizing plasma. Design and development of this diagnostic and performance with the NTX ion beamline is presented.

  4. Stability of Single Particle Motion with Head-On Beam-Beam Compensation in the RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo,Y.; Fischer, W.; Abreu, N.

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To compensate the large tune shift and tune spread generated by the head-on beam-beam interactions in the polarized proton run in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), we proposed a low energy electron beam with a Gaussian transverse profiles to collide head-on with the proton beam. In this article, with a weak-strong beam-beam interaction model, we investigate the stability of single particle motion in the presence of head-on beam-beam compensation. Tune footprints, tune diffusion, Lyapunov exponents, and 10{sup 6} turn dynamic apertures are calculated and compared between the cases without and with beam-beam compensation. A tune scan is performed and the possibility of increasing the bunch intensity is studied. The cause of tune footprint foldings is discussed, and the tune diffusion and Lyapunov exponent analysis are compared.

  5. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, James E. (Knoxville, TN)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiation events, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible "chirp". The rate of the "chirps" is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field.

  6. Packet personal radiation monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phelps, J.E.

    1988-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A personal radiation monitor of the chirper type is provided for detecting ionizing radiation. A battery powered high voltage power supply is used to generate and apply a high voltage bias to a G-M tube radiation sensor. The high voltage is monitored by a low-loss sensing network which generates a feedback signal to control the high voltage power supply such that the high voltage bias is recharged to +500 VDC when the current pulses of the sensor, generated by the detection of ionizing radiatonevents, discharges the high voltage bias to +450 VDC. During the high voltage recharge period an audio transducer is activated to produce an audible ''chirp''. The rate of the ''chirps'' is controlled by the rate at which the high voltage bias is recharged, which is proportional to the radiation field intensity to which the sensor is exposed. The chirp rate sensitivity is set to be approximately 1.5 (chirps/min/MR/hr.). The G-M tube sensor is used in a current sensing mode so that the device does not paralyze in a high radiation field. 2 figs.

  7. Suncatcher monitoring project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, B.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intensive microcomputer-based energy monitoring project was conducted on a passively heated and cooled residence in Davis, California. The building performance was estimated in the design phase by both a simplified method and an hourly simulation. In the monitoring phase, more than 75 sensors, located in the building elements, interior spaces, appliances, and the ambient environment provide data about temperatures, energy use and radiation. These data are used to determine the actual solar system contributions, and to validate and improve design calculation tools. Information was gathered on the Suncatcher system for almost three years. Daily min/max temperatures inside and outside of the house and utility use have been reduced and analyzed. From these data we calculate the monthly net heating load and the percentage of that met by solar energy. To date, it has averaged 71%. Hourly data, gathered by the custom-made data acquisition system, show how daily temperature and radiation patterns change. Natural cooling supplied 100% of the cooling need. During the hot summers typical of the Davis area, the house has remained very comfortable virtually all of the time, except for two or three afternoons each summer, where temperatures reached a stuffy 83 or 84F. The other solar energy source, the solar hot water system, has provided 50 to 60% of the hot water needed by the residents, who use less domestic hot water than average.

  8. Summary of session 3 on synchrotron radiation and beam dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab; Metral, E.; /CERN

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize presentations, discussions and general conclusions of the Workshop session on 'Beam Dynamics Issues'. Major subjects include effects due to synchrotron radiation (SR), cryogenic loads, electron cloud, impedances, intra-beam scattering (IBS) and beam-beam interactions.

  9. Investigation of an electron beam evaporative source: Part 1, Theory; Part 2, Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sze, J.S.; Self, S.A. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

    1989-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A theory for evaluating the performance parameters of linear electron beam evaporative source is presented. The electron beam is considered to be generated from a linear gun and its trajectory is curved by a uniform magnetic field onto a target. A model has been developed to estimate the trajectory of the electron beam. The performance of the electron gun is characterized by two coefficients: {alpha}, the divergence effect of the beam as it enters into the electric field free space region, and {Beta}, the space charge parameter, which is proportional to the magnitude of the current density of the beam. These two parameters determine the location (angular position) of the beam waist and the current density at the target. In addition, neutralization of the electron space charge by vapor ions generated near the target is considered. A discussion is also given of the shape of the depression in the surface of the molten metal, which is due to the pressure on the surface associated with the momentum recoil from the evaporative vapor flux. By relating the characteristic depth and width of the depression to magnitude and the shape of the pressure profile, useful analytical and numerical results are presented for a given pressure profile. The implication of the results for the design of electron beam evaporative sources are also discussed. Measurements are discussed a the end of the paper. 11 refs., 15 figs.

  10. Position and orientation tracking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burks, B.L.; DePiero, F.W.; Armstrong, G.A.; Jansen, J.F.; Muller, R.C.; Gee, T.F.

    1998-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A position and orientation tracking system presents a laser scanning apparatus having two measurement pods, a control station, and a detector array. The measurement pods can be mounted in the dome of a radioactive waste storage silo. Each measurement pod includes dual orthogonal laser scanner subsystems. The first laser scanner subsystem is oriented to emit a first line laser in the pan direction. The second laser scanner is oriented to emit a second line laser in the tilt direction. Both emitted line lasers scan planes across the radioactive waste surface to encounter the detector array mounted on a target robotic vehicle. The angles of incidence of the planes with the detector array are recorded by the control station. Combining measurements describing each of the four planes provides data for a closed form solution of the algebraic transform describing the position and orientation of the target robotic vehicle. 14 figs.

  11. Position and orientation tracking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burks, Barry L. (Oak Ridge, TN); DePiero, Fred W. (Knoxville, TN); Armstrong, Gary A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Jansen, John F. (Knoxville, TN); Muller, Richard C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Gee, Timothy F. (Riceville, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A position and orientation tracking system presents a laser scanning appaus having two measurement pods, a control station, and a detector array. The measurement pods can be mounted in the dome of a radioactive waste storage silo. Each measurement pod includes dual orthogonal laser scanner subsystems. The first laser scanner subsystem is oriented to emit a first line laser in the pan direction. The second laser scanner is oriented to emit a second line laser in the tilt direction. Both emitted line lasers scan planes across the radioactive waste surface to encounter the detector array mounted on a target robotic vehicle. The angles of incidence of the planes with the detector array are recorded by the control station. Combining measurements describing each of the four planes provides data for a closed form solution of the algebraic transform describing the position and orientation of the target robotic vehicle.

  12. Beam intensity upgrade at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchionni, A.; /Fermilab

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of the Fermilab proton accelerator complex is reviewed. The coming into operation of the NuMI neutrino line and the implementation of slip-stacking to increase the anti-proton production rate has pushed the total beam intensity in the Main Injector up to {approx} 3 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse. A maximum beam power of 270 kW has been delivered on the NuMI target during the first year of operation. A plan is in place to increase it to 350 kW, in parallel with the operation of the Collider program. As more machines of the Fermilab complex become available with the termination of the Collider operation, a set of upgrades are being planned to reach first 700 kW and then 1.2 MW by reducing the Main Injector cycle time and by implementing proton stacking.

  13. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Y. Simon (Lakewood, CO)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used.

  14. Oxygen ion-beam microlithography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsuo, Y.S.

    1991-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of providing and developing a resist on a substrate for constructing integrated circuit (IC) chips includes the following steps: of depositing a thin film of amorphous silicon or hydrogenated amorphous silicon on the substrate and exposing portions of the amorphous silicon to low-energy oxygen ion beams to oxidize the amorphous silicon at those selected portions. The nonoxidized portions are then removed by etching with RF-excited hydrogen plasma. Components of the IC chip can then be constructed through the removed portions of the resist. The entire process can be performed in an in-line vacuum production system having several vacuum chambers. Nitrogen or carbon ion beams can also be used. 5 figures.

  15. The MICE Muon Beam Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apollonio, Marco [High Energy Physics Group, Department of Physics, Imperial College London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) at RAL, muons are produced and transported in a dedicated beam line connecting the production point (target) to the cooling channel. We discuss the main features of the beamline, meant to provide muons with momenta between 140 MeV/c and 240 MeV/c and emittances up to 10 mm rad, which is accomplished by means of a diffuser. Matching procedures to the MICE cooling channel are also described. In summer 2010 we performed an intense data taking campaign to finalize the calibration of the MICE Particle Identification (PID) detectors and the understanding of the beam line, which completes the STEPI phase of MICE. We highlight the main results from these data.

  16. Neutron beam testing of triblades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalak, Sarah E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, Andrew J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Storlie, Curtis B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rust, William N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Du Bois, David H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Modl, David G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quinn, Heather M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blanchard, Sean P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manuzzato, Andrea [UNIV DEGLI STUDI DI PADOVA ITALY

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Four IBM Triblades were tested in the Irradiation of Chips and Electronics facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Triblades include two dual-core Opteron processors and four PowerXCell 8i (Cell) processors. The Triblades were tested in their field configuration while running different applications, with the beam aimed at the Cell processor or the Opteron running the application. Testing focused on the Cell processors, which were tested while running five different applications and an idle condition. While neither application nor Triblade was statistically important in predicting the hazard rate, the hazard rate when the beam was aimed at the Opterons was significantly higher than when it was aimed at the Cell processors. In addition, four Cell blades (one in each Triblade) suffered voltage shorts, leading to their inoperability. The hardware tested is the same as that in the Roadrunner supercomputer.

  17. Winter 2015 Positive Parenting Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter 2015 Positive Parenting Group This is an eight-week parent group series starting Monday, January 12, 2015 Future parent group sessions to be held: January 26 (no group 19th ) February 2, 9 and 23 (no group 16th ) and March 2, 9 and 16 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Room 145 of the Clinical Services

  18. Use of radial self-field geometry for intense pulsed ion beam generation above 6 MeV on Hermes III.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renk, Timothy Jerome; Harper-Slaboszewicz, Victor Jozef; Ginn, William Craig; Mikkelson, Kenneth A.; Schall, Michael; Cooper, Gary Wayne

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the generation and propagation of intense pulsed ion beams at the 6 MeV level and above using the Hermes III facility at Sandia National Laboratories. While high-power ion beams have previously been produced using Hermes III, we have conducted systematic studies of several ion diode geometries for the purpose of maximizing focused ion energy for a number of applications. A self-field axial-gap diode of the pinch reflex type and operated in positive polarity yielded beam power below predicted levels. This is ascribed both to power flow losses of unknown origin upstream of the diode load in Hermes positive polarity operation, and to anomalies in beam focusing in this configuration. A change to a radial self-field geometry and negative polarity operation resulted in greatly increased beam voltage (> 6 MeV) and estimated ion current. A comprehensive diagnostic set was developed to characterize beam performance, including both time-dependent and time-integrated measurements of local and total beam power. A substantial high-energy ion population was identified propagating in reverse direction, i.e. from the back side of the anode in the electron beam dump. While significant progress was made in increasing beam power, further improvements in assessing the beam focusing envelope will be required before ultimate ion generation efficiency with this geometry can be completely determined.

  19. Wide-range monitor for pulsed x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaifer, R.C.; Jenkins, T.E.; Straume, T.

    1981-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring instrument based on a high-pressure ionization chamber has been developed that measures average dose rates as low as 0.1 mR/h and responds linearly to short pulses at dose rates up to 1.2 x 10/sup 10/ R/h. Its sensitivity can be remotely changed by a factor of 10/sup 4/, to enable accurate measurement of both background radiation and very high intensities such as can be expected from accelerator beam-spills. The instrument's detector-electrometer pulse response was measured using a dose-calibrated field-emission accelerator having a 30-ns pulse width.

  20. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.