Sample records for bcsb multiple-wavelength anomalous

  1. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Kurtz, Sarah R. (Golden, CO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  2. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  3. Multiple-wavelength spectroscopic quantitation of light-absorbing species in scattering media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nathel, Howard (Albany, CA); Cartland, Harry E. (Livermore, CA); Colston, Jr., Billy W. (Livermore, CA); Everett, Matthew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Roe, Jeffery N. (San Ramon, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen concentration measurement system for blood hemoglobin comprises a multiple-wavelength low-coherence optical light source that is coupled by single mode fibers through a splitter and combiner and focused on both a target tissue sample and a reference mirror. Reflections from both the reference mirror and from the depths of the target tissue sample are carried back and mixed to produce interference fringes in the splitter and combiner. The reference mirror is set such that the distance traversed in the reference path is the same as the distance traversed into and back from the target tissue sample at some depth in the sample that will provide light attenuation information that is dependent on the oxygen in blood hemoglobin in the target tissue sample. Two wavelengths of light are used to obtain concentrations. The method can be used to measure total hemoglobin concentration [Hb.sub.deoxy +Hb.sub.oxy ] or total blood volume in tissue and in conjunction with oxygen saturation measurements from pulse oximetry can be used to absolutely quantify oxyhemoglobin [HbO.sub.2 ] in tissue. The apparatus and method provide a general means for absolute quantitation of an absorber dispersed in a highly scattering medium.

  4. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stix, Thomas H. (Princeton, NJ); Ono, Masayuki (Princeton Junction, NJ)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  5. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  6. Anomalous

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternative FuelsSanta3 Tableimpurity ion heating from Alfvénic

  7. Anomalous Emission from HII regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Dickinson

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Spinning dust appears to be the best explanation for the anomalous emission that has been observed at $\\sim 10-60$ GHz. One of the best examples of spinning dust comes from a HII region in the Perseus molecular cloud. Observations of other HII regions also show tentative evidence for excess emission at frequencies $\\sim 30$ GHz, although at lower emissivity levels. A new detection of excess emission at 31 GHz in the HII region RCW175 has been made. The most plausible explanation again comes from spinning dust. HII regions are a good place to look for spinning dust as long as accurate radio data spanning the $\\sim 5-100$ GHz range is available.

  8. Anomalous transport through porous and fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Peter Kyungchul

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous transport, understood as the nonlinear scaling with time of the mean square displacement of transported particles, is observed in many physical processes, including contaminant transport through porous and fractured ...

  9. Anomalous scalings in differential models of turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon Thalabard; Sergey Nazarenko; Sebastien Galtier; Medvedev Sergey

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential models for hydrodynamic, passive-scalar and wave turbulence given by nonlinear first- and second-order evolution equations for the energy spectrum in the $k$-space were analysed. Both types of models predict formation an anomalous transient power-law spectra. The second-order models were analysed in terms of self-similar solutions of the second kind, and a phenomenological formula for the anomalous spectrum exponent was constructed using numerics for a broad range of parameters covering all known physical examples. The first-order models were examined analytically, including finding an analytical prediction for the anomalous exponent of the transient spectrum and description of formation of the Kolmogorov-type spectrum as a reflection wave from the dissipative scale back into the inertial range. The latter behaviour was linked to pre-shock/shock singularities similar to the ones arising in the Burgers equation. Existence of the transient anomalous scaling and the reflection-wave scenario are argued to be a robust feature common to the finite-capacity turbulence systems. The anomalous exponent is independent of the initial conditions but varies for for different models of the same physical system.

  10. anomalous behaviours studied: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the diffraction patterns. Several 42 ANOMALOUS ISOTOPE SHIFTS IN Pb NUCLEI IN RMF THEORY CiteSeer Summary: We have studied the anomalous behaviour of isotopic shifts of Pb...

  11. Theory of the Anomalous Hall Effect in the Insulating Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiongjun

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hall resistivity in ferromagnetic materials has an anomalous contribution proportional to the magnetization, which is defined as the anomalous Hall effect (AHE). Being a central topic in the study of ferromagnetic materials for many decades...

  12. anomalous gauge couplings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fichet; Gero von Gersdorff 2013-11-26 16 Anomalous gauge-boson couplings and the Higgs-boson mass HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: We study anomalous gauge-boson couplings...

  13. Slow dynamics and anomalous nonlinear fast dynamics in diverse solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slow dynamics and anomalous nonlinear fast dynamics in diverse solids Paul Johnsona) Geophysics study of anomalous nonlinear fast dynamics and slow dynamics in a number of solids. Observations are presented from seven diverse materials showing that anomalous nonlinear fast dynamics ANFD and slow dynamics

  14. Anomalous scalings in differential models of turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thalabard, Simon; Galtier, Sebastien; Sergey, Medvedev

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differential models for hydrodynamic, passive-scalar and wave turbulence given by nonlinear first- and second-order evolution equations for the energy spectrum in the $k$-space were analysed. Both types of models predict formation an anomalous transient power-law spectra. The second-order models were analysed in terms of self-similar solutions of the second kind, and a phenomenological formula for the anomalous spectrum exponent was constructed using numerics for a broad range of parameters covering all known physical examples. The first-order models were examined analytically, including finding an analytical prediction for the anomalous exponent of the transient spectrum and description of formation of the Kolmogorov-type spectrum as a reflection wave from the dissipative scale back into the inertial range. The latter behaviour was linked to pre-shock/shock singularities similar to the ones arising in the Burgers equation. Existence of the transient anomalous scaling and the reflection-wave scenario are argu...

  15. Anomalous Cherenkov spin-orbit sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, Sergey [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, D-93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cherenkov effect is a well-known phenomenon in the electrodynamics of fast charged particles passing through transparent media. If the particle is faster than the light in a given medium, the medium emits a forward light cone. This beautiful phenomenon has an acoustic counterpart where the role of photons is played by phonons and the role of the speed of light is played by the sound velocity. In this case the medium emits a forward sound cone. Here, we show that in a system with spin-orbit interactions in addition to this normal Cherenkov sound there appears an anomalous Cherenkov sound with forward and backward sound propagation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transition from the normal to anomalous Cherenkov sound happens in a singular way at the Cherenkov cone angle. The detection of this acoustic singularity therefore represents an alternative experimental tool for the measurement of the spin-orbit coupling strength.

  16. Anomalous Topological Pumps and Fractional Josephson Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan Zhang; C. L. Kane

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We discover novel topological pumps in the Josephson effects for superconductors. The phase difference, which is odd under the chiral symmetry defined by the product of time-reversal and particle-hole symmetries, acts as an anomalous adiabatic parameter. These pumping cycles are different from those in the "periodic table", and are characterized by $Z\\times Z$ or $Z_2\\times Z_2$ strong invariants. We determine the general classifications in class AIII, and those in class DIII with a single anomalous parameter. For the $Z_2\\times Z_2$ topological pump in class DIII, one $Z_2$ invariant describes the coincidence of fermion parity and spin pumps whereas the other one reflects the non-Abelian statistics of Majorana Kramers pairs, leading to three distinct fractional Josephson effects.

  17. anomalous diffusion dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transport became a very important topic over the past couple Wright, Francis 5 Fractal Location and Anomalous Diffusion Dynamics for Oil Wells from the KY Geological Survey...

  18. anomalous energy exchange: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measured and calculated cross sections for spin-exchange between alkali atoms and noble gases (specifically sodium and helium) are used to constrain anomalous spin-dependent forces...

  19. Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso volcanic region, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  20. The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    River valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...

  1. anomalous dielectric absorption: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the radiative one. The case is similar to the recently introduced anomalous scattering PRL vol. 97, 263902 (2006) and exhibits similar peculiarities. Tribelsky, Michael I...

  2. anomalous laser light: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the radiative one. The case is similar to the recently introduced anomalous scattering PRL vol. 97, 263902 (2006) and exhibits similar peculiarities. Tribelsky, Michael I...

  3. anomalous isotope effect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the following recombination Reid, Scott A. 4 Anomalous quantum and isotope effects in water clusters: Physical phenomenon, model artifact, or bad approximation? CERN Preprints...

  4. anomalous discrete chiral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Masahiro Ibe; John Kehayias; Tsutomu T. Yanagida 2011-11-10 17 Disoriented Chiral Condensates and Anomalous Production of Pions CERN Preprints Summary: The leading-particle...

  5. anomalous thermal behavior: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exponential term to describe the shape. A. A. Bylinkin; A. A. Rostovtsev 2011-12-24 12 Thermal fluctuations and anomalous elasticity of homogeneous nematic elastomers Condensed...

  6. A Possible Explanation of Anomalous Earth Flybys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Petry

    2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Doppler shift observations of several spacecrafts during near Earth flybys show an unexplained frequency shift. This shift is interpreted as an unexpected velocity change called Earth flyby anomaly. A theory of non-privileged reference frames is used to study the Doppler shift in such frames which are experimentally justified by the measured dipole anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in the solar system. The system in which the CMB is isotropic defines the privileged reference frame. The calculated frequency shift in non-privileged reference frames may give an explanation of the anomalous Earth flybys.

  7. Anomalous Light Absorption by Small Particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael I. Tribelsky

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of resonant light absorption by a small particle (nanocluster) is reported. The problem cannot be described within the commonly used dipole scattering approximation and should be studied with methods based upon the exact Mie solution. It is shown that the absorption cross-section has giant maxima realized at small values of the imaginary part of the complex dielectric permittivity of the particle. The maxima are situated in the vicinity of the plasmon (polariton) resonances and correspond to the regions where the dissipative damping equals the radiative one. The case is similar to the recently introduced anomalous scattering [PRL vol. 97, 263902 (2006)] and exhibits similar peculiarities.

  8. Top polarisation measurement and anomalous $Wtb$ coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arun Prasath; Rohini M. Godbole; Saurabh D. Rindani

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinematical distributions of the decay products of the top quark carry information on the polarisation of the top as well as on any possible new physics in the decay of the top quark. We construct observables in the form of asymmetries in the kinematical distributions to probe their effects. Charged-lepton angular distributions in the decay are insensitive to anomalous couplings and are a sensitive measure of top polarisation. However, these are difficult to measure in the case of highly boosted top quarks as compared to energy distributions of decay products. These are then sensitive, in general, to both top polarisation and top anomalous couplings. We compare various asymmetries for their sensitivities to the polarisation of the top quark as well as to possible new physics in the $Wtb$ vertex, paying special attention to the case of highly boosted top quarks. We perform a $\\chi ^2$- analysis to determine the regions in the polarisation of the top quark and the couplings of the $Wtb$ vertex constrained by different combinations of the asymmetries.

  9. anomalous light absorption: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anomalous light absorption First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Anomalous Light Absorption...

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalously interacting extra Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ON ANOMALOUS Summary: questionable, if one should study models with a fundamental Higgs boson, but with extra anomalous vector boson... vector bosons via normal standard model...

  11. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous specific heat Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be important for redistributing the anomalous heat content in the hot spot region to the remote Tropics... . The anomalous heat content of ... Source: Sobel, Adam - Department of...

  12. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous field effect Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with an anomalous friction torque being driven... by altering both the diabatic heating and surface friction fields. For example, in regions of anomalous... (Fig. 3b) and...

  13. Anomalous Flavor U(1)_X for Everything

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dreiner, Herbi K.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Thormeier, Marc

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an ambitious model of flavor, based on an anomalous U(1)_X gauge symmetry with one flavon, only two right-handed neutrinos and only two mass scales: M_{grav} and m_{3/2}. In particular, there are no new scales introduced for right-handed neutrino masses. The X-charges of the matter fields are such that R-parity is conserved exactly, higher-dimensional operators are sufficiently suppressed to guarantee a proton lifetime in agreement with experiment, and the phenomenology is viable for quarks, charged leptons, as well as neutrinos. In our model one of the three light neutrinos automatically is massless. The price we have to pay for this very successful model are highly fractional X-charges which can likely be improved with less restrictive phenomenological ansatze for mass matrices.

  14. Examining Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL] [ORNL; Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL] [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnection networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; however, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to understand anomalous network performance. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  15. Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL] [ORNL; Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL] [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnection networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; however, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to understand anomalous network performance. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  16. Sampling and Characterization of 618-2 Anomalous Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.E. Zacharias

    2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Excavation of the 618-2 Burial Ground has produced many items of anomalous waste. Prior to temporary packaging and/or storage, these items have been characterized in the field to identify radiological and industrial safety conditions.

  17. Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling in an open ballistic bismuth nanocavity Home Author: B. Hackens, J. P. Minet, S. Faniel, G. Farhi, C. Gustin, J. P....

  18. Origin of anomalous atomic vibrations in efficient thermoelectrics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    White arrows point out anomalous double-peak in PbTe, which is absent in SnTe. Thermoelectric SnTe and PbTe compounds were investigated with inelastic neutron scattering (INS)...

  19. anomalously high photocurrents: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Baier; M. Dirks; O. Kober 1996-03-13 7 Anomalous behavior of pion production in high energy particle collisions HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: A shape of invariant...

  20. anomalously high bed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Baier; M. Dirks; O. Kober 1996-03-13 5 Anomalous behavior of pion production in high energy particle collisions HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: A shape of invariant...

  1. anomalously high number: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Baier; M. Dirks; O. Kober 1996-03-13 7 Anomalous behavior of pion production in high energy particle collisions HEP - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: A shape of invariant...

  2. anomalous microwave emission: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UV discharge in the lamp 1 was from 20x50 mm. The spectral characteristics 1 of the electrodeless lamp resemble more those of high-pressure Cirkva, Vladimir 302 Anomalous...

  3. anomalous scaling spikes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Entropy of the Nordic electricity market: anomalous scaling, spikes, and mean-reversion CERN Preprints Summary:...

  4. anomalous coupling limits: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the WWZ couplings. D0 Collaboration 1999-05-04 4 Limits on Anomalous Couplings from Higgs Boson Production at the Tevatron HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: We estimate the...

  5. anomalous scattering factor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D. Mitra; D. R. Lorimer; A. G. Lyne 2001-11-08 5 Anomalous gauge couplings of the Higgs boson at the CERN LHC: Semileptonic mode in WW scatterings HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv)...

  6. anomalous scattering boosts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are not excluded, but they are constrained to be functions of conformal cross ratios of kinematic variables. Einan Gardi; Lorenzo Magnea 2009-01-08 3 Notes on Anomalous...

  7. Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taner, M. Turhan

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

  8. Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnec- tion networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; how- ever, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to under- stand anomalous network performance. Our tool, Confidence, instead uses an empirically derived probability distribution to characterize network performance. In this paper we describe several instances where the Confidence toolkit allowed us to understand and diagnose network performance anomalies that we could not adequately explore with the simple summary statis- tics provided by traditional measurement tools. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  9. Anomalous transport and confinement scaling studies in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, W.M.; Cheng, C.Z.; Krommes, J.A.; Lee, W.W.; Oberman, C.R.; Perkins, F.W.; Rewoldt, G.; Smith, R.; Bonoli, P.; Coppi, B.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addressing the general issue of anomalous energy transport, this paper reports on results of theoretical studies concerning: (1) the characteristics and relative strength of the dominant kinetic instabilities likely to be present under realistic tokamak operating conditions; (2) specific nonlinear processes relevant to the saturation and transport properties of drift-type instabilities; (3) the construction of semiempirical models for electron thermal transport and the scaling trends inferred from them; and (4) the application of specific anomalous transport models to simulate recent large-scale confinement experiments (TFTR and JET) and current drive experiments.

  10. Anomalous Magnetic and Electric Dipole Moments of the Tau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas Taylor

    1998-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the theoretical predictions for and the experimental measurements of the anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments of the tau lepton. In particular, recent analyses of the $\\eettg$ process from the L3 and OPAL collaborations are described. The most precise results, from L3, for the anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments respectively are: $\\atau = 0.004 \\pm 0.027 \\pm 0.023$ and $\\dtau = (0.0 \\pm 1.5 \\pm 1.3)\\times 10^{-16}{e{\\cdot}\\mathrm{cm}}$.

  11. Controlling anomalous stresses in soft field-responsive systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Reguera; J. M. Rubí; A. Pérez-Madrid

    2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a new phenomenon occurring in field-responsive suspensions: shear-induced anomalous stresses. Competition between a rotating field and a shear flow originates a multiplicity of anomalous stress behaviors in suspensions of bounded dimers constituted by induced dipoles. The great variety of stress regimes includes non-monotonous behaviors, multi-resonances, negative viscosity effect and blockades. The reversibility of the transitions between the different regimes and the self-similarity of the stresses make this phenomenon controllable and therefore applicable to modify macroscopic properties of soft condensed matter phases

  12. Anomalous $tq?$ couplings in $?p$ collision at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Köksal; S. C. ?nan

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have examined the constraints on the anomalous $tq\\gamma$ ($q=u,c$) couplings through the process $pp\\to p\\gamma p\\to pWbX$ at the LHC by considering three forward detector acceptances: $0.00150.5$, $0.00150.5$. The sensitivity bounds on the anomalous couplings have been obtained at the $95%$ confidence level in a model independent effective lagrangian approach. We have found that the bounds on these couplings can be highly improved compared to current experimental bounds.

  13. On the Tropospheric Response to Anomalous Stratospheric Wave Drag and Radiative Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Tropospheric Response to Anomalous Stratospheric Wave Drag and Radiative Heating DAVID W. J of anomalous diabatic heating in the polar stratosphere as stratospheric temperatures relax to climatology

  14. Multiscale analysis of three consecutive years of anomalous flooding in Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    Multiscale analysis of three consecutive years of anomalous flooding in Pakistan By K. L. Rasmussen investigation into three years of anomalous floods in Pakistan provides insight into their formation, unifying for the formation of anomalous easterly midlevel flow across central India into Pakistan that advected deep

  15. CRITICAL FLUCTUATIONS. ANOMALOUS LINE SHAPES OF Fe3+ -MOSSBAUER SPECTRA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CRITICAL FLUCTUATIONS. ANOMALOUS LINE SHAPES OF Fe3+ -MOSSBAUER SPECTRA IN MAGNETICALLY ORDERED Mossbauer ont montre qu'un recuit incomplet des solutions solides CrzO3-Fez03 et A12 0 3-Fez03 donnelieu203-Fe203pures ou dopeespar Fe2+donnent lieu uneespkceentierementnouvelle de spectres Mossbauer

  16. Quantum origin of an anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Quantum origin of an anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation D. Babikov *, B.K. Kendrick, R mechanical calculations of the ðJ ¼ 0Þ energies and lifetimes of the metastable states of ozone on a new effect in the reaction that forms ozone because of their role in the energy transfer mechanism, in which

  17. anomalous energy dependence: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anomalous energy dependence First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Scale-dependent mass...

  18. Anomalous Phase Inversion in Polymer Blends Prepared by Cryogenic Mechanical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , as well as interpenetrating and bicontinu- ous networks.7,8 Phase inversion occurs when the mi- norityAnomalous Phase Inversion in Polymer Blends Prepared by Cryogenic Mechanical Alloying Archie P strategies for producing highly dis- persed multicomponent polymer blends. By their very nature

  19. Anomalous Size Dependence of the Thermal Conductivity of Graphene Ribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anomalous Size Dependence of the Thermal Conductivity of Graphene Ribbons Denis L. Nika,, Artur S. Askerov, and Alexander A. Balandin*, Nano-Device Laboratory, Department of Electrical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering Program, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California

  20. Anomalous emissions of 103mRh biphoton transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao Cheng; Bing Xia

    2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, the anomalous emissions, centered on the one half transition energy 39.76/2 keV, are observed from the long-lived Mossbauer state of 103mRh excited by bremsstrahlung exposure. Strong coupling with identical nuclei in Rh crystals opens cascade channels for biphoton transitions.

  1. Effective field theory: A modern approach to anomalous couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degrande, Céline, E-mail: cdegrand@illinois.edu [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Greiner, Nicolas [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, Föhringer Ring 6, 80805 München (Germany); Kilian, Wolfgang [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); University of Siegen, Fachbereich Physik, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Mattelaer, Olivier [Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)] [Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Mebane, Harrison; Stelzer, Tim; Willenbrock, Scott [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Zhang, Cen [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology (CP3), Université Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We advocate an effective field theory approach to anomalous couplings. The effective field theory approach is the natural way to extend the standard model such that the gauge symmetries are respected. It is general enough to capture any physics beyond the standard model, yet also provides guidance as to the most likely place to see the effects of new physics. The effective field theory approach also clarifies that one need not be concerned with the violation of unitarity in scattering processes at high energy. We apply these ideas to pair production of electroweak vector bosons. -- Highlights: •We discuss the advantages of effective field theories compared to anomalous couplings. •We show that one need not be concerned with unitarity violation at high energy. •We discuss the application of effective field theory to weak boson physics.

  2. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4442180.552290 m Left: 268655.053363 m Right: 359915.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  3. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359411.975000 m Bottom: 4447521.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  4. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolores County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  5. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  6. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies). Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144825.235807 m Left: 285446.256851 m Right: 350577.338852 m Bottom: 4096962.250137 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  7. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  8. Anomalous dynamics of confined water at low hydration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Gallo; M. Rovere

    2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The mobility of water molecules confined in a silica pore is studied by computer simulation in the low hydration regime, where most of the molecules reside close to the hydrophilic substrate. A layer analysis of the single particle dynamics of these molecules shows an anomalous diffusion with a sublinear behaviour at long time. This behaviour is strictly connected to the long time decay of the residence time distribution analogously to water at contact with proteins.

  9. Anomalous spin of the Chern-Simons-Georgi-Glashow model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huo Qiu-Hong; Jiang Yunguo

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    With the Coulomb gauge, the Chern-Simons-Georgi-Glashow (CSGG) model is quantized in the Dirac formalism for the constrained system. Combining the Gauss law and Coulomb gauge consistency condition, the difference between the Schwinger angular momentum and canonical angular momentum of the system is found to be an anomalous spin. The reason for this result lies in that the Schwinger energy momentum tensor and the canonical one have different symmetry properties in presence of the Chern-Simons term.

  10. Multiple wavelength time-of-flight sensor based on time-correlated single-photon counting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buller, Gerald S.

    The optical system was based around a commercially available Meade LX200 catadioptric Schmidt a collection fiber and camera in the image plane of the telescope; and c optical routing: an optical routing demonstrated good performance at ranges of up to 17 km in daylight conditions. Analysis techniques were

  11. Anomalous Lagrangians and the radiative muon capture in hydrogen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Smejkal; E. Truhlik; F. C. Khanna

    2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The structure of an anomalous Lagrangian of the pi-rho-omega-a_1 system is investigated within the hidden local SU(2)_R x SU(2)_L symmetry approach. The interaction of the external electromagnetic and weak vector and axial-vector fields with the above hadron system is included. The Lagrangian of interest contains the anomalous Wess-Zumino term following from the well known Wess-Zumino-Witten action and six independent homogenous terms. It is characterized by four constants that are to be determined from a fit to the data on various elementary reactions. Present data allows one to extract the constants with a good accuracy. The homogenous part of the Lagrangian has been applied in the study of anomalous processes that could enhance the high energy tail of the spectrum of photons, produced in the radiative muon capture in hydrogen. It should be noted that recently, an intensive search for such enhancement processes has been carried in the literature, in an attempt to resolve the so called "g_P puzzle": an about 50 % difference between the theoretical prediction of the value of the induced pseudoscalar constant g_P and its value extracted from the high energy tail of the photon spectrum, measured in the precision TRIUMF experiment. Here, more details on the studied material are presented and new results, obtained by using the Wess-Zumino term, are provided.

  12. Anomalous effects due to the inertial anti-gravitational potential of the sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. L. Khokhlov

    2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is introduced inertial anti-gravitational potential into the theory of gravity to stop gravitational collapse at the nuclear density and thus prevent singularities. It is considered effective gravity which includes Newtonian potential and inertial anti-gravitational potential. It is investigated footprints of the effective gravity in the solar system. The inertial anti-gravitational potential of the sun allows to explain the anomalous acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11, the anomalous increase in the lunar semi-major axis, the residuals of the seasonal variation of the proper angular velocity of the earth, the anomalous increase of the Astronomical Unit, the anomalous shift of the perihelion of mercury.

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous heat conduction Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    parallel studies of the upper ocean heat budget have been conducted... of the anomalous heat ... Source: Kelly, Kathryn A. - Air-Sea Interaction and Remote Sensing Department,...

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous physical effects Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    advection (including the effect of ocean waves) and evaporational cooling... ) and the remote and local impact of the anomalous monsoon (Fig. 12d). The ... Source: Chang,...

  15. Influence of the radial profile of the magnetic fluctuations on anomalous transport Boris WEYSSOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Influence of the radial profile of the magnetic fluctuations on anomalous transport Boris WEYSSOW with radial profiles are considered. Comparisons between correct Langevin solutions and solutions

  16. anomalous flux-ratio gravitational: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lens systems appears to be higher than that predicted in the standard cold dark matter cosmology. We present a possible alternative route to anomalous flux ratios from lens...

  17. anomalous low-temperature behavior: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Investigation on Reliability and Anomalous Degradation of Low Temperature Poly-Si Thin-Film Transistor. Open Access Theses and Dissertations Summary: ??In this thesis, we will...

  18. Anomalous diffusion for inertial particles under gravity in parallel flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Martins Afonso

    2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the bounds between normal or anomalous effective diffusion for inertial particles transported by parallel flows. The infrared behavior of the fluid kinetic-energy spectrum, i.e. the possible presence of long-range spatio-temporal correlations, is modeled as a power law by means of two parameters, and the problem is studied as a function of these latter. Our results, obtained in the limit of weak relative inertia, extend well-known results for tracers and apply to particles of any mass density, subject to gravity and Brownian diffusion. We consider both steady and time-dependent flows, and cases of both vanishing and finite particle sedimentation.

  19. Anomalous magnetic behavior at the graphene/Co interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, Sumit; Saha, Shyamal K., E-mail: cnssks@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An intensive theoretical study on the interaction between graphene and transition metal atom has been carried out; however, its experimental verification is still lacking. To explore the theoretical prediction of antiferromagnetic coupling due to charge transfer between graphene and cobalt, epitaxial layer of cobalt is grown on graphene surface. Predicted antiferromagnetic interaction with Neel temperature (T{sub N}???32?K) which anomalously shifts to higher temperature (34?K) and becomes more prominent under application of magnetic field of 1 T is reported. Lowering of magnetoresistance as a consequence of this antiferromagnetic coupling at the interface is also observed.

  20. Effective Field Theory: A Modern Approach to Anomalous Couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Celine Degrande; Nicolas Greiner; Wolfgang Kilian; Olivier Mattelaer; Harrison Mebane; Tim Stelzer; Scott Willenbrock; Cen Zhang

    2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We advocate an effective field theory approach to anomalous couplings. The effective field theory approach is the natural way to extend the standard model such that the gauge symmetries are respected. It is general enough to capture any physics beyond the standard model, yet also provides guidance as to the most likely place to see the effects of new physics. The effective field theory approach also clarifies that one need not be concerned with the violation of unitarity in scattering processes at high energy. We apply these ideas to pair production of electroweak vector bosons.

  1. Origin of anomalous anharmonic lattice dynamics of lead telluride

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiga, Takuma; Hori, Takuma; Delaire, Olivier; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the anomalous anharmonic lattice dynamics of lead telluride is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations with interatomic force constants (IFCs) up to quartic terms obtained from first principles. The calculations reproduce the peak asymmetry of the radial distribution functions and the double peaks of transverse optical phonon previously observed with neutron diffraction and scattering experiments. They are identified to be due to the extremely large nearest-neighbor cubic IFCs in the [100] direction. The outstanding strength of the nearest-neighbor cubic IFCs relative to the longer-range ones explains the reason why the distortion in the radial distribution function is local.

  2. The Running coupling BFKL anomalous dimensions and splitting functions.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorne, Robert S

    2 2 + 30.72?¯50? ) . (2.36) 14 This contribution to the splitting function for t = 6 and is shown in fig. 6.a. Note that because of the truncation of GE(N, t), beyond 6th order the expression for PLOgg (?, ?s(Q2)) is not what one would really get... .K. Abstract I explicitly calculate the anomalous dimensions and splitting functions governing the Q2 evolu- tion of the parton densities and structure functions which result from the running coupling BFKL equation at LO, i.e. I perform a resummation in powers...

  3. Indication of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Levi; Evelyn Foschi; Torbjörn Hartman; Bo Höistad; Roland Pettersson; Lars Tegnér; Hanno Essén

    2013-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation of possible anomalous heat production in a special type of reactor tube named E-Cat HT is carried out. The reactor tube is charged with a small amount of hydrogen loaded nickel powder plus some additives. The reaction is primarily initiated by heat from resistor coils inside the reactor tube. Measurement of the produced heat was performed with high-resolution thermal imaging cameras, recording data every second from the hot reactor tube. The measurements of electrical power input were performed with a large bandwidth three-phase power analyzer. Data were collected in two experimental runs lasting 96 and 116 hours, respectively. An anomalous heat production was indicated in both experiments. The 116-hour experiment also included a calibration of the experimental set-up without the active charge present in the E-Cat HT. In this case, no extra heat was generated beyond the expected heat from the electric input. Computed volumetric and gravimetric energy densities were found to be far above those of any known chemical source. Even by the most conservative assumptions as to the errors in the measurements, the result is still one order of magnitude greater than conventional energy sources.

  4. Indication of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Giuseppe; Hartman, Torbjörn; Höistad, Bo; Pettersson, Roland; Tegnér, Lars; Essén, Hanno

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation of possible anomalous heat production in a special type of reactor tube named E-Cat HT is carried out. The reactor tube is charged with a small amount of hydrogen loaded nickel powder plus some additives. The reaction is primarily initiated by heat from resistor coils inside the reactor tube. Measurement of the produced heat was performed with high-resolution thermal imaging cameras, recording data every second from the hot reactor tube. The measurements of electrical power input were performed with a large bandwidth three-phase power analyzer. Data were collected in two experimental runs lasting 96 and 116 hours, respectively. An anomalous heat production was indicated in both experiments. The 116-hour experiment also included a calibration of the experimental set-up without the active charge present in the E-Cat HT. In this case, no extra heat was generated beyond the expected heat from the electric input. Computed volumetric and gravimetric energy densities were found to be fa...

  5. New Curved Spacetime Dirac Equations - On the Anomalous Gyromagnetic Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Nyambuya

    2008-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    I propose three new curved spacetime versions of the Dirac Equation. These equations have been developed mainly to try and account in a natural way for the observed anomalous gyromagnetic ratio of Fermions. The derived equations suggest that particles including the Electron which is thought to be a point particle do have a finite spatial size which is the reason for the observed anomalous gyromagnetic ratio. A serendipitous result of the theory, is that, two of the equation exhibits an asymmetry in their positive and negative energy solutions the first suggestion of which is clear that a solution to the problem as to why the Electron and Muon - despite their acute similarities - exhibit an asymmetry in their mass is possible. The Mourn is often thought as an Electron in a higher energy state. Another of the consequences of three equations emanating from the asymmetric serendipity of the energy solutions of two of these equations, is that, an explanation as to why Leptons exhibit a three stage mass hierarchy is possible.

  6. Apparent anomalous fading of thermoluminescence associated with competition with radiationless transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Reuven

    of a thermoluminescence (TL) peak for its application in TL dosimetry and even more so, in TL dating is its stability; accepted 8 March 2000 Abstract Anomalous fading of thermoluminescence (TL) is the eect of a fading whichApparent anomalous fading of thermoluminescence associated with competition with radiationless

  7. Formation of ozone: Metastable states and anomalous isotope effect Dmitri Babikov,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Formation of ozone: Metastable states and anomalous isotope effect Dmitri Babikov,a) Brian K for an anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation is given in terms of the energy transfer mechanism, where the metastable states of ozone are formed first, and then stabilized by collisions with other atoms. Unusual

  8. MAGNETISM AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY OF ANOMALOUS RARE-EARTH METALS AND ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    MAGNETISM AND SUPERCONDUCTIVITY OF ANOMALOUS RARE-EARTH METALS AND ALLOYS B. COQBLIN Laboratoire de impurities. 1. Introduction. -The rare-earth metals can be divided in two groups : - The (( normal )) rare-earths lantha- num are (( anomalous )) rare-earths metals. The same duality exists in alloys with rareearth

  9. Temperature fluctuations and anomalous scaling in low-Mach-number compressible turbulent flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elperin, Tov

    Temperature fluctuations and anomalous scaling in low-Mach-number compressible turbulent flow Tov 25 October 1996; revised manuscript received 20 February 1997 Temperature fluctuations in a low pressure fluctuations, the anomalous scaling may occur in the second moment of the temperature field

  10. Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 19971998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 1997 Abstract. An anomalous climatic event occurred in the Indian Ocean (IO) region during 1997­1998, which 1997, warm SSTAs appeared in the western IO, and they peaked in February 1998. An ocean general

  11. Modeling anomalous/non-CCM extinction using nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rai, Rakesh K

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling extinction along anomalous/non-CCM sightlines, which are characterized by a broad $217.5 nm$ bump and steep far-ultraviolet (FUV) rise, is reported. The extinction along these sightlines, viz. {HD 210121}, {HD 204827}, {HD 29647} and {HD 62542}, is difficult to reproduce using standard silicate and graphite grains. Very good match with the observed extinction is obtained by considering nanodiamond component as part of carbonaceous matter. Most of these sightlines are rich in carbon and are invariably backed by a young hot stellar object. Nanodiamond is taken as core within amorphous carbon and graphite. These core-mantle particles taken as additional components along with graphite and silicates lead to reduction in the silicate requirement. The abundance of carbonaceous matter is not affected as a very small fraction of nanodiamond is required. Extinction along sightlines that show steep FUV is also reported demonstrating the importance of nanodiamond component in all such regions.

  12. Anomalous skin effects in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas, G., E-mail: gohar.abbas@gcu.edu.pk; Sarfraz, M. [Department of Physics, GC University Lahore, Katchery Road, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Shah, H. A. [Forman Christian College University, Farozpur Road, Lahore 54600 (Pakistan)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized degenerate electron plasma is presented and a graphical comparison is made with the results obtained using relativistic Maxwellian distribution function [G. Abbas, M. F. Bashir, and G. Murtaza, Phys. Plasmas 18, 102115 (2011)]. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves for degenerate case is qualitatively small in comparison with the Maxwellian plasma case. The quantitative reduction due to weak magnetic field in the skin depth in R-wave for degenerate plasma is large as compared to the non-degenerate one. By ignoring the ambient magnetic field, previous results for degenerate field free case are salvaged [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Principles of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin/Heidelberg, 1984), p. 90].

  13. Violations of Lorentz invariance in the neutrino sector: an improved analysis of anomalous threshold constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Maccione; Stefano Liberati; David M. Mattingly

    2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently there has been a renewed activity in the physics of violations of Lorentz invariance in the neutrino sector. Flavor dependent Lorentz violation, which generically changes the pattern of neutrino oscillations, is extremely tightly constrained by oscillation experiments. Flavor independent Lorentz violation, which does not introduce new oscillation phenomena, is much more weakly constrained with constraints coming from time of flight and anomalous threshold analyses. We use a simplified rotationally invariant model to investigate the effects of finite baselines and energy dependent dispersion on anomalous reaction rates in long baseline experiments and show numerically that anomalous reactions do not necessarily cut off the spectrum quite as sharply as currently assumed. We also present a revised analysis of how anomalous reactions can be used to cast constraints from the observed atmospheric high energy neutrinos and the expected cosmogenic ones.

  14. Modified Gravitational Theory and the Pioneer 10 and 11 Spacecraft Anomalous Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. W. Moffat

    2004-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonsymmetric gravitational theory leads to a modified acceleration law that can at intermediate distance ranges account for the anomalous acceleration experienced by the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft.

  15. Nature of the Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Thompson

    2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I summarize recent developments in the magnetar model of the Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars, give a critical inventory of alternative models for the AXPs, and outline the improved diagnostics expected from present observational efforts.

  16. Higgs Mechanism and Anomalous Hall Effect in Three-Dimensional Topological Superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nogueira, Flavio S; Eremin, Ilya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that the Higgs mechanism in three-dimensional topological superconductors exhibits unique features with experimentally observable consequences. The Higgs model we discuss has two superconducting components and an axion-like magnetoelectric term with the phase difference of the superconducting order parameters playing the role of the axion field. Due to this additional term, quantum electromagnetic and phase fluctuations lead to a robust topologically non-trivial state that cannot be continuously deformed into a topologically non-trivial one. In the low frequency London regime an anomalous Hall effect is induced in the presence of an applied electric field parallel to the surface. This anomalous Hall current is induced by a Lorentz-like force arising from the axion term, and it involves the relative superfluid velocity of the superconducting components. The anomalous Hall current has a negative sign, a situation reminiscent, but quite distinct in physical origin, of the anomalous Hall effect obs...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous quasi-elastic electron Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sample search results for: anomalous quasi-elastic electron Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Neutron scattering study of the quasi-elastic spectral width in CeMg, CeMg3 and NdMg3...

  18. SOLAR WIND MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS TURBULENCE: ANOMALOUS SCALING AND ROLE OF INTERMITTENCY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salem, C.; Bale, S. D. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Mangeney, A. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, F-92195 Meudon (France); Veltri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita della Calabria, Rende (Italy)], E-mail: salem@ssl.berkeley.edu

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a study of the scaling properties and intermittency of solar wind MHD turbulence based on the use of wavelet transforms. More specifically, we use the Haar Wavelet transform on simultaneous 3 s resolution particle and magnetic field data from the Wind spacecraft, to investigate anomalous scaling and intermittency effects of both magnetic field and solar wind velocity fluctuations in the inertial range. For this purpose, we calculated spectra, structure functions, and probability distribution functions. We show that this powerful wavelet technique allows for a systematic elimination of intermittency effects on spectra and structure functions and thus for a clear determination of the actual scaling properties in the inertial range. The scaling of the magnetic field and the velocity fluctuations are found to be fundamentally different. Moreover, when the most intermittent structures superposed to the standard fluctuations are removed, simple statistics are recovered. The magnetic field and the velocity fluctuations exhibit a well-defined, although different, monofractal behavior, following a Kolmogorov -5/3 scaling and a Iroshnikov-Kraichnan -3/2 scaling, respectively. The multifractal properties of solar wind turbulence appear to be determined by the presence of those most intermittent structures. Finally, our wavelet technique also allows for a direct and systematic identification of the most active, singular structures responsible for the intermittency in the solar wind.

  19. An Explanation of Dayton Miller's Anomalous "Ether Drift" Result

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas J. Roberts

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1933 Dayton Miller published in this journal the results of his voluminous observations using his ether drift interferometer, and proclaimed that he had determined the "absolute motion of the earth". This result is in direct conflict with the prediction of Special Relativity, and also with numerous related experiments that found no such signal or "absolute motion". This paper presents a complete explanation for his anomalous result by: a) showing that his results are not statistically significant, b) describing in detail how flaws in his analysis procedure produced a false signal with precisely the properties he expected, and c) presenting a quantitative model of his systematic drift that shows there is no real signal in his data. In short, this is every experimenter's nightmare: he was unknowingly looking at statistically insignificant patterns in his systematic drift that mimicked the appearance of a real signal. An upper limit on "absolute motion" of 6 km/sec is derived from his raw data, fully consistent with similar experimental results and the prediction of Special Relativity. The key point of this paper is the need for a comprehensive and quantitative error analysis. The concepts and techniques used in this analysis were not available in Miller's day, but are now standard. These problems also apply to the famous measurements of Michelson and Morley, and to most if not all similar experiments; appendices are provided discussing several such experiments.

  20. Anomalous transport in Charney-Hasegawa-Mima flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoncini, Xavier; Agullo, Olivier; Benkadda, Sadruddin; Zaslavsky, George M. [PIIM, Universite, de Provence, CNRS, Centre Universitaire de Saint Jerome, F-13397 Marseilles (France); Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, 251 Mercer Street, New York, New York 10012, USA and Department of Physics, New York University, 2-4 Washington Place, New York, New York 10003 (United States)

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transport properties of particles evolving in a system governed by the Charney-Hasegawa-Mima equation are investigated. Transport is found to be anomalous with a nonlinear evolution of the second moments with time. The origin of this anomaly is traced back to the presence of chaotic jets within the flow. All characteristic transport exponents have a similar value around {mu}=1.75, which is also the one found for simple point vortex flows in the literature, indicating some kind of universality. Moreover, the law {gamma}={mu}+1 linking the trapping-time exponent within jets to the transport exponent is confirmed, and an accumulation toward zero of the spectrum of the finite-time Lyapunov exponent is observed. The localization of a jet is performed, and its structure is analyzed. It is clearly shown that despite a regular coarse-grained picture of the jet, the motion within the jet appears as chaotic, but that chaos is bounded on successive small scales.

  1. Anomalous X-ray Diffraction Studies for Photovoltaic Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous X-ray Diffraction (AXRD) has become a useful technique in characterizing bulk and nanomaterials as it provides specific information about the crystal structure of materials. In this project we present the results of AXRD applied to materials for photovoltaic applications: ZnO loaded with Ga and ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel. The X-ray diffraction data collected for various energies were plotted in Origin software. The peaks were fitted using different functions including Pseudo Voigt, Gaussian, and Lorentzian. This fitting provided the integrated intensity data (peaks area values), which when plotted as a function of X-ray energies determined the material structure. For the first analyzed sample, Ga was not incorporated into the ZnO crystal structure. For the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel Co was found in one or both tetrahedral and octahedral sites. The use of anomalous X-ray diffraction (AXRD) provides element and site specific information for the crystal structure of a material. This technique lets us correlate the structure to the electronic properties of the materials as it allows us to probe precise locations of cations in the spinel structure. What makes it possible is that in AXRD the diffraction pattern is measured at a number of energies near an X-ray absorption edge of an element of interest. The atomic scattering strength of an element varies near its absorption edge and hence the total intensity of the diffraction peak changes by changing the X-ray energy. Thus AXRD provides element specific structural information. This method can be applied to both crystalline and liquid materials. One of the advantages of AXRD in crystallography experiments is its sensitivity to neighboring elements in the periodic tables. This method is also sensitive to specific crystallographic phases and to a specific site in a phase. The main use of AXRD in this study is for transparent conductors (TCs) analysis. TCs are considered to be important materials because of their efficiency and low risk of environmental pollution. These materials are important to solar cells as a result of their remarkable combination of optical and electrical properties, including high electrical conductivity and high optical transparency in the spectrum of visible light. TCs provide a transparent window, which allows sunlight to pass through while also allowing electricity to conduct out of the cell. Spinel materials have the chemical form AB{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and are made of a face-centered cubic (FCC) lattice of oxygen anions and cations in specific interstitial sites. A normal spinel has all A cations on tetrahedral sites and B cations on octahedral sites. In contrast; an inverse spinel has the A and half of the B cations on octahedral sites and the other half of the B cations on tetrahedral sites; a mixed spinel lies between. In the spinel structure, 8 of 64 possible tetrahedral sites and 16 of 32 possible octahedral sites are filled. Normal spinels have particularly high conduction as the linear octahedral chains of B cations likely serve as conduction paths. In this paper we present how the data obtained with AXRD is used to analyze TCs properties as they apply to photovoltaic applications. One of the materials used for this analysis is zinc oxide. It has been loaded with 5% and 10% of Ga, which has an absorption edge of 10367 eV. The peak (100) was measured for the zinc oxide loaded with 10% Ga. In the case of 5% Ga, we measured peaks (100) and (101). With the information provided by the AXRD we can identify if Ga is being incorporated in the ZnO crystal structure. The analysis of 311 plane in the ZnCo{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel shows if Co is in tetrahedral or octahedral site.

  2. LFV decays and anomalous magnetic (electric) moments in a lepton mass matrices ansatz induced by SUSY GUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Huo

    2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    By using the anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments of the $\\tau$ lepton in an effective lagrangian approach to the new physics, we investigate the lepton flavor violation (LFV) decays, $l\\to l'\\gamma$, and $\\mu,\\tau$ anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments in a lepton mass matrices ansatz which induced by SUSY GUT. We put very stringent constraints LFV decays and $\\tau$ anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments.

  3. Constraints on anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings from ??bar ?? and qqbar ?? events at CERN LEP2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abbiendi, G.; Ainsley, C.; Å kesson, P. F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, J.; Amaral, P.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K. J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.

    2004-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    PHYSICAL REVIEW D 70, 032005 ~2004!Constraints on anomalous quartic gauge boson couplings from nn¯ gg and qq¯gg events at CERN LEP2 G. Abbiendi,2 C. Ainsley,5 P. F. Åkesson,3,v G. Alexander,21 J. Allison,15 P. Amaral,8 G. Anagnostou,1 K. J. Anderson..., the ratio of the observ expectation is R(data/SM)50.9260.0760.04, where tainties respectively. The nn¯gg and qq¯gg data are use couplings. Combining with previous OPAL results fr limits on the anomalous coupling parameters a0 Z , ac Z ,0.023 GeV22, 20.029 Ge...

  4. A like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry at Tevatron induced by the anomalous top quark couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jong Phil Lee; Kang Young Lee

    2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the recently measured 3.2 $\\sigma$ deviations of the charge asymmetry of like-sign dimuon events from the standard model prediction by the D0 collaboration at Tevatron can be explained by introducing the anomalous right-handed top quark couplings. Combined analysis with the $\\bs$ and $\\bd$ mixings and $B \\to X_s \\gamma$ decays has been performed. We discuss how to discriminate the effects on the dimuon charge asymmetry of the anomalous $\\tsW$ and $\\tbW$ couplings.

  5. Equivalence of the channel-corrected-T-matrix and anomalous-propagator approaches to condensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morawetz, K. [Muenster University of Applied Science, Stegerwaldstrasse 39, 48565 Steinfurt (Germany); International Institute of Physics (IIP), Universidade Federal do Rio grande do Norte, BrazilAvenida Odilon Gomes de Lima, 1722-CEP 59078-400, Natal/RN (Brazil) and Max-Planck-Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Any many-body approximation corrected for unphysical repeated collisions in a given condensation channel is shown to provide the same set of equations as they appear by using anomalous propagators. The ad hoc assumption in the latter theory about nonconservation of particle numbers can be released. In this way, the widespread used anomalous-propagator approach is given another physical interpretation. A generalized Soven equation follows which improves a chosen approximation in the same way as the coherent-potential approximation improves the averaged T matrix for impurity scattering.

  6. Anomalous transport effects and possible environmental symmetry "violation" in heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinfeng Liao

    2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The heavy ion collision provides a unique many-body environment where local domains of strongly interacting chiral medium may occur and in a sense allow environmental symmetry "violation" phenomena. For example certain anomalous transport processes, forbidden in usual medium, become possible in such domains. We briefly review recent progress in both the theoretical understanding and experimental search of various anomalous transport effects (such as the Chiral Magnetic Effect, Chiral Separation Effect, Chiral Electric Separation Effect, Chiral Electric/Magnetic Waves, etc) in the hot QCD fluid created by such collisions.

  7. QCD radiation in WH and WZ production and anomalous coupling measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco Campanario; Robin Roth; Dieter Zeppenfeld

    2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We study QCD radiation for the WH and WZ production processes at the LHC. We identify the regions sensitive to anomalous couplings, by considering jet observables, computed at NLO QCD with the use of the Monte Carlo program VBFNLO. Based on these observations, we propose the use of a dynamical jet veto. The dynamical jet veto avoids the problem of large logarithms depending on the veto scale, hence, providing more reliable predictions and simultaneously increasing the sensitivity to anomalous coupling searches, especially in the WZ production process.

  8. Enhanced anomalous photo-absorption from TiO{sub 2} nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solanki, Vanaraj; Majumder, Subrata; Mishra, Indrani; Varma, Shikha, E-mail: shikha@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar 751005 (India); Dash, P. [Utkal University, Bhubaneswar 751004 (India); Singh, C. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Kanjilal, D. [Inter University Accelerator Center, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Two dimensional nanostructures have been created on the rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) surfaces via ion irradiation technique. Enhanced anomalous photo- absorption response is displayed, where nanostructures of 15?nm diameter with 0.5?nm height, and not the smaller nanostructures with larger surface area, delineate highest absorbance. Comprehensive investigations of oxygen vacancy states, on ion- irradiated surfaces, display a remarkable result that the number of vacancies saturates for higher fluences. A competition between the number of vacancy sites on the nanostructure in conjunction with its size is responsible for the observed anomalous photo-absorption.

  9. $B_d-\\bar{B}_d$ mixing vs. $B_s-\\bar{B}_s$ mixing with the anomalous $Wtb$ couplings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jong Phil Lee; Kang Young Lee

    2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the effects of the anomalous $tbW$ couplings on the $\\bd$ mixing and recently measured $\\bs$ mixing. The combined analysis of mixings via box diagrams with penguin decays provides strong constraints on the anomalous top quark couplings. We find the bound from the $\\bd$ mixing data is stronger than that from the $\\bs$ mixing.

  10. JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 18, NO. 12, DECEMBER 2000 2167 10 Gb/s Multiple Wavelength, Coherent Short Pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jalali. Bahram

    /s by year 2002 with a further doubling every two years. Utilizing the entire 40 THz low loss transmission links. The preferred approach to utilize the low loss transmis- sion window of silica fibers calculate the coherence degradation due to amplification of incoherent energy during the SC generation

  11. Hidden local symmetry for anomalous processes with isospin- and SU(3)-breaking effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashimoto, M. [Department of Physics Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan)] [Department of Physics Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-01 (Japan)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that isospin- and SU(3)-breaking terms can be introduced to the anomalous {ital VVP} coupling in the hidden local symmetry scheme without changing the Wess-Zumino-Witten term in the low-energy limit. We make the analysis for anomalous processes of two-body and three-body decays such as radiative vector meson decays ({ital V}{r_arrow}{ital P}{gamma}), conversion decays of a photon into a lepton pair ({ital V}{r_arrow}{ital Pl}{sup +}{ital l}{sup {minus}}), and hadronic anomalous decays ({ital V}{r_arrow}{ital PPP}). The predictions successfully reproduce all experimental data of anomalous decays. In particular, we predict the decay widths of {rho}{sup 0}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{gamma} and {phi}{r_arrow}{eta}{prime}{gamma} as 101{plus_minus}9 keV and 0.508{plus_minus}0.035 keV, respectively, which will be tested in the DA{Phi}NE {phi} factory. Moreover, predictions are also made for {phi}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup 0}{ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}}, {rho}{r_arrow}3{pi}, {ital K}{asterisk}{r_arrow}{ital K}{pi}{pi}, and so on, for which only the experimental upper bounds are available now. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. ANOMALOUS DISPERSION OF SLOW NEUTRONS IN CRYSTALS By H. G. SMITH and S. W. PETERSON (1),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Studies of anomalous scattering of neutrons from CdI2 single crystals were conti- nued over an energy neutron scattering by nuclei and crystals has been fairly well understood for many years. An incident, and depends on the neutron-nucleus interactions. In general, the scattering amplitude can be expressed

  13. Anomalous density dependence of static friction in sand Viktor K. Horvath,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jánosi, Imre M.

    Anomalous density dependence of static friction in sand Viktor K. Horva´th,1 Imre M. Ja´nosi,2; revised manuscript received 26 April 1996 We measured experimentally the static friction force Fs on the surface of a glass rod immersed in dry sand. We observed that Fs is extremely sensitive to the closeness

  14. Semiclassical wave packet study of anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Semiclassical wave packet study of anomalous isotope effect in ozone formation Evgeny Vetoshkin represent the metastable O3 * species and play a central role in the process of ozone formation.1063/1.2778432 I. INTRODUCTION Ozone O3 is formed in the stratosphere as a product of the following recombination

  15. Oil and Gas CDT Anomalous compaction and lithification during early burial in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    Oil and Gas CDT Anomalous compaction and lithification during early burial in sedimentary basins training in a range of skills will mean opportunities for academic, government or Oil and Gas sector (e geoscience for oil and gas). References & Further Reading Neagu, R.C. Cartwright, J., Davies R.J. & Jensen L

  16. Anomalous Microfluidic Phonons Induced by the Interplay of Hydrodynamic Screening and Incompressibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tlusty, Tsvi

    Anomalous Microfluidic Phonons Induced by the Interplay of Hydrodynamic Screening the acoustic normal modes (``phonons'') of a 1D microfluidic droplet crystal at the crossover between 2D flow.55.Dÿ, 47.60.+i, 47.63.mf, 63.22.+m Microfluidic two-phase flow offers experimental tools to investigate

  17. Physical causes and modeling challenges of anomalous diffusion of sediment tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physical causes and modeling challenges of anomalous diffusion of sediment tracers Douglas] #12;Velocity autocorrelation: Controlled by inertia 0.1 1 Dispersion: inertial at short time particles spend much more time at rest than in motion. Stochastic modeling approach: Direct solution of f

  18. Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    LETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from and heterotrophic respira- tion, that determines whether an ecosystem is sequestering carbon or releasing

  19. Conversion from interchange-type modes to tearing modes: an explanation of tokamak anomalous transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Atsushi

    Conversion from interchange-type modes to tearing modes: an explanation of tokamak anomalous of non-classical tearing mode exists in tokamaks: viz., current interchange tearing modes (CITMs). CITMs type (e.g., interchange/ballooning modes, drift waves, etc.) due to resistivity gradient in tokamaks

  20. Anomalous trichromats' judgments of surface color in natural scenes under different daylights

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, David H.

    Anomalous trichromats' judgments of surface color in natural scenes under different daylights daylight illuminants were presented on a high-resolution color monitor to 7 deuteranomalous, 7 to the daylight locus rather than along the daylight locus ~Foster & Linnell, 1995; Amano et al., 2003

  1. Effective anomalous Hall coefficient in an ultrathin Co layer sandwiched by Pt layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Peng; Wu, Di; Jiang, Zhengsheng; Sang, Hai, E-mail: weiwei.lin@u-psud.fr, E-mail: haisang@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Lin, Weiwei, E-mail: weiwei.lin@u-psud.fr, E-mail: haisang@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Institut d'Electronique Fondamentale, Université Paris-Sud, Orsay 91405 (France)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous Hall effect in Co/Pt multilayer is important to study the effect of interface with strong spin-orbit coupling. However, the shunting effect of the layers in such system and the circuit in the plane perpendicular to the injected current were overlooked in most works and thus, anomalous Hall coefficient in Co/Pt multilayer has not been determined accurately. Considering the shunting effect and the equivalent circuit, we show that the effective anomalous Hall coefficient of a 0.5?nm thick Co layer sandwiched by Pt layers R{sub S} is 0.29?±?0.01????cm/T at the zero temperature limit and increases to about 0.73????cm/T at the temperature of 300?K. R{sub S} is one order larger than that in bulk Co film, indicating the large contribution of the Co/Pt interface. R{sub S} increases with the resistivity of Co as well as a resistivity independent contribution of ?0.23?±?0.01????cm/T. The equivalent anomalous Hall current in the Co layer has a maximum of 1.1% of the injected transverse current in the Co layer around the temperature of 80?K.

  2. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 483 (2002) 482487 Anomalous free electron laser interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerby, Eli

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Road, Ramat Aviv 69978, Israel Abstract Free electron lasers (FELs) are considered, typically, as fast: 41.60 Cr Keywords: Free electron laser 1. Introduction Free electron lasers (FELs) and cyclotronNuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 483 (2002) 482­487 Anomalous free electron

  3. Light supersymmetric axion in an anomalous Abelian extension of the standard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coriano, Claudio; Guzzi, Marco; Mariano, Antonio; Morelli, Simone [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita del Salento Via Arnesano 73100 Lecce (Italy) and INFN Sezione di Lecce, Via Arnesano 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a supersymmetric extension of the standard model (USSM-A) with an anomalous U(1) and Stueckelberg axions for anomaly cancellation, generalizing similar nonsupersymmetric constructions. The model, built by a bottom-up approach, is expected to capture the low-energy supersymmetric description of axionic symmetries in theories with gauged anomalous Abelian interactions, previously explored in the nonsupersymmetric case for scenarios with intersecting branes. The choice of a USSM-like superpotential, with one extra singlet superfield and an extra Abelian symmetry, allows a physical axionlike particle in the spectrum. We describe some general features of this construction and, in particular, the modification of the dark-matter sector which involves both the axion and several neutralinos with an axino component. The axion is expected to be very light in the absence of phases in the superpotential but could acquire a mass which can also be in the few GeV range or larger. In particular, the gauging of the anomalous symmetry allows independent mass/coupling interaction to the gauge fields of this particle, a feature which is absent in traditional (invisible) axion models. We comment on the general implications of our study for the signature of moduli from string theory due to the presence of these anomalous symmetries.

  4. Search for anomalous production of multilepton events in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    A search for anomalous production of events with three or more isolated leptons in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV is presented. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.98 fb[superscript ?1], were collected ...

  5. Hadronic contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment Workshop. $(g-2)_?$: Quo vadis? Workshop. Mini proceedings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurice Benayoun; Johan Bijnens; Tom Blum; Irinel Caprini; Gilberto Colangelo; Henryk Czy?; Achim Denig; Cesareo A. Dominguez; Simon Eidelman; Christian S. Fischer; Paolo Gauzzi; Yuping Guo; Andreas Hafner; Masashi Hayakawa; Gregorio Herdoiza; Martin Hoferichter; Guangshun Huang; Karl Jansen; Fred Jegerlehner; Benedikt Kloss; Bastian Kubis; Zhiqing Liu; William Marciano; Pere Masjuan; Harvey B. Meyer; Tsutomu Mibe; Andreas Nyffeler; Vladimir Pascalutsa; Vladyslav Pauk; Michael R. Pennington; Santiago Peris; Christoph F. Redmer; Pablo Sanchez-Puertas; Boris Shwartz; Evgeny Solodov; Dominik Stoeckinger; Thomas Teubner; Marc Unverzagt; Marc Vanderhaeghen; Magnus Wolke

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the mini-proceedings of the workshops Hadronic contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment: strategies for improvements of the accuracy of the theoretical prediction and $(g-2)_{\\mu}$: Quo vadis?, both held in Mainz from April 1$^{\\rm rst}$ to 5$^{\\rm th}$ and from April 7$^{\\rm th}$ to 10$^{\\rm th}$, 2014, respectively.

  6. Limits on anomalous WW? and WWZ couplings from WW/WZ? e?jj production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Coppage, Don; Hebert, C.

    2000-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Limits on anomalous WW? and WWZ couplings are presented from a study of WW/WZ? e?jj events produced in pp¯ collisions at s?=1.8?TeV. Results from the analysis of data collected using the DØ detector during the 1993–1995 Tevatron collider run...

  7. Leading-order hadronic contributions to the electron and tau anomalous magnetic moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florian Burger; Grit Hotzel; Karl Jansen; Marcus Petschlies

    2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The leading hadronic contributions to the anomalous magnetic moments of the electron and the $\\tau$-lepton are determined by a four-flavour lattice QCD computation with twisted mass fermions. The continuum limit is taken and systematic uncertainties are quantified. Full agreement with results obtained by phenomenological analyses is found.

  8. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 85, 061128 (2012) Universal anomalous diffusion of weakly damped particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Michael

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gothenburg, Sweden (Received 6 March 2012; published 26 June 2012) We show that anomalous diffusion arises. In this paper we describe two physically natural models for the diffusion of a particle that is accelerated- Rosenbluth model for diffusion [7,8], in which a test particle interacts with a gas of point masses via

  9. Ab initio prediction of GaN ,,1010... and ,,110... anomalous surface relaxation John E. Jaffe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Ravi

    Ab initio prediction of GaN ,,101¯0... and ,,110... anomalous surface relaxation John E. Jaffe Received 22 September 1995 The results of a study of the surface relaxation of GaN in the framework is minimized the Ga-N surface bonds show a very small rotation angle of about 6° accompanied by a reduction

  10. Detecting Anomalous Sensor Events in Smart Home Data for Enhancing the Living Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Diane J.

    Detecting Anomalous Sensor Events in Smart Home Data for Enhancing the Living Experience is on the rise and the place for smart home solutions is growing. One of the major concerns for smart home data captured from a smart home testbed. Introduction Smart homes are built by adding intelligent

  11. Splenic Artery Aneurysm of the Anomalous Splenomesenteric Trunk: Successful Treatment by Transcatheter Embolization Using Detachable Coils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sato, Motohiro [Ibaraki Prefectural Central Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan)], E-mail: mo-sato@chubyoin.pref.ibaraki.jp; Anno, Izumi; Yamaguchi, Masayuki [Institute of Clinical Medicine University of Tsukuba, Department of Radiology (Japan); Iida, Hiroyuki; Orii, Kazuo [Tsukuba Gakuen Hospital, Department of Surgery (Japan)

    2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A splenomesenteric trunk, which involves replacing the splenic artery from the superior mesenteric artery (SMA), is rare and occurs in less than 1% of patients. We report a case of an aneurysm involving the origin of the splenic artery that anomalously arose from the SMA, and which was successfully treated using Guglielmi detachable coils.

  12. Search for anomalous production of events with a photon, jet, b-quark jet, and missing transverse energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We present a signature-based search for the anomalous production of events containing a photon, two jets, of which at least one is identified as originating from a b quark, and missing transverse energy (E?[subscript T]). ...

  13. Anomalous Fiber Optic Gyroscope Signals Observed above Spinning Rings at Low Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tajmar; F. Plesescu; B. Seifert

    2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Precision fiber optic gyroscopes were mounted mechanically de-coupled above spinning rings inside a cryostat. Below a critical temperature (typically <30 K), the gyroscopes measure a significant deviation from their usual offset due to Earth's rotation. This deviation is proportional to the applied angular ring velocity with maximum signals towards lower temperatures. The anomalous gyroscope signal is about 8 orders of magnitude smaller then the applied angular ring velocity, compensating about one third of the Earth rotation offset at an angular top speed of 420 rad/s. Moreover, our data shows a parity violation as the effect appears to be dominant for rotation against the Earth's spin. No systematic effect was found to explain this effect including the magnetic environment, vibration and helium gas friction suggesting that our observation is a new low temperature phenomenon. Tests in various configurations suggest that the rotating low temperature helium may be the source of our anomalous signals.

  14. Time-series investigation of anomalous thermocouple responses in a liquid-metal-cooled reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, K.C.; Planchon, H.P.; Poloncsik, J.

    1988-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was undertaken using SAS software to investigate the origin of anomalous temperature measurements recorded by thermocouples (TCs) in an instrumented fuel assembly in a liquid-metal-cooled nuclear reactor. SAS macros that implement univariate and bivariate spectral decomposition techniques were employed to analyze data recorded during a series of experiments conducted at full reactor power. For each experiment, data from physical sensors in the tests assembly were digitized at a sampling rate of 2/s and recorded on magnetic tapes for subsequent interactive processing with CMS SAS. Results from spectral and cross-correlation analyses led to the identification of a flow rate-dependent electromotive force (EMF) phenomenon as the origin of the anomalous TC readings. Knowledge of the physical mechanism responsible for the discrepant TC signals enabled us to device and justify a simple correction factor to be applied to future readings.

  15. Enhanced reflection via phase compensation from anomalous dispersion in atomic vapor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Junxiang; Zhou Haitao [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Opto-Electronics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Wang Dawei [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Zhu Shiyao [State Key Laboratory of Quantum Optics and Quantum Optics Devices, Institute of Opto-Electronics, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Physics, Hong Kong Baptist University (Hong Kong)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The phase compensation mechanism induced by anomalous dispersion in the reflection process of four-wave mixing (or reflection from a grating) in a three-level system is investigated, where the four wave vectors do not match in vacuum. An efficiency of the reflected signal of as high as 43% from a hot atomic cell of Cs is observed. The maximum reflection occurs when the frequency of the probe beam (and consequently the frequency of the reflected signal) is slightly red detuned from the transition frequency, which is attributed to the phase compensation from the steep anomalous dispersion accompanied with a strong probe absorption. The dependences of the efficiency on the angle between the coupling and probe lights, on the intensity of the coupling, field and on atomic density are studied. A theoretical model is presented and it is in good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry with 9 fb?¹ of pp? collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an updated measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry Absl for semileptonic b-hadron decays in 9.0 fb?¹ of pp? collisions recorded with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of ?s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We obtain Absl=(-0.787±0.172(stat)±0.093(syst))%. This result differs by 3.9 standard deviations from the prediction of the standard model and provides evidence for anomalously large CP violation in semileptonic neutral B decay. The dependence of the asymmetry on the muon impact parameter is consistent with the hypothesis that it originates from semileptonic b-hadron decays.

  17. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in electron-temperature-gradient-modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaqub Khan, M., E-mail: myaqubsultani@gmail.com [Department of Basic Sciences, Riphah International University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); National Centre for Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Iqbal, J. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad 45320 (Pakistan); Ul Haq, A. [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Physics, Riphah International University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the interconnection of entropy with temperature and density of plasma, it would be interesting to investigate plasma related phenomena with respect to entropy. By employing Braginskii transport equations, it is proved that entropy is proportional to a function of potential and distribution function of entropy is re-defined, ?S–drift in obtained. New dispersion relation is derived; it is found that the anomalous transport depends on the gradient of the entropy.

  18. Fault Characterization using Induced Electric Currents Presumed to Undergo Anomalous Diffusion in Mason, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Blaine Cullen

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    FAULT CHARACTERIZATION USING INDUCED ELECTRIC CURRENTS PRESUMED TO UNDERGO ANOMALOUS DIFFUSION IN MASON, TEXAS A Thesis by BLAINE CULLEN MURPHY Submitted to the Office of Graduate and Professional Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... Blaine Cullen Murphy ABSTRACT A tensorial (9-component) controlled source electromagnetic survey over an oblique slip fault in Mason County, Texas was acquired and the data were analyzed in order to characterize the structure of the fault and observe...

  19. Semiclassical origin of anomalous shell effect for tetrahedral deformation in radial power-law potential model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken-ichiro Arita; Yasunori Mukumoto

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Shell structures in single-particle energy spectra are investigated against regular tetrahedral type deformation using radial power-law potential model. Employing a natural way of shape parametrization which interpolates sphere and regular tetrahedron, we find prominent shell effects at rather large tetrahedral deformations, which bring about shell energies much larger than the cases of spherical and quadrupole type shapes. We discuss the semiclassical origin of these anomalous shell structures using periodic orbit theory.

  20. Critical Review of Theoretical Models for Anomalous Effects (Cold Fusion) in Deuterated Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chechin, V A; Rabinowitz, M; Kim, Y E

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly summarize the reported anomalous effects in deuterated metals at ambient temperature, commonly known as "Cold Fusion" (CF), with an emphasis on important experiments as well as the theoretical basis for the opposition to interpreting them as cold fusion. Then we critically examine more than 25 theoretical models for CF, including unusual nuclear and exotic chemical hypotheses. We conclude that they do not explain the data.

  1. Critical Review of Theoretical Models for Anomalous Effects (Cold Fusion) in Deuterated Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Chechin; V. A. Tsarev; M. Rabinowitz; Y. E. Kim

    2003-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly summarize the reported anomalous effects in deuterated metals at ambient temperature, commonly known as "Cold Fusion" (CF), with an emphasis on important experiments as well as the theoretical basis for the opposition to interpreting them as cold fusion. Then we critically examine more than 25 theoretical models for CF, including unusual nuclear and exotic chemical hypotheses. We conclude that they do not explain the data.

  2. COMMENTS ON ANOMALOUS EFFECTS IN CHARGING OF PD POWDERS WITH HIGH DENSITY HYDROGEN ISOTOPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanahan, K.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Kitamura, et al, Pd-containing materials are exposed to isotopes of hydrogen and anomalous results obtained. These are claimed to be a replication of another experiment conducted by Arata and Zhang. Erroneous basic assumptions are pointed out herein that alter the derived conclusions significantly. The final conclusion is that the reported results are likely normal chemistry combined with noise. Thus the claim to have proven that cold fusion is occurring in these systems is both premature and unlikely.

  3. Anomalous light-by-light scattering at the LHC: recent developments and future perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fichet, Sylvain

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The installation of forward proton detectors at the LHC will provide the possibility to perform new high-precision measurements, opening a novel window on physics beyond the Standard Model. We review recent simulations and theoretical developments about the measurement of anomalous light-by-light scattering. The search for this process is expected to provide bounds on a wide range of new particles. Future perspectives for precision QED at the LHC are also briefly discussed.

  4. Uncorrelated versus independent elliptically-contoured distributions for anomalous change detection in hyperspectral imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scovel, James C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of actual changes in a pair of images is confounded by the inadvertent but pervasive differences that inevitably arise whenever two pictures are taken of the same scene, but at different times and under different conditions. These differences include effects due to illumination, calibration, misregistration, etc. If the actual changes are assumed to be rare, then one can 'learn' what the pervasive differences are, and can identify the deviations from this pattern as the anomalous changes. A recently proposed framework for anomalous change detection recasts the problem as one of binary classification between pixel pairs in the data and pixel pairs that are independently chosen from the two images. When an elliptically-contoured (EC) distribution is assumed for the data, then analytical expressions can be derived for the measure of anomalousness of change. However, these expression are only available for a limited class of EC distributions. By replacing independent pixel pairs with uncorrelated pixel pairs, an approximate solution can be found for a much broader class of EC distributions. The performance of this approximation is investigated analytically and empirically, and includes experiments comparing the detection of real changes in real data.

  5. X-ray observations during a Her X-1 anomalous low-state

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Parmar; T. Oosterbroek; D. Dal Fiume; M. Orlandini; A. Santangelo; A. Segreto; S. Del Sordo

    1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a 1999 July 8-10 BeppoSAX observation during an anomalous low-state of Her X-1 are presented. The standard on-state power-law and blackbody continuum model is excluded at high confidence unless partial covering is included. This gives a power-law photon index of 0.63 +/- 0.02 and implies that 0.28 +/- 0.03 of the flux undergoes additional absorption of (27 +/- 7) 10^22 atom/cm2. 11% of the observed 0.1-10 keV flux is from the 0.068 +/- 0.015 keV blackbody. 1.237747(2) s pulses with a semi-amplitude of 2.1 +/- 0.8% are detected at >99.5% confidence and confirmed by RXTE measurements. This implies that Her X-1 underwent substantial spin-down close to the start of the anomalous low-state. The spectral and temporal changes are similar to those recently reported from 4U1626-67. These may result from a strongly warped disk that produces a spin-down torque. The X-ray source is then mostly viewed through the inner regions of the accretion disk. A similar mechanism could be responsible for the Her X-1 anomalous low-states. Shadowing by such an unusually warped disk could produce observable effects in the optical and UV emission from the companion star.

  6. Anomalously increased effective thermal conductivities of ethylene glycol-based nanofluids containing copper nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eastman, J. A.; Choi, S. U. S.; Li, S.; Yu, W.; Thompson, L. J.

    2001-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that a ''nanofluid'' consisting of copper nanometer-sized particles dispersed in ethylene glycol has a much higher effective thermal conductivity than either pure ethylene glycol or ethylene glycol containing the same volume fraction of dispersed oxide nanoparticles. The effective thermal conductivity of ethylene glycol is shown to be increased by up to 40% for a nanofluid consisting of ethylene glycol containing approximately 0.3 vol% Cu nanoparticles of mean diameter <10 nm. The results are anomalous based on previous theoretical calculations that had predicted a strong effect of particle shape on effective nanofluid thermal conductivity, but no effect of either particle size or particle thermal conductivity.

  7. Anomalous Quantum Hall Effect of 4D Graphene in Background Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. B Drissi; H. Mhamdi; E. H Saidi

    2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Bori\\c{c}i-Creutz (\\emph{BC}) model describing the dynamics of light quarks in lattice \\emph{QCD} has been shown to be intimately linked to the four dimensional extension of 2D graphene refereed below to as four dimensional graphene (\\emph{4D-graphene}). Borrowing ideas from the field theory description of the usual \\emph{2D} graphene, we study in this paper the anomalous quantum Hall effect (AQHE) of the \\emph{BC} fermions in presence of a constant background field strength $\\mathcal{F}_{\\mu \

  8. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Hg_1-yMn_yTe Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chao-Xing; /Tsinghua U., Beijing /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum Hall effect is usually observed when the two-dimensional electron gas is subjected to an external magnetic field, so that their quantum states form Landau levels. In this work we predict that a new phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, can be realized in Hg{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}Te quantum wells, without the external magnetic field and the associated Landau levels. This effect arises purely from the spin polarization of the Mn atoms, and the quantized Hall conductance is predicted for a range of quantum well thickness and the concentration of the Mn atoms. This effect enables dissipationless charge current in spintronics devices.

  9. Anomalous triple gauge couplings from $B$-meson and kaon observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobeth, Christoph

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the three CP-conserving dimension-6 operators that encode the leading new-physics effects in the triple gauge couplings. The contributions to the standard-model electromagnetic dipole and semi-leptonic vector and axial-vector interactions that arise from the insertions of these operators are calculated. We show that radiative and rare $B$-meson decays provide, under certain assumptions, constraints on two out of the three anomalous couplings that are competitive with the restrictions obtained from LEP II, Tevatron and LHC data. The constraints arising from the $Z \\to b \\bar b$ electroweak pseudo observables, $K \\to \\pi \

  10. Anomalous sea surface temperatures of the North Pacific Ocean and their relationship to precipitation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Garey Cecil

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the North Pacific and precip1tation in the ten climatic divisions of Texas, concurrently, and for t1me lags of up to six months. Anomalous sea surface temperatures for the 20 year period, 1947-1966, were correlated to prec1 pi tation totals that were... reported for the ten climatic divisions of Texas. An examination of the levels of significance for each correlat1on coeffic1ent was conducted. Correlation coefficients with high levels of significance were studied for patterns and peak frequencies...

  11. Anomalous behaviour of magnetic coercivity in graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagani, K.; Bhattacharya, A.; Kaur, J.; Rai Chowdhury, A.; Ghosh, B.; Banerjee, S., E-mail: sangam.banerjee@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, Surface Physics Division, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Sardar, M. [Material Science Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we present the temperature dependence of the magnetic coercivity of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO). We observe an anomalous decrease in coercivity of GO and RGO with decreasing temperature. The observation could be understood by invoking the inherent presence of wrinkles on graphene oxide due to presence of oxygen containing groups. Scanning electron microscopic image reveals high wrinkles in GO than RGO. We observe higher coercivity in RGO than in GO. At room temperature, we observe antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic behaviours in GO and RGO, respectively. Whereas, at low temperatures (below T?=?60–70?K), both materials show paramagnetic behaviour.

  12. Search for Anomalous Production of Events with Two Photons and Additional Energetic Objects at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /Padua U. /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U. /Kosice, IEF; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present results of a search for anomalous production of two photons together with an electron, muon, {tau} lepton, missing transverse energy, or jets using p{bar p} collision data from 1.1-2.0 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The event yields and kinematic distributions are examined for signs for new physics without favoring a specific model of new physics. The results are consistent with the standard model expectations. The search employs several new analysis techniques that significantly reduce instrumental backgrounds in channels with an electron and missing transverse energy.

  13. Hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blum, Thomas [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chowdhury, Saumitra [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Hayakawa, Masashi [Nagoya Univ. (Japan); Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama (Japan); Izubuchi, Taku [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The form factor that yields the light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment is computed in lattice QCD+QED and QED. A non-perturbative treatment of QED is used and is checked against perturbation theory. The hadronic contribution is calculated for unphysical quark and muon masses, and only the diagram with a single quark loop is computed. Statistically significant signals are obtained. Initial results appear promising, and the prospect for a complete calculation with physical masses and controlled errors is discussed.

  14. Anomalous Scaling of Structure Functions and Dynamic Constraints on Turbulence Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Yakhot; Katepalli R. Sreenivasan

    2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The connection between anomalous scaling of structure functions (intermittency) and numerical methods for turbulence simulations is discussed. It is argued that the computational work for direct numerical simulations (DNS) of fully developed turbulence increases as $Re^{4}$, and not as $Re^{3}$ expected from Kolmogorov's theory, where $Re$ is a large-scale Reynolds number. Various relations for the moments of acceleration and velocity derivatives are derived. An infinite set of exact constraints on dynamically consistent subgrid models for Large Eddy Simulations (LES) is derived from the Navier-Stokes equations, and some problems of principle associated with existing LES models are highlighted.

  15. Influence of disordered porous media in the anomalous properties of a simple water model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furlan, A P; Barbosa, M C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermodynamic, dynamic and structural behavior of a water-like system confined in a matrix is analyzed for increasing confining geometries. The liquid is modeled by a two dimensional associating lattice gas model that exhibits density and diffusion anomalies, in similarity to the anomalies present in liquid water. The matrix is a triangular lattice in which fixed obstacles impose restrictions to the occupation of the particles. We show that obstacules shortens all lines, including the phase coexistence, the critical and the anomalous lines. The inclusion of a very dense matrix not only suppress the anomalies but also the liquid-liquid critical point.

  16. Testing of the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation with T-Matrix Calculations for Hexagonal Columns

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed Donat About Usof the Modified Anomalous

  17. Anomalous zones in Gulf Coast Salt domes with special reference to Big Hill, TX, and Weeks Island, LA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States); Thoms, R.L. [AGM, Inc., College Station, TX (United States); Autin, W.J.; McCulloh, R.P. [Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Denzler, S.; Byrne, K.O. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous features in Gulf Coast Salt domes exhibit deviations from normally pure salt and vary widely in form from one dome to the next, ranging considerably in length and width. They have affected both conventional and solution mining in several ways. Gas outbursts, insolubles, and potash (especially carnallite) have led to the breakage of tubing in a number of caverns, and caused irregular shapes of many caverns through preferential leaching. Such anomalous features essentially have limited the lateral extent of conventional mining at several salt mines, and led to accidents and even the closing of several other mines. Such anomalous features, are often aligned in anomalous zones, and appear to be related to diapiric processes of salt dome development. Evidence indicates that anomalous zones are found between salt spines, where the differential salt intrusion accumulates other materials: Anhydrite bands which are relatively strong, and other, weaker impurities. Shear zones and fault displacement detected at Big Hill and Weeks Island domes have not yet had any known adverse impacts on SPR oil storage, but new caverns at these sites conceivably may encounter some potentially adverse conditions. Seismic reflection profiles at Big Hill dome have shown numerous fractures and faults in the caprock, and verified the earlier recognition of a major shear zone transecting the entire salt stock and forming a graben in the overlying caprock. Casing that is placed in such zones can be at risk. Knowledge of these zones should create awareness of possible effects rather than preclude the future emplacement of caverns. To the extent possible, major anomalous zones and salt stock boundaries should be avoided. Shear zones along overhangs may be particularly hazardous, and otherwise unknown valleys in the top of salt may occur along shear zones. These zones often can be mapped geophysically, especially with high-resolution seismic techniques.

  18. Strange and charm quark contributions to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bipasha Chakraborty; C. T. H. Davies; G. C. Donald; R. J. Dowdall; J. Koponen; G. P. Lepage; T. Teubner

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new technique to determine the contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon coming from the hadronic vacuum polarization using lattice QCD. Our method reconstructs the Adler function, using Pad\\'{e} approximants, from its derivatives at $q^2=0$ obtained simply and accurately from time-moments of the vector current-current correlator at zero spatial momentum. We test the method using strange quark correlators on large-volume gluon field configurations that include the effect of up and down (at physical masses), strange and charm quarks in the sea at multiple values of the lattice spacing and multiple volumes and show that 1% accuracy is achievable. For the charm quark contributions we use our previously determined moments with up, down and strange quarks in the sea on very fine lattices. We find the (connected) contribution to the anomalous moment from the strange quark vacuum polarization to be $a_\\mu^s = 53.41(59) \\times 10^{-10}$, and from charm to be $a_\\mu^c = 14.42(39)\\times 10^{-10}$. These are in good agreement with flavour-separated results from non-lattice methods, given caveats about the comparison. The extension of our method to the light quark contribution and to that from the quark-line disconnected diagram is straightforward.

  19. Anomalous Flyby in the Non-Prefered Reference Frame of the Rotating Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Petry

    2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Several spacecrafts show an anomalous flyby. In a previous paper a non-prefered reference frame is studied moving uniformly relative to the prefered one. In this article the Doppler frequency residual is derived. The prefered reference frame is given by the isotropy of the CMB and the non-prefered one is the Earth. The resulting jump is much too small to explain the measured anomalous flybys of the different spacecrafts. Therefore, the transformations from the prefered frame to the non-prefered frame are replaced by the corresponding total differentials. A formula for the Doppler frequency residual is derived. It is applied to the prefered frame of the Earth and the non-prefered frame of the rotating Earth. The resulting Doppler residual depends on the direction of the velocity of the spacecraft and the position of the observer on the rotating Earth. It is similar to the experimental formula of Anderson et al. which is independent of the position of the observer.

  20. Magnetic reconnection with anomalous resistivity in two-and-a-half dimensions. I. Quasistationary case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malyshkin, Leonid M.; Linde, Timur; Kulsrud, Russell M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Chicago, Center for Magnetic Self-Organization (CMSO), Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Center for Magnetic Self-Organization (CMSO), Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper quasistationary, 'two-and-a-half-dimensional' magnetic reconnection is studied in the framework of incompressible resistive magnetohydrodynamics. A new theoretical approach for the calculation of the reconnection rate is presented. This approach is based on the local analytical derivations in a thin reconnection layer, and it is applicable to the case when resistivity is anomalous and is an arbitrary function of the electric current and the spatial coordinates. It is found that a quasistationary reconnection rate is fully determined by a particular functional form of the anomalous resistivity and by the local configuration of the magnetic field just outside the reconnection layer. It is also found that, in the special case of constant resistivity, reconnection is Sweet-Parker [Electromagnetic Phenomena, edited by B. Lehnert (Cambridge University Press, New York, 1958), p. 123; Astrophys. J., Suppl. 8, 177 (1963)] and not Petschek [AAS-NASA Symposium on Solar Flares NASA SP5 (National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, D.C., 1964), p. 425].

  1. Testing the role of metal hydrolysis in the anomalous electrodeposition of Ni-Fe alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, T.M.; St. Clair, J. [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the objective of testing several models of the anomalous codeposition (ACD) encountered in the electrodeposition of nickel-iron alloys, the effects of bath pH and complexing agents on the composition of deposits were examined. When the pH of the base line bath was increased from 3.0 to 5.0, the Ni/Fe mass ratio of the deposit increased (i.e., the deposition became less anomalous). The presence of tartrate ion in the bath produced a slight decrease in the Ni/Fe of the deposit. This complexing agent complexes ferric ion and thus prevents its precipitation but has little interaction with ferrous ion or nickel ion under the electrodeposition conditions examined. The addition of ethylenediamine to the bath produced a significant increase in the Ni/Fe mass ratio. This complexing agent does not interact significantly with ferric ion or ferrous ion under the test conditions. None of these observations are consistent with the Dahms and Croll model of ACD. The effects of pH and tartaric acid on the deposit composition are consistent with the predictions of the Grande and Talbot model and the Matlosz model. The effect of ethylenediamine is not consistent with the Grande and Talbot model, but may be interpreted within the framework of the Matlosz model and the Hessami and Tobias model.

  2. Analysis of The Anomalous Orbital-Energy Changes Observed in Spacecraft Flybys of Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roger Ellman

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In March 2008 anomalous behavior in spacecraft flybys of Earth was reported in Physical Review Letters, Volume 100, Issue 9, March 7, 2008, in an article entitled "Anomalous Orbital-Energy Changes Observed during Spacecraft Flybys of Earth". The data indicate unaccounted for changes in spacecraft speed, both increases and decreases, for six different spacecraft involved in Earth flybys from December 8, 1990 to August 2, 2005. The article states that, "All ... potential sources of systematic error .... [have been] modeled. None can account for the observed anomalies.... Like the Pioneer anomaly ... the Earth flybys anomaly is a real effect .... Its source is unknown." In the present article it is shown that the Earth flybys anomaly would be caused by a very small acceleration [in addition to that of natural gravitation], centrally directed and independent of distance, the same effect as that which the Pioneer anomaly exhibits. How that effect operates to produce the observed results is analyzed. A cause of the centrally directed accelerations is presented.

  3. Anomalous photoresponse of GaN x-ray Schottky detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duboz, Jean-Yves [CRHEA, CNRS, rue Bernard Gregory, Sophia Antipolis, F-06560 Valbonne (France); Beaumont, Bernard [Lumilog Groupe Saint GOBAIN Crystals, 2720 Chemin de Saint Bernard, F-06220 Vallauris (France); Reverchon, Jean-Luc [THALES R and T, Campus Polytechnique, 1 Avenue Augustin Fresnel, F-91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Wieck, Andreas D. [Fakultaet fuer Physik und Astronomie, Lehrstuhl fuer Angewandte Festkoerperphysik, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GaN based materials are believed to be very stable materials, in particular, under irradiation by high energy photons such as x rays. We have studied x-ray detectors based on GaN Schottky diodes. Vertical Schottky diodes were fabricated based on a 20 mum thick undoped GaN layer grown on a conductive GaN substrate. Their photoresponse to near UV light and to x rays was measured. While the response to near UV light was fast and linear as expected, anomalous behaviors were observed under x-ray illumination. The photocurrent increases as the third power of the incident x-ray flux. The photocurrent transient when the x rays is turned on are long and nonexponential (S shape) and strongly differs from the off transient which is fast and exponential. Also, a very strong quenching of the x-ray photoresponse is observed when the detector is simultaneously illuminated with visible light. All of these anomalous behaviors are explained in the frame of a complete model involving traps and tunnel currents. A reasonable quantitative agreement between the model and the experimental data is obtained.

  4. Implications of the anomalous top quark couplings in $B_s-\\bar{B}_s$ mixing, $B \\to X_s ?$ and top quark decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jong Phil Lee; Kang Young Lee

    2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined analysis of recent measured $\\bs$ mixing and $B \\to X_s \\gamma$ decays provides constraints on the anomalous $\\bar{t}sW$ couplings. We discuss the perspectives to examine the anomalous $\\bar{t}sW$ couplings through CKM-suppressed $ t \\to s W$ decays at the LHC.

  5. Intrinsic anomalous surface roughening of TiN films deposited by reactive sputtering M. A. Auger,1,5 L. Vzquez,1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cuerno, Rodolfo

    Intrinsic anomalous surface roughening of TiN films deposited by reactive sputtering M. A. Auger,1 manuscript received 1 December 2005; published 31 January 2006 We study surface kinetic roughening of TiN. The TiN films exhibit intrinsic anomalous scaling and multiscaling. The film kinetic roughening

  6. Investigation of Sludge Batch 3 (Macrobatch 4) Glass Sample Anomalous Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.; Bibler, N. E.; Peeler, D. K.

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass samples from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) (Macrobatch 4) were received by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) on February 23, 2005. One sample, S02244, was designated for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and elemental and radionuclide analyses. The second sample, S02247, was designated for archival storage. The samples were pulled from the melter pour stream during the feeding of Melter Feed Tank (MFT) Batch 308 and therefore roughly correspond to feed from Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Batches 306-308. During the course of preparing sample S02244 for PCT and other analyses two observations were made which were characterized as ''unusual'' or anomalous behavior relative to historical observations of glasses prepared for the PCT. These observations ultimately led to a series of scoping tests in order to determine more about the nature of the behavior and possible mechanisms. The first observation was the behavior of the ground glass fraction (-100 +200 mesh) for PCT analysis when contacted with deionized water during the washing phase of the PCT procedure. The behavior was analogous to that of an organic compound in the presence of water: clumping, floating on the water surface, and crawling up the beaker walls. In other words, the glass sample did not ''wet'' normally, displaying a hydrophobic behavior in water. This had never been seen before in 18 years SRNL PCT tests on either radioactive or non-radioactive glasses. Typical glass behavior is largely to settle to the bottom of the water filled beaker, though there may be suspended fines which result in some cloudiness to the wash water. The typical appearance is analogous to wetting sand. The second observation was the presence of faint black rings at the initial and final solution levels in the Teflon vessels used for the mixed acid digestion of S02244 glass conducted for compositional analysis. The digestion is composed of two stages, and at both the intermediate and the final content levels in the digestion vessel the rings were present. The rings had not been seen previously during glass digestions and were not present in the Analytical Reference Glass (ARG) standard samples digested, in separate vessels, along with the DWPF glass. What follows in this report are the results and analyses from various scoping experiments done in order to explain the anomalous behavior observed with DWPF glass S02244, along with a comparison with tests on sample S02247 where the anomalous wetting behavior was not observed.

  7. The 2007 Bering Strait oceanic heat flux and anomalous Arctic sea-ice Rebecca A. Woodgate,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsay, Ron

    flowing PW weakens the ice-pack thereby promoting more sea-ice motion in response to wind, which in turnThe 2007 Bering Strait oceanic heat flux and anomalous Arctic sea-ice retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate,1 sea-ice retreat, we use observational data to estimate Bering Strait volume and heat transports from

  8. The 2007 Bering Strait Oceanic Heat Flux and anomalous Arctic Sea-ice Retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate*, Tom Weingartner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    where heat carried by northward flowing PW weakens the ice-pack thereby promoting more sea-ice motionThe 2007 Bering Strait Oceanic Heat Flux and anomalous Arctic Sea-ice Retreat Rebecca A. Woodgate Abstract: To illuminate the role of Pacific Waters in the 2007 Arctic sea-ice retreat, we use observational

  9. Anomalous skin effects in relativistic parallel propagating weakly magnetized electron plasma waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas, Gohar; Bashir, M. F. [Salam Chair in Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Department of Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan); Murtaza, G. [Salam Chair in Physics, G. C. University, Lahore 54000 (Pakistan)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully relativistic analysis of anomalous skin effects for parallel propagating waves in a weakly magnetized electron plasma is presented and general expressions for longitudinal and transverse permittivites are derived. It is found that the penetration depth for R- and L-waves increases as we move from non-relativistic to highly relativistic regime. The ambient magnetic field reduces/enhances the skin effects for R-wave/L-wave as the strength of the field is increased. In general, the weak magnetic field effects are pronounced for the weakly relativistic regime as compared with other relativistic cases. The results are also graphically illustrated. On switching off the magnetic field, previous results for field free case are retrieved [A. F. Alexandrov, A. S. Bogdankevich, and A. A. Rukhadze, Priniples of Plasma Electrodynamics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, 1984), Vol. 9, p. 106].

  10. Generation of anomalously energetic suprathermal electrons by an electron beam interacting with a nonuniform plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sydorenko, D; Chen, L; Ventzek, P L G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of anomalously energetic suprathermal electrons was observed in simulation of a high- voltage dc discharge with electron emission from the cathode. An electron beam produced by the emission interacts with the nonuniform plasma in the discharge via a two-stream instability. Efficient energy transfer from the beam to the plasma electrons is ensured by the plasma nonuniformity. The electron beam excites plasma waves whose wavelength and phase speed gradually decrease towards anode. The short waves near the anode accelerate plasma bulk electrons to suprathermal energies. The sheath near the anode reflects some of the accelerated electrons back into the plasma. These electrons travel through the plasma, reflect near the cathode, and enter the accelerating area again but with a higher energy than before. Such particles are accelerated to energies much higher than after the first acceleration. This mechanism plays a role in explaining earlier experimental observations of energetic suprathermal electrons i...

  11. A Case Against Spinning PAHs as the Source of the Anomalous Microwave Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensley, Brandon S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ the all-sky map of the anomalous microwave emission (AME) produced by component separation of the microwave sky to study correlations between the AME and Galactic dust properties. We find that while the AME is highly correlated with all tracers of dust emission, fluctuations in the AME intensity per dust optical depth are uncorrelated with fluctuations in the emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), casting doubt on the association between AME and PAHs. Further, we find that the best predictor of the AME strength is the dust radiance and that the AME intensity increases with increasing radiation field strength, at variance with predictions from the spinning dust hypothesis. A reconsideration of other emission mechanisms, such as magnetic dipole emission, is warranted.

  12. Anomalous Brownian motion of colloidal particle in a nematic environment: effect of the director fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Turiv; A. Brodin; V. Nazarenko

    2015-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    As recently reported [Turiv T. et al., Science, 2013, Vol. 342, 1351], fluctuations in the orientation of the liquid crystal (LC) director can transfer momentum from the LC to a colloid, such that the diffusion of the colloid becomes anomalous on a short time scale. Using video microscopy and single particle tracking, we investigate random thermal motion of colloidal particles in a nematic liquid crystal for the time scales shorter than the expected time of director fluctuations. At long times, compared to the characteristic time of the nematic director relaxation we observe typical anisotropic Brownian motion with the mean square displacement (MSD) linear in time $\\tau$ and inversly proportional to the effective viscosity of the nematic medium. At shorter times, however, the dynamics is markedly nonlinear with MSD growing more slowly (subdiffusion) or faster (superdiffusion) than $\\tau$. These results are discussed in the context of coupling of colloidal particle's dynamics to the director fluctuation dynamics.

  13. Anomalous Lattice Dynamics and Thermal Properties of Supported Size- and Shape-selected Pt Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B Roldan Cuenya; A Frenkel; S Mostafa; F Behafarid; J Croy; L Ono; Q Wang

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous lattice dynamics and thermal behavior have been observed for ligand-free, size-, and shape-selected Pt nanoparticles (NPs) supported on nanocrystalline {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via extended x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy. Several major differences were observed for the NPs with respect to bulk Pt: (i) a contraction in the interatomic distances, (ii) a reduction in the dynamic (temperature-dependent) bond-length disorder and associated increase in the Debye temperature ({Theta}{sub D}), and (iii) an overall decrease in the bond-length expansion coefficient coupled with NP stiffening. The increase in the Debye temperature is explained in terms of the NP size, shape, support interactions, and adsorbate effects. For a similar average size, we observe a striking correlation between the shapes of the NPs and their {Theta}{sub D} values.

  14. Anomalous Viscosity, Resistivity, and Thermal Diffusivity of the Solar Wind Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahendra K. Verma

    1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have estimated typical anomalous viscosity, resistivity, and thermal difffusivity of the solar wind plasma. Since the solar wind is collsionless plasma, we have assumed that the dissipation in the solar wind occurs at proton gyro radius through wave-particle interactions. Using this dissipation length-scale and the dissipation rates calculated using MHD turbulence phenomenology [{\\it Verma et al.}, 1995a], we estimate the viscosity and proton thermal diffusivity. The resistivity and electron's thermal diffusivity have also been estimated. We find that all our transport quantities are several orders of magnitude higher than those calculated earlier using classical transport theories of {\\it Braginskii}. In this paper we have also estimated the eddy turbulent viscosity.

  15. Topological insulators in silicene: Quantum hall, quantum spin hall and quantum anomalous hall effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ezawa, Motohiko [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicene is a monolayer of silicon atoms forming a two-dimensional honeycomb lattice, which shares almost every remarkable property with graphene. The low energy dynamics is described by Dirac electrons, but they are massive due to relatively large spin-orbit interactions. I will explain the following properties of silicene: 1) The band structure is controllable by applying an electric field. 2) Silicene undergoes a phase transition from a topological insulator to a band insulator by applying external electric field. 3) The topological phase transition can be detected experimentally by way of diamagnetism. 4) There is a novel valley-spin selection rules revealed by way of photon absorption. 5) Silicene yields a remarkably many phases such as quantum anomalous Hall phase and valley polarized metal when the exchange field is additionally introduced. 6) A silicon nanotubes can be used to convey spin currents under an electric field.

  16. Entropy of the Nordic electricity market: anomalous scaling, spikes, and mean-reversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perello, J; Montero, M; Palatella, L; Simonsen, I; Masoliver, Jaume; Montero, Miquel; Palatella, Luigi; Perello, Josep; Simonsen, Ingve

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electricity market is a very peculiar market due to the large variety of phenomena that can affect the spot price. However, this market still shows many typical features of other speculative (commodity) markets like, for instance, data clustering and mean reversion. We apply the diffusion entropy analysis (DEA) to the Nordic spot electricity market (Nord Pool). We study the waiting time statistics between consecutive spot price spikes and find it to show anomalous scaling characterized by a decaying power-law. The exponent observed in data follows a quite robust relationship with the one implied by the DEA analysis. We also in terms of the DEA revisit topics like clustering, mean-reversion and periodicities. We finally propose a GARCH inspired model but for the price itself. Models in the context of stochastic volatility processes appear under this scope to have a feasible description.

  17. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, Lucas R [ORNL; Broido, David [Boston College, Chestnut Hill; Carrete, Jesus [French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Grenoble; Mingo, Natalio [French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Grenoble; Reinecke, Tom [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lattice thermal conductivities ( ) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure, P, using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of . This anomalous P dependence of arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with small mass ratios. This work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.

  18. Fractal Location and Anomalous Diffusion Dynamics for Oil Wells from the KY Geological Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Keith; Andrew, Kevin A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Utilizing data available from the Kentucky Geonet (KYGeonet.ky.gov) the fossil fuel mining locations created by the Kentucky Geological Survey geo-locating oil and gas wells are mapped using ESRI ArcGIS in Kentucky single plain 1602 ft projection. This data was then exported into a spreadsheet showing latitude and longitude for each point to be used for modeling at different scales to determine the fractal dimension of the set. Following the porosity and diffusivity studies of Tarafdar and Roy1 we extract fractal dimensions of the fossil fuel mining locations and search for evidence of scaling laws for the set of deposits. The Levy index is used to determine a match to a statistical mechanically motivated generalized probability function for the wells. This probability distribution corresponds to a solution of a dynamical anomalous diffusion equation of fractional order that describes the Levy paths which can be solved in the diffusion limit by the Fox H function ansatz.

  19. Strong coupling of an optomechanical system to an anomalously dispersive atomic medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haibin Wu; Min Xiao

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate a hybrid optomechanical system in which a membrane oscillator is coupled to a collective spin of ground states of an intracavity $\\Lambda$-type three-level atomic medium. The cavity field response is greatly modified by atomic coherence and the anomalous dispersion generated by two Raman pumping beams near two-photon resonance. The optomechanical interaction, therefore radiation pressure force, is substantially enhanced due to superluminal propagation of photons in the cavity. Such improvement facilitates ground-state cooling of the mechanical oscillator with room temperature thermal environment. Moreover, it can greatly improve the sensitivity and bandwidth of displacement measurement. In such system, optically-controlled strong-coupling interaction between the mechanical oscillator and cavity field could be implemented on small intracavity photon number, even at the single quanta level, which is important for weak-light nonlinear photonics and the generation of nonclassical quantum states in the mechanical field.

  20. Four-flavour leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burger, Florian [Humboldt U. Berlin; Feng, Xu [KEK; Hotzel, Grit [Humboldt U. Berlin; Jansen, Karl [DESY, Cyprus; Petschlies, Marcus [The Cyprus Institute; Renner, Dru B. [JLAB

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a four-flavour lattice calculation of the leading-order hadronic vacuum polarisation contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a?hvp, arising from quark-connected Feynman graphs. It is based on ensembles featuring Nf=2+1+1 dynamical twisted mass fermions generated by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration (ETMC). Several light quark masses are used in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass. We employ three lattice spacings to examine lattice artefacts and several different volumes to check for finite-size effects. Including the complete first two generations of quarks allows for a direct comparison with phenomenological determinations of a ?hvp. Our final result involving an estimate of the systematic uncertainty a ?hvp=6.74 (21)(18) 10-8 shows a good overall agreement with these computations.

  1. Anomalous magnetic and electric moments of $?$ and lepton flavor mixing matrix in effective lagrangian approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Q. Zhang; X. C. Song; W. J. Huo; T. F. Feng

    2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In an effective lagrangian approach [EM97] to new physics, the authors in ref. [HL99] pushed tau anomalous magnetic and electric dipole moments (AMDM and EDM) down to $10^{-11}$ and $10^{-25} e cm$ by using a Fritzsch-Xing lepton mass matrix ansatz. In this note, we find that, in this approach, there exists the connection between $\\tau$ AMDM and EDM and the lepton flavor mixing matrix. By using the current neutrino oscillation experimental results, we investigate the parameter space of lepton mixing angles to $\\tau$ AMDM and EDM. We can obtain the same or smaller bounds of $\\delta a_\\tau$ and $d_\\tau$ acquired in ref. [HL99] and constrain $\\theta_l$ (the mixing angle obtained by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments) from $\\tau$ AMDM and EDM.

  2. Multipole Models of Four-Image Gravitational Lenses with Anomalous Flux Ratios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arthur B. Congdon; Charles R. Keeton

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous radio flux ratios in four-image gravitational lens systems can be explained by adding a clumpy cold dark matter (CDM) component to the potential of the lens galaxy. Evans & Witt (2003) recently suggested that smooth multipole perturbations can provide a reasonable alternative to CDM substructure in some but not all cases. We generalize their method in two ways so as to determine whether multipole models can explain highly anomalous systems. We carry the multipole expansion to higher order, and also include external tidal shear as a free parameter. Fitting for the shear proves crucial to finding a physical (positive-definite density) model. For B1422+231, working to order k = 5 (and including shear) yields a model that is physical but implausible. Going to higher order (k >~ 9) reduces global departures from ellipticity at the cost of introducing small scale wiggles near the bright images. These localized undulations are more pronounced in B2045+265, where k ~ 17 multipoles are required to smooth out large scale deviations from elliptical symmetry. Such modes surely cannot be taken at face value; they must indicate that the models are trying to reproduce some other sort of structure. Our formalism naturally finds models that fit the data exactly, but we use B0712+472 to show that measurement uncertainties have little effect on our results. Finally, we consider the system B1933+503, where two sources are lensed by the same foreground galaxy. The additional constraints provided by the images of the second source render the multipole model unphysical. We conclude that external shear must be taken into account to obtain plausible models, and that a purely smooth angular structure for the lens galaxy does not provide a viable alternative to the prevailing CDM clump hypothesis.

  3. Search of anomalous $Wtb$ couplins in single top quark prodution at D0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Jyoti; Beri, Suman; /Panjab U.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The large mass of the top quark, close to the electroweak symmetry-breaking scale, makes it a good candidate for probing physics beyond the Standard Model, including possible anomalous couplings. D0 has made measurements of single top quark production using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. We examine the data to study the Lorentz structure of the Wtb coupling. We find that the data prefer the left-handed vector coupling and set upper limits on the anomalous couplings. In 2009, the electroweak single top quark production was observed by the D0 and CDF collaborations. Electroweak production of top quarks at the Tevatron proceeds mainly via the decay of a time-like virtual W boson accompanied by a bottom quark in the s-channel (tb = t{bar b} + {bar t}b), or via the exchange of a space-like virtual W boson between a light quark and a bottom quark in the t-channel (tqb = tq{bar b} + {bar t}qb, where q refers to the light quark). For a top quark mass of 172.5 GeV, The Standard Model (SM) prediction of single top production rate at next-to-leading order with soft-gluon contributions at next-to-next-to-leading order are 1.04 {+-} 0.04 pb (s-channel) and 2.26 {+-} 0.12 pb (t-channel). The large mass of the top quark implies that it has large couplings to the electroweak symmetry breaking sector of the SM and may have non-standard interactions with the weak gauge bosons. Single top quark production provides a unique probe to study the interactions of the top quark with the W boson.

  4. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4441550.552290 m Left: 271445.053363 m Right: 359825.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  5. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359681.975000 m Bottom: 4447251.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  6. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  7. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144691.792023 m Left: 285531.662851 m Right: 348694.182686 m Bottom: 4097005.210304 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  8. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolored County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  9. An Instability of the Standard Model Creates the Anomalous Acceleration Without Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joel Smoller; Blake Temple; Zeke Vogler

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new asymptotic ansatz for spherical perturbations of the Standard Model of Cosmology (SM) which applies during the $p=0$ epoch, and prove that these perturbations trigger instabilities in the SM on the scale of the supernova data. These instabilities create a large, central region of uniform under-density which expands faster than the SM, and this central region of accelerated uniform expansion introduces into the SM {\\it precisely} the same range of corrections to redshift vs luminosity as are produced by the cosmological constant in the theory of Dark Energy. A universal behavior is exhibited because all sufficiently small perturbations evolve to a single stable rest point. Moreover, we prove that these perturbations are consistent with, and the instability is triggered by, the one parameter family of self-similar waves which the authors previously proposed as possible time-asymptotic wave patterns for perturbations of the SM at the end of the radiation epoch. Using numerical simulations, we calculate the unique wave in the family that accounts for the same values of the Hubble constant and quadratic correction to redshift vs luminosity as in a universe with seventy percent Dark Energy, $\\Omega_{\\Lambda}\\approx.7$. A numerical simulation of the third order correction associated with that unique wave establishes a testable prediction that distinguishes this theory from the theory of Dark Energy. This explanation for the anomalous acceleration, based on instabilities in the SM together with simple wave perturbations from the radiation epoch that trigger them, provides perhaps the simplest mathematical explanation for the anomalous acceleration of the galaxies that does not invoke Dark Energy.

  10. Search for anomalous production of prompt like-sign muon pairs and constraints on physics beyond the standard model with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    An inclusive search for anomalous production of two prompt, isolated muons with the same electric charge is presented. The search is performed in a data sample corresponding to 1.6??fb[superscript -1] of integrated luminosity ...

  11. On the Indication from Pioneer 10/11 Data of an Apparent Anomalous, Weak, Long-Range Acceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. G. Yi

    2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Hubble's law, which states a linear increase in velocities with distances, can physically be understood in terms of an acceleration cH. This work proposes a connection between this "universal" acceleration seen in the solar system and the anomalous acceleration acting on the Pioneer 10/11 spacecraft, in which the Hubble constant inferred from Pioneer 10/11 data is ~ 87 km/s/Mpc. Its physical implication is discussed in relation with Mach's principle.

  12. Large anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic insulator-topological insulator heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alegria, L. D.; Petta, J. R. [Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Ji, H.; Cava, R. J. [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Yao, N. [Princeton Institute for the Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Clarke, J. J. [Hitachi High Technologies America, Inc., Clarksburg, Maryland 20871 (United States)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the van der Waals epitaxy of the topological insulator compound Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on the ferromagnetic insulator Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The layers are oriented with (001)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(001)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and (110)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(100)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicates the formation of a sharp interface. At low temperatures, bilayers consisting of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} exhibit a large anomalous Hall effect (AHE). Tilted field studies of the AHE indicate that the easy axis lies along the c-axis of the heterostructure, consistent with magnetization measurements in bulk Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The 61?K Curie temperature of Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and the use of near-stoichiometric materials may lead to the development of spintronic devices based on the AHE.

  13. Astrophysics of the Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Thompson

    2000-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    I summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the Soft Gamma Repeaters: in particular their spin behavior, persistent emission and hyper-Eddington outbursts. The giant flares on 5 March 1979 and 27 August 1998 provide compelling physical evidence for magnetic fields stronger than 10 B_{QED} = 4.4 x 10^{14} G, consistent with the rapid spindown detected in two of these sources. The persistent X-ray emission and variable spindown of the 6-12 s Anomalous X-ray Pulsars are compared and contrasted with those of the SGRs, and the case made for a close connection between the two types of sources. Their collective properties point to the existence of {\\it magnetars}: neutron stars in which a decaying magnetic field (rather than accretion or rotation) is the dominant source of energy for radiative and particle emissions. Observational tests of the magnetar model are outlined, along with current ideas about the trigger of SGR outbursts, new evidence for the trapped fireball model, and the influence of QED processes on X-ray spectra and lightcurves. A critical examination is made of coherent radio emission from bursting strong-field neutron stars. I conclude with an overview of the genetic connection between neutron star magnetism and the violent fluid motions in a collapsing supernova core.

  14. Thermodynamically Anomalous Regions and Possible New Signals of Mixed Phase Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. A. Bugaev; A. I. Ivanytskyi; D. R. Oliinychenko; V. V. Sagun; I. N. Mishustin; D. H. Rischke; L. M. Satarov; G. M. Zinovjev

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an advanced version of the hadron resonance gas model we have found remarkable irregularities of relativistic heavy-ion collisions at chemical freeze-out. They include an abrupt change of the effective number of degrees of freedom at laboratory energies 8.9-11.6 AGeV and plateaus in the collision-energy dependence of the entropy per baryon, total pion number per baryon, and thermal pion number per baryon at laboratory energies 6.9-11.6 AGeV. Also at chemical freeze-out we observe a sharp peak in the dimensionless trace anomaly at laboratory energy 11.6 AGeV. On the basis of the generalized shock-adiabat model we demonstrate that these observations give evidence for the anomalous thermodynamic properties of the mixed phase at its boundary to the quark-gluon plasma. We argue that the trace anomaly peak and the local minimum of the generalized specific volume observed at a laboratory energy of 11.6 AGeV provide a signal for the formation of a mixed phase between the quark-gluon plasma and the hadron phase.

  15. On anomalous temporal evolution of gas pressure in inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, B. H.; Chang, H. Y. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); You, S. J.; Kim, J. H.; Seong, D. J. [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-306 (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Vacuum Technology, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-306 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The temporal measurement of gas pressure in inductive coupled plasma revealed that there is an interesting anomalous evolution of gas pressure in the early stage of plasma ignition and extinction: a sudden gas pressure change and its relaxation of which time scales are about a few seconds and a few tens of second, respectively, were observed after plasma ignition and extinction. This phenomenon can be understood as a combined result between the neutral heating effect induced by plasma and the pressure relaxation effect for new gas temperature. The temporal measurement of gas temperature by laser Rayleigh scattering and the time dependant calculations for the neutral heating and pressure relaxation are in good agreement with our experimental results. This result and physics behind are expected to provide a new operational perspective of the recent plasma processes of which time is very short, such as a plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition/etching, a soft etch for disposal of residual by-products on wafer, and light oxidation process in semiconductor manufacturing.

  16. Resonant cavity mode dependence of anomalous and inverse spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-young, E-mail: parksy@kbsi.re.kr [Division of Materials Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct current electric voltage induced by the Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) and Anomalous Hall Effect (AHE) was investigated in the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The ISHE and AHE components were distinguishable through the fitting of the voltage spectrum. The unwanted AHE was minimized by placing the DUT (Device Under Test) at the center of both the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The voltage of ISHE in the TE{sub 011} cavity was larger than that in the TE{sub 102} cavity due to the higher quality factor of the former. Despite optimized centering, AHE voltage from TE{sub 011} cavity was also higher. The reason was attributed to the E-field distribution inside the cavity. In the case of the TE{sub 011} cavity, the DUT was easily exposed to the E-field in all directions. Therefore, the parasitic AHE voltage in the TE{sub 102} cavity was less sensitive than that in the TE{sub 011} cavity to decentering problem.

  17. Note on Anomalous Higgs-Boson Couplings in Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchalla, G; Celis, A; Krause, C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a parametrization of anomalous Higgs-boson couplings that is both systematic and practical. It is based on the electroweak chiral Lagrangian, including a light Higgs boson, as the effective field theory (EFT) at the electroweak scale $v$. This is the appropriate framework for the case of sizeable deviations in the Higgs couplings of order $10\\%$ from the Standard Model, considered to be parametrically larger than new-physics effects in the sector of electroweak gauge interactions. The role of power counting in identifying the relevant parameters is emphasized. The three relevant scales, $v$, the scale of new Higgs dynamics $f$, and the cut-off $\\Lambda=4\\pi f$, admit expansions in $\\xi=v^2/f^2$ and $f^2/\\Lambda^2$. The former corresponds to an organization of operators by their canonical dimension, the latter by their loop order or chiral dimension. In full generality the EFT is thus organized as a double expansion. However, as long as $\\xi\\gg 1/16\\pi^2$ the EFT systematics is closer to the chiral ...

  18. On The Anomalous Fast Ion Energy Diffusion in Toroidal Plasmas Due to Cavity Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.N. Gorelenkov, N.J. Fisch and E. Fredrickson

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An enormous wave-particle diffusion coefficient along paths suitable for alpha channeling had been deduced in mode converted ion Bernstein wave experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) the only plausible explanation advanced for such a large diffusion coefficient was the excitation of internal cavity modes which induce particle diffusion along identical diffusion paths, but at much higher rates. Although such a mode was conjectured, it was never observed. However, recent detailed observations of high frequency compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAEs) on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) indirectly support the existence of the related conjectured modes on TFTR. The eigenmodes responsible for the high frequency magnetic activity can be identified as CAEs through the polarization of the observed magnetic field oscillations in NSTX and through a comparison with the theoretically derived freuency dispersion relation. Here, we show how these recent observations of high frequency CAEs lend support to this explanation of the long-standing puzzle of anomalous fast ion energy diffusion on TFTR. The support of the conjecure that these internal modes could have caused the remarkable ion energy diffusion on TFTR carries significant and favorable implications for the possibilities in achieving the alpha channeling effect with small injected power in a tokamak reactor.

  19. Optical properties of metals: Infrared emissivity in the anomalous skin effect spectral region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Echániz, T. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Pérez-Sáez, R. B., E-mail: raul.perez@ehu.es; Tello, M. J. [Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Facultad de Ciencia y Tecnología, UPV/EHU, Sarriena s/n, Leioa 48940 (Spain); Instituto de Síntesis y Estudio de Materiales, Universidad del País Vasco, Apdo. 644, Bilbao 48080 (Spain)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    When the penetration depth of an electromagnetic wave in a metal is similar to the mean free path of the conduction electrons, the Drude classical theory is no longer satisfied and the skin effect becomes anomalous. Physical parameters of this theory for twelve metals were calculated and analyzed. The theory predicts an emissivity peak ?{sub peak} at room temperature in the mid-infrared for smooth surface metals that moves towards larger wavelengths as temperature decreases. Furthermore, the theory states that ?{sub peak} increases with the emission angle but its position, ?{sub peak}, is constant. Copper directional emissivity measurements as well as emissivity obtained using optical constants data confirm the predictions of the theory. Considering the relationship between the specularity parameter p and the sample roughness, it is concluded that p is not the simple parameter it is usually assumed to be. Quantitative comparison between experimental data and theoretical predictions shows that the specularity parameter can be equal to one for roughness values larger than those predicted. An exhaustive analysis of the experimental optical parameters shows signs of a reflectance broad peak in Cu, Al, Au, and Mo around the wavelength predicted by the theory for p?=?1.

  20. Anomalous X-ray pulsars and soft gamma-ray repeaters - the connection with supernova remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan Gaensler

    2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the properties of anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) are still a matter of much debate, as is the connection (if any) between these two groups of sources. In cases where we can identify the supernova remnant (SNR) associated with an AXP or SGR, the extra information thus obtained can provide important constraints as to the nature of these exotic objects. In this paper, I explain the criteria by which an association between a SNR and an AXP/SGR should be judged, review the set of associations which result, and discuss the implications provided by these associations for the ages, environments and evolutionary pathways of the AXPs and SGRs. There are several convincing associations between AXPs and SNRs, demonstrating that AXPs are young neutron stars with moderate space velocities. The lack of associations between SGRs and SNRs implies that the SGRs either represent an older population of neutron stars than do the AXPs, or originate from more massive progenitors.

  1. Anomalous ion heating and superthermal electrons in the MST reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hokin, S.; Almagri, A.; Assadi, S.; Cekic, M.; Chapman, B.; Chartas, G.; Crocker, N.; Cudzinovic, M.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Dexter, R.; Fiksel, G.; Fonck, R.; Henry, J.; Holly, D.; Prager, S.; Rempel, T.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Sprott, C.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous ion heating and superthermal electron populations have been studied in the MST reversed-field pinch. The ion heating is much stronger than that given by classical electron-ion friction, and is particularly strong during dynamo bursts. The heating displays a marked density dependence: in a 350-kA discharge with a maximum {bar n} = 0.9 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus} 3}, T{sub i} rises sharply as {bar n} drops below 0.4 {times} 10{sub 13} cm{sup {minus}3} late in the discharge. Superthermal electrons are produced in the core, with temperatures of T{sub eh}, = 350--700 eV while the bulk core temperature is T{sub e}o = 130--230 eV. The fraction of superthermal electrons decreases with increasing density, from 40% at {bar n} = 0.5 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} to 8% at {bar n} = 1.9 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} at I = 350 kA. However, data with similar plasma parameters but higher oxygen impurity content had a lower T{sub eh} and higher hot fraction. The edge superthermal electron distribution is well fit by a drifted bi-Maxwellian distribution with T{sub {parallel}} {approximately} T{sub e0} and relative drift speed v{sub d}/v{sub th} = 0.4. With the assumption that the parallel heat flux measured with a pyroelectric probe is carried by superthermal electrons, the measured electron current is consistent with T{sub {perpendicular}} {approximately} T{sub ea} {approximately} T{sub e0}/3 and accounts for over half of the total edge parallel current measured with magnetic probes.

  2. Stationary table CT dosimetry and anomalous scanner-reported values of CTDI{sub vol}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, Robert L., E-mail: rdixon@wfubmc.edu [Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157 (United States); Boone, John M. [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)] [Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Anomalous, scanner-reported values of CTDI{sub vol} for stationary phantom/table protocols (having elevated values of CTDI{sub vol} over 300% higher than the actual dose to the phantom) have been observed; which are well-beyond the typical accuracy expected of CTDI{sub vol} as a phantom dose. Recognition of these outliers as “bad data” is important to users of CT dose index tracking systems (e.g., ACR DIR), and a method for recognition and correction is provided. Methods: Rigorous methods and equations are presented which describe the dose distributions for stationary-table CT. A comparison with formulae for scanner-reported values of CTDI{sub vol} clearly identifies the source of these anomalies. Results: For the stationary table, use of the CTDI{sub 100} formula (applicable to a moving phantom only) overestimates the dose due to extra scatter and also includes an overbeaming correction, both of which are nonexistent when the phantom (or patient) is held stationary. The reported DLP remains robust for the stationary phantom. Conclusions: The CTDI-paradigm does not apply in the case of a stationary phantom and simpler nonintegral equations suffice. A method of correction of the currently reported CTDI{sub vol} using the approach-to-equilibrium formula H(a) and an overbeaming correction factor serves to scale the reported CTDI{sub vol} values to more accurate levels for stationary-table CT, as well as serving as an indicator in the detection of “bad data.”.

  3. Peccei-Quinn invariant singlet extended SUSY with anomalous U(1) gauge symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang Hui Im; Min-Seok Seo

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent discovery of the SM-like Higgs boson with $m_h\\simeq 125$ GeV motivates an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), which involves a singlet Higgs superfield with a sizable Yukawa coupling to the doublet Higgs superfields. We examine such singlet-extended SUSY models with a Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry that originates from an anomalous $U(1)_A$ gauge symmetry. We focus on the specific scheme that the PQ symmetry is spontaneously broken at an intermediate scale $v_{\\rm PQ}\\sim \\sqrt{m_{\\rm SUSY}M_{\\rm Pl}}$ by an interplay between Planck scale suppressed operators and tachyonic soft scalar mass $m_{\\rm SUSY}\\sim \\sqrt{D_A}$ induced dominantly by the $U(1)_A$ $D$-term, $D_A$. This scheme also results in spontaneous SUSY breaking in the PQ sector, generating the gaugino masses $M_{1/2}\\sim \\sqrt{D_A}$ when it is transmitted to the MSSM sector by the conventional gauge mediation mechanism. As a result, the MSSM soft parameters in this scheme are induced mostly by the $U(1)_A$ $D$-term and the gauge mediated SUSY breaking from the PQ sector, so that the sparticle masses can be near the present experimental bounds without causing the SUSY flavor problem. The scheme is severely constrained by the condition that a phenomenologically viable form of the low energy operators of the singlet and doublet Higgs superfields is generated by the PQ breaking sector in a way similar to the Kim-Nilles solution of the $\\mu$ problem, and the resulting Higgs mass parameters allow the electroweak symmetry breaking with small $\\tan\\beta$. We find two minimal models with two singlet Higgs superfields, satisfying this condition with a relatively simple form of the PQ breaking sector, and briefly discuss some phenomenological aspects of the model.

  4. Note on Anomalous Higgs-Boson Couplings in Effective Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Buchalla; O. Cata; A. Celis; C. Krause

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a parametrization of anomalous Higgs-boson couplings that is both systematic and practical. It is based on the electroweak chiral Lagrangian, including a light Higgs boson, as the effective field theory (EFT) at the electroweak scale $v$. This is the appropriate framework for the case of sizeable deviations in the Higgs couplings of order $10\\%$ from the Standard Model, considered to be parametrically larger than new-physics effects in the sector of electroweak gauge interactions. The role of power counting in identifying the relevant parameters is emphasized. The three relevant scales, $v$, the scale of new Higgs dynamics $f$, and the cut-off $\\Lambda=4\\pi f$, admit expansions in $\\xi=v^2/f^2$ and $f^2/\\Lambda^2$. The former corresponds to an organization of operators by their canonical dimension, the latter by their loop order or chiral dimension. In full generality the EFT is thus organized as a double expansion. However, as long as $\\xi\\gg 1/16\\pi^2$ the EFT systematics is closer to the chiral counting. The leading effects in the consistent approximation provided by the EFT, relevant for the presently most important processes of Higgs production and decay, are given by a few (typically six) couplings. These parameters allow us to describe the properties of the Higgs boson in a general and systematic way, and with a precision adequate for the measurements to be performed at the LHC. The framework can be systematically extended to include loop corrections and higher-order terms in the EFT.

  5. Anomalous critical behaviour in the polymer collapse transition of three-dimensional lattice trails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Bedini; Aleksander L Owczarek; Thomas Prellberg

    2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Trails (bond-avoiding walks) provide an alternative lattice model of polymers to self-avoiding walks, and adding self-interaction at multiply visited sites gives a model of polymer collapse. Recently, a two-dimensional model (triangular lattice) where doubly and triply visited sites are given different weights was shown to display a rich phase diagram with first and second order collapse separated by a multi-critical point. A kinetic growth process of trails (KGT) was conjectured to map precisely to this multi-critical point. Two types of low temperature phases, globule and crystal-like, were encountered. Here, we investigate the collapse properties of a similar extended model of interacting lattice trails on the simple cubic lattice with separate weights for doubly and triply visited sites. Again we find first and second order collapse transitions dependent on the relative sizes of the doubly and triply visited energies. However we find no evidence of a low temperature crystal-like phase with only the globular phase in existence. Intriguingly, when the ratio of the energies is precisely that which separates the first order from the second-order regions anomalous finite-sized scaling appears. At the finite size location of the rounded transition clear evidence exists for a first order transition that persists in the thermodynamic limit. This location moves as the length increases, with its limit apparently at the point that maps to a KGT. However, if one fixes the temperature to sit at exactly this KGT point then only a critical point can be deduced from the data. The resolution of this apparent contradiction lies in the breaking of crossover scaling and the difference in the shift and transition width (crossover) exponents.

  6. A BeppoSAX observation of Her X-1 during the first main-on after an anomalous low-state: evidence for rapid spin-down

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Oosterbroek; A. N. Parmar; M. Orlandini; A. Segreto; A. Santangelo; S. Del Sordo

    2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a BeppoSAX observation of Her X-1 in 2000 October during the first main-on state after the longest recorded anomalous low-state are presented. The 0.1-30 keV spectrum, light curve and pulse profile are all consistent with those measured during previous main on-states, indicating that Her X-1 has resumed its regular 35 day cycle with similar on-state properties as before. However, from a comparison of the measured pulse period with that obtained close to the start of the anomalous low-state, it is evident that Her X-1 continued to spin-down strongly during the anomalous low-state such that the pulse period has returned to a similar value as ~15 years ago. Additionally, the occurrence time of the main-on states after the end of the anomalous low-state indicate that a change in the length, or phasing, of the 35-day cycle occurred during the anomalous low-state.

  7. Critical Test of the Self-Similar Cosmological Paradigm: Anomalously Few Planets Orbiting Low-Mass Red Dwarf Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert L. Oldershaw

    2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The incidence of planetary systems orbiting red dwarf stars with masses less than 0.4 solar masses provides a crucial observational test for the Self-Similar Cosmological paradigm. The discrete self-similarity of the paradigm mandates the prediction of anomalously few planetary systems associated with these lowest mass red dwarf stars, in contrast to conventional astrophysical assumptions. Ongoing observational programs are rapidly collecting the data necessary for testing this prediction and preliminary results are highly encouraging. A definitive verdict on the prediction should be available in the near future.

  8. Diffraction anomalous fine structure analysis on (Bi,Pb){sub 2}PtO{sub 4} powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vacinova, J. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France). Lab. de Cristallographie; Hodeau, J.L.; Bordet, P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 38 - Grenoble (France)] [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure (DAFS) method can provide site selective and chemical selective structural information. The possibilities of DAFS experimental and data analysis procedures are demonstrated for (Bi{sub 1.67},Pb{sub 0.33}) powder samples. Experiments have been performed at both L{sub III} and K Pt edges (11.56.564keV and 78keV), using several data collection set-ups (analyser crystals, 1D-detector, 2D-detector). Based on this example, a comparison between these experimental procedures and analysis is given and discussed.

  9. Anomalous small angle x-ray scattering studies of amorphous metal-germanium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, M.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation addresses the issue of composition modulation in sputtered amorphous metal-germanium thin films with the aim of understanding the intermediate range structure of these films as a function of composition. The investigative tool used in this work is anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS). The primary focus of this investigation is the amorphous iron-germanium (a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}) system with particular emphasis on the semiconductor-rich regime. Brief excursions are made into the amorphous tungsten-germanium (a-W{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}) and the amorphous molybdenum-germanium (a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}) systems. All three systems exhibit an amorphous structure over a broad composition range extending from pure amorphous germanium to approximately 70 atomic percent metal when prepared as sputtered films. Across this composition range the structures change from the open, covalently bonded, tetrahedral network of pure a-Ge to densely packed metals. The structural changes are accompanied by a semiconductor-metal transition in all three systems as well as a ferromagnetic transition in the a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} system and a superconducting transition in the a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} system. A long standing question, particularly in the a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} and the a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} systems, has been whether the structural changes (and therefore the accompanying electrical and magnetic transitions) are accomplished by homogeneous alloy formation or phase separation. The application of ASAXS to this problem proves unambiguously that fine scale composition modulations, as distinct from the simple density fluctuations that arise from cracks and voids, are present in the a-Fe{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}, a-W{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x}, and a-Mo{sub x}Ge{sub 100-x} systems in the semiconductor-metal transition region. Furthermore, ASAXS shows that germanium is distributed uniformly throughout each sample in the x<25 regime of all three systems.

  10. Search for anomalous quartic WW?? couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Holzbauer, J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WW?? in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp? collisions at s?=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with ?cutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed upper limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/?²|WC/?²|<0.0092 GeV?².

  11. Search for anomalous quartic WW?? couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WW?? in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb?¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp? collisions at s?=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with ?cutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed uppermore »limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/?²|WC/?²|« less

  12. Discrete Symmetries on the Light Front and a General Relation connecting Nucleon Electric Dipole and Anomalous Magnetic Moments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Gardner, Susan; /Kentucky U.; Hwang, Dae Sung; /Sejong U.

    2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the electric dipole form factor, F{sub 3}(q{sup 2}), as well as the Dirac and Pauli form factors, F{sub 1}(q{sup 2}) and F{sub 2}(q{sup 2}), of the nucleon in the light-front formalism. We derive an exact formula for F{sub 3}(q{sup 2}) to complement those known for F{sub 1}(q{sup 2}) and F{sub 2}(q{sup 2}). We derive the light-front representation of the discrete symmetry transformations and show that time-reversal- and parity-odd effects are captured by phases in the light-front wave functions. We thus determine that the contributions to F{sub 2}(q{sup 2}) and F{sub 3}(q{sup 2}), Fock-state by Fock-state, are related, independent of the fundamental mechanism through which CP violation is generated. Our relation is not specific to the nucleon, but, rather, is true of spin-1/2 systems in general, be they lepton or baryon. The empirical values of the anomalous magnetic moments, in concert with empirical bounds on the associated electric dipole moments, can better constrain theories of CP violation. In particular, we find that the neutron and proton electric dipole moments echo the isospin structure of the anomalous magnetic moments, {kappa}{sup n} {approx} -{kappa}{sup p}.

  13. Discrete symmetries on the light front and a general relation connecting the nucleon electric dipole and anomalous magnetic moments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, Stanley J. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94309 (United States); Gardner, Susan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055 (United States); Hwang, Dae Sung [Department of Physics, Sejong University, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the electric dipole form factor, F{sub 3}(q{sup 2}), as well as the Dirac and Pauli form factors, F{sub 1}(q{sup 2}) and F{sub 2}(q{sup 2}), of the nucleon in the light-front formalism. We derive an exact formula for F{sub 3}(q{sup 2}) to complement those known for F{sub 1}(q{sup 2}) and F{sub 2}(q{sup 2}). We derive the light-front representation of the discrete symmetry transformations and show that time-reversal- and parity-odd effects are captured by phases in the light-front wave functions. We thus determine that the contributions to F{sub 2}(q{sup 2}) and F{sub 3}(q{sup 2}), Fock state by Fock state, are related, independent of the fundamental mechanism through which CP violation is generated. Our relation is not specific to the nucleon, but, rather, is true of spin-1/2 systems in general, be they lepton or baryon. The empirical values of the anomalous magnetic moments, in concert with empirical bounds on the associated electric dipole moments, can better constrain theories of CP violation. In particular, we find that the neutron and proton electric dipole moments echo the isospin structure of the anomalous magnetic moments, {kappa}{sup n}{approx}-{kappa}{sup p}.

  14. Discrete Symmetries on the Light Front and a General Relation Connecting Nucleon Electric Dipole and Anomalous Magnetic Moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. J. Brodsky; S. Gardner; D. S. Hwang

    2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the electric dipole form factor, F_3(q^2), as well as the Dirac and Pauli form factors, F_1(q^2) and F_2(q^2), of the nucleon in the light-front formalism. We derive an exact formula for F_3(q^2) to complement those known for F_1(q^2) and F_2(q^2). We derive the light-front representation of the discrete symmetry transformations and show that time-reversal- and parity-odd effects are captured by phases in the light-front wave functions. We thus determine that the contributions to F_2(q^2) and F_3(q^2), Fock state by Fock state, are related, independent of the fundamental mechanism through which CP violation is generated. Our relation is not specific to the nucleon, but, rather, is true of spin-1/2 systems in general, be they lepton or baryon. The empirical values of the anomalous magnetic moments, in concert with empirical bounds on the associated electric dipole moments, can better constrain theories of CP violation. In particular, we find that the neutron and proton electric dipole moments echo the isospin structure of the anomalous magnetic moments, kappa^n ~ - kappa^p.

  15. Structural behavior and dynamics of an anomalous fluid between solvophilic and solvophobic walls: templating, molding and superdiffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabio Leoni; Giancarlo Franzese

    2014-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Confinement can modify the dynamics, the thermodynamics and the structural properties of liquid water, the prototypical anomalous liquid. By considering a general anomalous liquid, suitable for globular proteins, colloids or liquid metals, we study by molecular dynamics simulations the effect of a solvophilic structured and a solvophobic unstructured wall on the phases, the crystal nucleation and the dynamics of the fluid. We find that at low temperatures the large density of the solvophilic wall induces a high-density, high-energy structure in the first layer ("tempting" effect). In turn, the first layer induces a "molding" effect on the second layer determining a structure with reduced energy and density, closer to the average density of the system. This low-density, low-energy structure propagates further through the layers by templating effect and can involve all the existing layers at the lowest temperatures investigated. Therefore, although the high-density, high-energy structure does not self-reproduce further than the first layer, the structured wall can have a long-range effect thanks to a sequence of templating, molding and templating effects through the layers. We find dynamical slowing down of the solvent near the solvophilic wall but with largely heterogeneous dynamics near the wall due to superdiffusive liquid veins within a frozen matrix of solvent. Hence, the partial freezing of the first hydration layer does not correspond necessarily to an effective reduction of the channel section in terms of transport properties.

  16. Detection of Anomalous Reactor Activity Using Antineutrino Count Rate Evolution Over the Course of a Reactor Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vera Bulaevskaya; Adam Bernstein

    2010-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper analyzes the sensitivity of antineutrino count rate measurements to changes in the fissile content of civil power reactors. Such measurements may be useful in IAEA reactor safeguards applications. We introduce a hypothesis testing procedure to identify statistically significant differences between the antineutrino count rate evolution of a standard 'baseline' fuel cycle and that of an anomalous cycle, in which plutonium is removed and replaced with an equivalent fissile worth of uranium. The test would allow an inspector to detect anomalous reactor activity, or to positively confirm that the reactor is operating in a manner consistent with its declared fuel inventory and power level. We show that with a reasonable choice of detector parameters, the test can detect replacement of 73 kg of plutonium in 90 days with 95% probability, while controlling the false positive rate at 5%. We show that some improvement on this level of sensitivity may be expected by various means, including use of the method in conjunction with existing reactor safeguards methods. We also identify a necessary and sufficient daily antineutrino count rate to achieve the quoted sensitivity, and list examples of detectors in which such rates have been attained.

  17. Method and apparatus for analyzing error conditions in a massively parallel computer system by identifying anomalous nodes within a communicator set

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gooding, Thomas Michael (Rochester, MN)

    2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical mechanism for a massively parallel computer system automatically analyzes data retrieved from the system, and identifies nodes which exhibit anomalous behavior in comparison to their immediate neighbors. Preferably, anomalous behavior is determined by comparing call-return stack tracebacks for each node, grouping like nodes together, and identifying neighboring nodes which do not themselves belong to the group. A node, not itself in the group, having a large number of neighbors in the group, is a likely locality of error. The analyzer preferably presents this information to the user by sorting the neighbors according to number of adjoining members of the group.

  18. ANOMALOUS NITROGEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS IN THE STARDUST-RICH ANTARCTIC MICROMETEORITE T98G8: AFFINITIES TO PRIMITIVE CR CHONDRITES AND ANHYDROUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANOMALOUS NITROGEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS IN THE STARDUST-RICH ANTARCTIC MICROMETEORITE T98G8, T98G8, exhibits high abundances of silicate stardust grains and also contains several C report on C and N isotopic distributions in T98G8 and explore the relationship of this micrometeorite

  19. Anomalous electron transport in back-gated field-effect transistors with TiTe2 semimetal thin-film channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anomalous electron transport in back-gated field-effect transistors with TiTe2 semimetal thin. The exfoliated crystalline TiTe2 films were used as the channel layers in the back-gated field-effect transistors-voltage characteristics revealed strongly non-linear behavior with signatures of the source-drain threshold voltage

  20. Remark on ``Indication, from Pioneer 10/11, Galileo, and Ulysses Data, of an Apparent Anomalous, Weak, Long-Range Acceleration''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. W. Kuhne

    1998-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, Anderson et al. presented possible evidence for an anomalous acceleration acting on spacecrafts. Furthermore, the motions of several planets and comets are known to experience unexplained disturbances. A transneptunian comet or asteroid belt might be the common origin of these anomalies.

  1. Anomalous junctions characterized by Raman spectroscopy in Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1?x} nanowires with axially degraded components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Minggang, E-mail: xiamg@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Laboratory of Nanostructure and Physics Properties, and MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Department of Optical Information Science and Technology, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Han, Jinyun; Cheng, Zhaofang; Liang, Chunping; Zhang, Shengli [Laboratory of Nanostructure and Physics Properties, and MOE Key Laboratory for Non-equilibrium Synthesis and Modulation of Condensed Matter, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, 710049 (China); Department of Applied Physics, School of Science, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The characterization of junctions in nanowires by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with spherical aberration correction is tricky and tedious. Many disadvantages also exist, including rigorous sample preparation and structural damage inflicted by high-energy electrons. In this work, we present a simple, low-cost, and non-destructive Raman spectroscopy method of characterizing anomalous junctions in nanowires with axially degraded components. The Raman spectra of Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1?x} nanowires with axially degraded components are studied in detail using a confocal micro-Raman spectrometer. Three Raman peaks (?{sub Si–Si}?=?490?cm{sup ?1}, ?{sub Si–Ge}?=?400?cm{sup ?1}, and ?{sub Ge–Ge}?=?284?cm{sup ?1}) up-shift with increased Si content. This up-shift originates in the bond compression induced by a confined effect on the radial direction of nanowire. The anomalous junctions in Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1?x} nanowires with axially degraded components are then observed by Raman spectroscopy and verified by transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The anomalous junctions of Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1?x} nanowires with axially degraded components are due to the vortex flow of inlet SiH{sub 4} and GeH{sub 4} gas in their synthesis. The anomalous junctions can be used as raw materials for fabricating devices with special functions.

  2. Anomalous Higgs-top Coupling Pollution on Triple Higgs Coupling Extraction at Future High-Luminosity Electron-Positron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen Shen; Shou-hua Zhu

    2015-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most challenging tasks for future high-luminosity electron-positron colliders is to extract Higgs triple coupling. It was proposed that this can be carried out via the precisely measuring the cross section of ZH associated production up to $0.4\\%$. In this paper, we example the possible heavy pollution from Higgs-top anomalous coupling. Our numerical results show that the pollution is small for $\\sqrt{s}_{e^+e^-}= 240 GeV$. However for the higher energy collider, pollution is sizable, which should be taken into account. We further explored the possibility to measure CP-violated Higgs top coupling, via the forward-backward asymmetry $A_{FB}$ for the process $e^+e^- \\rightarrow ZH$. The asymmetry can reach $0.7\\%$ which is comparable to the precision of cross section measurement.

  3. Anomalous enhancements of low-energy fusion rates in plasmas: the role of ion momentum distributions and inhomogeneous screening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Coraddu; M. Lissia; P. Quarati

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-resonant fusion cross-sections significantly higher than corresponding theoretical predictions are observed in low-energy experiments with deuterated matrix target. Models based on thermal effects, electron screening, or quantum-effect dispersion relations have been proposed to explain these anomalous results: none of them appears to satisfactory reproduce the experiments. Velocity distributions are fundamental for the reaction rates and deviations from the Maxwellian limit could play a central role in explaining the enhancement. We examine two effects: an increase of the tail of the target Deuteron momentum distribution due to the Galitskii-Yakimets quantum uncertainty effect, which broadens the energy-momentum relation; and spatial fluctuations of the Debye-H\\"{u}ckel radius leading to an effective increase of electron screening. Either effect leads to larger reaction rates especially large at energies below a few keV, reducing the discrepancy between observations and theoretical expectations.

  4. Magnetic Domains in Magnetar Matter as an Engine for Soft Gamma-ray Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In-Saeng Suh; Grant J. Mathews

    2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetars have been suggested as the most promising site for the origin of observed soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs). In this work we investigate the possibility that SGRs and AXPs might be observational evidence for a magnetic phase separation in magnetars. We study magnetic domain formation as a new mechanism for SGRs and AXPs in which magnetar-matter separates into two phases containing different flux densities. We identify the parameter space in matter density and magnetic field strength at which there is an instability for magnetic domain formation. We conclude that such instabilities will likely occur in the deep outer crust for the magnetic Baym, Pethick, and Sutherland (BPS) model and in the inner crust and core for magnetars described in relativistic Hartree theory. Moreover, we estimate that the energy released by the onset of this instability is comparable with the energy emitted by SGRs.

  5. Anomalous magnetic behavior in nanocomposite materials of reduced graphene oxide-Ni/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollu, Pratap, E-mail: pk419@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in, E-mail: dhirenb@iitb.ac.in [DST-INSPIRE Faculty, Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Prathapani, Sateesh; Varaprasadarao, Eswara K.; Mallick, Sudhanshu; Bahadur, D., E-mail: pk419@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in, E-mail: dhirenb@iitb.ac.in [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai 400076 (India); Santosh, Chella; Grace, Andrews Nirmala, E-mail: pk419@cam.ac.uk, E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in, E-mail: dhirenb@iitb.ac.in [Centre for Nanotechnology Research, VIT University, Vellore 632014 (India)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic Reduced Graphene Oxide-Nickel/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (RGO-Ni/NF) nanocomposite has been synthesized by one pot solvothermal method. Respective phase formations and their purities in the composite are confirmed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope and X Ray Diffraction, respectively. For the RGO-Ni/NF composite material finite-size effects lead to the anomalous magnetic behavior, which is corroborated in temperature and field dependent magnetization curves. Here, we are reporting the behavior of higher magnetization values for Zero Field Cooled condition to that of Field Cooled for the RGO-Ni/NF nanocomposite. Also, the observed negative and positive moments in Hysteresis loops at relatively smaller applied fields (100?Oe and 200?Oe) are explained on the basis of surface spin disorder.

  6. Local structure underlying anomalous tetragonal distortions in BiFeO{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, I.; Krayzman, V.; Woicik, J. C. [Materials Measurement Science Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Tucker, M. G. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The local structure of tetragonal BiFeO{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} solid solutions featuring anomalous lattice distortions has been determined using simultaneous fitting of neutron total scattering and extended X-ray absorption fine structure data. On the local scale, the large tetragonal distortion, promoted by the displacements of the A-cations (Bi and Pb), is accommodated primarily by the [FeO{sub 6}] octahedra, even though both Fe and Ti acquire (5+1)-fold coordination. Bi cations exhibit considerably larger displacements than Pb. The combination of the A-cation displacements and the ability of M-cations to adopt 5-fold coordination is suggested as key for stabilizing the large tetragonality in BiMO{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} systems.

  7. W? Production and Limits on Anomalous WW? Couplings in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the cross section and the difference in rapidities between photons and charged leptons for inclusive W(?l?)+? production in e? and ?? final states. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb?¹ collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, the measured cross section times branching fraction for the process pp??W?+X?l??+X and the distribution of the charge-signed photon-lepton rapidity difference are found to be in agreement with the standard model. These results provide the most stringent limits on anomalous WW? couplings for data from hadron colliders: -0.4??<0.07 at the 95% C.L.

  8. Anomalous Higgs-top Coupling Pollution on Triple Higgs Coupling Extraction at Future High-Luminosity Electron-Positron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Chen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most challenging tasks for future high-luminosity electron-positron colliders is to extract Higgs triple coupling. It was proposed that this can be carried out via the precisely measuring the cross section of ZH associated production up to $0.4\\%$. In this paper, we example the possible heavy pollution from Higgs-top anomalous coupling. Our numerical results show that the pollution is quite small for $\\sqrt{s}_{e^+e^-}= 240 GeV$. However for the higher energy collider, pollution is sizable, which should be taken into account. We further explored the possibility to measure CP-violated Higgs top coupling, via the forward-backward asymmetry $A_{FB}$ for the process $e^+e^- \\rightarrow ZH$. The asymmetry can reach $0.3\\%$ which is comparable to the precision of cross section measurement.

  9. Polarity characterization by anomalous x-ray dispersion of ZnO films and GaN lateral polar structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, Christopher T.; Sachet, Edward; Paisley, Elizabeth A.; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Rajan, Joseph; Collazo, Ramón; Sitar, Zlatko; Maria, Jon-Paul [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the use of anomalous x-ray scattering of constituent cations at their absorption edge, in a conventional Bragg-Brentano diffractometer, to measure absolutely and quantitatively the polar orientation and polarity fraction of unipolar and mixed polar wurtzitic crystals. In one set of experiments, the gradual transition between c+ and c? polarity of epitaxial ZnO films on sapphire as a function of MgO buffer layer thickness is monitored quantitatively, while in a second experiment, we map the polarity of a lateral polar homojunction in GaN. The dispersion measurements are compared with piezoforce microscopy images, and we demonstrate how x-ray dispersion and scanning probe methods can provide complementary information that can discriminate between polarity fractions at a material surface and polarity fractions averaged over the film bulk.

  10. On the source of the dust extinction in type Ia supernovae and the discovery of anomalously strong Na I absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, M. M.; Morrell, Nidia; Hsiao, E. Y.; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos [Carnegie Observatories, Las Campanas Observatory, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Simon, Joshua D.; Burns, Christopher R.; Persson, Sven E.; Thompson, I. B.; Freedman, Wendy L. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Cox, Nick L. J. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D bus 2401, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Karakas, Amanda I. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Patat, F. [European Southern Observatory (ESO), Karl Schwarschild Strasse 2, D-85748, Garching bei München (Germany); Sternberg, A. [Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics, Karl Schwarzschild Strasse 1, D-85741 Garching bei München (Germany); Williams, R. E. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gal-Yam, A. [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Leonard, D. C. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States); Stritzinger, Maximilian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, Ny Munkegade 120, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Folatelli, Gastón, E-mail: mmp@lco.cl [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, the University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    High-dispersion observations of the Na I D ??5890, 5896 and K I ??7665, 7699 interstellar lines, and the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å in the spectra of 32 Type Ia supernovae are used as an independent means of probing dust extinction. We show that the dust extinction of the objects where the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å is detected is consistent with the visual extinction derived from the supernova colors. This strongly suggests that the dust producing the extinction is predominantly located in the interstellar medium of the host galaxies and not in circumstellar material associated with the progenitor system. One quarter of the supernovae display anomalously large Na I column densities in comparison to the amount of dust extinction derived from their colors. Remarkably, all of the cases of unusually strong Na I D absorption correspond to 'Blueshifted' profiles in the classification scheme of Sternberg et al. This coincidence suggests that outflowing circumstellar gas is responsible for at least some of the cases of anomalously large Na I column densities. Two supernovae with unusually strong Na I D absorption showed essentially normal K I column densities for the dust extinction implied by their colors, but this does not appear to be a universal characteristic. Overall, we find the most accurate predictor of individual supernova extinction to be the equivalent width of the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å, and provide an empirical relation for its use. Finally, we identify ways of producing significant enhancements of the Na abundance of circumstellar material in both the single-degenerate and double-degenerate scenarios for the progenitor system.

  11. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  12. Structural behavior and dynamics of an anomalous fluid between attractive and repulsive walls: Templating, molding, and superdiffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoni, Fabio; Franzese, Giancarlo [Departament de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Confinement can modify the dynamics, the thermodynamics, and the structural properties of liquid water, the prototypical anomalous liquid. By considering a generic model for anomalous liquids, suitable for describing solutions of globular proteins, colloids, or liquid metals, we study by molecular dynamics simulations the effect that an attractive wall with structure and a repulsive wall without structure have on the phases, the crystal nucleation, and the dynamics of the fluid. We find that at low temperatures the large density of the attractive wall induces a high-density, high-energy structure in the first layer (“templating” effect). In turn, the first layer induces a “molding” effect on the second layer determining a structure with reduced energy and density, closer to the average density of the system. This low-density, low-energy structure propagates further through the layers by templating effect and can involve all the existing layers at the lowest temperatures investigated. Therefore, although the high-density, high-energy structure does not self-reproduce further than the first layer, the structured wall can have a long-range influence thanks to a sequence of templating, molding, and templating effects through the layers. We find that the walls also have an influence on the dynamics of the liquid, with a stronger effect near the attractive wall. In particular, we observe that the dynamics is largely heterogeneous (i) among the layers, as a consequence of the sequence of structures caused by the walls presence, and (ii) within the same layer, due to superdiffusive liquid veins within a frozen matrix of particles near the walls at low temperature and high density. Hence, the partial freezing of the first layer does not correspond necessarily to an effective reduction of the channel's section in terms of transport properties, as suggested by other authors.

  13. Correlelations between the Anomalous Behaviour of the Ionosphere and the Seismic Events for VTX-MALDA VLF Propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray, Suman; Sasmal, S. [Indian Centre for Space Physics, 43 Chalantika, Garia Station Road, Kolkata 700084 (India); Chakrabarti, S. K. [Indian Centre for Space Physics, 43 Chalantika, Garia Station Road, Kolkata 700084 (India); S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Choudhury, A. K. [Indian Centre for Space Physics, Malda Branch, Atul Market, Malda 731101 (India)

    2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important application of the VLF signals is that it contains possible information about the lithosphere-ionosphere coupling. In other words, in near future, it may be possible to predict seismic events by judging signatures of VLF signals. In this paper, we present the result of the monitoring of the VLF signals collected in the Malda branch of ICSP, located in Malda, West Bengal, for four years (2005, 2007-09) and we try to find out the co-relations, if any, between the ionospheric activities and the earthquakes. Here we use that VLF signals which are transmitted from the VTX station (18.2 KHz), located near Vijayanarayanam in Tamilnadu, about 2290 km away from the receiver. To find out the co-relation of the ionospheric activities with the seismic events such as earthquake, first we have to study the average signal throughout the year. For this, we plot the so-called standardized calibration curve using the four years data. Here we use a total of 481 no. of data. To establish the co-relation between the ionospheric activities and the seismic events, we use the data of the year 2008 and we found that the deviations of the anomalous data are co-related with the seismic event. We found that the highest deviation takes place one day prior to the seismic events. We also calculated the 'D-layer preparation time'(DLPT) and the 'D-layer disappearance time'(DLDT) for the data of 2008 and tried to establish the co-relation between the anomalous DLPT and DLDT with the seismic events, if any. We compare our result with the VLF signals received from other places.

  14. Measurement of the W+W- Production Cross Section and Search for Anomalous WW? and WWZ Couplings in pp[over-bar] Collisions at [sqrt]s=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the W boson pair production cross section and most sensitive test of anomalous WW? and WWZ couplings in pp[over-bar] collisions at a center-of-mass energy of ...

  15. Bounds on an Anomalous Dijet Resonance in W+ jets Production in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the dijet invariant mass spectrum in events with two jets produced in association with a W boson in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb?¹ collected with the D0 detector at s?=1.96 TeV. We find no evidence for anomalous resonant dijet production and derive upper limits on the production cross section of an anomalous dijet resonance recently reported by the CDF Collaboration, investigating the range of dijet invariant mass from 110 to 170 GeV/c². The probability of the D0 data being consistent with the presence of a dijet resonance with 4 pb production cross section at 145 GeV/c² is 8×10??.

  16. Anomalous effect due to oxygen vacancy accumulation below the electrode in bipolar resistance switching Pt/Nb:SrTiO{sub 3} cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Shinbuhm; Won Noh, Tae, E-mail: twnoh@snu.ac.kr [Center for Correlated Electron Systems, Institute for Basic Science, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Sung [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jong-Bong; Koo Kyoung, Yong [Analytical Science Group, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myoung-Jae [Logic TD, Semiconductor R and D Center, Samsung Electronics, Hwaseong-si, Gyeonggi-do 445-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In conventional semiconductor theory, greater doping decreases the electronic resistance of a semiconductor. For the bipolar resistance switching (BRS) phenomena in oxides, the same doping principle has been used commonly to explain the relationship between the density variation of oxygen vacancies (V{sub o}¨) and the electronic resistance. We find that the V{sub o}¨ density can change at a depth of ?10 nm below the Pt electrodes in Pt/Nb:SrTiO{sub 3} cells, depending on the resistance state. Using electron energy loss spectroscopy and secondary ion mass spectrometry, we found that greater V{sub o}¨ density underneath the electrode resulted in higher resistance, contrary to the conventional doping principle of semiconductors. To explain this seemingly anomalous experimental behavior, we provide quantitative explanations on the anomalous BRS behavior by simulating the mobile V{sub o}¨ [J. S. Lee et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 102, 253503 (2013)] near the Schottky barrier interface.

  17. Bounds on an Anomalous Dijet Resonance in W+ jets Production in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the dijet invariant mass spectrum in events with two jets produced in association with a W boson in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb?¹ collected with the D0 detector at s?=1.96 TeV. We find no evidence for anomalous resonant dijet production and derive upper limits on the production cross section of an anomalous dijet resonance recently reported by the CDF Collaboration, investigating the range of dijet invariant mass from 110 to 170 GeV/c². The probability of the D0 data being consistent with the presence of a dijet resonance with 4 pb productionmore »cross section at 145 GeV/c² is 8×10??.« less

  18. Search for Anomalous Scattering of keV Neutrons from H2O-D2O Mixtures R. Moreh,1,2,* R. C. Block,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Search for Anomalous Scattering of keV Neutrons from H2O-D2O Mixtures R. Moreh,1,2,* R. C. Block,2 (Received 20 January 2005; published 12 May 2005) We measured the neutron scattering intensities from pure Linac and the final energy of the scattered neutrons was fixed at 24.3 keV using a 20 cm thick pure iron

  19. Chemical and displacement atomic pair correlations in crystalline solid solutions recovered by anomalous x-ray scattering in Fe-Ni alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ice, G.E.; Sparks, C.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shaffer, L.B. [Anderson Univ., Anderson, IN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Short-range pair correlations of atoms in crystalline solid solutions consist of both chemical and displacement correlations. Measurement of these pair correlations is fundamental to understanding the properties of solid solutions. We discuss anomalous scattering techniques which have provided an important advance in our ability to recover these pair correlations and to model the local atomic arrangements in crystalline solid solutions of Fe-Ni alloys.

  20. Measurement of the pp-bar?W?+X cross section at s?=1.96 TeV and WW? anomalous coupling limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Coppage, Don; Gardner, J.; Hensel, Carsten; Christofek, L.|J|abeen, S.; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.

    2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    . The cross section times branching fraction for pp-bar?W(?)+X????+X with E(?)(T)>8 GeV and ?R(??)> 0.7 is 14.8±1.6(stat)±1.0(syst)±1.0(lum)??pb. The one-dimensional 95% confidence level limits on anomalous couplings are ?0.88

  1. Implications of the anomalous top quark couplings in B{sub s}-B{sub s} mixing, B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} and top quark decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jong Phil; Lee, Kang Young [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics, Korea University, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined analysis of recent measured B{sub s}-B{sub s} mixing and B{yields}X{sub s}{gamma} decays provides constraints on the anomalous tsW couplings. We discuss the perspectives to examine the anomalous tsW couplings through Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa quark-mixing matrix-suppressed t{yields}sW decays at the LHC.

  2. Discrete Symmetries on the Light Front and a General Relation Connecting Nucleon Electric Dipole and Anomalous Magnetic Moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brodsky, S J; Hwang, D S

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the electric dipole form factor, F_3(q^2), as well as the Dirac and Pauli form factors, F_1(q^2) and F_2(q^2), of the nucleon in the light-front formalism. We derive an exact formula for F_3(q^2) to complement those known for F_1(q^2) and F_2(q^2). We derive the light-front representation of the discrete symmetry transformations and show that time-reversal- and parity-odd effects are captured by phases in the light-front wave functions. We thus determine that the contributions to F_2(q^2) and F_3(q^2), Fock-state by Fock-state, are related, independent of the fundamental mechanism through which CP violation is generated. Our relation is not specific to the nucleon, but, rather, is true of spin-1/2 systems in general, be they lepton or baryon. The empirical values of the anomalous magnetic moments, in concert with empirical bounds on the associated electric dipole moments, can better constrain theories of CP violation. In particular, we find that the neutron and proton electric dipole moments echo ...

  3. Anomalous porosity preservation and preferential accumulation of gas hydrate in the Andaman accretionary wedge, NGHP-01 site 17A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Kelly K.; Johnson, Joel E.; Torres, Marta E.; Hong, WeiLi; Giosan, Liviu; Solomon, E.; Kastner, Miriam; Cawthern, Thomas; Long, Philip E.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to well established properties that control the presence or absence of the hydrate stability zone, such as pressure, temperature, and salinity, additional parameters appear to influence the concentration of gas hydrate in host sediments. The stratigraphic record at Site 17A in the Andaman Sea, eastern Indian Ocean, illustrates the need to better understand the role pore-scale phenomena play in the distribution and presence of marine gas hydrates in a variety of subsurface settings. In this paper we integrate field-generated datasets with newly acquired sedimentology, physical property, imaging and geochemical data with mineral saturation and ion activity products of key mineral phases such as amorphous silica and calcite, to document the presence and nature of secondary precipitates that contributed to anomalous porosity preservation at Site 17A in the Andaman Sea. This study demonstrates the importance of grain-scale subsurface heterogeneities in controlling the occurrence and distribution of concentrated gas hydrate accumulations in marine sediments, and document the importance that increased permeability and enhanced porosity play in supporting gas concentrations sufficient to support gas hydrate formation. The grain scale relationships between porosity, permeability, and gas hydrate saturation documented at Site 17A likely offer insights into what may control the occurrence and distribution of gas hydrate in other sedimentary settings.

  4. Reanalyses of Anomalous Gravitational Microlensing Events in the OGLE-III Early Warning System Database with Combined Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, J; Han, C; Gould, A; Udalski, A; Szyma?ski, M K; Pietrzy?ski, G; Soszy?ski, I; Poleski, R; Ulaczyk, K; Wyrzykowski, ?; Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Fukunaga, D; Itow, Y; Koshimoto, N; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Namba, S; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Sweatman, W L; Sumi, T; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Tsurumi, N; Wada, K; Yamai, N; Yock, P C M; Yonehara, A; Albrow, M D; Batista, V; Beaulieu, J -P; Caldwell, J A R; Cassan, A; Cole, A; Coutures, C; Dieters, S; Dominik, M; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Fouqué, P; Greenhill, J; Hoffman, M; Huber, M; Jørgensen, U G; Kane, S R; Kubas, D; Martin, R; Marquette, J -B; Menzies, J; Pitrou, C; Pollard, K; Sahu, K C; Vinter, C; Wambsganss, J; Williams, A; Allen, W; Bolt, G; Choi, J -Y; Christie, G W; DePoy, D L; Drummond, J; Gaudi, B S; Hwang, K -H; Jung, Y K; Lee, C -U; Mallia, F; Maoz, D; Maury, A; McCormick, J; Monard, L A G; Moorhouse, D; Natusch, T; Ofek, E O; Park, B -G; Pogge, R W; Santallo, R; Shin, I -G; Thornley, G; Yee, J C; Bramich, D M; Horne, K; Hundertmark, M; Kains, N; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I; Street, R; Tsapras, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We reanalyze microlensing events in the published list of anomalous events that were observed from the OGLE lensing survey conducted during 2004-2008 period. In order to check the existence of possible degenerate solutions and extract extra information, we conduct analyses based on combined data from other survey and follow-up observation and consider higher-order effects. Among the analyzed events, we present analyses of 8 events for which either new solutions are identified or additional information is obtained. We find that the previous binary-source interpretations of 5 events are better interpreted by binary-lens models. These events include OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2007-BLG-159, OGLE-2007-BLG-491, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, and OGLE-2008-BLG-210. With additional data covering caustic crossings, we detect finite-source effects for 6 events including OGLE-2006-BLG-215, OGLE-2006-BLG-238, OGLE-2006-BLG-450, OGLE-2008-BLG-143, OGLE-2008-BLG-210, and OGLE-2008-BLG-513. Among them, we are able to measure the Einstein ...

  5. Influence of an anomalous dimension effect on thermal instability in amorphous-InGaZnO thin-film transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Kuan-Hsien; Chou, Wu-Ching, E-mail: tcchang3708@gmail.com, E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-chu 300, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Chang, E-mail: tcchang3708@gmail.com, E-mail: wuchingchou@mail.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan (China); Chen, Hua-Mao; Tai, Ya-Hsiang [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-chu 300, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Ming-Yen; Hung, Pei-Hua; Chu, Ann-Kuo [Department of Photonics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Wu, Ming-Siou; Hung, Yi-Syuan [Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsin-Chu 300, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Tien-Yu [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Bo-Liang [Advanced Display Technology Research Center, AU Optronics, No.1, Li-Hsin Rd. 2, Hsinchu Science Park, Hsin-Chu 30078, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates abnormal dimension-dependent thermal instability in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc-oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors. Device dimension should theoretically have no effects on threshold voltage, except for in short channel devices. Unlike short channel drain-induced source barrier lowering effect, threshold voltage increases with increasing drain voltage. Furthermore, for devices with either a relatively large channel width or a short channel length, the output drain current decreases instead of saturating with an increase in drain voltage. Moreover, the wider the channel and the shorter the channel length, the larger the threshold voltage and output on-state current degradation that is observed. Because of the surrounding oxide and other thermal insulating material and the low thermal conductivity of the IGZO layer, the self-heating effect will be pronounced in wider/shorter channel length devices and those with a larger operating drain bias. To further clarify the physical mechanism, fast I{sub D}-V{sub G} and modulated peak/base pulse time I{sub D}-V{sub D} measurements are utilized to demonstrate the self-heating induced anomalous dimension-dependent threshold voltage variation and on-state current degradation.

  6. ON THE X-RAY OUTBURSTS OF TRANSIENT ANOMALOUS X-RAY PULSARS AND SOFT GAMMA-RAY REPEATERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Sirin; Ertan, Uenal [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul, 34956 (Turkey)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the X-ray outburst light curves of four transient anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma-ray repeaters (SGRs), namely, XTE J1810-197, SGR 0501+4516, SGR 1627-41, and CXOU J164710.2-455216, can be produced by the fallback disk model that was also applied to the outburst light curves of persistent AXPs and SGRs in our earlier work. The model solves the diffusion equation for the relaxation of a disk that has been pushed back by a soft gamma-ray burst. The sets of main disk parameters used for these transient sources are very similar to each other and to those employed in our earlier models of persistent AXPs and SGRs. There is a characteristic difference between the X-ray outburst light curves of transient and persistent sources. This can be explained by the differences in the disk surface density profiles of the transient and persistent sources in quiescence indicated by their quiescent X-ray luminosities. Our results imply that a viscous disk instability operating at a critical temperature in the range of {approx}1300-2800 K is a common property of all fallback disks around AXPs and SGRs. The effect of the instability is more pronounced and starts earlier for the sources with lower quiescent luminosities, which leads to the observable differences in the X-ray enhancement light curves of transient and persistent sources. A single active disk model with the same basic disk parameters can account for the enhancement phases of both transient and persistent AXPs and SGRs. We also present a detailed parameter study to show the effects of disk parameters on the evolution of the X-ray luminosity of AXPs and SGRs in the X-ray enhancement phases.

  7. Search for anomalous Wtb couplings in single top quark production in pp? collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new direct constraints on a general Wtb interaction using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb-1 collected by the D0 detector at the Tevatron pp? collider. The standard model provides a purely left-handed vector coupling at the Wtb vertex, while the most general, lowest dimension Lagrangian allows right-handed vector and left- or right-handed tensor couplings as well. We obtain precise limits on these anomalous couplings by comparing the data to the expectations from different assumptions on the Wtb coupling.

  8. Anomalous output characteristic shift for the n-type lateral diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor with floating P-top layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Siyang; Zhang, Chunwei; Sun, Weifeng, E-mail: swffrog@seu.edu.cn [National ASIC System Engineering Research Center, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Su, Wei; Wang, Shaorong; Ma, Shulang; Huang, Yu [CSMC Technologies Corporation, Wuxi 214061 (China)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous output characteristic shift of the n-type lateral diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor transistor with floating P-top layer is investigated. It shows that the linear drain current has obvious decrease when the output characteristic of fresh device is measured for two consecutive times. The charge pumping experiments demonstrate that the decrease is not from hot-carrier degradation. The reduction of cross section area for the current flowing, which results from the squeezing of the depletion region surrounding the P-top layer, is responsible for the shift. Consequently, the current capability of this special device should be evaluated by the second measured output characteristic.

  9. CP violating anomalous top-quark coupling in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sehwook; /Iowa State U.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We conduct the first study of the T-odd correlations in tt events produced in p{bar p} collision at the Fermilab Tevatron collider that can be used to search for CP violation. We select events which have lepton+jets final states to identify t{bar t} events and measure counting asymmetries of several physics observables. Based on the result, we search the top quark anomalous couplings at the production vertex at the Tevatron. In addition, Geant4 development, photon identification, the discrimination of a single photon and a photon doublet from {pi}{sup 0} decay are discussed in this thesis.

  10. Evidence of W ? ? Production in p p Collisions at s = 8 TeV and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O.?S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter reports evidence of triple gauge boson production pp ? W (l?)?? + X, which is accessible for the first time with the 8 TeV LHC data set. The fiducial cross section for this process is measured in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1, collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012. Events are selected using the W boson decay to e? or ?? as well as requiring two isolated photons. The measured cross section is used to set limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings in the high diphoton mass region.

  11. The New (g-2) Experiment: A proposal to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment to +-0.14 ppm precision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, R.M.; Lynch, K.R.; Miller, J.P.; Roberts, B.L.; Morse, W.M.; Semertzides, Y.K.; Druzhinin, V.P.; Khazin, B.I.; Koop, I.A.; Logashenko, I.; Redin, S.I.; /Boston U. /Brookhaven /Novosibirsk, IYF /Cornell U., CIHEP /Fermilab /Frascati /Illinois U., Urbana /James Madison U. /Groningen, KVI /KEK, Tsukuba /Kentucky U.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment, a{sub {mu}}, to 0.14 ppm-a fourfold improvement over the 0.54 ppm precision obtained in the BNL experiment E821. The muon anomaly is a fundamental quantity and its precise determination will have lasting value. The current measurement was statistics limited, suggesting that greater precision can be obtained in a higher-rate, next-generation experiment. We outline a plan to use the unique FNAL complex of proton accelerators and rings to produce high-intensity bunches of muons, which will be directed into the relocated BNL muon storage ring. The physics goal of our experiment is a precision on the muon anomaly of 16 x 10{sup -11}, which will require 21 times the statistics of the BNL measurement, as well a factor of 3 reduction in the overall systematic error. Our goal is well matched to anticipated advances in the worldwide effort to determine the standard model (SM) value of the anomaly. The present comparison, {Delta}a{sub {mu}} (Expt: -SM) = (295 {+-} 81) x 10{sup -11}, is already suggestive of possible new physics contributions to the muon anomaly. Assuming that the current theory error of 51 x 10{sup -11} is reduced to 30 x 10{sup -11} on the time scale of the completion of our experiment, a future {Delta}a{sub {mu}} comparison would have a combined uncertainty of {approx} 34 x 10{sup -11}, which will be a sensitive and complementary benchmark for proposed standard model extensions. The experimental data will also be used to improve the muon EDM limit by up to a factor of 100 and make a higher-precision test of Lorentz and CPT violation. We describe in this Proposal why the FNAL complex provides a uniquely ideal facility for a next-generation (g-2) experiment. The experiment is compatible with the fixed-target neutrino program; indeed, it requires only the unused Booster batch cycles and can acquire the desired statistics in less than two years of running. The proton beam preparations are largely aligned with the new Mu2e experimental requirements. The (g-2) experiment itself is based on the solid foundation of E821 at BNL, with modest improvements related to systematic error control. We outline the motivation, conceptual plans, and details of the tasks, anticipated budget, and timeline in this proposal.

  12. Anomalous diffusion of field lines and charged particles in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress force-free magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, Abhay K. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Dasgupta, Brahmananda [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, Alabama 35805 (United States); Krishnamurthy, V. [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States); Mitra, Dhrubaditya [Nordita, KTH Royal Institute of Technology and Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmic magnetic fields in regions of low plasma pressure and large currents, such as in interstellar space and gaseous nebulae, are force-free in the sense that the Lorentz force vanishes. The three-dimensional Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) field is an example of a force-free, helical magnetic field. In fluid dynamics, ABC flows are steady state solutions of the Euler equation. The ABC magnetic field lines exhibit a complex and varied structure that is a mix of regular and chaotic trajectories in phase space. The characteristic features of field line trajectories are illustrated through the phase space distribution of finite-distance and asymptotic-distance Lyapunov exponents. In regions of chaotic trajectories, an ensemble-averaged variance of the distance between field lines reveals anomalous diffusion—in fact, superdiffusion—of the field lines. The motion of charged particles in the force-free ABC magnetic fields is different from the flow of passive scalars in ABC flows. The particles do not necessarily follow the field lines and display a variety of dynamical behavior depending on their energy, and their initial pitch-angle. There is an overlap, in space, of the regions in which the field lines and the particle orbits are chaotic. The time evolution of an ensemble of particles, in such regions, can be divided into three categories. For short times, the motion of the particles is essentially ballistic; the ensemble-averaged, mean square displacement is approximately proportional to t{sup 2}, where t is the time of evolution. The intermediate time region is defined by a decay of the velocity autocorrelation function—this being a measure of the time after which the collective dynamics is independent of the initial conditions. For longer times, the particles undergo superdiffusion—the mean square displacement is proportional to t{sup ?}, where ??>?1, and is weakly dependent on the energy of the particles. These super-diffusive characteristics, both of magnetic field lines and of particles moving in these fields, strongly suggest that theories of transport in three-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields need a shift from the usual paradigm of quasilinear diffusion.

  13. Anomalous behaviour of DSSSDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grassi, L.; Torresi, D.; Acosta, L.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Grilj, V.; Jaksic, M.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatovic, T.; Milin, M.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Tokic, V.; Uroic, M. [Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sez. di Catania, Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Sez. di Padova, Padova, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy and University of Messina - Department of physics, Messina (Italy); Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare - Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, Italy and University of Catania - Department of physics, Catania (Italy); Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); University of Zagreb - Department of physics, Zagreb (Croatia); Ruder Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia)

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) are often used in nuclear physics experiments in a wide energy range. According to the previous experiments, when a particle hits the interstrip region of these detectors, different effects may occur. Charge sharing, pulse height deficits and inverse polarity pulses on adjacent strips can influence the measured charge. In order to understand these effects and improve DSSSD utilization, an experiment was performed at the scanning proton microbeam of the Ruder Boskovic Institute (RBI) using low proton microbeam intensity ({approx}fA) and two DSSSDs of thickness 75 {mu}m and 998 {mu}m.

  14. Aspects of anomalous glue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven D. Bass

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-perturbative glue associated with gluon topology plays a vital role in determining the mass of the etaprime meson. We give an introduction to axial U(1) physics and explain how this non-perturbative glue also contributes to etaprime interactions with other hadrons. We concentrate on resonant etaprime pi production in partial waves with exotic quantum numbers not compatible with a quark-antiquark state and on the etaprime in nuclear media where there are new results from the COMPASS and CBELSA/TAPS experiments respectively.

  15. An anomalous propulsion mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evgeny Shaverin; Amos Yarom

    2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a gas of free chiral fermions trapped inside a uniform rotating spherical shell. Once the shell becomes transparent the fermions are emitted along the axis of rotation due to the chiral and mixed anomaly. In return, owing to momentum conservation, the shell is propelled forward. We study the dependence of the magnitude of this effect on the shell parameters in a controlled setting and find that it is sensitive to the formation of an ergosphere around the rotating shell. A brief discussion on a possible relation to pulsar kicks is provided.

  16. Anomalous momentum and energy transfer rates for electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence in downward auroral-current regions of the Earth's magnetosphere. III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasperse, John R.; Basu, Bamandas [Air Force Research Laboratory, Space Vehicles Directorate, Hanscom AFB, Massachusetts 01731 (United States); Lund, Eric J. [Space Science Center, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States); Grossbard, Neil [Institute for Scientific Research, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts 02467 (United States)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, a new multimoment fluid theory was developed for inhomogeneous, nonuniformly magnetized plasma in the guiding-center and gyrotropic approximation that includes the effect of electrostatic, turbulent, wave-particle interactions (see Jasperse et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 072903 (2006); ibid.13, 112902 (2006)]). In the present paper, which is intended as a sequel, it is concluded from FAST satellite data that the electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence that appears is due to the operation of an electron, bump-on-tail-driven ion-cyclotron instability for downward currents in the long-range potential region of the Earth's magnetosphere. Approximate closed-form expressions for the anomalous momentum and energy transfer rates for the ion-cyclotron turbulence are obtained. The turbulent, inhomogeneous, nonuniformly magnetized, multimoment fluid theory given above, in the limit of a turbulent, homogeneous, uniformly magnetized, quasisteady plasma, yields the well-known formula for the anomalous resistivity given by Gary and Paul [Phys. Rev. Lett. 26, 1097 (1971)] and Tange and Ichimaru [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 36, 1437 (1974)].

  17. Step-by-step capping and strain state of GaN/AlN quantum dots studied by grazing-incidence diffraction anomalous fine structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coraux, J.; Favre-Nicolin, V.; Renevier, H. [Commissariat l'Energie Atomique, Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, SP2M/NRS, 17 rue des martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 53, 38041, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Proietti, M. G. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, c. Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Daudin, B. [Commissariat l'Energie Atomique, Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee, SP2M/NRS, 17 rue des martyrs, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The investigation of small-size embedded nanostructures, by a combination of complementary anomalous diffraction techniques, is reported. GaN quantum dots (QD's), grown by molecular beam epitaxy in a modified Stranski-Krastanow mode, are studied in terms of strain and local environment, as a function of the AlN cap layer thickness, by means of grazing-incidence anomalous diffraction. That is, the x-ray photon energy is tuned across the Ga absorption K edge which makes diffraction chemically selective. Measurement of hkl scans, close to the AlN (3030) Bragg reflection, at several energies across the Ga K edge, allows the extraction of the Ga partial structure factor, from which the in-plane strain of GaN QD's is deduced. From the fixed-Q energy-dependent diffracted intensity spectra, measured for diffraction-selected isostrain regions corresponding to the average in-plane strain state of the QD's, quantitative information regarding the composition and out-of-plane strain has been obtained. We recover the in-plane and out-of-plane strains in the dots. The comparison to the biaxial elastic strain in a pseudomorphic layer indicates a tendency to an overstrained regime.

  18. Anomalous Hall effect in a two-dimensional electron gas Tamara S. Nunner,1 N. A. Sinitsyn,2,3 Mario F. Borunda,2 V. K. Dugaev,4 A. A. Kovalev,2 Ar. Abanov,2 Carsten Timm,5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timm, Carsten

    Station, Texas 77843-4242, USA 3CNLS/CCS-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544-Streda formalism in the presence of pointlike potential impurities. We find that all contributions to the anomalous, this skew- scattering contribution to Rs is sensitive to the type and range of the scattering potential and

  19. Anomalous transport in an n-type topological insulator ultrathin Bi2Se3 film Toru Hirahara,1,* Yusuke Sakamoto,1 Yasuo Takeichi,2 Hidetoshi Miyazaki,3 Shin-ichi Kimura,3 Iwao Matsuda,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasegawa, Shuji

    Anomalous transport in an n-type topological insulator ultrathin Bi2Se3 film Toru Hirahara,1, 73.61.Ng I. INTRODUCTION Topological insulators have attracted much attention from a wide variety, they are mathematically characterized by the so-called Z2 topological number.1 While the bulk is insulating

  20. Spin-glass behavior and anomalous magnetoresistance in ferromagnetic Ge{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}Te epilayer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Jindong [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Cheng, Xiaomin, E-mail: xmcheng@mail.hust.edu.cn; Tong, Fei; Miao, Xiangshui [School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report that the Ge{sub 1-x}Fe{sub x}Te thin film exhibits spin-glass behavior when the Fe concentration increases to 0.08. A large bifurcation between the zero-field cooling and field cooling temperature-dependent magnetization was observed. The hysteresis loops after zero-field cooling and field cooling show an exchange bias effect. A time-dependent thermoremanent magnetization follows power-law decay, which confirms the existence of spin glass. The anomalous magnetotranport properties present a further evidence for spin-glass behavior and give a freezing temperature T{sub g}???5?K in the Ge{sub 0.92}Fe{sub 0.08}Te thin film.

  1. Mind the gap on Icecube: Cosmic neutrino spectrum and muon anomalous magnetic moment in the gauged L_{\\mu} - L_{\\tau} model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Araki, Takeshi; Konishi, Yasufumi; Ota, Toshihiko; Sato, Joe; Shimomura, Takashi

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of cosmic neutrinos, which was recently reported by the IceCube collaboration, shows a gap between 400 TeV and 1 PeV. An unknown neutrino interaction mediated by a field with a mass of the MeV scale is one of the possible solutions to this gap. We examine if the leptonic gauge interaction L_{\\mu} - L_{\\tau} can simultaneously explain the two phenomena in the lepton sector: the gap in the cosmic neutrino spectrum and the unsettled disagreement in muon anomalous magnetic moment. We illustrate that there remains the regions in the model parameter space, which account for both the problems. Our results also provide a hint for the distance to the source of the high-energy cosmic neutrinos.

  2. Search for Anomalous Kinematics of Top Dilepton Events in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author presents a search for anomalous kinematics of t{bar t} dilepton events in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 193 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector. They developed a new a priori technique designed to silate the subset in a data sample revealing the largest deviation from Standard Model expectations and to quantify the significance of this departure. In the four-variable space considered, no particular subset shows a significant discrepancy and they find that the probability to obtain a data sample less consistent with the Standard Model than what is observed is 1.0-4.5%.

  3. W? Production and Limits on Anomalous WW? Couplings in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the cross section and the difference in rapidities between photons and charged leptons for inclusive W(?l?)+? production in e? and ?? final states. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb?¹ collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, the measured cross section times branching fraction for the process pp??W?+X?l??+X and the distribution of the charge-signed photon-lepton rapidity difference are found to be in agreement with the standard model. These results provide the most stringent limits on anomalous WW? couplings for data from hadron colliders: -0.4?<0.4 and -0.08?<0.07 at the 95% C.L.

  4. Anomalous optical switching and thermal hysteresis during semiconductor-metal phase transition of VO{sub 2} films on Si substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leahu, G.; Li Voti, R., E-mail: roberto.livoti@uniroma1.it; Sibilia, C.; Bertolotti, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base ed Applicate per l'Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma, via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Scienze di Base ed Applicate per l'Ingegneria, Sapienza Università di Roma, via A. Scarpa 16, 00161 Roma (Italy)

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed infrared study of the semiconductor-to-metal transition (SMT) in a vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) film deposited on silicon wafer. The VO{sub 2} phase transition is studied in the mid-infrared region by analyzing the transmittance and the reflectance measurements, and the calculated emissivity. The reflectance has been measured in two configurations: from the side of the VO{sub 2} film and from that of Si wafer. The results show a strong asymmetry between the emissivity in the two configurations, and the fact that the emissivity dynamic range from the silicon side is twice as large than that from the VO{sub 2} side. The temperature behaviour of the emissivity during the SMT put into evidence the phenomenon of the anomalous absorption in VO{sub 2}, which has been explained by applying the Maxwell Garnett effective medium approximation theory.

  5. Synthesis, characterization, and anomalous dielectric and conductivity performance of one-dimensional (bdaH)InSe{sub 2} (bda = 1,4-butanediamine)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Ke-Zhao; Hu, Wan-Biao [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Hu, Bing; Guan, Xiang-Feng [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Huang, Xiao-Ying, E-mail: xyhuang@fjirsm.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, The Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Anomalous dielectric and conductivity performance have been observed in the organic-containing indium selenide (bdaH)InSe{sub 2}, which are attributed to the water molecules existing in the crystal boundary rather than phase transition. Highlights: {yields} The title compound is the first example of organic-containing one-dimensional indium selenide. {yields} The anomalous dielectric peak is attributed to water molecules in crystal boundary. {yields} The inorganic and organic components of the title compound are connected via hydrogen bonding to form a supramolecular three-dimensional network. -- Abstract: A new indium selenide, namely (bdaH)InSe{sub 2} (1) (bda = 1,4-butanediamine) has been solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. It belongs to the non-centrosymmetric space group Fdd2. Its structure features an infinite one-dimensional anionic chain of [InSe{sub 2}]{sub n}{sup n-} with monoprotonated [bdaH]{sup +} as charge compensating cation. The organic [bdaH]{sup +} cations are joined into a supramolecular one-dimensional chain via N-H...N hydrogen bonding, which further interacts with the inorganic chain via N-H...Se and C-H...Se hydrogen bonding, forming a supramolecular three-dimensional network. Based on such a well-defined structure, the thermal stability, optical, conductivity, and dielectric properties were systematically investigated, showing that dielectric constant, as well as conductivity, had a hump at about 95 {sup o}C, which could be attributed to water molecules in the crystal boundary.

  6. Spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC) energies and the possibility to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baryshevsky, V G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the phenomena of spin rotation and depolarization of high-energy particles in crystals in the range of high energies that will be available at Hadron Collider (LHC) and Future Circular Collider (FCC). It is shown that these phenomena can be used to measure the anomalous magnetic moments of short-lived particles in this range of energies. We also demonstrate that the phenomenon of particle spin depolarization in crystals provides a unique possibility of measuring the anomalous magnetic moment of negatively-charged particles (e.g., beauty baryons), for which the channeling effect is hampered due to far more rapid dechanneling as compared to that for positively-charged particles. Channeling of particles in either straight or bent crystals with polarized nuclei could be used for polarization and the analysis thereof of high-energy particles.

  7. Measurement of the W Gamma --> mu nu gamma Cross-Section, Limits on Anomalous Trilinear Vector Boson Couplings, and the Radiation Amplitude Zero in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askew, Andrew Warren

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis details the measurement of the p{bar p} {yields} W{gamma} + X {yields} {mu}{nu}{gamma} + X cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the D0 detector at Fermilab, in 134.5 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. From the photon E{sub T} spectrum limits on anomalous couplings of the photon to the W are obtained. At 95% confidence level, limits of -1.05 < {Delta}{kappa} < 1.04 for {lambda} = 0 and -0.28 < {lambda} < 0.27 for {Delta}{kappa} = 0 are obtained on the anomalous coupling parameters. The charge signed rapidity difference from the data is displayed, and its significance discussed.

  8. 4500. Nasch, P.M., M.H. Manghnani, and R.A. Secco, 1997, Anomalous behavior of sound velocity and attenuation in liquid Fe-Ni-S, Science, 277, 219-221.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4500. Nasch, P.M., M.H. Manghnani, and R.A. Secco, 1997, Anomalous behavior of sound velocityForschungsZentrum, Potsdam, Germany, 6-16. 4502. Blewett, D.T., P.G. Lucey, and B.R. Hawke, 1997, Clementine images., 132, 119-132. 4504. Yu, Z.-P., P.-S. Chu, and T. Schroeder, 1997, Predictive skills of seasonal

  9. Constraints on string percolation model from anomalous centrality evolution data in Au-Au collisions at $\\mathbf{\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=}$ 62 and 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigory Feofilov; Igor Altsybeev; Olga Kochebina

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous centrality evolution of two-particle angular correlations observed in Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 62$ and 200 GeV and the onset of ridge structures are considered in the model of interacting quark-gluon strings. We assume that at the given energy of nucleus-nucleus collisions the critical energy density may be reached at the specific centrality. In a string percolation model this might be treated equivalently to a formation of a large cluster of strings characterized by the critical string density, with a size comparable to the whole area of interaction of two nuclei. This hypothesis allows to define some constraints on the string percolation model using data on transitional centralities in Au-Au collisions at these two energies. Results are extrapolated to the LHC energy where high string densities (exceeding the critical value) are confirmed for all classes of centralities in Pb-Pb collisions. Interaction between strings inside large clusters formed in nucleus-nucleus collisions is considered in a simplified Monte Carlo model. This model is applied to the qualitative analysis of the onset of collectivity and the ridge formation in Pb-Pb collisions. It is shown that the approach of the repulsive string-string interaction is capable to explain the appearance of elliptic and triangular flow observed in nucleus-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC energies.

  10. Role of pressure in understanding the anomalous superconductivity in europium (molybdenum)/sub 6/(sulfur)/sub 8/ and (TMTSF)/sub 2/FSO/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, S.A.; Huang, C.Y.; Lacoe, R.C.; Chaikin, P.M.; Fuller, W.W.; Luo, H.L.; Wudl, F.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the Chevrel phase compound EuMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/ and the organic material, (TMTSF)/sub 2/FSO/sub 3/ are superconducting only under moderate pressure. In both instances the absence of superconductivity at ambient pressure is directly attributed to a low temperature structural distortion that introduces a gap over all or part of the Fermi surface. The role of pressure is to suppress the transition and thus allow the electrons to condense into the superconducting state. In EuMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/, details of the pressure dependence of both the structural and superconducting transition have been explained on the basis of a competition between a charge density wave-type state and superconductivity. In the case of (TMTSF)/sub 2/FSO/sub 3/ an anion ordering giving rise to a metal-insulator transition is responsible for suppressing superconductivity. The critical magnetic fields of EuMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/ are extremely anomalous and are related to the magnetism of the Eu as well as the structure of the compound.

  11. Zgamma production and limits on anomalous ZZgamma and Zgammagamma couplings in ppbar collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abazov, V M; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguiló, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Åsman, B; Assis-Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benítez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Böhnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Bühler, M; Büscher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clement, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M C; Crepe-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; Da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; De Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; García, C; García-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Yu; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, P; Grivaz, J F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutíerrez, G; Gutíerrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A I; Kharzheev, Yu M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kühl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G L; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Lévêque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajícek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nöding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Oteroy-Garzon, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Petroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M E; Pompos, A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of eegamma and mumugamma events using over 1 fb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron ppbar Collider at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV. Having observed 453 (515) candidates in the eegamma (mumugamma) final state, we measure the Zgamma production cross section for a photon with transverse energy ET > 7 GeV, separation between the photon and leptons Delta R(lgamma} > 0.7, and invariant mass of the di-lepton pair M(ll) > 30 GeV, to be 4.96 +/- 0.30(stat. + syst.) +/- 0.30(lumi.) pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction of 4.74 +/- 0.22 pb. This is the most precise Zgamma cross section measurement at a hadron collider. We set limits on anomalous trilinear Zgammagamma and ZZgamma gauge boson couplings of -0.085 < h(30)^(gamma) < 0.084, -0.0053 < h(40)^(gamma) < 0.0054 and -0.083 < h(30)^(Z) < 0.082, -0.0053 < h(40)^(Z) < 0.0054 at the 95% C.L. for the form-factor scale Lambda = 1.2 TeV.

  12. Determination of the optical properties of La2-xBaxCuO? for several dopings, including the anomalous x=1/8 phase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Homes, C. C.; Hücker, M.; Li, Q.; Xu, Z. J.; Wen, J. S.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties of single crystals of the high-temperature superconductor La2-xBaxCuO? have been measured over a wide frequency and temperature range for light polarized in the a-b planes and along the c axis. Three different Ba concentrations have been examined, x=0.095 with a critical temperature Tc=32 K, x=0.125 where the superconductivity is dramatically weakened with Tc?2.4 K, and x=0.145 with Tc?24 K. The in-plane behavior of the optical conductivity for these materials at high temperature is described by a Drude-like response with a scattering rate that decreases with temperature. Below Tc in the x=0.095 and 0.145 materials there is a clear signature of the formation of a superconducting state in the optical properties allowing the superfluid density (?s0) and the penetration depth to be determined. In the anomalous 1/8 phase, some spectral weight shifts from lower to higher frequency (?300 cm?¹) on cooling below the spin-ordering temperature Tso?42 K, associated with the onset of spin-stripe order; we discuss alternative interpretations in terms of a conventional density-wave gap versus the response to pair-density-wave superconductivity. The two dopings for which a superconducting response is observed both fall on the universal scaling line ?s0/8?4.4?dcTc, which is consistent with the observation of strong dissipation within the a-b planes. The optical properties for light polarized along the c axis reveal an insulating character dominated by lattice vibrations, superimposed on a weak electronic background. No Josephson plasma edge is observed in the low-frequency reflectance along the c axis for x=1/8; however, sharp plasma edges are observed for x=0.095 and 0.145 below Tc.

  13. Determination of the optical properties of La2-xBaxCuO? for several dopings, including the anomalous x=1/8 phase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Homes, C. C.; Hücker, M.; Li, Q.; Xu, Z. J.; Wen, J. S.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties of single crystals of the high-temperature superconductor La2-xBaxCuO? have been measured over a wide frequency and temperature range for light polarized in the a-b planes and along the c axis. Three different Ba concentrations have been examined, x=0.095 with a critical temperature Tc=32 K, x=0.125 where the superconductivity is dramatically weakened with Tc?2.4 K, and x=0.145 with Tc?24 K. The in-plane behavior of the optical conductivity for these materials at high temperature is described by a Drude-like response with a scattering rate that decreases with temperature. Below Tc in the x=0.095 and 0.145 materials there is amore »clear signature of the formation of a superconducting state in the optical properties allowing the superfluid density (?s0) and the penetration depth to be determined. In the anomalous 1/8 phase, some spectral weight shifts from lower to higher frequency (?300 cm?¹) on cooling below the spin-ordering temperature Tso?42 K, associated with the onset of spin-stripe order; we discuss alternative interpretations in terms of a conventional density-wave gap versus the response to pair-density-wave superconductivity. The two dopings for which a superconducting response is observed both fall on the universal scaling line ?s0/8?4.4?dcTc, which is consistent with the observation of strong dissipation within the a-b planes. The optical properties for light polarized along the c axis reveal an insulating character dominated by lattice vibrations, superimposed on a weak electronic background. No Josephson plasma edge is observed in the low-frequency reflectance along the c axis for x=1/8; however, sharp plasma edges are observed for x=0.095 and 0.145 below Tc.« less

  14. High Resolution Imaging of the Anomalous Flux-Ratio Gravitational Lens System CLASS B2045+265: Dark Or Luminous Satellites?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKean, J.P.; Koopmans, L.V.E.; Flack, C.E.; Fassnacht, C.D.; Thompson, D.; Matthews, K.; Blandford, R.D.; Readhead, A.C.S.; Soifer, B.T.; /UC, Davis /Bonn, Max Planck

    2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of flux-ratio anomalies between fold and cusp images in galaxy-scale strong-lens systems has led to an interpretation based on the presence of a high mass-fraction of cold-dark-matter (CDM) substructures around galaxies, as predicted by numerical N-body simulations. These substructures can cause large perturbations of the image magnifications, leading to changes in the image flux ratios. The flux-ratio anomaly is particularly evident in the radio-loud quadruple gravitational lens system CLASS B2045+265. In this paper, new high-resolution radio, optical, and infrared imaging of B2045+265 is presented which sheds more light on this anomaly and its possible causes. First, deep Very Long Baseline Array observations show very compact images, possibly with a hint of a jet, but with no evidence for differential scattering or scatter broadening. Hence, the flux-ratio anomaly is unlikely to be caused by refractive scattering in either the Milky Way or the lens galaxy. Second, optical and infrared observations with the Hubble Space Telescope and through Adaptive-Optics imaging with the W. M. Keck Telescope, show a previously undiscovered object--interpreted as a (tidally disrupted) dwarf satellite based on its colors and slight extension--between the main lens galaxy and the three anomalous flux-ratio images. Third, color variations in the early-type lens galaxy indicate recent star-formation, possibly the result of secondary infall of gas-rich satellites. A population of young galaxies around the lens system could explain the previously discovered strong [O II] emission. However, spiral structure and/or normal star formation in the lens galaxy cannot be excluded. In light of these new data, we propose a lens model for the system, including the observed dwarf satellite, which reproduces all positional and flux-ratio constraints, without the need for additional CDM substructure. Although the model is peculiar in that the dwarf galaxy must be highly flattened, the model is very similar to recently proposed mass models based on high-order multipole expansions.

  15. Anomalous diffusion in fractal globules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail V. Tamm; Leonid I. Nazarov; Alexey A. Gavrilov; Alexander V. Chertovich

    2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractal globule state is widely believed to be the best known model to describe the chromatin packing in the eucaryotic nuclei. Here we provide a scaling theory and dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) computer simulation for the thermal motion of monomers in the fractal globule state. We show this motion to be subdiffusive described by $\\langle X^2 (t)\\rangle \\sim t^{\\alpha_F}$ with $\\alpha_F$ close to 0.4. We also suggest a novel way to construct a fractal globule state in computer simulation, and provide simulation evidence supporting the conjecture that different initial entanglement-free states of a polymer chain converge as they are thermally annealed.

  16. Anomalous magnetoresistance in Fibonacci multilayers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machado, L. D.; Bezerra, C. G.; Correa, M. A.; Chesman, C.; Pearson, J. E.; Hoffmann, A. (Materials Science Division); (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically investigated magnetoresistance curves in quasiperiodic magnetic multilayers for two different growth directions, namely, [110] and [100]. We considered identical ferromagnetic layers separated by nonmagnetic layers with two different thicknesses chosen based on the Fibonacci sequence. Using parameters for Fe/Cr multilayers, four terms were included in our description of the magnetic energy: Zeeman, cubic anisotropy, bilinear coupling, and biquadratic coupling. The minimum energy was determined by the gradient method and the equilibrium magnetization directions found were used to calculate magnetoresistance curves. By choosing spacers with a thickness such that biquadratic coupling is stronger than bilinear coupling, unusual behaviors for the magnetoresistance were observed: (i) for the [110] case, there is a different behavior for structures based on even and odd Fibonacci generations, and, more interesting, (ii) for the [100] case, we found magnetic field ranges for which the magnetoresistance increases with magnetic field.

  17. Anomalous change detection in imagery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theiler, James P. (Los Alamos, NM); Perkins, Simon J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A distribution-based anomaly detection platform is described that identifies a non-flat background that is specified in terms of the distribution of the data. A resampling approach is also disclosed employing scrambled resampling of the original data with one class specified by the data and the other by the explicit distribution, and solving using binary classification.

  18. Anomalous Bimanual Coordination Among Dyslexic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,tt and Richard J. Davidsonttt Most neuropsychological models of dyslexia have focused on left hemisphere dys, while contemporary views of dyslexia have more commonly attributed reading failure to left hemisphere

  19. Are nanophase grain boundaries anomalous?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stern, E.A.; Siegel, R.W.; Newville, M.; Sanders, P.G.; Haskel, D. [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

    1995-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The grain boundary regions of nanophase Cu metal are investigated using the x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique. Typical samples made by standard techniques need to be greatly thinned if measured in transmission in order to eliminate experimental artifacts which erroneously lower the apparent coordination number. To avoid this problem the samples were measured by the total electron yield technique. The results indicate a grain boundary structure which, on the average, is similar to that in conventional polycrystalline Cu, contrary to previous XAFS measurements made in transmission which indicated a lower coordination number. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  20. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ Production Cross Section and Search for Anomalous $WW\\gamma$ and $WWZ$ Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, J.; /Chicago U., EFI; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the W boson pair production cross section and most sensitive test of anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The WW candidates are reconstructed from decays containing two charged leptons and two neutrinos, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector from 3.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, a total of 654 candidate events are observed with an expected background contribution of 320 {+-} 47 events. The measured total cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} + X) = 12.1 {+-} 0.9 (stat){sub -1.4}{sup +1.6} (syst) pb, which is in good agreement with the standard model prediction. The same data sample is used to place constraints on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings.

  1. A Comparison of Radial Intensity Profiles of Termination Shock Particles and Anomalous Cosmic Rays in the Outer North-South Heliosheaths Using CRS data from V1 and V2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webber, W R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using data from the Voyager 1 and 2 CRS telescopes available on the web through the end of 2014 we have studied the intensity variations of termination shock H nuclei and anomalous cosmic ray H and He nuclei as a function of radial distance. In contrast to the inner part of the heliosheath where the intensity vs. radius profiles in the North and South heliosheaths are much different, these intensity vs. radius profiles, as well as the intensities themselves, are more similar in the outer North and South heliosheaths as measured by V1 and V2 respectively. In the N heliosheath, taken to be 27.6 AU thick beyond the HTS crossing distance of 94 AU, the intensities of termination shock particles and anomalous cosmic rays reach a maximum at between 110-112 AU or at a location ~halfway between the termination shock and the heliopause. They then decrease more or less continuously to an intensity ~2/3 of the maximum for each component just before the final dropout at ~121 AU, just inside the heliopause. This intensity-...

  2. Measurement of the Z????-bar ? Production Cross Section and Limits on Anomalous ZZ? and Z?? Couplings in pp-bar Collisions at s?=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Clutter, Justace Randall; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace

    2009-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    , 201802 (2009) P HY S I CA L R EV I EW LE T T E R S week ending 22 MAY 2009 201802-5 of couplings for a grid in which hV30 runs from #1;0:12 to 0.12 with a step of 0.01, and hV40 varies from #1;0:08 to 0.08 with a step of 0.001. The MC samples...Measurement of the Z#1; ! #2; #1;#2;#1; Production Cross Section and Limits on Anomalous ZZ#1; and Z#1;#1; Couplings in p #1;p Collisions at ffiffi s p ¼ 1:96 TeV V.M. Abazov,36 B. Abbott,74 M. Abolins,64 B. S. Acharya,29 M. Adams,50 T. Adams,48 E...

  3. Anomalous diffusion of Ga and As from semi-insulating GaAs substrate into MOCVD grown ZnO films as a function of annealing temperature and its effect on charge compensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Pranab; Banerji, P., E-mail: pallab@matsc.iitkgp.ernet.in [Materials Science Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Halder, Nripendra N. [Advanced Technology Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India)] [Advanced Technology Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Kundu, Souvik [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Oregon State University, 1148 Kelley Engineering Center, Corvallis, OR 97331–5501 (United States)] [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Oregon State University, 1148 Kelley Engineering Center, Corvallis, OR 97331–5501 (United States); Shripathi, T.; Gupta, M. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001 (India)] [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452 001 (India)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The diffusion behavior of arsenic (As) and gallium (Ga) atoms from semi-insulating GaAs (SI-GaAs) into ZnO films upon post-growth annealing vis-à-vis the resulting charge compensation was investigated with the help of x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectroscopy. The films, annealed at 600 ºC and 700 ºC showed p-type conductivity with a hole concentration of 1.1 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup ?3} and 2.8 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup ?3} respectively, whereas those annealed at 800 ºC showed n-type conductivity with a carrier concentration of 6.5 × 10{sup 16} cm{sup ?3}. It is observed that at lower temperatures, large fraction of As atoms diffused from the SI-GaAs substrates into ZnO and formed acceptor related complex, (As{sub Zn}–2V{sub Zn}), by substituting Zn atoms (As{sub Zn}) and thereby creating two zinc vacancies (V{sub Zn}). Thus as-grown ZnO which was supposed to be n-type due to nonstoichiometric nature showed p-type behavior. On further increasing the annealing temperature to 800 ºC, Ga atoms diffused more than As atoms and substitute Zn atoms thereby forming shallow donor complex, Ga{sub Zn}. Electrons from donor levels then compensate the p-type carriers and the material reverts back to n-type. Thus the conversion of carrier type took place due to charge compensation between the donors and acceptors in ZnO and this compensation is the possible origin of anomalous conduction in wide band gap materials.

  4. Determination of the optical properties of La2-xBaxCuO? for several dopings, including the anomalous x=1/8 phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Homes, C. C.; Hücker, M.; Li, Q.; Xu, Z. J.; Wen, J. S.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties of single crystals of the high-temperature superconductor La2-xBaxCuO? have been measured over a wide frequency and temperature range for light polarized in the a-b planes and along the c axis. Three different Ba concentrations have been examined, x=0.095 with a critical temperature Tc=32 K, x=0.125 where the superconductivity is dramatically weakened with Tc?2.4 K, and x=0.145 with Tc?24 K. The in-plane behavior of the optical conductivity for these materials at high temperature is described by a Drude-like response with a scattering rate that decreases with temperature. Below Tc in the x=0.095 and 0.145 materials there is a clear signature of the formation of a superconducting state in the optical properties allowing the superfluid density (?s0) and the penetration depth to be determined. In the anomalous 1/8 phase, some spectral weight shifts from lower to higher frequency (?300 cm?¹) on cooling below the spin-ordering temperature Tso?42 K, associated with the onset of spin-stripe order; we discuss alternative interpretations in terms of a conventional density-wave gap versus the response to pair-density-wave superconductivity. The two dopings for which a superconducting response is observed both fall on the universal scaling line ?s0/8?4.4?dcTc, which is consistent with the observation of strong dissipation within the a-b planes. The optical properties for light polarized along the c axis reveal an insulating character dominated by lattice vibrations, superimposed on a weak electronic background. No Josephson plasma edge is observed in the low-frequency reflectance along the c axis for x=1/8; however, sharp plasma edges are observed for x=0.095 and 0.145 below Tc.

  5. Anomalous optical nonlinearity of dielectric nanodispersions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milichko, V A; Dzyuba, V P; Kul'chin, Yurii N

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of studying the nonlinear optical response of nanodispersions of semiconductor (TiO{sub 2}, ZnO) and dielectric (SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticles of spherical, spheroidal and flake shape, suspended in polar and nonpolar dielectric matrices (water, isopropanol, polymethylsiloxane and transformer oil) by means of z-scanning in the field of low-intensity visible laser radiation. It is found that, unlike semiconductor nanoparticles and particles of spherical shape, flake-shaped SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles suspended in nonpolar matrices exhibit nonlinear optical response within the intensity interval from 0 to 500 W cm{sup -2} that vanishes at higher intensities. The diagrams of energy states of the optical electrons in nanoparticles that allow explanation of differences in the nonlinear-optical properties of nanodispersions are proposed. Good agreement between the experimental and theoretical dependences of nonlinear refractive indices and absorption coefficients on the intensity of radiation is observed. (optical nanostructures)

  6. Anomalous radial transport in tokamak edge plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodi, Vasudeva Raghavendra Kowsik

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport in tokamak plasma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Numerical simulations of tokamak plasma . . . . . . . . .of blobs in tokamak edge plasmas . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  7. ATLAS Sensitivity to Anomalous WWV Couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simic, Lj.; Vranjes, N.; Mendas, I.; Popovic, D. S. [Institute of Physics, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the strategy in extracting information on triple gauge boson couplings in WW production and summarize the expected limits on WWV couplings from the ATLAS experiment at the LHC.

  8. Anomalous diffusion in bounded temporally irregular flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkataramani, Shankar C.

    Department of Physics, Department of Electrical Engineering and Institute for Plasma Research, University

  9. Distribution of anomalous exponents of natural images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sochen, Nir

    to the appropriate Fourier components of the image. Such a behavior is typical to the Fourier transform of the spin logarithm, (i), the power spectrum of the whole set of images is taken. The power spectrum is found dimension, is positive and usually not large [5­7]. Such power law behavior is also characteristic of system

  10. Anomalous behaviour of molybdenum in steel welds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choudhary, Habib Ullah

    to the Cam- bridge Commonwealth Trust, Dr. \\Vali Mohammad Trust, ESAB AB (Sweden), NEI Parsons and Churchill College for the financial support. I thank Dr. A. 1. Greer for his valuable guidance concerning my research work. I also express my thanks to Dr. L... . -E. Svensson ofESAB (Sweden), Dr. G. M. Evans of OERLIKON (Switzerland), Dr. G. Rees, Prof. J. R. Yang, Dr. H. Murakami and members of P. T. Group, Ashraf, Shafiq, Suresh, Hiroshi, Susumu, Kazuaki, Julia, Nikki, Marty, Akihiro, Rachel, Shahriar, Chang...

  11. Anomalous critical fields in quantum critical superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Putzke, C.; Walmsley, P.; Fletcher, J.D.; Malone, L.; Vignolles, D.; Proust, C.; Badoux, S.; See, P.; Beere, H.E.; Ritchie, D.A.; Kasahara, S.; Mizukami, Y.; Shibauchi, T.; Matsuda, Y.; Carrington, A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -temperature superconductivity. However, the exact mechanism by which this occurs remains poorly understood. The iron-pnictide superconductor BaFe2(As1?xPx)2 is perhaps the clearest example to date of a high temperature quantum critical superconductor, and so it is a... mixing of antiferromagnetism and superconductivity, suggesting that a highly unusual vortex state is realised in quantum critical superconductors. Quantum critical points (QCPs) can be associated with a variety of different order-disorder phenomena...

  12. Anomalous temperature behavior of Sn impurities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haskel, D.; Shechter, H. (Department of Physics, Technion, Haifa (Israel)); Stern, E.A.; Newville, M. (Department of Physics FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)); Yacoby, Y. (Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel))

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sn impurities in Pb and Ag hosts have been investigated by Moessbauer effect and in Pb by x-ray-absorption fine-structure (XAFS) studies. The Sn atoms are dissolved up to at least 2 at. % in Pb and up to at least 8 at. % in Ag for the temperature ranges investigated. The concentration limit for Sn-Sn interactions is 1 at. % for Pb and 2 at. % for Ag as determined experimentally by lowering the Sn concentration until no appreciable change occurs in the Moessbauer effect. XAFS measurements verify that the Sn impurities in Pb are dissolved and predominantly at substitutional sites. For both hosts the temperature dependence of the spectral intensities of isolated Sn impurities below a temperature [ital T][sub 0] is as expected for vibrating about a lattice site. Above [ital T][sub 0] the Moessbauer spectral intensity exhibits a greatly increased rate of drop-off with temperature without appreciable broadening. This drop-off is too steep to be explained by ordinary anharmonic effects and can be explained by a liquidlike rapid hopping of the Sn, localized about a lattice site. Higher-entropy-density regions of radii somewhat more than an atomic spacing surround such impurities, and can act as nucleation sites for three-dimensional melting.

  13. Comments on the report "Indications of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device containing hydrogen loaded nickel powder" [arXiv:1305.3913] by G.Levi, E.Foschi, T.Hartman, B.Höistad, R.Pettersson, L.Tegnér, H.Essén

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Göran Ericsson; Stephan Pomp

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent report titled "Indications of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device containing hydrogen loaded nickel powder" and published on arXiv, G. Levi and co-workers put forth several claims concerning the operations and performance of the so-called E-Cat of inventor Andrea Rossi. We note first of all that the circumstances and people involved in the test make it far from being an independent one. We examine the claims put forth by the authors and note that in many cases they are not supported by the facts given in the report. We present results from thermal calculations showing that alternative explanations are possible were the authors seem to jump to conclusions fitting pre-conceived ideas. In general we find that much attention is drawn to trivialities, while important pieces of information and investigation are lacking and seem not to have been conducted or considered. We also note that the proposed claims would require new physics in not only one but several areas. Besides a cold-fusion like process without production of any radiation also extreme new material properties would be needed to explain what rather seems to be a problem of correct measurement. Therefore, it is clear to us that a truly independent and scientific investigation of the so called E-Cat device, convincingly demonstrating an "anomalous heat energy production" has not been presented in the arXiv report and is thus, to-date, still lacking.

  14. Measurement of the Z gamma ---> nu anti-nu gamma cross section and limits on anomalous Z Z gamma and Z gamma gamma couplings in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, B.; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, M.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, M.; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, T.; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, E.; /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U.; Ahsan, M.; /Kansas State U.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Northeastern U.

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first observation of the Z{gamma} {yields}{nu}{bar {nu}}{gamma} process at the Tevatron at 5.1 standard deviations significance, based on 3.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The measured Z{gamma} cross section multiplied by the branching fraction of Z {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}} is 32 {+-} 9(stat. + syst.) {+-} 2(lumi.) fb for the photon E{sub T} > 90 GeV. It is in agreement with the standard model prediction of 39 {+-} 4 fb. We set the most restrictive limits on anomalous trilinear Z{gamma}{gamma} and ZZ{gamma} gauge boson couplings at a hadron collider to date, with three constraints being the world's strongest.

  15. Comments on the report "Indications of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device containing hydrogen loaded nickel powder" [arXiv:1305.3913] by G.Levi, E.Foschi, T.Hartman, B.H\\"oistad, R.Pettersson, L.Tegn\\'er, H.Ess\\'en

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ericsson, Göran

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent report titled "Indications of anomalous heat energy production in a reactor device containing hydrogen loaded nickel powder" [arXiv:1305.3913], G. Levi and co-workers put forth several claims concerning the operations and performance of the so-called E-Cat of Andrea Rossi. We note first of all that the circumstances and people involved in the test make if far from being an independent one. We examine the claims put forth by the authors and note that in many cases they are not supported by the facts given in the report. The authors seem to jump to conclusions fitting pre-conceived ideas where alternative explanations are possible. In general we find that much attention is drawn to trivialities while important pieces of information and investigation are lacking and seem not to have been conducted or considered. These are characteristics more typically found in pseudo-scientific texts and have no place in a technical/scientific report on this level. We also note that the proposed claims would require...

  16. Origin of anomalous Xe-H in nanodiamond stardust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kratz, K. L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, D-55128 Mainz, Germany and Fachbereich Chemie, Pharmazie und Geowissenschaften, Universitat Mainz, Mainz (United States); Farouqi, K. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, D-55128 Mainz, Germany and Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Hallmann, O. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Pfeiffer, B. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Univ. Giessen, D-35392 Giessen (Germany); Ott, U. [Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie, Otto-Hahn-Institut, D-55128 Mainz (Germany); Univ. of West Hungary, H-9700 Szombathely (Hungary)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Still today, the nucleosynthesis origin of Xe-H in presolar nanodiamonds is far from understood. Historically possible explanations were proposed by a secondary “neutron-burst” process occurring in the He- or C/O-shells of a type-II supernova (SN-II), which are, however, not fully convincing in terms of modern nucleosynthesis conditions. Therefore, we have investigated Xe isotopic abundance features that may be diagnostic for different versions of a classical, primary r-process in high-entropy-wind (HEW) ejecta of core-collapse SN-II. We report here on parameter tests for non-standard r-process variants, by varying electron abundances (Y{sub e}), ranges of entropies (S) and expansion velocities (V{sub exp}) with their correlated neutron-freezeout times (?(freeze)) and temperatures (T{sub 9}(freeze)). From this study, we conclude that a best fi to the measured Xe-H abundance ratios {sup i}Xe/{sup 136}Xe can be obtained with the high-S “main” component of a “cold” r-process variant.

  17. Sweet-Parker Reconnection with Anomalous Resistivity — A Toy Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Xuening; Diamond, Patrick

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    waves and particles. The wave energy density is proportionalwaves. Physically, the wave energy is the sum of the energyequations (36) and (45). Wave Energy Spectrum The key to

  18. anomalous silicate dust: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emission feature in the type 1 (i.e. face-on) LINER nucleus of M81. Using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument on Spitzer, we determine the feature in the central 230...

  19. anomalous ion diffusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    process. Based on this finding, we present the two hypotheses concerning the effect of fractal time-space fabric on physical behaviors and accordingly derive fractional quantum...

  20. anisotropic anomalous diffusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    process. Based on this finding, we present the two hypotheses concerning the effect of fractal time-space fabric on physical behaviors and accordingly derive fractional quantum...

  1. anomalous cosmic rays: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (arXiv) Summary: We consider the propagation of galactic cosmic rays in the fractal interstellar medium. Steady state solution of the fractional diffusion equation,...

  2. anomalous diffusion induced: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    process. Based on this finding, we present the two hypotheses concerning the effect of fractal time-space fabric on physical behaviors and accordingly derive fractional quantum...

  3. anomalous moisture diffusion: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    process. Based on this finding, we present the two hypotheses concerning the effect of fractal time-space fabric on physical behaviors and accordingly derive fractional quantum...

  4. anomalous cosmic ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (arXiv) Summary: We consider the propagation of galactic cosmic rays in the fractal interstellar medium. Steady state solution of the fractional diffusion equation,...

  5. anomalous diffusion assessed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    process. Based on this finding, we present the two hypotheses concerning the effect of fractal time-space fabric on physical behaviors and accordingly derive fractional quantum...

  6. Limits on anomalous WW and WWZ couplings B. Abbott,31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Go´mez,1 G. Go´mez,25 P. I. Goncharov,38 J. L. Gonza´lez Soli´s,11 H. Gordon,4 L. T. Goss,48 K

  7. anomalous coronary arteries: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Chan, Juliana Maria 67 Association of Common Polymorphisms in GLUT9 Gene with Gout but Not with Coronary Artery Disease in a Large Case-Control Study CiteSeer Summary:...

  8. anomalous wave propagation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of wave vector and energy flow are also significantly different. It is found that waves exhibit different propagation behaviors in anisotropic media with different sign...

  9. anomalous spin waves: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    branches of wave dispersion: spin-electromagnetic plasma waves and self-consistent spin waves. Propagation of neutron beams through quantum plasmas is also considered....

  10. anomalous ultrasound propagation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The equations of fluid dynamics developed in paper I are applied to the study of the propagation of ultrasound waves. There is good agreement between the predicted propagation...

  11. anomalous ion transport: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and fuel (mostly methane) conversion purposes over the last three decades. The fuel ... Apo, Daniel Jolomi 2012-01-01 123 Particle transport and ion current rectification in...

  12. Giant anomalous self-steepening in photonic crystal waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Husko, Chad

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-steepening of optical pulses arises due the dispersive contribution of the $\\chi^{(3)}(\\omega)$ Kerr nonlinearity. In typical structures this response is on the order of a few femtoseconds with a fixed frequency response. In contrast, the effective $\\chi^{(3)}$ Kerr nonlinearity in photonic crystal waveguides (PhCWGs) is largely determined by the geometrical parameters of the structure and is consequently tunable over a wide range. Here we show self-steepening based on group-velocity (group-index) modulation for the first time, giving rise to a new physical mechanism for generating this effect. Further, we demonstrate that periodic media such as PhCWGS can exhibit self-steepening coefficients two orders of magnitude larger than typical systems. At these magnitudes the self-steepening strongly affects the nonlinear pulse dynamics even for picosecond pulses. Due to interaction with additional higher-order nonlinearities in the semiconductor materials under consideration, we employ a generalized nonlinear S...

  13. Are beryllium abundances anomalous in stars with giant planets?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. C. Santos; G. Israelian; R. J Garcia Lopez; M. Mayor; R. Rebolo; S. Randich; A. Ecuvillon; C. Dominguez Cerdena

    2004-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present beryllium (Be) abundances in a large sample of 41 extra-solar planet host stars, and for 29 stars without any known planetary-mass companion, spanning a large range of effective temperatures. The Be abundances were derived through spectral synthesis done in standard Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium, using spectra obtained with various instruments. The results seem to confirm that overall, planet-host stars have ``normal'' Be abundances, although a small, but not significant, difference might be present. This result is discussed, and we show that this difference is probably not due to any stellar ``pollution'' events. In other words, our results support the idea that the high-metal content of planet-host stars has, overall, a ``primordial'' origin. However, we also find a small subset of planet-host late-F and early-G dwarfs that might have higher than average Be abundances. The reason for the offset is not clear, and might be related either to the engulfment of planetary material, to galactic chemical evolution effects, or to stellar-mass differences for stars of similar temperature.

  14. anomalously large capacitance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: ply a modified Iterated Local Search procedure to Capacitated Vehicle .... enter and leave the set S, in such a way that at least 2k(S) ? |?R(S)| times an .........

  15. Theory of the Anomalous Hall Effect in the Insulating Regime 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiongjun

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    .3 The upper limit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 6.4 Dependence of the AHC on DOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 6.5 Efros-shklovskii hopping conduction regime . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 6.6 Activation E3... in this figure is given by ? = 1.5 ? 1.7 [38]. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 xi FIGURE Page 2.8 Experimental data from Ref. [39]. (a) Temperature dependence of the longitudinal resistance versus 1/T (a) and 1/T 1/2 (b-d). The samples A, B, and C are grow...

  16. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, Nancy K. (San Leandro, CA); Durbin, Philip F. (Livermore, CA); Dolan, Kenneth W. (Livermore, CA); Perkins, Dwight E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features.

  17. Anomalous diffusion of proteins in sheared lipid membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khoshnood, Atefeh

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use coarse grained molecular dynamics simulations to investigate diffusion properties of sheared lipid membranes with embedded transmembrane proteins. In membranes without proteins, we find normal in-plane diffusion of lipids in all flow conditions. Protein embedded membranes behave quite differently: by imposing a simple shear flow and sliding the monolayers of the membrane over each other, the motion of protein clusters becomes strongly superdiffusive in the shear direction. In such a circumstance, subdiffusion regime is predominant perpendicular to the flow. We show that superdiffusion is a result of accelerated chaotic motions of protein--lipid complexes within the membrane voids, which are generated by hydrophobic mismatch or the transport of lipids by proteins.

  18. anomalously large deformation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    radiation. I. F. Malov 2007-11-04 88 A study of large plastic deformations in dual phase steel using digital image correlation and FE analysis Physics Websites Summary: ),...

  19. Spectroscopic Studies of Anomalous Hydrodynamic Behaviour in Complex Fluids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edington, David W. N.

    2002-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Brillouin spectroscopy probes the thermally generated pressure fluctuations (sound waves) which propagate in a material. The resulting information on sound velocity and absorption provides a fast and efficient method of ...

  20. Anomalous high ionic conductivity of nanoporous -Li3PS4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zengcai [ORNL] [ORNL; Fu, Wujun [ORNL] [ORNL; Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL] [ORNL; Yu, Xiang [ORNL] [ORNL; Wu, Zili [ORNL] [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL] [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL] [ORNL; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL] [ORNL; Rondinone, Adam Justin [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lithium-ion conducting solid electrolytes hold the promise for enabling high-energy battery chemistries and circumventing safety issues of conventional lithium batteries1-3. Achieving the combination of high ionic conductivity and broad electrochemical window in solid electrolytes is a grand challenge for the synthesis of battery materials. Herein we show an enhancement of room-temperature lithium-ion conductivity of 3 orders of magnitude by creating nanostructured Li3PS4. This material has a wide (5V) electrochemical window and superior chemical stability against lithium metal. The nanoporous structure of Li3PS4 reconciles two vital effects that enhance ionic conductivity: (1) The reduced dimension to nanometer-sized framework stabilizes the high conduction beta phase that occurs at elevated temperatures1,4; and (2) The high surface-to-bulk ratio of nanoporous -Li3PS4 promotes surface conduction5,6. Manipulating the ionic conductivity of solid electrolytes has far-reaching implications for materials design and synthesis in a broad range of applications such as batteries, fuel-cells, sensors, photovoltaic systems, and so forth3,7.

  1. anomalous elastic behavior: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of symmetry and relevance, we introduce a minimal Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson elastic energy for nematic elastomers. Performing a diagrammatic low temperature expansion, we...

  2. Joule Heating and Anomalous Resistivity in the Solar Corona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven R. Spangler

    2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent radioastronomical observations of Faraday rotation in the solar corona can be interpreted as evidence for coronal currents, with values as large as $2.5 \\times 10^9$ Amperes (Spangler 2007). These estimates of currents are used to develop a model for Joule heating in the corona. It is assumed that the currents are concentrated in thin current sheets, as suggested by theories of two dimensional magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. The Spitzer result for the resistivity is adopted as a lower limit to the true resistivity. The calculated volumetric heating rate is compared with an independent theoretical estimate by Cranmer et al (2007). This latter estimate accounts for the dynamic and thermodynamic properties of the corona at a heliocentric distance of several solar radii. Our calculated Joule heating rate is less than the Cranmer et al estimate by at least a factor of $3 \\times 10^5$. The currents inferred from the observations of Spangler (2007) are not relevant to coronal heating unless the true resistivity is enormously increased relative to the Spitzer value. However, the same model for turbulent current sheets used to calculate the heating rate also gives an electron drift speed which can be comparable to the electron thermal speed, and larger than the ion acoustic speed. It is therefore possible that the coronal current sheets are unstable to current-driven instabilities which produce high levels of waves, enhance the resistivity and thus the heating rate.

  3. anomalous diffusion due: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    uptake of 99m Tc-MDP. The mechanism of extraskeletal uptake of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in damaged, inflamed, neoplastic or necrotic tissues may be due to dystrophic...

  4. Cages and anomalous diffusion in vibrated dense granular media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camille Scalliet; Andrea Gnoli; Andrea Puglisi; Angelo Vulpiani

    2015-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertically shaken granular medium hosts a blade rotating around a fixed vertical axis, which acts as a mesorheological probe. At high densities, independently from the shaking intensity, the blade's dynamics show strong caging effects, marked by transient sub-diffusion and a maximum in the velocity power density spectrum (vpds), at a resonant frequency $\\sim 10$ Hz. Interpreting the data through a diffusing harmonic cage model allows us to retrieve the elastic constant of the granular medium and its collective diffusion coefficient. For high frequencies $f$, a tail $\\sim 1/f$ in the vpds reveals non-trivial correlations in the intra-cage micro-dynamics. At very long times (larger than $10$ s), a super-diffusive behavior emerges, ballistic in the most extreme cases. Consistently, the distribution of slow velocity inversion times $\\tau$ displays a power-law decay, likely due to persistent collective fluctuations of the host medium.

  5. Revisiting anomalous structures in liquid Ga K. H. Tsai,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Ten-Ming

    of Physics, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan 804, Republic of China Received 2 November's simulation at high temperature, dimers with extremely short bond lengths are indeed found in our model just-range order, which is related to the structures beyond the first shell of the radial distribution function

  6. Probing the anomalous compressibility of silica glass using grid computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Andrew

    2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    thermalexpansionWalker et al. (2007) J. Phys: Con. Mat. 19 art. no. 275210Dove et. al. (2006) Mol. Simul. 32 pp. 949-952 CamGrid: High Throughput Computing in Science 2008 Acknowledgments • People: Martin Dove, Lucy Sullivan, KostyaTracheno, Richard Bruin, Rik Tyer...

  7. anomalous process behaviour: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fourth, the students develop appropriate methods for observation and analysis. Fifth, theory is gradually introduced through discussion in the field, the accommodation and at a...

  8. anomalous event detection: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dark matter, then some amount must exist in our solar system. We demonstrate that the mirror matter theory allows for a simple explanation for the puzzling meteoritic events both...

  9. Evidence for an anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; /Dubna, JINR; Abbott, Braden Keim; /Oklahoma U.; Abolins, Maris A.; /Michigan State U.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; /Tata Inst.; Adams, Mark Raymond; /Illinois U., Chicago; Adams, Todd; /Florida State U.; Aguilo, Ernest; /York U., Canada; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; /Dubna, JINR; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; /St. Petersburg, INP; Alton, Andrew K.; /Michigan U. /Augustana Coll., Sioux Falls; Alverson, George O.; /Northeastern U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the charge asymmetry A of like-sign dimuon events in 6.1 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions recorded with the DO detector at a center of mass energy sqrt s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider.

  10. anomalous solar chemical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with observations. Dmitri A. Uzdensky 2002-12-18 15 Microbial Electrosynthesis Turns Solar Energy into Chemicals May 31, 2010 Environmental Management and Restoration Websites...

  11. anomalous fading rate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    USA Received 12 December 2002; accepted 20 December 2002 Abstract Capacity fade of Sony US 18650 Li Popov, Branko N. 8 Power Control and Achievable Rates for Fading CDMA:...

  12. Precise Quantization of Anomalous Hall Effect Near Zero Magnetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources U.S. Science Information - Science.gov Global Science Information - WorldWideScience.org - Energy Technology Data Exchange - International Nuclear Information System...

  13. anomalous hall effect: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    magnetic fields. For the lowest Landau level, we argue that the basic physics of graphene is similar to that of two-dimensional electron gas, which is in agreement with the...

  14. Anomalous partially hyperbolic diffeomorphisms I: dynamically coherent examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    splits into three one-dimensional1 Df-invariant continuous bundles TM = Ess Ec Euu such that there exists > 0 such that for every x M: Df |Ess(x) is partially hyperbolic and there exists Ess(x)

  15. anomalous single top: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    angular correlation and the amount of top quark polarization in the production of a higgs boson in association with a single top quark in the t-channel at the LHC. We also study...

  16. anomalous gtt couplings: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yukawa Couplings HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: In the standard model, the Higgs boson h couples to the quarks and charged leptons according to the well-known formula...

  17. anomalous gravity effects: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    addition, a large A term orand a large stop mass are needed to have about a 126 GeV Higgs boson with three families of quarks and leptons. Thus, we suggest an inverted effective...

  18. anomalous retroesophageal left: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mu+mu-gamma, through a t-channel exchange of an additional charged triplet Higgs boson. The DM is leptophilic which is useful for explaining the non-observation of any...

  19. anomalous physical properties: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - Experiment (arXiv) Summary: The initial data on the production and decay of the Higgs boson reported significant deviations from the Standard Model (SM) expectations,...

  20. anomalous vvh interactions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    independent way, the sensitivity of a Linear Collider to the couplings of a light Higgs boson to gauge bosons. Including the possibility of CP violation, we construct several...

  1. Stability maps to predict anomalous ductility in B2 materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Ruoshi

    While most B2 materials are brittle, a new class of B2 (rare-earth) intermetallic compounds is observed to have large ductility. We analytically derive a necessary condition for ductility (dislocation motion) involving ...

  2. A Fractional Lie Group Method For Anomalous Diffusion Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo-cheng Wu

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Lie group method provides an efficient tool to solve a differential equation. This paper suggests a fractional partner for fractional partial differential equations using a fractional characteristic method. A space-time fractional diffusion equation is used as an example to illustrate the effectiveness of the Lie group method.

  3. Anomalous thermodynamics and phase transitions of neutron-star matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Chomaz; F. Gulminelli; C. Ducoin; P. Napolitani; K. H. O. Hasnaoui

    2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this letter we show that the presence of the long-range Coulomb force in dense stellar matter implies that the total charge cannot be associated with a chemical potential, even if it is a conserved quantity. As a further consequence, the analytical properties of the partition sum are modified, changing the order of the phase transitions and affecting the possible occurrence of critical behaviours. The peculiar thermodynamic properties of the system can be understood introducing a model hamiltonian in which each charge is independently neutralized by a uniform background of opposite charge.

  4. KINETIC THEORY OF THE ANOMALOUS TRANSPORT OF SUPERTHERMAL ELECTRONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukyanov, Alex

    of thermonuclear fusion research. It is well known that various instabilities leading to dis- charge turbulization

  5. anomalous ion thermal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: The heavy ion collision provides a unique many-body environment where local domains of strongly interacting chiral medium may occur and in a...

  6. anomalous dust emission: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    leq 4times10-3. We observe that the duststellar ratios depend on the interstellar medium (ISM) environment, such as the distance from currently or previously star-forming...

  7. anomalous fine structure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interlaced by concentrations of stronger magnetic field at the interface between the umbra and the outer field-free atmosphere. Calculated synthetic images show dark cores like...

  8. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Dolan, K.W.; Perkins, D.E.

    1995-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation is disclosed. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features. 1 fig.

  9. anomalous calcium phosphate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    human bones have been synthesized by using novel synthetic body uid solutions via the self-propagating combustion A. Cu Neyt Tas 2000-01-01 14 Mechanical properties of zinc...

  10. anomalous positron peaks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    matter ("secondary production"). Positrons may, however, also be created by dark matter particle annihilations in the galactic halo or in the magnetospheres of near-by...

  11. Automated Detection of Anomalous Shipping Manifests to Identify Illicit Trade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Chikkagoudar, Satish

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an approach to analyzing trade data which uses clustering to detect similarities across shipping manifest records, classification to evaluate clustering results and categorize new unseen shipping data records, and visual analytics to provide to support situation awareness in dynamic decision making to monitor and warn against the movement of radiological threat materials through search, analysis and forecasting capabilities. The evaluation of clustering results through classification and systematic inspection of the clusters show the clusters have strong semantic cohesion and offer novel ways to detect transactions related to nuclear smuggling.

  12. anomalous bcd mrk: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    work, increasing the detector's sensitivity. Smith, D A; Britto, R; Bruel, P; Gordo, J B; Dumora, D; Durand, E; Eschstruth, P; Espigat, P; Holder, J; Jacholkowska, A; Lavalle,...

  13. anomalous small angle: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Formation ? 2% and 0.2% (wv) solutions in H2O and D2O ? Filtration through 0.2 ?m filters ? Large aggregates detected by DLS. ? Hydrodynamic radii of several hundred...

  14. anomalous quantum interference: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    superconducting quantum interference device SQUID-temperature RT sample scanning superconduct- ing quantum interference device SQUID microscopy SSM is a very Weiss, Benjamin P....

  15. anomalous superconducting proximity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the out-of-equilibrium current through a quantum dot which is placed between two superconduct- ing leadsor the width of the dot level, we first investigate the crossover...

  16. Anomalous phenomena and spectral tailoring in photonic crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghebrebrhan, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic crystals are recently discovered meta-materials whose optical properties arise from periodic refractive index variations. In this thesis I examine various aspects of photonic crystals including a self-assembled ...

  17. anomalous thermal conductivity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conductivity in the range (4.84 ( 0.44) ? 103 to (5.30 ( 0 84 THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF HEMP CONCRETES: VARIATION WITH FORMULATION, DENSITY AND Mathematics Websites Summary:...

  18. anomalous mole fraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    distribution and study the relation between our solutions and those obtained within the maximum entropy principle by using the Tsallis entropy. Long-Jin Lv; Jian-Bin Xiao; Fu-Yao...

  19. anomalous diffraction method: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 21 MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD AND OSCILLATIONS IN THE DIFFRACTION CONE CiteSeer Summary: The...

  20. anomalous equilibrium fractionation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    distribution and study the relation between our solutions and those obtained within the maximum entropy principle by using the Tsallis entropy. Long-Jin Lv; Jian-Bin Xiao; Fu-Yao...

  1. anomalous gluon spectral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    non-perturbative gluon spectral functions at finite temperature in quenched QCD with the maximum entropy method. We also provide a closed loop equation for the spectral function...

  2. Rapid and Efficient Detection of Distributed Anomalous Aggregates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetherall, David

    be halted and require administrative action, e.g., consider the consequences of a DDoS attack launched via case of normal behavior. In this paper, we study the problem of rapid and efficient detection quickly and with orders of magnitude lower communication overhead than periodic queries in the common case

  3. Origin of anomalous atomic vibrations in efficient thermoelectrics revealed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest andOptimize carbon AboutOrganizing| ornl.gov

  4. The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <MaintainedInformation 2EnergyCityGreenElectricityOpen|OpenEIIdaho

  5. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. -J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; et al

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore »in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  6. Quantum anomalous Hall effect with cold atoms trapped in a square lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiong-Jun; Liu, Xin; Wu, Congjun; Sinova, Jairo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -JUN LIU, XIN LIU, CONGJUN WU, AND JAIRO SINOVA PHYSICAL REVIEW A 81, 033622 (2010) represent the edge and bulk states, respectively. The light Bragg scattering directly measures the dynamical structure factor [23]: S(q, ?) = ? ky1 ,ky2 { 1? f [E...| #1; q0 the dynamical structure takes the general form S(q, ?) ? (|q| + ky0 )#5;2?(? ? vF q) + #8;0 ?#5;20 2t2aba2 1+ 3h???/(2q0atab) [1+ h???/(q0atab)]2 ? ( pi 2 + sin?1 ?1/2|q ? q0|? h??? ) #15;(? ? ?c), (11) where ?? = ? ?#8;0/2h...

  7. Anomalous electron-ion energy coupling in electron drift wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Lei

    annulus arises due to a wave energy flux differential acrossprincipal collisionless wave energy dissipation channel inOn the other hand, wave energy can be dissipated by ion

  8. anomalous x-ray pulsars: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

  9. anomalous x-ray scattering: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

  10. anomalous x-ray fluorescence: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

  11. anomalous small-angle x-ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

  12. anomalous surface x-ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

  13. anomalous x-ray diffraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

  14. anomalous x-ray pulsar: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the soft X-rays emitted by the neutron-star surface. The relation between these heating rates and measured near-infrared fluxes in the K and Ks bands places severe...

  15. Z .Chemical Geology 152 1998 287306 Sediment chemistry and magnetic properties in an anomalously

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Lange b,2 a Paleomagnetic Laboratory `Fort Hoofddijk', Utrecht UniÃ?ersity, Budapestlaan 17, 3584 CD Utrecht, Netherlands b ( )Institute of PaleoenÃ?ironments and Paleoclimate Utrecht IPPU , Department of Geochemistry, Faculty of Earth Sciences, Utrecht UniÃ?ersity, PO Box 80.021, 3508 TA Utrecht, Netherlands

  16. Long-wavelength anomalous diffusion mode in the two-dimensional XY dipole magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abanov, Artem; Kashuba, A.; Pokrovsky, Valery L.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e , ETH-H dynamics diffusio PHYSICAL REVIEW B 1 AUGUST 1997-IIVOLUME 56, NUMBER 6 energy v . Each kind of excitations has its specific dispersion relation or spectrum v5e(p). A wide scope of physical problems can be solved assuming... magnetization field S(x), Hdip5 g 2(k ~ Skk !~S2kk! uku . ~4! 3182 56AR. ABANOV, A. KASHUBA, AND V. L. POKROVSKY r in small spin fluctuations f . We take the uniform magnetic d quantities are defined by f E 2 nonquadrati ~ k 2 , appears...

  17. Anomalous thermal relaxation in carbon nanoclusters Alexander V. Savin1,2,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The experimental demonstrations employed two types of absorbing particles, i carbon nano- clusters produced by laser ablation and ii hollow glass carbon-coated microspheres. Being inspired by the experimental of carbon clusters, in this let- ter, we study how the thermal relaxation of the carbon nano- clusters

  18. Limits on anomalous WW and WWZ couplings from WWWZ\\e jj production B. Abbott,47

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Genser,29 C. E. Gerber,29 Y. Gershtein,53 B. Gibbard,50 R. Gilmartin,27 G. Ginther,48 B. Gobbi,32 B. Go´mez,5 G. Go´mez,40 P. I. Goncharov,19 J. L. Gonza´lez Soli´s,15 H. Gordon,50 L. T. Goss,55 K. Gounder,26

  19. Disorder effects in the anomalous Hall effect induced by Berry curvature RID B-5617-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinitsyn, NA; Niu, Q.; Sinova, Jairo; Nomura, K.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in ferromagnets results from the interplay of the ex- change field, which breaks the time-reversal symmetry, and the spin-orbit coupling, that violates the chiral symmetry. Interestingly, at the same time a similar effect was predicted and explained... of the distribution function in a single band at zero temperature: Jyx #1;clean#2; = e#8; d2kf0#1;k#2;vy#1;a#2; = e#8; 0 kF kdk#8; 0 2#5; d#6; #1;2#5;#2;2eExFz = e2ExFzkF 2 4#5; , #1;5#2; where f0#1;k#2; is the equilibrium distribution function and k...

  20. DOI: 10.1002/adma.200502588 The Anomalous Infrared Transmission of Gold Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    interest. This interest stems from both the underlying physics and also the perceived potential report a study on the infrared transmission properties of gold films patterned on 2D CCs. The fabricated studies on the optical properties of metallic microstructures deposited on 2D CCs. The ordered metallic

  1. Linker-Induced Anomalous Emission of Organic-Molecule Conjugated Metal-Oxide Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turkowski, Volodymyr; Babu, Suresh; Le, Duy; Kumar, Amit; Haldar, Manas K.; Wagh, Anil V.; Hu, Zhongjian; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Gesquiere, Andre J.; Law, Benedict; Mallik, Sanku; Rahman, Talat S.; Leuenberger, Michael N.; Seal, Sudipta

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Semiconductor nanoparticles conjugated with organic- and dye-molecules to yield high efficiency visible photoluminescence (PL) hold great potential for many future technological applications. We show that folic acid (FA)-conjugated to nanosize TiO2 and CeO2 particles demonstrates a dramatic increase of photoemission intensity at wavelengths between 500 and 700 nm when derivatized using aminopropyl trimethoxysilane (APTMS) as spacer-linker molecules between the metal oxide and FA. Using density-functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT calculations we demonstrate that the strong increase of the PL can be explained by electronic transitions between the titania surface oxygen vacancy (OV) states and the low-energy excited states of the FA/APTMS molecule anchored onto the surface oxygen bridge sites in close proximity to the OVs. We suggest this scenario to be a universal feature for a wide class of metal oxide nanoparticles, including nanoceria, possessing a similar band gap (3 eV) and with a large surface-vacancy-related density of electronic states. We demonstrate that the molecule-nanoparticle linker can play a crucial role in tuning the electronic and optical properties of nanosystems by bringing optically active parts of the molecule and of the surface close to each other.

  2. Anomalous dimensions determine the power counting -- Wilsonian RG analysis of nuclear EFT --

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koji Harada; Hirofumi Kubo

    2006-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Legendre flow equation, a version of exact Wilsonian renormalization group (WRG) equation, is employed to consider the power counting issues in Nuclear Effective Field Theory. A WRG approach is an ideal framework because it is nonperturbative and does not require any prescribed power counting rule. The power counting is determined systematically from the scaling dimensions of the operators at the nontrivial fixed point. The phase structure is emphasized and the inverse of the scattering length, which is identified as a relevant coupling, is shown to play a role of the order parameter. The relations to the work done by Birse, McGovern, and Richardson and to the Kaplan-Savage-Wise scheme are explained.

  3. Identifying anomalous diffusion and melting in dusty plasmas Yan Feng,* J. Goree, and Bin Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goree, John

    is deter- mined by the balance of the energy input and dissipation. As the driven energy input increases Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA Received 3 June 2010 described as 2D experiments 1,4­8 . Dusty plasma is a driven-dissipative system 1 , and its kinetic energy

  4. Anomalous decoherence and absence of thermalization in a photonic many-body system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, Jonas [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Center, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The intention of this work is twofold: first, to present a most simple system capable of simulating the intrinsic bosonic Josephson effect with photons and, second, to study various outcomes deriving from inherent or external decoherence. A qubit induces an effective coupling between two externally pumped cavity modes. Without cavity losses and in the dispersive regime, intrinsic Josephson oscillations of photons between the two modes occurs. In this case, contrary to regular Markovian decoherence, the qubit purity shows a Gaussian decay and recurrence of its coherence. Due to intrinsic nonlinearities, both the Josephson oscillations as well as the qubit properties display a rich collapse-revival structure, where, however, the complexity of the qubit evolution is in some sense stronger. The qubit as a meter of the photon dynamics is considered, and it is shown that qubit dephasing, originating, for example, from nondemolition measurements, results in an exponential destruction of the oscillations which manifests the collectiveness of the Josephson effect. Nonselective qubit measurements, on the other hand, render a Zeno effect seen in a slowing down of the Josephson oscillations. Contrary to dephasing, cavity dissipation results in a Gaussian decay of the scaled Josephson oscillations. Finally, following Ponomarev et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 010405 (2011)], we analyze aspects of thermalization. In particular, despite similarities with the generic model studied by Ponomarev et al., our system does not seem to thermalize.

  5. Anomalous shell effect in the transition from a circular to a triangular billiard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken-ichiro Arita; Matthias Brack

    2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We apply periodic orbit theory to a two-dimensional non-integrable billiard system whose boundary is varied smoothly from a circular to an equilateral triangular shape. Although the classical dynamics becomes chaotic with increasing triangular deformation, it exhibits an astonishingly pronounced shell effect on its way through the shape transition. A semiclassical analysis reveals that this shell effect emerges from a codimension-two bifurcation of the triangular periodic orbit. Gutzwiller's semiclassical trace formula, using a global uniform approximation for the bifurcation of the triangular orbit and including the contributions of the other isolated orbits, describes very well the coarse-grained quantum-mechanical level density of this system. We also discuss the role of discrete symmetry for the large shell effect obtained here.

  6. Gaussian variational ansatz in the problem of anomalous sea waves: Comparison with direct numerical simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruban, V P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear dynamics of an obliquely oriented wave packet at sea surface is studied both analytically and numerically for various initial parameters of the packet, in connection with the problem of oceanic rogue waves. In the framework of Gaussian variational ansatz applied to the corresponding (1+2D) hyperbolic nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation, a simplified Lagrangian system of differential equations is derived, which determines the evolution of coefficients of the real and imaginary quadratic forms appearing in the Gaussian. This model provides a semi-quantitative description for the process of nonlinear spatio-temporal focusing, which is one of the most probable mechanisms of rogue wave formation in random wave fields. The system is integrated in quadratures, which fact allows us to understand qualitative differences between the linear and nonlinear regimes of the focusing of wave packet. Comparison of the Gaussian model predictions with results of direct numerical simulation of fully nonlinear long-cres...

  7. Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea Volcano...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii- Evidence For The Distribution Of Magma Below Kilauea'S East Rift Zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous neutrino oscillations Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Group Collection: Physics 62 arXiv:hep-ph0412300v121Dec2004 Neutrinoless double beta decay and direct searches for neutrino mass Summary: ranges of increasing...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous chiral superfluidity Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Department of Physics, University of Maryland at College Park Collection: Physics 49 Aerogels: stiff foams composed of up to 99.8% air Silica aerogel is the world's lowest-density...

  10. Hydrogen adsorption and anomalous electronic properties of nitrogen-doped graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimoto, Yoshitaka, E-mail: fujimoto@stat.phys.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Oh-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Saito, Susumu [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Oh-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); International Research Center for Nanoscience and Quantum Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Oh-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 226-8503 (Japan)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate hydrogen adsorption effects on stabilities and electronic properties of nitrogen defects in graphene using first-principles electronic-structure calculations within the density-functional theory. We find that the adsorption of hydrogen atoms on the pyridine-type nitrogen defects in graphene becomes energetically favorable, whereas in the case of the substitutional nitrogen defect the hydrogen adsorption becomes unfavorable. We also find that a transition from p-type to n-type doping properties occurs by hydrogen adsorption on the pyridine-type defects, suggesting that even the carrier type is controllable in nitrogen-doped graphene.

  11. Constraints on warm dark matter from weak lensing in anomalous quadruple lenses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiki Taro Inoue; Ryuichi Takahashi; Tomo Takahashi; Tomoaki Ishiyama

    2015-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the weak lensing effect by line-of-sight structures with a surface mass density of solar mass/arcsec^2 in QSO-galaxy quadruple lens systems. Using high-resolution N-body simulations in warm dark matter (WDM) models and observed four quadruple lenses that show anomalies in the flux ratios, we obtain constraints on the mass of thermal WDM, m_WDM>= 1.3keV(95%CL) assuming that the density of the primary lens is described by a singular isothermal ellipsoid (SIE). The obtained constraint is consistent with those from Lyman-$\\alpha$ forests and the number counts of high-redshift galaxies at z>4. Our results show that WDM with a free-streaming comoving wavenumber k_{fs} <= 27 h/Mpc is disfavored as the major component of cosmological density at redshifts 0.5 <~ z <~ 4 provided that the SIE models describe the gravitational potentials of the primary lenses correctly.

  12. Anomalous interactions in confined chargestabilized D G Grier+ and Y Han#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    ], and other mean­field mechanisms were excluded soon thereafter on theoretical grounds [10, 11, 12, 13]. When, the experimental evidence came under renewed critical scrutiny. Measurements of long­ranged attractions performed, 16, 22]. However, they obtain pair potentials by inverting measured pair correlation functions, #12

  13. Anomalous interactions in confined charge-stabilized D G Grier and Y Han

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    mean-field mechanisms were excluded soon thereafter on theoretical grounds [10, 11, 12, 13]. When, the experimental evidence came under renewed critical scrutiny. Measurements of long-ranged attractions performed, 16, 22]. However, they obtain pair potentials by inverting measured pair correlation functions, #12

  14. Anomalous thermal conduction characteristics of phase change composites with single walled carbon nanotube inclusions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    , solar energy storage, etc.1, 2 The latent heat energy storages requires high thermal conductivity to the presence of exfoliated graphite nanoplatelets. Thermal energy storages using phase change materials of the phase change materials, because low thermal conductivity hinders the rate of energy storage and release

  15. Role of anomalous warm gulf waters in the intensification of Hurricane Menas Kafatos,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Donglian

    coincident with the distribution of warm waters or high sea surface temperature (SST). High SST values Donglian Sun,1 Ritesh Gautam,1 Zafer Boybeyi,1 Ruixin Yang,1 and Guido Cervone1 Received 18 April 2006 the Gulf States, especially Hurricane Katrina. Remarkable similarities between sea surface temperature

  16. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous quartic gauge Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the electroweak gauge boson quartic couplings, growing quadratically with the Higgs boson mass, is reviewed... expressions have been obtained for the two-loop m2 H...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous hollow electron Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the Optical Properties of Bullet Rosettes: Implications for Active and Passive Remote Sensing of Ice Cloud Properties Summary: are common in ice clouds, and the bullets...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalous gulf heating Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is... Meteorological Society Heat Budget in the Gulf Stream Region: The Importance of Heat Storage and Advection SHENFU... -dimensional thermodynamic model is used to study ......

  19. MRF Technical Note # 49 Can desert dust explain the anomalous greenhouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan, Richard P.

    radiative energy balance between net incoming solar radiation and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR in the model surface temperature, surface emissivity, or atmospheric transmission. By building up a physical clear-sky regions. In section 4, we describe the radiation code and vertical profiles of temperature

  20. On the Anomalous Silicate Emission Features of AGNs: A Possible Interpretation Based on Porous Dust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. P. Li; Q. J. Shi; Aigen Li

    2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent Spitzer detections of the 9.7 micron Si--O silicate emission in type 1 AGNs provide support for the AGN unification scheme. The properties of the silicate dust are of key importance to understanding the physical, chemical and evolutionary properties of the obscuring dusty torus around AGNs. Compared to that of the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM), the 10 micron silicate emission profile of type 1 AGNs is broadened and has a clear shift of peak position to longer wavelengths. In literature this is generally interpreted as an indication of the deviations of the silicate composition, size, and degree of crystallization of AGNs from that of the Galactic ISM. In this Letter we show that the observed peak shift and profile broadening of the 9.7 micron silicate emission feature can be explained in terms of porous composite dust consisting of ordinary interstellar amorphous silicate, amorphous carbon and vacuum. Porous dust is naturally expected in the dense circumnuclear region around AGNs, as a consequence of grain coagulation.

  1. ANOMALOUS SILICATE DUST EMISSION IN THE TYPE 1 LINER NUCLEUS OF M81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Howard A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Fazio, G. G.; Huang, J.-S.; Marengo, M.; Wang, Z.; Willner, S.; Zezas, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Li, Aigen; Li, M. P.; Koehler, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Spinoglio, L. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, CNR, via Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Wu, Y. L., E-mail: hsmith@cfa.harvard.ed, E-mail: lia@missouri.ed [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States)

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection and successful modeling of the unusual 9.7 {mu}m Si-O stretching silicate emission feature in the type 1 (i.e., face-on) LINER nucleus of M81. Using the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) instrument on Spitzer, we determine the feature in the central 230 pc of M81 to be in strong emission, with a peak at {approx}10.5 {mu}m. This feature is strikingly different in character from the absorption feature of the galactic interstellar medium, and from the silicate absorption or weak emission features typical of galaxies with active star formation. We successfully model the high signal-to-noise ratio IRS spectra with porous silicate dust using laboratory-acquired mineral spectra. We find that the most probable fit uses micron-sized, porous grains of amorphous silicate and amorphous carbon. In addition to silicate dust, there is weak polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission present (particularly at 11.3 {mu}m, arising from the C-H out-of-plane bending vibration of relatively large PAHs of {approx}500-1000 C atoms) whose character reflects the low-excitation active galactic nucleus environment, with some evidence that small PAHs of {approx}100-200 C atoms (responsible for the 7.7 {mu}m C-C stretching band) in the immediate vicinity of the nucleus have been preferentially destroyed. Analysis of the infrared fine structure lines confirms the LINER character of the M81 nucleus. Four of the infrared H{sub 2} rotational lines are detected and fit to an excitation temperature of T {approx} 800 K. Spectral maps of the central 230 pc in the [Ne II] 12.8 {mu}m line, the H{sub 2} 17 {mu}m line, and the 11.3 {mu}m PAH C-H bending feature reveal arc- or spiral-like structures extending from the core. We also report on epochal photometric and spectroscopic observations of M81, whose nuclear intensity varies in time across the spectrum due to what is thought to be inefficient, sub-Eddington accretion onto its central black hole. We find that, contrary to the implications of earlier photometry, the nucleus has not varied over a period of two years at these infrared wavelengths to a precision of about 1%.

  2. Anomalous decoupling dynamics in glycerol and its nanocolloid with silver nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szymon Starzonek; Sylwester J. Rzoska; Aleksandra Drozd-Rzoska; Sebastian Pawlus; Julio C. Martinez-Garcia; Ludmila Kistersky

    2014-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Orientational and translational decouplings in ultraviscous glass forming glycerol and its nanocolloid based on Ag nanoparticles, as the function of temperature and pressure up to challenging P more than 1.5 GPa, are discussed. The analysis is focused on the fractional Debye-Stokes-Einstein relation FDSE sigma times tau to the power S equals const., where tau and sigma are for the structural relaxation time and electric conductivity are functions of T and P, respectively. For temperature tests in glycerol the clear evidence for the almost coupled exponent S equals 1 was obtained. For the supercooled nanocolloid the crossover to the decoupled domain associated with S equals 0.91 was noted. In super pressed glycerol and the nanocolloid the clear cross over from the domain described by the exponent S equals 1 to S less than 1 appeared on the GPa domain. For the nanocolloid it is associated with particularly strong decoupling, related to S equals 0.5, and occurs at well-defined pressure. This can suggest a possible fluid-fluid transition. Questions related to the validity of the Debye-Stokes tau equals approx. eta over T and Maxwell tau equals approx. eta relations, where eta is for viscosity, are also addressed. Results obtained do not support the recently suggested universality of the fractional exponent describing orientational and translational decoupling.

  3. SnTe field effect transistors and the anomalous electrical response of structural phase transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Haitao, E-mail: haitao.li@nist.gov; Zhu, Hao; Yuan, Hui; Li, Qiliang, E-mail: qli6@gmu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States); Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); You, Lin; Kopanski, Joseph J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States); Richter, Curt A. [Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Zhao, Erhai [School of Physics, Astronomy, and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Fairfax, Virginia 22030 (United States)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    SnTe is a conventional thermoelectric material and has been newly found to be a topological crystalline insulator. In this work, back-gate SnTe field-effect transistors have been fabricated and fully characterized. The devices exhibit n-type transistor behaviors with excellent current-voltage characteristics and large on/off ratio (>10{sup 6}). The device threshold voltage, conductance, mobility, and subthreshold swing have been studied and compared at different temperatures. It is found that the subthreshold swings as a function of temperature have an apparent response to the SnTe phase transition between cubic and rhombohedral structures at 110?K. The abnormal and rapid increase in subthreshold swing around the phase transition temperature may be due to the soft phonon/structure change which causes the large increase in SnTe dielectric constant. Such an interesting and remarkable electrical response to phase transition at different temperatures makes the small SnTe transistor attractive for various electronic devices.

  4. E-Print Network 3.0 - anomalously large anisotropic Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    depth... waves anisotropy in P-wave data, it can often propagate in anisotropic media (media go unnoticed... exploration anisotropic, and evidence increasingly geophysicists...

  5. Anomalous diameter dependence of thermal transport in ultra-narrow Si nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karamitaheri, Hossein, E-mail: karami@iue.tuwien.ac.at [Institute for Microelectronics, TU Wien, Gußhausstraße 27-29/E360, A-1040 Wien (Austria); Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan, 87317-51167 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Neophytou, Neophytos, E-mail: neophytou@iue.tuwien.ac.at [Institute for Microelectronics, TU Wien, Gußhausstraße 27-29/E360, A-1040 Wien (Austria); School of Engineering, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Kosina, Hans, E-mail: kosina@iue.tuwien.ac.at [Institute for Microelectronics, TU Wien, Gußhausstraße 27-29/E360, A-1040 Wien (Austria)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present atomistic valence force field calculations of thermal transport in Si nanowires of diameters from 12?nm down to 1?nm. We show that as the diameter is reduced, the phonon density-of-states and transmission function acquire a finite value at low frequency, in contrast to approaching zero as in the bulk material. It turns out that this effect results in what Ziman described as the “problem of long longitudinal waves” [J. M. Ziman, Electrons and Phonons: The Theory of Transport Phenomena in Solids (Clarendon, Oxford, 1962)], which states that the thermal conductivity of a material increases as its length is increased due to the vanishing scattering for long-wavelength phonons. We show that this thermal transport improvement also appears in nanowires as their diameter is decreased below D?=?5?nm (not only as the length increases), originating from the increase in the density of the long wavevector modes. The observation is present under ballistic transport conditions, and further enhanced with the introduction of phonon-phonon scattering. Because of this, in such ultra-narrow nanowires, as the diameter is reduced, phonon transport is dominated more and more by lower energy phonons with longer mean-free paths. We show that ?80% of the heat is carried by phonons with energies less than 5?meV, most with mean-free paths of several hundreds of nanometers.

  6. Challenges to quantum chromodynamics: Anomalous spin, heavy quark, and nuclear phenomena

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The general structure of QCD meshes remarkably well with the facts of the hadronic world, especially quark-based spectroscopy, current algebra, the approximate point-like structure of large momentum transfer inclusive reactions, and the logarithmic violation of scale invariance in deep inelastic lepton-hadron reactions. QCD has been successful in predicting the features of electron-positron and photon-photon annihilation into hadrons, including the magnitude and scaling of the cross sections, the shape of the photon structure function, the production of hadronic jets with patterns conforming to elementary quark and gluon subprocesses. The experimental measurements appear to be consistent with basic postulates of QCD, that the charge and weak currents within hadrons are carried by fractionally-charged quarks, and that the strength of the interactions between the quarks, and gluons becomes weak at short distances, consistent with asymptotic freedom. Nevertheless in some cases, the predictions of QCD appear to be in dramatic conflict with experiment. The anomalies suggest that the proton itself as a much more complex object than suggested by simple non-relativistic quark models. Recent analyses of the proton distribution amplitude using QCD sum rules points to highly-nontrival proton structure. Solutions to QCD in one-space and one-time dimension suggest that the momentum distributions of non-valence quarks in the hadrons have a non-trival oscillatory structure. The data seems also to be suggesting that the intrinsic'' bound state structure of the proton has a non- negligible strange and charm quark content, in addition to the extrinsic'' sources of heavy quarks created in the collision itself. 144 refs., 46 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Anomalous Phonon Behavior: Blueshift of the Surface Boson Peak in Silica Glass with Increasing Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manson, Joseph R.

    Surface et Interface du Verre, UMR 125 CNRS/ Saint-Gobain, 39 Quai Lucien Lefranc, 93303 Aubervilliers

  8. ANOMALOUS ELECTRON PRODUCTION IN THE LEAD-GLASS WALL EXPERIMENT AT SPEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madaras, R.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the 1)1(3772). PRELIMINARY Eem = 3.77 GeV 46t.12 events ..I.Q. ) Eem c 4.16 GeV 50 ± 12 events II> Q. )Q. ) c ttt+ + 4.4Eem < 5.7 GeV 119 ± 20 even t s "C z 20 "

  9. Probing bismuth ferrite nanoparticles by hard x-ray photoemission: Anomalous occurrence of metallic bismuth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Smita; Rajendra, Ranguwar; Ballav, Nirmalya; Kulkarni, Sulabha, E-mail: s.kulkarni@iiserpune.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pune 411008 (India); Sarkar, Indranil [DESY Photon Science, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Shirolkar, Mandar M. [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Jeng, U-Ser; Yeh, Yi-Qi [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, 101, Hsin-Ann Road, Science Park, Hsinchu 3007-6, Taiwan (China)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated bismuth ferrite nanoparticles (?75?nm and ?155?nm) synthesized by a chemical method, using soft X-ray (1253.6?eV) and hard X-ray (3500, 5500, and 7500?eV) photoelectron spectroscopy. This provided an evidence for the variation of chemical state of bismuth in crystalline, phase pure nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis using Mg K? (1253.6?eV) source showed that iron and bismuth were present in both Fe{sup 3+} and Bi{sup 3+} valence states as expected for bismuth ferrite. However, hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the bismuth ferrite nanoparticles using variable photon energies unexpectedly showed the presence of Bi{sup 0} valence state below the surface region, indicating that bismuth ferrite nanoparticles are chemically inhomogeneous in the radial direction. Consistently, small-angle X-ray scattering reveals a core-shell structure for these radial inhomogeneous nanoparticles.

  10. Anomalous X-Ray emission in GRB060904B: a Nickel line?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Margutti; A. Moretti; F. Pasotti; S. Campana; G. Chincarini; S. Covino; C. Guidorzi; P. Romano; G. Tagliaferri

    2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of an extra component in GRB060904B X-ray spectra in addition to the standard single power-law behaviour has recently been reported in the literature. This component can be fit with different models; in particular the addition of a spectral line provides the best representation.In this paper we investigate the physical properties that the surrounding medium must have in order to produce a spectral feature that can explain the detected emission. We analyse and discuss how and if the detected spectral excess fits in different theoretical models developed to explain the nature of line emission during the afterglow phase of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Trasmission and reflection models have been considered. Given the high value (>>1) of the Thomson optical depth, the emission is likely to arise in a reflection scenario. Within reflection models, the external reflection geometry fails to predict the observed luminosity. On the contrary, the detected feature can be explained in a funnel scenario with typical opening angle theta of 5 degrees, Nickel mass of the order of 0.1 M_o and T=10^6 K. For theta=20 degrees, assuming the reprocessing material to be the SN shell, the detected emission implies a Nickel mass of 0.4 M_o at T=10^7 K and a metallicity 10 times the solar value. If the giant X-ray flare that dominates the early XRT light curve is identified with the ionizing source, the SN expansion began 3000 s before the GRB event.

  11. Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiter, George F [ORNL; Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL; Paddison, Stephen J [ORNL; Platzman, P. M. [480 Addison Road, Short Hills, New Jersey, 07078, USA; Moravsky, Alexander P. [5MER Corporation, Tucson, Arizona; Adams, Mark A. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory; Mayers, Dr. Jerry [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep inelastic neutron scattering provides a means of directly and accurately measuring the momentum distribution of protons in water, which is determined primarily by the proton ground-state wave function.We find that in water confined on scales of 20 A, this wave function responds to the details of the confinement, corresponds to a strongly anharmonic local potential, shows evidence in some cases of coherent delocalization in double wells, and involves changes in zero-point kinetic energy of the protons from 40 to +120 meV difference from that of bulk water at room temperature. This behavior appears to be a generic feature of nanoscale confinement. It is exhibited here in 16 A inner diameter carbon nanotubes, two different hydrated proton exchange membranes (PEMs), Nafion 1120 and Dow 858, and has been seen earlier in xerogel and 14 A diameter carbon nanotubes. The proton conductivity in the PEM samples correlates with the degree of coherent delocalization of the proton.

  12. Anomalous Dynamical Line Shapes in a Quantum Magnet at Finite Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant D. A.; James A.; Lake, B.; Essler, F.H.L.; Notbohm, S.; Mikeska, H.-J.; Fielden, J.; Kogerler,, P.; Canfield, P.C.; Telling, M.T.F.

    2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of thermal fluctuations on the dynamics of a gapped quantum magnet is studied using inelastic neutron scattering on copper nitrate, a model material for the spin-1/2, one-dimensional (1D) bond alternating Heisenberg chain. A large, highly deuterated, single-crystal sample of copper nitrate is produced using a solution growth method and measurements are made using the high-resolution backscattering spectrometer OSIRIS at the ISIS Facility. Theoretical calculations and numerical analysis are combined to interpret the physical origin of the thermal effects observed in the magnetic spectra. The primary observations are (1) a thermally induced central peak due to intraband scattering, which is similar to Villain scattering familiar from soliton systems in 1D, and (2) the one-magnon quasiparticle pole is seen to develop with temperature into an asymmetric continuum of scattering. We relate this asymmetric line broadening to a thermal strongly correlated state caused by hard-core constraints and quasiparticle interactions. These findings are a counter example to recent assertions of the universality of line broadening in 1D systems and are applicable to a broad range of quantum systems.

  13. Anomalously thin transition zone and apparently isotropic upper mantle beneath Bermuda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for upwelling Margaret H. Benoit Department of Physics, College of New Jersey, Ewing, New Jersey, USA (benoit@tcnj.edu) Maureen D. Long Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA Scott D analyze shear wave splitting measurements to estimate mantle flow direction and receiver function stacks

  14. Proton Hexality from an Anomalous Flavor U(1) and Neutrino Masses - Linking to the String Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbi K. Dreiner; Christoph Luhn; Hitoshi Murayama; Marc Thormeier

    2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We devise minimalistic gauged U(1)_X Froggatt-Nielsen models which at low-energy give rise to the recently suggested discrete gauge Z_6 symmetry, proton hexality, thus stabilizing the proton. Assuming three generations of right-handed neutrinos, with the proper choice of X-charges, we obtain viable neutrino masses. Furthermore, we find scenarios such that no X-charged hidden sector superfields are needed, which from a bottom-up perspective allows the calculation of g_string, g_X and G_SM's Kac-Moody levels. The only mass scale apart from M_grav is m_soft.

  15. Anomalous Electron Transport Due to Multiple High Frequency Beam Ion Driven Alfven Eigenmode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.N. Gorelenkov, D. Stutman, K. Tritz, A. Boozer, L. Delgardo-Aparicio, E. Fredrickson, S. Kaye, and R. White

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the simulations of recently observed correlations of the core electron transport with the sub-thermal ion cyclotron frequency instabilities in low aspect ratio plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In order to model the electron transport of the guiding center code ORBIT is employed. A spectrum of test functions of multiple core localized Global shear Alfven Eigenmode (GAE) instabilities based on a previously developed theory and experimental observations is used to examine the electron transport properties. The simulations exhibit thermal electron transport induced by electron drift orbit stochasticity in the presence of multiple core localized GAE.

  16. Anomalous visualization of sub-2 THz photons on standard silicon CCD and COMS sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shalaby, Mostafa; Hauri, Christoph P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally show that indirect light-induced electron transitions could lead to THz detection on standard CCD and CMOS sensors, introducing this well-established technological concept to the THz range. Unlike its optical counterpart, we found that the THz sensitivity is nonlinear. We imaged 1-13 THz radiation with photon energy less than 2% of the well-established band gap energy threshold. The unprecedented small pitch and large number of pixels uniquely allowed us to visualize the complex propagation of THz radiation, as it focuses down to the physical diffraction limit. Broadband pulses were detectable at a single shot. This opens a whole new field of real time THz imaging at the frame rate of the sensor.

  17. anomalous exciton-radiation coupling: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yukawa Couplings HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: In the standard model, the Higgs boson h couples to the quarks and charged leptons according to the well-known formula...

  18. Transport theory for disordered multiple-band systems: Anomalous Hall effect and anisotropic magnetoresistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kovalev, Alexey A.; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav; Vyborny, Karel; Sinova, Jairo.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ;#5;k? #2;2/2m + #18;?k? ? #4;? #19; z ? h? #1;?z + 1?V#1;r?#2; , #1;29#2; where #18;? is the strength of spin-orbit interaction, #4;? are Pauli matrices, #5;k? =?i#5;#3;?eA /c, A#1;t#2;=?cEt describes the exter- nal electric field, and V#1;r#2...#18;2 #5;#16; #26; = ? V4 V2 2 e2h#18;2 ln#23; k+2#1;k02 ? k?2#2;k ? 2#1;k02 ? k+2#2;#23; #5;#16;2#1;k+2 ? k?2#2; , #1;xy II#1;i#2; = 0, #1;45#2; which reproduces result of Ref. 24 in the limit of large cutoff k0. In reference to the Kubo...

  19. Storm fronts over galaxy discs: Models of how waves generate extraplanar gas and its anomalous kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis Struck; Daniel C. Smith

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of partially ionized, diffuse gas and dust clouds at kiloparsec scale distances above the central planes of edge-on, galaxy discs was an unexpected discovery about 20 yrs ago. Subsequent observations showed that this EDIG (extended or extraplanar diffuse interstellar gas) has rotation velocities approximately 10-20% lower than those in the central plane, and have been hard to account for. Here we present results of hydrodynamic models, with radiative cooling and heating from star formation. We find that in models with star formation generated stochastically across the disc an extraplanar gas layer is generated as long as the star formation is sufficiently strong. However, this gas rotates at nearly the same speed as the mid-plane gas. We then studied a range of models with imposed spiral or bar waves in the disc. EDIG layers were also generated in these models, but primarily over the wave regions, not over the entire disc. Because of this partial coverage, the EDIG clouds move radially, as well as vertically, with the result that observed kinematic anomalies are reproduced. The implication is that the kinematic anomalies are the result of three-dimensional motions when the cylindrical symmetry of the disc is broken. Thus, the kinematic anomalies are the result of bars or strong waves, and more face-on galaxies with such waves should have an asymmetric EDIG component. The models also indicate that the EDIG can contain a significant fraction of cool gas, and that some star formation can be triggered at considerable heights above the disc midplane. We expect all of these effects to be more prominent in young, forming discs, to play a role in rapidly smoothing disc asymmetries, and in working to self-regulate disc structure.

  20. Efficiency enhancement of anomalous-Doppler electron cyclotron masers with tapered magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Chao-Ran; Hou, Zhi-Ling [Beijing Key Laboratory of Harmful Chemicals Analysis and School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)] [Beijing Key Laboratory of Harmful Chemicals Analysis and School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Kong, Ling-Bao, E-mail: konglingbao@gmail.com, E-mail: pkliu@pku.edu.cn [School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China) [School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Beijing Key Laboratory of Harmful Chemicals Analysis and School of Science, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Liu, Pu-Kun, E-mail: konglingbao@gmail.com, E-mail: pkliu@pku.edu.cn; Du, Chao-Hai [School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)] [School of Electronics Engineering and Computer Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jin, Hai-Bo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) is usually low, thus limiting the practical applications. Here, a method of tapered magnetic field is introduced for the efficiency enhancement of the slow-wave ECM. The numerical calculations show that the tapered magnetic-field method can enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM significantly. The effect of beam electron velocity spread on the efficiency has also been studied. Although the velocity spread reduces the efficiency, a great enhancement of efficiency can still be obtained by the tapered magnetic field method.

  1. CONSTRAINING HIGH-SPEED WINDS IN EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES THROUGH OBSERVATIONS OF ANOMALOUS DOPPLER SHIFTS DURING TRANSIT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller-Ricci Kempton, Eliza [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Rauscher, Emily, E-mail: ekempton@ucolick.org [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional (3D) dynamical models of hot Jupiter atmospheres predict very strong wind speeds. For tidally locked hot Jupiters, winds at high altitude in the planet's atmosphere advect heat from the day side to the cooler night side of the planet. Net wind speeds on the order of 1-10 km s{sup -1} directed towards the night side of the planet are predicted at mbar pressures, which is the approximate pressure level probed by transmission spectroscopy. These winds should result in an observed blueshift of spectral lines in transmission on the order of the wind speed. Indeed, Snellen et al. recently observed a 2 {+-} 1 km s{sup -1} blueshift of CO transmission features for HD 209458b, which has been interpreted as a detection of the day-to-night (substellar to anti-stellar) winds that have been predicted by 3D atmospheric dynamics modeling. Here, we present the results of a coupled 3D atmospheric dynamics and transmission spectrum model, which predicts the Doppler-shifted spectrum of a hot Jupiter during transit resulting from winds in the planet's atmosphere. We explore four different models for the hot Jupiter atmosphere using different prescriptions for atmospheric drag via interaction with planetary magnetic fields. We find that models with no magnetic drag produce net Doppler blueshifts in the transmission spectrum of {approx}2 km s{sup -1} and that lower Doppler shifts of {approx}1 km s{sup -1} are found for the higher drag cases, results consistent with-but not yet strongly constrained by-the Snellen et al. measurement. We additionally explore the possibility of recovering the average terminator wind speed as a function of altitude by measuring Doppler shifts of individual spectral lines and spatially resolving wind speeds across the leading and trailing terminators during ingress and egress.

  2. OBSERVATION OF ANOMALOUSLY BROAD GAUSSIAN HeII 4686A SPECTRAL LINES IN TORMAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, R.S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fields, or by the Doppler effect, if there is appreciablebroadening, by the Doppler effect, if there is appreciableeffect (GRIEM, 1974). Gaussian Heii 4686A line shapes that are not explained by Doppler

  3. The Anomalous Surface Salinity Minima Area Across the Northern Gulf of Alaska and Its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean for these groups. Although oceanographic studies by fisheries groups have not been a part, the Kuroshio was also believed to penetrate Norton Sound in the Bering Sea because of the warm summer Ocean Cape, Cape Cleare. and Cape Chiniak revealed a pronounced west- ward current at the edge

  4. Investigating the Linear and Nonlinear Stationary Wave Response to Anomalous North American Snow Cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on monthly-to-intraseasonal time scales, with the potential to modify local and remote atmospheric diagnose a deep, snow-induced, tropospheric cooling over NA and hypothesize that this may represent that diabatic cooling is the primary driver of the stationary wave response. In particular, the total nonlinear

  5. Identification and elimination of anomalous thermal decay in gamma-ray microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horansky, Robert D.; Bennett, Douglas A.; Schmidt, Daniel R.; Ullom, Joel N. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway MS 686.02, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway MS 686.02, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Zink, Barry L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado 80208 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Denver, Denver, Colorado 80208 (United States)

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Microcalorimeter detectors rely on superconducting components and cryogenic temperatures to provide over an order-of-magnitude improvement in energy resolution compared to semiconducting sensors. Resolution improvements impact fields from gamma-ray astrophysics to nuclear safeguards. The temporal response of these detectors has been much slower than predicted from the known device parameters. This discrepancy has been attributed to the dynamics of quasiparticles and phonons in the bulk absorber used for absorbing photons. We will show that long-lived states in the glue used for absorber attachment have been the dominant cause of the slow response. Also, we have fabricated microcalorimeters using metal-to-metal diffusion bonding to attach the absorber. These detectors show a significant improvement in their recovery after gamma-ray events and will now enable study of the internal scattering dynamics of the bulk absorber.

  6. FLUORESCENCE-BASED INVESTIGATION OF THE JA NOSSY EFFECT ANOMALOUS WAVELENGTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marrucci, Lorenzo

    Manzo, Domenico Paparo, Stefano Lettieri, and Lorenzo MarrucciÃ? INFM ``COHERENTIA'' and Universita` di Napoli ``Federico II'', Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Complesso di Monte S. Angelo, via Cintia, 80126

  7. Nuclear absorption and anomalous J/psi suppression in Pb+Pb collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2002-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the J/psi suppression in 158 GeV/c Pb+Pb collisions at CERN SPS. J/psi production is assumed to be a two step process, (i) formation of c bar{c} pair, which is accurately calculable in QCD and (ii) formation of J/psi meson from the c bar{c} pair, which can be conveniently parameterized. In a pA/AA collision, as the c bar{c} pair pass through the nuclear medium, it gains relative square momentum. As a result, some of the c bar{c} pairs can gain enough momentum to cross the threshold to become open charm meson, leading to suppression in pA/AA collisions. The model without any free parameter could describe the of NA50 data on centrality dependence of the ratio's; J/psi over Drell-Yan, J/psi over minimum bias and also the Drell-Yan over minimum bias. The model was used to predict J/psi suppression at RHIC energy. At RHIC energy, hard processes may be important. With hard processes included, J/psi's are strongly suppressed, in agreement with other model calculations. We also show that centrality dependence of J/psi over minimum bias ratio can be used to determine the fraction of hard processes in the collision.

  8. Nuclear absorption and anomalous $J/?$ suppression in Pb+Pb collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss $J/\\psi$ suppression in a QCD based nuclear absorption model. Centrality dependence of $J/\\psi$ suppression in S+U and in Pb+Pb collisions are explained in the model. However, the model fails to explain the centrality dependence of $\\psi\\prime$ suppression. $\\psi\\prime$ suppression in S+U or in Pb+Pb collisions require additional suppression. Additional suppression of $\\psi\\prime$, due to hadronic comovers or due to QGP formation could not be distinguished in Pb+Pb collisions. We then show that the centrality dependence of the ratio, $\\psi\\prime$ over $J/\\psi$, could possibly distinguish two scenario (e.g. QGP or hadronic comover) at RHIC energy.

  9. Evaluation of Anomalous Solute Transport in a Large Heterogeneous Soil Column with Mobile-Immobile Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    -Immobile Model Guangyao Gao1 ; Shaoyuan Feng2 ; Hongbin Zhan3 ; Guanhua Huang4 ; and Xiaomin Mao5 Abstract

  10. The anomalous lepton magnetic moment, LFV decays and the fourth generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Huo; T. F. Feng

    2003-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the lepton flavor violation (LFV) decays, $\\tau\\to l\\gamma$ ($l=\\mu, e$) and $\\mu\\to e\\gamma$, and the newly observed muon $g-2$ anomaly in the framwork of a squential fourth generation model with a heavy fourth neutrino, $\

  11. anomalous high-temperature stability: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of different instabilities that lead to many competing orders. In high-temperature superconduct- ors, besides the superconducting phase, many competing or- ders, such as...

  12. A Numerical Investigation into the Anomalous Slight NOx Increase when Burning Biodiesel: A New (Old) Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, G A; Chen, J Y; Buchholz, B A; Dibble, R W

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Biodiesel is a notable alternative to petroleum derived diesel fuel because it comes from natural domestic sources and thus reduces dependence on diminishing petroleum fuel from foreign sources, it likely lowers lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, and it lowers an engine's emission of most pollutants as compared to petroleum derived diesel. However, the use of biodiesel often slightly increases a diesel engine's emission of smog forming nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) relative to petroleum diesel. In this paper, previously proposed theories for this slight NOx increase are reviewed, including theories based on biodiesel's cetane number, which leads to differing amounts of charge preheating, and theories based on the fuel's bulk modulus, which affects injection timing. This paper proposes an additional theory for the slight NO{sub x} increase of biodiesel. Biodiesel typically contains more double bonded molecules than petroleum derived diesel. These double bonded molecules have a slightly higher adiabatic flame temperature, which leads to the increase in NOx production for biodiesel. Our theory was verified using numerical simulations to show a NOx increase, due to the double bonded molecules, that is consistent with observation. Further, the details of these numerical simulations show that NOx is predominantly due to the Zeldovich mechanism.

  13. A numerical investigation into the anomalous slight NOx increase when burning biodiesel; A new (old) theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ban-Weiss, George A.; Chen, J.Y.; Buchholz, Bruce A.; Dibble, Robert W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    G. et al, 2005. The Biodiesel Handbook. AOCS Publishing,x Increase When Burning Biodiesel; A New (Old) Theory GeorgeIncrease When Burning Biodiesel; A New (Old) Theory. Fuel

  14. Anomalous Lattice Vibrations of Single-and Few-Layer MoS2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in its bulk counterpart, graphite.2 Further, the ability to form samples with a controlled number the intralayer bonding and lattice vi- brations of stacked few-layer samples. In bulk graphite, this weak is an ingre- dient in some Li ion batteries.19 As exempli- fied by the recent studies on few-layer graphene

  15. Critical evaluation of anomalous thermal conductivity and convective heat transfer enhancement in nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prabhat, Naveen

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While robust progress has been made towards the practical use of nanofluids, uncertainties remain concerning the fundamental effects of nanoparticles on key thermo-physical properties. Nanofluids have higher thermal ...

  16. Anomalous magnetosheath properties during Earth passage of an interplanetary magnetic cloud

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrugia, C.J. [Univ. of Malta, Msida (Malta)] [Univ. of Malta, Msida (Malta); Erkaev, N.V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Burlaga, L.F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [and others] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); and others

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work the authors present a model for the behavior of the magnetosheath during the passage of the earth thru an interplanetary magnetic cloud. They study the variation of plasma flow and field values as a result of this encounter. The unique feature of such encounters is that they present substantial changes in the solar wind conditions along the bow shock and magnetopause for periods of 1 to 2 days. The mach number upstream of the bow shock can be as low as 3, compared to normal value of 8 to 10. The mach number and magnetic shear across the magnetopause have a major impact on the magnetosheath properties. The authors use the encounter of January 14-15, 1988, as a basis for their model, and apply ideal MHD equations, by means of a boundary layer technique, to study changes in field and plasma flow patterns.

  17. Anomalous diffusivity and electric conductivity for low concentration electrolytes in nanopores S. K. Lai1,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the properties of confined electrolytes has been directed to finding an optimized performance of fuel cells

  18. anomalous high-pressure behavior: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    than recently predicted. McMahon, Jeffrey M 2011-01-01 105 Selection of High Strength Encapsulant for MEMS Devices Undergoing High Pressure Packaging CERN Preprints Summary:...

  19. Anomalous fluctuations of vertical velocity of Earth and their possible implications for earthquakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manshour, Pouya [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9161 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ghasemi, Fatemeh; Sahimi, Muhammad [Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-1211 (United States); Matsumoto, T. [Division of Physics and Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa Oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); CNRS UMR 6202, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Gomez, J. [Earth Sciences Department, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50009 (Spain); Peinke, J. [Institute of Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Pacheco, A. F. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Tabar, M. Reza Rahimi [Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran 11155-9161 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); CNRS UMR 6202, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Institute of Physics, Carl von Ossietzky University, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany); Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Osnabrueck, Barbarastrasse, 49706 Osnabrueck (Germany)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High-quality measurements of seismic activities around the world provide a wealth of data and information that are relevant to understanding of when earthquakes may occur. If viewed as complex stochastic time series, such data may be analyzed by methods that provide deeper insights into their nature, hence leading to better understanding of the data and their possible implications for earthquakes. In this paper, we provide further evidence for our recent proposal [P. Mansour et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 014101 (2009)] for the existence of a transition in the shape of the probability density function (PDF) of the successive detrended increments of the stochastic fluctuations of Earth's vertical velocity V{sub z}, collected by broadband stations before moderate and large earthquakes. To demonstrate the transition, we carried out extensive analysis of the data for V{sub z} for 12 earthquakes in several regions around the world, including the recent catasrophic one in Haiti. The analysis supports the hypothesis that before and near the time of an earthquake, the shape of the PDF undergoes significant and discernable changes, which can be characterized quantitatively. The typical time over which the PDF undergoes the transition is about 5-10 h prior to a moderate or large earthquake.

  20. The leading disconnected contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony Francis; Vera Gülpers; Benjamin Jäger; Harvey Meyer; Georg von Hippel; Hartmut Wittig

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The hadronic vacuum polarization can be determined from the vector correlator in a mixed time-momentum representation. We explicitly calculate the disconnected contribution to the vector correlator, both in the $N_f = 2$ theory and with an additional quenched strange quark, using non-perturbatively $O(a)$-improved Wilson fermions. All-to-all propagators are computed using stochastic sources and a generalized hopping parameter expansion. Combining the result with the dominant connected contribution, we are able to estimate an upper bound for the systematic error that arises from neglecting the disconnected contribution in the determination of $(g-2)_\\mu$.

  1. Study of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon computed from the Adler function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michele Della Morte; Anthony Francis; Gregorio Herdoiza; Hanno Horch; Benjamin Jäger; Andreas Jüttner; Harvey Meyer; Hartmut Wittig

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the Adler function on the lattice from vacuum polarization data with twisted boundary conditions using numerical derivatives. The study is based on CLS ensembles with two flavours of $O(a)$ improved Wilson fermions. We extrapolate the lattice data for the Adler function to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass and analyze its dependence on the momentum transfer. We discuss the application of this method to the extraction of the $u,d$ contribution to $a_\\mu^{\\mathrm{HLO}}$.

  2. ANOMALOUS BUCKLING BEHAVIOUR OF TRUSS BEAMS ALEXIS FEDOROFF and REIJO KOUHIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kouhia, Reijo

    stability of the truss against lateral buckling, the designer would restrict lateral movement of the upper laterally. This design choice is based on the assumption that a solid beam does not buckle laterally by lateral movement of the lower chord while the compressed vertical member buckles as a rigid body

  3. Anomalously high photocurrents in nanostructured electrodes : a new local microchip power source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Robert Clark; Dunphy, Darren Robert; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Brozik, Susan Marie

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An increase in photocurrent has been observed at silicon electrodes coated with nanostructured porous silica films as compared to bare, unmodified silicon. Ultimately, to utilize this effect in devices such as sensors or microchip power supplies, the physical phenomena behind this observation need to be well characterized. To this end, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) was used to characterize the effect of surfactant-templated mesoporous silica films deposited onto silicon electrodes on the electrical properties of the electrode space-charge region in an aqueous electrolyte solution, as the electrical properties of this space-charge region are responsible for the photobehavior of semiconductor devices. A significant shift in apparent flat-band potential was observed for electrodes modified with the silica film when compared to bare electrodes; the reliability of this data is suspect, however, due to contributions from surface states to the overall capacitance of the system. To assist in the interpretation of this EIS data, a series of measurements at Pt electrodes was performed with the hope of decoupling electrode and film contributions from the EIS spectra. Surprisingly, the frequency-dependent impedance data for Pt electrodes coated with a surfactant-templated film was nearly identical to that observed for bare Pt electrodes, indicating that the mesoporous film had little effect on the transport of small electrolyte ions to the electrode surface. Pore-blocking agents (tetraalkylammonium salts) were not observed to inhibit this transport process. However, untemplated (non-porous) silica films dramatically increased film resistance, indicating that our EIS data for the Pt electrodes is reliable. Overall, our preliminary conclusion is that a shift in electrical properties in the space-charge region induced by the presence of a porous silica film is responsible for the increase in observed photocurrent.

  4. Lyapunov exponents and anomalous diffusion of a Lorentz gas with infinite horizon using approximate zeta functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlqvist, P. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the Lyapunov exponent, the generalized Lyapunov exponents, and the diffusion constant for a Lorentz gas on a square lattice, thus having infinite horizon. Approximate zeta functions, written in terms of probabilities rather than periodic orbits, are used in order to avoid the convergence problems of cycle expansions. The emphasis is on the relaxation between the analytic structure of the zeta function, where a branch cut plays an important role, and the asymptotic dynamics of the system. The Lyapunov exponent for the corresponding map agrees with the conjectured limit {lambda}{sub map}=-2 log(R) + C + O(R) and we derive an approximate value for the constant C in good agreement with numerical simulations. We also find a diverging diffusion constant D(t){approx}log t and a phase transition for the generalized Lyapunov exponents.

  5. Anomalous absorption of bulk shear sagittal acoustic waves in a layered structure with viscous fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri K. Gramotnev; Melissa L. Mather; Timo A. Nieminen

    2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    It is demonstrated theoretically that the absorptivity of bulk shear sagittal waves by an ultra-thin layer of viscous fluid between two different elastic media has a strong maximum (in some cases as good as 100%) at an optimal layer thickness. This thickness is usually much smaller than the penetration depths and lengths of transverse and longitudinal waves in the fluid. The angular dependencies of the absorptivity are demonstrated to have significant and unusual structure near critical angles of incidence. The effect of non-Newtonian properties and non-uniformities of the fluid layer on the absorptivity is also investigated. In particular, it is shown that the absorption in a thin layer of viscous fluid is much more sensitive to non-zero relaxation time(s) in the fluid layer than the absorption at an isolated solid-fluid interface.

  6. Center for Inverse Design Highlight: Anomalous Surface Conductivity in In2O3 Transparent Conductors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess StoriesFebruaryMetalControl SystemLightWhite Light

  7. Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the Coso

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: Energy Resources JumpAnaconda, Montana:

  8. Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii-

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat Place:Alvan2809328°,AnfuNorth,Open Energy

  9. GROUND LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF ANOMALOUS RADIATION LEVELS IN NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? . -. .- *' * ..+GROUND

  10. Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling in an open

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITY AEROSOL:Quantum Condensed MatterQuantum

  11. Iron and s-elements abundance variations in NGC5286: comparison with anomalous globular clusters and Milky Way satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marino, A F; Karakas, A I; Casagrande, L; Yong, D; Shingles, L; Da Costa, G; Norris, J E; Stetson, P B; Lind, K; Asplund, M; Collet, R; Jerjen, H; Sbordone, L; Aparicio, A; Cassisi, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a high resolution spectroscopic analysis of 62 red giants in the Milky Way globular cluster NGC5286. We have determined abundances of representative light proton-capture, alpha, Fe-peak and neutron-capture element groups, and combined them with photometry of multiple sequences observed along the colour-magnitude diagram. Our principal results are: (i) a broad, bimodal distribution in s-process element abundance ratios, with two main groups, the s-poor and s-rich groups; (ii) substantial star-to-star Fe variations, with the s-rich stars having higher Fe, e.g. _s-rich - _s-poor ~ 0.2~dex; and (iii) the presence of O-Na-Al (anti-)correlations in both stellar groups. We have defined a new photometric index, c_{BVI}=(B-V)-(V-I), to maximise the separation in the colour-magnitude diagram between the two stellar groups with different Fe and s-element content, and this index is not significantly affected by variations in light elements (such as the O-Na anticorrelation). The variations in the overall metal...

  12. Studies of WW and WZ production and limits on anomalous WW and WWZ couplings B. Abbott,45

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,27 Y. Gershtein,51 B. Gibbard,48 B. Gobbi,30 B. Go´mez,5 G. Go´mez,38 P. I. Goncharov,18 J. L. Gonza

  13. ISOTOPICALLY ANOMALOUS ORGANIC GLOBULES FROM COMET 81P/WILD 2. B. T. De Grego-, R. M. Stroud1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nittler, Larry R.

    . Organic matter is present in several particles from comet 81P/Wild 2 captured in silica aerogel) were S-embedded, ultramicrotomed, and placed on SiO-coated Cu TEM grids (Track 2 sections prepared by K (CIW). Results: Each organic globule is near aerogel from the Stardust sample collector, and both

  14. Impact of Anomalous Ocean Heat Transport on the North Atlantic Oscillation FABIO D'ANDREA, ARNAUD CZAJA, AND JOHN MARSHALL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czaja, Arnaud

    CZAJA, AND JOHN MARSHALL Department of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts--see the discussion in Marshall et al. (2001a). The problem is made difficult by the long time scales of variation, with the effect of "redden- ing" the NAO spectrum. Marshall et al. (2001b) and Czaja and Marshall (2001), however

  15. PHYSICAL REVIEW B 87, 165409 (2013) Anomalous Raman spectra and thickness-dependent electronic properties of WSe2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    preparation and/or as a result of the interaction between WSe2 and the substrate. Furthermore, we find.65.Pq, 81.16.Pr I. INTRODUCTION Owing to its extraordinary properties,1,2 graphene has already been

  16. Anomalous pH Dependent Stability Behavior of Surfactant-Free Nonpolar Oil Drops in Aqueous Electrolyte Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Derek Y C

    . In this study, we investigated the interaction across an aqueous thin film between fluorocarbon with a higher refractive index than water, and a fluorocarbon oil (perfluoropentane, C5F12), a liquid will be attractive for the hydrocarbon oil and repulsive for the fluorocarbon oil. Traditional methods

  17. Role of channel coupling and deuteron-exchange mechanisms in anomalous alpha-particle scattering on {sup 6}Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakuta, S. B., E-mail: sakuta@dni.polyn.kiae.s [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Artemov, S.V. [Uzbek Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Uzbekistan); Burtebaev, N.; Kerimkulov, Zh. [National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Kazakhstan); Novatsky, B. G.; Stepanov, D.N. [Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Yarmukhamedov, R. [Uzbek Academy of Sciences, Institute of Nuclear Physics (Uzbekistan)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A unified description of existing experimental data on alpha-particle scattering by {sup 6}Li over the broad energy range from 18 to 166 MeV was obtained with allowance for channel-coupling effects and mechanisms involving the exchange of a deuteron cluster. Angular distributions were analyzed on the basis of the optical model and the coupled reaction channels method. It was shown that the inclusion of channel coupling and the contributions from one- and two-step exchangemechanismsmakes it possible to describe special features of the behavior of differential cross sections for both elastic and inelastic scattering in a full energy range. Optimum values found for the parameters of optical potentials agree with the parameters of the global potential proposed previously for nuclei in the mass region A > 12.

  18. Observation of Anomalous Internal Pair Creation in $^8$Be: A Possible Signature of a Light, Neutral Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Krasznahorkay; M. Csatlós; L. Csige; Z. Gácsi; J. Gulyás; M. Hunyadi; T. J. Ketel; A. Krasznahorkay; I. Kuti; B. M. Nyakó; L. Stuhl; J. Timár; T. G. Tornyi; Zs. Vajta

    2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-positron angular correlations were measured for the isovector magnetic dipole 17.6 MeV state ($J^\\pi=1^+$, $T=1$) $\\rightarrow$ ground state ($J^\\pi=0^+$, $T=0$) and the isoscalar magnetic dipole 18.15 MeV ($J^\\pi=1^+$, $T=0$) state $\\rightarrow$ ground state transitions in $^{8}$Be. Significant deviation from the internal pair creation was observed at large angles in the angular correlation for the isoscalar transition with a confidence level of $> 5\\sigma$. This observation might indicate that, in an intermediate step, a neutral isoscalar particle with a mass of 16.70$\\pm0.35 $ (stat)$\\pm 0.5 $ (sys) MeV$/c^2$ and $J^\\pi = 1^+$ was created.

  19. Observation of Anomalous Internal Pair Creation in $^8$Be: A Possible Signature of a Light, Neutral Boson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasznahorkay, A J; Csige, L; Gácsi, Z; Gulyás, J; Hunyadi, M; Ketel, T J; Krasznahorkay, A; Kuti, I; Nyakó, B M; Stuhl, L; Timár, J; Tornyi, T G; Vajta, Zs

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron-positron angular correlations were measured for the isovector magnetic dipole 17.6 MeV state ($J^\\pi=1^+$, $T=1$) $\\rightarrow$ ground state ($J^\\pi=0^+$, $T=0$) and the isoscalar magnetic dipole 18.15 MeV ($J^\\pi=1^+$, $T=0$) state $\\rightarrow$ ground state transitions in $^{8}$Be. Significant deviation from the internal pair creation was observed at large angles in the angular correlation for the isoscalar transition with a confidence level of $> 5\\sigma$. This observation might indicate that, in an intermediate step, a neutral isoscalar particle with a mass of 16.70$\\pm0.35 $ (stat)$\\pm 0.5 $ (sys) MeV$/c^2$ and $J^\\pi = 1^+$ was created.

  20. Proton hexality from an anomalous flavor U(1) and neutrino masses--Linking to the string scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dreiner, Herbi K.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    would suppress the Majorana mass matrix in Eq. (3.2) so thatthe Dirac and the Majorana mass matrices can be written as =

  1. Element-and site-specific oxidation state and cation distribution in manganese ferrite films by diffraction anomalous fine structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haskel, Daniel

    Element- and site-specific oxidation state and cation distribution in manganese ferrite films Received 2 April 2008; accepted 9 July 2008; published online 8 August 2008 Epitaxial manganese ferrite.1063/1.2969406 Spinel ferrites represent an important class of materials that provide high permeability, moderate

  2. Anomalous swelling of lipid bilayer stacks is caused by softening of the bending modulus Nanjun Chu,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagle, John F.

    of membranes and to understand the effec- tive forces between mesoscale structures 11,12 . The phe- nomenon

  3. Top quark spin correlations and polarization at the LHC: standard model predictions and effects of anomalous top chromo moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Werner Bernreuther; Zong-Guo Si

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of top-spin observables are computed within the Standard Model (SM), at next-to-leading order in the strong and weak gauge couplings for hadronic top-quark anti-quark (ttbar) production and decay at the LHC for center-of-mass energies 7 and 8 TeV. For dileptonic final states we consider the azimuthal angle correlation, the helicity correlation, and the opening angle distribution; for lepton plus jets final states we determine distributions and asymmetries that trace a longitudinal and transverse polarization, respectively, of the t and t-bar samples. In addition, we investigate the effects of a non-zero chromo-magnetic and chromo-electric dipole moment of the top quark on these and other top-spin observables and associated asymmetries. These observables allow to disentangle the contributions from the real and imaginary parts of these moments.

  4. Liquid polymorphism, order-disorder transitions and anomalous a Monte Carlo study of the Bell-Lavis model for water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Marcia C. B.

    the lack of consensus concerning the origin of water-like anomalies, it is widely believed of the Bell-Lavis model for water Carlos E. Fiore Departamento de F´isica, Universidade Federal do Paran for liquid water is investigated through numerical simulations. The lattice- gas model on a triangular

  5. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 86, 011123 (2012) Anomalous critical behavior in the polymer collapse transition of three-dimensional lattice trails

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prellberg, Thomas

    of three-dimensional lattice trails Andrea Bedini* and Aleksander L. Owczarek Department of Mathematics

  6. Dmitri Babikov (dmitri.babikov@mu.edu; 288-3538) Quantum Origin of Anomalous Isotope Effect in Ozone Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    of photocatalytic hybrid materials for solar energy conversion James Kincaid (james.kincaid@mu.edu; 288 in Ozone Formation Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory for Collisional Energy Transfer Computational Study-Halons Mark Steinmetz (mark.steinmetz@mu.edu; 288-3535) Photochemically Removable Protecting Groups Qadir

  7. Dmitri Babikov (dmitri.babikov@mu.edu; 288-3538) Quantum Origin of Anomalous Isotope Effect in Ozone Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    -Function Analyses of photocatalytic hybrid materials for solar energy conversion James Kincaid Effect in Ozone Formation · Mixed Quantum/Classical Theory for Collisional Energy Transfer: The Intriguing Story of the Iso-Halons Mark Steinmetz (mark

  8. 718 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON PLASMA SCIENCE, VOL. 34, NO. 3, JUNE 2006 Nonlinear Effects and Anomalous Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaganovich, Igor

    . The first is a spiral coil shaped like a stove-top heating element and placed on the dielectric top cover understanding this. The second type of antenna, however, is wound around the cylindrical sides of the vacuum use, the parameters can be adjusted to produce a completely uni- form plasma across the diameter

  9. Theory of the anomalous Doppler cyclotron-resonance-maser amplifier with tapered parameters G. S. Nusinovich,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerby, Eli

    . Nusinovich,1 M. Korol,2 and E. Jerby2 1 Institute for Plasma Research, University of Maryland, College Park

  10. Phonon self-energy and origin of anomalous neutron scattering spectra in SnTe and PbTe thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Chen [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL] [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL] [ORNL; Cao, Huibo [ORNL] [ORNL; Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL] [ORNL; Ehlers, Georg [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL] [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL] [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The anharmonic lattice dynamics of rock-salt thermoelectric compounds SnTe and PbTe are investigated with inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and first-principles calculations. The experiments show that, surprisingly, although SnTe is closer to the ferroelectric instability, phonon spectra in PbTe exhibit a more anharmonic character. This behavior is reproduced in first-principles calculations of the temperature-dependent phonon self-energy. Our simulations reveal how the nesting of phonon dispersions induces prominent features in the self-energy, which account for the measured INS spectra and their temperature dependence. We establish that the phase-space for three-phonon scattering processes, rather than just the proximity to the lattice instability, is the mechanism determining the complex spectrum of the transverse-optical ferroelectric mode.

  11. Drifting localization of ionization runaway: Unraveling the nature of anomalous transport in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Pavel; Rauch, Albert

    2011-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The plasma over the magnetron’s erosion “racetrack” is not azimuthally uniform but concentrated in distinct dense plasma zones which move in the {vector E}×{vector B} direction with about 10% of the electrons’ {vector E}×{vector B}/B{sup 2} drift velocity. The plasma zones are investigated with a gated camera working in concert with a streak camera for Al, Nb, Cu, and W targets in Ar or Kr background gas. It is found that each plasma zone has a high density edge which is the origin of a plasma-generating electron jet leaving the target zone. Each region of strong azimuthal density gradient generates an azimuthal electric field which promotes the escape of magnetized electrons and the formation of electron jets and plasma flares. The phenomena are proposed to be caused by an ionization instability where each dense plasma zone exhibits a high stopping power for drifting high energy electrons, thereby enhancing itself.

  12. Anomalous nonlinear photoresponse in a InGaNGaN heterostructure J. Zeller,* W. Rudolph, and M. Sheik-Bahae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    deposition on a c-plane sapphire substrate. A 20 nm thick low-temperature grown GaN buffer layer between the sapphire substrate and the n-GaN layer as well as linear photoconductivity in a Gallium nitride/ Indium-Gallium nitride GaN/InGaN heterostructure

  13. Comment to `The dependence of the anomalous J/psi suppression on the number of participant nucleons'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Kostyuk; H. Stoecker; W. Greiner

    2002-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The recently published experimental dependence of the J/psi suppression pattern in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS on the energy of zero degree calorimeter E_ZDC are analyzed. It is found that the data obtained within the `minimum bias' analysis (using `theoretical Drell-Yan') are at variance with the previously published experimental dependence of the same quantity on the transversal energy of neutral hadrons E_T. The discrepancy is related to the moderate centrality region: 100 < N_p < 200 (N_p is the number of nucleon participants). This could result from systematic experimental errors in the minimum bias sample. A possible source of the errors may be contamination of the minimum bias sample by off-target interactions. The data obtained within the standard analysis (using measured Drell-Yan multiplicity) are found to be much less sensitive to the contamination.

  14. Modification of solid state CdZnTe (CZT) radiation detectors with high sensitivity or high resolution operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Washington, II, Aaron L; Duff, Martine C; Teague, Lucile C; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and process is provided to illustrate the manipulation of the internal electric field of CZT using multiple wavelength light illumination on the crystal surface at RT. The control of the internal electric field is shown through the polarization in the IR transmission image under illumination as a result of the Pockels effect.

  15. CHAPTER 8. QUANTITATIVE GEOLOGICAL SURFACE PROCESSES EXTRACTED FROM INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY AND REMOTE SENSING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael

    , the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument has been observing the Earth's surface at high spatial resolution and in multiple wavelength bands during the day and night and lithological mapping because the energy emitted from the surface is sensitive to most of the major rock forming

  16. "BNC Seminar" January 31st, 2014 @ 12:00noon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    - organization here might be due an ion bombardment, arc-discharge evaporation, laser ablation, etc. The main experience in many aspects of photonics and has pioneered a number of developments in chemical lasers, optical memory devices with random access, fiber optics, multiple-wavelength lasers, few-cycle optical

  17. Semiconductor laser with multiple lasing wavelengths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of multi-terminal vertical-cavity semiconductor laser components has been developed. These multi-terminal laser components can be switched, either electrically or optically, between distinct lasing wavelengths, or can be made to lase simultaneously at multiple wavelengths.

  18. III : Large : Discovering Complex Anomalous Patterns Many of the most interesting and valuable discoveries from data arise not from the evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Geoffrey J.

    , such as graph mining or frequent sets. Our proposed methods will search over arbitrary subsets of records of patient care in the intensive care unit (ICU) and aircraft fleet maintenance. Through the project of all algorithms developed through this grant will be made publicly available at www

  19. Measurement of W? and Z? production cross sections in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV and limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings with the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    This Letter presents measurements of l[superscript ±]?? and l[superscript +l[superscript ?]? (l=e,?) production in 1.02 fb[superscript ?1] of pp collision data recorded at ?s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in ...

  20. Anomalous Chemical Expansion Behavior of Pr[subscript 0.2]Ce[subscript 0.8]O[subscript 2-?] Thin Films Grown by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuru, Y.

    The chemomechanical and electrical properties of (Pr,Ce)O[subscript 2-?] thin films were studied between 30 and 875°C in air by in situ X-ray diffraction and complex impedance spectroscopy measurements. Reduction/oxidation ...

  1. Degeneracy of electronic states and the 'anomalous' kinetics of a nonlinear response of high-temperature superconductors in pump-probe spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobyrev, Yu V; Petnikova, V M; Rudenko, K V; Shuvalov, Vladimir V [International Laser Center, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that all the spectral-temporal and temperature anomalies of a nonlinear response of high-temperature superconductors (HTSCs) observed in the pump-probe spectroscopy at high excitation levels can be interpreted taking into account contributions of interband electronic transitions to the dielectric constant of an excited HTSC film with a 'frozen' energy gap in the electronic spectrum. A model is constructed which explains all these 'anomalies' by a drastic decrease in the rates of three-particle nonradiative recombination of excess carriers under strong degeneracy conditions. It is found that this situation takes place due to the specific distribution of the density of electronic states in a HTSC almost immediately after the 'opening' of the energy gap in the electronic spectrum. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  2. Anomalous reduction of the switching voltage of Bi-doped Ge{sub 0.5}Se{sub 0.5} ovonic threshold switching devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Juhee [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Nanomaterials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hyung-Woo [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Material Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Sang-yeol [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Byung-ki; Lee, Suyoun, E-mail: slee-eels@kist.re.kr [Electronic Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Switching devices based on Ovonic Threshold Switching (OTS) have been considered as a solution to overcoming limitations of Si-based electronic devices, but the reduction of switching voltage is a major challenge. Here, we investigated the effect of Bi-doping in Ge{sub 0.5}Se{sub 0.5} thin films on their thermal, optical, electrical properties, as well as on the characteristics of OTS devices. As Bi increased, it was found that both of the optical energy gap (E{sub g}{sup opt}) and the depth of trap states decreased resulting in a drastic reduction of the threshold voltage (V{sub th}) by over 50%. In addition, E{sub g}{sup opt} was found to be about three times of the conduction activation energy for each composition. These results are explained in terms of the Mott delocalization effect by doping Bi.

  3. Influence of Ga content on the structure and anomalous Hall effect of Fe{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x} thin films on GaSb(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anh Tuan, Duong; Shin, Yooleemi; Viet Cuong, Tran; Cho, Sunglae, E-mail: slcho@ulsan.ac.kr [Department of Physics and Energy Harvest-Storage Research Center, University of Ulsan, Ulsan 680-749 (Korea, Republic of); Phan, The-Long [Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fe{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x} thin films (x?=?0.4, 0.5) have been grown on GaSb(100) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy. An epitaxial film with bcc ?-Fe crystal structure (A2) is observed in Fe{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4} film, while an impure Fe{sub 3}Ga phase with DO{sub 3} structure is appeared in Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5} film. The saturated magnetizations at room temperature are observed to be 570?emu/cm{sup 3} and 180?emu/cm{sup 3} and the coercivities to be 170 and 364?Oe for Fe{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4} and Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}, respectively. A hysteresis trend in Hall resistance vs. magnetic field is observed for Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5} film. However, there is a weak hysteresis noticed in Fe{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6} thin film.

  4. Anomalous cell surface structure of sickle cell anemia erythrocytes as demonstrated by cell surface labeling and endo-beta-galactosidase treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukuda, M.; Fukuda, M.N.; Hakomori, S.; Papayannopoulou, T.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Erythrocyte surface glycoproteins from patients with various types of sickle cell anemia have been analyzed and compared with those from normal individuals. By hemagglutination with various anti-carbohydrate antibodies, sickle cells showed profound increase of i antigens and moderate increase of GlcNAc beta 1 leads to 3Gal beta 1 leads to 3 Glc structure, whereas antigenicity toward globosidic structure was unchanged. In parallel to these findings, erythrocytes of sickle cell patients have additional sialylated lactosaminoglycan in Band 3. Thus, it can be concluded that erythrocytes of sickle cell patients are characterized by an altered cell surface structure which does not appear to be due to topographical changes of cell surface membrane. It is possible that the anemia or the ''stress'' hematopoiesis in these patients is responsible for these changes.

  5. Measurement of the ZZ production cross section and search for anomalous couplings in 2?2?? final states in pp collisions at s?=7 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Kenny, R. P. III; Murray, Michael J.; Noonan, Danny; Sanders, Stephen J.; Stringer, Robert W.; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Chatrchyan, S.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Aguilo, E.

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    and MET, CMS-PAS-PFT-09-001, CERN, Geneva Switzerland (2009). [29] CMS collaboration, Performance of ? -lepton reconstruction and identification in CMS, 2012 JINST 7 P01001 [arXiv:1109.6034] [INSPIRE]. [30] M. Cacciari and G.P. Salam, Pileup subtraction..., S.R. Ro, D.C. Son, T. Son Chonnam National University, Institute for Universe and Elementary Particles, Kwangju, Korea J.Y. Kim, Zero...

  6. Search for anomalous production of photonic events with missing energy in $e^+ e^-$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 130-172 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerstaff, K; Allison, J; Altekamp, N; Anderson, K J; Anderson, S; Arcelli, S; Asai, S; Ashby, S F; Axen, D A; Azuelos, Georges; Ball, A H; Barberio, E; Barlow, R J; Bartoldus, R; Batley, J Richard; Baumann, S; Bechtluft, J; Beeston, C; Behnke, T; Bell, A N; Bell, K W; Bella, G; Bentvelsen, Stanislaus Cornelius Maria; Bethke, Siegfried; Betts, S; Biebel, O; Biguzzi, A; Bird, S D; Blobel, Volker; Bloodworth, Ian J; Bloomer, J E; Bobinski, M; Bock, P; Bonacorsi, D; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brigliadori, L; Brown, R M; Burckhart, Helfried J; Burgard, C; Bürgin, R; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Chrisman, D; Clarke, P E L; Cohen, I; Conboy, J E; Cooke, O C; Couyoumtzelis, C; Coxe, R L; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallapiccola, C; Dallavalle, G M; Davis, R; De Jong, S; del Pozo, L A; Desch, Klaus; Dienes, B; Dixit, M S; Doucet, M; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Eatough, D; Edwards, J E G; Estabrooks, P G; Evans, H G; Evans, M; Fabbri, Franco Luigi; Fanfani, A; Fanti, M; Faust, A A; Feld, L; Fiedler, F; Fierro, M; Fischer, H M; Fleck, I; Folman, R; Fong, D G; Foucher, M; Fürtjes, A; Futyan, D I; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Gascon, J; Gascon-Shotkin, S M; Geddes, N I; Geich-Gimbel, C; Geralis, T; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giacomelli, R; Gibson, V; Gibson, W R; Gingrich, D M; Glenzinski, D A; Goldberg, J; Goodrick, M J; Gorn, W; Grandi, C; Gross, E; Grunhaus, Jacob; Gruwé, M; Hajdu, C; Hanson, G G; Hansroul, M; Hapke, M; Hargrove, C K; Hart, P A; Hartmann, C; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Hemingway, Richard J; Herndon, M; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hildreth, M D; Hill, J C; Hillier, S J; Hobson, P R; Höcker, Andreas; Homer, R James; Honma, A K; Horváth, D; Hossain, K R; Howard, R; Hüntemeyer, P; Hutchcroft, D E; Igo-Kemenes, P; Imrie, D C; Ingram, M R; Ishii, K; Jawahery, A; Jeffreys, P W; Jeremie, H; Jimack, Martin Paul; Joly, A; Jones, C R; Jones, G; Jones, M; Jost, U; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J I; Karlen, D A; Kartvelishvili, V G; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Kayal, P I; Keeler, Richard K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kirk, J; Klier, A; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Koetke, D S; Kokott, T P; Kolrep, M; Komamiya, S; Kress, T; Krieger, P; Von Krogh, J; Kyberd, P; Lafferty, G D; Lahmann, R; Lai, W P; Lanske, D; Lauber, J; Lautenschlager, S R; Layter, J G; Lazic, D; Lee, A M; Lefebvre, E; Lellouch, Daniel; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Long, G D; Losty, Michael J; Ludwig, J; Liu, D; Macchiolo, A; MacPherson, A L; Mannelli, M; Marcellini, S; Markopoulos, C; Markus, C; Martin, A J; Martin, J P; Martínez, G; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McDonald, W J; McKenna, J A; McKigney, E A; McMahon, T J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menke, S; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, J; Michelini, Aldo; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mincer, A; Mir, R; Mohr, W; Montanari, A; Mori, T; Müller, U; Mihara, S; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Neal, H A; Nellen, B; Nisius, R; O'Neale, S W; Oakham, F G; Odorici, F; Ögren, H O; Oh, A; Oldershaw, N J; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pálinkás, J; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Patrick, G N; Patt, J; Pérez-Ochoa, R; Petzold, S; Pfeifenschneider, P; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J L; Plane, D E; Poffenberger, P R; Poli, B; Posthaus, A; Rembser, C; Robertson, S; Robins, S A; Rodning, N L; Roney, J M; Rooke, A M; Rossi, A M; Routenburg, P; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Runólfsson, O; Ruppel, U; Rust, D R; Rylko, R; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sang, W M; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sbarra, C; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharf, F; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schleper, P; Schmitt, B; Schmitt, S; Schöning, A; Schröder, M; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Schumacher, M; Schwick, C; Scott, W G; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Sherwood, P; Siroli, G P; Sittler, A; Skillman, A; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Snow, G A; Sobie, Randall J; Söldner-Rembold, S; Springer, R W; Sproston, M; Stephens, K; Steuerer, J; Stockhausen, B; Stoll, K; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Szymanski, P; Tafirout, R; Talbot, S D; Tanaka, S; Taras, P; Tarem, S; Teuscher, R; Thiergen, M; Thomson, M A; Von Törne, E; Torrence, E; Towers, S; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z L; Tsur, E; Turcot, A S; Turner-Watson, M F; Utzat, P; Van Kooten, R; Verzocchi, M; Vikas, P; Vokurka, E H; Voss, H; Wäckerle, F; Wagner, A; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wermes, N; White, J S; Wilkens, B; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Yekutieli, G; Zacek, V; Zer-Zion, D

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photonic events with large missing energy have been observed in e+e- collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 130, 136, 161 and 172 GeV using the OPAL detector at LEP. Results are presented based on search topologies designed to select events with a single photon and missing transverse energy or events with a pair of acoplanar photons. In both search topologies, cross-section measurements are performed within the kinematic acceptance of the selection. These results are compared with the expectations from the Standard Model processes e+e- -> nu nu(bar) gamma (gamma) (single-photon) and e+e- -> \

  7. Search for anomalous production of events with three or more leptons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for physics beyond the standard model in events with at least three leptons is presented. The data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns of proton-proton collisions with center-of-mass energy sqrt(s) = 8 TeV, was collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC during 2012. The data are divided into exclusive categories based on the number of leptons and their flavor, the presence or absence of an opposite-sign, same-flavor lepton pair (OSSF), the invariant mass of the OSSF pair, the presence or absence of a tagged bottom-quark jet, the number of identified hadronically decaying tau leptons, and the magnitude of the missing transverse energy and of the scalar sum of jet transverse momenta. The numbers of observed events are found to be consistent with the expected numbers from standard model processes, and limits are placed on new-physics scenarios that yield multilepton final states. In particular, scenarios that predict Higgs boson production in the context of supersymmetric decay chains are examined. We also place a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.3% on the branching fraction for the decay of a top quark to a charm quark and a Higgs boson (t to c H), which translates to a bound on the left- and right-handed top-charm flavor-violating Higgs Yukawa couplings, lambda[H, tc] and lambda[H, ct], respectively, of sqrt(abs(lambda[H, tc])^2 + abs(lambda[H, ct])^2) < 0.21.

  8. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous HVV couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the $\\mathrm{H} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{Z} \\mathrm{Z}$, $\\mathrm{Z}\\gamma^*$, $\\gamma^*\\gamma^* \\rightarrow 4\\ell$, $\\mathrm{H} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{W} \\mathrm{W} \\rightarrow \\ell\

  9. Anomalous codeposition of Fe-Ni alloys and Fe-Ni-SiO{sub 2} composites under potentiostatic conditions: Experimental study and mathematical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramasubramanian, M.; Popova, S.N.; Popov, B.N.; White, R.E. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Yin, K.M. [Yuan-Ze Inst. of Tech., Taoyuan (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mathematical model has been developed to describe the electrodeposition of Fe-Ni alloys and Fe-Ni-SiO{sub 2} composites under potentiostatic conditions. This model can be used to predict the polarization behavior, partial current densities, and alloy composition of each of the components as a function of the applied potential. Fe-Ni-SiO{sub 2} samples were deposited on platinum rotating disk electrodes from sulfate electrolytes under potentiostatic conditions, and the results obtained were compared to the model. The model predictions were found to agree well with the experimental observations for the Fe-Ni and Fe-Ni-SiO{sub 2} systems.

  10. Anomalous centrality evolution of two-particle angular correlations from Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}$ = 62 and 200 GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STAR Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; A. V. Alakhverdyants; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; B. D. Anderson; C. D. Anson; D. Arkhipkin; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; M. J. Betancourt; R. R. Betts; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; E. Braidot; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; E. Bruna; S. Bueltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; X. Z. Cai; H. Caines; M. Calderon; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; J. Y. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; P. Chung; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; L. Didenko; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; M. Elnimr; J. Engelage; G. Eppley; M. Estienne; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; J. Fedorisin; R. G. Fersch; P. Filip; E. Finch; V. Fine; Y. Fisyak; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; F. Geurts; P. Ghosh; Y. N. Gorbunov; A. Gordon; O. G. Grebenyuk; D. Grosnick; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; T. J. Humanic; L. Huo; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; C. Jena; J. Joseph; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; K. Kang; J. Kapitan; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; D. Kettler; D. P. Kikola; J. Kiryluk; A. Kisiel; V. Kizka; S. R. Klein; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. Koroleva; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; L. Kumar; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; S. LaPointe; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; L. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; Y. Lu; E. V. Lukashov; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; O. I. Mall; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; A. Meschanin; R. Milner; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; M. K. Mitrovski; Y. Mohammed; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; B. Morozov; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; M. Naglis; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; L. V. Nogach; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; D. Olson; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; H. Pei; T. Peitzmann; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; J. Porter; C. B. Powell; D. Prindle; C. Pruneau; N. K. Pruthi; P. R. Pujahari; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; R. Redwine; R. Reed; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; J. Schaub; A. M. Schmah; N. Schmitz; T. R. Schuster; J. Seele; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; M. Shao; M. Sharma; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; F. Simon; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. de Souza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; S. G. Steadman; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. C. Suarez; M. Sumbera; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; L. H. Tarini; T. Tarnowsky; D. Thein; J. H. Thomas; J. Tian; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; T. A. Trainor; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; F. Videbaek; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; Q. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; C. Whitten Jr.; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; W. Witzke; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; W. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; L. Xue; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; P. Yepes; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; M. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zhan; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; W. M. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We present two-dimensional (2D) two-particle angular correlations on relative pseudorapidity $\\eta$ and azimuth $\\phi$ for charged particles from Au-Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 62$ and 200 GeV with transverse momentum $p_t \\geq 0.15$ GeV/$c$, $|\\eta| \\leq 1$ and $2\\pi$ azimuth. Observed correlations include a {same-side} (relative azimuth $< \\pi/2$) 2D peak, a closely-related away-side azimuth dipole, and an azimuth quadrupole conventionally associated with elliptic flow. The same-side 2D peak and away-side dipole are explained by semihard parton scattering and fragmentation (minijets) in proton-proton and peripheral nucleus-nucleus collisions. Those structures follow N-N binary-collision scaling in Au-Au collisions until mid-centrality where a transition to a qualitatively different centrality trend occurs within a small centrality interval. Above the transition point the number of same-side and away-side correlated pairs increases rapidly {relative to} binary-collision scaling, the $\\eta$ width of the same-side 2D peak also increases rapidly ($\\eta$ elongation) and the $\\phi$ width actually decreases significantly. Those centrality trends are more remarkable when contrasted with expectations of jet quenching in a dense medium. Observed centrality trends are compared to {\\sc hijing} predictions and to the expected trends for semihard parton scattering and fragmentation in a thermalized opaque medium. We are unable to reconcile a semihard parton scattering and fragmentation origin for the observed correlation structure and centrality trends with heavy ion collision scenarios which invoke rapid parton thermalization. On the other hand, if the collision system is effectively opaque to few-GeV partons the observations reported here would be inconsistent with a minijet picture.

  11. A model-independent analysis of the dependence of the anomalous J/psi suppression on the number of participant nucleons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Kostyuk; W. Greiner

    2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently published experimental dependence of the J/psi to Drell-Yan ratio on the measured, by a zero degree calorimeter, forward energy E_ZDC in Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN SPS is analyzed. Using a model-independent approach it is shown that the data are at variance with an earlier published experimental dependence of the same quantity on the transverse energy of neutral hadrons E_T. The discrepancy is related to a moderate centrality region: 100 < N_p < 200 (N_p is the number of participant nucleons) and is peculiar only to the data obtained within the `minimum bias' analysis (using the `theoretical Drell-Yan'). This could result from systematic experimental errors in the minimum bias sample. A possible source of the errors is discussed.

  12. Microscopic Measurement of the Pair Interaction Potential of Charge-Stabilized John C. Crocker and David G. Grier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grier, David

    discrepancies [10, 11] and anomalous observations includ- ing the unaccounted-for monodisperse glassy phase [11

  13. VOLUME 80, NUMBER 13 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 30 MARCH 1998 Anomalously Large Thermal Expansion at the (0001) Surface of Beryllium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pohl, Karsten

    Thermal Expansion at the (0001) Surface of Beryllium without Observable Interlayer Anharmonicity K. Pohl,1

  14. Tkalcic, H., D.S. Dreger, G.R. Foulger, B.R. Julian, A. Fichtner, A seismological portrait of the anomalous 1996 Bardarbunga volcano, Iceland, earthquake (invited poster), EOS Trans. AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl.,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    in the Global Centroid Moment Tensor catalog. An earthquake with Mw 5.6 and a strong non-double-couple radiation was recorded well by the regional-scale Iceland Hotspot Project seismic experiment. Several hypotheses were proposed to explain the seismically observed displacement field and the sequence of observed events

  15. Anomalous electro-optic effect in Sr0.6Ba0.4Nb2O6 single crystals and its application in two-dimensional laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalan, Venkatraman

    -dimensional laser scanning L. Tian, D. A. Scrymgeour, Alok Sharan, and Venkatraman Gopalana) Materials Research-optic effect that results in laser scanning along the polarization direction of strontium barium niobate (Sr0-charge fields. Based on this effect, two-dimensional scanning is demonstrated by using a combination of SBN:60

  16. Measurement of WZ production and searches for anomalous top quark decays and Higgs boson production using tri-lepton final states in ppbar collisions at ?s = 1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGivern, Carrie Lynne

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . 21 2-4 The new RunII central tracking system. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2-5 Silicon microstrip tracker. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2-6 (a) The uranium/liquid-argon electromagnetic, fine hadronic, and coarse.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 2-7 Uranium/liquid-argon plates configuration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 2-8 Expanded view of (a) the muon wire drift chambers and (b) the muon scintillation detectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 2...

  17. Anomalous Hall effect in a two-dimensional Dirac band: The link between the Kubo-Streda formula and the semiclassical Boltzmann equation approach RID B-5617-2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinitsyn, N. A.; MacDonald, A. H.; Jungwirth, T.; Dugaev, V. K.; Sinova, Jairo.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systematic but can be technically more difficult to implement and are often not physically transparent. Renewed interest in reaching consensus on a general theory of the AHE has been fueled in part by the realization of diluted magnetic semiconductor #1...

  18. Search for anomalous production of prompt same-sign lepton pairs and pair-produced doubly charged Higgs bosons with $\\sqrt{s} = 8$ TeV $pp$ collisions using the ATLAS detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ATLAS Collaboration

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-background inclusive search for new physics in events with same-sign dileptons is presented. The search uses proton-proton collisions corresponding to 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity taken in 2012 at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Pairs of isolated leptons with the same electric charge and large transverse momenta of the type $e^{\\pm}e^{\\pm}, e^{\\pm}\\mu^{\\pm}$, and $\\mu^{\\pm}\\mu^{\\pm}$ are selected and their invariant mass distribution is examined. No excess of events above the expected level of Standard Model background is found. The results are used to set upper limits on the cross-sections for processes beyond the Standard Model. Limits are placed as a function of the dilepton invariant mass within a fiducial region corresponding to the signal event selection criteria. Exclusion limits are also derived for a specific model of doubly charged Higgs boson production.

  19. A Meaurement of the W+- production cross section in p anti-p collisions at sqroot(s)=1.96 TeV in the DiLepton channel and limits on anomalous WWZ/gamma couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGivern, Dustin; /University Coll. London

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the production cross section of W{sup +}W{sup -} pairs in p{bar p} collisions at 1.96 TeV and limits on trilinear gauge boson coupling (TGC) parameters are presented. The data were recorded with the CDF experiment at Tevatron during the 2001 and 2002 data taking periods in which a total integrated luminosity of 184 pb{sup -1} was collected. The data sample was filtered for events with two leptonic w boson decays where the charged leptons can be either electrons or muons. 17 events are observed against an expected background of 5.0{sub -0.8}{sup +2.2} events. The resulting cross-section is found to be {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) = 14.5{sub -5.1}{sup +5.8}(stat){sub -3.0}{sup +1.8}(syst) {+-} 0.9(lum) pb and agrees well with the Standard Model expectation. Limits on the TGC parameters {Delta}{kappa} and {lambda} are set under both the equal coupling scheme, that assumes the W boson couples identically to the Z and {gamma}, and the HISZ coupling scheme, that requires the couplings to respect SU(2){sub L} x &(1){sub Y} gauge symmetry. In both cases this is achieved by using a likelihood fit to the lepton-P{sub T} distribution of the 17 candidate events. The resulting limits are found to be: -0.4 < {Delta}{kappa} < +0.6({lambda} = 0); -0.3 < {lambda} < +0.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) for the EQUAL couplings and -0.7 < {Delta}{kappa} < +0.9 ({lambda} = 0); -0.4 < {lambda} < +0.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) for the HISZ couplings.

  20. Final Technical Report for SBIR entitled Four-Dimensional Finite-Orbit-Width Fokker-Planck Code with Sources, for Neoclassical/Anomalous Transport Simulation of Ion and Electron Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, R. W. [CompX; Petrov, Yu. V. [CompX

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the US Department of Energy/Office of Fusion Energy magnetic fusion research program, there is an important whole-plasma-modeling need for a radio-frequency/neutral-beam-injection (RF/NBI) transport-oriented finite-difference Fokker-Planck (FP) code with combined capabilities for 4D (2R2V) geometry near the fusion plasma periphery, and computationally less demanding 3D (1R2V) bounce-averaged capabilities for plasma in the core of fusion devices. Demonstration of proof-of-principle achievement of this goal has been carried out in research carried out under Phase I of the SBIR award. Two DOE-sponsored codes, the CQL3D bounce-average Fokker-Planck code in which CompX has specialized, and the COGENT 4D, plasma edge-oriented Fokker-Planck code which has been constructed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory scientists, where coupled. Coupling was achieved by using CQL3D calculated velocity distributions including an energetic tail resulting from NBI, as boundary conditions for the COGENT code over the two-dimensional velocity space on a spatial interface (flux) surface at a given radius near the plasma periphery. The finite-orbit-width fast ions from the CQL3D distributions penetrated into the peripheral plasma modeled by the COGENT code. This combined code demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed 3D/4D code. By combining these codes, the greatest computational efficiency is achieved subject to present modeling needs in toroidally symmetric magnetic fusion devices. The more efficient 3D code can be used in its regions of applicability, coupled to the more computationally demanding 4D code in higher collisionality edge plasma regions where that extended capability is necessary for accurate representation of the plasma. More efficient code leads to greater use and utility of the model. An ancillary aim of the project is to make the combined 3D/4D code user friendly. Achievement of full-coupling of these two Fokker-Planck codes will advance computational modeling of plasma devices important to the USDOE magnetic fusion energy program, in particular the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics, San Diego, the NSTX spherical tokamak at Princeton, New Jersey, and the MST reversed-field-pinch Madison, Wisconsin. The validation studies of the code against the experiments will improve understanding of physics important for magnetic fusion, and will increase our design capabilities for achieving the goals of the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) project in which the US is a participant and which seeks to demonstrate at least a factor of five in fusion power production divided by input power.