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1

Oceanic Heat Flux Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors review the procedure for the direct calculation of oceanic heat flux from hydrographic measurements and set out the full “recipe” that is required.

Sheldon Bacon; Nick Fofonoff

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO (EFRC) proposes to license, construct, and operate a conventional acid leach uranium and vanadium mill storage pad, and access roads. The mill is designed to process ore containing uranium and vanadium

3

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Protection Division Environmental Protection Division Home Reactor Projects Celebrating DOE's Cleanup Accomplishments (PDF) Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor(BGRR) BGRR Overview BGRR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision BGRR Complex Cleanup Actions BGRR Documents BGRR Science & Accomplishments High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) HFBR Overview HFBR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision HFBR Complex Cleanup Actions HFBR Documents HFBR Science & Accomplishments Groundwater Protection Group Environmental Protection Division Contact > See also: HFBR Science & Accomplishments High Flux Beam Reactor Under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) underwent stabilization and partial decommissioning to prepare the HFBR confinement for long-term safe

4

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports HFBR Waste Loading Area, Soil Remediation (PDF) - July 2009 HFBR Decommissioning Project, Removal of the Control Rod Blades and Beam Plugs (PDF) - January 2010...

5

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why is the High Flux Beam Reactor Being Decommissioned? Why is the High Flux Beam Reactor Being Decommissioned? HFBR The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is being decommissioned because the Department of Energy (DOE) decided in 1999 that it would be permanently closed. The reactor was shut down in 1997 after tritium from a leak in the spent-fuel pool was found in the groundwater. The HFBR, which had operated from 1965 to 1996, was used solely for scientific research, providing neutrons for materials science, chemistry, biology, and physics experiments. The reactor was shut down for routine maintenance in November of 1996. In January 1997, tritium, a radioactive form of hydrogen and a by-product of reactor operations, was found in groundwater monitoring wells immediately south of the HFBR. The tritium

6

Dose measurements and calculations in the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR)  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of the epithermal neutron beam at BMRR were measured, calculated, and reported. This beam has already been used for animal irradiations. We anticipate that it will be used for clinical trials. Thermal and epithermal neutron flux densities distributions, and dose rate distributions, as a function of depth were measured in a lucite dog-head phantom. Monte Carlo calculations were performed and compared with the measured values. 2 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Fairchild, R.G.; Greenberg, D.; Kamen, Y.; Fiarman, S. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA). Medical Dept.); Benary, V. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA). Medical Dept. Tel Aviv Univ. (Israel)); Kalef-Ezra, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA). Medical Dept. Ioannina Univ. (Greece)); Wielopolski, L. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA). Medical Dept. State Univ. of New

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Integral window/photon beam position monitor and beam flux detectors for x-ray beams  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitor/detector assembly in a synchrotron for either monitoring the position of a photon beam or detecting beam flux may additionally function as a vacuum barrier between the front end and downstream segment of the beamline in the synchrotron. A base flange of the monitor/detector assembly is formed of oxygen free copper with a central opening covered by a window foil that is fused thereon. The window foil is made of man-made materials, such as chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and in certain configurations includes a central opening through which the beams are transmitted. Sensors of low atomic number materials, such as aluminum or beryllium, are laid on the window foil. The configuration of the sensors on the window foil may be varied depending on the function to be performed. A contact plate of insulating material, such as aluminum oxide, is secured to the base flange and is thereby clamped against the sensor on the window foil. The sensor is coupled to external electronic signal processing devices via a gold or silver lead printed onto the contact plate and a copper post screw or alternatively via a copper screw and a copper spring that can be inserted through the contact plate and coupled to the sensors. In an alternate embodiment of the monitor/detector assembly, the sensors are sandwiched between the window foil of chemical vapor deposition diamond or cubic boron nitrate and a front foil made of similar material.

Shu, Deming (Darien, IL); Kuzay, Tuncer M. (Naperville, IL)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Calculation of heating values for the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments. (authors)

Peterson, J.; Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Calculation of Heating Values for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments.

Peterson, Joshua L [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Level 1 Tornado PRA for the High Flux Beam Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a risk analysis primarily directed at providing an estimate for the frequency of tornado induced damage to the core of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and thus it constitutes a Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) covering tornado induced accident sequences. The basic methodology of the risk analysis was to develop a ``tornado specific`` plant logic model that integrates the internal random hardware failures with failures caused externally by the tornado strike and includes operator errors worsened by the tornado modified environment. The tornado hazard frequency, as well as earlier prepared structural and equipment fragility data, were used as input data to the model. To keep modeling/calculational complexity as simple as reasonable a ``bounding`` type, slightly conservative, approach was applied. By a thorough screening process a single dominant initiating event was selected as a representative initiator, defined as: ``Tornado Induced Loss of Offsite Power.`` The frequency of this initiator was determined to be 6.37E-5/year. The safety response of the HFBR facility resulted in a total Conditional Core Damage Probability of .621. Thus, the point estimate of the HFBR`s Tornado Induced Core Damage Frequency (CDF) was found to be: (CDF){sub Tornado} = 3.96E-5/year. This value represents only 7.8% of the internal CDF and thus is considered to be a small contribution to the overall facility risk expressed in terms of total Core Damage Frequency. In addition to providing the estimate of (CDF){sub Tornado}, the report documents, the relative importance of various tornado induced system, component, and operator failures that contribute most to (CDF){sub Tornado}.

Bozoki, G.E.; Conrad, C.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

CALCULATION OF PULSED KICKER MAGNETIC FIELD ATTENUATION INSIDE BEAM CHAMBERS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CALCULATION OF PULSED KICKER MAGNETIC FIELD ATTENUATION CALCULATION OF PULSED KICKER MAGNETIC FIELD ATTENUATION INSIDE BEAM CHAMBERS S. H. Kim January 8, 2001 1. Introduction and Summary The ceramic beam chambers in the sections of the kicker magnets for the beam injection and extraction in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) are made of alumina. The inner surface of the ceramic chamber is coated with a conductive paste. The choice of coating thickness is intended to reduce the shielding of the pulsed kicker magnetic field while containing the electromagnetic fields due to the beam bunches inside the chamber, and minimize the Ohmic heating due to the fields on the chamber [1]. The thin coating generally does not give a uniform surface resistivity for typical dimensions of the ceramic chambers in use. The chamber cross section is a circular or

12

Rebuilding the Brookhaven high flux beam reactor: A feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

After nearly thirty years of operation, Brookhaven`s High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) is still one of the world`s premier steady-state neutron sources. A major center for condensed matter studies, it currently supports fifteen separate beamlines conducting research in fields as diverse as crystallography, solid-state, nuclear and surface physics, polymer physics and structural biology and will very likely be able to do so for perhaps another decade. But beyond that point the HFBR will be running on borrowed time. Unless appropriate remedial action is taken, progressive radiation-induced embrittlement problems will eventually shut it down. Recognizing the HFBR`s value as a national scientific resource, members of the Laboratory`s scientific and reactor operations staffs began earlier this year to consider what could be done both to extend its useful life and to assure that it continues to provide state-of-the-art research facilities for the scientific community. This report summarizes the findings of that study. It addresses two basic issues: (i) identification and replacement of lifetime-limiting components and (ii) modifications and additions that could expand and enhance the reactor`s research capabilities.

Brynda, W.J.; Passell, L.; Rorer, D.C.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Decommissioning of the high flux beam reactor at Brookhaven Lab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high-flux beam reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory was a heavy water cooled and moderated reactor that achieved criticality on Oct. 31, 1965. It operated at a power level of 40 megawatts. An equipment upgrade in 1982 allowed operations at 60 megawatts. After a 1989 reactor shutdown to reanalyze safety impact of a hypothetical loss of coolant accident, the reactor was restarted in 1991 at 30 megawatts. The HFBR was shut down in December 1996 for routine maintenance and refueling. At that time, a leak of tritiated water was identified by routine sampling of groundwater from wells located adjacent to the reactor's spent fuel pool. The reactor remained shut down for almost three years for safety and environmental reviews. In November 1999 the United States Dept. of Energy decided to permanently shut down the HFBR. The decontamination and decommissioning of the HFBR complex, consisting of multiple structures and systems to operate and maintain the reactor, were complete in 2009 after removing and shipping off all the control rod blades. The emptied and cleaned HFBR dome, which still contains the irradiated reactor vessel, is presently under 24/7 surveillance for safety. Detailed dosimetry performed for the HFBR decommissioning during 1996-2009 is described in the paper. (authors)

Hu, J.P. [National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Reciniello, R.N. [Radiological Control Div., Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Holden, N.E. [National Nuclear Data Center, Brookhaven Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Measurements and model calculations of radiative fluxes for the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are compared with calculations made with a state-of-the art radiative transfer model (Modtran). The model is driven by measurements that give an as accurate as possible...

15

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the high flux beam reactor (HFBR).  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study for converting the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory. The purpose of this study is to determine what LEU fuel density would be needed to provide fuel lifetime and neutron flux performance similar to the current HEU fuel. The results indicate that it is not possible to convert the HFBR to LEU fuel with the current reactor core configuration. To use LEU fuel, either the core needs to be reconfigured to increase the neutron thermalization or a new LEU reactor design needs to be considered. This paper presents results of reactor calculations for a reference 28-assembly HEU-fuel core configuration and for an alternative 18-assembly LEU-fuel core configuration with increased neutron thermalization. Neutronic studies show that similar in-core and ex-core neutron fluxes, and fuel cycle length can be achieved using high-density LEU fuel with about 6.1 gU/cm{sup 3} in an altered reactor core configuration. However, hydraulic and safety analyses of the altered HFBR core configuration needs to be performed in order to establish the feasibility of this concept.

Pond, R. B.

1998-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

16

Model for Calculating Photosynthetic Photon Flux Densities in Forest Openings on Slopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model has been developed to calculate the spatial distribution of the photosynthetic photon flux density (PPFD) in elliptical forest openings of given slopes and orientations. The PPFD is separated into direct and diffuse components. The direct ...

Jing M. Chen; T. Andrew Black; David T. Price; Reid E. Carter

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Use of the Inertial Dissipation Method for Calculating Turbulent Fluxes from Low-Level Airborne Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements are currently used for computing turbulence fluxes of heat and momentum. The method generally used is the eddy correlation technique, which requires sophisticated equipments to calculate the absolute velocities of the air. ...

Pierre Durand; Leonardo De Sa; Aimé Druilhet; Frédérique Said

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Calculation of Consistent Flux and Advective Terms from Adjusted Vertical Profiles of Divergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple framework is presented for adjusting the normal wind components in a polygon of data points which produces a vanishing vertical integral of horizontal divergence, allows correct calculation of flux and advective terms, and permits ...

John Molinari; Steven Skubis

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

A Comparison of Sensible and Latent Heat Flux Calculations Using the Bowen Ratio and Aerodynamic Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis technique is outlined that calculates the sensible and latent heat fluxes by the Bowen ratio and aerodynamic methods, using profile measurements at any number of heights. Field measurements at two sites near Churchill, Manitoba, ...

David H. Halliwell; Wayne R. Rouse

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Efficient Calculation of Infrared Fluxes and Cooling Rates Using the Two-Stream Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calculation of infrared radiative fluxes and cooling rates using the two-stream equations is discussed. It is argued that at infrared wavelengths the two-stream equations are best viewed as an approximation to the differential radiance, the ...

J. M. Edwards

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Calculating Monthly Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates fromMonthly Cloud Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative transfer model from NCAR’s general circulation model CCM3 is modified to calculate monthly radiative fluxes and heating rates from monthly observations of cloud properties from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project ...

John W. Bergman; Harry H. Hendon

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Energy distribution and flux of fast neutrals and residual ions extracted from a neutral beam source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy distribution and flux of fast neutrals and residual ions extracted from a neutral beam-4004 Received 21 April 2006; accepted 6 July 2006; published 7 August 2006 The energy distribution and flux into fast neutrals. The neutral energy distribution was always shifted to lower energies compared

Economou, Demetre J.

23

MEASURED AND CALCULATED HEATING AND DOSE RATES FOR THE HFIR HB4 BEAM TUBE AND COLD SOURCE  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory was upgraded to install a cold source in horizontal beam tube number 4. Calculations were performed and measurements were made to determine heating within the cold source and dose rates within and outside a shield tunnel surrounding the beam tube. This report briefly describes the calculations and presents comparisons of the measured and calculated results. Some calculated dose rates are in fair to good agreement with the measured results while others, particularly those at the shield interfaces, differ greatly from the measured results. Calculated neutron exposure to the Teflon seals in the hydrogen transfer line is about one fourth of the measured value, underpredicting the lifetime by a factor of four. The calculated cold source heating is in good agreement with the measured heating.

Slater, Charles O [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Selby, Douglas L [ORNL; Ferguson, Phillip D [ORNL; Bucholz, James A [ORNL; Popov, Emilian L [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-03-0 FINAL REPORT- INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BNL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5098-LR-01-0 -LETTER REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

26

PRELIMINARY HAZARDS SUMMARY REPORT ON THE BROOKHAVEN HIGH FLUX BEAM RESEARCH REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Beam Reactor, HFBR, is cooled, moderated, and reflected by heavy water and designed to produce 40 Mw with a total epithermal flux of ~1.6 X 10/sup 15/cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ and a flector thermal maximum flux of 7 X 10/sup 14/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/, using a core formed by ETR plate-type fuel elements in a close-packed array. The hazards summary is given in terms of site description, reactor design, building design, plant operation, disposal of radioactive wastes and effluents, and safety analysis. (B.O.G.)

Hendrie, J.M.; Kouts, H.J.C.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Integrated framework for the flux calculation of neutral species inside trenches and holes during plasma etching  

SciTech Connect

An integrated framework for the neutral flux calculation inside trenches and holes during plasma etching is described, and a comparison between the two types of structure in a number of applications is presented. First, a detailed and functional set of equations for the neutral and ion flux calculations inside long trenches and holes with cylindrical symmetry is explicitly formulated. This set is based on early works [T. S. Cale and G. B. Raupp, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 8, 1242 (1990); V. K. Singh et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. B 10, 1091 (1992)], and includes new equations for the case of holes with cylindrical symmetry. Second, a method for the solution of the respective numerical task, i.e., one or a set of linear or nonlinear integral equations, is described. This method includes a coupling algorithm with a surface chemistry model and resolves the singularity problem of the integral equations. Third, the fluxes inside trenches and holes are compared. The flux from reemission is the major portion of the local flux at the bottom of both types of structure. The framework is applied in SiO{sub 2} etching by fluorocarbon plasmas to predict the increased intensity of reactive ion etching lag in SiO{sub 2} holes compared to trenches. It is also applied in deep Si etching: By calculating the flux of F atoms at the bottom of very high aspect ratio (up to 150) Si trenches and holes during the gas chopping process, the aspect ratio at which the flux of F atoms is eliminated and etching practically stops is estimated.

Kokkoris, George; Boudouvis, Andreas G.; Gogolides, Evangelos [Institute of Microelectronics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki 15310 (Greece); School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zographou Campus, Attiki 15780 (Greece); Institute of Microelectronics, NCSR ' Demokritos' , Aghia Paraskevi, Attiki 15310 (Greece)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

28

Reactor operations Brookhaven medical research reactor, Brookhaven high flux beam reactor informal monthly report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the April 1995 summary report on reactor operations at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Ongoing experiments/irradiations in each are listed, and other significant operations functions are also noted. The HFBR surveillance testing schedule is also listed.

Hauptman, H.M.; Petro, J.N.; Jacobi, O. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Efficiency calculations for the direct energy conversion system of the Cadarache neutral beam injectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A prototype energy conversion system is presently in operation at Cadarache, France. Such a device is planned for installation on each six neutral beam injectors for use in the Tore Supra experiment in 1989. We present calculations of beam performance that may influence design considerations. The calculations are performed with the DART charged particle beam code. We investigate the effects of cold plasma, direct energy conversion and neutral beam production. 4 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

White, R.C.

1988-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

30

Comparison of three-dimensional neutron flux calculations for Maine Yankee  

SciTech Connect

Calculations have been performed on the Maine Yankee Power Plant to obtain three-dimensional neutron fluxes using the spatial synthesis with the two-dimensional discrete ordinates code DORT, the three-dimensional discrete ordinates code THREEDANT and the three-dimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP. Neutron fluxes are compared for energies above 0.1 MeV and 1.0 MeV as well as dpa. Results were obtained at the Yankee dosimetry locations and special test regions within the pressure vessel, in the reactor cavity, and in a shield tank detector well.

Urban, W.T.; Crotzer, L.A.; Waters, L.S.; Parsons, D.K.; Alcouffe, R.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Spinney, K.B.; Cacciapouti, R.J. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Reactor operations: Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Informal report, June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part one of this report gives the operating history of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor for the month of June. Also included are the BMRR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of BMRR irradiations for the month. Part two gives the operating histories of the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor and the Cold Neutron Facility at HFBR for June. Also included are the HFBR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of HFBR irradiations for the month.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Reactor operations: Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Informal report, July 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part one of this report gives the operating history for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor for the month of July. Also included are the BMRR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of BMRR irradiations for the month. Part two gives the operating histories for the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor and the Cold Neutron Source Facility for the month of July. Also included are the HFBR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of HFBR irradiations for the month.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

ANL/APS/TB-20 Bremsstrahlung Scattering Calculations for the Beam Stops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Bremsstrahlung Scattering Calculations for the Beam Stops and Collimators in the APS Insertion-Device Beamlines P. K. Job, D. R. Haeffner, and D. Shu Contents 1. Introduction........................................................................................................1 2. Calculation Method............................................................................................2 3. Results and Discussion ......................................................................................3 a. Thick Lead and Tungsten Targets................................................................3 b. Monochromatic Aperture and Bremsstrahlung Stop ...................................4 c. Collimators for the White-Beam Transport .................................................5

34

TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BNL  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-02-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 DF WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

35

The method of convergence to calculate particles fluxes in X rays spectrometry techniques. Application in nuclear compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to calculate particle fluxes applicable in most of the spectroscopy techniques is described. Flux intensities of backscattered or absorbed electrons and emitted photons are calculated using a method of convergence to solve the invariant embedding equations that are used to describe the particle trajectories inside a solid sample. Our results are found to be helpful to carry out a procedure for quantitative characterization using instruments such as electron probe microanalyser or other probes. Examples of application to calculate the composition of ternary alloys are given and are compared with the same calculations using another procedure.

Figueroa, C.; Nieva, N.; Brizuela, H.; Heluani, S. P. [Laboratorio de Fisica del Solido, Dpto. de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologia, Universidad Nacional de Tucuman (Argentina)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Very narrow band model calculations of atmospheric fluxes and cooling rates  

SciTech Connect

A new very narrow band model (VNBM) approach has been developed and incorporated into the MODTRAN atmospheric transmittance-radiance code. The VNBM includes a computational spectral resolution of 1 cm{sup {minus}1}, a single-line Voigt equivalent width formalism that is based on the Rodgers-Williams approximation and accounts for the finite spectral width of the interval, explicit consideration of line tails, a statistical line overlap correction, a new sublayer integration approach that treats the effect of the sublayer temperature gradient on the path radiance, and the Curtis-Godson (CG) approximation for inhomogeneous paths. A modified procedure for determining the line density parameter 1/d is introduced, which reduces its magnitude. This results in a partial correction of the VNBM tendency to overestimate the interval equivalent widths. The standard two parameter CG approximation is used for H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, while the Goody three parameter CG approximation is used for O{sub 3}. Atmospheric flux and cooling rate predictions using a research version of MODTRAN, MODR, are presented for H{sub 2}O (with and without the continuum), CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 3} for several model atmospheres. The effect of doubling the CO{sub 2} concentration is also considered. These calculations are compared to line-by-line (LBL) model calculations using the AER, GLA, GFDL, and GISS codes. The MODR predictions fall within the spread of the LBL results. The effects of decreasing the band model spectral resolution are illustrated using CO{sub 2} cooling rate and flux calculations. 36 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

Bernstein, L.S.; Berk, A.; Acharya, P.K.; Robertson, D.C. [Spectral Sciences, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States)] [and others] [Spectral Sciences, Inc., Burlington, MA (United States); and others

1996-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

A new method to calculate the beam charge for an integrating current transformer  

SciTech Connect

The integrating current transformer (ICT) is a magnetic sensor widely used to precisely measure the charge of an ultra-short-pulse charged particle beam generated by traditional accelerators and new laser-plasma particle accelerators. In this paper, we present a new method to calculate the beam charge in an ICT based on circuit analysis. The output transfer function shows an invariable signal profile for an ultra-short electron bunch, so the function can be used to evaluate the signal quality and calculate the beam charge through signal fitting. We obtain a set of parameters in the output function from a standard signal generated by an ultra-short electron bunch (about 1 ps in duration) at a radio frequency linear electron accelerator at Tsinghua University. These parameters can be used to obtain the beam charge by signal fitting with excellent accuracy.

Wu Yuchi; Han Dan; Zhu Bin; Dong Kegong; Tan Fang; Gu Yuqiu [Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory, Research Center of Laser Fusion, CAEP, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

5098-SR-04-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

P.C. Weaver

2010-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

39

PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-SR-05-0 PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

Lasche, G.P.

1983-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Neutron Flux Measurements and Calculations in the Gamma Irradiation Facility Using MCNPX.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The gamma irradiation facility at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)is used to deliver a pure gamma dose to any target of interest. in addition… (more)

Giuliano, Dominic Richard

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5000 5000 6000 7000 8000 Wavelength (Angstroms) Flux (in arbitrary units) SN 1990N SN 1989B SN 1993O SN 1981B SN 1994D SN 1997ap Iron Peak Blends Ca II Si II & Co II Fe II & III Day -7 Day -5 Day -4 Day -2 ± 2 Day 0 Day +2 * -50 0 50 100 150 Observed days from peak Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 Observed R magnitude 27 26 25 24 Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 R band Ground-based I band HST I band (b) (c) (a) Pre-SN observation 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 log(cz) 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 effective m B 0.02 0.05 0.1 0.2 0.5 1.0 redshift z Hamuy et al (A.J. 1996) Supernova Cosmology Project 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H = 50 km s -1 Mpc -1 ) No Big Bang 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 ! " z ~ 0 . 4 z = 0 . 8 3 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H=50 km/s/Mpc)

43

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Development of Aerosol Models for Radiative Flux Calculations at ARM Sites: Utility of Trajectory Clustering for Characterizing Aerosol Climatology E. Andrews Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environment University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado E. Andrews, J. A. Ogren, P. J. Sheridan, and J. M. Harris Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder, Colorado P. K. Quinn Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Seattle, Washington Abstract The uncertainties associated with assumptions of generic aerosol properties in radiative transfer codes are unknown, which means that these uncertainties are frequently invoked when models and

44

Calculation of Surface Fluxes under Convective Conditions by Turbulence Closure Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of deriving new relationships between near-surface turbulent fluxes and vertical differences of wind speed and potential temperature between two levels in the atmospheric surface layer from simplified second-order turbulence closure ...

Lech ?obocki

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Ray tracing flux calculation for the small and wide angle x-ray scattering diffraction station at the SESAME synchrotron radiation facility  

SciTech Connect

The calculation for the optics of the synchrotron radiation small and wide angle x-ray scattering beamline, currently under construction at SESAME is described. This beamline is based on a cylindrically bent germanium (111) single crystal with an asymmetric cut of 10.5 deg., followed by a 1.2 m long rhodium coated plane mirror bent into a cylindrical form. The focusing properties of bent asymmetrically cut crystals have not yet been studied in depth. The present paper is devoted to study of a particular application of a bent asymmetrically cut crystal using ray tracing simulations with the SHADOW code. These simulations show that photon fluxes of order of 1.09x10{sup 11} photons/s will be available at the experimental focus at 8.79 keV. The focused beam dimensions will be 2.2 mm horizontal full width at half maximum (FWHM) by 0.12 mm vertical (FWHM).

Salah, Wa'el [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan); Department of Physics, The Hashemite University, Zarqa 13115 (Jordan); Sanchez del Rio, M. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Bp 220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Hoorani, H. [Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Application in the Middle East (SESAME), P.O. Box 7, Allan 19252 (Jordan)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Calculation of synchrotron radiation from high intensity electron beam at eRHIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electron-Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (eRHIC) at Brookhaven National Lab is an upgrade project for the existing RHIC. A 30 GeV energy recovery linac (ERL) will provide a high charge and high quality electron beam to collide with proton and ion beams. This will improve the luminosity by at least 2 orders of magnitude. The synchrotron radiation (SR) from the bending magnets and strong quadrupoles for such an intense beam could be penetrating the vacuum chamber and producing hazards to electronic devices and undesired background for detectors. In this paper, we calculate the SR spectral intensity, power density distributions and heat load on the chamber wall. We suggest the wall thickness required to stop the SR and estimate spectral characteristics of the residual and scattered background radiation outside the chamber.

Jing Y.; Chubar, O.; Litvinenko, V.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

47

CALCULATION OF EFFECT OF FUEL BURNUP ON FUEL AND POISON DISTRIBUTIONS AND ON FLUX DISTRIBUTION IN THE MARINE REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The changes in fuel and poison distributions and the changes in flux shape which accompany the consumption of fuel are studied. The technique employed is a perturbation calculation based on a one-velocity group treatment of the neutrons. The geometry is a spherical core surrounded by an infinite reflector. The programming forms for the IBM-650 which performs the computations using the Wolontis interpretative system are included. Two sample calculations were worked out using the code described and the results are plotted. (M.H.R.)

Hinman, G.

1957-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

48

Simple Radiative Transfer Methods for Calculating Domain-Averaged Solar Fluxes in Inhomogeneous Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of cloud fraction as a means of incorporating horizontal cloud inhomogeneity in radiative transfer calculations is widespread in the atmospheric science community. This study addresses some issues pertaining to the use of cloud fraction ...

P. M. Gabriel; K. F. Evans

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Neutron Flux Interpolation with Finite Element Method in the Nuclear Fuel Cell Calculation using Collision Probability Method  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear reactor design and analysis of next-generation reactors require a comprehensive computing which is better to be executed in a high performance computing. Flat flux (FF) approach is a common approach in solving an integral transport equation with collision probability (CP) method. In fact, the neutron flux distribution is not flat, even though the neutron cross section is assumed to be equal in all regions and the neutron source is uniform throughout the nuclear fuel cell. In non-flat flux (NFF) approach, the distribution of neutrons in each region will be different depending on the desired interpolation model selection. In this study, the linear interpolation using Finite Element Method (FEM) has been carried out to be treated the neutron distribution. The CP method is compatible to solve the neutron transport equation for cylindrical geometry, because the angle integration can be done analytically. Distribution of neutrons in each region of can be explained by the NFF approach with FEM and the calculation results are in a good agreement with the result from the SRAC code. In this study, the effects of the mesh on the k{sub eff} and other parameters are investigated.

Shafii, M. Ali [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Physics Department, Andalas University, Kampus Limau Manis, Padang, Sumatera Barat (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Kurniasih, Neny [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Ariani, Menik [Physics Department, Sriwijaya University, Kampus Indralaya, Ogan Ilir, Sumatera Selatan (Indonesia); Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Yulianti, Yanti [Physics Department, Lampung University, Jl.Sumantri Brojonegoro no 1, Lampung (Indonesia); Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

50

Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injectors  

SciTech Connect

Data from an E {parallel} B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; O' Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

MCNP modeling of the Swiss LWRs for the calculation of the in- and ex-vessel neutron flux distributions  

SciTech Connect

MCNP models of all Swiss Nuclear Power Plants have been developed by the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra), in collaboration with the utilities and ETH Zurich, for the 2011 decommissioning cost study. The estimation of the residual radionuclide inventories and corresponding activity levels of irradiated structures and components following the NPP shut-down is of crucial importance for the planning of the dismantling process, the waste packaging concept and, consequently, for the estimation of the decommissioning costs. Based on NPP specific data, the neutron transport simulations lead to the best yet knowledge of the neutron spectra necessary for the ensuing activation calculations. In this paper, the modeling concept towards the MCNP-NPPs is outlined and the resulting flux distribution maps are presented. (authors)

Pantelias, M.; Volmert, B.; Caruso, S. [National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste Nagra, Hardstrasse 73, 5430, Wettingen (Switzerland); Zvoncek, P. [Laboratory for Nuclear Energy Systems, ETH Zurich, Sonneggstrasse 3, 8092, Zurich (Switzerland); Bitterli, B. [Kernkraftwerk Goesgen-Daeniken AG, 4658 Daeniken (Switzerland); Neukaeter, E.; Nissen, W. [BKW FMB Energie AG-Kernkraftwerk Muehleberg, 3203 Muehleberg (Switzerland); Ledergerber, G. [Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt AG, 5325 Leibstadt (Switzerland); Vielma, R. [Axpo AG-Kernkraftwerk Beznau, 5312 Doettingen (Switzerland)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

RELAP5/MOD2. 5 analysis of the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) for a loss of power and coolant accident  

SciTech Connect

A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

Slovik, G.C.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, Jae.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-power-density-laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems. 25 figs.

Lasche, G.P.

1987-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

54

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

SciTech Connect

A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.

Lasche, George P. (Arlington, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

On the use of flux limiters in the discrete ordinates method for 3D radiation calculations in absorbing and scattering media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of flux limiters to the discrete ordinates method (DOM), S"N, for radiative transfer calculations is discussed and analyzed for 3D enclosures for cases in which the intensities are strongly coupled to each other such as: radiative equilibrium ... Keywords: Discrete ordinates method (DOM), Flux limiters, Newton-Krylov GMRES, Non-homogeneous 3D media, Radiation heat transfer, Radiative transfer equation (RTE), TVD schemes

William F. Godoy; Paul E. DesJardin

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Band gap tunability of molecular beam epitaxy grown lateral composition modulated GaInP structures by controlling V/III flux ratio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lateral composition modulated (LCM) GaInP structures were grown on (001) GaAs substrate by molecular beam epitaxy with different V/III flux ratios. Band gap of LCM structures could be tuned from 1.93 eV to 1.83 eV by decreasing flux ratio while maintaining the same photoluminescence intensity, enhanced light absorption, and widened absorption spectrum. It is shown that for band gap tuning of LCM structures, flux ratio adjustment is a more viable method compared to growth temperature adjustment.

Park, K. W. [School of Information and Communications, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Park, C. Y. [Micro Systems Laboratory, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Y. T. [School of Information and Communications, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanobio Materials and Electronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Photonics and Applied Physics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

57

Plasma focus ion beam fluence and flux-Scaling with stored energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements on plasma focus ion beams include various advanced techniques producing a variety of data which has yet to produce benchmark numbers [A Bernard et al., J. Mosc. Phys. Soc. 8, 93-170 (1998)]. This present paper uses the Lee Model code [S Lee, http://www.plasmafocus.net (2012)], integrated with experimental measurements to provide the basis for reference numbers and the scaling of deuteron beams versus stored energy E{sub 0}. The ion number fluence (ions m{sup -2}) and energy fluence (J m{sup -2}) computed as 2.4-7.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} and 2.2-33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}, respectively, are found to be independent of E{sub 0} from 0.4 to 486 kJ. Typical inductance machines (33-55 nH) produce 1.2-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} ions per kJ carrying 1.3%-4% E{sub 0} at mean ion energy 50-205 keV, dropping to 0.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} ions per kJ carrying 0.7% E{sub 0} for the high inductance INTI PF.

Lee, S. [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia); Physics Department, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Saw, S. H. [INTI International University, 71800 Nilai (Malaysia); Institute for Plasma Focus Studies, 32 Oakpark Drive, Chadstone 3148 (Australia)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Improvement of Air Transport Data and Wall Transmission/Reflection Data in the SKYSHINE Code (1) - Calculation of line Beam Reponse Functions for Gamma-Ray Skyshine Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvement of Air Transport Data and Wall Transmission/Reflection Data in the SKYSHINE Code (1) - Calculation of line Beam Reponse Functions for Gamma-Ray Skyshine Analysis

Nemoto, M; Hirayama, H; Sakamoto, Y; Hayashi, K; Hayashida, Y; Ishikawa, S; Sato, O; Tayama, R

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Flux lattices reformulated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically explore the optical flux lattices produced for ultra-cold atoms subject to laser fields where both the atom-light coupling and the effective detuning are spatially periodic. We analyze the geometric vector potential and the magnetic flux it generates, as well as the accompanying geometric scalar potential. We show how to understand the gauge-dependent Aharonov-Bohm singularities in the vector potential, and calculate the continuous magnetic flux through the elementary cell in terms of these singularities. The analysis is illustrated with a square optical flux lattice. We conclude with an explicit laser configuration yielding such a lattice using a set of five properly chosen beams with two counterpropagating pairs (one along the x axes and the other y axes), together with a single beam along the z axis. We show that this lattice is not phase-stable, and identify the one phase-difference that affects the magnetic flux. Thus armed with realistic laser setup, we directly compute the Chern number...

Juzeli?nas, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

Evan Harpeneau

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3: TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect

5098-LR-02-0 SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3 TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

E.M. Harpenau

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Two-dimensional Lasnex ray-trace calculations of thermal whole beam self-focusing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal self-focusing of laser light may be significant when a plasma is irradiated with short-wavelength laser light. Self-focusing magnifies the light intensity which can increase absorption by plasma waves (producing hot electrons which may cause preheat), could increase scattering, and could be a perturbation source for the Rayleigh--Taylor instability. We use two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations to characterize thermal self-focusing for parameters of interest to laser fusion applications, and present a simple model. A diverging beam is shown to reduce the self-focusing.

Estabrook, K.; Kruer, W.L.; Bailey, D.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Dose calculations using MARS for Bremsstrahlung beam stops and collimators in APS beamline stations.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MARS is used to model the generation of gas bremsstrahlung (GB) radiation from 7-GeV electrons which scatter from residual gas atoms in undulator straight sections within the Advanced Photon Source (APS) storage ring. Additionally, MARS is employed to model the interactions of the GB radiation with components along the x-ray beamlines and then determine the expected radiation dose-rates that result. In this manner, MARS can be used to assess the adequacy of existing shielding or the specifications for new shielding when required. The GB radiation generated in the 'thin-target' of an ID straight section will consist only of photons in a 1/E-distribution up to the full energy of the stored electron beam. Using this analytical model, the predicted GB power for a typical APS 15.38-m insertion device (ID) straight section is 4.59 x 10{sup -7} W/nTorr/mA, assuming a background gas composed of air (Z{sub eff} = 7.31) at room temperature (293K). The total GB power provides a useful benchmark for comparisons between analytical and numerical approaches. We find good agreement between MARS and analytical estimates for total GB power. The extended straight section 'target' creates a radial profile of GB, which is highly peaked centered on the electron beam. The GB distribution reflects the size of the electron beam that creates the radiation. Optimizing the performance of MARS in terms of CPU time per incident trajectory requires the use of a relatively short, high-density gas target (air); in this report, the target density is {rho}L = 2.89 x 10{sup -2} g/cm{sup 2} over a length of 24 cm. MARS results are compared with the contact dose levels reported in TB-20, which used EGS4 for radiation transport simulations. Maximum dose-rates in 1 cc of tissue phantom form the initial basis for comparison. MARS and EGS4 results are approximately the same for maximum 1-cc dose-rates and attenuation in the photon-dominated regions; for thicker targets, however, the dose-rate no longer depends only on photon attenuation, as photoneutrons (PNs) begin to dominate. The GB radiation-induced photoneutron measurements from four different metals (Fe, Cu, W, and Pb) are compared with MARS predictions. The simulated dose-rates for beamline 6-ID are approximately 3-5 times larger than the measured values, whereas those for beamline 11-ID are much closer. Given the uncertainty in local values of pressure and Z, the degree of agreement between MARS and the PN measurements is good. MARS simulations of GB-induced radiation in and around the FOE show the importance of using actual pressure and gas composition (Z{sub eff}) to obtain accurate PN dose. For a beam current of 300 mA, extrapolating pressure data measured in previously published studies predicts an average background gas pressure of 27 nTorr. An average atomic number of Z{sub eff} = 4.0 is obtained from the same studies. In addition, models of copper masks presently in use at the APS are included. Simulations show that inclusion of exit masks make significant differences in both the radiation spatial distribution within the FOE, as well as the peak intensity. Two studies have been conducted with MARS to assess shielding requirements. First, dose levels in contact with the outside wall of the FOE are examined when GB radiation strikes Pb or W beam stops of varying transverse size within the FOE. Four separate phantom regions are utilized to measure the dose, two at beam elevation and two at the horizontal beam position. The first two phantoms are used for scoring FOE dose along the outside and back walls, horizontally; the second two collect dose on the roof and vertically on the back wall. In all cases, the beam stop depth is maintained at 30 cm. Inclusion of front end (FE) exit masks typically cause a 1-2 order-of-magnitude increase in the dose-rates relative to the case with no masks. Masks place secondary bremsstrahlung sources inside the FOE, and therefore they must be shielded appropriately. The MARS model does not fully account for all shielding present

Dooling, J.; Accelerator Systems Division (APS)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Commissioning of the Korean High Heat Flux Test Facility by Using Electron Beam System for Plasma Facing Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Divertor and High-Heat-Flux Components / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 1), Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Suk-Kwon Kim; Eo Hwak Lee; Jae-Sung Yoon; Dong Won Lee; Duck-Hoi Kim; Seungyon Cho

65

ANL/APS/TB-54, Dose Calculations using MARS for Bremsstrahlung Beam Stops and Collimators in APS Beamline Stations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 DOSE CALCULATIONS USING MARS FOR BREMSSTRAHLUNG BEAM STOPS AND COLLIMATORS IN APS BEAMLINE STATIONS Jeffrey C. Dooling Accelerator Systems Division Advanced Photon Source August 2010 This work is sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Science The submitted manuscript has been created by UChicago Argonne, LLC, Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne"). Argonne, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on its behalf, a paid-up nonexclusive, irrevocable worldwide license in said article to reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute copies to the public, and perform publicly and display

66

Design and characterization of 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance plasma source with magnetron magnetic field configuration for high flux of hyperthermal neutral beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) source with a magnetron magnetic field configuration was developed to meet the demand of a hyperthermal neutral beam (HNB) flux on a substrate of more than 1x10{sup 15} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for industrial applications. The parameters of the operating pressure, ion density, electron temperature, and distance between the neutralization plate and the substrate for the HNB source are specified in a theoretical analysis. The electron temperature and the ion density are measured to characterize the ECR HNB source using a Langmuir probe and optical emission spectroscopy. The parameters of the ECR HNB source are in good agreement with the theoretically specified parameters.

Kim, Seong Bong [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Chul; Yoo, Suk Jae [Convergence Plasma Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Namkung, Won; Cho, Moohyun [Department of Physics, Pohang University of Science and Technology, San 31, Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Calculation of the parameters of the X-ray diffraction station with adaptive segmented optics on the side beam from the wiggler of the Sibir'-2 storage ring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mounting of an X-ray diffraction station on the side beam of a 19-pole superconducting wiggler makes it possible not only to use the central synchrotron radiation beam with a wavelength of 0.5 Angstrom-Sign , but also to solve problems requiring softer X rays at a synchrotron radiation (SR) intensity exceeding that for the beams from the bending magnet. A numerical simulation of the formation of photon beams from a source and their transmission through the elements of the station (and through the station as a whole) allows one to calculate the parameters of the station, compare it with the existing analogs, determine its potential and actual efficiency of its elements, and estimate the adjustment quality. A numerical simulation of the SR source on the side beam from the wiggler and the focusing channel (segmented condenser mirror, monochromator with sagittal focusing by the segmented second crystal, and segmented focusing mirror) has been performed. The sizes of the focus and the divergence of rays in it are determined with allowance for the finite sizes of segments. The intensity of radiation with a wavelength {lambda} = 1.0 Angstrom-Sign in the focus is determined taking into account the loss in the SR extraction channel and in the focusing channel. The values of the critical wavelength for the side beam from the wiggler and the wavelength resolution are calculated. The intensities in the X-ray diffraction pattern and its angular resolution are found.

Molodenskii, D. S.; Kheiker, D. M., E-mail: kheiker@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Korchuganov, V. N. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Konoplev, E. E. [NPO Luch (Russian Federation); Dorovatovskii, P. V. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Influence of V/III growth flux ratio on trap states in m-plane GaN grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and deep level optical spectroscopy (DLOS) were utilized to investigate the behavior of deep states in m-plane, n-type GaN grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy (NH{sub 3}-MBE) as a function of systematically varied V/III growth flux ratios. Levels were detected at E{sub C} - 0.14 eV, E{sub C} - 0.21 eV, E{sub C} - 0.26 eV, E{sub C} - 0.62 eV, E{sub C} - 0.67 eV, E{sub C} - 2.65 eV, and E{sub C} - 3.31 eV, with the concentrations of several traps exhibiting systematic dependencies on V/III ratio. The DLTS spectra are dominated by traps at E{sub C} - 0.14 eV and E{sub C} - 0.67 eV, whose concentrations decreased monotonically with increasing V/III ratio and decreasing oxygen impurity concentration, and by a trap at E{sub C} - 0.21 eV that revealed no dependence of its concentration on growth conditions, suggestive of different physical origins. Higher concentrations of deeper trap states detected by DLOS with activation energies of E{sub C} - 2.65 eV and E{sub C} - 3.31 eV in each sample did not display measureable sensitivity to the intentionally varied V/III ratio, necessitating further study on reducing these deep traps through growth optimization for maximizing material quality of NH{sub 3}-MBE grown m-plane GaN.

Zhang, Z.; Arehart, A. R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Hurni, C. A.; Speck, J. S. [Department of Materials, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106-5050 (United States); Ringel, S. A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Institute for Materials Research, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

69

Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To illustrate the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux, we briefly explain our calculation scheme and important components, such as primary cosmic ray spectra, interaction model, and geomagnetic model. Then, we calculate the atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site in our calculation scheme. We compare the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes predicted at INO with those at other major neutrino detector sites, especially that at SK site.

Honda, Morihiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

70

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Prieto, Carlos Allende

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Carlos Allende Prieto

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

72

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Cao, Jun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

74

Reflected Fluxes for Broken Clouds over a Lambertian Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reflected fluxes are calculated for broken cloudiness (i.e., nonplane parallel) as a function of cloud cover, cloud optical depth, solar zenith angle and surface albedo. These calculations extend previous results for broken cloud reflected fluxes ...

Ronald M. Welch; Bruce A. Wielicki

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO, South Pole and Pyhäsalmi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes for the neutrino experiments proposed at INO, South Pole and Pyh\\"asalmi. Neutrino fluxes have been obtained using ATMNC, a simulation code for cosmic ray in the atmosphere. Even using the same primary flux model and the interaction model, the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes are different for the different sites due to the geomagnetic field. The prediction of these fluxes in the present paper would be quite useful in the experimental analysis.

M. Sajjad Athar; M. Honda; T. Kajita; K. Kasahara; S. Midorikawa

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

76

HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR PRELIMINARY DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of possible types of research reactors for the production of transplutonium elements and other isotopes indicates that a flux-trap reactor consisting of a beryllium-reflecteds light-water-cooled annular fuel region surrounding a light-water island provides the required thermal neutron fluxes at minimum cost. The preliminary desigu of such a reactor was carried out on the basis of a parametric study of the effect of dimensions of the island and fuel regions heat removal rates, and fuel loading on the achievable thermal neutmn fluxes in the island and reflector. The results indicate that a 12- to 14-cm- diam. island provides the maximum flux for a given power density. This is in good agreement with the US8R critical experiments. Heat removal calculations indicate that average power densities up to 3.9 Mw/liter are achievable with H/ sub 2/O-cooled, platetype fuel elements if the system is pressurized to 650 psi to prevent surface boiling. On this basis, 100 Mw of heat can be removed from a 14-cm-ID x 36-cm-OD x 30.5-cm-long fuel regions resulting in a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10/sup 15/ in the island after insertion of 100 g of Cm/sup 244/ or equivalent. The resulting production of Cf/sup 252/ amounts to 65 mg for a 1 1/2- year irradiation. Operation of the reactor at the more conservative level of 67 Mw, providing an irradiation flux of 2 x 10/sup 15/ in the islands will result in the production of 35 mg of Cf/sup 252/ per 18 months from 100 g of Cm/sup 244/. A development program is proposed to answer the question of the feasibility of the higher power operation. In addition to the central irradiation facility for heavyelement productions the HFIR contains ten hydraulic rabbit tubes passing through the beryllium reflector for isotope production and four beam holes for basic research, Preliminary estimates indicate that the cost of the facility, designed for an operating power level of 100 Mw, will be approximately 2 million. (auth)

Lane, J.A.; Cheverton, R.D.; Claiborne, G.C.; Cole, T.E.; Gambill, W.R.; Gill, J.P.; Hilvety, N.; McWherther, J.R.; Vroom, D.W.

1959-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

77

Beam History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Status Beam History Print Beamline History Request Form To request a beam current histograph from the ALS storage ring beam histograph database, select the year, month, and...

78

Decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

After careful planning and input from regulatory agencies and the community, a decommissioning plan for the HFBR has been finalized. A Feasibility Study was completed and a...

79

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

been taken to partially decommission and prepare the HFBR for safe storage. Final decommissioning of the HFBR building will be performed at the completion of the decay period. The...

80

MEMS Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... beams. In addition, wafer bond strength is determined from micro-chevron test structures using a material test machine. ...

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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81

Float Observations of the Southern Ocean. Part II: Eddy Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Autonomous Lagrangian Circulation Explorer (ALACE) floats are used to examine eddy fluxes in the Southern Ocean. Eddy fluxes are calculated from differences between ALACE float data and mean fields derived from hydrographic atlas data or ...

Sarah T. Gille

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Global Character of the Flux of Downward Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four different types of estimates of the surface downwelling longwave radiative flux (DLR) are reviewed. One group of estimates synthesizes global cloud, aerosol, and other information in a radiation model that is used to calculate fluxes. Because ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Martin Wild; Paul W. Stackhouse Jr.; Tristan L’Ecuyer; Seiji Kato; David S. Henderson

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

GCM-Simulated Surface Energy Fluxes in Climate Change Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The changes in the surface energy fluxes calculated with a general circulation model under increased levels of carbon dioxide concentration are analyzed and related to the simulation of these fluxes under present-day conditions. It is shown that ...

Martin Wild; Atsumu Ohmura; Ulrich Cubasch

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Beam current sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

85

Beam current sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

Kuchnir, Moyses (Elmhurst, IL); Mills, Frederick E. (Elburn, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Beam History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam History Print Beamline History Request Form To request a beam current histograph from the ALS storage ring beam histograph database, select the year, month, and day, then...

87

Beam/seam alignment control for electron beam welding  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a dynamic beam/seam alignment control system for electron beam welds utilizing video apparatus. The system includes automatic control of workpiece illumination, near infrared illumination of the workpiece to limit the range of illumination and camera sensitivity adjustment, curve fitting of seam position data to obtain an accurate measure of beam/seam alignment, and automatic beam detection and calculation of the threshold beam level from the peak beam level of the preceding video line to locate the beam or seam edges.

Burkhardt, Jr., James H. (Knoxville, TN); Henry, J. James (Oak Ridge, TN); Davenport, Clyde M. (Knoxville, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Fast flux locked loop  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

89

Heat and mass transfer in a gas in a capillary induced by light with nonuniform intensity distribution over the beam cross section  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is presented of the heat and drift fluxes induced by velocity-selective light absorption in a single-component gas in a capillary tube. The light intensity distribution across the beam is assumed to have a Gaussian profile. Kinetic equations are solved numerically to calculate flux profiles and kinetic coefficients quantifying the contributions of surface and collisional mechanisms to light-induced transfer as functions of the Knudsen number, the ratio of the rate of radiative decay of the exited level and intermolecular collision frequency, accommodation coefficient, and the ratio of the tube radius to the light beam radius.

Chernyak, V. G., E-mail: vladimir.chernyak@usu.ru; Polikarpov, A. P., E-mail: alexey.polikarpov@usu.ru [Ural State University (Russian Federation)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Modeling the beam characterization system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Beam Characterization System (BCS) recently developed for heliostat evaluation at the Central Receiver Test Facility at Sandia Laboratories, measures, digitizes, records, and analyzes a flux-density pattern in a beam of reflected sunlight. Since the BCS collects data with a given set of conditions (geometry, weather, etc.) to determine optical specifications which can predict heliostat behavior under other sets of conditions, it is necessary to use a theoretical model of the system to interpret results. This model serves as an aid to define specifications, analyze measurements, calculate performance, and answer other questions about the heliostat. A statistical method is used to handle stochastic variables such as sun-tracking errors and surface-slope errors. A cone-optics technique is used to incorporate the statistics into a consistent model of the optical behavior of a heliostat. An overview of this model is given. Use of the model is unfolding slope-error distributions and sun-tracking statistics is described for measurements both in and out of the focal plane. The importance of auxiliary input information such as the sunshape (angular distribution of sun rays) to the analysis of BCS measurements is discussed. Finally, the role of the BCS in validating heliostats against acceptance criteria is summarized.

Biggs, F.; Vittitoe, C.N.; King, D.L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

POLOIDAL FLUX LINKAGE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INTERNATIONAL THERMONUCLEAREXPERIMENTAL REACTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the poloidal flux linkage requirements for the current ramp-up and for the flat-top phase of the proposed [2] and JSOLVER [3] to calculate the flux linkage requirements during the current ramp-up and steady regarding the plasma ramp-up time, and the amount of flux linkage change that the poloidal field coil system

92

Invert Effective Thermal Conductivity Calculation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this calculation is to evaluate the temperature-dependent effective thermal conductivities of a repository-emplaced invert steel set and surrounding ballast material. The scope of this calculation analyzes a ballast-material thermal conductivity range of 0.10 to 0.70 W/m {center_dot} K, a transverse beam spacing range of 0.75 to 1.50 meters, and beam compositions of A 516 carbon steel and plain carbon steel. Results from this calculation are intended to support calculations that identify waste package and repository thermal characteristics for Site Recommendation (SR). This calculation was developed by Waste Package Department (WPD) under Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) procedure AP-3.12Q, Revision 1, ICN 0, Calculations.

M.J. Anderson; H.M. Wade; T.L. Mitchell

2000-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

93

Geometrical vector flux sinks and ideal flux concentrators  

SciTech Connect

The description of ideal flux concentrators as shapes that do not disturb the geometrical vector flux field is extended to all the known types of ideal flux concentrators. This is accomplished, in part, by the introduction of vector flux sinks.

Greenman, P.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Footprint Calculator?  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

fuels and advanced vehicles (AFVs). The Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emis- sions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) Fleet Foot- print Calculator can help fleets decide on...

95

Subtropical Climatology of Direct Beam Solar Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A climatology of direct beam irradiance has been compiled for Mauna Loa Observatory. A broadband transmittance, calculated from the direct-beam data, has been stratified into clear sky and optically thin and thick cloud regimes; statistics of ...

T. M. Thompson; S. K. Cox

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Solar Glare and Flux Mapping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SGFMT Home SGFMT Home Register Glare Analysis Solar Glare Hazard Analysis SGHAT 1.0 (old) Empirical Glare Analysis Analytical Glare Analysis PHLUX Mapping Reflectivity Calculator References Contact Us Solar Glare and Flux Mapping Tools Measurement of reflected solar irradiance is receiving significant attention by industry, military, and government agencies to assess potential impacts of glint and glare from growing numbers of solar power installations around the world. In addition, characterization of the incident solar flux distribution on central receivers for concentrating solar power applications is important to monitor and maintain system performance. This website contains tools to evaluate solar glare and receiver irradiance. Register to access the tools Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

97

Experimental and Computational Study of the Flux Spectrum in Materials Irradiation Facilities of the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compares the available experimental neutron flux data in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to computational models of the HFIR loosely based on the experimental loading of cycle 400. Over the last several decades, many materials irradiation experiments have included fluence monitors which were subsequently used to reconstruct a coarse-group energy-dependent flux spectrum. Experimental values for thermal and fast neutron flux in the flux trap about the midplane are found to be 1.78 0.27 and 1.05 0:06 1E15 n/cm sec, respectively. The reactor physics code MCNP is used to calculate neutron flux in the HFIR at irradiation locations. The computational results are shown to correspond to closely to experimental data for thermal and fast neutron flux with calculated percent differences ranging from 0:55 13.20%.

McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Daly, Thomas F [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Chromo-Electric flux tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The profiles of the chromo-electric field generated by static quark-antiquark, $Q{\\bar Q}$ and three-quark, $QQQ$ sources are calculated in Coulomb gauge. Using a variational ansatz for the ground state, we show that a flux tube-like structure emerges and combines to the ``Y''-shape field profile for three static quarks. The properties of the chromo-electric field are, however, not expected to be the same as those of the full action density or the Wilson line and the differences are discussed.

Patrick O. Bowman; Adam P. Szczepaniak

2004-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

99

Electric Flux Tube in Magnetic Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study a methodical problem related to the magnetic scenario recently suggested and initiated by the authors \\cite{Liao_ES_mono} to understand the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (sQGP): the electric flux tube in monopole plasma. A macroscopic approach, interpolating between Bose condensed (dual superconductor) and classical gas medium is developed first. Then we work out a microscopic approach based on detailed quantum mechanical calculation of the monopole scattering on electric flux tube, evaluating induced currents for all partial waves. As expected, the flux tube looses its stability when particles can penetrate it: we make this condition precise by calculating the critical value for the product of the flux tube size times the particle momentum, above which the flux tube dissolves. Lattice static potentials indicate that flux tubes seem to dissolve at $T>T_{dissolution} \\approx 1.3 T_c$. Using our criterion one gets an estimate of the magnetic density $n\\approx 4.4 \\sim 6.6 fm^{-3}$ a...

Liao Jin Feng

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

A pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To develop a flexible pencil beam algorithm for helium ion beam therapy. Dose distributions were calculated using the newly developed pencil beam algorithm and validated using Monte Carlo (MC) methods. Methods: The algorithm was based on the established theory of fluence weighted elemental pencil beam (PB) kernels. Using a new real-time splitting approach, a minimization routine selects the optimal shape for each sub-beam. Dose depositions along the beam path were determined using a look-up table (LUT). Data for LUT generation were derived from MC simulations in water using GATE 6.1. For materials other than water, dose depositions were calculated by the algorithm using water-equivalent depth scaling. Lateral beam spreading caused by multiple scattering has been accounted for by implementing a non-local scattering formula developed by Gottschalk. A new nuclear correction was modelled using a Voigt function and implemented by a LUT approach. Validation simulations have been performed using a phantom filled with homogeneous materials or heterogeneous slabs of up to 3 cm. The beams were incident perpendicular to the phantoms surface with initial particle energies ranging from 50 to 250 MeV/A with a total number of 10{sup 7} ions per beam. For comparison a special evaluation software was developed calculating the gamma indices for dose distributions. Results: In homogeneous phantoms, maximum range deviations between PB and MC of less than 1.1% and differences in the width of the distal energy falloff of the Bragg-Peak from 80% to 20% of less than 0.1 mm were found. Heterogeneous phantoms using layered slabs satisfied a {gamma}-index criterion of 2%/2mm of the local value except for some single voxels. For more complex phantoms using laterally arranged bone-air slabs, the {gamma}-index criterion was exceeded in some areas giving a maximum {gamma}-index of 1.75 and 4.9% of the voxels showed {gamma}-index values larger than one. The calculation precision of the presented algorithm was considered to be sufficient for clinical practice. Although only data for helium beams was presented, the performance of the pencil beam algorithm for proton beams was comparable. Conclusions: The pencil beam algorithm developed for helium ions presents a suitable tool for dose calculations. Its calculation speed was evaluated to be similar to other published pencil beam algorithms. The flexible design allows easy customization of measured depth-dose distributions and use of varying beam profiles, thus making it a promising candidate for integration into future treatment planning systems. Current work in progress deals with RBE effects of helium ions to complete the model.

Fuchs, Hermann; Stroebele, Julia; Schreiner, Thomas; Hirtl, Albert; Georg, Dietmar [Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); PEG MedAustron, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria) and Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna/AKH Vienna, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Concentration with uniform flux  

SciTech Connect

A modification of a parabolic cylinder concentrator is developed to procedure uniform flux. The controlling surface equation is given. A three-dimensional ray-trace technique is used to obtain the shape of the image at the focal plane of a thin slice of the mirror. Also, the concentration distribution for uniform flux is given. 1 references, 7 figures.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Estimate of Undulator Magnet Damage Due to Beam Finder Wire Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beam Finder Wire (BFW) devices will be installed at each break in the Undulator magnet line. These devices will scan small wires across the beam causing some electrons to lose energy through bremsstrahlung. The degraded electrons are subsequently detected downstream of a set of vertical dipole magnets after they pass through the vacuum chamber. This signal can then be used to accurately determine the beam position with respect to the BFW wire. The choice of the wire diameter, scan speed, and operating parameters, depends on the trade-off between the signal size and the radiation damage to the undulator magnets. In this note I estimate the rate of undulator magnet damage that results from scanning as a function of, wire size, scan speed, and average beam current. A separate analysis of the signal size was carried out by Wu. The damage estimate is primarily based on two sources: the first, Fasso, is used to estimate the amount of radiation generated and then absorbed by the magnets; the second, Alderman et. al., is used to estimate the amount of damage the magnet undergoes as a result of the absorbed radiation. Fasso performed a detailed calculation of the radiation, including neutron fluence, that results from a the electron beam passing through a 100 micron diamond foil inserted just in front of the undulator line. Fasso discussed the signficance of various types of radiation and stated that photoneutrons probably play a major role. The estimate in this paper assumes the neutron fluence is the only significant cause of radiation-induced demagnetization. The specific results I use from Fasso's paper are reproduced here in Figure 1, which shows the radial distribution of the integrated neutron fluence per day in the undulator magnets, and Figure 2, which shows the absorbed radiation dose all along the undulator line. In the longitudinal dimension, Fasso's calculation, (see Figure 2), shows that the radiation dose is widely distributed all along the undulator line, but is highest around 70 m from the front of the undulator line where the foil is. At the 70 m point, for the purpose of calculating the demagnetization, I chose a conservative estimate for the effective neutron flux of 1.0 x 10{sup 13} n/cm{sup 2}/day. As can be seen in Figure 1, this choice is representative of the flux nearest the beam where it is the highest. A less conservative estimate, but perhaps more accurate, estimate of the effective flux, would be the average flux in the magnet block, which is roughly one half as much.

Welch, J.

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

103

Measurements of Turbulent Fluxes of Momentum and Sensible Heat over the Labrador Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulent fluxes of momentum and sensible heat were estimated from sonic anemometer measurements gathered over the Labrador Sea during a winter cruise of the R/V Knorr. The inertial dissipation method was used to calculate turbulent fluxes of ...

Karl Bumke; U. Karger; K. Uhlig

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ~24°C, indicating that heat conduction was small. T h i sday, indicating large heat conduction a n d storage. Control2.1.3 showed that conduction heat flux through the roof was

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A Nonlinear Statistical Model of Turbulent Air–Sea Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the bulk algorithms used to calculate turbulent air–sea fluxes of momentum and heat are iterative algorithms whose convergence is slow and not always achieved. To avoid these drawbacks that are critical when large datasets must be ...

Denis Bourras; Gilles Reverdin; Guy Caniaux; Sophie Belamari

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Surface Energy Fluxes of the South Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluxes of sensible, latent and radiational energy and momentum across the surface of the South Atlantic Ocean have been calculated by substituting ship meteorological observations into bulk aerodynamic and empirical radiation equations. Upper-air ...

Andrew F. Bunker

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Stratocumulus Cloud Field Reflected Fluxes: The Effect of Cloud Shape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reflected fluxes are calculated for stratocumulus cloud fields as a function of sky cover, cloud aspect ratio, and cloud shape. Cloud liquid water volume is held invariant as cloud shape is varied so that the results can be utilized more ...

R. M. Welch; B. A. Wielicki

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Estimating Sensible Heat Flux from the Oklahoma Mesonet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The challenges of using the Oklahoma Mesonet for calculations of sensible heat flux are discussed. The mesonet is an integrated network of 115 remote and automated meteorological stations across Oklahoma that provides the spatial density to ...

Jerald A. Brotzge; Kenneth C. Crawford

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Top-of-Atmosphere Radiance-to-Flux Conversion in the SW Domain for the ScaRaB-3 Instrument on Megha-Tropiques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The earth radiation budget (ERB) is the difference between the solar absorbed flux and the terrestrial emitted flux. These fluxes are calculated from satellite measurements of outgoing shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiances using empirical or ...

Michel Viollier; Carsten Standfuss; Olivier Chomette; Arnaud Quesney

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The relevance of particle flux monitors in accelerator-based activation analysis  

SciTech Connect

One of the most critical parameters in activation analysis is the flux density of the activating radiation, its spatial distribution in particular. The validity of the basic equation for calculating the activity induced to the exposed item depends upon the fulfilment of several conditions, the most relevant of them being equal doses of incident activating radiation received by the unknown sample, the calibration material and the reference material, respectively. This requirement is most problematic if accelerator-produced radiation is used for activation. Whilst nuclear research reactors usually are equipped with exposure positions that provide fairly homogenous activation fields for thermal neutron activation analysis accelerator-generated particle beams (neutrons, photons, charged particles) usually exhibit axial and, in particular, sharp radial flux gradients. Different experimental procedures have been developed to fulfil the condition mentioned above. In this paper, three variants of the application of flux monitors in photon activation analysis are discussed (external monitor, additive and inherent internal monitor). Experiments have indicated that the latter technique yields highest quality of the analytical results.

Segebade, Chr.; Maimaitimin, M.; Sun Zaijing [Idaho Accelerator Centre, Idaho State University, 1500 Alvin Ricken Drive, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

111

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figs.

Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

1989-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

Theory of flux cutting and flux transport at the critical current of a type-II superconducting cylindrical wire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I introduce a critical-state theory incorporating both flux cutting and flux transport to calculate the magnetic-field and current-density distributions inside a type-II superconducting cylinder at its critical current in a longitudinal applied magnetic field. The theory is an extension of the elliptic critical-state model introduced by Romero-Salazar and Perez-Rodriguez. The vortex dynamics depend in detail on two nonlinear effective resistivities for flux cutting ({rho}{parallel}) and flux flow ({rho}{perpendicular}), and their ratio r = {rho}{parallel}/{rho}{perpendicular}. When r flux cutting in reducing the magnitude of the internal magnetic-flux density leads to a paramagnetic longitudinal magnetic moment. As a model for understanding the experimentally observed interrelationship between the critical currents for flux cutting and depinning, I calculate the forces on a helical vortex arc stretched between two pinning centers when the vortex is subjected to a current density of arbitrary angle {phi}. Simultaneous initiation of flux cutting and flux transport occurs at the critical current density J{sub c}({phi}) that makes the vortex arc unstable.

Clem, John R.

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

113

Theory of flux cutting and flux transport at the critical current of a type-II superconducting cylindrical wire  

SciTech Connect

I introduce a critical-state theory incorporating both flux cutting and flux transport to calculate the magnetic-field and current-density distributions inside a type-II superconducting cylinder at its critical current in a longitudinal applied magnetic field. The theory is an extension of the elliptic critical-state model introduced by Romero-Salazar and Pérez-Rodríguez. The vortex dynamics depend in detail on two nonlinear effective resistivities for flux cutting (?{sub ?}) and flux flow (?{sub ?}), and their ratio r=?{sub ?}/?{sub ?}. When r<1, the low relative efficiency of flux cutting in reducing the magnitude of the internal magnetic-flux density leads to a paramagnetic longitudinal magnetic moment. As a model for understanding the experimentally observed interrelationship between the critical currents for flux cutting and depinning, I calculate the forces on a helical vortex arc stretched between two pinning centers when the vortex is subjected to a current density of arbitrary angle ?. Simultaneous initiation of flux cutting and flux transport occurs at the critical current density J{sub c}(?) that makes the vortex arc unstable.

Clem, John R.

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

114

Mapping Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An infrared camera technique designed for remote sensing of air–water heat flux has been developed. The technique uses the differential absorption of water between 3.817 and 4.514 microns. This difference causes each channel’s radiance to ...

Walt McKeown; Richard Leighton

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Ion-beam-driven resonant ion cyclotron instability  

SciTech Connect

The resonant ion-beam-driven electrostatic ion cyclotron instability is identified. Measured dispersion relation and onset vs. beam energy and density agree with numerical calculations based on a theory which includes beam acoustic terms. After amplitude saturation, velocity space diffusion of the beam ions is observed. (auth)

Hendel, H.W.; Yamada, M.; Seiler, S.W.; Ikezi, H.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Underground particle fluxes in the Soudan mine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a summary of our knowledge of the underground particle fluxes in the vicinity of Soudan 2 and of the future MINOS detector. It includes a brief description of the measured muon fluxes and of the gamma ray spectra deduced from measurements of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K concentrations in the rock. Counting rates in gaseous and scintillation detectors are estimated. Some data on what is known about the chemical composition of the local rocks are included; these are relevant to an understanding of the underground muon rates and also to a calculation of low energy neutron fluxes. 1 Introduction As plans for the MINOS detector and for the excavation of a new detector hall progress, some people have begun asking what is known of the fluxes of various particles underground. The muon flux is relevant for possibly calibrating and certainly for monitoring the long term behavior of the detector. It will likely be the determining factor in the eventual trigger rate if the MINOS det...

Keith Ruddick; Keith Ruddick; Th

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF FAST NEUTRON BEAM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental techniques are described for the spectral measurement of a collimated fast-neutron beam. A H/sub 2-/ filled cloud chamber, proton-recording nuclear plates, and threshold fission foils were used as neutron detectors in the measurements. As an application of these techniques, the energy distribution and absolute flux of the fast neutron beam emerging from the Los Alamos fast reactor was measured from 0.1 to 18 Mev. (D.E.B.)

Nereson, N.; Allison, E.; Carlson, J.; Norwood, P.; Squires, D.

1951-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Beam line windows at LAMPF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The A-6 main beam-line window at LAMPF separates the vacuum of the main beam line from the isotope production station, proton irradiation ports, and the beam stop, which operate in air. This window must withstand the design beam current of 1 mA at 800 MeV for periods of at least 3000 hours without failure. The window is water cooled and must be strong enough to withstand the 2.1 MPa (300 psig) cooling water pressure, as well as beam-induced thermal stresses. Two designs have been used to meet these goals, a stepped-plate window and a hemispherical window, both made from a precipitation-hardened nickel base alloy, Alloy 718. Calculations of the temperatures and stresses in each of these windows are presented.

Brown, R.D.; Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Beam characterization at the Neutron Radiography Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quality of a neutron-imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, potential image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This paper provides a characterization of the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio and potential image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. The NRAD has an effective collimation ratio greater than 125, a beam divergence of 0.3 +_ 0.1 degrees, and a gold foil cadmium ratio of 2.7. The flux profile has been quantified and the facility is an ASTM Category 1 radiographic facility. Based on bare and cadmium covered foil activation results, the neutron energy spectrum used in the current MCNP model of the radiography beamline over-samples the thermal region of the neutron energy spectrum.

Sarah W. Morgan; Jeffrey C. King; Chad L. Pope

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

ARM Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) station: surf. heat flux and related data, 30-min  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-min estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity. Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

Cook, David

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121

ARM Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) station: surf. heat flux and related data, 30-min  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-min estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity. Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

Cook, David

1993-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

122

Suppression of stimulated Raman scattering due to localization of electron plasma wave in laser beam filaments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The filamentation of the high power laser beam by taking off-axial contribution is investigated when ponderomotive nonlinearity is taken into account. The splitted profile of the laser beam is obtained due to uneven focusing of the off-axial rays. It is observed that the weak electron plasma wave (EPW) propagating in the z direction is nonlinearly coupled in the modified filamentary regions of the laser beam. The semianalytical solution of the nonlinear coupled EPW equation in the presence of laser beam filaments has been found and it is observed that the nonlinear coupling between these two waves leads to localization of the EPW. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of this EPW is studied and backreflectivity has been calculated. Further, the localization of EPW affects the eigenfrequency and damping of plasma wave. As a result of this, mismatch and modified enhanced Landau damping lead to the disruption of SRS process and a substantial reduction in the backreflectivity. For the typical laser beam and plasma parameters with wavelength ({lambda}=1064 nm), power flux ({approx_equal}10{sup 16} W cm{sup -2}), and plasma density (n/n{sub cr})=0.2; the backreflectivity was found to be suppressed by a factor of around 20%.

Sharma, Prerana; Sharma, R. P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Calculation of polarization effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Basically there are two areas of accelerator applications that involve beam polarization. One is the acceleration of a polarized beam (most likely a proton beam) in a synchrotron. Another concerns polarized beams in an electron storage ring. In both areas, numerical techniques have been very useful.

Chao, A.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A new luminescence beam profile monitor for intense proton and heavy ion beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new luminescence beam profile monitor is realized in the polarized hydrogen gas jet target at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) facility. In addition to the spin polarization of the proton beam being routinely measured by the hydrogen gas jet, the luminescence produced by beam-hydrogen excitation leads to a strong Balmer series lines emission. A selected hydrogen Balmer line is spectrally filtered and imaged to produce the transverse RHIC proton beam shape with unprecedented details on the RHIC beam profile. Alternatively, when the passage of the high energy RHIC gold ion beam excited only the residual gas molecules in the beam path, sufficient ion beam induced luminescence is produced and the transverse gold ion beam profile is obtained. The measured transverse beam sizes and the calculated emittances provide an independent confirmation of the RHIC beam characteristics and to verify the emittance conservation along the RHIC accelerator. This optical beam diagnostic technique by making use of the beam induced fluorescence from injected or residual gas offers a truly noninvasive particle beam characterization, and provides a visual observation of proton and heavy ion beams. Combined with a longitudinal bunch measurement system, a 3-dimensional spatial particle beam profile can be reconstructed tomographically.

Tsang,T.; Bellavia, S.; Connolly, R.; Gassner, D.; Makdisi, Y.; Russo, T.; Thieberger, P.; Trbojevic, D.; Zelenski, A.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Effects of Airflow Trajectories Around Aircraft on Measurements of Scalar Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential-flow calculations of the airflow around two research aircraft are used to estimate the effect of flow distortion on measured fluxes of sensible heat and water vapor. From the calculated flow patterns, flow-distortion coefficients are ...

William A. Cooper; Diana Rogers

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

Russell, J.T.

1964-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

127

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Complex Description Complex Description Current HFBR Complex The HFBR complex consists of multiple structures and systems that were necessary to operate and maintain the reactor. The most recognizable features of the complex are the domed reactor confinement building and the distinctive red-and-white stack. Portions of the complex building structures, systems, and components, some of which are underground, were contaminated with radionuclides and chemicals as a result of previous HFBR and Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) operations. A number of decommissioning and preparation for long-term safe storage actions have been taken including the removal of contaminated structures, hazardous materials, and contaminated equipment and components. The structures and systems, both current and former, are

128

F i g u r e 1 : In QCD a confining flux tube forms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V Upgrade of the CEBAF complex at Jefferson Lab in Newport News, Virginia. Figure 3 shows a conceptual by passing a fine electron beam from the CEBAF accelerator though a wafer-thin diamond crystal: At special polarized photons. With the planned photon fluxes of 10 7 /sec and the continuous CEBAF beam, the experiment

129

Simple Low-Frequency Beam Pickup  

SciTech Connect

Detection of the field induced by a beam outside of the beam pipe can be used as a beam diagnostic. Wires placed in longitudinal slots in the outside wall of the beam pipe can be used as a beam pickup. This has a very small beam-coupling impedance and avoids complications of having a feedthrough. The signal can be reasonably high at low frequencies. We present a field waveform at the outer side of a beam pipe, obtained as a result of calculations and measurements. We calculate the beam-coupling impedance due to a long longitudinal slot in the resistive wall and the signal induced in a wire placed in such a slot and shielded by a thin screen from the beam. These results should be relevant for impedance calculations of the slot in an antechamber and for slots in the PEP-II distributed ion pump screens. The design of the low-frequency beam position monitor is very simple. It can be used in storage rings, synchrotron light sources, and free electron lasers, like LINAC coherent light source.

Novokhatski, A.; Heifets, S.; /SLAC; Aleksandrov, A.; /Oak Ridge

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

130

An approximate algorithm for the flux from a rectangular volume source  

SciTech Connect

An exact semi-analytic formula for the flux from a rectangular surface source with a slab shield has been derived and the required function table has been calculated. This formula is the basis for an algorithm which gives a good approximation for the flux from a rectangular volume source. No other hand calculation method for this source geometry is available in the literature.

Wallace, O.J.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

131

Rhodium self-powered neutron detector as a suitable on-line thermal neutron flux monitor in BNCT treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: A rhodium self-powered neutron detector (Rh SPND) has been specifically developed by the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA) of Argentina to measure locally and in real time thermal neutron fluxes in patients treated with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). In this work, the thermal and epithermal neutron response of the Rh SPND was evaluated by studying the detector response to two different reactor spectra. In addition, during clinical trials of the BNCT Project of the CNEA, on-line neutron flux measurements using the specially designed detector were assessed. Methods: The first calibration of the detector was done with the well-thermalized neutron spectrum of the CNEA RA-3 reactor thermal column. For this purpose, the reactor spectrum was approximated by a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution in the thermal energy range. The second calibration was done at different positions along the central axis of a water-filled cylindrical phantom, placed in the mixed thermal-epithermal neutron beam of CNEA RA-6 reactor. In this latter case, the RA-6 neutron spectrum had been well characterized by both calculation and measurement, and it presented some marked differences with the ideal spectrum considered for SPND calibrations at RA-3. In addition, the RA-6 neutron spectrum varied with depth in the water phantom and thus the percentage of the epithermal contribution to the total neutron flux changed at each measurement location. Local (one point-position) and global (several points-positions) and thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities were determined from these measurements. Thermal neutron flux was also measured during BNCT clinical trials within the irradiation fields incident on the patients. In order to achieve this, the detector was placed on patient's skin at dosimetric reference points for each one of the fields. System stability was adequate for this kind of measurement. Results: Local mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities and global thermal and mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivities derived from measurements performed at the RA-6 were compared and no significant differences were found. Global RA-6-based thermal neutron sensitivity showed agreement with pure thermal neutron sensitivity measurements performed in the RA-3 spectrum. Additionally, the detector response proved nearly unchanged by differences in neutron spectra from real (RA-6 BNCT beam) and ideal (considered for calibration calculations at RA-3) neutron source descriptions. The results confirm that the special design of the Rh SPND can be considered as having a pure thermal response for neutron spectra with epithermal-to-thermal flux ratios up to 12%. In addition, the linear response of the detector to thermal flux allows the use of a mixed-field thermal neutron sensitivity of 1.95 {+-} 0.05 x 10{sup -21} A n{sup -1}{center_dot}cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s. This sensitivity can be used in spectra with up to 21% epithermal-to-thermal flux ratio without significant error due to epithermal neutron and gamma induced effects. The values of the measured fluxes in clinical applications had discrepancies with calculated results that were in the range of -25% to +30%, which shows the importance of a local on-line independent measurement as part of a treatment planning quality control system. Conclusions: The usefulness of the CNEA Rh SPND for the on-line local measurement of thermal neutron flux on BNCT patients has been demonstrated based on an appropriate neutron spectra calibration and clinical applications.

Miller, Marcelo E.; Sztejnberg, Manuel L.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Longhino, Juan M.; Estryk, Guillermo [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429, Argentina and CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1033 (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. del Libertador 8250, Ciudad de Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Detection of the Neutrino Fluxes from Several Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is considered the detection of neutrinos moving from the opposite directions. The states of the particle of the detector interacting with the neutrinos are connected with the P-transformation. Hence only a half of neutrinos gives contribution into the superposition of the neutrino states. Taking into account the effect of the opposite neutrino directions the total neutrino flux from several sources are in the range 0.5--1 of that without the effect. The neutrino flux from nuclear reactors measured in the KamLAND experiment is $0.611\\pm 0.085 {\\rm (stat)} \\pm 0.041 {\\rm (syst)} $ of the expected flux. Calculations for the conditions of the KamLAND experiment yield the neutrino flux taking into account the effect of the opposite neutrino directions, 0.555, of that without the effect that may account for the neutrino flux observed in the KamLAND experiment.

D. L. Khokhlov

2003-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

133

High flux reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high flux reactor is comprised of a core which is divided into two symetric segments housed in a pressure vessel. The core segments include at least one radial fuel plate. The spacing between the plates functions as a coolant flow channel. The core segments are spaced axially apart such that a coolant mixing plenum is formed between them. A channel is provided such that a portion of the coolant bypasses the first core section and goes directly into the mixing plenum. The outlet coolant from the first core segment is mixed with the bypass coolant resulting in a lower inlet temperature to the lower core segment.

Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heath, Russell L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Liebenthal, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DeBoisblanc, Deslonde R. (Summit, NJ); Leyse, Carl F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parsons, Kent (Idaho Falls, ID); Ryskamp, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wadkins, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fillmore, Gary N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Oh, Chang H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Gradiometric flux qubits with tunable gap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For gradiometric three-Josephson-junction flux qubits, we perform a systematic study on the tuning of the minimal transition frequency, the so-called qubit gap. By replacing one of the qubit's Josephson junctions by a dc SQUID, the critical current of this SQUID and, in turn, the qubit gap can be tuned in situ by a control flux threading the SQUID loop. We present spectroscopic measurements demonstrating a well-defined controllability of the qubit gap between zero and more than 10 GHz. In the future, this enables one to tune the qubit into and out of resonance with other superconducting quantum circuits, while operating the qubit at its symmetry point with optimal dephasing properties. The experimental data agree very well with model calculations based on the full qubit Hamiltonian. From a numerical fit, we determine the Josephson coupling and the charging energies of the qubit junctions. The derived values agree well with those measured for other junctions fabricated on the same chip. We also demonstrate the biasing of gradiometric flux qubits near the symmetry point by trapping an odd number of flux quanta in the gradiometer loop. In this way, we study the effect of the significant kinetic inductance, thereby obtaining valuable information for the qubit design.

M. J. Schwarz; J. Goetz; Z. Jiang; T. Niemczyk; F. Deppe; A. Marx; R. Gross

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

135

Electroslag remelting with used fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Specialty Steel collaborated with plants engaged in the production of quality metals to introduce a low-waste electroslag remelting (ESR) technology employing used fluxes. It was established that the fluoride (type ANF-1) and fluoride-oxide (type ANF-6) fluxes which are widely used in ESR still have a high content of calcium fluoride and alumina and a low impurity content after 8-10 h of ESR. In the ESR of steels with used fluxes, the content of monitored components in the final slags changes negligibly, while the content of most impurities decreases. The used flux is also characterized by a low concentration of phosphorus and sulfur. It was found that flux can be used 3-5 times when it makes up 50% of the flux mixture in the charge. The savings realized from the use of spent flux in ESR amounts to 4-9 rubles/ton steel.

Yakovlev, N.F.; Sokha, Yu.S.; Oleinik, Yu.S.; Prokhorov, A.N.; Ol'shanskaya, T.V.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Portable radiography system using a relativistic electron beam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable radiographic generator is provided with an explosive magnetic flux compression generator producing the high voltage necessary to generate a relativistic electron beam. The relativistic electron beam is provided with target materials which generates the desired radiographic pulse. The magnetic flux compression generator may require at least two conventional explosively driven generators in series to obtain a desired output voltage of at least 1 MV. The cathode and anode configuration of the diode are selected to provide a switching action wherein a high impedance load is presented to the magnetic flux compression generator when the high voltage is being generated, and thereafter switching to a low impedance load to generate the relativistic electron beam. Magnetic flux compression generators can be explosively driven and provided in a relatively compact, portable form for use with the relativistic x-ray equipment.

Hoeberling, Robert F. (502 Hamlin Ct., Los Alamos, NM 87544)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

BEAM LINE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BEAM LINE BEAM LINE 45 W ILHELM ROENTGEN'S INITIAL DISCOVERY of X-radiation in 1895 led immediately to practical applications in medicine. Over the next few decades X rays proved to be an invaluable tool for the investigation of the micro-world of the atom and the development of the quantum theory of matter. Almost a century later, telescopes designed to detect X-radiation are indispensable for understanding the structure and evolution of the macro-world of stars, galaxies, and the Universe as a whole. The X-Ray Universe by WALLACE H. TUCKER X-ray images of the Universe are strikingly different from the usual visible-light images. 46 SUMMER 1995 did not think: I investigated." Undeterred by NASA's rejection of a proposal to search for cosmic X-radiation, Giacconi persuaded the

138

Beam heating of target foils  

SciTech Connect

A target rotator, built to reduce the effects of beam spot heating, is fully adjustable, holds three targets, is chamber independent, and takes up limited space. The expected temperature rise in the target is calculated from the Stefan--Boltzmann law. (PMA)

Corwin, W.C.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Beam Characterization at the Neutron Radiography Facility  

SciTech Connect

The quality of a neutron imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This project characterized the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam’s effective length-to-diameter ratio and image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. Improvement of the existing NRAD MCNP beamline model includes validation of the model’s energy spectrum and the development of enhanced image simulation methods. The image simulation methods predict the radiographic image of an object based on the foil reaction rate data obtained by placing a model of the object in front of the image plane in an MCNP beamline model.

Sarah Morgan; Jeffrey King

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Accelerator beam profile analyzer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A beam profile analyzer employing sector or quadrant plates each servo controlled to outline the edge of a beam.

Godel, Julius B. (Bayport, NY); Guillaume, Marcel (Grivegnee, BE); Lambrecht, Richard M. (East Quogue, NY); Withnell, Ronald (East Setauket, NY)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

A FLUX ROPE NETWORK AND PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN THREE-DIMENSIONAL RELATIVISTIC MAGNETIC RECONNECTION  

SciTech Connect

We investigate magnetic reconnection and particle acceleration in relativistic pair plasmas with three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of a kinetic-scale current sheet in a periodic geometry. We include a guide field that introduces an inclination between the reconnecting field lines and explore outside-of-the-current sheet magnetizations that are significantly below those considered by other authors carrying out similar calculations. Thus, our simulations probe the transitional regime in which the magnetic and plasma pressures are of the same order of magnitude. The tearing instability is the dominant mode in the current sheet for all guide field strengths, while the linear kink mode is less important even without the guide field, except in the lower magnetization case. Oblique modes seem to be suppressed entirely. In its nonlinear evolution, the reconnection layer develops a network of interconnected and interacting magnetic flux ropes. As smaller flux ropes merge into larger ones, the reconnection layer evolves toward a three-dimensional, disordered state in which the resulting flux rope segments contain magnetic substructure on plasma skin depth scales. Embedded in the flux ropes, we detect spatially and temporally intermittent sites of dissipation reflected in peaks in the parallel electric field. Magnetic dissipation and particle acceleration persist until the end of the simulations, with simulations with higher magnetization and lower guide field strength exhibiting greater and faster energy conversion and particle energization. At the end of our largest simulation, the particle energy spectrum attains a tail extending to high Lorentz factors that is best modeled with a combination of two additional thermal components. We confirm that the primary energization mechanism is acceleration by the electric field in the X-line region. The highest-energy positrons (electrons) are moderately beamed with median angles {approx}30 Degree-Sign -40 Degree-Sign relative to (the opposite of) the direction of the initial current density, but we speculate that reconnection in more highly magnetized plasmas would give rise to stronger beaming. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for macroscopic reconnection sites, and which of our results may be expected to hold in systems with higher magnetizations.

Kagan, Daniel; Milosavljevic, Milos [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Spitkovsky, Anatoly [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Ion fluxes through nano-pores and transmembrane channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a new approach for calculating ionic fluxes through narrow nano-pores and transmembrane channels. The method relies on a dual-control-volume grand-canonical molecular dynamics (DCV-GCMD) simulation and the analytical solution for the electrostatic potential inside a cylindrical nano-pore recently obtained by Levin [1]. The theory is used to calculate the ionic fluxes through a gramicidin A channel, obtaining the current-voltage and the current-concentration relations under various experimental conditions. A good agreement with experimental results is observed. [1] Y. Levin. Europhys. Letters, 76, 163 (2006).

Bordin, José Rafael; Barbosa, Marcia C; Levin, Yan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

ARM - Measurement - CO2 flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CO2 flux The rate of flow for carbon dioxide, a heavy, colorless greenhouse gas. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is...

144

Physics of String Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

145

Prompt muon contribution to the flux underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present high energy spectra and zenith-angle distributions of the atmospheric muons computed for the depths of the locations of the underwater neutrino telescopes. We compare the calculations with the data obtained in the Baikal and the AMANDA muon experiments. The prompt muon contribution to the muon flux underwater due to recent perturbative QCD-based models of the charm production is expected to be observable at depths of the large underwater neutrino telescopes. This appears to be probable even at rather shallow depths (1-2 km), provided that the energy threshold for muon detection is raised above $\\sim 100$ TeV.

T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky

2000-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

146

Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel iso-topes, with improvements on two aspects. One is more recent input data acquired from updated nuclear databases. The other, which is unprecedented, is a consideration of the production yields of fission fragments from both thermal and fast incident neutrons for each of the four main fuel isotopes. The change in calculated antineutrino flux due to the new values of thermal fission energy is about 0.33%, and the uncertainties of the new values are about 30% smaller.

Ma, X B; Wang, L Z; Chen, Y X; Cao, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

A Direct Calculation of Current Drive in Toroidal Geometry J. C. Wright and C. K. Phillips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

field in the quasilinear flux are used to evaluate the current in a specified toroidal geometry. PACS­induced quasilinear flux in a toroidal geometry and a Green's function for the current. An expression calculation of the current using a quasilinear flux model for a spectrum of parallel wavenum­ bers, k k j k

148

ARM - Measurement - Latent heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsLatent heat flux govMeasurementsLatent heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Latent heat flux The time rate of flow for the specific enthalpy difference between two phases of a substance at the same temperature, typically water. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

149

Solar proton fluxes since 1956  

SciTech Connect

The fluxes of protons emitted during solar flares since 1956 were evaluated. The depth-versus-activity profiles of /sup 56/Co in several lunar rocks are consistent with the solar-proton fluxes detected by experiments on several satellites. Only about 20% of the solar-proton-induced activities of /sup 22/Na and /sup 55/Fe in lunar rocks from early Apollo missions were produced by protons emitted from the sun during solar cycle 20 (1965--1975). The depth-versus-activity data for these radionuclides in several lunar rocks were used to determine the fluxes of protons during solar cycle 19 (1954--1964). The average proton fluxes for cycle 19 are about five times those for both the last million years and for cycle 20. These solar-proton flux variations correlate with changes in sunspot activity.

Reedy, R.C.

1977-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

ARM - Measurement - Sensible heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsSensible heat flux govMeasurementsSensible heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Sensible heat flux The time rate of flow for the energy transferred from a warm or hot surface to whatever is touching it, typically air. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

151

Solar Model Parameters and Direct Measurements of Solar Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore a novel possibility of determining the solar model parameters, which serve as input in the calculations of the solar neutrino fluxes, by exploiting the data from direct measurements of the fluxes. More specifically, we use the rather precise value of the $^8B$ neutrino flux, $\\phi_B$ obtained from the global analysis of the solar neutrino and KamLAND data, to derive constraints on each of the solar model parameters on which $\\phi_B$ depends. We also use more precise values of $^7Be$ and $pp$ fluxes as can be obtained from future prospective data and discuss whether such measurements can help in reducing the uncertainties of one or more input parameters of the Standard Solar Model.

Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Simple beam profile monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B. [ASD Inc. Garden Bay, BC (Canada); Best Theratronics Ltd Ottawa Ontario (Canada); PharmaSpect Ltd., Burnaby BC (Canada)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

153

Method of automatic measurement and focus of an electron beam and apparatus therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron beam focusing system, including a plural slit-type Faraday beam trap, for measuring the diameter of an electron beam and automatically focusing the beam for welding. Beam size is determined from profiles of the current measured as the beam is swept over at least two narrow slits of the beam trap. An automated procedure changes the focus coil current until the focal point location is just below a workpiece surface. A parabolic equation is fitted to the calculated beam sizes from which optimal focus coil current and optimal beam diameter are determined.

Giedt, Warren H. (San Jose, CA); Campiotti, Richard (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Method of automatic measurement and focus of an electron beam and apparatus therefore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electron beam focusing system, including a plural slit-type Faraday beam trap, for measuring the diameter of an electron beam and automatically focusing the beam for welding is disclosed. Beam size is determined from profiles of the current measured as the beam is swept over at least two narrow slits of the beam trap. An automated procedure changes the focus coil current until the focal point location is just below a workpiece surface. A parabolic equation is fitted to the calculated beam sizes from which optimal focus coil current and optimal beam diameter are determined. 12 figs.

Giedt, W.H.; Campiotti, R.

1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

155

Mass, Heat and Freshwater Fluxes in the South Indian Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six hydrographic sections were used to examine the circulation and property fluxes in the South Indian Ocean from 10° to 32°S. The calculations were made by applying an inverse method to the data. In the interior of the South Indian Ocean, the ...

Lee-Lueng Fu

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The boardman regional flux experiment  

SciTech Connect

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible- and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy laboratories, one National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration laboratory, and several universities. The experiment was conducted in a region of severe contrasts in adjacent surface types that accentuated the response of the atmosphere to variable surface forcing. Large values of sensible-heat flux and low values of latent-heat flux characterized a sagebrush steppe area; significantly smaller sensible-heat fluxes and much larger latent-heat fluxes were associated with extensive tracts of irrigated farmland to the north, east, and west of the steppe. Data were obtained from an array of surface flux stations, remote-sensing devices, an instrumented aircraft, and soil and vegetation measurements. The data will be used to address the problem of extrapolating from a limited number of local measurements to area-averaged values of fluxes suitable for use in global climate models. 16 refs., 13 figs.

Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Kirkham, R.R.; Shaw, W.J.; Whiteman, C.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Barnes, F.J.; Cooper, D.; Porch, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Coulter, R.L.; Cook, D.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Experimental Estimate of Beam Loading and Minimum rf Voltage for Acceleration of High Intensity Beam in the Fermilab Booster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The difference between the rf voltage seen by the beam and the accelerating voltage required to match the rate of change of the Booster magnetic field is used to estimate the energy loss per beam turn. Because the rf voltage (RFSUM) and the synchronous phase can be experimentally measured, they can be used to calculate the effective accelerating voltage. Also an RFSUM reduction technique has been applied to measure experimentally the RFSUM limit at which the beam loss starts. With information on beam energy loss, the running conditions, especially for the high intensity beam, can be optimized in order to achieve a higher intensity beam from the Fermilab Booster.

Yang, X; Norem, J; Yang, Xi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Experimental estimate of beam loading and minimum rf voltage for acceleration of high intensity beam in the Fermilab Booster  

SciTech Connect

The difference between the rf voltage seen by the beam and the accelerating voltage required to match the rate of change of the Booster magnetic field is used to estimate the energy loss per beam turn. Because the rf voltage (RFSUM) and the synchronous phase can be experimentally measured, they can be used to calculate the effective accelerating voltage. Also an RFSUM reduction technique has been applied to measure experimentally the RFSUM limit at which the beam loss starts. With information on beam energy loss, the running conditions, especially for the high intensity beam, can be optimized in order to achieve a higher intensity beam from the Fermilab Booster.

Xi Yang; Charles M Ankenbrandt and Jim Norem

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Relativistic electron beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

1975-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

160

My Trip Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savings Calculator Trip Calculator Benefits Why is fuel economy important? Climate Change Oil Dependence Costs Sustainability Save Money Vehicles produce about half of the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NK Muon Beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NK Muon Beam will be a modified version of the existing NT beam line. The decision to employ a modified version of the NT beam line was made based on considerations of cost and availability of the beam line. Preliminary studies considered use of other beam lines, e.g., the NW beam line, and even of moving the bubble chamber with its superconducting coils but were rejected for reasons such as cost, personnel limitations, and potential conflicts with other users.

Koizumi, G.

1988-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

162

Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations September 29, 2003 1 Eddy-Current-Induced Multipole Field Calculations Nicholas S. Sereno, Suk H. Kim 1.0 Abstract Time-varying magnetic fields of magnets in booster accelerators induce substantial eddy currents in the vacuum chambers. The eddy currents in turn act to produce various multi- pole fields that act on the beam. These fields must be taken into account when doing a lat- tice design. In the APS booster, the relatively long dipole magnets (3 meters) are linearly ramped to accelerate the injected 325 MeV beam to 7 GeV. Substantial dipole and sextu- pole fields are generated in the elliptical vacuum chamber from the induced eddy currents. In this note, formulas for the induced dipole and sextupole fields are derived for elliptical and rectangular vacuum chambers for a time-varying dipole field. A discussion is given

163

ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat flux heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil heat flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dT/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the heat is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments

164

Estimation of Surface Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors reconsider the problem of estimating the sensible heat transfer at the earth's surface from direct measurements of turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer. For simplicity, only horizontally homogeneous conditions are ...

Jielun Sun; Steven K. Esbensen; L. Mahrt

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture flux moisture flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dq/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the moisture is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems External Instruments ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

166

Flux Measurement with Conditional Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed to measure scalar fluxes using conditional sampling. Only the mean concentrations of updraft and downdraft samples, the standard deviation of the vertical velocity, and a coefficient of proportionality, b, need to be known. ...

Joost A. Businger; Steven P. Oncley

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

The Solar Wind Energy Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Grid-Averaged Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the inadequacies of formulations for surface fluxes for use in numerical models of atmospheric flow. The difficulty is that numerical models imply spatial averaging over each grid area. Existing formulations am based on the ...

L. Mahrt

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and Al-Hf alloy heat sink system is capable of maintaining all system components below their maximum temperature limits. The maximum temperature of this conduction cooling system, 224.2°C (435.6 °F) occurs in a small, localized region in the heat sink structure near the core mid-plane. The total coolant flow rate requirement for this configuration is 207 L/min (54.7 gpm). The calculated Flow Instability Ratio and Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio for this configuration under nominal conditions are 6.5 and 8.0, respectively, which safely exceed the minimum values of 2.0. Materials and fabrication issues inspection revealed that the neutron absorber would probably best be made from powdered Al3Hf mixed with aluminum powder and extruded or hot isostatically pressed. Although Al3Hf has not been specifically studied extensively, its mechanical and chemical properties should be very much like Al3Zr, which has been studied. Its behavior under irradiation should be very satisfactory, and resistance to corrosion will be investigated to a limited extent in planned miniplate irradiation tests in ATR. Pressurized water systems needed to effect heat removal are already available in the ATR complex, and mixed gas temperature control systems needed to trim experiment temperatures have been engineered and need only be fabricated and installed. In sum, it appears the alternately cooled configuration arrived at can be very successful. The cost estimate for this configuration indicates to

Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Definition: Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares...

171

Flux Sampling Errors for Aircraft and Towers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various errors and influences leading to differences between tower- and aircraft-measured fluxes are surveyed. This survey is motivated by reports in the literature that aircraft fluxes are sometimes smaller than tower-measured fluxes. Both tower ...

L. Mahrt

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Can Shipboard Measurements Reveal Secular Changes in Tropical Air–Sea Heat Flux?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set for the period 1854–1979 will soon become available for studies of secular climate changes in ocean surface heat flux. Of the observed variables from which heat flux is calculated, wind speed and sea ...

C. S. Ramage

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

CALCULATION OF PULSED KICKER MAGNETIC FIELD ATTENUATION INSIDE BEAM CHAMBERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum Institute, and CENPES/Petrobrás in Brazil. REFERENCES Agência Nacional do Petróleo (ANP). 1999. http://www.anp.gov.br. Alvarez, P.J.J. and Vogel, T.M. 1995. Degradation of BTEX and their aerobic

Kemner, Ken

174

NSLS-II Beam Diagnostics Overview  

SciTech Connect

A new 3rd generation light source (NSLS-II) is in the early stages of construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux with exceptional beam stability. It presents several challenges for diagnostics and instrumentation, related to the extremely small emittance. In this paper, we present an overview of all planned instrumentation systems, results from research and development activities; and then focus on other challenging aspects.

Singh,O.; Alforque, R.; Bacha, B.; Blednykh, A.; Cameron, P.; Cheng, W.; Dalesio, L. B.; Della Penna, A. J.; doom, L.; Fliller, R. P.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H-C.; Johnson, E. D.; Kosciuk, b. N.; Kramer, S. L.; Krinsky, S.; Mead, J.; Ozaki, S.; Padrazo, D.; Pinayev, I.; Ravindranath, R. V.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Sharma, S.; Skaritka, J.; Tanabe, T.; Tian, Y.; Willeke, F. J.; Yu, L-H.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

175

Advanced Online Flux Mapping of CANDU PHWR by Least-Squares Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A least-squares method that solves both the core neutronics design equations and the in-core detector response equations on the least-squares principle is presented as a new advanced online flux-mapping method for CANada Deuterium Uranium (CANDU) pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). The effectiveness of the new flux-mapping method is examined in terms of online flux-mapping calculations with numerically simulated true flux distribution and detector signals and those with the actual core-follow data for the Wolsong CANDU PHWRs in Korea. The effects of core neutronics models as well as the detector failures and uncertainties of measured detector signals on the effectiveness of the least-squares flux-mapping calculations are also examined.The following results are obtained. The least-squares method predicts the flux distribution in better agreement with the simulated true flux distribution than the standard core neutronics calculations by the finite difference method (FDM) computer code without using the detector signals. The adoption of the nonlinear nodal method based on the unified nodal method formulation instead of the FDM results in a significant improvement in prediction accuracy of the flux-mapping calculations. The detector signals estimated from the least-squares flux-mapping calculations are much closer to the measured detector signals than those from the flux synthesis method (FSM), the current online flux-mapping method for CANDU reactors. The effect of detector failures is relatively small so that the plant can tolerate up to 25% of detector failures without seriously affecting the plant operation. The detector signal uncertainties aggravate accuracy of the flux-mapping calculations, yet the effects of signal uncertainties of the order of 1% standard deviation can be tolerable without seriously degrading the prediction accuracy of the least-squares method. The least-squares method is disadvantageous because it requires longer CPU time than the existing FSM. Considering ever-increasing computer speed and the improved operational safety margin of CANDU reactors gained by accurate flux-mapping calculations, however, it is concluded that the least-squares method presents an effective alternative to the existing flux-mapping method for CANDU reactors.

Hong, In Seob [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang Hyo [Seoul National University (Korea, Republic of); Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Boundary Layer of Mars: Fluxes, Stability, Turbulent Spectra, and Growth of the Mixed Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectra of wind from high-frequency measurements in the Martian atmospheric surface layer, along with the diurnal variation of the height of the mixed surface layer, are calculated for the first time for Mars. Heat and momentum fluxes, stability, ...

James E. Tillman; Lars Landberg; Søren E. Larsen

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Estimating Meridional Energy Transports by the Atmospheric and Oceanic General Circulations Using Boundary Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual-mean meridional energy transport in the atmosphere–ocean system (total transport) is estimated using 4-yr mean net radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) calculated from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology ...

Y-C. Zhang; W. B. Rossow

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Incoming Shortwave Fluxes at the Surface—A Comparison of GCM Results with Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence is presented that the excess surface net radiation calculated in general circulation models at continental surfaces is mostly due to excess incoming shortwave fluxes. Based on long-term observations from 22 worldwide inland stations and ...

J. R. Garratt

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Evaluation of Turbulent Surface Flux Parameterizations for the Stable Surface Layer over Halley, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculated surface fluxes from seven surface layer parameterizations are verified against 45 months of observations from Halley, Antarctica, with a temporal resolution of 1 h. The surface layer parameterizations are taken from widely used ...

John J. Cassano; Thomas R. Parish; John C. King

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Estimation of Meridional Heat Flux in the North Atlantic by Inverse Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrographic sections spanning the Atlantic Ocean at 24, 36 and 48°N are used to make an estimate of meridional heat flux in the ocean. An inverse method provides reference level velocities for geostrophic calculations, consistent with ...

Dean Roemmich

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Distribution of Surface Fluxes and Boundary Layer Divergence in Midlatitude Ocean Storms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface meteorological observations have been used to calculate the distributions of surface fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, and latent heat and the distributions of surface divergence and curl of surface stress which are characteristic of ...

Robert G. Fleagle; Wendell A. Nuss

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Uncertainties in Global Ocean Surface Heat Flux Climatologies Derived from Ship Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology to define uncertainties associated with ocean surface heat flux calculations has been developed and applied to a global climatology that utilizes a summary of the Comprehensive Ocean–Atmosphere Data Set surface observations. ...

Peter J. Gleckler; Bryan C. Weare

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

184

Fast Beam Conditions Monitor BCM1F for the CMS Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CMS Beam Conditions and Radiation Monitoring System, BRM, will support beam tuning, protect the CMS detector from adverse beam conditions, and measure the accumulated dose close to or inside all sub-detectors. It is composed of different sub-systems measuring either the particle flux near the beam pipe with time resolution between nano- and microseconds or the integrated dose over longer time intervals. This paper presents the Fast Beam Conditions Monitor, BCM1F, which is designed for fast flux monitoring measuring both beam halo and collision products. BCM1F is located inside the CMS pixel detector volume close to the beam-pipe. It uses sCVD diamond sensors and radiation hard front-end electronics, along with an analog optical readout of the signals. The commissioning of the system and its successful operation during the first be ams of the LHC are described.

Bell, A; Hall-Wilton, R; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Macpherson, A; Ohlerich, M; Rodriguez, N; Ryjov, V; Schmidt, R S; Stone, R L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

R-value Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Wall Systems Advanced Wall Systems ORNL Home ASTM Testing BEP Home Related Sites Work With Us Advanced Wall Systems Home Interactive Calculators New Whole Wall R-value Calculators As A Part Of The ORNL Material Database For Whole Building Energy Simulations These calculators are replacing the old Whole Wall Thermal Performance calculator. These new versions of the calculator contain many new features and are part of the newly developed Interactive Envelope Materials Database for Whole-Building Energy Simulation Programs. The simple version of the Whole Wall R-value calculator is now available for use. This calculator is similar to the previous Whole Wall Thermal Performance calculator and does not require any downloads from the user. However, it was updated to allow calculations for fourteen wall details

186

SUMMARY OF BEAM BEAM OBSERVATIONS DURING STORES IN RHIC.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During stores, the beam-beam interaction has a significant impact on the beam and luminosity lifetimes in RHIC. This was observed in heavy ion, and even more pronounced in proton collisions. Observations include measurements of beam-beam induced tune shifts, lifetime and emittance growth measurements with and without beam-beam interaction, and background rates as a function of tunes. In addition, RHIC is currently the only hadron collider in which strong-strong beam-beam effects can be seen. Coherent beam-beam modes were observed, and suppressed by tune changes. In this article we summarize the most important beam-beam observations made during stores so far.

FISCHER,W.

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

187

DISCONNECTING OPEN SOLAR MAGNETIC FLUX  

SciTech Connect

Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by coronal mass ejections and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctive shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly disconnected flux takes the form of a 'U-'shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m s{sup -2} to 320 km s{sup -1}, thereafter expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8 {mu}T, 6 R{sub Sun} above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} Wb (1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx). We model the feature's propagation by balancing inferred magnetic tension force against accretion drag. This model is consistent with the feature's behavior and accepted solar wind parameters. By counting events over a 36 day window, we estimate a global event rate of 1 day{sup -1} and a global solar minimum unsigned flux disconnection rate of 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Wb yr{sup -1} (6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} Mx yr{sup -1}) by this mechanism. That rate corresponds to {approx} - 0.2 nT yr{sup -1} change in the radial heliospheric field at 1 AU, indicating that the mechanism is important to the heliospheric flux balance.

DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

188

RELAP5 model of the high flux isotope reactor with low enriched fuel thermal flux profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) currently uses highly enriched uranium (HEU) fabricated into involute-shaped fuel plates. It is desired that HFIR be able to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel while preserving the current performance capability for its diverse missions in material irradiation studies, isotope production, and the use of neutron beam lines for basic research. Preliminary neutronics and depletion simulations of HFIR with LEU fuel have arrived to feasible fuel loadings that maintain the neutronics performance of the reactor. This article illustrates preliminary models developed for the analysis of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the LEU core to ensure safe operation of the reactor. The beginning of life (BOL) LEU thermal flux profile has been modeled in RELAP5 to facilitate steady state simulation of the core cooling, and of anticipated and unanticipated transients. Steady state results are presented to validate the new thermal power profile inputs. A power ramp, slow depressurization at the outlet, and flow coast down transients are also evaluated. (authors)

Banfield, J.; Mervin, B.; Hart, S.; Ritchie, J.; Walker, S.; Ruggles, A.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O' Gallagher, J.J.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

190

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O' Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

191

ARM - PI Product - Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux 1997.01.01 - 2010.12.31 Site(s) NSA SGP TWP General Description This data product contains atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

192

Tevatron beam-beam compensation project progress  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we report the progress of the Tevatron Beam-Beam Compensation (BBC) project [1]. Electron beam induced proton and antiproton tuneshifts have been reported in [2], suppression of an antiproton emittance growth has been observed, too [1]. Currently, the first electron lens (TEL1) is in operational use as the Tevatron DC beam cleaner. We have made a lot of the upgrades to improve its stability [3]. The 2nd Tevatron electron lens (TEL2) is under the final phase of development and preparation for installation in the Tevatron.

Shiltsev, V.; Zhang, X.L.; Kuznetsov, G.; Pfeffer, H.; Saewert, G.; /Fermilab; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN; Tiunov, M.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Bishofberger, K.; /UCLA; Bogdanov, I.; Kashtanov, E.; Kozub, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tkachenko, L.; /Serpukhov, IHEP

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ION BEAM COLLIMATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for defining a beam of high energy particles wherein the means for defining the beam in the horizontal and vertical dimension are separately adjustable and the defining members are internally cooled. In general, the device comprises a mounting block having a central opening through which the beam is projected, means for rotatably supporting two pairs of beam- forming members, passages in each member for the flow of coolant; the beam- forming members being insulated from each other and the block, and each having an end projecting into the opening. The beam-forming members are adjustable and may be cooperatively positioned to define the beam passing between the end of the members. To assist in projecting and defining the beam, the member ends have individual means connected thereto for indicating the amount of charge collected thereon due to beam interception.

Langsdorf, A.S. Jr.

1957-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Measurement, interpretation and use of unsteady momentum fluxes in two-phase flow.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The steady and unsteady components of the momentum flux in a two-phase flow have been measured at the exit of a vertical pipe by means of an impulse technique using a turning tee and beam. Different electrical filters have ...

Yih, Tien Sieh

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Trapped-flux superconducting memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A memory cell based on trapped flux in superconductors has been built and tested. The cell is constructed entirely by vacuum evaporation of thin films and can be selected by coincident current or by other techniques, with drive-current requirements less ...

J. W. Crowe

1957-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

The Boardman Regional Flux Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible-and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy ...

J. C. Doran; J. M. Hubbe; R. R. Kirkham; W. J. Shaw; C. D. Whiteman; F. J. Barnes; D. Cooper; W. Porch; R. L. Coutler; D. R. Cook; R. L. Hart; W. Gao; T. J. Martin; J. D. Shannon; T. L. Crawford; D. D. Baldocchi; R. J. Dobosy; T. P. Meyers; L. Balick; W. A. Dugas; R. Hicks; L. Fritschen; L. Hipps; E. Swiatek; K. E. Kunkel

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

The Antarctic Zone Flux Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In winter the eastern Weddell Sea in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean hosts some of the most dynamic air-ice-sea interactions found on earth. Sea ice in the region is kept relatively thin by heat flux from below, maintained by upper-...

M. G. McPhee; S. F. Ackley; P. Guest; T. P. Stanton; B. A. Huber; D. G. Martinson; J. H. Morison; R. D. Muench; L. Padman

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

199

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel isotopes, with improvements on three aspects. One is more recent input data acquired from updated nuclear databases. the second one is a consideration of the production yields of fission fragments from both thermal and fast incident neutrons for each of the four main fuel isotopes. The last one is more carefully calculation of the average energy taken away by antineutrinos in thermal fission with the comparison of antineutrino spectrum from different models. The change in calculated antineutrino flux due to the new values of thermal fission energy is about 0.32%, and the uncertainties of the new values are about 50% smaller.

X. B. Ma; W. L. Zhong; L. Z. Wang; Y. X. Chen; J. Cao

2012-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Beam position monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for determining the position of an x-ray beam relative to a desired beam axis where the apparatus is positioned along the beam path so that a thin metal foil target intersects the x-ray beam generating fluorescent radiation. A PIN diode array is positioned so that a portion of the fluorescent radiation is intercepted by the array resulting in a series of electrical signals from the PIN diodes making up the array. The signals are then analyzed and the position of the x-ray beam is determined relative to the desired beam path.

Alkire, Randy W.; Rosenbaum, Gerold; Evans, Gwyndaf

2000-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

202

Uncertainties in (E)UV model atmosphere fluxes (Research Note)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. During the comparison of synthetic spectra calculated with two NLTE model atmosphere codes, namely TMAP and TLUSTY, we encounter systematic differences in the EUV fluxes due to the treatment of level dissolution by pressure ionization. Aims. In the case of Sirius B, we demonstrate an uncertainty in modeling the EUV flux reliably in order to challenge theoreticians to improve the theory of level dissolution. Methods. We calculated synthetic spectra for hot, compact stars using state-of-the-art NLTE model-atmosphere techniques. Results. Systematic differences may occur due to a code-specific cutoff frequency of the H I Lyman bound-free opacity. This is the case for TMAP and TLUSTY. Both codes predict the same flux level at wavelengths lower than about 1500 Å for stars with effective temperatures (Teff) below about 30 000 K only, if the same cutoff frequency is chosen. Conclusions. The theory of level dissolution in high-density plasmas, which is available for hydrogen only should be generalized to all species. Especially, the cutoff frequencies for the bound-free opacities should be defined in order to make predictions of UV fluxes more reliable.

T. Rauch

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept  

SciTech Connect

In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

205

Manipulating a Neutrino Spectrum to Maximize the Physics Potential from a Low Energy Beta Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposed low energy beta beam facilities would be capable of producing intense beams of neutrinos (anti-neutrinos) with well defined spectra. We present analytic expressions and numerical results which accurately show how the total neutrino flux reaching the detector depends on the geometry of the source and the detector. Several authors have proposed measurements which require using different flux shapes. We show that detectors of different sizes and shapes will receive neutrino fluxes with different spectral shapes, and that the spectral shape will also be different in different regions of the same detector. Our findings also show that for certain measurements systematic uncertainties and run time can be reduced.

Philip S. Amanik; Gail C. McLaughlin

2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

206

Multiphase flow calculation software  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Scattering Length Density Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... For energy dependent cross sections please go to ... The neutron scattering length density is defined ... To calculate scattering length densities enter a ...

208

Heating Fuel Comparision Calculator  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood, Pellet, Corn (kernel), and Coal Heaters Heating Fuel Comparison Calculator Instructions and Guidance Residential Fuel/Energy Price Links Spot Prices, Daily

209

Scattering Length Density Calculator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The first calculation will take the longest because the program has to download ... will take a few seconds as the database of isotopes is downloaded ...

210

Nonclassicality of vortex Airy beams in the Wigner representation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Wigner distribution function (WDF) of a vortex Airy beam is calculated analytically. The WDF provides intuitive pictures of the intriguing features of vorticity in phase space. The nonclassical property of the vortex Airy beam and the Airy beam is analyzed through the negative parts of the WDF. The study shows that destructive interference of certain classical waves can mimic nonclassical lights such as those due to quantum effects.

Chen Ruipin [School of Sciences, Zhejiang A and F University, Lin'an, Zhejiang Province 311300 (China); Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ooi, C. H. Raymond [Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Beam injection into RHIC  

SciTech Connect

During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Electron beam device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent pertains to an electron beam device in which a hollow target is symmetrically irradiated by a high energy, pulsed electron beam about its periphery and wherein the outer portion of the target has a thickness slightly greater than required to absorb the electron beam pulse energy. (auth)

Beckner, E.H.; Clauser, M.J.

1975-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Method for measuring and controlling beam current in ion beam processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing film thickness control of ion beam sputter deposition films. Great improvements in film thickness control is accomplished by keeping the total current supplied to both the beam and suppressor grids of a radio frequency (RF) in beam source constant, rather than just the current supplied to the beam grid. By controlling both currents, using this method, deposition rates are more stable, and this allows the deposition of layers with extremely well controlled thicknesses to about 0.1%. The method is carried out by calculating deposition rates based on the total of the suppressor and beam currents and maintaining the total current constant by adjusting RF power which gives more consistent values.

Kearney, Patrick A. (Livermore, CA); Burkhart, Scott C. (Livermore, CA)

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

214

Scatterometer Beam Balancing Using Open-Ocean Backscatter Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculation of vector winds from spaceborne fan-beam scatterometers requires that backscatter measurements from different antennas be relatively calibrated to high accuracy. A method is developed to perform postlaunch antenna calibration using ...

Michael H. Freilich; Hongbo Qi; R. Scott Dunbar

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Electron beam depolarization in a damping ring  

SciTech Connect

Depolarization of a polarized electron beam injected into a damping ring is analyzed by extending calculations conventionally applied to proton synchrotrons. Synchrotron radiation in an electron ring gives rise to both polarizing and depolarizing effects. In a damping ring, the beam is stored for a time much less than the time for self polarization. Spin flip radiation may therefore be neglected. Synchrotron radiation without spin flips, however, must be considered as the resonance strength depends on the vertical betatron oscillation amplitude which changes as the electron beam is radiation damped. An expression for the beam polarization at extraction is derived which takes into account radiation damping. The results are applied to the electron ring at the Stanford Linear Collider and are compared with numerical matrix formalisms.

Minty, M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

BEAM CONTROL PROBE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A probe is described for intercepting a desired portion of a beam of charged particles and for indicating the spatial disposition of the beam. The disclosed probe assembly includes a pair of pivotally mounted vanes moveable into a single plane with adjacent edges joining and a calibrated mechanical arrangement for pivoting the vancs apart. When the probe is disposed in the path of a charged particle beam, the vanes may be adjusted according to the beam current received in each vane to ascertain the dimension of the beam.

Chesterman, A.W.

1959-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

217

Urban Cloud Condensation Nuclei Spectral Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectral flux and the condensation nuclei (CN) flux from an urban area are determined from in situ aircraft measurements at Denver, Colorado. The concentration differences between upwind and downwind cross ...

Paul R. Frisbie; James G. Hudson

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

When Are Eddy Tracer Fluxes Directed Downgradient?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanisms controlling the direction of eddy tracer fluxes are examined using eddy-resolving isopycnic experiments for a cyclic zonal channel. Eddy fluxes are directed downgradient on average when either (i) there is a Lagrangian increase in ...

Chris Wilson; Richard G. Williams

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

EUROv Super Beam Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutrino Super Beams use conventional techniques to significantly increase the neutrino beam intensity compared to the present neutrino facilities. An essential part of these facilities is an intense proton driver producing a beam power higher than a MW. The protons hit a target able to accept the high proton beam intensity. The produced charged particles are focused by a system of magnetic horns towards the experiment detectors. The main challenge of these projects is to deal with the high beam intensity for many years. New high power neutrino facilities could be build at CERN profiting from an eventual construction of a high power proton driver. The European FP7 Design Study EUROv, among other neutrino beams, studies this Super Beam possibility. This paper will give the latest developments in this direction.

Dracos, Marcos [IPHC, Universite de Strasbourg, CNRS/IN2P3, F-67037 Strasbourg (France)

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

220

High-flux solar photon processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

Lorents, D C; Narang, S; Huestis, D C; Mooney, J L; Mill, T; Song, H K; Ventura, S [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

CRTF Real-Time Aperture Flux system  

SciTech Connect

The Real-Time Aperture Flux system (TRAF) is a test measurement system designed to determine the input power/unit area (flux density) during solar experiments conducted at the Central Receiver Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The RTAF is capable of using both thermal sensors and photon sensors to determine the flux densities in the RTAF measuring plane. These data are manipulated in various ways to derive input power and flux density distribution to solar experiments.

Davis, D.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Uncertainty of calorimeter measurements at NREL's high flux solar furnace  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The uncertainties of the calorimeter and concentration measurements at the High Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are discussed. Two calorimeter types have been used to date. One is an array of seven commercially available circular foil calorimeters (gardon or heat flux gages) for primary concentrator peak flux (up to 250 W/cm{sup 2}). The second is a cold-water calorimeter designed and built by the University of Chicago to measure the average exit power of the reflective compound parabolic secondary concentrator used at the HFSF (over 3.3 kW across a 1.6cm{sup {minus}2} exit aperture, corresponding to a flux of about 2 kW/cm{sup 2}). This paper discussed the uncertainties of the calorimeter and pyrheliometer measurements and resulting concentration calculations. The measurement uncertainty analysis is performed according to the ASME/ANSI standard PTC 19.1 (1985). Random and bias errors for each portion of the measurement are analyzed. The results show that as either the power or the flux is reduced, the uncertainties increase. Another calorimeter is being designed for a new, refractive secondary which will use a refractive material to produce a higher average flux (5 kW/cm{sup 2}) than the reflective secondary. The new calorimeter will use a time derivative of the fluid temperature as a key measurement of the average power out of the secondary. A description of this calorimeter and test procedure is also presented, along with a pre-test estimate of major sources of uncertainty. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Bingham, C.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Maximizing Buoyancy Flux across Layered Geostrophic Sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For layered analogues of the ocean stratification, the problem of maximizing buoyancy flux across a section with zero mass flux is considered. The two layer situation on an f-plane is particularly simple and it is shown that the buoyancy flux is ...

Nelson G. Hogg; Henry M. Stommel

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

An Algorithm for the Calculation of the Time-Dependent Mixing Height in Coastal Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a simple algorithm for the calculation of the time-dependent mixing height h(t) in coastal sites using wind, temperature, momentum flux, and heat flux time series as input data. A stationary expression for the coastal ...

Paolo Martano

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Mixed field dosimetry of epithermal neutron beams for boron neutron capture therapy at the MITR-II research reactor  

SciTech Connect

During the past several years, there has been growing interest in Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) using epithermal neutron beams. The dosimetry of these beams is challenging. The incident beam is comprised mostly of epithermal neutrons, but there is some contamination from photons and fast neutrons. Within the patient, the neutron spectrum changes rapidly as the incident epithermal neutrons scatter and thermalize, and a photon field is generated from neutron capture in hydrogen. In this paper, a method to determine the doses from thermal and fast neutrons, photons, and the B-10([ital n],[alpha])Li-7 reaction is presented. The photon and fast neutron doses are measured with ionization chambers, in realistic phantoms, using the dual chamber technique. The thermal neutron flux is measured with gold foils using the cadmium difference technique; the thermal neutron and B-10 doses are determined by the kerma factor method. Representative results are presented for a unilateral irradiation of the head. Sources of error in the method as applied to BNCT dosimetry, and the uncertainties in the calculated doses are discussed.

Rogus, R.D.; Harling, O.K.; Yanch, J.C. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States))

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

How do Uncertainties in the Surface Chemical Abundances of the Sun Affect the Predicted Solar Neutrino Fluxes?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that uncertainties in the values of the surface heavy element abundances of the Sun are the largest source of the theoretical uncertainty in calculating the p-p, pep, 8B, 13N, 15O, and 17F solar neutrino fluxes. We evaluate for the first time the sensitivity (partial derivative) of each solar neutrino flux with respect to the surface abundance of each element. We then calculate the uncertainties in each neutrino flux using `conservative (preferred)' and `optimistic' estimates for the uncertainties in the element abundances. The total conservative (optimistic) composition uncertainty in the predicted 8B neutrino flux is 11.6% (5.0%) when sensitivities to individual element abundances are used. The traditional method that lumps all abundances into a single quantity (total heavy element to hydrogen ratio, Z/X) yields a larger uncertainty, 20%. The uncertainties in the carbon, oxygen, neon, silicon, sulphur, and iron abundances all make significant contributions to the uncertainties in calculating solar neutrino fluxes; the uncertainties of different elements are most important for different neutrino fluxes. The uncertainty in the iron abundance is the largest source of the estimated composition uncertainties of the important 7Be and 8B solar neutrinos. Carbon is the largest contributor to the uncertainty in the calculation of the p-p, 13N, and 15O neutrino fluxes. However, for all neutrino fluxes, several elements contribute comparable amounts to the total composition uncertainty.

John N. Bahcall; Aldo M. Serenelli

2004-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

227

Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

228

MODIFIED ZONE METHOD CALCULATOR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Zone Method is recommended for R-value calculations in steel stud walls by the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals ASHRAE 1997. The Modified Zone Method is similar to the...

229

Source and replica calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The starting point of the Hiroshima-Nagasaki Dose Reevaluation Program is the energy and directional distributions of the prompt neutron and gamma-ray radiation emitted from the exploding bombs. A brief introduction to the neutron source calculations is presented. The development of our current understanding of the source problem is outlined. It is recommended that adjoint calculations be used to modify source spectra to resolve the neutron discrepancy problem.

Whalen, P.P.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF WATER AND SOLUTE FLUXES USING A PASSIVE SURFACE WATER FLUX METER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF WATER AND SOLUTE FLUXES USING A PASSIVE SURFACE WATER FLUX METER J Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM). Current techniques for estimating contaminant mass inputs to impaired flux meter, MS Thesis, UF. This work was supported by the United States Department of Agriculture

Watson, Craig A.

231

Observations and Calculations of Aerosol Heating over the Arabian Sea during MONEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation flux observations were obtained during a flight of the NCAR Electra over the Arabian Sea during MONEX when aerosols were present, and these observations have been compared with theoretical calculations based upon simultaneously observed ...

Robert O. Ellingson; George N. Serafino

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A Comparison of Radiation Variables Calculated in the UCLA General Circulation Model to Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons are made between the spatial patterns of solar and thermal fluxes of radiation calculated by the UCLA general circulation model and observations. The latter include estimates at the Pacific Ocean surface of the climatological averages ...

Bryan C. Weare

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A Simplified Method for the Calculation of Diurnally Averaged Photodissociation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Expressions are given for the calculation of the diurnally averaged transmission of solar flux from a series summation involving relatively few terms (10) and readily available mathematical functions. It is shown that these expressions can be ...

Robert E. Boughner

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Prospects for Off-Axis Neutral Beam Current Drive in the DIII-D Tokamak  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Off-axis neutral beam (NB) current drive (CD) (NBCD) has the potential to supply substantial off-axis CD for the demonstration steady-state, Advanced Tokamak scenarios. A modification of the two existing DIII-D NB beamlines is proposed to allow off-axis CD with NB injection (NBI) vertically steered to drive current as far off axis as half the plasma radius. The profile and magnitude of the driven current is calculated using the NUBEAM Monte Carlo module in the TRANSP and ONETWO transport codes. When the beam is injected in the same direction as the toroidal field, off-axis CD of approximate to 45 kA/MW is calculated at normalized radius (square root of the wtoroidal flux), rho = 0. 5 with full-width at half-maximum of 0.45 in rho. The dimensionless CD efficiency is comparable or somewhat better than that for electron cyclotron CD (ECCD) at the same location and plasma parameters. The efficiency stays nearly constant in going from on-axis to off-axis CD. The localization and magnitude of the off-axis NBCD are sensitive to the alignment of the NBI relative to the helical pitch of the magnetic field lines and thus to the direction of the toroidal field and plasma current. The driven current is still localized off axis for fast ion diffusivities up to 1 m(2)/s. The calculations show that the off-axis NBCD can supply much of the off-axis CD for the steady-state scenarios under consideration, leaving ECCD for fine-tuning of the current profile and real-time control.

Murakami, Masanori [ORNL; Park, Jin Myung [ORNL; Luce, T.C. [General Atomics, San Diego; Wade, David R [ORNL; Hong, R. M. [General Atomics, San Diego

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Strong-strong beam-beam simulation on parallel computer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The beam-beam interaction puts a strong limit on the luminosity of the high energy storage ring colliders. At the interaction points, the electromagnetic fields generated by one beam focus or defocus the opposite beam. This can cause beam blowup and a reduction of luminosity. An accurate simulation of the beam-beam interaction is needed to help optimize the luminosity in high energy colliders.

Qiang, Ji

2004-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

236

New Insights into the Ocean Heat Budget Closure Problem from Analysis of the SOC Air–Sea Flux Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from an analysis of the Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) global air–sea heat flux climatology, which has been calculated using in situ weather reports from voluntary observing ships covering the period 1980–93, are presented. ...

Simon A. Josey; Elizabeth C. Kent; Peter K. Taylor

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Turbulent Heat Fluxes in Urban Areas: Observations and a Local-Scale Urban Meteorological Parameterization Scheme (LUMPS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linked set of simple equations specifically designed to calculate heat fluxes for the urban environment is presented. This local-scale urban meteorological parameterization scheme (LUMPS), which has similarities to the hybrid plume dispersion ...

C. S. B. Grimmond; T. R. Oke

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Aerosol Radiative Impact on Spectral Solar Flux at the Surface, Derived from Principal-Plane Sky Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate measurements of the spectral solar flux reaching the surface in cloud-free conditions are required to determine the aerosol radiative impact and to test aerosol models that are used to calculate radiative forcing of climate. Spectral ...

Y. J. Kaufman; D. Tanré; B. N. Holben; S. Mattoo; L. A. Remer; T. F. Eck; J. Vaughan; Bernadette Chatenet

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Impact of Isopycnal Diffusion on Heat Fluxes and the Transient Response of a Two-Dimensional Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional (latitude–depth) ocean–climate model is used to assess the impact of calculating diffusive heat and salinity fluxes along and across isopycnal surfaces rather than in a vertical–horizontal coordinate system. Differences between ...

L. D. Danny Harvey

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Polarizing a stored proton beam by spin flip?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss polarizing a proton beam in a storage ring, either by selective removal or by spin flip of the stored ions. Prompted by recent, conflicting calculations, we have carried out a measurement of the spin flip cross section in low-energy electron-proton scattering. The experiment uses the cooling electron beam at COSY as an electron target. The measured cross sections are too small for making spin flip a viable tool in polarizing a stored beam. This invalidates a recent proposal to use co-moving polarized positrons to polarize a stored antiproton beam.

D. Oellers; L. Barion; S. Barsov; U. Bechstedt; P. Benati; S. Bertelli; D. Chiladze; G. Ciullo; M. Contalbrigo; P. F. Dalpiaz; J. Dietrich; N. Dolfus; S. Dymov; R. Engels; W. Erven; A. Garishvili; R. Gebel; P. Goslawski; K. Grigoryev; H. Hadamek; A. Kacharava; A. Khoukaz; A. Kulikov; G. Langenberg; A. Lehrach; P. Lenisa; N. Lomidze; B. Lorentz; G. Macharashvili; R. Maier; S. Martin; S. Merzliakov; I. N. Meshkov; H. O. Meyer; M. Mielke; M. Mikirtychiants; S. Mikirtychiants; A. Nass; M. Nekipelov; N. N. Nikolaev; M. Nioradze; G. d'Orsaneo; M. Papenbrock; D. Prasuhn; F. Rathmann; J. Sarkadi; R. Schleichert; A. Smirnov; H. Seyfarth; J. Sowinski; D. Spoelgen; G. Stancari; M. Stancari; M. Statera; E. Steffens; H. J. Stein; H. Stockhorst; H. Straatmann; H. Stroeher; M. Tabidze; G. Tagliente; P. Thoerngren Engblom; S. Trusov; A. Vasilyev; Chr. Weidemann; D. Welsch; P. Wieder; P. Wuestner; P. Zupranski

2009-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Multiple Electron Stripping of Heavy Ion Beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One approach being explored as a route to practical fusion energy uses heavy ion beams focused on an indirect drive target. Such beams will lose electrons while passing through background gas in the target chamber, and therefore it is necessary to assess the rate at which the charge state of the incident beam evolves on the way to the target. Accelerators designed primarily for nuclear physics or high energy physics experiments utilize ion sources that generate highly stripped ions in order to achieve high energies economically. As a result, accelerators capable of producing heavy ion beams of 10 to 40 Mev/amu with charge state 1 currently do not exist. Hence, the stripping cross-sections used to model the performance of heavy ion fusion driver beams have, up to now, been based upon theoretical calculations. We have investigated experimentally the stripping of 3.4 Mev/amu Kr 7+ and Xe +11 in N2; 10.2 MeV/amu Ar +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 19 MeV/amu Ar +8 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 30 MeV He 1 + in He, N2, Ar and Xe; and 38 MeV/amu N +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe. The results of these measurements are compared with the theoretical calculations to assess their applicability over a wide range of parameters.

D. Mueller; L. Grisham; I. Kaganovich; R. L. Watson; V. Horvat; K. E. Zaharakis; Y. Peng

2002-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

242

Beam-Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas Gas and Thermal Photon Scattering in the NLC Main Linac as a Source of Beam Halo P. Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0051 12-JAN-2001 Abstract Scattering of primary beam electrons off of residual gas molecules or blackbody radiation photons in the NLC main linac has been identified as a potential source of beam haloes which must be collimated in the beam delivery system. We consider the contributions from four scat- tering mechanisms: inelastic thermal-photon scattering, elastic beam-gas (Coulomb) scattering inelastic beam-gas (Bremsstrahlung) scattering, and atomic-electron scattering. In each case we develop the formalism necessary to estimate the backgrounds generated in the main linac, and determine the expected number of off-energy or large-amplitude particles from each process, assuming a main linac injection energy of 8 GeV and extraction energy of 500 GeV. 1 Introduction The

243

Particle beam injection system  

SciTech Connect

This invention provides a poloidal divertor for stacking counterstreaming ion beams to provide high intensity colliding beams. To this end, method and apparatus are provided that inject high energy, high velocity, ordered, atomic deuterium and tritium beams into a lower energy, toroidal, thermal equilibrium, neutral, target plasma column that is magnetically confined along an endless magnetic axis in a strong restoring force magnetic field having helical field lines to produce counterstreaming deuteron and triton beams that are received bent, stacked and transported along the endless axis, while a poloidal divertor removes thermal ions and electrons all along the axis to increase the density of the counterstreaming ion beams and the reaction products resulting therefrom. By balancing the stacking and removal, colliding, strong focused particle beams, reaction products and reactions are produced that convert one form of energy into another form of energy.

Jassby, Daniel L. (Princeton, NJ); Kulsrud, Russell M. (Princeton, NJ)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Ion Beam Materials Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities » Facilities » Ion Beam Materials Lab Ion Beam Materials Lab A new research frontier awaits! Our door is open and we thrive on mutually beneficial partnerships, collaborations that drive innovations and new technologies. April 12, 2012 Ion Beam Danfysik Implanter High Voltage Terminal. Contact Yongqiang Wang (505) 665-1596 Email Devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams The Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Alamos National Laboratory resource devoted to the characterization and modification of surfaces through the use of ion beams. The IBML provides and operates the core facilities, while supporting the design and implementation of specific apparati needed for experiments requested by users of the facility. The result is a facility with

245

Calculations of slurry pump jet impingement loads  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a methodology to calculate the impingement load in the region of a submerged turbulent jet where a potential core exits and the jet is not fully developed. The profile of the jet flow velocities is represented by a piece-wise linear function which satisfies the conservation of momentum flux of the jet flow. The adequacy of the of the predicted jet expansion is further verified by considering the continuity of the jet flow from the region of potential core to the fully developed region. The jet impingement load can be calculated either as a direct impingement force or a drag force using the jet velocity field determined by the methodology presented.

Wu, T.T.

1996-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

246

Broad beam ion implanter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion implantation device for creating a large diameter, homogeneous, ion beam is described, as well as a method for creating same, wherein the device is characterized by extraction of a diverging ion beam and its conversion by ion beam optics to an essentially parallel ion beam. The device comprises a plasma or ion source, an anode and exit aperture, an extraction electrode, a divergence-limiting electrode and an acceleration electrode, as well as the means for connecting a voltage supply to the electrodes.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

BEAMS Crossword Puzzle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

puzzle with words from the BEAMS Vocabulary List. Download this Activity Lab Pages Puzzle Puzzle Puzzle (cont) Puzzle (cont) Sample AnswersAnswer Key Ansewr Key Ansewr Key...

248

Electron Beam Melting (EBM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 18, 2011 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting (EBM) I Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program Organizers: Ian D. Harris, EWI; ...

249

Electron Beam Melting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 9, 2012 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting Program Organizers: Ian Harris, EWI; Ola Harrysson, North Carolina State University; ...

250

Neutron Spectral Brightness of Cold Guide 4 at the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor resumed operation in June of 2007 with a super-critical hydrogen cold source in horizontal beam tube 4. Cold guide 4 is a guide system designed to deliver neutrons from this source at reasonable flux at wavelengths greater than 4 Å to several instruments, and includes a 15-m, 96-section, 4-channel bender. A time-of-flight spectrum with calibrated detector was recorded at port C of cold guide 4, and compared to McStas simulations, to generate a brightness spectrum.

Winn,B.L.; Robertson, J.L.; Iverson, E.B.; Selby, D.L.

2009-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

251

Digital signal processing control of induction machine`s torque and stator flux utilizing the direct stator flux field orientation method  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a review of the Direct Stator Flux Field Orientation control method. This method can be used to control an induction motor`s torque and flux directly and is the application of interest for this thesis. This control method is implemented without the traditional feedback loops and associated hardware. Predictions are made, by mathematical calculations, of the stator voltage vector. The voltage vector is determined twice a switching period. The switching period is fixed throughout the analysis. The three phase inverter duty cycle necessary to control the torque and flux of the induction machine is determined by the voltage space vector Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) technique. Transient performance of either the flux or torque requires an alternate modulation scheme which is also addressed in this thesis. A block diagram of this closed loop system is provided. 22 figs., 7 tabs.

Seiz, J.B.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Performance and safety parameters for the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDF/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data. (authors)

Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm III, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States); Primm Consulting, LLC, 945 Laurel Hill Road, Knoxville, TN 37923 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Performance and Safety Parameters for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A Monte Carlo depletion model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cycle 400 and its use in calculating parameters of relevance to the reactor performance and safety during the reactor cycle are presented in this paper. This depletion model was developed to serve as a reference for the design of a low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel for an ongoing study to convert HFIR from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to LEU fuel; both HEU and LEU depletion models use the same methodology and ENDV/B-VII nuclear data as discussed in this paper. The calculated HFIR Cycle 400 parameters, which are compared when available with measurement data from critical experiments performed at HFIR, data included in the HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR), or data reported by previous calculations, provide a basis for verification or updating of the corresponding SAR data.

Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [Primm Consulting, LLC

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

TVDG LET Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To The B N L Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator To The B N L Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator TVDG LET Calculator This program calculates the Peak LET, Corresponding Energy and Range as well as the LET and Range at the Specified Energy for the Specified Ion in the Specified Target. Select the Target Material from the dropdown list. Select the Ion Specie from the dropdown list. Enter the Total Ion Energy in the text box. This is equal to the Atomic Mass times the Energy/Nucleon. Click the 'Calculate' button or press the 'Enter' key. The Peak LET, Corresponding Energy and Range as well as the LET and Range at the Specified Energy for the Specified Ion in the Specified Target will be returned. Select your Target from the list Air Aluminum Oxide Carbon Copper Gallium Arsenide Gold Polyester Polyethylene Silicon Silicon Dioxide Skin Soda Lime Glass Sodium Iodide Water Select your Ion from the list

255

Solar Reflectance Index Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reflectance Index Calculator Reflectance Index Calculator ASTM Designation: E 1980-01 Enter A State: Select a state Alabama Alaska Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Iowa Idaho Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana North Carolina North Dakota Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Pacific Islands Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Canadian Cities Enter A City: Select a city Wind Speed (mph) Wind Speed (m/s) Please input both the SR and the TE and the convection coeficient and surface temperature will be calculated

256

Spin resonance strength calculations  

SciTech Connect

In calculating the strengths of depolarizing resonances it may be convenient to reformulate the equations of spin motion in a coordinate system based on the actual trajectory of the particle, as introduced by Kondratenko, rather than the conventional one based on a reference orbit. It is shown that resonance strengths calculated by the conventional and the revised formalisms are identical. Resonances induced by radiofrequency dipoles or solenoids are also treated; with rf dipoles it is essential to consider not only the direct effect of the dipole but also the contribution from oscillations induced by it.

Courant,E.D.

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

257

A unique method of neutron flux determination from experimental data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for determining the fission heat flux of a prime specimen inserted into a specimen of a test reactor. A pair of thermocouple test specimens are positioned at the same level in the holder and a determination is made of various experimental data including the temperature of the thermocouple test specimens, the temperature of bulk water channels located in the test holder, the gamma scan count ratios for the thermocouple test specimens and the prime specimen, and the thicknesses of the outer clads, the fuel fillers, and the backclad of the thermocouple test specimen. Using this experimental data, the absolute value of the fission heat flux for the thermocouple test specimens and prime specimen can be calculated.

Paxton, Frank A.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Method of fission heat flux determination from experimental data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for determining the fission heat flux of a prime specimen inserted into a specimen of a test reactor. A pair of thermocouple test specimens are positioned at the same level in the holder and a determination is made of various experimental data including the temperature of the thermocouple test specimens, the temperature of bulk water channels located in the test holder, the gamma scan count ratios for the thermocouple test specimens and the prime specimen, and the thicknesses of the outer clads, the fuel fillers, and the backclad of the thermocouple test specimen. Using this experimental data, the absolute value of the fission heat flux for the thermocouple test specimens and prime specimen can be calculated.

Paxton, Frank A. (Schenectady, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Mitigation Efforts Calculator (MEC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mitigation Efforts Calculator (MEC) has been developed by the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) as an online tool to compare greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation proposals by various countries for the year 2020. In this paper, ... Keywords: Business intelligence, Cost curves, Decision model, Interactive system, Optimisation

Thanh Binh Nguyen; Lena Hoeglund-Isaksson; Fabian Wagner; Wolfgang Schoepp

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Tunnel closure calculations  

SciTech Connect

When a deeply penetrating munition explodes above the roof of a tunnel, the amount of rubble that falls inside the tunnel is primarily a function of three parameters: first the cube-root scaled distance from the center of the explosive to the roof of the tunnel. Second the material properties of the rock around the tunnel, and in particular the shear strength of that rock, its RQD (Rock Quality Designator), and the extent and orientation of joints. And third the ratio of the tunnel diameter to the standoff distance (distance between the center of explosive and the tunnel roof). The authors have used CALE, a well-established 2-D hydrodynamic computer code, to calculate the amount of rubble that falls inside a tunnel as a function of standoff distance for two different tunnel diameters. In particular they calculated three of the tunnel collapse experiments conducted in an iron ore mine near Kirkeness, Norway in the summer of 1994. The failure model that they used in their calculations combines an equivalent plastic strain criterion with a maximum tensile strength criterion and can be calibrated for different rocks using cratering data as well as laboratory experiments. These calculations are intended to test and improve the understanding of both the Norway Experiments and the ACE (Array of conventional Explosive) phenomenology.

Moran, B.; Attia, A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

262

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Beam Diagnostics for FACET  

SciTech Connect

FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration beginning in summer 2011. The nominal FACET parameters are 23GeV, 3nC electron bunches compressed to about 20 {micro}m long and focussed to about 10 {micro}m wide. Characterization of the beam-plasma interaction requires complete knowledge of the incoming beam parameters on a pulse-to-pulse basis. FACET diagnostics include Beam Position Monitors, Toroidal current monitors, X-ray and Cerenkov based energy spectrometers, optical transition radiation (OTR) profile monitors and coherent transition radiation (CTR) bunch length measurement systems. The compliment of beam diagnostics and their expected performance are reviewed. Beam diagnostic measurements not only provide valuable insights to the running and tuning of the accelerator but also are crucial for the PWFA experiments in particular. Beam diagnostic devices are being set up at FACET and will be ready for beam commissioning in summer 2011.

Li, S.Z.; Hogan, M.J.; /SLAC

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

266

Plutonium 239 Equivalency Calculations  

SciTech Connect

This document provides the basis for converting actual weapons grade plutonium mass to a plutonium equivalency (PuE) mass of Plutonium 239. The conversion can be accomplished by performing calculations utilizing either: (1) Isotopic conversions factors (CF{sub isotope}), or (2) 30-year-old weapons grade conversion factor (CF{sub 30 yr}) Both of these methods are provided in this document. Material mass and isotopic data are needed to calculate PuE using the isotopic conversion factors, which will provide the actual PuE value at the time of calculation. PuE is the summation of the isotopic masses times their associated isotopic conversion factors for plutonium 239. Isotopic conversion factors are calculated by a normalized equation, relative to Plutonium 239, of specific activity (SA) and cumulated dose inhalation affects based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). The isotopic conversion factors for converting weapons grade plutonium to PuE are provided in Table-1. The unit for specific activity (SA) is curies per gram (Ci/g) and the isotopic SA values come from reference [1]. The cumulated dose inhalation effect values in units of rem/Ci are based on 50-yr committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE). A person irradiated by gamma radiation outside the body will receive a dose only during the period of irradiation. However, following an intake by inhalation, some radionuclides persist in the body and irradiate the various tissues for many years. There are three groups CEDE data representing lengths of time of 0.5 (D), 50 (W) and 500 (Y) days, which are in reference [2]. The CEDE values in the (W) group demonstrates the highest dose equivalent value; therefore they are used for the calculation.

Wen, J

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Four-button BPM coefficients in cylindrical and elliptic beam chambers.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beam position monitor (BPM) coefficients are calculated from induced charges on four-button BPMs in circular and elliptic beam chambers for {gamma} >>1. Since the beam chamber cross-section for the APS storage ring is different from an exact elliptic geometry, numerical values of the BPM coefficients and their inversions are computed from two-dimensional electrostatic field distributions inside an exact geometry of the beam chamber. Utilizing Green's reciprocation theorem, a potential value is applied to the buttons rather than changing the beam position, and potential distributions corresponding to the beam positions are then computed.

Kim, S.H.

1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

268

Laser beam alignment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of pivotal reflectors direct a high-power laser beam onto a workpiece, and a rotatable reflector is movable to a position wherein it intercepts the beam and deflects a major portion thereof away from its normal path, the remainder of the beam passing to the pivotal reflectors through an aperture in the rotating reflector. A plurality of targets are movable to positions intercepting the path of light traveling to the pivotal reflectors, and a preliminary adjustment of the latter is made by use of a low-power laser beam reflected from the rotating reflector, after which the same targets are used to make a final adjustment of the pivotal reflectors with the portion of the high-power laser beam passed through the rotating reflector.

Kasner, William H. (11686 Althea Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15235); Racki, Daniel J. (712 Union Cemetery Rd., Greensburg, PA 15601); Swenson, Clark E. (228 Scott Dr., Monroeville, PA 15146)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Beam director design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A design and fabrication effort for a beam director is documented. The conceptual design provides for the beam to pass first through a bending and focusing system (or ''achromat''), through a second achromat, through an air-to-vacuum interface (the ''beam window''), and finally through the vernier steering system. Following an initial concept study for a beam director, a prototype permanent magnet 30/sup 0/ beam-bending achromat and prototype vernier steering magnet were designed and built. In volume II, copies are included of the funding instruments, requests for quotations, purchase orders, a complete set of as-built drawings, magnetic measurement reports, the concept design report, and the final report on the design and fabrication project. (LEW)

Younger, F.C.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

First Beam to FACET  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SLAC 3km linear electron accelerator has been reconfigured to provide a beam of electrons to the new Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) while simultaneously providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). On June 23, 2011, the first electron beam was transported through this new facility. Commissioning of FACET is in progress. On June 23, 2011, an electron beam was successfully transported through the new FACET system to a dump in Sector 20 in the linac tunnel. This was achieved while the last third of the linac, operating from the same control room, but with a separate injector system, was providing an electron beam to the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), demonstrating that concurrent operation of the two facilities is practical. With the initial checkout of the new transport line essentially complete, attention is now turning toward compressing the electron bunches longitudinally and focusing them transversely to support a variety of accelerator science experiments.

Erickson, R.; Clarke, C.; Colocho, W.; Decker, F.-J.; Hogan, M.; Kalsi, S.; Lipkowitz, N.; Nelson, J.; Phinney, N.; Schuh, P.; Sheppard, J.; Smith, H.; Smith, T.; Stanek, M.; Turner, J.; Warren, J.; Weathersby, S.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; Woodley, M.; Yocky, G.; /SLAC

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

271

Scientific Upgrades at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is sponsoring a number of projects that will provide scientific upgrades to the neutron science facilities associated with the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Funding for the first upgrade project was initiated in 1996 and all presently identified upgrade projects are expected to be completed by the end of 2003. The upgrade projects include: (1) larger beam tubes, (2) a new monochromator drum for the HB-1 beam line, (3) a new HB-2 beam line system that includes one thermal guide and a new monochromator drum, (4) new instruments for the HB-2 beamline, (5) a new monochromator drum for the HB-3 beam line, (6) a supercritical hydrogen cold source system to be retrofitted into the HB-4 beam tube, (7) a 3.5 kW refrigeration system at 20 K to support the cold source and a new building to house it, (8) a new HB-4 beam line system composed of four cold neutron guides with various mirror coatings and associated shielding, (9) a number of new instruments for the cold beams including two new SANS instruments, and (10) construction of support buildings. This paper provides a short summary of these projects including their present status and schedule.

Selby, Douglas L [ORNL; Jones, Amy [ORNL; Crow, Lowell [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Physics of relativistic electron beams in rectangular and cylindrical geometries  

SciTech Connect

The use of electron beams for the direct pumping of lasers for fusion applications requires the generation of large area beams in appropriate geometries. Two geometries which are of particular interest are rectangular electron beams with planar anodes and radially converging beams with cyclindrical anodes. The generation of such beams requires the management of electron trajectories in a complex combination of applied and self-generated electric and magnetic fields. The beam's self-electric field limits the emitted current and the deflection of the electron in the self-magnetic field (beam pinch) limits the beam area that can be generated from a single cathode. A simple analytic model is used to derive a scaling relationship for beam pinch in both geometries of the form V/sup 1/2/ w/d = $alpha$ where V is the diode voltage, w the beam width, d the anode-cathode spacing, and $alpha$ is a weak function of the geometry. Numerical calculations are presented to show the effects of nonuniform electric fields encountered in typical geometries together with supporting experimental measurements. (auth)

Schlitt, L.G.; Bradley, L.P.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Predicting Low Flux High - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High flux can access high fluence, but such TTS data is under-predicted by current ... on Defect Migration and Void Formation using the Phase Field Method.

274

Flux: for brass quintet with analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper will examine the piece Flux: for Brass Quintet, completed in the spring of 2010 by Robert DeVet. It will first examine the system… (more)

Devet, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

On solar neutrino fluxes in radiochemical experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze fluctuations of the solar neutrino flux using data from the Homestake, GALLEX, GNO, SAGE and Super Kamiokande experiments. Spectral analysis and direct quantitative estimations show that the most stable variation of the solar neutrino flux is a quasi-five-year periodicity. The revised values of the mean solar neutrino flux are presented in Table 4. They were used to estimate the observed pp-flux of the solar electron neutrinos near the Earth. We consider two alternative explanations for the origin of a variable component of the solar neutrino deficit.

R. N. Ikhsanov; Yu. N. Gnedin; E. V. Miletsky

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

276

Vector Representation of Trade Cumulus Thermodynamic Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vector representation of the BOMEX thermodynamic budget data is presented which shows graphically the relationship of the fluxes and the mean layer structure.

Alan K. Betts

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFIR Working with HFIR Neutron imaging offers new tools for exploring artifacts and ancient technology Home | User Facilities | HFIR HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor SHARE The High...

278

BNL VERY LONG BASELINE EXPERIMENT WITH A SUPER NEUTRINO BEAM.  

SciTech Connect

An upgrade to the BNL AGS could produce a very intense proton source at a relatively low cost. This proton source could produce a conventional neutrino beam with a very significant flux at large distances from the laboratory. In this paper we examine the possibility of using this neutrino beam for a very long baseline oscillation experiment where a 500 kiloton water Cherenkov detector is situated at the Homestake mine in South Dakota. We study the physics potential of a high intensity neutrino oscillation experiment with a 2540 km baseline and a peak neutrino energy of {approx}1 GeV.

KAHN,S.A.

2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

279

Neutronics Modeling of the High Flux Isotope Reactor using COMSOL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a versatile 85 MWth research reactor with cold and thermal neutron scattering, materials irradiation, isotope production, and neutron activation analysis capabilities. HFIR staff members are currently in the process of updating the thermal hydraulic and reactor transient modeling methodologies. COMSOL Multiphysics has been adopted for the thermal hydraulic analyses and has proven to be a powerful finite-element-based simulation tool for solving multiple physics-based systems of partial and ordinary differential equations. Modeling reactor transients is a challenging task because of the coupling of neutronics, heat transfer, and hydrodynamics. This paper presents a preliminary COMSOL-based neutronics study performed by creating a two-dimensional, two-group, diffusion neutronics model of HFIR to study the spatially-dependent, beginning-of-cycle fast and thermal neutron fluxes. The 238-group ENDF/B-VII neutron cross section library and NEWT, a two-dimensional, discrete-ordinates neutron transport code within the SCALE 6 code package, were used to calculate the two-group neutron cross sections required to solve the diffusion equations. The two-group diffusion equations were implemented in the COMSOL coefficient form PDE application mode and were solved via eigenvalue analysis using a direct (PARDISO) linear system solver. A COMSOL-provided adaptive mesh refinement algorithm was used to increase the number of elements in areas of largest numerical error to increase the accuracy of the solution. The flux distributions calculated by means of COMSOL/SCALE compare well with those calculated with benchmarked three-dimensional MCNP and KENO models, a necessary first step along the path to implementing two- and three-dimensional models of HFIR in COMSOL for the purpose of studying the spatial dependence of transient-induced behavior in the reactor core.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

SPEAR3 Beam Line Availability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Line Support | Floor Support | Administrative Support SPEAR3 Beam Line Availability Beam Line BL Type Technique(s) Status 1-4 X-ray Small and Wide Angle X-ray Scattering Open...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Molecular beams studies of the energetics and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Quantum mechanical effects on the angular distribution of HF products from the F + H/sub 2/ reaction were studied using crossed atomic and molecular beams with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector and time-of-flight velocity analysis. Measurement of the singlet-triplet splitting of CH/sub 2/ from the recoil velocities of fragments from ketene photodissociation in a molecular beam is also reported. Partial center-of-mass angular distributions, and velocity flux contour maps have been derived for individual vibrational states of the HF product from the F + H/sub 2/ reaction at collision energies of 2 and 3 kcal/mole. The center-of-mass distributions were obtained by analysis of laboratory angular and time-of-flight measurements of the reactive scattering. The results are consistent with recent three dimensional quantum mechanical scattering calculations, which predict that resonance effects should appear in the product angular distributions in this energy range. The photofragmentation of ketene in a molecular beam was used to measure the singlet-triplet splitting in CH/sub 2/. A rare gas halide excimer laser operating at 351 nm (XeF) and 308 nm (XeCl) dissociated the ketene. Time-of-flight measurements of the fragment velocities allowed determination of the energetics of the dissociation. The /sup 1/A/sub 1/ - /sup 3/B/sub 1/ splitting in CH/sub 2/ was found to be 8.5 +- 0.8 kcal/mole. This agrees with many experimental results, but not with the value of 19.5 kcal/mole derived from recent photodetachment experiments on CH/sub 2//sup -/.

Hayden, C.C.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Calculation of fusion product angular correlation coefficients for fusion plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The angular correlation coefficients for fusion products are calculated in the cases of Maxwellian and beam-target plasmas. Measurement of these coefficients as a localized ion temperature or fast-ion diagnostic is discussed. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Murphy, T.J.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

284

Steep Slope Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Steep Slope Calculator Steep Slope Calculator Estimates Cooling and Heating Savings for Residential Roofs with Non-Black Surfaces Enter A State: Select a state Alabama Alaska Arkansas Arizona California Colorado Connecticut Delaware Florida Georgia Hawaii Iowa Idaho Illinois Indiana Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana North Carolina North Dakota Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Pacific Islands Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Canadian Cities Enter A City: Select a city Click to see Data for All 243 Locations Roof Inputs: R-value(Btu-in/(hr ft2 oF):

285

A brief History of Neutron Scattering at the Oak Ridge High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron scattering at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory dates back to 1945 when Ernest Wollan installed a modified x-ray diffractometer on a beam port of the original graphite reactor. Subsequently, Wollan and Clifford Shull pioneered neutron diffraction and laid the foundation for an active neutron scattering effort that continued through the 1950s, using the Oak Ridge Research reactor after 1958, and, starting in 1966, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, or HFIR.

Nagler, Stephen E [ORNL; Mook Jr, Herbert A [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Electron and laser beam welding  

SciTech Connect

This book contains 22 selections. Some of the titles are: Laser welding of chandelles to the plates of the sommier employed in the nuclear power plant core; Electron beam welding of hobbing cutters; Sealing welds in electron beam welding of thick metals; Development and application of high power electron beam welding; Electron beam welding of dissimilar metals (niobium, molybdenum, porous tungsten-molybdenum); Status of electron beam welding in the United States of America; and Electron and laser beam welding in Japan.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Source Terms for HFIR Beam Tube Shielding Analyses, and a Complete Shielding Analysis of the HB-3 Tube  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is in the midst of a massive upgrade program to enhance experimental facilities. The reactor presently has four horizontal experimental beam tubes, all of which will be replaced or redesigned. The HB-2 beam tube will be enlarged to support more guide tubes, while the HB-4 beam tube will soon include a cold neutron source.

Bucholz, J.A.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

An Energy-Stabilized Varied-Line-Space-Monochromator UndulatorBeam Line for PEEM Illumination and Magnetic Circular Dichroism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new undulator beam line has been built and commissioned at the Advanced Light Source for illumination of the PEEM3 microscope. The beam line delivers high flux beams over an energy range from C1s through the transition metals to include the M edges of the magnetic rare earth elements. We present details of the optical design, and data on the performance of the zero-order tracking of the photon energy.

Warwick, Tony; McKinney, Wayne; Domning, Ed; Doran, Andrew; Padmore, Howard

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.  

SciTech Connect

Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A Comparison of Latent Heat Fluxes over Global Oceans for Four Flux Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean surface latent heat flux (LHF) plays an essential role in global energy and water cycle variability. In this study, monthly LHF over global oceans during 1992–93 are compared among Goddard Satellite-Based Surface Turbulent Fluxes, ...

Shu-Hsien Chou; Eric Nelkin; Joe Ardizzone; Robert M. Atlas

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Challenges in Accelerator Beam Instrumentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The challenges in beam instrumentation and diagnostics for present and future particle accelerator projects are presented. A few examples for advanced hadron and lepton beam diagnostics are given.

Wendt, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Challenges in Accelerator Beam Instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The challenges in beam instrumentation and diagnostics for present and future particle accelerator projects are presented. A few examples for advanced hadron and lepton beam diagnostics are given.

Wendt, M.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Frontiers of Particle Beam Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Emittance e--e+ Beams, Brookhaven National Laboratory,Island, NY, October 1988, Brookhaven National Laboratory,Low Emittance e--e+ Beams, Brookhaven National Laboratory,

Sessler, Andrew M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Beam Purification by Photodetachment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion beam purity is of crucial importance to many basic and applied studies. Selective photodetachment has been proposed to suppress unwanted species in negative ion beams while preserving the intensity of the species of interest. A highly efficient technique based on photodetachment in a gas-filled radio frequency quadrupole ion cooler has been demonstrated. In off-line experiments with stable ions, up to 104 times suppression of the isobar contaminants in a number of interesting radioactive negative ion beams has been demonstrated. For selected species, this technique promises experimental possibilities in studies on exotic nuclei, accelerator mass spectrometry, and fundamental properties of negative atomic and molecular ions.

Liu, Yuan [ORNL; Beene, James R [ORNL; Havener, Charles C [ORNL; Galindo-Uribarri, Alfredo {nmn} [ORNL; Andersson, P. [University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Lindahl, A. O. [University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Hanstorp, D. [University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Forstner, Dr. Oliver [University of Vienna, Austria; Gottwald, T. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Wendt, K. [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Thermal evaluation of uranium silicide miniplates irradiated at high heat flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Test Loop (GTL)-1 irradiation experiment was conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to assess corrosion performance of proposed booster fuel at heat flux levels ~30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density (4.8 g U/cm3) U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 to 593 W/cm2. No adverse impacts to the miniplates were observed at these high heat flux levels. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective ATR south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant–hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average hydroxide thickness on each miniplate measured during post-irradiation examination. The purpose of this study was to obtain a best estimate of the as-run experiment temperatures to aid in establishing acceptable heat flux levels and designing fuel qualification experiments for this fuel type.

Donna P. Guillen

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Simulations of beam-beam and beam-wire interactions in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

The beam-beam interaction is one of the dominant sources of emittance growth and luminosity lifetime deterioration. A current carrying wire has been proposed to compensate long-range beam-beam effects in the LHC and strong localized long-range beam-beam effects are experimentally investigated in the RHIC collider. Tune shift, beam transfer function, and beam loss rate are measured in dedicated experiments. In this paper, they report on simulations to study the effect of beam-wire interactions based on diffusive apertures, beam loss rates, and beam transfer function using a parallelized weak-strong beam simulation code (BBSIMC). The simulation results are compared with measurements performed in RHIC during 2007 and 2008.

Kim, Hyung J.; Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab; Abreu, Natalia P.; Fischer, Wolfram; /Brookhaven

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Space Charge Correction on Emittance Measurement of Low Energy Electron Beams  

SciTech Connect

The goal of any particle accelerator is to optimize the transport of a charged particle beam along a set path by confining the beam to a small region close to the design trajectory and directing it accurately along the beamline. To do so in the simplest fashion, accelerators use a system of magnets that exert approximately linear electromagnetic forces on the charged beam. These electromagnets bend the beam along the desired path, in the case of bending magnets, and constrain the beam to the desired area through alternating focusing and defocusing effects, in the case of quadrupole magnets. We can model the transport of such a beam through transfer matrices representing the actions of the various beamline elements. However, space charge effects, produced from self electric fields within the beam, defocus the beam and must be accounted for in the calculation of beam emittance. We present below the preliminary results of a MATLAB code built to model the transport of a charged particle beam through an accelerator and measure the emittance under the influence of space charge effects. We demonstrate the method of correctly calculating the emittance of a beam under space charge effects using a least square fit to determine the initial properties of the beam given the beam size measured at a specific point after transport.

Treado, Colleen J.; /Massachusetts U., Amherst

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

298

Recent High Heat Flux Tests on W-Rod-Armored Mockups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the authors initial high heat flux tests on small mockups armored with W rods, done in the small electron beam facility (EBTS) at Sandia National Laboratories, the mockups exhibited excellent thermal performance. However, to reach high heat fluxes, they reduced the heated area to only a portion ({approximately}25%) of the sample. They have now begun tests in their larger electron beam facility, EB 1200, where the available power (1.2 MW) is more than enough to heat the entire surface area of the small mockups. The initial results indicate that, at a given power, the surface temperatures of rods in the EB 1200 tests is somewhat higher than was observed in the EBTS tests. Also, it appears that one mockup (PW-10) has higher surface temperatures than other mockups with similar height (10mm) W rods, and that the previously reported values of absorbed heat flux on this mockup were too high. In the tests in EB 1200 of a second mockup, PW-4, absorbed heat fluxes of {approximately}22MW/m{sup 2} were reached but the corresponding surface temperatures were somewhat higher than in EBTS. A further conclusion is that the simple 1-D model initially used in evaluating some of the results from the EBTS testing was not adequate, and 3-D thermal modeling will be needed to interpret the results.

NYGREN,RICHARD E.; YOUCHISON,DENNIS L.; MCDONALD,JIMMIE M.; LUTZ,THOMAS J.; MISZKIEL,MARK E.

2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

299

What is a flux tube? On the magnetic field topology of buoyant flux structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is a flux tube? On the magnetic field topology of buoyant flux structures Fausto Cattaneo study the topology of field lines threading buoyant magnetic flux struc- tures. The magnetic structures ­ Sun: interior ­ Sun: magnetic fields ­ Stars: spots 1 Current address: Department of Mathematics

300

Skew Fluxes in Polarized Wave Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scalar flux due to small amplitude waves that exhibit a preferred sense of rotation or polarization is shown to consist of a component. FS, that is skewed, being everywhere orthogonal to the mean scalar gradient, Q. The skew flux is ...

John F. Middleton; John W. Loder

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

METHOD AND FLUX COMPOSITION FOR TREATING URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A flux composition is described fer use with molten uranium or uranium alloys. The flux consists of about 46 weight per cent calcium fiuoride, 46 weight per cent magnesium fluoride and about 8 weight per cent of uranium tetrafiuoride.

Foote, F.

1958-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

302

PRIMARY SHIELDING CALCULATIONS ON THE IBM 650 (ROC CODES)  

SciTech Connect

Four programs written for the IBM 650 to calculate the gamma dose rates in the primary shielding of thermal reactors are described. Their functions are outlined as follows: Program 651-calculates the core attenuation coefficient and equivalent core gamma volumetric source values for a specific core. Program 652- calculates the activation gamma source data in the shield and prepares tabular data in machine storage for Programs 653 and 654. Program 653- calculates the gamma dose rates in the shield due to gammas arising from activation of shield materials. Program 654calculates the gamma dose rates in the shield due to gammas arising in the core. Gamma photo source values are obtained on the basis of two group neutron flux distributions throughout the reactor core and shield. (W.D.M.)

Rosen, S.S.; Oby, P.V.; Caton, R.L.

1958-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Simulation study of beam-beam effects in ion beams with large space charge tuneshift  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During low-energy operations with gold-gold collisions at 3.85 GeV beam energy, significant beam lifetime reductions have been observed due to the beam-beam interaction in the presence of large space charge tuneshifts. These beam-beam tuneshift parameters were about an order of magnitude smaller than during regular high energy operations. To get a better understanding of this effect, simulations have been performed. Recent results are presented.

Montag C.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

304

Remote Sounding of High Clouds. III: Monte Carlo Calculations of Multiple-Scattered Lidar Returns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monte Carlo calculations of multiple-scattered contributions to the total energy received in a lidar beam have been made for a representative cirrus ice-cloud scattering phase function. The phase function is varied arbitrarily near the back ...

C. M. R. Platt

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Calculating Energy Flux in Internal Solitary Waves with an Application to Reflectance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energetics of internal solitary waves (ISWs) in continuous, quasi-two-layer stratifications are explored using fully nonlinear, nonhydrostatic numerical simulations. The kinetic energy of an internal solitary wave is always greater than the ...

Kevin G. Lamb; Van T. Nguyen

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Very Narrow Band Model Calculations of Atmospheric Fluxes and Cooling Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new very narrow band model (VNBM) approach has been developed and incorporated into the MODTRAN atmospheric transmittance–radiance code. The VNBM includes a computational spectral resolution of 1 cm?1, a single-line Voigt equivalent width ...

L. S. Bernstein; A. Berk; P. K. Acharya; D. C. Robertson; G. P. Anderson; J. H. Chetwynd; L. M. Kimball

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The neutral beam intensity controller is based on selected magnetic defocusing of the ion beam prior to neutralization. The defocused portion of the beam is dumped onto a beam dump disposed perpendicular to the beam axis. Selective defocusing is accomplished by means of a magnetic field generator disposed about the neutralizer so that the field is transverse to the beam axis. The magnetic field intensity is varied to provide the selected partial beam defocusing of the ions prior to neutralization. The desired focused neutral beam portion passes along the beam path through a defining aperture in the beam dump, thereby controlling the desired fraction of neutral particles transmitted to a utilization device without altering the kinetic energy level of the desired neutral particle fraction. By proper selection of the magnetic field intensity, virtually zero through 100% intensity control of the neutral beam is achieved.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

308

Chirping the LCLS Electron Beam  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore scenarios for generating a linear time-correlated energy spread in the LCLS electron bunch, prior to the undulator, that is needed for optical (x-ray) pulse compression. The correlated energy spread (`chirp') is formed by generating an energy gradient along the length of the electron bunch using RF phasing and/or longitudinal wakefields of the accelerating structures. The sign of the correlation is an important limitation. Excluding a complete re-design of the compression systems, the best possibility is to use `over-compression' to effect the required energy chirp. This is easily done with only a slight strength increase (~10 %) in the chicane bends of the second compressor. In this case, the bend-plane emittance dilution associated with the increased coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the bunch compressor may, however, significantly compromise the electron beam density. The CSR calculations for the momentary extremely short (~1 m) electron bunch during over-compressio...

P. Emma

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Courses on Beam Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Physics Beam Physics The following is an incomplete listing of course available for beam physics. United States Particle Accelerator School The US Particle Accelerator School provides educational programs in the field of beams and their associated accelerator technologies not otherwise available to the community of science and technology. Joint Universities Accelerator School Each year JUAS provides a foundation course on accelerator physics and associated technologies. The US-CERN-Japan-Russia Joint Accelerator School The purpose of the US-CERN-Japan-Russia joint school is to better our relations by working together on an advanced topical course every two years, alternating between the U.S., western Europe, Japan and Russia. The last set of courses focused on the frontiers of accelerator technology in

310

1996 Beam Instrumentation Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1996 Beam Instrumentation Workshop BIW '96 logo The Advanced Photon Source (APS) Argonne National Laboratory May 6-9, 1996 Dear Colleague: It is my pleasure to invite you to the...

311

BNL | ATF Beam Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beam Schedule (pdf) Beam Schedule (pdf) Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday 22 1/2 Holiday Holiday 28 January Holiday 4 5 Maintenance 11 12 Maintenance 18 19 Holiday AE52 - DWFA (Euclid), BL2 25 February AE52 - DWFA (Euclid), BL2 1 2 AE50 - PWFA in QNR (UCLA), BL2 8 9 AE50 - PWFA in QNR (UCLA), BL2 15 16 Holiday AE50 - PWFA in QNR (UCLA), BL2 22 March 1 2 AE53 - Nonlinear Compton (UCLA) 8 9 AE53 - Nonlinear Compton (UCLA) 15 16 AE53 - Nonlinear Compton (UCLA) 22 23 29 Sunday Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday User operations (E-beam in use) Ions - Ion generation User operations (laser in use) PWFA - Plasma Wakefield Acceleration User operations (E-beam and laser in use)

312

CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure (Revised October 2009) CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure (Revised October 2009) The files in this site contain a revised (October 2009) version of the climatological mean values in 4° Latitude X 5° Longitude box areas and the distribution maps. These were originally published in: Takahashi, et al. (2009), DSR II, 56, 554-577. The data file containing annual flux data for each 4° X 5° box is located here. The data file from which this map was created, including all 12 months of data is here. This data file, in ASCII form, also contains the flux data and the intermediate values used to calculate that flux for each month. In December 2010 our colleague, R. Wanninkhof pointed out a problem with the flux data for the month of December. The file of ice coverage for December was corrupted and showed zero ice for the entire month, worldwide. This has been corrected with the estimated percent of ice and the flux recalculated. Version "c" of the data files contain this correction.

313

Intense ion beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus for producing intense megavolt ion beams are disclosed. In one embodiment, a reflex triode-type pulsed ion accelerator is described which produces ion pulses of more than 5 kiloamperes current with a peak energy of 3 MeV. In other embodiments, the device is constructed so as to focus the beam of ions for high concentration and ease of extraction, and magnetic insulation is provided to increase the efficiency of operation.

Humphries, Jr., Stanley (Ithaca, NY); Sudan, Ravindra N. (Ithaca, NY)

1977-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Toroidal midplane neutral beam armor and plasma limiter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in a tokamak fusion reactor having a midplane magnetic coil on the inner wall of an evacuated toriodal chamber within which a neutral beam heated, fusing plasma is magnetically confined, a neutral beam armor shield and plasma limiter is provided on the inner wall of the toroidal chamber to shield the midplane coil from neutral beam shine-thru and plasma deposition. The armor shield/plasma limiter forms a semicircular enclosure around the midplane coil with the outer surface of the armor shield/plasma limiter shaped to match, as closely as practical, the inner limiting magnetic flux surface of the toroidally confined, indented, bean-shaped plasma. The armor shield/plasma limiter includes a plurality of semicircular graphite plates each having a pair of coupled upper and lower sections with each plate positioned in intimate contact with an adjacent plate on each side thereof so as to form a closed, planar structure around the entire outer periphery of the circular midplane coil. The upper and lower plate sections are adapted for coupling to heat sensing thermocouples and to a circulating water conduit system for cooling the armor shield/plasma limiter.The inner center portion of each graphite plate is adapted to receive and enclose a section of a circular diagnostic magnetic flux loop so as to minimize the power from the plasma confinement chamber incident upon the flux loop.

Kugel, Henry W. (Somerset, NJ); Hand, Jr, Samuel W. (Hopewell Township, Mercer County, NJ); Ksayian, Haig (Titusville, NJ)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Small Spot, Brighter Beam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Spot, Brighter Beam Small Spot, Brighter Beam Small Spot, Brighter Beam Print Do you notice the brighter beam? During the most recent shutdown, all of the corrector magnets were replaced with sextupoles, reducing the horizontal emittance and increasing beam brightness. "This is part of ongoing improvement to keep the ALS on the cutting edge," says Alastair MacDowell, a beamline scientist on Beamline 12.2.2. The brightness has increased by a factor of about three in the storage ring. Beamlines on superbend or center-bend magnets will see the most noticeable increase in brightness, but the horizontal beam size and divergence have been substantially reduced at all beamlines. "We are starting to approach the resolution of many beamlines. Therefore, not every beamline will be able to resolve the full improvement," says Christoph Steier, project leader of the brightness upgrade. Though superbend and center-bend magnet source sizes are reduced by roughly a factor of three, "measured improvements so far range from a factor of 2-2.5," Steier says. He and MacDowell agree that the beamline optics are likely the limiting factor in resolving the full improvement at the beamlines.

316

MFE/ACT: a TRS-80 code for calculating neutron activation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MFE/ACT code, written to run on the TRS-80, can be used to calculate the neutron activation of materials used in fission and fusion reactors. Input data include the specific isotopes to be calculated, the neutron fluxes, the neutron cross sections, and the nuclear decay half-lives.

Dorn, D.W.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Wire Scanner Beam Profile Measurements: LANSCE Facility Beam Development  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is replacing Wire Scanner (WS) beam profile measurement systems. Three beam development tests have taken place to test the new wire scanners under beam conditions. These beam development tests have integrated the WS actuator, cable plant, electronics processors and associated software and have used H{sup -} beams of different beam energy and current conditions. In addition, the WS measurement-system beam tests verified actuator control systems for minimum profile bin repeatability and speed, checked for actuator backlash and positional stability, tested the replacement of simple broadband potentiometers with narrow band resolvers, and tested resolver use with National Instruments Compact Reconfigurable Input and Output (cRIO) Virtual Instrumentation. These beam tests also have verified how trans-impedance amplifiers react with various types of beam line background noise and how noise currents were not generated. This paper will describe these beam development tests and show some resulting data.

Gilpatrick, John D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batygin, Yuri K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Fermin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gruchalla, Michael E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kutac, Vincent G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martinez, Derwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sedillo, James Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pillai, Chandra [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Brian G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

On the parametrization of atmospheric muon angular flux underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analytical expression for angular integral flux of atmospheric muons in matter with the explicit relation of its parameters with those of the sea level spectrum is obtained. The fitting formula for the sea level muon spectrum at different zenith angles for spherical atmosphere is proposed. The concrete calculations for pure water are presented. Fluctuations of muon energy losses are taken into account by means of parametrized correction factor calculated using survival probabilities resulted from Monte Carlo simulations. Parametrizations of all continuous energy losses are obtained with using the most recent expressions for muon interaction cross-sections. The corresponding parametrization errors and field of method application are comprehensively discussed. The proposed formulae could be useful primarily for experimentalists processing data of arrays located deep under water or under ice.

S. I. Klimushin; E. V. Bugaev; I. A. Sokalski

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

319

Single element laser beam shaper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single lens laser beam shaper for converting laser beams from any spatial profile to a flat-top or uniform spatial profile. The laser beam shaper includes a lens having two aspheric surfaces. The beam shaper significantly simplifies the overall structure in comparison with conventional 2-element systems and therefore provides great ease in alignment and reduction of cost.

Zhang, Shukui (Yorktown, VA); Michelle D. Shinn (Newport News, VA)

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

320

Electron Beam Powder Bed Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Materials, Processes and Applications for Additive Manufacturing : Electron Beam Powder Bed Processes Program Organizers: Andrzej ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Surface Heat Flux in the East China Sea and the Yellow Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climatological monthly mean variations of the surface heat fluxes over the East China Sea and the Yellow Sea are calculated by both a data analysis and a numerical simulation. The result of the data analysis based on the empirical/bulk method ...

Naoki Hirose; Hyun-Chul Lee; Jong-Hwan Yoon

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Be7(p,gamma)B8 and the high-energy solar neutrino flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The importance of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 reaction in predicting the high-energy solar neutrino flux is discussed. I present a microscopic eight-body model and a potential model for the calculation of the Be7(p,gamma)B8 cross section.

Attila Csoto

1997-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

323

Intensity of Upward Muon Flux Due to Cosmic-Ray Neutrinos Produced in the Atmosphere  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Calculations were performed to determine the upward going muon flux leaving the earth's surface after production by cosmic-ray neutrinos in the crust. Only neutrinos produced in the earth's atmosphere are considered. Rates of the order of one per 100 sq m/day might be expected if an intermediate boson exists and has a mass less than 2 Bev. (auth)

Lee, T. D.; Robinson, H.; Schwartz, M.; Cool, R.

1963-06-00T23:59:59.000Z

324

Dynamical Collective Calculation of Supernova Neutrino Signals  

SciTech Connect

We present the first calculations with three flavors of collective and shock wave effects for neutrino propagation in core-collapse supernovae using hydrodynamical density profiles and the S matrix formalism. We explore the interplay between the neutrino-neutrino interaction and the effects of multiple resonances upon the time signal of positrons in supernova observatories. A specific signature is found for the inverted hierarchy and a large third neutrino mixing angle and we predict, in this case, a dearth of lower energy positrons in Cherenkov detectors midway through the neutrino signal and the simultaneous revelation of valuable information about the original fluxes. We show that this feature is also observable with current generation neutrino detectors at the level of several sigmas.

Gava, Jerome; Kneller, James; Volpe, Cristina; McLaughlin, G. C. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire, F-91406 Orsay cedex, CNRS/IN2P3 and University of Paris-XI (France); Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8202 (United States)

2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

325

ON THE ERUPTION OF CORONAL FLUX ROPES  

SciTech Connect

We present three-dimensional MHD simulations of the evolution of the magnetic field in the corona where the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux tube is driven at the lower boundary into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. Through a sequence of simulations in which we vary the amount of twisted flux transported into the corona before the emergence is stopped, we investigate the conditions that lead to a dynamic eruption of the resulting coronal flux rope. It is found that the critical condition for the onset of eruption is for the center of the flux rope to reach a critical height at which the corresponding potential field declines with height at a sufficiently steep rate, consistent with the onset of the torus instability of the flux rope. In some cases, immediately after the emergence is stopped, the coronal flux rope first settles into a quasi-static rise with an underlying sigmoid-shaped current layer developing. Preferential heating of field lines going through this current layer may give rise to the observed quiescent X-ray sigmoid loops before eruption. Reconnections in the current layer during the initial quasi-static stage is found to add detached flux to the coronal flux rope, allowing it to rise quasi-statically to the critical height and dynamic eruption of the flux rope then ensues. By identifying field lines whose tops are in the most intense part of the current layer during the eruption, we deduce the evolution and morphology of the post-flare X-ray loops and the flare ribbons at their footpoints.

Fan, Y. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

326

Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

Brennan, T.M.; Hammons, B.E.; Tsao, J.Y.

1990-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Reflection mass spectrometry technique for monitoring and controlling composition during molecular beam epitaxy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for on-line accurate monitoring and precise control of molecular beam epitaxial growth of Groups III-III-V or Groups III-V-V layers in an advanced semiconductor device incorporates reflection mass spectrometry. The reflection mass spectrometry is responsive to intentional perturbations in molecular fluxes incident on a substrate by accurately measuring the molecular fluxes reflected from the substrate. The reflected flux is extremely sensitive to the state of the growing surface and the measurements obtained enable control of newly forming surfaces that are dynamically changing as a result of growth.

Brennan, Thomas M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hammons, B. Eugene (Tijeras, NM); Tsao, Jeffrey Y. (Albuquerque, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

FLUX EMERGENCE IN A MAGNETIZED CONVECTION ZONE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux ropes and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code (anelastic spherical harmonics) and analyzed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The global nature of this model can only very crudely and inaccurately represent the local dynamics of the buoyant rise of the implanted magnetic structure, but nonetheless allows us to study the influence of global effects, such as self-consistently generated differential rotation and meridional circulation, and of Coriolis forces. Although motivated by the solar context, this model cannot be thought of as a realistic model of the rise of magnetic structures and their emergence in the Sun, where the local dynamics are completely different. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise are determined essentially by the flux-rope's properties and the convective flows and consequently are in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increasingly strong as the flux ropes evolve. During the buoyant rise across the convection zone, the flux-rope's magnetic field strength scales as B{proportional_to}{rho}{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} {approx}current density is observed to precede flux emergence at all longitudes. The geometry, latitude, and relative orientation of the flux ropes with respect to the background magnetic field influences the resulting rise speeds, zonal flow amplitudes (which develop within the flux ropes), and the corresponding surface signatures. This influences the morphology, duration and amplitude of the surface shearing, and the Poynting flux associated with magnetic flux-rope emergence. The emerged magnetic flux influences the system's global polarity, leading in some cases to a polarity reversal while inhibiting the background dynamo from doing so in others. The emerged magnetic flux is slowly advected poleward while being diffused and assimilated by the background dynamo field.

Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S., E-mail: rui.pinto@cea.fr [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/Irfu Universite Paris-Diderot CNRS/INSU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

329

Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

Cook, DR

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Beam Characterizations at Femtosecond Electron Beam Facility  

SciTech Connect

The SURIYA project at the Fast Neutron Research Facility (FNRF) has been established and is being commissioning to generate femtosecond (fs) electron bunches. Theses short bunches are produced by a system consisting of an S-band thermionic cathode RF-gun, an alpha magnet (a-magnet) serving as a magnetic bunch compressor, and a SLAC-type linear accelerator (linac). The characteristics of its major components and the beam characterizations as well as the preliminary experimental results will be presented and discussed in this paper.

Rimjaem, S.; Jinamoon, V.; Kangrang, M.; Kusoljariyakul, K.; Saisut, J.; Thongbai, C.; Vilaithong, T.; Rhodes, M.W.; Wichaisirimongkol, P.; /Chiang Mai U.; Wiedemann, H.; /SLAC

2006-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

331

The influence of the geomagnetic field and of the uncertainties in the primary spectrum on the development of the muon flux in the atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the sensitivity of the flux of atmospheric muons to uncertainties in the primary cosmic ray spectrum and to the treatment of the geomagnetic field in a calculation. We use the air shower simulation program AIRES to make the calculation for two different primary spectra and under several approximations to the propagation of charged particles in the geomagnetic field. The results illustrate the importance of accurate modelling of the geomagnetic field effects. We propose a high and a low fit of the proton and helium fluxes, and calculate the muon fluxes with these different inputs. Comparison with measurements of the muon flux by the CAPRICE experiment shows a slight preference for the higher primary cosmic ray flux parametrization.

P. Hansen; T. K. Gaisser; T. Stanev; S. J. Sciutto

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

332

Measurement of Beam Lifetime and Applications for SPEAR3  

SciTech Connect

Beam lifetime studies for the SPEAR3 storage ring are presented. The three lifetime components are separated with lifetime measurements under various combinations of beam currents and fill patterns and vertical scraper scans. Touschek lifetime is studied with rf voltage scans and with the horizontal or vertical scrapers inserted. The measurements are explained with calculations based on the calibrated lattice model. Quantum lifetime measurements are performed with reduced longitudinal and horizontal apertures, respectively, from which we deduce the radiation energy loss down to a few keV per revolution and the horizontal beam size.

Huang, Xiaobiao; Corbett, Jeff; /SLAC

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

333

Neutron beam imaging at neutron spectrometers at Dhruva  

SciTech Connect

A low efficiency, 2-Dimensional Position Sensitive Neutron Detector based on delay line position encoding is developed. It is designed to handle beam flux of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}/s and for monitoring intensity profiles of neutron beams. The present detector can be mounted in transmission mode, as the hardware allows maximum neutron transmission in sensitive region. Position resolution of 1.2 mm in X and Y directions, is obtained. Online monitoring of beam images and intensity profile of various neutron scattering spectrometers at Dhruva are presented. It shows better dynamic range of intensity over commercial neutron camera and is also time effective over the traditionally used photographic method.

Desai, Shraddha S.; Rao, Mala N. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

334

ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter  

SciTech Connect

The Collider-Accelerator Department at Brookhaven National Laboratory is building a high-brightness 500 mA capable Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) as one of its main R&D thrusts towards eRHIC, the polarized electron - hadron collider as an upgrade of the operating RHIC facility. The ERL is in final assembly stages, with injection commisioning starting in October 2012. The objective of this ERL is to serve as a platform for R&D into high current ERL, in particular issues of halo generation and control, Higher-Order Mode (HOM) issues, coherent emissions for the beam and high-brightness, high-power beam generation and preservation. The R&D ERL features a superconducting laser-photocathode RF gun with a high quantum efficiency photoccathode served with a load-lock cathode delivery system, a highly damped 5-cell accelerating cavity, a highly flexible single-pass loop and a comprehensive system of beam instrumentation. In this ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter article we will describe the ERL in a degree of detail that is not usually found in regular publications. We will discuss the various systems of the ERL, following the electrons from the photocathode to the beam dump, cover the control system, machine protection etc and summarize with the status of the ERL systems.

Ben-Zvi I.; Kuczewski A.; Altinbas, Z.; Beavis, D.; Belomestnykh,; Dai, J. et al

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Booster gold beam injection efficiency and beam loss  

SciTech Connect

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the BNL requires the AGS to provide gold beam with the intensity of 10{sup 9} ions per bunch. Over the years, the Tandem Van de Graaff has provided steadily increasing intensity of gold ion beams to the AGS Booster. However, the gold ion beam injection efficiency at the Booster has been found to decrease with the rising intensity of injected beams. As the result, for Tandem beams of the highest intensity, the Booster late intensity is lower than with slightly lower intensity Tandem beam. In this article, the authors present two experiments associated with the Booster injection efficiency and beam intensity. One experiment looks at the Booster injection efficiency by adjusting the Tandem beam intensity, and another looks at the beam life time while scraping the beam in the Booster. The studies suggest that the gold beam injection efficiency at the AGS Booster is related to the beam loss in the ring, rather than the intensity of injected beam or circulating beam.

Zhang, S.Y.; Ahrens, L.A.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Neutron beam characterization at the Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD) is a 250-kW TRIGA Reactor operated by Argonne National Laboratory and is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho. The reactor and its facilities regarding radiography are detailed in another paper at this conference; this paper summarizes neutron flux measurements and calculations that have been performed to better understand and potentially improve the neutronics characteristics of the reactor.

Imel, G.R.; Urbatsch, T.; Pruett, D.P.; Ross, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Crab Cavity Phase Noise Calculations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of whether or not it is reasonable to consider a conventional positron source for a Tesla formatted beam. The critical issue is that of energy deposition in the conversion...

338

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, Scott B. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Cloud Identification for ERBE Radiative Flux Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Derivation of top of atmosphere radiative fluxes requires the use of measured satellite radiances and assumptions about the anisotropy of the Earth's radiation field. The primary modification of the Earth's anisotropy is caused by variations in ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; Richard N. Green

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Computing Surface Fluxes from Mesonet Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using air–vegetation–soil layer coupled model equations as weak constraints, a variational method is developed to compute sensible and latent heat fluxes from conventional observations obtained at meteorological surface stations. This method ...

Binbin Zhou; Qin Xu

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

A low cost high flux solar simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A low cost, high flux, large area solar simulator has been designed, built and characterized for the purpose of studying optical melting and light absorption behavior of molten salts. Seven 1500 W metal halide outdoor ...

Codd, Daniel S.

342

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, S.B.

1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

343

BTRIC - Tools & Calculators - ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calculators Calculators Attic Radiant Barrier Calculator Low-Slope Roof Calculator for Commercial Buildings (6/05) - estimates annual energy cost savings Moisture Control for Low-Slope Roofing (5/04) - determine if a roof design needs a vapor retarder or if the roofing system can be modified to enhance its tolerance for small leaks Modified Zone Method Roof Savings Calculator (12/12) - for commerical and residential buildings using whole-building energy simulations Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) Calculator (6/06) Steep-Slope Roof Calculator on Residential Buildings (6/05) - estimate annual energy cost savings Whole-Wall R-Value Calculator 2.0 (10/06) ZIP-Code R-Value Recommendation Calculator (1/08) Roofs/Attics Attic Radiant Barrier Fact Sheet (Jan 2011) Cool Roofs Will Revolutionize the Building Industry Fact Sheet

344

Radiative component and combined heat transfer in the thermal calculation of finned tube banks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For more exact calculation of combined heat transfer in the case of finned tube banks (e.g., in the convective section of a furnace), the radiative heat transfer cannot be neglected. A new method for relatively simple calculation of total heat flux (convection + radiation + conduction in fins) is fully compatible with that for bare tube banks/bundles developed earlier. It is based on the method of radiative coefficients. However, the resulting value of heat flux must be corrected due to fin thickness and especially due to the fin radiative influence. For this purpose the so-called multiplicator of heat flux was introduced. The applicability of this methods has been demonstrated on a tubular fired heater convective section. A developed computer program based on the method has also been used for an analysis of the influence of selected parameters to show the share of radiation on the total heat flux.

Stehlik, P. [Technical Univ. of Brno (Czech Republic). Dept. of Process Engineering] [Technical Univ. of Brno (Czech Republic). Dept. of Process Engineering

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Beam-Based Alignment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

One: One: Single-Bunch Comparative Study of Three Algorithms Peter Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0013 17-February-1999 Abstract We describe the results of a series of simulation studies of beam-based alignment of the NLC main linacs using the program LIAR. Three algorithms for alignment of quadrupoles and girders are consid- ered: the algorithm used in the ZDR, the ZDR algorithm combined with a post-alignment MICADO operation, and an algorithm which requires no steering dipoles but requires twice as many alignment segments per linac as the ZDR algorithm. The third algorithm appears to be the most robust, based on convergence time, required quad mover step sizes, and variation in extracted beam emittance as a function of BNS profile. We also study the effect of structure BPM resolution and ATL misalignments during the alignment process. 1 Introduction Beam-based alignment and steering of the

346

Colliding Crystalline Beams  

SciTech Connect

Crystalline Beams* are an ordered state of an ensemble of ions, circulating in a storage ring, with very small velocity fluctuations. They can be obtained from ordinary warm ion beams with the application of powerful cooling techniques (stochastic, electron, laser, ...). Depending on the focussing properties and dimensions of the storage ring, and on the ion beam density, several ground states are possible. All of them can be visualized as a bundle of n{sub s} symmetrically distributed, parallel strings. The longitudinal ion separation {lambda} is the same for all strings. The minimum temperature that can be achieved depends on die background noise of the cooling technique used. It is required for stability that the vibration amplitude of the ions is only a fraction of the separation {lambda}.

Haffmans, A.F.; Maletic, D.; Ruggiero, A.G.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Intercomparison of Various Surface Latent Heat Flux Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Japanese Ocean Flux Data Sets with use of Remote Sensing Observations (J-OFURO) latent heat flux field is compared with the Hamburg Ocean–Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data (HOAPS), the Goddard Satellite-Based Surface ...

Masahisa Kubota; Atsuko Kano; Hidenori Muramatsu; Hiroyuki Tomita

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Gravity Wave 1-leat Fluxes: A Lagrangian Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of a vertically propagating, internal gravity wave on the vertical flux of potential temperature (heat) is considered by averaging the local heat flux vector over a potential temperature surface. This approach gives the wave heat flux ...

Lawrence Coy; David C. Fritts

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A computer program for HVDC converter station RF noise calculations  

SciTech Connect

HVDC converter station operations generate radio frequency (RF) electromagnetic (EM) noise which could interfere with adjacent communication and computer equipment, and carrier system operations. A generic Radio Frequency Computer Analysis Program (RAFCAP) for calculating the EM noise generated by valve ignition of a converter station has been developed as part of a larger project. The program calculates RF voltages, currents, complex power, ground level electric field strength and magnetic flux density in and around an HVDC converter station. The program requires the converter station network to be represented by frequency dependent impedance functions. Comparisons of calculated and measured values are given for an actual HVDC station to illustrate the validity of the program. RAFCAP is designed to be used by engineers for the purpose of calculating the RF noise produced by the igniting of HVDC converter valves.

Kasten, D.G.; Caldecott, R.; Sebo, S.A. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Liu, Y. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Bradley Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

RADIATION FROM COMOVING POYNTING FLUX ACCELERATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the radiation power output when electrons are accelerated by a relativistic comoving kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these analytic results with particle-in-cell simulations. We also derive analytically the critical frequency of the radiation spectrum. Potential astrophysical applications of these results are discussed. A quantitative model of gamma-ray bursts based on the breakout of kinetic Poynting flux is presented.

Liang, Edison; Noguchi, Koichi [Rice University, Houston TX 77005-1892 (United States)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

Radiation from Comoving Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the radiation power output when electrons are accelerated by a relativistic comoving kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these analytic results with Particle-In-Cell simulations. We also derive analytically the critical frequency of the radiation spectrum. Potential astrophysical applications of these results are discussed. A quantitative model of gamma-ray bursts based on the breakout of kinetic Poynting flux is presented.

Liang, Edison

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

BOOSTER GOLD BEAM INJECTION EFFICIENCY AND BEAM LOSS  

SciTech Connect

The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at the BNL requires the AGS to provide Gold beam with the intensity of 10{sup 9} ions per bunch. Over the years, the Tandem Van de Graaff has provided steadily increasing intensity of gold ion beams to the AGS Booster. However, the gold beam injection efficiency at the Booster has been found to decrease with the rising intensity of injected beams. As the result, for Tandem beams of the highest intensity, the Booster late intensity is lower than with slightly lower intensity Tandem beam. In this article, the authors present two experiments associated with the Booster injection efficiency and beam intensity. One experiment looks at the Booster injection efficiency by adjusting the Tandem beam intensity, and another looks at the beam life time while scraping the beam in the Booster. The studies suggest that the gold beam injection efficiency at the AGS Booster is related to the beam loss in the ring, rather than the intensity of injected beam or circulating beam. A close look at the effect of the lost gold ion at the Booster injection leads to the prediction that the lost gold ion creates large number of positive ions, and even larger number of electrons. The lost gold beam is also expected to create large numbers of neutral particles. In 1998 heavy ion run, the production of positive ions and electrons due to the lost gold beam has been observed. Also the high vacuum pressure due to the beam loss, presumably because of the neutral particles it created, has been measured. These results will be reported elsewhere.

ZHANG,S.Y.; AHRENS,L.A.

1998-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

353

Neutrino Beams for Scattering Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Options for Neutrino Scattering Measurements Options for Neutrino Scattering Measurements Draft Skeleton Table Beam Characteristics K2K CERN AD FNAL Debuncher FNAL Booster NuMI LE NuMI ME NuMI HE Peak E(nu) (GeV) X X ~2.5 1 3.5 7.5 13 Maximum E(nu) (GeV) (->1% peak rate) X X 8.9 3 50 50+ 50+ Nu(mu) CC Rate (per ton-year) X 1.4 0 5,000 210,000 1,100,000 2,000,000 Nubar(mu) CC Rate (per ton-year) X 3.4 ~18 (Time Separated) ~360 (Prompt) 1,000 21,000 32,000 20,000 Nu(e) CC Rate (per ton-year) X 0 0 1 2,300 9,500 12,000 Nubar(e) CC Rate (per ton-year) X 0.4 ~18 (Time Separated) 0.5 630 660 600 Flux uncertainty X X 10% 10% 20% 20% 20% QE events / 100 ton-years X 169 nubar(mu) 47 nu(mu) 17 nubar(e) 525 nubar(e) 500,000 nu(mu) 100,000 nu(mu) X X X Floor space (m**2) X X New Hall New Hall 20 x 2.5 20 x 2.5 20 x 2.5 Run Type X X Parasitic Parasitic Parasitic Parasitic Parasitic

354

PURIFICATION OF IRIDIUM BY ELECTRON BEAM MELTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purification of iridium metal by electron beam melting has been characterized for 48 impurity elements. Chemical analysis was performed by glow discharge mass spectrographic (GDMS) analysis for all elements except carbon, which was analyzed by combustion. The average levels of individual elemental impurities in the starting powder varied from 37 g/g to 0.02 g/g. The impurity elements Li, Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Pd, Ag, Cd, Sn, Sb, Te, Ba, Ce, Tl, Pb, and Bi were not detectable following the purification. No significant change in concentration of the elements Ti, V, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Re was found. The elements B, C, Al, Si, Cr, Fe, Ru, Rh, and Pt were partially removed by vaporization during electron beam melting. Langmuir's equation for ideal vaporization into a vacuum was used to calculate for each impurity element the expected ratio of impurity content after melting to that before melting. Equilibrium vapor pressures were calculated using Henry's law, with activity coefficients obtained from published data for the elements Fe, Ti, and Pt. Activity coefficients were estimated from enthalpy data for Al, Si, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Zr, Nb, Mo, and Hf and an ideal solution model was used for the remaining elements. The melt temperature was determined from measured iridium weight loss. Excellent agreement was found between measured and calculated impurity ratios for all impurity elements. The results are consistent with some localized heating of the melt pool due to rastering of the electron beam, with an average vaporization temperature of 3100 K as compared to a temperature of 2965 K calculated for uniform heating of the melt pool. The results are also consistent with ideal mixing in the melt pool.

Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Title High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Publication...

356

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Exploration Activity Details...

357

John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flux Coupling Machines and Switched Reluctance Motors to Replace Permanent Magnets in Electric Vehicles John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines and...

358

MAGNETIC FLUX DENSITY MEASURED IN FAST AND SLOW SOLAR WIND STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radial component of the heliospheric magnetic field vector is used to estimate the open magnetic flux density of the Sun. This parameter has been calculated using observations from the Ulysses mission that covered heliolatitudes from 80 Degree-Sign S to 80 Degree-Sign N, from 1990 to 2009 and distances from 1 to 5.4 AU, the Advanced Composition Explorer mission at 1 AU from 1997 to 2010, the OMNI interplanetary database from 1971, and the Helios 1 and 2 missions that covered the distance range from 0.3 to 1 AU. The flux density was found to be much affected by fluctuations in the magnetic field which make its calculated value dependent on heliospheric location, type of solar wind (fast or slow), and the level of solar activity. However, fluctuations are distributed symmetrically perpendicular to the average Parker direction. Therefore, distributions of the field vector in the two-dimensional plane defined by the radial and azimuthal directions in heliospheric coordinates provide a way to reduce the effects of the fluctuations on the measurement of the flux density. This leads to a better defined flux density parameter; the distributions modified by removing the effects of fluctuations then allow a clearer assessment of the dependence of the flux density on heliospheric location, solar wind type, and solar activity. This assessment indicates that the flux density normalized to 1 AU is independent of location and solar wind type (fast or slow). However, there is a residual dependence on solar activity which can be studied using the modified flux density measurements.

Erdos, G. [Wigner Research Centre for Physics of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Balogh, A., E-mail: erdos.geza@wigner.mta.hu [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

359

Multi-transmission-line-beam interactive system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct here a Lagrangian field formulation for a system consisting of an electron beam interacting with a slow-wave structure modeled by a possibly non-uniform multiple transmission line (MTL). In the case of a single line we recover the linear model of a traveling wave tube (TWT) due to J.R. Pierce. Since a properly chosen MTL can approximate a real waveguide structure with any desired accuracy, the proposed model can be used in particular for design optimization. Furthermore, the Lagrangian formulation provides for: (i) a clear identification of the mathematical source of amplification, (ii) exact expressions for the conserved energy and its flux distributions obtained from the Noether theorem. In the case of uniform MTLs we carry out an exhaustive analysis of eigenmodes and find sharp conditions on the parameters of the system to provide for amplifying regimes.

Alexander Figotin; Guillermo Reyes

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

360

Beam specie analyzer for intense neutral beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A three-channel neutral particle energy analyzer has been fabricated and calibrated for H/sup 0/ particles. H/sup 0/ with energies 3.5-55 keV was passed through a N/sub 2/ gas cell maintained at charge equilibrium pressures. H/sup +/ ions formed by stripping collisions were energy analyzed by a 45/sup 0/, parabolic, electrostatic analyzer and detected by three Faraday cups spaced to intercept the full-, half-, and third-energy beam components. The conversion efficiency of the analyzer system increased from 0.11 at 3.5 keV to 0.54 at 55 keV with an accuracy of +- 3%.

Barnett, C.F.; Ray, J.A.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Resistive wall heating due to image current on the beam chamber for a superconducting undulator.  

SciTech Connect

The image-current heating on the resistive beam chamber of a superconducting undulator (SCU) was calculated based on the normal and anomalous skin effects. Using the bulk resistivity of copper for the beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated for the residual resistivity ratios (RRRs) of unity at room temperature to 100 K at a cryogenic temperature as the reference. Then, using the resistivity of the specific aluminum alloy 6053-T5, which will be used for the SCU beam chamber, the heat loads were calculated. An electron beam stored in a storage ring induces an image current on the inner conducting wall, mainly within a skin depth, of the beam chamber. The image current, with opposite charge to the electron beam, travels along the chamber wall in the same direction as the electron beam. The average current in the storage ring consists of a number of bunches. When the pattern of the bunched beam is repeated according to the rf frequency, the beam current may be expressed in terms of a Fourier series. The time structure of the image current is assumed to be the same as that of the beam current. For a given resistivity of the chamber inner wall, the application ofthe normal or anomalous skin effect will depend on the harmonic numbers of the Fourier series of the beam current and the temperature of the chamber. For a round beam chamber with a ratius r, much larger than the beam size, one can assume that the image current density as well as the density square, may be uniform around the perimeter 2{pi}r. For the SCU beam chamber, which has a relatively narrow vertical gap compared to the width, the effective perimeter was estimated since the heat load should be proportional to the inverse of the perimeter.

Kim, S. H. (Accelerator Systems Division (APS))

2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

362

Electron beam dynamics for the ISIS bremsstrahlung beam generation system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An electron beam transport system was designed for use in the Bremsstrahlung Beam Generation System of the Integrated Stand-off Inspection System (ISIS). The purpose of this electron transport system was to provide for ...

Block, Robert E. (Robert Edward)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Calculating kinetics parameters and reactivity changes with continuous-energy Monte Carlo  

SciTech Connect

The iterated fission probability interpretation of the adjoint flux forms the basis for a method to perform adjoint weighting of tally scores in continuous-energy Monte Carlo k-eigenvalue calculations. Applying this approach, adjoint-weighted tallies are developed for two applications: calculating point reactor kinetics parameters and estimating changes in reactivity from perturbations. Calculations are performed in the widely-used production code, MCNP, and the results of both applications are compared with discrete ordinates calculations, experimental measurements, and other Monte Carlo calculations.

Kiedrowski, Brian C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Paul [UNIV. WISCONSIN

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Positive and Negative Ion Beam Merging System for Neutral Beam ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Semiconductor manufacturing; Low- and medium-energy ion implantation; Fusion plasma systems requiring neutral beam ...

365

Neutral particle beam intensity controller  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutral beam intensity controller is provided for a neutral beam generator in which a neutral beam is established by accelerating ions from an ion source into a gas neutralizer. An amplitude modulated, rotating magnetic field is applied to the accelerated ion beam in the gas neutralizer to defocus the resultant neutral beam in a controlled manner to achieve intensity control of the neutral beam along the beam axis at constant beam energy. The rotating magnetic field alters the orbits of ions in the gas neutralizer before they are neutralized, thereby controlling the fraction of neutral particles transmitted out of the neutralizer along the central beam axis to a fusion device or the like. The altered path or defocused neutral particles are sprayed onto an actively cooled beam dump disposed perpendicular to the neutral beam axis and having a central open for passage of the focused beam at the central axis of the beamline. Virtually zero therough 100% intensity control is achieved by varying the magnetic field strength without altering the ion source beam intensity or its species yield.

Dagenhart, William K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Generalized flux-tube solution in Abelian-projected SU(N) gauge theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The [U(1)]^{N-1} dual Ginzburg-Landau (DGL) theory as a low-energy effective theory of Abelian-projected SU(N) gauge theory is formulated in a Weyl symmetric way. The string tensions of flux-tube solutions of the DGL theory associated with color-electric charges in various representations of SU(N) are calculated analytically at the border between type-I and type-II of the dual superconducting vacuum (Bogomol'nyi limit). The resulting string tensions satisfy the flux counting rule, which reflects the non-Abelian nature of gauge theory.

Yoshiaki Koma

2002-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

367

Understanding Supernova Neutrino Physics using Low-Energy Beta-Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that fitting linear combinations of low-energy beta-beam spectra to supernova-neutrino energy-distributions reconstructs the response of a nuclear target to a supernova flux in a very accurate way. This allows one to make direct predictions about the supernova-neutrino signal in a terrestrial neutrino detector.

N. Jachowicz; G. C. McLaughlin

2005-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

368

Beam experiments towards high-intensity beams in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

Proton bunch intensities in RHIC are planned to be increased from 2 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} to 3 {center_dot} 10{sup 11} protons per bunch to increase the luminosity, together with head-on beam-beam compensation using electron lenses. To study the feasibility of the intensity increase, beam experiments are being performed. Recent experimental results are presented.

Montag C.; Ahrens, L.; Brennan, J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Drees, A.; Fischer, W.; Hayes, T.; Huang, H.; Mernick, K.; Robert-Demolaize, G.; Smith, K.; Than, R.; Thieberger, P.; Yip, K.; Zeno, K.; Zhang, S.Y.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

369

2050 Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 Calculator 0 Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: 2050 Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: United Kingdom Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Biomass, Buildings - Commercial, Buildings - Residential, Economic Development, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Multi-model Integration, Multi-sector Impact Evaluation, Solar, Wind Phase: Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Analysis Tools, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Spreadsheet, Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.gov.uk/2050-pathways-analysis Country: United Kingdom Web Application Link: 2050-calculator-tool.decc.gov.uk/pathways/1111111111111111111111111111

370

The explicit representation for the angular flux solution in the simplified P{sub N} (SP{sub N}) theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current SP{sub n} theory formulation, via either the asymptotic method or the variational method, does not provide an explicit and calculable representation for the corresponding angular flux solution. It is therefore not possible to reconstruct from the SP{sub n} solution the corresponding angular flux solution, or to extract from a reference transport solution the corresponding SP{sub n} solution. This makes it impossible to calculate the necessary surface discontinuity factors to force consistency between the SP{sub n} solution and the higher level transport solution. Without discontinuity factors, the superiority of SP{sub n} over diffusion could be significantly degraded in practical applications. In this paper we present a different SP{sub n} formulation that provides the explicit angular flux solution such that the physical picture for the SP{sub n} approximation is transparent and the SP{sub n} discontinuity factors can be calculated. (authors)

Chao, Y. A. [Apartment 101, Building 2, 788 Hong Xu Road, Shanghai 201103 (China); Yamamoto, A. [Nagoya Univ., Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

HRA Calculator v. 5.0 BETA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HRA Calculator analyzes and calculates human error probabilities in support of probabilistic risk assessments. HRA Calculator takes ...

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

372

EPRI HRA Calculator Version 5.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HRA Calculator analyzes and calculates human error probabilities in support of probabilistic risk assessments. HRA Calculator takes ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

A transport based one-dimensional perturbation code for reactivity calculations in metal systems  

SciTech Connect

A one-dimensional reactivity calculation code is developed using first order perturbation theory. The reactivity equation is based on the multi-group transport equation using the discrete ordinates method for angular dependence. In addition to the first order perturbation approximations, the reactivity code uses only the isotropic scattering data, but cross section libraries with higher order scattering data can still be used with this code. The reactivity code obtains all the flux, cross section, and geometry data from the standard interface files created by ONEDANT, a discrete ordinates transport code. Comparisons between calculated and experimental reactivities were done with the central reactivity worth data for Lady Godiva, a bare uranium metal assembly. Good agreement is found for isotopes that do not violate the assumptions in the first order approximation. In general for cases where there are large discrepancies, the discretized cross section data is not accurately representing certain resonance regions that coincide with dominant flux groups in the Godiva assembly. Comparing reactivities calculated with first order perturbation theory and a straight {Delta}k/k calculation shows agreement within 10% indicating the perturbation of the calculated fluxes is small enough for first order perturbation theory to be applicable in the modeled system. Computation time comparisons between reactivities calculated with first order perturbation theory and straight {Delta}k/k calculations indicate considerable time can be saved performing a calculation with a perturbation code particularly as the complexity of the modeled problems increase.

Wenz, T.R.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Focused ion beam direct fabrication of micro-optical elements: features compared with laser beam and electron beam direct writing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three types of focused ion beam machine: focused ion beam milling (FIB milling), focused ion beam lithography (FIB lithography), and focused ion beam direct deposition (FIB deposition), are described in detail to compare ...

Fu, Yongqi

375

Dependence of the Photon Beam Characteristics on Electron Beam Parameters in Third Generation Synchrotron Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dependence of the Photon Beam Characteristics on Electron Beam Parameters in Third Generation Synchrotron Light Sources

Ivanyan, M I; Tsakanov, V M

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Energy Flux We discuss various ways of describing energy flux and related quantities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 6 Energy Flux We discuss various ways of describing energy flux and related quantities. 6.0.1 Energy Current Density The energy current density is given by the Poynting vector S = E Ã? H (6.1) where all quantities are real. The Poynting vector gives the instantaneous lo- cal energy current density

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

377

Optical transition radiation used in the diagnostic of low energy and low current electron beams in particle accelerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical transition radiation (OTR) plays an important role in beam diagnostics for high energy particle accelerators. Its linear intensity with beam current is a great advantage as compared to fluorescent screens, which are subject to saturation. Moreover, the measurement of the angular distribution of the emitted radiation enables the determination of many beam parameters in a single observation point. However, few works deals with the application of OTR to monitor low energy beams. In this work we describe the design of an OTR based beam monitor used to measure the transverse beam charge distribution of the 1.9-MeV electron beam of the linac injector of the IFUSP microtron using a standard vision machine camera. The average beam current in pulsed operation mode is of the order of tens of nano-Amps. Low energy and low beam current make OTR observation difficult. To improve sensitivity, the beam incidence angle on the target was chosen to maximize the photon flux in the camera field-of-view. Measurements that assess OTR observation (linearity with beam current, polarization, and spectrum shape) are presented, as well as a typical 1.9-MeV electron beam charge distribution obtained from OTR. Some aspects of emittance measurement using this device are also discussed.

Silva, T. F.; Bonini, A. L.; Lima, R. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Malafronte, A. A.; Pascholati, P. R.; Vanin, V. R.; Martins, M. N. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

A Look Inside the Cash Flow Opportunity Calculator: Calculations and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Look Inside the Cash Flow Opportunity Calculator: Calculations A Look Inside the Cash Flow Opportunity Calculator: Calculations and Methodology Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

379

Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors  

SciTech Connect

Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the magnets instead of trying to oppose it. It is robust and could be particularly useful for PM generators and electric vehicle drives. Recent efforts have introduced a brushless machine that transfers a magneto-motive force (MMF) generated by a stationary excitation coil to the rotor [4]. Although a conventional PM machine may be field weakened using vector control, the air-gap flux density cannot be effectively enhanced. In Hsu's new machine, the magnetic field generated by the rotor's PM may be augmented by the field from the stationery excitation coil and channeled with flux guides to its desired destination to enhance the air-gap flux that produces torque. The magnetic field can also be weakened by reversing the current in the stationary excitation winding. A patent for advanced technology in this area is pending. Several additional RTFC methods have been discussed in open literature. These include methods of changing the number of poles by magnetizing and demagnetizing the magnets poles with pulses of current corresponding to direct-axis (d-axis) current of vector control [5,6], changing the number of stator coils [7], and controlling the air gap [8]. Test experience has shown that the magnet strengths may vary and weaken naturally as rotor temperature increases suggesting that careful control of the rotor temperature, which is no easy task, could yield another method of RTFC. The purpose of this report is to (1) examine the interaction of rotor and stator flux with regard to RTFC, (2) review and summarize the status of RTFC technology, and (3) compare and evaluate methods for RTFC with respect to maturity, advantages and limitations, deployment difficulty and relative complexity.

Otaduy, P.J.

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

380

Relativistic Poynting-Flux Jets as Transmission Lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent radio emission, polarization, and Faraday rotation maps of the radio jet of the galaxy 3C 303 have shown that one knot of this jet has a {\\it galactic}-scale electric current of $\\sim 3\\times 10^{18}$ Amp\\`ere flowing along the jet axis (Kronberg et al. 2011). We develop the theory of relativistic Poynting-flux jets which are modeled as a transmission line carrying a DC current $I_0$, having a potential drop $V_0$, and a definite impedance ${\\cal Z}_0 =90(u_z/c)\\Omega$, where $u_z$ is the bulk velocity of the jet plasma. The electromagnetic energy flow in the jet is ${\\cal Z}_0 I_0^2$. The observed current in 3C 303 can be used to calculate the electromagnetic energy flow in this magnetically dominated jet. Time-dependent but not necessarily small perturbations of a Poynting-flux jet - possibly triggered by a gas cloud penetrating the jet - are described by "telegrapher's equations," which predict the propagation speed of disturbances and the effective wave impedance ${\\cal Z}$. The disturbance of a Po...

Lovelace, R V E; Kronberg, P P

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Beam-stack search: Integrating backtracking with beam search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe a method for transforming beam search into a complete search algorithm that is guaranteed to find an optimal solution. Called beam-stack search, the algorithm uses a new data structure, called a beam stack, that makes it possible to integrate systematic backtracking with beam search. The resulting search algorithm is an anytime algorithm that finds a good, sub-optimal solution quickly, like beam search, and then backtracks and continues to find improved solutions until convergence to an optimal solution. We describe a memory-efficient implementation of beam-stack search, called divide-and-conquer beam-stack search, as well as an iterative-deepening version of the algorithm. The approach is applied to domain-independent STRIPS planning, and computational results show its advantages.

Rong Zhou; Eric A. Hansen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF A MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE ERUPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fields of the flux rope were partly opened due to magnetic reconnection. Subject headings: Sun: flares to escape with a fairly small reconnection rate in the vertical current sheet created below. Magnetic flux an interesting flux rope eruption model for fast CMEs, in which a flux rope is in a specific sling-shot field

383

Heterotic type IIA duality with fluxes - towards the complete story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the heterotic type IIA duality when fluxes are turned on. We show that many of the known fluxes are dual to each other and claim that certain fluxes on the heterotic side require that the type IIA picture is lifted to M or even F-theory compactifications with geometric fluxes.

Andrei Micu

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

384

Calibration of the Forward-scattering Spectrometer Probe: Modeling Scattering from a Multimode Laser Beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scattering calculations using a more detailed model of the multimode laser beam in the forward-scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP) were carried out by using a recently developed extension to Mie scattering theory. From this model, new ...

Edward A. Hovenac; James A. Lock

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

LIFTING BEAM DESIGN/ANALYSIS FOR THE DATA ACQUISITION AND CONTROL SYSTEM TRAILER  

SciTech Connect

This supporting document details calculations completed to properly design an adjustable lifting beam. The main use of the lifting beam is to hoist the Data Acquisition and Controls Systems (DACS) trailer over a steam line. All design work was completed using the American Institute of Steel Construction, Manual of Steel Construction (AISC, 1989) and Hanford Hoisting and Rigging Manual (WHC, 1992).

MACKEY TC; BENEGAS TR

1993-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Laser beam guard clamps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A quick insert and release laser beam guard panel clamping apparatus having a base plate mountable on an optical table, a first jaw affixed to the base plate, and a spring-loaded second jaw slidably carried by the base plate to exert a clamping force. The first and second jaws each having a face acutely angled relative to the other face to form a V-shaped, open channel mouth, which enables wedge-action jaw separation by and subsequent clamping of a laser beam guard panel inserted through the open channel mouth. Preferably, the clamping apparatus also includes a support structure having an open slot aperture which is positioned over and parallel with the open channel mouth.

Dickson, Richard K. (Stockton, CA)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

387

Application of the adjoint method in atmospheric radiative transfer calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transfer of solar radiation through a standard mid-latitude summer atmosphere including different amounts of aerosols (from clear to hazy) has been computed. The discrete-ordinates (S/sub N/) method, which has been developed to a high degree of computational efficiency and accuracy primarily for nuclear radiation shielding applications, is employed in a forward as well as adjoint mode. In the adjoint mode the result of a transfer calculation is an importance function (adjoint intensity) which allows the calculation of transmitted fluxes, or other radiative responses, for any arbitrary source distribution. The theory of the adjoint method is outlined in detail and physical interpretations are developed for the adjoint intensity. If, for example, the downward directed solar flux at ground level, F/sub lambda/ (z = 0), is desired for N different solar zenith angles, a regular (forward) radiative transfer calculation must be repeated for each solar zenith angle. In contrast, only 1 adjoint transfer calculation gives F/sub lambda/ (z = 0) for all solar zenith angles in a hazy aerosol atmosphere, for 1 wavelength interval, in 2.3 seconds on a CDC-7600 computer. A total of 155 altitude zones were employed between 0 and 70 km, and the convergence criterion for the ratio of fluxes from successive iterations was set at 2 x 10/sup -3/. Our results demonstrate not only the applicability of the highly efficient modern S/sub N/ codes, but indicate also conceptual and computational advantages when the adjoint formulation of the radiative transfer equation is used.

Gerstl, S.A.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Influence of the geomagnetic field and of the uncertainties in the primary spectrum on the development of the muon flux in the atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we study the sensitivity of the flux of atmospheric muons to uncertainties in the primary cosmic ray spectrum and to the treatment of the geomagnetic field. We use the air shower simulation program AIRES to make the calculation for two different primary spectra and under several approximations to the propagation of charged particles in the geomagnetic field. The results illustrate the importance of accurate modeling of the geomagnetic field effects. We propose a high and a low fit of the proton and helium fluxes, and calculate the muon fluxes with these different inputs. Comparison with measurements of the muon flux by the CAPRICE experiment shows a slight preference for the higher primary cosmic ray flux parametrization.

Hansen, P.; Gaisser, T.K.; Stanev, T.; Sciutto, S.J. [Bartol Research Institute, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Departamento de Fisica and IFLP/CONICET, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C. C. 67 - 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Absolute beam flux measurement at NDCX-I using gold-melting calorimetry technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1]. Here c - specific heat capacity, m - mass of heatedis determined by the Au heat capacity. During stage (2) thefor gold density and heat capacity it can be estimated that

Ni, P.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

First Beam Measurements with the LHC Synchrotron Light Monitors  

SciTech Connect

The continuous monitoring of the transverse sizes of the beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) relies on the use of synchrotron radiation and intensified video cameras. Depending on the beam energy, different synchrotron light sources must be used. A dedicated superconducting undulator has been built for low beam energies (450 GeV to 1.5 TeV), while edge and centre radiation from a beam-separation dipole magnet are used respectively for intermediate and high energies (up to 7 TeV). The emitted visible photons are collected using a retractable mirror, which sends the light into an optical system adapted for acquisition using intensified CCD cameras. This paper presents the design of the imaging system, and compares the expected light intensity with measurements and the calculated spatial resolution with a cross calibration performed with the wire scanners. Upgrades and future plans are also discussed.

Lefevre, Thibaut; /CERN; Bravin, Enrico; /CERN; Burtin, Gerard; /CERN; Guerrero, Ana; /CERN; Jeff, Adam; /CERN; Rabiller, Aurelie; /CERN; Roncarolo, Federico; /CERN; Fisher, Alan; /SLAC

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

391

Summary of working group g: beam material interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the first time, the workshop on High-Intensity and High-Brightness Hadron Beams (HB2010), held at Morschach, Switzerland and organized by the Paul Scherrer Institute, included a Working group dealing with the interaction between beam and material. Due to the high power beams of existing and future facilities, this topic is already of great relevance for such machines and is expected to become even more important in the future. While more specialized workshops related to topics of radiation damage, activation or thermo - mechanical calculations, already exist, HB2010 provided the occasion to discuss the interplay of these topics, focusing on components like targets, beam dumps and collimators, whose reliability are crucial for a user facility. In addition, a broader community of people working on a variety of issues related to the operation of accelerators could be informed and their interest sparked.

Kiselev, D; Schmidt, R

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Energy flux limitation by tame turbulence  

SciTech Connect

A quasi-linear theory of energy flux limitation by ion acoustic turbulence is presented. This distribution function is modelled by a Maxwellian plus an additional piece which carries a heat flux Q. By taking the fourth moment of the Vlasov equation one finds the anomalous thermal conductivity K approximately 3 v/sub e/ delta/sub De/ (e phi/T/sub e/)$sup -2$. Other moments treated self-consistently include anomalous ion heating, electron cooling, current generation and enhanced inverse bremsstrahlung due to the nonthermal ion fluctuations. (auth)

Manheimer, W.M.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer - a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10{sup {minus}5} to 10{sup 3} N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10`s of eV of kinetic energy in an intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer - a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10[sup [minus]5] to 10[sup 3] N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in an intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-5 1-5 Nov. 10, 2008 Nov. 11, 2008 Nov. 12, 2008 Nov. 13, 2008 Nov. 14, 2008 Nov. 15, 2008 Nov. 16, 2008 DOWN FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI BEAM LINE 7-1 Nov. 10, 2008 Nov. 11, 2008 Nov. 12, 2008 Nov. 13, 2008 Nov. 14, 2008 Nov. 15, 2008 Nov. 16, 2008 DOWN FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI

397

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-5 1-5 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 Unscheduled FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI BEAM LINE 7-1 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 Unscheduled FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI

398

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Mar. 15, 2004 Mar. 16, 2004 Mar. 17, 2004 Mar. 18, 2004 Mar. 19, 2004 Mar. 20, 2004 Mar. 21, 2004 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN BEAM LINE 1-5 Mar. 15, 2004 Mar. 16, 2004 Mar. 17, 2004 Mar. 18, 2004 Mar. 19, 2004 Mar. 20, 2004 Mar. 21, 2004 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN

399

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-1 5-1 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI BEAM LINE 5-2 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI FACI

400

Ion beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

Brown, Ian G. (1088 Woodside Rd., Berkeley, CA 94708); Galvin, James (2 Commodore #276, Emeryville, CA 94608)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Ion beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. 10 figs.

Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.

1987-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

402

Relativistic electron beam device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A design is given for an electron beam device for irradiating spherical hydrogen isotope bearing targets. The accelerator, which includes hollow cathodes facing each other, injects an anode plasma between the cathodes and produces an approximately 10 nanosecond, megajoule pulse between the anode plasma and the cathodes. Targets may be repetitively positioned within the plasma between the cathodes, and accelerator diode arrangement permits materials to survive operation in a fusion power source. (auth)

Freeman, J.R.; Poukey, J.W.; Shope, S.L.; Yonas, G.

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Stationary nonlinear Airy beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate the existence of an additional class of stationary accelerating Airy wave forms that exist in the presence of third-order (Kerr) nonlinearity and nonlinear losses. Numerical simulations and experiments, in agreement with the analytical model, highlight how these stationary solutions sustain the nonlinear evolution of Airy beams. The generic nature of the Airy solution allows extension of these results to other settings, and a variety of applications are suggested.

Lotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Matematica, Universita del'Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Faccio, D. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Matematica, Universita del'Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, I-22100 Como (Italy); School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, SUPA, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Couairon, A. [Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau (France); Papazoglou, D. G. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Materials Science and Technology Department, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Panagiotopoulos, P.; Tzortzakis, S. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Abdollahpour, D. [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas (FORTH), P.O. Box 1527, GR-71110 Heraklion (Greece); Physics Department, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Compact high-flux two-stage solar collectors based on tailored edge-ray concentrators  

SciTech Connect

The recently-invented tailored edge-ray concentrator (TERC) approach permits the design of compact two-stage high-flux solar collectors, with a focusing primary reflector and a non-imaging TERC secondary reflector. We present a new primary reflector shape based on the TERC approach and a secondary TERC tailored to its particular flux map, such that more compact concentrators emerge at flux concentration levels in excess of 90% of the thermodynamic limit. Calculations and raytrace simulation results are also offered which demonstrate that V-cone approximations to a wide variety of TERCs attain the concentration of the TERC to within a few percent. These V-cones represent practical secondary concentrators that may be superior to corresponding compound parabolic concentrator or trumpet secondaries. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Friedman, R.P. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus (Israel); Gordon, J.M. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boqer Campus (Israel)]|[Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheva (Israel); Ries, H. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

TRACKING CODE DEVELOPMENT FOR BEAM DYNAMICS OPTIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic aperture (DA) optimization with direct particle tracking is a straight forward approach when the computing power is permitted. It can have various realistic errors included and is more close than theoretical estimations. In this approach, a fast and parallel tracking code could be very helpful. In this presentation, we describe an implementation of storage ring particle tracking code TESLA for beam dynamics optimization. It supports MPI based parallel computing and is robust as DA calculation engine. This code has been used in the NSLS-II dynamics optimizations and obtained promising performance.

Yang, L.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

406

Calculation of complex DNA damage induced by ions  

SciTech Connect

This paper is devoted to the analysis of the complex damage of DNA irradiated by ions. The assessment of complex damage is important because cells in which it occurs are less likely to survive because the DNA repair mechanisms may not be sufficiently effective. We study the flux of secondary electrons through the surface of nucleosomes and calculate the radial dose and the distribution of clustered damage around the ion's path. The calculated radial dose distribution is compared to simulations. The radial distribution of the complex damage is found to be different from that of the dose. A comparison with experiments may solve the question of what is more lethal for the cell, damage complexity or absorbed energy. We suggest a way to calculate the probability of cell death based on the complexity of the damage. This work is done within the framework of the phenomenon-based multiscale approach to radiation damage by ions.

Surdutovich, Eugene [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States); Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Gallagher, David C. [Department of Physics, Oakland University, Rochester, Michigan 48309 (United States); Solov'yov, Andrey V. [Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Ruth-Moufang-Strasse 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Parallel transport of long mean-free-path plasma along open magnetic field lines: Parallel heat flux  

SciTech Connect

In a long mean-free-path plasma where temperature anisotropy can be sustained, the parallel heat flux has two components with one associated with the parallel thermal energy and the other the perpendicular thermal energy. Due to the large deviation of the distribution function from local Maxwellian in an open field line plasma with low collisionality, the conventional perturbative calculation of the parallel heat flux closure in its local or non-local form is no longer applicable. Here, a non-perturbative calculation is presented for a collisionless plasma in a two-dimensional flux expander bounded by absorbing walls. Specifically, closures of previously unfamiliar form are obtained for ions and electrons, which relate two distinct components of the species parallel heat flux to the lower order fluid moments such as density, parallel flow, parallel and perpendicular temperatures, and the field quantities such as the magnetic field strength and the electrostatic potential. The plasma source and boundary condition at the absorbing wall enter explicitly in the closure calculation. Although the closure calculation does not take into account wave-particle interactions, the results based on passing orbits from steady-state collisionless drift-kinetic equation show remarkable agreement with fully kinetic-Maxwell simulations. As an example of the physical implications of the theory, the parallel heat flux closures are found to predict a surprising observation in the kinetic-Maxwell simulation of the 2D magnetic flux expander problem, where the parallel heat flux of the parallel thermal energy flows from low to high parallel temperature region.

Guo Zehua; Tang Xianzhu [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

Flattening Filter Free vs Flattened Beams for Breast Irradiation  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Flattening filter free (FFF) beams offer the potential for a higher dose rate, shorter treatment time, and lower peripheral dose. To investigate their role in large-field treatments, this study compared flattened and FFF beams for breast irradiation. Methods and Materials: Ten left breast clinical plans comprising 2 tangential beams and a medially located 3-field simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) were replanned. Full intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), hybrid IMRT, electronic tissue compensator (ETC), and multiple static field treatment plans were created for the elective breast volume using flattened and FFF beams, in combination with a 3-field IMRT SIB. Plan quality was assessed and delivery times were measured for all plans for 1 patient. Out-of-field doses were measured using an ionization chamber for an IMRT plan optimized on a corner of simple cubic phantom for both flattened and FFF beams. Results: For each technique, mean target volume metrics (planning target volume coverage, homogeneity, conformity) were typically within 3% for flattened and FFF beams. Larger mean differences in boost conformity favoring flattened hybrid (7.2%) and full IMRT (5.5%) plans may have reflected limitations in plan normalization. Calculated heart and ipsilateral lung doses were comparable; however, both flattened and FFF low-dose phantom measurements were substantially higher than calculated values, rendering the comparison of low dose in the contralateral breast uncertain. Beam delivery times were on average 31% less for FFF. Conclusions: In general, target volume metrics for flattened and FFF plans were comparable. The planning system did not seem to allow for accurate peripheral dose evaluation. FFF was associated with a potentially shorter treatment time. All 4 IMRT techniques allowed FFF beams to generate acceptable plans for breast IMRT.

Spruijt, Kees H., E-mail: k.spruijt@vumc.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Dahele, Max; Cuijpers, Johan P.; Jeulink, Marloes; Rietveld, Derek; Slotman, Ben J.; Verbakel, Wilko F.A.R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, De Boelelaan 1117, 1081HV Amsterdam (Netherlands)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

SHORT CIRCUIT CALCULATION (TEMPORARY POWER)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and objective of this calculation is to determine the momentary and interrupting duty on the breakers, for 69kV temporary power only.

Yuri Shane

1995-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

410

FLUX SENSOR EVALUATIONS AT THE ATR CRITICAL FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the ATR Critical (ATRC) facilities lack real-time methods for detecting thermal neutron flux and fission reaction rates for irradiation capsules. Direct measurements of the actual power deposited into a test are now possible without resorting to complicated correction factors. In addition, it is possible to directly measure minor actinide fission reaction rates and to provide time-dependent monitoring of the fission reaction rate or fast/thermal flux during transient testing. A joint Idaho State University /Idaho National Laboratory ATR National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project was recently initiated to evaluate new real-time state-of-the-art in-pile flux detection sensors. Initially, the project is comparing the accuracy, response time, and long duration performance of French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)-developed miniature fission chambers, specialized self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) by the Argentinean National Energy Commission (CNEA), specially developed commercial SPNDs, and back-to-back fission (BTB) chambers developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). As discussed in this paper, specialized fixturing and software was developed by INL to facilitate these joint ISU/INL evaluations. Calculations were performed by ISU to assess the performance of and reduce uncertainties in flux detection sensors and compare data obtained from these sensors with existing integral methods employed at the ATRC. Ultimately, project results will be used to select the detector that can provide the best online regional ATRC power measurement. It is anticipated that project results may offer the potential to increase the ATRC’s current power limit and its ability to perform low-level irradiation experiments. In addition, results from this effort will provide insights about the viability of using these detectors in the ATR. Hence, this effort complements current activities to improve ATR software tools, computational protocols and in-core instrumentation under the ATR Modeling, Simulation and V&V Upgrade initiative, as well as the work to replace nuclear instrumentation under the ATR Life Extension Project (LEP) and provide support to the ATR NSUF.

Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe; David Nigg; George Imel; Jason Harris; Eric Bonebrake

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Radiation from Kinetic Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the power output and critical frequency of radiation by electrons accelerated by relativistic kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these results with Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. We find that the in-situ radiation power output and critical frequency are much below those predicted by the classical synchrotron formulae. We discuss potential astrophysical applications of these results.

Edison Liang; Koichi Noguchi

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

412

Estimation of Global Ground Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of a previously published algorithm for estimating ground heat flux (GHF) at the global scale. The method is based on an analytical solution of the diffusion equation for heat transfer in a soil layer and has been ...

William B. Bennett; Jingfeng Wang; Rafael L. Bras

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Convective Transport Theory for Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a boundary layer in free convection where turbulent thermal structures communicate information between the surface and the interior of the mixed layer, it is hypothesized that the surface momentum flux can be parameterized by u*2 = bDwBMML, ...

Roland B. Stull

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Flux Power Incorporated | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flux Power Incorporated Flux Power Incorporated Jump to: navigation, search Name Flux Power Incorporated Place Vista, California Zip 92081 Product California-based FLux Ppower was created in late-2009 to provide monitoring, diagnostics and charging technology aimed at extending the life of lithium-ion batteries. The company signed a supply deal with Wheego in January 2010. Coordinates 37.989712°, -93.665689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.989712,"lon":-93.665689,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

415

Defect-free ultrahigh flux asymmetric membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Defect-free, ultrahigh flux integrally-skinned asymmetric membranes having extremely thin surface layers (<0.2 .mu.m) comprised of glassy polymers are disclosed. The membranes are formed by casting an appropriate drope followed by forced convective evaporation of solvent to obtain a dry phase separated asymmetrical structure. The structure is then washed in a precipitation liquid and dried.

Pinnau, Ingo (Austin, TX); Koros, William J. (Austin, TX)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Erosion tests of materials by energetic particle beams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The internal components of magnetic fusion devices must withstand erosion from and high heat flux of energetic plasma particles. The selection of materials for the construction of these components is important to minimize contamination of the plasma. In order to study various materials' comparative resistance to erosion by energetic particles and their ability to withstand high heat flux, water-cooled copper swirl tubes coated or armored with various materials were subjected to bombardment by hydrogen and helium particle beams. Materials tested were graphite, titanium carbide (TiC), chromium, nickel, copper, silver, gold, and aluminum. Details of the experimental arrangement and methods of application or attachment of the materials to the copper swirl tubes are presented. Results including survivability and mass losses are discussed.

Schechter, D.E.; Becraft, W.R.; Hoffman, D.J.; Sluss, F.; Tsai, C.C.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Continental scale estimastes of the biotic carbon flux from land cover change: 1850 to 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes a Numeric Data Package (NDP) that contains annual carbon flux estimates from land cover change for nine regions of the world (i.e., North America, Europe, the Former Soviet Union, Pacific Developed Region, China, South and Central America, North Africa-Middle East, Tropical Africa, and South and Southeast Asia). Annual rates of land cover change and vegetation-soil response curves for each region and ecosystem are included in the database. The vegetation-soil curves are used in a bookkeeping carbon model to estimate the carbon flux with the atmosphere from the clearing or degradation of vegetation, cultivation of soils, decay of dead vegetation, and the recovery of abandoned lands. The model calculates the net flux of carbon in each region based on land cover change rates and vegetation-soil response curves for the period 1850 to 1980 (a few regions have WA cover records beginning in 1700 and carbon flux estimates ending in 1990). These data were collected and modeled in an attempt to reduce the uncertainty associated with the magnitude and time course of the flux of carbon from terrestrial vegetation to the atmosphere.

Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Houghton, R.A.; Hackler, J.L. [Woods Hole Research Center, MA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Beam-Beam Interaction Simulations with Guinea Pig  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 SLAC-TN-03-070 September 2003 Beam-Beam Interaction Simulations with Guinea Pig C. Sramek, T. O. Raubenheimer, A. Seryi, M. Woods, J. Yu Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford University Stanford, CA Abstract: At the interaction point of a particle accelerator, various phenomena occur that are known as beam-beam effects. Incident bunches of electrons (or positrons) experience strong electromagnetic fields from the opposing bunches, which leads to electron deflection, beamstrahlung and the creation of electron/positron pairs and hadrons due to two-photon exchange. In addition, the beams experience a "pinch effect" which focuses each beam and results in either a reduction or expansion of their vertical size. Finally, if a

419

BEAM HALO FORMATION IN HIGH-INTENSITY BEAMS.  

SciTech Connect

Studies of beam halo became unavoidable feature of high-intensity machines where uncontrolled beam loss should be kept to extremely small level. For a well controlled stable beam such a loss is typically associated with the low density halo surrounding beam core. In order to minimize uncontrolled beam loss or improve performance of an accelerator, it is very important to understand what are the sources of halo formation in a specific machine of interest. The dominant mechanisms are, in fact, different in linear accelerators, circular machines or Energy Recovering Linacs (ERL). In this paper, we summarize basic mechanisms of halo formation in high-intensity beams and discuss their application to various types of accelerators of interest, such as linacs, rings and ERL.

FEDOTOV, A.V.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

420

A low energy beam transport system for proton beam  

SciTech Connect

A low energy beam transport (LEBT) system has been built for a compact pulsed hadron source (CPHS) at Tsinghua University in China. The LEBT, consisting of two solenoids and three short-drift sections, transports a pulsed proton beam of 60 mA of energy of 50 keV to the entrance of a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ). Measurement has shown a normalized RMS beam emittance less than 0.2 {pi} mm mrad at the end of the LEBT. Beam simulations were carried out to compare with the measurement and are in good agreement. Based on the successful CPHS LEBT development, a new LEBT for a China ADS projector has been designed. The features of the new design, including a beam chopper and beam simulations of the LEBT are presented and discussed along with CPHS LEBT development in this article.

Yang, Y. [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Zhang, Z. M.; Wu, Q.; Zhang, W. H.; Ma, H. Y.; Sun, L. T.; Zhang, X. Z.; Liu, Z. W.; He, Y.; Zhao, H. W.; Xie, D. Z. [Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Production of fullerenes using concentrated solar flux  

SciTech Connect

A method of producing soot containing high amounts of fullerenes comprising: providing a primary concentrator capable of impingement of a concentrated beam of sunlight onto a carbon source to cause vaporization of carbon and subsequent formation of fullerenes, or providing a solar furnace having a primary concentrator with a focal point that concentrates a solar beam of sunlight; providing a reflective secondary concentrator having an entrance aperture and an exit aperture at the focal point of the solar furnace; providing a carbon source at the exit aperture of the secondary concentrator; supplying an inert gas over the carbon source to keep the secondary concentrator free from vaporized carbon; and impinging a concentrated beam of sunlight from the secondary concentrator on the carbon source to vaporize the carbon source into a soot containing high amounts of fullerenes.

Fields, Clark L. (Greeley, CO); Pitts, John Roland (Lakewood, CO); King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Hale, Mary Jane (Golden, CO); Bingham, Carl E. (Denver, CO); Lewandowski, Allan A. (Evergreen, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

NUCLEAR CALCULATIONS FOR THE PNPF  

SciTech Connect

The reactivity of the Piqua Nuclear Power Facility (PNPF) was calculated at various loadings using a oneregion (with reflector savings), four-group diffusion equation. These calculations were checked with a two-region, four- group FOG calculation. The thermal group constants were obtained with the TEMPEST II-S/sub 4/ procedure, the fast group constants with FORM. The U/sup 238/ resonance integral was adjusted to make the calculations for the critical assembly fit the measurements and the adjusted parameter was used for the PNPF calculations. The minimum critical loading at 360 deg F was calculated to be 20.4 elements, with and excess reactivity of 0.22% (31 cents) for the minimum critical loading of 21 elements. The excess reactivity wss calculated for core loadings of 19, 37, 61, and 85 elements, which result as the outer rings of element positions are filled consecutively. The isothermal temperature coefficient of reactivity was estimated for several core loadings by using the calculated reactivities at 325 deg F and 585 deg F. The values of the coefficient for 21- and 61-element loadings are --4.6 and --4.9 x 10/sup -5/ delta k/ deg F, respectively. The largest coefficient is --5.0 x 10/sup -6/ delta k/ deg F at a loading of 38 elements. The kinetics parameters 1 and BETA /sub eff/ were calculated using the PERT program. The lifetime is 5.23 x 10/sup -5/ seconds at 325 deg F and 5.67 x 10/sup -6/ at 585 deg F. Beta effective ranged from 0.00689 for and 85-element loading at 325 deg F to 0.00728 for a 19-element loading at 585 deg F. A value of 0.0070 was chosen for kinetics calculations. (auth)

Mountford, L.A.; Hume, J.R.

1963-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

423

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) cold source project at ORNL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following the decision to cancel the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), it was determined that a hydrogen cold source should be retrofitted into an existing beam tube of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL> The preliminary design of this system has been completed and an approval in principal of the design has been obtained from the internal ORNL safety review committees and the US Department of Energy (DOE) safety review committee. The cold source concept is basically a closed loop forced flow supercritical hydrogen system. The supercritical approach was chosen because of its enhanced stability in the proposed high heat flux regions. Neutron and gamma physics of the moderator have been analyzed using the 3D Monte Carlo code MCNP. A 3D structural analysis model of the moderator vessel, vacuum tube, and beam tube was completed to evaluate stress loadings and to examine the impact of hydrogen detonations in the beam tube. A detailed ATHENA system model of the hydrogen system has been developed to simulate loop performance under normal and off-normal transient conditions. Semi-prototypic hydrogen loop tests of the system have been performed at the Arnold Engineering Design Center (AEDC) located in Tullahoma, Tennessee to verify the design and benchmark the analytical system model. A 3.5 kW refrigerator system has been ordered and is expected to be delivered to ORNL by the end of this calendar year. The present schedule shows the assembling of the cold source loop on side during the fall of 1999 for final testing before insertion of the moderator plug assembly into the reactor beam tube during the end of the year 2000.

Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Chang, S.J.; Freels, J.D.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 Mar. 15, 2004 Mar. 16, 2004 Mar. 17, 2004 Mar. 18, 2004 Mar. 19, 2004 Mar. 20, 2004 Mar. 21, 2004 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN BEAM LINE 9-1 Mar. 15, 2004 Mar. 16, 2004 Mar. 17, 2004 Mar. 18, 2004 Mar. 19, 2004 Mar. 20, 2004 Mar. 21, 2004 Unscheduled CHANGE/8837 A.COHE 8837 A.COHEN 8837 A.COHEN 8837 A.COHEN 8837 A.COHEN 8837 A.COHEN

425

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-4 1-4 Oct. 30, 2006 Oct. 31, 2006 Nov. 01, 2006 Nov. 02, 2006 Nov. 03, 2006 Nov. 04, 2006 Nov. 05, 2006 DOWN Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled Unscheduled BEAM LINE 2-1 Oct. 30, 2006 Oct. 31, 2006 Nov. 01, 2006 Nov. 02, 2006 Nov. 03, 2006 Nov. 04, 2006 Nov. 05, 2006 DOWN 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON

426

Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam  

SciTech Connect

Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

High-flux neutron source based on a liquid-lithium target  

SciTech Connect

A prototype compact Liquid Lithium Target (LiLiT), able to constitute an accelerator-based intense neutron source, was built. The neutron source is intended for nuclear astrophysical research, boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in hospitals and material studies for fusion reactors. The LiLiT setup is presently being commissioned at Soreq Nuclear research Center (SNRC). The lithium target will produce neutrons through the {sup 7}Li(p,n){sup 7}Be reaction and it will overcome the major problem of removing the thermal power generated by a high-intensity proton beam, necessary for intense neutron flux for the above applications. The liquid-lithium loop of LiLiT is designed to generate a stable lithium jet at high velocity on a concave supporting wall with free surface toward the incident proton beam (up to 10 kW). During off-line tests, liquid lithium was flown through the loop and generated a stable jet at velocity higher than 5 m/s on the concave supporting wall. The target is now under extensive test program using a high-power electron-gun. Up to 2 kW electron beam was applied on the lithium flow at velocity of 4 m/s without any flow instabilities or excessive evaporation. High-intensity proton beam irradiation will take place at SARAF (Soreq Applied Research Accelerator Facility) superconducting linear accelerator currently in commissioning at SNRC.

Halfon, S. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Feinberg, G. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel) and Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Paul, M. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, 91904 (Israel); Arenshtam, A.; Berkovits, D.; Kijel, D.; Nagler, A.; Eliyahu, I.; Silverman, I. [Soreq NRC, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

428

Surface Heat Flux Variations across the Kuroshio Extension as Observed by Surface Flux Buoys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wintertime sea surface heat flux variability across the Kuroshio Extension (KE) front is analyzed using data from the Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) buoy in the Kuroshio recirculation gyre south of the KE front and from the Japan Agency for ...

Masanori Konda; Hiroshi Ichikawa; Hiroyuki Tomita; Meghan F. Cronin

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Turbulent Fluxes in the Hurricane Boundary Layer. Part II: Latent Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the recent ONR-sponsored Coupled Boundary Layer Air–Sea Transfer (CBLAST) Departmental Research Initiative, an aircraft was instrumented to carry out direct turbulent flux measurements in the high wind boundary layer of a hurricane. ...

William M. Drennan; Jun A. Zhang; Jeffrey R. French; Cyril McCormick; Peter G. Black

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on the critical heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic experimental and analytic investigation of the effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on critical heat rilux was performed with water in the quality condition. Utilizing a model which ascribes the ...

Todreas, Neil E.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Detailed Burnup Calculations for Testing Nuclear Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A general method (MCQ) has been developed by introducing a microscopic burnup scheme that uses the Monte Carlo calculated fluxes and microscopic reaction rates of a complex system and a depletion code for burnup calculations as a basis for solving nuclide material balance equations for each spatial region in which the system is divided. Continuous energy-dependent cross-section libraries and full 3D geometry of the system can be input for the calculations. The resulting predictions for the system at successive burnup time steps are thus based on a calculation route where both geometry and cross sections are accurately represented, without geometry simplifications and with continuous energy data, providing an independent approach for benchmarking other methods and nuclear data of actinides, fission products, and other burnable absorbers. The main advantage of this method over the classical deterministic methods currently used is that the MCQ System is a direct 3D method without the limitations and errors introduced on the homogenization of geometry and condensation of energy of deterministic methods. The Monte Carlo and burnup codes adopted until now are the widely used MCNP and ORIGEN codes, but other codes can be used also. For using this method, there is need of a well-known set of nuclear data for isotopes involved in burnup chains, including burnable poisons, fission products, and actinides. For fixing the data to be included in this set, a study of the present status of nuclear data is performed, as part of the development of the MCQ method. This study begins with a review of the available cross-section data of isotopes involved in burnup chains for power and research nuclear reactors. The main data needs for burnup calculations are neutron cross sections, decay constants, branching ratios, fission energy, and yields. The present work includes results of selected experimental benchmarks and conclusions about the sensitivity of different sets of cross-section data for burnup calculations, using some of the main available evaluated nuclear data files (ENDF-B-VI-Rel.8, JEFF-3.0, JENDL-3.3), on an isotope-by-isotope basis as much as possible. The selected experimental burnup benchmarks are reference cases for LWR and HWR reactors, with analysis of isotopic composition as a function of burnup. For LWR (H2O-moderated uranium oxide lattices) four benchmarks are included: ATM-104 NEA Burnup credit criticality benchmark; Yankee-Rowe Core V; H.B.Robinson Unit 2 and Turkey Point Unit 3. For HWR (D2O-moderated uranium oxide cluster lattices), three benchmarks were selected: NPD-19-rod Fuel Clusters; Pickering-28-rod Fuel Clusters; and Bruce-37-rod Fuel Clusters. The isotopes with experimental concentration data included in these benchmarks are: Se-79, Sr90, Tc99, Ru106, Sn126, Sb125,1129, Cs133-137, Nd143, 145, Sm149-150, 152, Eul53-155, U234-235, 238, Np237, Pu238-242, Am241-243, and Cm242-248. Results and analysis of differences between calculated and measured absolute and/or relative concentrations of these isotopes for the seven benchmarks are included in this work.

Leszczynski, F. [Centro Atomico Bariloche (CNEA), 8400 S.C.de Bariloche (Argentina)

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

432

Bayesian hierarchical models for soil CO{sub 2} flux and leak detection at geologic sequestration sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper characterizations of background soil CO{sub 2} respiration rates are critical for interpreting CO{sub 2} leakage monitoring results at geologic sequestration sites. In this paper, a method is developed for determining temperature-dependent critical values of soil CO{sub 2} flux for preliminary leak detection inference. The method is illustrated using surface CO{sub 2} flux measurements obtained from the AmeriFlux network fit with alternative models for the soil CO{sub 2} flux versus soil temperature relationship. The models are fit first to determine pooled parameter estimates across the sites, then using a Bayesian hierarchical method to obtain both global and site-specific parameter estimates. Model comparisons are made using the deviance information criterion (DIC), which considers both goodness of fit and model complexity. The hierarchical models consistently outperform the corresponding pooled models, demonstrating the need for site-specific data and estimates when determining relationships for background soil respiration. A hierarchical model that relates the square root of the CO{sub 2} flux to a quadratic function of soil temperature is found to provide the best fit for the AmeriFlux sites among the models tested. This model also yields effective prediction intervals, consistent with the upper envelope of the flux data across the modeled sites and temperature ranges. Calculation of upper prediction intervals using the proposed method can provide a basis for setting critical values in CO{sub 2} leak detection monitoring at sequestration sites.

Yang, Ya-Mei; Small, Mitchell J.; Junker, Brian; Bromhal, Grant S.; Strazisar, Brian; Wells, Arthur

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Energy distribution measurement of narrow-band ultrashort x-ray beams via K-edge filters subtraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterization of novel x-ray sources includes the measurement of the photon flux and the energy distribution of the produced beam. The aim of BEATS2 experiment at the SPARC-LAB facility of the INFN National Laboratories of Frascati (Rome, Italy) is to investigate possible medical applications of an x-ray source based on Thomson relativistic back-scattering. This source is expected to produce a pulsed quasi-monochromatic x-ray beam with an instantaneous flux of 10{sup 20} ph/s in pulses 10 ps long and with an average energy of about 20 keV. A direct measurement of energy distribution of this beam is very difficult with traditional detectors because of the extremely high photon flux. In this paper, we present a method for the evaluation of the energy distribution of quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams based on beam filtration with K-edge absorbing foils in the energy range of interest (16-22 keV). The technique was tested measuring the energy distribution of an x-ray beam having a spectrum similar to the expected one (SPARC-LAB Thomson source) by using a tungsten anode x-ray tube properly filtered and powered. The energy distribution obtained has been compared with the one measured with a HPGe detector showing very good agreement.

Cardarelli, Paolo; Di Domenico, Giovanni; Marziani, Michele; Mucollari, Irena; Pupillo, Gaia; Sisini, Francesco; Taibi, Angelo; Gambaccini, Mauro [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara and INFN - Ferrara, via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Magnetically operated beam dump for dumping high power beams in a neutral beamline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of this invention to provide a beam dump system for a neutral beam generator which lowers the time-averaged power density of the beam dump impingement surface. Another object of this invention is to provide a beam dump system for a neutral particle beam based on reionization and subsequent magnetic beam position modulation of the beam onto a beam dump surface to lower the time-averaged power density of the beam dump ion impingement surface.

Dagenhart, W.K.

1984-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

435

LANL: Ion Beam Materials Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Ion Beam Materials Laboratory (IBML) is a Los Alamos National Laboratory resource devoted to materi- als research through the use of ion beams. Current major research areas include surface characterization through ion beam analysis techniques, surface modification and materials synthesis through ion implantation technology, and radiation damage stud- ies in gases, liquids, and solids. The laboratory's core is a 3.2 MV tandem ion accelerator and a 200 kV ion implanter together with several beam lines. Attached to each beam line is a series of experimental stations that support various research programs. The operation of IBML and its interactions with users are organized around core facilities and experimental stations. The IBML provides and operates the core facilities as well as supports

436

Beam-line cryopump  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A cryopumping module using metallic surfaces at liquid helium temperature for condensation of hydrogen and deuterium gas has been constructed. This pump, a prototype of four units which will provide pumping for the Livermore 200 kV test stand, will be used to verify the concept and establish engineering parameters. Upon completion of engineering tests and evaluation the pump will be installed in an operating beam line. The design point pumping capacity is 80,000 liters per second for hydrogen and deuterium at 10$sup -4$ torr based on sticking coefficients of 0.15 and 0.25, respectively. Both the liquid helium temperature pumping surface and the liquid nitrogen temperature radiation shields are constructed of quilted double wall cylindrical shells. The pumping shell dimensions are 1.5 meters dia. x 0.6 meters long. Cryogen circulation is convection current driven in both cases. Liquid helium is supplied from an overhead Dewar through bayonet coupling. In the 200 kV beam line, pumping modules will be supplied via transfer lines from a central Dewar. Voltage standoff will be accomplished in the transfer lines. (auth)

Duffy, T.J.; Oddon, L.D.

1975-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

437

Atmospheric Muon Flux at Sea Level, Underground, and Underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vertical sea-level muon spectrum at energies above 1 GeV and the underground/underwater muon intensities at depths up to 18 km w.e. are calculated. The results are particularly collated with a great body of the ground-level, underground, and underwater muon data. In the hadron-cascade calculations, the growth with energy of inelastic cross sections and pion, kaon, and nucleon generation in pion-nucleus collisions are taken into account. For evaluating the prompt muon contribution to the muon flux, we apply two phenomenological approaches to the charm production problem: the recombination quark-parton model and the quark-gluon string model. To solve the muon transport equation at large depths of homogeneous medium, a semi-analytical method is used. The simple fitting formulas describing our numerical results are given. Our analysis shows that, at depths up to 6-7 km w. e., essentially all underground data on the muon intensity correlate with each other and with predicted depth-intensity relation for conventional muons to within 10%. However, the high-energy sea-level data as well as the data at large depths are contradictory and cannot be quantitatively decribed by a single nuclear-cascade model.

E. V. Bugaev; A. Misaki; V. A. Naumov; T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky; N. Takahashi

1998-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

438

Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of designing a village electric power system, the present and future electric loads must be defined, including both seasonal and daily usage patterns. However, in many cases, detailed electric load information is not readily available. NREL developed the Alaska Village Electric Load Calculator to help estimate the electricity requirements in a village given basic information about the types of facilities located within the community. The purpose of this report is to explain how the load calculator was developed and to provide instructions on its use so that organizations can then use this model to calculate expected electrical energy usage.

Devine, M.; Baring-Gould, E. I.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Study of the Neutron Flux and Dpa Attenuation in the Reactor Pressure-Vessel Wall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of the neutron flux and dpa attenuation in the reactor pressure vessel (PV) wall presented in this work was performed with state-of-the art methods currently used to determine PV fluxes, the BUGLE-96 cross-section library, and the iron displacement cross sections derived from ENDF/B-VI data. The calculations showed that the RG 1.99, Rev. 2, extrapolation formula predicts slower--and therefore conservative--attenuation of the neutron flux (E > 1MeV) in the PV wall. More importantly, the calculations gave slower attenuation of the dpa rate in the PV wall than the attenuation predicted by the formula. The slower dpa rate attenuation was observed for all the cases considered, which included two different PWRs, and several configurations obtained by varying the PV wall thickness and thermal shield thickness. For example, for a PV wall thickness of {approximately}24 cm, the calculated ratio of the dpa rate at 1/4 and 3/4 of the PV wall thickness to the dpa value on the inner PV surface is {approximately}14% and 19% higher, respectively, than predicted by the RG 1.99, Rev. 2, formula.

Remec, I.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Beam emittance measurements at Fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We give short overview of various beam emittance measurement methods, currently applied at different machine locations for the Run II collider physics program at Fermilab. All these methods are based on beam profile measurements, and we give some examples of the related instrumentation techniques. At the end we introduce a multi-megawatt proton source project, currently under investigation at Fermilab, with respect to the beam instrumentation challenges.

Wendt, Manfred; Eddy, Nathan; Hu, Martin; Scarpine, Victor; Syphers, Mike; Tassotto, Gianni; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yang, Ming-Jen; Zagel, James; /Fermilab

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Broad-band beam buncher  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A broad-band beam buncher is disclosed, comprising an evacuated housing, an electron gun therein for producing an electron beam, a buncher cavity having entrance and exit openings through which the beam is directed, grids across such openings, a source providing a positive DC voltage between the cavity and the electron gun, a drift tube through which the electron beam travels in passing through such cavity, grids across the ends of such drift tube, gaps being provided between the drift tube grids and the entrance and exit grids, a modulator for supplying an ultrahigh frequency modulating signal to the drift tube for producing velocity modulation of the electrons in the beam, a drift space in the housing through which the velocity modulated electron beam travels and in which the beam is bunched, and a discharge opening from such drift tube and having a grid across such opening through which the bunched electron beam is discharged into an accelerator or the like. The buncher cavity and the drift tube may be arranged to constitute an extension of a coaxial transmission line which is employed to deliver the modulating signal from a signal source. The extended transmission line may be terminated in its characteristic impedance to afford a broad-band response and the device as a whole designed to effect broad-band beam coupling, so as to minimize variations of the output across the response band.

Goldberg, David A. (Walnut Creek, CA); Flood, William S. (Berkeley, CA); Arthur, Allan A. (Martinez, CA); Voelker, Ferdinand (Orinda, CA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Electron Beam Melting (EBM) II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... Additive Manufacturing of Metals: Electron Beam Melting (EBM) II Sponsored by: MS&T Organization Program Organizers: Ian D. Harris, EWI; ...

443

Surface fluxes important to cloud development  

SciTech Connect

To address some of the issues in scaling and averaging of measurements, collaborative field campaigns were conducted in June 1991 and 1992 by the DOE laboratories funded under the ARM program. We selected a site in Boardman, OR, with two distinct regions where the sensible and latent heat fluxes would differ sharply and where each region was sufficiently extensive for full development of boundary layers and for utilizing aircraft-mounted instrument systems (Barnes et al. 1992, Doran et al. 1992). Measurements were clustered along a 16-km transect across adjoining irrigated farmland and semi-arid rangeland regions that allowed the collaborating teams to conduct a variety of studies relating to overall goals. The Los Alamos team efforts were focused on assessing the effects of different surface characteristics on fluxes of heat and water vapor.

Barnes, F.J.; Porch, W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kunkel, K.E. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Surface fluxes important to cloud development  

SciTech Connect

To address some of the issues in scaling and averaging of measurements, collaborative field campaigns were conducted in June 1991 and 1992 by the DOE laboratories funded under the ARM program. We selected a site in Boardman, OR, with two distinct regions where the sensible and latent heat fluxes would differ sharply and where each region was sufficiently extensive for full development of boundary layers and for utilizing aircraft-mounted instrument systems (Barnes et al. 1992, Doran et al. 1992). Measurements were clustered along a 16-km transect across adjoining irrigated farmland and semi-arid rangeland regions that allowed the collaborating teams to conduct a variety of studies relating to overall goals. The Los Alamos team efforts were focused on assessing the effects of different surface characteristics on fluxes of heat and water vapor.

Barnes, F.J.; Porch, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Kunkel, K.E. (Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

MAGNETIC FLUX CONSERVATION IN THE HELIOSHEATH  

SciTech Connect

Voyager 1(V1) and Voyager 2(V2) have observed heliosheath plasma since 2005 December and 2007 August, respectively. The observed speed profiles are very different at the two spacecrafts. Speeds at V1 decreased to zero in 2010 while the average speed at V2 is a constant 150 km s{sup -1} with the direction rotating tailward. The magnetic flux is expected to be constant in these heliosheath flows. We show that the flux is constant at V2 but decreases by an order of magnitude at V1, even after accounting for divergence of the flows and changes in the solar field. If reconnection were responsible for this decrease, the magnetic field would lose 70% of its free energy to reconnection and the energy density released would be 0.6 eV cm{sup -3}.

Richardson, J. D. [Kavli Center for Astrophysics and Space Science Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Burlaga, L. F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Decker, R. B. [Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Drake, J. F. [Department of Physics and Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Ness, N. F. [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Opher, M., E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu, E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net, E-mail: robert.decker@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: drake@umd.edu, E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com, E-mail: mopher@bu.edu [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

On Rayleigh Optical Depth Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many different techniques are used for the calculation of Rayleigh optical depth in the atmosphere. In some cases differences among these techniques can be important, especially in the UV region of the spectrum and under clean atmospheric ...

Barry A. Bodhaine; Norman B. Wood; Ellsworth G. Dutton; James R. Slusser

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

E. -I. Esch; T. J. Bowles; A. Hime; A. Pichlmaier; R. Reifarth; H. Wollnik

2004-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

448

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to ?vert = (3.10 +0.05 ?0.07) 10?7 s ?1 cm ?2 sr ?1.

E. -i. Esch A; T. J. Bowles A; A. Hime A; A. Pichlmaier A; R. Reifarth A; H. Wollnik B

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

Esch, E I; Hime, A; Pichlmaier, A; Reifarth, R; Wollnik, H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A thermal analysis model for high power density beam stops  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is presently designing and building the 2.5 MeV injector for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The design includes various beam intercepting devices such as beam stops and slits. The target power densities can be as high as 500 kW/cm{sup 2} with a beam stopping range of 25 to 30 microns, producing stresses well above yield in most materials. In order to analyze the induced temperatures and stresses, a finite element model has been developed. The model has been written parametrically to allow the beam characteristics, target material, dimensions, angle of incidence and mesh densities to be easily adjusted. The heat load is applied to the model through the use of a 3-dimensional table containing the calculated volumetric heat rates. The load is based on a bi-gaussian beam shape which is absorbed by the target according to a Bragg peak distribution. The results of several analyses using the SNS Front End beam are presented.

Virostek, S.; Oshatz, D.; Staples, J.

2001-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

451

Accelerators, Beams And Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators And Beams  

SciTech Connect

Accelerator science and technology have evolved as accelerators became larger and important to a broad range of science. Physical Review Special Topics - Accelerators and Beams was established to serve the accelerator community as a timely, widely circulated, international journal covering the full breadth of accelerators and beams. The history of the journal and the innovations associated with it are reviewed.

Siemann, R.H.; /SLAC

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

452

NEUTRAL-BEAM INJECTION  

SciTech Connect

The emphasis in the preceding chapters has been on magnetic confinement of high temperature plasmas. The question of production and heating of such plasmas has been dealt with relatively more briefly. It should not be inferred, however, that these matters must therefore be either trivial or unimportant. A review of the history reveals that in the early days all these aspects of the controlled fusion problem were considered to be on a par, and were tackled simultaneously and with equal vigor. Only the confinement problem turned out to be much more complex than initially anticipated, and richer in challenge to the plasma physicist than the questions of plasma production and heating. On the other hand, the properties of high-temperature plasmas and plasma confinement can only be studied experimentally after the problems of production and of heating to adequate temperatures are solved. It is the purpose of this and the next chapter to supplement the preceding discussions with more detail on two important subjects: neutral-beam injection and radio-frequency heating. These are the major contenders for heating in present and future tokamak and mirror fusion experiments, and even in several proposed reactors. For neutral beams we emphasize here the technology involved, which has undergone a rather remarkable development. The physics of particle and energy deposition in the plasma, and the discussion of the resulting effects on the confined plasma, have been included in previous chapters, and some experimental results are quoted there. Other heating processes of relevance to fusion are mentioned elsewhere in this book, in connection with the experiments where they are used: i.e. ohmic heating, adiabatic compression heating, and alpha-particle heating in Chapter 3 by H.P. Furth; more ohmic heating in Chapter 7, and shock-implosion heating, laser heating, and relativistic-electron beam heating in Chapter 8, both by W. E. Quinn. These methods are relatively straightforward in their physics and their technology, or in any case they are considered to be adequately covered by these other authors.

Kunkel, W.B.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Heavy Oil Upgrading from Electron Beam (E-Beam) Irradiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Society's growing demands for energy results in rapid increase in oil consumption and motivates us to make unconventional resources conventional resources. There are enormous amounts of heavy oil reserves in the world but the lack of cost effective technologies either for extraction, transportation, or refinery upgrading hinders the development of heavy oil reserves. One of the critical problems with heavy oil and bitumen is that they require large amounts of thermal energy and expensive catalysts to upgrade. This thesis demonstrates that electron beam (E-Beam) heavy oil upgrading, which uses unique features of E-Beam irradiation, may be used to improve conventional heavy oil upgrading. E-Beam processing lowers the thermal energy requirements and could sharply reduce the investment in catalysts. The design of the facilities can be simpler and will contribute to lowering the costs of transporting and processing heavy oil and bitumen. E-Beam technology uses the high kinetic energy of fast electrons, which not only transfer their energy but also interact with hydrocarbons to break the heavy molecules with lower thermal energy. In this work, we conducted three major stages to evaluate the applicability of E-Beam for heavy oil upgrading. First, we conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the effects of E-Beam on hydrocarbons. To do so, we used a Van de Graff accelerator, which generates the high kinetic energy of electrons, and a laboratory scale apparatus to investigate extensively how radiation effects hydrocarbons. Second, we studied the energy transfer mechanism of E-Beam upgrading to optimize the process. Third, we conducted a preliminary economic analysis based on energy consumption and compared the economics of E-Beam upgrading with conventional upgrading. The results of our study are very encouraging. From the experiments we found that E-Beam effect on hydrocarbon is significant. We used less thermal energy for distillation of n-hexadecane (n-C16) and naphtha with E-Beam. The results of experiments with asphaltene indicate that E-Beam enhances the decomposition of heavy hydrocarbon molecules and improves the quality of upgraded hydrocarbon. From the study of energy transfer mechanism, we estimated heat loss, fluid movement, and radiation energy distribution during the reaction. The results of our economic evaluation show that E-Beam upgrading appears to be economically feasible in petroleum industry applications. These results indicate significant potential for the application of E-Beam technology throughout the petroleum industry, particularly near production facilities, transportation pipelines, and refining industry.

Yang, Daegil

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

A Comparison Between Calculated and Measured SHGC For Complex Fenestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison Between Calculated and Measured SHGC For Complex Fenestration Comparison Between Calculated and Measured SHGC For Complex Fenestration Systems Title A Comparison Between Calculated and Measured SHGC For Complex Fenestration Systems Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBL-37037 Year of Publication 1995 Authors Klems, Joseph H., Jeffrey L. Warner, and Guy O. Kelley Conference Name ASHRAE Transactions Volume 102, Part 1 Date Published 02/1996 Conference Location Atlanta, GA Call Number LBL-37037 Abstract Calorimetric measurements of the dynamic net heat flow through a complex fenestration system consisting of a buff venetian blind inside clear double glazing are used to derive the direction-dependent beam SHGC of the fenestration. These measurements are compared with calculations according to a proposed general method for deriving complex fenestration system SHGCs from bidirectional layer optical properties and generic calorimetric properties. Previously published optical measurements of the same venetian blind and generic inward-flowing fraction measurements are used in the calculation. The authors find satisfactory agreement between the SHGC measurements and the calculation.

455

Tuning the beam: a physics perspective on beam diagnostic instrumentation  

SciTech Connect

In a nutshell, the role of a beam diagnostic measurement is to provide information needed to get a particle beam from Point A (injection point) to Point B (a target) in a useable condition, with 'useable' meaning the right energy and size and with acceptable losses. Specifications and performance requirements of diagnostics are based on the physics of the particle beam to be measured, with typical customers of beam parameter measurements being the accelerator operators and accelerator physicists. This tutorial will be a physics-oriented discussion of the interplay between tuning evolutions and the beam diagnostics systems that support the machine tune. This will include the differences between developing a tune and maintaining a tune, among other things. Practical longitudinal and transverse tuning issues and techniques from a variety of proton and electron machines will also be discussed.

Gulley, Mark S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

ORNL DAAC, Arctic Tundra Flux Data, February 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

atmospheric fluxes in the Arctic tundra are now available on-line. The newly released data set "Arctic Tundra Flux Study in the Kuparuk River Basin (Alaska), 1994-1996" contains...

457

Stability-Dependent Exchange Coefficients for Air–Sea Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study introduces exchange coefficients for wind stress (CD), latent heat flux (CL), and sensible heat flux (CS) over the global ocean. They are obtained from the state-of-the-art Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) bulk ...

A. Birol Kara; Harley E. Hurlburt; Alan J. Wallcraft

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Spatial Distribution of Surface Fluxes Estimated from Remotely Sensed Variables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study relates surface fluxes to remotely sensed variables over well-defined variations of surface wetness and vegetation. The surface fluxes are estimated from repeated Twin Otter aircraft flights at 33 m above the surface after correcting ...

Jielun Sun; L. Mahrt

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

BOREAS SSA-YJP Tower Flux Data Revised  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tower Flux Data Revised A revised version of the BOREAS TF04 tower flux data is now available from the ORNL DAAC. Data providers have revised the data set entitled "BOREAS TF-04...

460

Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy flux is a fundamental quantity for understanding internal wave generation, propagation, and dissipation. In this paper, the estimation of internal wave energy fluxes u?p? from ocean observations that may be sparse in either time or depth ...

Jonathan D. Nash; Matthew H. Alford; Eric Kunze

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "beam calculated flux" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Sensible and Latent Heat Flux Measurements over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This papar presents an extensive act of sensible heat (Reynolds flux and dissipation methods) and latent heat (dissipation method) flux measurements from a stable deep water tower and from ships on the deep sea. Operational difficulties ...

W. G. Large; S. Pond

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Enhanced flux balance analysis to model metabolic networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) is a widely used technique to predict rates of reactions in metabolic networks in cells under steady state using only stoichiometric information about the reactions. In this work, we introduce Enhanced Flux Balance Analysis ...

Nishanth Ulhas Nair; Navin Goyal; Nagasuma R. Chandra

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Evaluation of HOAPS-3 Ocean Surface Freshwater Flux Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, latent heat flux and precipitation over the global ocean surface can be determined from microwave satellite data as a basis for estimating the related fields of the ocean surface freshwater flux. The Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and ...

Axel Andersson; Christian Klepp; Karsten Fennig; Stephan Bakan; Hartmut Grassl; Jörg Schulz

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Energy Flux and Wavelet Diagnostics of Secondary Mountain Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, aircraft data from mountain waves have been primarily analyzed using velocity and temperature power spectrum and momentum flux estimation. Herein it is argued that energy flux wavelets (i.e., pressure–velocity wavelet cross-...

Bryan K. Woods; Ronald B. Smith

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Spatial Variation in Turbulent Heat Fluxes in Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution underway shipboard atmospheric and oceanic observations collected in Drake Passage from 2000 to 2009 are used to examine the spatial scales of turbulent heat fluxes and flux-related state variables. The magnitude of the seasonal ...

ChuanLi Jiang; Sarah T. Gille; Janet Sprintall; Kei Yoshimura; Masao Kanamitsu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Entry, Flux, and Exit of Potential Vorticity in Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flux form of the potential vorticity (PV) equation is employed to derive simple expressions for the boundary and interior flux of PV in ocean circulation using Bernoulli functions. The formulas are discussed and physically interpreted and ...

John Marshall; Daniel Jamous; Johan Nilsson

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Factors Controlling ERBE Longwave Clear Sky and Cloud Forcing Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The factors controlling the Earth Radiation Budget satellite (ERBS) longwave clear sky and cloud-forcing fluxes are investigated using statistical analyses of the ERBS fluxes with International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud ...

Bryan C. Weare

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Flux Isotope Reactor High Flux Isotope Reactor May 30, 2013 The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) first achieved criticality on August 25, 1965, and achieved full power in August 1966. It is a versatile 85-MW isotope production, research, and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments and a world-class neutron scattering science program. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type swimming pool reactor that uses highly enriched uranium-235 as fuel. HFIR typically operates seven 23-to-27 day cycles per year. Irradiation facility capabilities include Flux trap positions: Peak thermal flux of 2.5X1015 n/cm2/s with similar epithermal and fast fluxes (Highest thermal flux available in the

469

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5-4 5-4 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 Unscheduled 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU CHANGE/8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU 8820 D.LU BEAM LINE 8-1 Nov. 05, 2007 Nov. 06, 2007 Nov. 07, 2007 Nov. 08, 2007 Nov. 09, 2007 Nov. 10, 2007 Nov. 11, 2007 8821 D.Brehmer 8821 D.Brehmer 8821 D.Brehmer 3064* S.SUN 3075 M.GARNER 3075 M.GARNER 3075 M.GARNER

470

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2013 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 18, 2013 Nov. 25, 2013 4, 2013 Nov. 11, 2013 Nov. 18, 2013 Nov. 25, 2013 Dec. 02, 2013 Dec. 09, 2013 Dec. 16, 2013 Dec. 23, 2013 Dec. 30, 2013 Jan. 06, 2014 Jan. 13, 2014 Jan. 20, 2014 Jan. 27, 2014 Feb. 03, 2014 Back to Table of Contents WEEK OF Nov. 04, 2013 Ops Re-start Nov. 04, 2013 Nov. 05, 2013 Nov. 06, 2013 Nov. 07, 2013 Nov. 08, 2013 Nov. 09, 2013 Nov. 10, 2013 BEAM LINE 5-4 Nov. 04, 2013 Nov. 05, 2013 Nov. 06, 2013 Nov. 07, 2013 Nov. 08, 2013 Nov. 09, 2013 Nov. 10, 2013 DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN DOWN

471

SSRL BEAM PORT SCHEDULE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1-4 1-4 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE CHANGE/8840 J.POPL 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE 8840 J.POPLE BEAM LINE 2-1 Nov. 28, 2005 Nov. 29, 2005 Nov. 30, 2005 Dec. 01, 2005 Dec. 02, 2005 Dec. 03, 2005 Dec. 04, 2005 MA 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON 8859 B.JOHNSON