National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for bcsb multiple-wavelength anomalous

  1. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION...

  2. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural...

  3. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural...

  4. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  5. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  6. Anomalous

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    impurity ion heating from Alfvénic cascade in the reversed field pinch Varun Tangri, P. W. Terry, and Gennady Fiksel Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas and Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA ͑Received 15 January 2008; accepted 19 September 2008; published online 3 November 2008͒ Anomalous ion and impurity heating in reversed field pinch plasmas is addressed. Previous work ͓N.

  7. Multiple-wavelength spectroscopic quantitation of light-absorbing species in scattering media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nathel, Howard; Cartland, Harry E.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Everett, Matthew J.; Roe, Jeffery N.

    2000-01-01

    An oxygen concentration measurement system for blood hemoglobin comprises a multiple-wavelength low-coherence optical light source that is coupled by single mode fibers through a splitter and combiner and focused on both a target tissue sample and a reference mirror. Reflections from both the reference mirror and from the depths of the target tissue sample are carried back and mixed to produce interference fringes in the splitter and combiner. The reference mirror is set such that the distance traversed in the reference path is the same as the distance traversed into and back from the target tissue sample at some depth in the sample that will provide light attenuation information that is dependent on the oxygen in blood hemoglobin in the target tissue sample. Two wavelengths of light are used to obtain concentrations. The method can be used to measure total hemoglobin concentration [Hb.sub.deoxy +Hb.sub.oxy ] or total blood volume in tissue and in conjunction with oxygen saturation measurements from pulse oximetry can be used to absolutely quantify oxyhemoglobin [HbO.sub.2 ] in tissue. The apparatus and method provide a general means for absolute quantitation of an absorber dispersed in a highly scattering medium.

  8. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  9. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  10. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  11. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  12. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  13. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  14. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  15. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  16. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE. Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured

  17. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  18. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  19. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  20. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  1. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator

  2. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator

  3. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.2 Beamline 5.0.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:35 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad

  4. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  5. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  6. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8.2.2 Beamline 8.2.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:54 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot

  7. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  8. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  9. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  10. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  11. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  12. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  13. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Beamline 8.2.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:54 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size

  14. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  15. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  16. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.2 Beamline 5.0.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:35 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with

  17. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Beamline 8.2.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:53 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) NOTE: AS OF MAY 2016, BEAMLINE 8.2.1 IS RESTRICTED TO MULTILAYER MODE UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE.

  18. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  19. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Beamline 8.2.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:54 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size

  20. Anomalous is ubiquitous

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2011-09-15

    Brownian motion is widely considered the quintessential model of diffusion processes-the most elemental random transport processes in Science and Engineering. Yet so, examples of diffusion processes displaying highly non-Brownian statistics-commonly termed 'Anomalous Diffusion' processes-are omnipresent both in the natural sciences and in engineered systems. The scientific interest in Anomalous Diffusion and its applications is growing exponentially in the recent years. In this Paper we review the key statistics of Anomalous Diffusion processes: sub-diffusion and super-diffusion, long-range dependence and the Joseph effect, Levy statistics and the Noah effect, and 1/f noise. We further present a theoretical model-generalizing the Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model-which provides a unified explanation for the prevalence of Anomalous Diffusion statistics. Our model shows that what is commonly perceived as 'anomalous' is in effect ubiquitous. - Highlights: > The article provides an overview of Anomalous Diffusion (AD) statistics. > The Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model is extended and generalized. > The generalized model universally generates AD statistics. > A unified 'universal macroscopic explanation' for AD statistics is established. > AD statistics are shown to be fundamentally connected to robustness.

  1. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  2. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion wemore » illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.« less

  3. Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor junctions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator ...

  4. Multiple wavelength photolithography for preparing multilayer microstructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dentinger, Paul Michael (Livermore, CA); Krafcik, Karen Lee (Livermore, CA)

    2003-06-24

    The invention relates to a multilayer microstructure and a method for preparing thereof. The method involves first applying a first photodefinable composition having a first exposure wavelength on a substrate to form a first polymeric layer. A portion of the first photodefinable composition is then exposed to electromagnetic radiation of the first exposure wavelength to form a first pattern in the first polymeric layer. After exposing the first polymeric layer, a second photodefinable composition having a second exposure wavelength is applied on the first polymeric layer to form a second polymeric layer. A portion of the second photodefinable composition is then exposed to electromagnetic radiation of the second exposure wavelength to form a second pattern in the second polymeric layer. In addition, a portion of each layer is removed according to the patterns to form a multilayer microstructure having a cavity having a shape that corresponds to the portions removed.

  5. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

  6. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focusing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points. 3 figs.

  7. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stix, Thomas H.; Ono, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  8. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  9. Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider We ...

  10. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators ...

  11. Anomalous spin precession and spin Hall effect in semiconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous spin precession and spin Hall effect in semiconductor quantum wells Title: Anomalous spin precession and spin Hall effect in semiconductor quantum wells Authors: Bi, ...

  12. The charmonium dissociation in an ''anomalous wind''

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-11

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and it qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmoniummore » color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. As a result, we speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.« less

  13. Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    junctions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor junctions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor junctions Authors: Ren, Jie ; Zhu, Jian-Xin Publication Date: 2013-04-15 OSTI Identifier: 1102080 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 16; Journal ID: ISSN

  14. Parametric probability distributions for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Foy, Bernard R; Wohlberg, Brendt E; Scovel, James C

    2010-01-01

    The problem of anomalous change detection arises when two (or possibly more) images are taken of the same scene, but at different times. The aim is to discount the 'pervasive differences' that occur thoughout the imagery, due to the inevitably different conditions under which the images were taken (caused, for instance, by differences in illumination, atmospheric conditions, sensor calibration, or misregistration), and to focus instead on the 'anomalous changes' that actually take place in the scene. In general, anomalous change detection algorithms attempt to model these normal or pervasive differences, based on data taken directly from the imagery, and then identify as anomalous those pixels for which the model does not hold. For many algorithms, these models are expressed in terms of probability distributions, and there is a class of such algorithms that assume the distributions are Gaussian. By considering a broader class of distributions, however, a new class of anomalous change detection algorithms can be developed. We consider several parametric families of such distributions, derive the associated change detection algorithms, and compare the performance with standard algorithms that are based on Gaussian distributions. We find that it is often possible to significantly outperform these standard algorithms, even using relatively simple non-Gaussian models.

  15. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for anomalous production of events with ...

  16. Total least squares for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Matsekh, Anna M

    2010-01-01

    A family of difference-based anomalous change detection algorithms is derived from a total least squares (TLSQ) framework. This provides an alternative to the well-known chronochrome algorithm, which is derived from ordinary least squares. In both cases, the most anomalous changes are identified with the pixels that exhibit the largest residuals with respect to the regression of the two images against each other. The family of TLSQ-based anomalous change detectors is shown to be equivalent to the subspace RX formulation for straight anomaly detection, but applied to the stacked space. However, this family is not invariant to linear coordinate transforms. On the other hand, whitened TLSQ is coordinate invariant, and furthermore it is shown to be equivalent to the optimized covariance equalization algorithm. What whitened TLSQ offers, in addition to connecting with a common language the derivations of two of the most popular anomalous change detection algorithms - chronochrome and covariance equalization - is a generalization of these algorithms with the potential for better performance.

  17. Method for identifying anomalous terrestrial heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, Nancy Kerr

    1977-01-25

    A method for locating and mapping the magnitude and extent of terrestrial heat-flow anomalies from 5 to 50 times average with a tenfold improved sensitivity over orthodox applications of aerial temperature-sensing surveys as used for geothermal reconnaissance. The method remotely senses surface temperature anomalies such as occur from geothermal resources or oxidizing ore bodies by: measuring the spectral, spatial, statistical, thermal, and temporal features characterizing infrared radiation emitted by natural terrestrial surfaces; deriving from these measurements the true surface temperature with uncertainties as small as 0.05 to 0.5 K; removing effects related to natural temperature variations of topographic, hydrologic, or meteoric origin, the surface composition, detector noise, and atmospheric conditions; factoring out the ambient normal-surface temperature for non-thermally enhanced areas surveyed under otherwise identical environmental conditions; distinguishing significant residual temperature enhancements characteristic of anomalous heat flows and mapping the extent and magnitude of anomalous heat flows where they occur.

  18. Anomalous Charge Transport in Disordered Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muniandy, S. V.; Woon, K. L.; Choo, K. Y.

    2011-03-30

    Anomalous charge carrier transport in disordered organic semiconductors is studied using fractional differential equations. The connection between index of fractional derivative and dispersion exponent is examined from the perspective of fractional Fokker-Planck equation and its link to the continuous time random walk formalism. The fractional model is used to describe the bi-scaling power-laws observed in the time-of flight photo-current transient data for two different types of organic semiconductors.

  19. Anomalous Zeeman response of the coexisting superconducting and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    s -wave pairing in ferropnictide superconductors Title: Anomalous Zeeman response of ... s -wave pairing in ferropnictide superconductors Authors: Ghaemi, Pouyan ; Vishwanath, ...

  20. Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of protons in nanoconfined water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water Deep inelastic neutron ...

  1. The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: The...

  2. Engineering quantum anomalous/valley Hall states in graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Engineering quantum anomalousvalley Hall states in graphene via metal-atom adsorption: An ab-initio study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Engineering quantum anomalous...

  3. Anomalous dimensions of the double parton fragmentation functions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Anomalous dimensions of the double parton fragmentation functions Authors: Fleming, Sean ; Leibovich, Adam K. ; Mehen, Thomas ; Rothstein, Ira Z. Publication Date: ...

  4. Phase-space jets drive transport and anomalous resistivity (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transport and anomalous resistivity In the presence of wave dissipation, phase-space structures spontaneously emerge in nonlinear Vlasov dynamics. These structures include not only...

  5. Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volcanic region, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the...

  6. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-03-03

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I. Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has expanded beyond ICF-related laser-plasma interactions to encompass closely related technical areas including laser particle acceleration, high-intensity laser effects, short­ pulse laser interactions, PIC and Vlasov/rad-hydro modeling, inertial and magnetic fusion plasmas, advanced plasma diagnostics, alternate ignition schemes, EOS/transport/opacity, and this year, x­ ray free-electron lasers and their applications. The conference continues to be a showcase for the presentation and discussion of the latest developments in these areas. II. Meeting Report The conference was extremely successful with more than one hundred participants. There were ninety-nine (99) abstracts submitted. There were forty-four (44) presentations including eleven (11) invited talks. The following topics were covered: a) Radiation Hydrodynamics b) Implosion Plasma Kinetic Effects c) Alternate Ignition Schemes d) Astrophysical Phenomena e) Opacity/Transport/EOS f) High Power Lasers and Facilities g) High-Intensity Laser-Matter Interactions h) Hydrodynamics and Hydro-instabilities i) Hot Dense Plasma Atomic Processes j) High Energy Density Physics k) Laser Particle Acceleration Physics l) Advanced Plasma Diagnostics m) Advanced light sources and applications Despite significant advertising, there were two students who applied for the travel grants: Charlie Jarrott and Joohwan Kim. The total funds expended were $3,216.14.

  7. Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxygen distance in supercondu...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxygen distance in superconducting cuprate bilayers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxy...

  8. Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Settlemyer, Bradley W; Hodson, Stephen W; Kuehn, Jeffery A; Poole, Stephen W

    2011-04-01

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnec- tion networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; how- ever, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to under- stand anomalous network performance. Our tool, Confidence, instead uses an empirically derived probability distribution to characterize network performance. In this paper we describe several instances where the Confidence toolkit allowed us to understand and diagnose network performance anomalies that we could not adequately explore with the simple summary statis- tics provided by traditional measurement tools. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  9. NLO BFKL and anomalous dimensions of light-ray operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balitsky, Ian

    2013-05-01

    This presentation covers: Regge limit in the coordinate space; BFKL representation of 4-point correlation function in N = 4 SYM; light-ray operators; DGLAP representation of 4-point correlation function; and anomalous dimensions from DGAP vs BFKL representations.

  10. Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling in an open ballistic bismuth nanocavity Home Author: B. Hackens, J. P. Minet, S. Faniel, G. Farhi, C. Gustin, J. P....

  11. Apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Wilde, Tyson; Barlow, Jonathan S.

    2010-04-13

    A method of responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a bore hole comprises detecting the anomalous change in downhole pressure, sending a signal along the segmented electromagnetic transmission path, receiving the signal, and performing a automated response. The anomalous change in downhole pressure is detected at a first location along a segmented electromagnetic transmission path, and the segmented electromagnetic transmission path is integrated into the tool string. The signal is received by at least one receiver in communication with the segmented electromagnetic transmission path. The automated response is performed along the tool string. Disclosed is an apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a downhole tool string, comprising a segmented electromagnetic transmission path connecting one or more receivers and at least one pressure sensor.

  12. Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene Authors: Qiao, Zhenhua ; Jiang, Hua ; Li, Xiao ; Yao, Yugui ; Niu, Qian Publication Date: 2012-03-27 OSTI Identifier: 1098600 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 85; Journal Issue: 11; Journal ID: ISSN 1098-0121

  13. Anomalous dimensions of the double parton fragmentation functions (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Anomalous dimensions of the double parton fragmentation functions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous dimensions of the double parton fragmentation functions Authors: Fleming, Sean ; Leibovich, Adam K. ; Mehen, Thomas ; Rothstein, Ira Z. Publication Date: 2013-04-23 OSTI Identifier: 1102128 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 87; Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN

  14. Anomalous negative electrocaloric effect in a relaxor/normal ferroelectric

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    polymer blend with controlled nano- and meso-dipolar couplings (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Anomalous negative electrocaloric effect in a relaxor/normal ferroelectric polymer blend with controlled nano- and meso-dipolar couplings Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on April 5, 2017 Title: Anomalous negative electrocaloric effect in a relaxor/normal ferroelectric polymer blend with controlled nano- and meso-dipolar couplings Authors: Qian,

  15. CP violating anomalous top-quark couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Sudhir Kumar; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Valencia, G.

    2009-08-01

    We study the T odd correlations induced by CP violating anomalous top-quark couplings at both production and decay level in the process gg{yields}tt{yields}(b{mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}})(b{mu}{sup -}{nu}{sub {mu}}). We consider several counting asymmetries at the parton level and find the ones with the most sensitivity to each of these anomalous couplings at the LHC.

  16. Simulation framework for spatio-spectral anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Harvey, Neal R; Porter, Reid B; Wohlberg, Brendt E

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a simulation framework for anomalous change detection that considers both the spatial and spectral aspects of the imagery. A purely spectral framework has previously been introduced, but the extension to spatio-spectral requires attention to a variety of new issues, and requires more careful modeling of the anomalous changes. Using this extended framework, they evaluate the utility of spatial image processing operators to enhance change detection sensitivity in (simulated) remote sensing imagery.

  17. Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taner, M. Turhan

    2006-01-03

    A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

  18. Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and

  19. Top quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider Authors: Devetak, Erik ; Nomerotski, Andrei ; Peskin, Michael Publication Date: 2011-08-17 OSTI Identifier: 1100572 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 84; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1550-7998 Publisher:

  20. Neutron diffraction study and anomalous negative thermal expansion in

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    non-superconducting PrFe1-xRuxAsO (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Neutron diffraction study and anomalous negative thermal expansion in non-superconducting PrFe1-xRuxAsO Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Neutron diffraction study and anomalous negative thermal expansion in non-superconducting PrFe1-xRuxAsO Neutron powder diraction has been used to investigate the structural and magnetic behavior of the isoelectronically doped Fe pnictide material PrFe1-xRuxAsO. Substitution of

  1. Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider We present a study of the experimental determination of the forward-backward asymmetry in the process e{sup +}e{sup -} {yields} t{bar t} and in the subsequent t {yields} Wb decay, studied in the context of the International Linear Collider. This process probes the elementary couplings of the top

  2. Anomalous fast ion losses at high β on the tokamak fusion test...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous fast ion losses at high on the tokamak fusion test reactor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous fast ion losses at high on the tokamak fusion test ...

  3. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene ...

  4. Effective field theory: A modern approach to anomalous couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degrande, Cline; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Universit Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve ; Greiner, Nicolas; Max-Planck-Institut fr Physik, Fhringer Ring 6, 80805 Mnchen ; Kilian, Wolfgang; University of Siegen, Fachbereich Physik, D-57068 Siegen ; Mattelaer, Olivier; Mebane, Harrison; Stelzer, Tim; Willenbrock, Scott; Zhang, Cen; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Universit Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve

    2013-08-15

    We advocate an effective field theory approach to anomalous couplings. The effective field theory approach is the natural way to extend the standard model such that the gauge symmetries are respected. It is general enough to capture any physics beyond the standard model, yet also provides guidance as to the most likely place to see the effects of new physics. The effective field theory approach also clarifies that one need not be concerned with the violation of unitarity in scattering processes at high energy. We apply these ideas to pair production of electroweak vector bosons. -- Highlights: We discuss the advantages of effective field theories compared to anomalous couplings. We show that one need not be concerned with unitarity violation at high energy. We discuss the application of effective field theory to weak boson physics.

  5. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Note: This Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset differs from the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359411.975000 m Bottom: 4447521.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  6. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Note: This Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset differs from the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  7. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Note: This Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset differs from the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset. Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies). Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144825.235807 m Left: 285446.256851 m Right: 350577.338852 m Bottom: 4096962.250137 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  8. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Note: This Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset differs from the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  9. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolores County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Note: This Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset differs from the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  10. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Note: This Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset differs from the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1? and 2? above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2? temperatures contained in the Anomalous Surface Temperature dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1? and 2? were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4442180.552290 m Left: 268655.053363 m Right: 359915.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  11. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Beamline 8.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:55 Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural...

  12. Beamline 4.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4.2.2 Print Molecular Biology Consortium Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL...

  13. Anomalous magnetic behavior at the graphene/Co interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, Sumit; Saha, Shyamal K., E-mail: cnssks@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-07-14

    An intensive theoretical study on the interaction between graphene and transition metal atom has been carried out; however, its experimental verification is still lacking. To explore the theoretical prediction of antiferromagnetic coupling due to charge transfer between graphene and cobalt, epitaxial layer of cobalt is grown on graphene surface. Predicted antiferromagnetic interaction with Neel temperature (T{sub N}???32?K) which anomalously shifts to higher temperature (34?K) and becomes more prominent under application of magnetic field of 1 T is reported. Lowering of magnetoresistance as a consequence of this antiferromagnetic coupling at the interface is also observed.

  14. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in topological insulator memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Tan, S. G.; Siu, Z. B.

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in a magnetically coupled three-dimensional-topological insulator (3D-TI) system. We apply the generalized spin-orbit coupling Hamiltonian to obtain the Hall conductivity ?{sup xy} of the system. The underlying topology of the QAHE phenomenon is then analyzed to show the quantization of ?{sup xy} and its relation to the Berry phase of the system. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of utilizing ?{sup xy} as a memory read-out in a 3D-TI based memory at finite temperatures, with comparison to known magnetically doped 3D-TIs.

  15. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure. In this study, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises from the interplay of spin-orbit interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a

  16. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    photon at the Tevatron (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron We present results of a search for the anomalous production of events containing a high-transverse momentum charged lepton ({ell}, either e or {mu}) and photon ({gamma}),

  17. Crowding and Anomalous Capacitance at an Electrode–Ionic Liquid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Crowding and Anomalous Capacitance at an ElectrodeIonic Liquid Interface Observed Using Operando X-ray Scattering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Crowding and ...

  18. Measuring anomalous couplings in H→WW* decays at the International...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Measuring anomalous couplings in HWW* decays at the International Linear Collider Authors: Takubo, Yosuke ; Hodgkinson, Robert N. ; Ikematsu, Katsumasa ; Fujii, Keisuke ; ...

  19. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bestwick, A. J.; Fox, E. J.; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  20. Sensor fusion and nonlinear prediction for anomalous event detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, J.V.; Moore, K.R.; Elphic, R.C.

    1995-03-07

    The authors consider the problem of using the information from various time series, each one characterizing a different physical quantity, to predict the future state of the system and, based on that information, to detect and classify anomalous events. They stress the application of principal components analysis (PCA) to analyze and combine data from different sensors. They construct both linear and nonlinear predictors. In particular, for linear prediction the authors use the least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm and for nonlinear prediction they use both backpropagation (BP) networks and fuzzy predictors (FP). As an application, they consider the prediction of gamma counts from past values of electron and gamma counts recorded by the instruments of a high altitude satellite.

  1. Reduced Lorenz models for anomalous transport and profile resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rypdal, K.; Garcia, O. E.

    2007-02-15

    The physical basis for the Lorenz equations for convective cells in stratified fluids, and for magnetized plasmas imbedded in curved magnetic fields, are reexamined with emphasis on anomalous transport. It is shown that the Galerkin truncation leading to the Lorenz equations for the closed boundary problem is incompatible with finite fluxes through the system in the limit of vanishing diffusion. An alternative formulation leading to the Lorenz equations is proposed, invoking open boundaries and the notion of convective streamers and their back-reaction on the profile gradient, giving rise to resilience of the profile. Particular emphasis is put on the diffusionless limit, where these equations reduce to a simple dynamical system depending only on one single forcing parameter. This model is studied numerically, stressing experimentally observable signatures, and some of the perils of dimension-reducing approximations are discussed.

  2. Metal-to-insulator switching in quantum anomalous Hall states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Jing; Fan, Yabin; Choi, Eun Sang; Lee, Wei -Li; Nie, Tianxiao; Murata, Koichi; Shao, Qiming; Zhang, Shou -Cheng; et al

    2015-10-07

    After decades of searching for the dissipationless transport in the absence of any external magnetic field, quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) was recently achieved in magnetic topological insulator films. However, the universal phase diagram of QAHE and its relation with quantum Hall effect (QHE) remain to be investigated. Here, we report the experimental observation of the giant longitudinal resistance peak and zero Hall conductance plateau at the coercive field in the six quintuple-layer (Cr0.12Bi0.26Sb0.62)2Te3 film, and demonstrate the metal-to-insulator switching between two opposite QAHE plateau states up to 0.3 K. Moreover, the universal QAHE phase diagram is confirmed through themore » angle-dependent measurements. Our results address that the quantum phase transitions in both QAHE and QHE regimes are in the same universality class, yet the microscopic details are different. Additionally, the realization of the QAHE insulating state unveils new ways to explore quantum phase-related physics and applications.« less

  3. Metal-to-insulator switching in quantum anomalous Hall states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Jing; Fan, Yabin; Choi, Eun Sang; Lee, Wei -Li; Nie, Tianxiao; Murata, Koichi; Shao, Qiming; Zhang, Shou -Cheng; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-10-07

    After decades of searching for the dissipationless transport in the absence of any external magnetic field, quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) was recently achieved in magnetic topological insulator films. However, the universal phase diagram of QAHE and its relation with quantum Hall effect (QHE) remain to be investigated. Here, we report the experimental observation of the giant longitudinal resistance peak and zero Hall conductance plateau at the coercive field in the six quintuple-layer (Cr0.12Bi0.26Sb0.62)2Te3 film, and demonstrate the metal-to-insulator switching between two opposite QAHE plateau states up to 0.3 K. Moreover, the universal QAHE phase diagram is confirmed through the angle-dependent measurements. Our results address that the quantum phase transitions in both QAHE and QHE regimes are in the same universality class, yet the microscopic details are different. Additionally, the realization of the QAHE insulating state unveils new ways to explore quantum phase-related physics and applications.

  4. Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea Volcano...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    down rift. The anomalously high b-values at the center of the South Flank, several kilometers away from the rift, may be explained by unusually high pore pressure throughout the...

  5. Violations of Lorentz invariance in the neutrino sector: an improved analysis of anomalous threshold constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maccione, Luca; Liberati, Stefano; Mattingly, David M. E-mail: liberati@sissa.it

    2013-03-01

    Recently there has been a renewed activity in the physics of violations of Lorentz invariance in the neutrino sector. Flavor dependent Lorentz violation, which generically changes the pattern of neutrino oscillations, is extremely tightly constrained by oscillation experiments. Flavor independent Lorentz violation, which does not introduce new oscillation phenomena, is much more weakly constrained with constraints coming from time of flight and anomalous threshold analyses. We use a simplified rotationally invariant model to investigate the effects of finite baselines and energy dependent dispersion on anomalous reaction rates in long baseline experiments and show numerically that anomalous reactions do not necessarily cut off the spectrum quite as sharply as currently assumed. We also present a revised analysis of how anomalous reactions can be used to cast constraints from the observed atmospheric high energy neutrinos and the expected cosmogenic ones.

  6. Engineering quantum anomalous/valley Hall states in graphene via metal-atom

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    adsorption: An ab-initio study (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Engineering quantum anomalous/valley Hall states in graphene via metal-atom adsorption: An ab-initio study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Engineering quantum anomalous/valley Hall states in graphene via metal-atom adsorption: An ab-initio study Authors: Ding, Jun ; Qiao, Zhenhua ; Feng, Wanxiang ; Yao, Yugui ; Niu, Qian Publication Date: 2011-11-15 OSTI Identifier: 1101181 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript

  7. Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water Deep inelastic neutron scattering provides a means of directly and accurately measuring the momentum distribution of protons in water, which is determined primarily by the proton ground-state wave function.We find that in water confined on scales of 20 A, this wave

  8. Measuring anomalous couplings in H→WW* decays at the International Linear

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Collider (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Measuring anomalous couplings in H→WW* decays at the International Linear Collider Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Measuring anomalous couplings in H→WW* decays at the International Linear Collider Authors: Takubo, Yosuke ; Hodgkinson, Robert N. ; Ikematsu, Katsumasa ; Fujii, Keisuke ; Okada, Nobuchika ; Yamamoto, Hitoshi Publication Date: 2013-07-18 OSTI Identifier: 1103733 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name:

  9. Structure solution with weak anomalous data (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Structure solution with weak anomalous data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structure solution with weak anomalous data Authors: Terwilliger, Thomas C. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory Publication Date: 2014-10-21 OSTI Identifier: 1133759 Report Number(s): LA-UR-14-24209 DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sponsoring Org: NIH Country of Publication: United

  10. Anomalous Dimensions and Non-Gaussianity (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Anomalous Dimensions and Non-Gaussianity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous Dimensions and Non-Gaussianity Authors: Green, Daniel ; Lewandowski, Matthew ; Senatore, Leonardo ; Silverstein, Eva ; Zaldarriaga, Matias Publication Date: 2013-02-21 OSTI Identifier: 1063787 Report Number(s): SLAC-PUB-15334 arXiv:1301.2630 DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: arXiv:1301.2630 Research Org: SLAC National

  11. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators Authors: Wang, Z. F. ; Liu, Zheng ; Liu, Feng Publication Date: 2013-05-06 OSTI Identifier: 1102216 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review Letters Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 110; Journal Issue: 19; Journal ID: ISSN 0031-9007 Publisher:

  12. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene Authors: Tse, Wang-Kong ; Qiao, Zhenhua ; Yao, Yugui ; MacDonald, A. H. ; Niu, Qian Publication Date: 2011-04-26 OSTI Identifier: 1100329 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 83; Journal Issue: 15; Journal ID:

  13. Scattering universality classes of side jump in the anomalous Hall effect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Scattering universality classes of side jump in the anomalous Hall effect Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scattering universality classes of side jump in the anomalous Hall effect Authors: Yang, Shengyuan A. ; Pan, Hui ; Yao, Yugui ; Niu, Qian Publication Date: 2011-03-31 OSTI Identifier: 1100161 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 83; Journal Issue: 12; Journal

  14. Impact of anomalous dispersion on the interferometer measurements of plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2004-12-16

    For many decades optical interferometers have been used to measure the electron density of plasmas. During the last ten years X-ray lasers in the wavelength range 14 to 47 nm have enabled researchers to use interferometers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes that the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index of refraction less than one and the electron density proportional to the number of fringe shifts. Recent experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one and made us question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction. Recent calculations showed how the anomalous dispersion from the bound electrons can dominate the index of refraction in many types of plasma and make the index greater than one or enhance the index such that one would greatly overestimate the electron density of the plasma using interferometers. In this work we calculate the index of refraction of C, Al, Ti, and Pd plasmas for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV (12.4 nm) using a new average-atom code. The results show large variations from the free electron approximation under many different plasma conditions. We validate the average-atom code against the more detailed OPAL code for carbon and aluminum plasmas. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  15. Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-Doped

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High-TcSuperconductor (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-Doped High-TcSuperconductor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-Doped High-TcSuperconductor We report the discovery of a self-doped multilayer high Tcsuperconductor Ba2Ca3Cu4O8F2 (F0234) which contains distinctly differentsuperconducting gap magnitudes along its two Fermi-surface sheets. Whileformal valence counting would

  16. Enhanced anomalous photo-absorption from TiO{sub 2} nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solanki, Vanaraj; Majumder, Subrata; Mishra, Indrani; Varma, Shikha; Dash, P.; Singh, C.; Kanjilal, D.

    2014-03-28

    Two dimensional nanostructures have been created on the rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) surfaces via ion irradiation technique. Enhanced anomalous photo- absorption response is displayed, where nanostructures of 15?nm diameter with 0.5?nm height, and not the smaller nanostructures with larger surface area, delineate highest absorbance. Comprehensive investigations of oxygen vacancy states, on ion- irradiated surfaces, display a remarkable result that the number of vacancies saturates for higher fluences. A competition between the number of vacancy sites on the nanostructure in conjunction with its size is responsible for the observed anomalous photo-absorption.

  17. Determination of the polarization state of x rays with the help of anomalous transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, K. S. Uschmann, I.; Frster, E.; Marx, B.; Paulus, G. G.; Sthlker, T.

    2014-04-14

    Besides intensity and direction, the polarization of an electromagnetic wave provides characteristic information on the crossed medium. Here, we present two methods for the determination of the polarization state of x rays by polarizers based on anomalous transmission (Borrmann effect). Using a polarizer-analyzer setup, we have measured a polarization purity of less than 1.5??10{sup ?5}, three orders of magnitude better than obtained in earlier work. Using the analyzer crystal in multiple-beam case with slightly detuned azimuth, we show how the first three Stokes parameters can be determined with a single angular scan. Thus, polarization analyzers based on anomalous transmission make it possible to detect changes of the polarization in a range from degrees down to arcseconds.

  18. Measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry with 9 fb? of pp? collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2011-09-16

    We present an updated measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry Absl for semileptonic b-hadron decays in 9.0 fb? of pp? collisions recorded with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of ?s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We obtain Absl=(-0.7870.172(stat)0.093(syst))%. This result differs by 3.9 standard deviations from the prediction of the standard model and provides evidence for anomalously large CP violation in semileptonic neutral B decay. The dependence of the asymmetry on the muon impact parameter is consistent with the hypothesis that it originates from semileptonic b-hadron decays.

  19. A spin-filter made of quantum anomalous Hall insulator nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jiansheng

    2014-07-28

    Topological end states (TES) in quantum anomalous Hall insulator nanowires can induce tunneling within the gap. Such TES are spin polarized, thus the induced current is spin polarized as well, which can be used to construct a spin-filter applied in spintronics. An interferometry device is designed to control the polarized current as well. The advantage and finite size effect on this system are discussed.

  20. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in electron-temperature-gradient-modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaqub Khan, M.; Iqbal, J.; Ul Haq, A.

    2014-05-15

    Due to the interconnection of entropy with temperature and density of plasma, it would be interesting to investigate plasma related phenomena with respect to entropy. By employing Braginskii transport equations, it is proved that entropy is proportional to a function of potential and distribution function of entropy is re-defined, ∇S–drift in obtained. New dispersion relation is derived; it is found that the anomalous transport depends on the gradient of the entropy.

  1. COMMENTS ON ANOMALOUS EFFECTS IN CHARGING OF PD POWDERS WITH HIGH DENSITY HYDROGEN ISOTOPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanahan, K.

    2009-10-01

    In Kitamura, et al, Pd-containing materials are exposed to isotopes of hydrogen and anomalous results obtained. These are claimed to be a replication of another experiment conducted by Arata and Zhang. Erroneous basic assumptions are pointed out herein that alter the derived conclusions significantly. The final conclusion is that the reported results are likely normal chemistry combined with noise. Thus the claim to have proven that cold fusion is occurring in these systems is both premature and unlikely.

  2. Critical review of theoretical models for anomalous effects in deuterated metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chechin, V.A.; Tsarev, V.A. ); Rabinowitz, M. ); Kim, Y.E. )

    1994-03-01

    The authors briefly summarize the reported anomalous effects in deuterated metals at ambient temperature commonly known as [open quotes]cold fusion[close quotes] (CF) with an emphasis on the latest experiments, as well as the theoretical basis for the opposition to interpreting them as cold fusion. Then they critically examine more than 25 theoretical models for CF, including unusual nuclear and exotic chemical hypotheses. They conclude that they do not explain the data.

  3. The measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon at Fermilab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Logashenko, I.

    2015-06-17

    The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon is one of the most precisely measured quantities in experimental particle physics. Its latest measurement at Brookhaven National Laboratory deviates from the Standard Model expectation by approximately 3.5 standard deviations. The goal of the new experiment, E989, now under construction at Fermilab, is a fourfold improvement in precision. Furthermore, we discuss the details of the future measurement and its current status.

  4. Fingerprints of anomalous primordial Universe on the abundance of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baghram, Shant; Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein E-mail: abolhasani@ipm.ir E-mail: MohammadHossein.Namjoo@utdallas.edu

    2014-12-01

    We study the predictions of anomalous inflationary models on the abundance of structures in large scale structure observations. The anomalous features encoded in primordial curvature perturbation power spectrum are (a): localized feature in momentum space, (b): hemispherical asymmetry and (c): statistical anisotropies. We present a model-independent expression relating the number density of structures to the changes in the matter density variance. Models with localized feature can alleviate the tension between observations and numerical simulations of cold dark matter structures on galactic scales as a possible solution to the missing satellite problem. In models with hemispherical asymmetry we show that the abundance of structures becomes asymmetric depending on the direction of observation to sky. In addition, we study the effects of scale-dependent dipole amplitude on the abundance of structures. Using the quasars data and adopting the power-law scaling k{sup n{sub A}-1} for the amplitude of dipole we find the upper bound n{sub A}<0.6 for the spectral index of the dipole asymmetry. In all cases there is a critical mass scale M{sub c} in which for MM{sub c}) the enhancement in variance induced from anomalous feature decreases (increases) the abundance of dark matter structures in Universe.

  5. Uncorrelated versus independent elliptically-contoured distributions for anomalous change detection in hyperspectral imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Scovel, James C

    2008-01-01

    The detection of actual changes in a pair of images is confounded by the inadvertent but pervasive differences that inevitably arise whenever two pictures are taken of the same scene, but at different times and under different conditions. These differences include effects due to illumination, calibration, misregistration, etc. If the actual changes are assumed to be rare, then one can 'learn' what the pervasive differences are, and can identify the deviations from this pattern as the anomalous changes. A recently proposed framework for anomalous change detection recasts the problem as one of binary classification between pixel pairs in the data and pixel pairs that are independently chosen from the two images. When an elliptically-contoured (EC) distribution is assumed for the data, then analytical expressions can be derived for the measure of anomalousness of change. However, these expression are only available for a limited class of EC distributions. By replacing independent pixel pairs with uncorrelated pixel pairs, an approximate solution can be found for a much broader class of EC distributions. The performance of this approximation is investigated analytically and empirically, and includes experiments comparing the detection of real changes in real data.

  6. The apparent anomalous, weak, long-range acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.D.; Lau, E.L.; Turyshev, S.G.; Laing, P.A.; Liu, A.S.; Nieto, M.M.

    1999-07-01

    Recently the authors reported that radio Doppler data generated by NASA`s Deep Space Network (DSN) with the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft indicate an apparent anomalous, constant, spacecraft acceleration with a magnitude {approximately}8.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm s{sup {minus}2}, directed towards the Sun. Analysis of similar Doppler and ranging data from the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft yielded ambiguous results for the anomalous acceleration, but the analysis was useful in that it ruled out the possibility of a systematic error in the DSN Doppler system that could easily be mistaken as a spacecraft acceleration. Here they present some new results, including a critique of the suggestion that the anomalous acceleration could be caused by collimated thermal emission. Based on upgraded JPL software for the Pioneer 10 orbit determination, and on a new data interval from January 1987 to July 1998, their best estimate of the average Pioneer 10 acceleration directed towards the Sun is 7.20 {sup {minus}} 0.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm s{sup {minus}2}.

  7. Beamline 4.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 4.2.2 Beamline 4.2.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:31 Molecular Biology Consortium Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography...

  8. Detection of Anomalous Gamma-Ray Spectra for On-Site Inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Pfund, David M.

    2009-05-29

    This work aims to solve some of the technical and logistical challenges inherent in performing On Site Inspection activities under the authority of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Inspectors require equipment that can reliably identify the radionuclide signatures of nuclear test explosions amid a background of environmental contamination. Detection of these radiation anomalies by mobile search teams in the air or on the ground can narrow the search field and target specific areas for more detailed inspection or sampling. The need to protect confidential information of the inspected State Party, especially regarding past nuclear testing activities, suggests that full access to measured gamma-ray spectra should be limited. Spectral blinding techniques---in which only a fraction of the information derived from the spectra is displayed and stored---have the potential to meet the needs of both the OSI team and the State Party. In this paper, we describe one such algorithm that we have developed for identifying anomalous spectra from handheld, mobile, or aerial sensors. The algorithm avoids potential sensitivities by reducing the gamma-ray spectrum into a single number that is displayed and stored. A high value indicates that the spectrum is anomalous. The proposed technique does not rely on identifying specific radionuclides, operates well in the presence of high background variability, and can be configured to ignore specific spectral components. In previous work, the algorithm has proven very effective in classifying gamma-ray spectra as anomalous or not, even with poor statistical information. We performed a limited simulation of an airborne search scenario to demonstrate the potential algorithm for OSI missions. The technique successfully detected an injected source of interest whose count rate was an order of magnitude below background levels. We also configured the algorithm to ignore 137Cs as irrelevant to the mission. The resulting alarm metrics were unaffected by the presence of injected 137Cs contamination.

  9. Decaying neutralino dark matter in anomalous U(1){sub H} models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sierra, D. Aristizabal; Restrepo, D.; Zapata, Oscar

    2009-09-01

    In supersymmetric models extended with an anomalous U(1){sub H} different R-parity violating couplings can yield an unstable neutralino. We show that in this context astrophysical and cosmological constraints on neutralino decaying dark matter forbid bilinear R-parity breaking neutralino decays and lead to a class of purely trilinear R-parity violating scenarios in which the neutralino is stable on cosmological scales. We have found that among the resulting models some of them become suitable to explain the observed anomalies in cosmic-ray electron/positron fluxes.

  10. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Hg_1-yMn_yTe Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The quantum Hall effect is usually observed when the two-dimensional electron gas is subjected to an external magnetic field, so that their quantum states form Landau levels. In this work we predict that a new phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, can be realized in Hg{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}Te quantum wells, without the external magnetic field and the associated Landau levels. This effect arises purely from the spin polarization of the Mn atoms, and the quantized Hall conductance is predicted for a range of quantum well thickness and the concentration of the Mn atoms. This effect enables dissipationless charge current in spintronics devices.

  11. Spin-fluctuation mechanism of anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in itinerant magnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhuravlev, I. A.; Antropov, V. P.; Belashchenko, K. D.

    2015-11-16

    The origins of the anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys are elucidated using first-principles calculations within the disordered local moment model. Excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained. The anomalies are associated with the changes in band occupations due to Stoner-like band shifts and with the selective suppression of spin-orbit “hot spots” by thermal spin fluctuations. Under certain conditions, the anisotropy can increase, rather than decrease, with decreasing magnetization. These peculiar electronic mechanisms are in stark contrast to the assumptions of the existing models.

  12. Anomalous deflection of a charged-particle beam by bent crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taratin, A.M.; Vorobev, S.A.

    1986-05-01

    Using computer simulations of particle trajectory, a deflection of part of the beam in the direction opposite to the curvature is discovered for charged particles passing through a bent crystal. The passage of a proton beam of energy E(0) = 1 GeV through a curved silicon single crystal is considered, and only particles that move through the single crystal in a quasi-channel mode are deflected. It is suggested that the observed anomalous deflection can be used to deflect beams of high energy charged particles through angles that are tens of times greater than the critical angle for channeling, with application to experimental nuclear physics. 6 references.

  13. Photon equation of motion with application to the electron's anomalous magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, A B

    2007-12-06

    The photon equation of motion previously applied to the Lamb shift is here applied to the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron. Exact agreement is obtained with the QED result of Schwinger. The photon theory treats the radiative correction to the photon in the presence of the electron rather than its inverse as in standard QED. The result is found to be first-order in the photon-electron interaction rather than second-order as in standard QED, introducing an ease of calculation hitherto unavailable.

  14. Anomalous complete opaqueness in a sparse array of gold nanoparticle chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai Benfeng; Li Xiaowei; Vartiainen, Ismo; Lehmuskero, Anni; Turunen, Jari; Kuittinen, Markku; Vahimaa, Pasi; Kang Guoguo

    2011-08-22

    We report on an anomalous polarization-switching extinction effect in a sparse array of gold nanoparticle chains: under normal incidence of light, the array is almost transparent for one polarization; whereas it is fully opaque (with nearly zero transmittance) for the orthogonal polarization within a narrow band, even though the nanoparticles cover only a tiny fraction (say, 3.5%) of the transparent substrate surface. We reveal that the strong polarization-dependent short-range dipolar coupling and long-range radiative coupling of gold nanoparticles in this highly asymmetric array is responsible for this extraordinary effect.

  15. Hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blum, Thomas; Chowdhury, Saumitra; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku

    2015-01-07

    The form factor that yields the light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment is computed in lattice QCD+QED and QED. A non-perturbative treatment of QED is used and is checked against perturbation theory. The hadronic contribution is calculated for unphysical quark and muon masses, and only the diagram with a single quark loop is computed. Statistically significant signals are obtained. Initial results appear promising, and the prospect for a complete calculation with physical masses and controlled errors is discussed.

  16. Electron Anomalous Magnetic Moment in Basis Light-Front Quantization Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xingbo; Honkanen, Heli; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We apply the Basis Light-Front Quantization (BLFQ) approach to the Hamiltonian field theory of Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) in free space. We solve for the mass eigenstates corresponding to an electron interacting with a single photon in light-front gauge. Based on the resulting non-perturbative ground state light-front amplitude we evaluate the electron anomalous magnetic moment. The numerical results from extrapolating to the infinite basis limit reproduce the perturbative Schwinger result with relative deviation less than 1.2%. We report significant improvements over previous works including the development of analytic methods for evaluating the vertex matrix elements of QED.

  17. Real-time detection and classification of anomalous events in streaming data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Goodall, John R.; Iannacone, Michael D.; Laska, Jason A.; Harrison, Lane T.

    2016-04-19

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The events can be displayed to a user in user-defined groupings in an animated fashion. The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The atypical traffic patterns can then be classified as being of interest or not. In one particular example, in a network environment, the classification can be whether the network traffic is malicious or not.

  18. Femtosecond laser pulse filamentation under anomalous dispersion in fused silica. Part 1. Numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smetanina, E O; Kompanets, V O; Chekalin, Sergei V; Kandidov, V P

    2012-10-31

    We report the results of investigation of femtosecond laser pulse filamentation in fused silica by varying the wavelength in the range from 800 to 2300 nm. It is shown that in the case of the anomalous group-velocity dispersion, a sequence of 'light bullets' with a high spatial and temporal localisation of the light field is formed along the filament. The relation of the formation and propagation of light bullets with the formation of an isolated anti-Stokes wing of the supercontinuum spectrum is established. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  19. Leptophilic dark matter and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Chacko, Zackaria; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2014-08-26

    We consider renormalizable theories such that the scattering of dark matter off leptons arises at tree level, but scattering off nuclei only arises at loop. In this framework, the various dark matter candidates can be classified by their spins and by the forms of their interactions with leptons. In this study, we determine the corrections to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon that arise from its interactions with dark matter. We then consider the implications of these results for a set of simplified models of leptophilic dark matter. When a dark matter candidate reduces the existing tension between the standard model prediction of the anomalous magnetic moment and the experimental measurement, the region of parameter space favored to completely remove the discrepancy is highlighted. Conversely, when agreement is worsened, we place limits on the parameters of the corresponding simplified model. These bounds and favored regions are compared against the experimental constraints on the simplified model from direct detection and from collider searches. Although these constraints are severe, we find there do exist limited regions of parameter space in these simple theories that can explain the observed anomaly in the muon magnetic moment while remaining consistent with all experimental bounds.

  20. Leptophilic dark matter and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Chacko, Zackaria; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2014-08-26

    We consider renormalizable theories such that the scattering of dark matter off leptons arises at tree level, but scattering off nuclei only arises at loop. In this framework, the various dark matter candidates can be classified by their spins and by the forms of their interactions with leptons. In this study, we determine the corrections to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon that arise from its interactions with dark matter. We then consider the implications of these results for a set of simplified models of leptophilic dark matter. When a dark matter candidate reduces the existing tension between themore » standard model prediction of the anomalous magnetic moment and the experimental measurement, the region of parameter space favored to completely remove the discrepancy is highlighted. Conversely, when agreement is worsened, we place limits on the parameters of the corresponding simplified model. These bounds and favored regions are compared against the experimental constraints on the simplified model from direct detection and from collider searches. Although these constraints are severe, we find there do exist limited regions of parameter space in these simple theories that can explain the observed anomaly in the muon magnetic moment while remaining consistent with all experimental bounds.« less

  1. Anomalous fast ion losses at high β on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Bell, M. G.; Budny, R. V.; Darrow, D. S.; White, R.

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes experiments carried out on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [R. J. Hawryluk et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 33, 1509 (1991)] to investigate the dependence of β-limiting disruption characteristics on toroidal field strength. The hard disruptions found at the β-limit in high field plasmas were not found at low field, even for β's 50% higher than the empirical β-limit of β{sub n} ≈ 2 at high field. Comparisons of experimentally measured β's to TRANSP simulations suggest anomalous loss of up to half of the beam fast ions in the highest β, low field shots. The anomalous transport responsible for the fast ion losses may at the same time broaden the pressure profile. Toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes, fishbone instabilities, and Geodesic Acoustic Modes are investigated as possible causes of the enhanced losses. Here, we present the first observations of high frequency fishbones [F. Zonca et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 085009 (2009)] on TFTR. The interpretation of Axi-symmetric Beam-driven Modes as Geodesic Acoustic Modes and their possible correlation with transport barrier formation are also presented.

  2. Nonlinear simulations of peeling-ballooning modes with anomalous electron viscosity and their role in edge localized mode crashes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, X. Q.; Dudson, B.; Snyder, P. B.; Umansky, M. V.; Wilson, H.

    2010-10-22

    A minimum set of equations based on the peeling-ballooning (P-B) model with nonideal physics effects (diamagnetic drift, E×B drift, resistivity, and anomalous electron viscosity) is found to simulate pedestal collapse when using the new BOUT++ simulation code, developed in part from the original fluid edge code BOUT. Nonlinear simulations of P-B modes demonstrate that the P-B modes trigger magnetic reconnection, which leads to the pedestal collapse. With the addition of a model of the anomalous electron viscosity under the assumption that the electron viscosity is comparable to the anomalous electron thermal diffusivity, it is found from simulations using a realisticmore » high-Lundquist number that the pedestal collapse is limited to the edge region and the edge localized mode (ELM) size is about 5–10% of the pedestal stored energy. Furthermore, this is consistent with many observations of large ELMs.« less

  3. Anomalous Transport in Sketched Nanostructures at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Interface (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Anomalous Transport in Sketched Nanostructures at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interface Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous Transport in Sketched Nanostructures at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Interface Authors: Cheng, Guanglei ; Veazey, Joshua P. ; Irvin, Patrick ; Cen, Cheng ; Bogorin, Daniela F. ; Bi, Feng ; Huang, Mengchen ; Lu, Shicheng ; Bark, Chung-Wung ; Ryu, Sangwoo ; Cho, Kwang-Hwan ; Eom, Chang-Beom ; Levy, Jeremy Publication Date:

  4. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, Lucas R; Broido, David; Carrete, Jesus; Mingo, Natalio; Reinecke, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The lattice thermal conductivities ( ) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure, P, using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of . This anomalous P dependence of arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with small mass ratios. This work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.

  5. Anomalous behavior of the Pd/D system. Final report, June 1989-August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpak, S.J.; Mosier-Boss, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    In a news conference on 23 March 1989, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons announced that nuclear events could be initiated by the electrochemical compression of deuterium into a palladium lattice. When researchers around the world tried to reproduce the effects described by Pons and Fleischmann in their laboratories, the results were mixed. The nature of the announcement and the Irreproducibility of the effect divided the scientific community into believers and skeptics, indicating religious fervor rather than scientific reasoning. Shortly after the Fleischmann-Pons announcement, a program at NRaD investigated anomalous effects in the Pd/D system. The NRaD program investigated the Pd/D system using standard electrochemical techniques to determine conditions for achieving high Pd/D loadings. Metallurgical aspects of the Pd/D system and the effect of additives were also examined. Tritium content in the gas/liquid phases and radiation emissions were monitored during electrolysis. This report summarizes the investigation results.

  6. Four-flavour leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Florian; Feng, Xu; Hotzel, Grit; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus; Renner, Dru B.

    2014-02-24

    We present a four-flavour lattice calculation of the leading-order hadronic vacuum polarisation contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a?hvp, arising from quark-connected Feynman graphs. It is based on ensembles featuring Nf=2+1+1 dynamical twisted mass fermions generated by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration (ETMC). Several light quark masses are used in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass. We employ three lattice spacings to examine lattice artefacts and several different volumes to check for finite-size effects. Including the complete first two generations of quarks allows for a direct comparison with phenomenological determinations of a ?hvp. The final result involving an estimate of the systematic uncertainty a?hvp=6.74 (21)(18) 10-8 shows a good overall agreement with these computations.

  7. Search for anomalous production of multiple leptons in association with $W$ and $Z$ bosons at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a search for anomalous production of multiple low-energy leptons in association with a W or Z boson using events collected at the CDF experiment corresponding to 5.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This search is sensitive to a wide range of topologies with low-momentum leptons, including those with the leptons near one another. The observed rates of production of additional electrons and muons are compared with the standard model predictions. No indications of phenomena beyond the standard model are found. A 95% confidence level limit is presented on the production cross section for a benchmark model of supersymmetric hidden-valley Higgs production. Particle identification efficiencies are also provided to enable the calculation of limits on additional models.

  8. Four-flavour leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burger, Florian; Feng, Xu; Hotzel, Grit; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus; Renner, Dru B.

    2014-02-24

    We present a four-flavour lattice calculation of the leading-order hadronic vacuum polarisation contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, aμhvp, arising from quark-connected Feynman graphs. It is based on ensembles featuring Nf=2+1+1 dynamical twisted mass fermions generated by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration (ETMC). Several light quark masses are used in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass. We employ three lattice spacings to examine lattice artefacts and several different volumes to check for finite-size effects. Including the complete first two generations of quarks allows for a direct comparison with phenomenological determinations of amore » μhvp. The final result involving an estimate of the systematic uncertainty aμhvp=6.74 (21)(18) 10-8 shows a good overall agreement with these computations.« less

  9. On the explanation and calculation of anomalous reflood hydrodynamics in large PWR cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    Reflood hydrodynamics from large-scale (1:20) test facilities in Japan have yielded apparently anomalous behavior relative to FLECHT tests. Namely, even at reflooding rates below one inch per second, very large liquid volume fractions (10-15%) exist above the quench fronts shortly after flood begins; thus cladding temperature excursions are terminated early in the reflood phase. This paper discusses an explanation for this behavior: liquid films on the core's unheated rods. The experimental findings are shown to be correctly simulated with a new four-field (vapor, films, droplets) version of the best-estimate TRAC-PF1 computer code, TRAC-FF. These experimental and analytical findings have important implications for PWR large-break LOCA licensing.

  10. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lindsay, Lucas R; Broido, David; Carrete, Jesus; Mingo, Natalio; Reinecke, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The lattice thermal conductivities ( ) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure, P, using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of . This anomalous P dependence of arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with small massmore » ratios. This work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.« less

  11. Extrinsic anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial Mn{sub 4}N films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X. Ren, L. Z.; Zhou, W. Q.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W.

    2015-01-19

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy is investigated. The longitudinal conductivity σ{sub xx} is within the superclean regime, indicating Mn{sub 4}N is a highly conducting material. We further demonstrate that the AHE signal in 40-nm-thick films is mainly due to the extrinsic contributions based on the analysis fitted by ρ{sub AH}=a′ρ{sub xx0}+bρ{sub xx}{sup 2} and σ{sub AH}∝σ{sub xx}. Our study not only provide a strategy for further theoretical work on antiperovskite manganese nitrides but also shed promising light on utilizing their extrinsic AHE to fabricate spintronic devices.

  12. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359681.975000 m Bottom: 4447251.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  13. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolored County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  14. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  15. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4441550.552290 m Left: 271445.053363 m Right: 359825.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  16. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144691.792023 m Left: 285531.662851 m Right: 348694.182686 m Bottom: 4097005.210304 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  17. Anomalous temperature dependence of flow stress in a Fe{sub 3}Al alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, J.H.; Ha, T.K.; Chang, Y.W.

    2000-01-01

    Iron aluminides have attracted much interest since 1930s when the excellent corrosion resistance was noted in alloys with the composition of more than about 18 at.% Al. These alloys have relatively low material cost, due to the reduced usage of strategic elements like Cr, Mo and Ni, and a lower density than stainless steels. Their tensile strength is also comparable to those of ferritic and austenitic steels. These advantages have led the iron aluminide alloys being considered for many applications in industries needing sulfidation and oxidation resistance (1). However, the poor ductility at ambient temperatures and an abrupt drop in strength above 600 C have limited these alloys for structural applications. In the past years, extensive efforts have been devoted to understanding and improving the metallurgical properties of iron aluminides with the aim of producing more strong, ductile, and corrosion-resistant materials for structural applications. These studies have resulted in significant contributions to the understanding of the fabrication and mechanical properties of iron aluminides. Deformation behavior in iron aluminides is now known to depend on composition, temperature, and the presence or absence of ordered structures. Recent studies have demonstrated that improved engineering ductility of 10--15% can be achieved in wrought Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminide alloys, through the control of composition and microstructure. The effect of strain rate on the deformation behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys, especially on the anomalous temperature dependence of strength is of interest recently and more systematic investigation is now necessitated. Load relaxation test has been generally regarded as a very effective technique to measure the strain rate sensitivity over a wider range of strain rates with very little microstructural changes and has been applied to the plasticity of various rate-sensitive materials. In the present study, the iron aluminide alloys with 27.6 at.% Al having the various single-phase field, i.e. the disordered solid solution ({alpha}), an Fe{sub 3}Al with an imperfectly ordered B2 structure, and an ordered Fe{sub 3}Al with the D0{sub 3} structure were first prepared. A series of load relaxation tests was then carried out at the various temperatures ranging from 300 to 800 C to investigate the effect of the tensile strain rate on the anomalous flow behavior.

  18. Measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry with 9 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-09-16

    We present an updated measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry Absl for semileptonic b-hadron decays in 9.0 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions recorded with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of √s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We obtain Absl=(-0.787±0.172(stat)±0.093(syst))%. This result differs by 3.9 standard deviations from the prediction of the standard model and provides evidence for anomalously large CP violation in semileptonic neutral B decay. The dependence of the asymmetry on the muon impact parameter is consistent with the hypothesis that it originates from semileptonic b-hadron decays.

  19. Anomalous hole injection deterioration of organic light-emitting diodes with a manganese phthalocyanine layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyunbok; Lee, Jeihyun; Yi, Yeonjin; Cho, Sang Wan; Kim, Jeong Won

    2015-01-21

    Metal phthalocyanines (MPcs) are well known as an efficient hole injection layer (HIL) in organic devices. They possess a low ionization energy, and so the low-lying highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) gives a small hole injection barrier from an anode in organic light-emitting diodes. However, in this study, we show that the hole injection characteristics of MPc are not only determined by the HOMO position but also significantly affected by the wave function distribution of the HOMO. We show that even with the HOMO level of a manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) HIL located between the Fermi level of an indium tin oxide anode and the HOMO level of a N,N?-bis(1-naphthyl)-N,N?-diphenyl-1,1?-biphenyl-4,4?-diamine hole transport layer the device performance with the MnPc HIL is rather deteriorated. This anomalous hole injection deterioration is due to the contracted HOMO wave function, which leads to small intermolecular electronic coupling. The origin of this contraction is the significant contribution of the Mn d-orbital to the MnPc HOMO.

  20. Layer-dependent quantum cooperation of electron and hole states in the anomalous semimetal WTe2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Das, Pranab Kumar; Di Sante, D.; Vobornik, I.; Fujii, J.; Okuda, T.; Bruyer, E.; Gyenis, A.; Feldman, B. E.; Tao, J.; Ciancio, R.; et al

    2016-02-29

    The behaviour of electrons and holes in a crystal lattice is a fundamental quantum phenomenon, accounting for a rich variety of material properties. Boosted by the remarkable electronic and physical properties of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently received renewed attention. In this context, the anomalous bulk properties of semimetallic WTe2 have attracted considerable interest. We report angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of WTe2 single crystals, through which we disentangle the role of W and Te atoms in the formation of the band structure and identify the interplay of charge, spin and orbitalmore » degrees of freedom. Supported by first-principles calculations and high-resolution surface topography, we also reveal the existence of a layer-dependent behaviour. The balance of electron and hole states is found only when considering at least three Te–W–Te layers, showing that the behaviour of WTe2 is not strictly two dimensional.« less

  1. Yukawa coupling and anomalous magnetic moment of the muon: An update for the LHC era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crivellin, Andreas; Girrbach, Jennifer; Nierste, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    We study the interplay between a soft muon Yukawa coupling generated radiatively with the trilinear A-terms of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. In the absence of a tree-level muon Yukawa coupling the lightest smuon mass is predicted to be in the range between 600 GeV and 2200 GeV at 2{sigma}, if the bino mass M{sub 1} is below 1 TeV. Therefore, a detection of a smuon (in conjunction with a sub-TeV bino) at the LHC would directly imply a nonzero muon Yukawa coupling in the MSSM superpotential. Inclusion of slepton flavor mixing could in principle lower the mass of one smuonlike slepton below 600 GeV. However, the experimental bounds on radiative lepton decays instead strengthen the lower mass bound, with larger effects for smaller M{sub 1}, We also extend the analysis to the electron case and find that a light selectron close to the current experimental search limit may prove the MSSM electron Yukawa coupling to be nonzero.

  2. Synthesis and anomalous magnetic properties of hexagonal CoO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Xuemin; Shi, Huigang

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} The as-synthesized CoO nanoparticles are of pyramid configuration with hcp structure. {yields} The hexagonal CoO particles do not exhibit antiferromagnetic transition around 300 K. {yields} The CoO particles have relative large saturation magnetization and coercivity at 5 K. {yields} The shift of hysteresis loops is consistent with the result of multisublattice model. {yields} The particles contain intrinsic antiferromagnetic structure and uncompensated spins. -- Abstract: CoO nanoparticles in the 38-93 nm range have been prepared by thermal decomposition. The particles were characterized to be pyramid shape with a hexagonal close-packed structure. Their anomalous magnetic behavior includes: (i) vanishing of antiferromagnetic transition around 300 K; (ii) creation of hysteresis below a blocking temperature of 6-11 K; (iii) presence of relatively large moments and coercivities accompany with specific loop shifts at 5 K; and (iv) appearance of an additional small peak located in low field in the electron spin resonance spectrum. Further, the present results provide evidence for the existence of uncompensated surface spins. The coercivity and exchange bias decrease with increasing particle size, indicating a distinct size effect. These observations can be explained by the multisublattice model, in which the reduced coordination of surface spins causes a fundamental change in the magnetic order throughout the total CoO particle.

  3. Anomalously Large Polarization Effect Responsible for Excitonic Red Shifts in PbSe Quantum Dot Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Wolcott; V Doyeux; C Nelson; R Gearba; K Lei; K Yager; A dolocan; K Williams; D Nguyen; X Zhu

    2011-12-31

    The formation of solid thin films from colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is often accompanied by red shifts in excitonic transitions, but the mechanisms responsible for the red shifts are under debate. We quantitatively address this issue using optical absorption spectroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of PbSe QDs with controlled inter-QD distance, which was determined by the length of alkanedithiol linking molecules. With decreasing inter-QD distance, the first and second exciton absorption peaks show increasing red shifts. Using thin films consisting of large and isolated QDs embedded in a matrix of small QDs, we determine that a dominant contribution to the observed red shift is due to changes in polarization of the dielectric environment surrounding each QD ({approx}88%), while electronic or transition dipole coupling plays a lesser role. However, the observed red shifts are more than 1 order of magnitude larger than theoretical predictions based on the dielectric polarization effect for spherical QDs. We attribute this anomalously large polarization effect to deviations of the exciton wave functions from eigenfunctions of the idealized spherical quantum well model.

  4. HORIZONTAL BRANCH MORPHOLOGY AND MULTIPLE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN THE ANOMALOUS GLOBULAR CLUSTER M 22

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marino, A. F.; Milone, A. P.; Lind, K. E-mail: milone@iac.es

    2013-05-01

    M 22 is an anomalous globular cluster that hosts two groups of stars with different metallicity and s-element abundance. The star-to-star light-element variations in both groups, with the presence of individual Na-O and C-N anticorrelations, demonstrates that this Milky Way satellite has experienced a complex star formation history. We have analyzed FLAMES/UVES spectra for seven stars covering a small color interval on the reddest horizontal branch (HB) portion of this cluster and investigated possible relations between the chemical composition of a star and its location along the HB. Our chemical abundance analysis takes into account effects introduced by deviations from the local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE effects), which are significant for the measured spectral lines in the atmospheric parameters range spanned by our stars. We find that all the analyzed stars are barium-poor and sodium-poor, thus supporting the idea that the position of a star along the HB is strictly related to the chemical composition, and that the HB morphology is influenced by the presence of different stellar populations.

  5. Large anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic insulator-topological insulator heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alegria, L. D.; Petta, J. R.; Ji, H.; Cava, R. J.; Yao, N.; Clarke, J. J.

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate the van der Waals epitaxy of the topological insulator compound Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on the ferromagnetic insulator Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The layers are oriented with (001)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(001)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and (110)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(100)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicates the formation of a sharp interface. At low temperatures, bilayers consisting of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} exhibit a large anomalous Hall effect (AHE). Tilted field studies of the AHE indicate that the easy axis lies along the c-axis of the heterostructure, consistent with magnetization measurements in bulk Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The 61 K Curie temperature of Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and the use of near-stoichiometric materials may lead to the development of spintronic devices based on the AHE.

  6. Resonant cavity mode dependence of anomalous and inverse spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-young

    2014-05-07

    The direct current electric voltage induced by the Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) and Anomalous Hall Effect (AHE) was investigated in the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The ISHE and AHE components were distinguishable through the fitting of the voltage spectrum. The unwanted AHE was minimized by placing the DUT (Device Under Test) at the center of both the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The voltage of ISHE in the TE{sub 011} cavity was larger than that in the TE{sub 102} cavity due to the higher quality factor of the former. Despite optimized centering, AHE voltage from TE{sub 011} cavity was also higher. The reason was attributed to the E-field distribution inside the cavity. In the case of the TE{sub 011} cavity, the DUT was easily exposed to the E-field in all directions. Therefore, the parasitic AHE voltage in the TE{sub 102} cavity was less sensitive than that in the TE{sub 011} cavity to decentering problem.

  7. Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of the Origins of Anomalous Particle Size Distributions in Supported Metal Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benavidez, Angelica D.; Kovarik, Libor; Genc, Arda; Agrawal, Nitin; Larsson, Elin M.; Hansen, Thomas W.; Karim, Ayman M.; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2012-10-31

    In this Environmental TEM (ETEM) study of supported Pt and Pd model catalysts, individual nanoparticles were tracked during heat treatments at temperatures up to 600C in H2, O2, and vacuum. We found anomalous growth of nanoparticles occurred during the early stages of catalyst sintering wherein some particles started to grow significantly larger than the mean, resulting in a broadening of the particle size distribution. We can rule out sample non-uniformity as a cause for the growth of these large particles, since images were recorded prior to heat treatments. The anomalous growth of these particles may help explain particle size distributions in heterogeneous catalysts which often show particles that are significantly larger than the mean, resulting in a long tail to the right. It has been suggested that particle migration and coalescence could be the likely cause for the broad size distributions. This study shows that anomalous growth of nanoparticles can occur under conditions where Ostwald ripening is the primary sintering mechanism.

  8. Is the acceleration of anomalous cosmic rays affected by the geometry of the termination shock?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senanayake, U. K.; Florinski, V. E-mail: vaf0001@uah.edu

    2013-12-01

    Historically, anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) were thought to be accelerated at the solar-wind termination shock (TS) by the diffusive shock acceleration process. When Voyager 1 crossed the TS in 2004, the measured ACR spectra did not match the theoretical prediction of a continuous power law, and the source of the high-energy ACRs was not observed. When the Voyager 2 crossed the TS in 2007, it produced similar results. Several possible explanations have since appeared in the literature, but we follow the suggestion that ACRs are still accelerated at the shock, only away from the Voyager crossing points. To investigate this hypothesis closer, we study ACR acceleration using a three-dimensional, non-spherical model of the heliosphere that is axisymmetric with respect to the interstellar flow direction. We then compare the results with those obtained for a spherical TS. A semi-analytic model of the plasma and magnetic field backgrounds is developed to permit an investigation over a wide range of parameters under controlled conditions. The model is applied to helium ACRs, whose phase-space trajectories are stochastically integrated backward in time until a pre-specified, low-energy boundary, taken to be 0.5 MeV n{sup 1} (the so-called injection energy), is reached. Our results show that ACR acceleration is quite efficient on the heliotail-facing part of the TS. For small values of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, our model yields a positive intensity gradient between the TS and about midway through the heliosheath, in agreement with the Voyager observations.

  9. Understanding the anomalous dispersion of doubly-ionized carbon plasmas near 47 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Castor, J I; Iglesias, C A; Cheng, K T; Dunn, J; Johnson, W R; Filevich, J; Purvis, M A; Grava, J; Rocca, J J

    2008-04-15

    Over the last several years we have predicted and observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one in the soft X-ray regime. These plasmas are usually a few times ionized and have ranged from low-Z carbon plasmas to mid-Z tin plasmas. Our main calculational tool has been the average atom code. We have recently observed C{sup 2+} plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one at a wavelength of 46.9 nm (26.44 eV). In this paper we compare the average atom method, AVATOMKG, against two more detailed methods, OPAL and CAK, for calculating the index of refraction for the carbon plasmas and discuss the different approximations used. We present experimental measurements of carbon plasmas that display this anomalous dispersion phenomenon. It is shown that the average atom calculation is a good approximation when the strongest lines dominate the dispersion. However, when weaker lines make a significant contribution, the more detailed calculations such as OPAL and CAK are essential. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential. With the advent of tunable X-ray lasers the frequency dependent interferometer measurements of the index of refraction may enable us to determine the absorption coefficients and line-shapes and make detailed comparisons against our atomic physics codes.

  10. Hydrophobic hydration and the anomalous partial molar volumes in ethanol-water mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Ming-Liang; Te, Jerez; Cendagorta, Joseph R.; Miller, Benjamin T.; Brooks, Bernard R.; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2015-02-14

    The anomalous behavior in the partial molar volumes of ethanol-water mixtures at low concentrations of ethanol is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Previous work indicates that the striking minimum in the partial molar volume of ethanol V{sub E} as a function of ethanol mole fraction X{sub E} is determined mainly by water-water interactions. These results were based on simulations that used one water model for the solute-water interactions but two different water models for the water-water interactions. This is confirmed here by using two more water models for the water-water interactions. Furthermore, the previous work indicates that the initial decrease is caused by association of the hydration shells of the hydrocarbon tails, and the minimum occurs at the concentration where all of the hydration shells are touching each other. Thus, the characteristics of the hydration of the tail that cause the decrease and the features of the water models that reproduce this type of hydration are also examined here. The results show that a single-site multipole water model with a charge distribution that mimics the large quadrupole and the p-orbital type electron density out of the molecular plane has “brittle” hydration with hydrogen bonds that break as the tails touch, which reproduces the deep minimum. However, water models with more typical site representations with partial charges lead to flexible hydration that tends to stay intact, which produces a shallow minimum. Thus, brittle hydration may play an essential role in hydrophobic association in water.

  11. Apex-oxygen-atom tunneling as source of anomalous low-temperature specific heat in high- T sub c superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zoli, M. )

    1991-10-01

    A model is proposed in which the quantum tunneling of the apex oxygen atom is coupled to the quasiparticle excitations of the superconducting state. A path-integral formulation allows one to renormalize the coupling constant as a function of temperature. It is shown that such a model can account for the anomalous low-temperature specific heat observed in high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} superconductors.

  12. JET-SHOCKED H{sub 2} AND CO IN THE ANOMALOUS ARMS OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION GALAXY NGC4258

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogle, P. M.; Lanz, L.; Appleton, P. N.

    2014-06-20

    We present a Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph map of H{sub 2} emission from the nearby galaxy NGC4258 (Messier 106). The H{sub 2} emission comes from 9.4 0.4 10{sup 6} M {sub ?} of warm molecular hydrogen heated to 240-1040K in the inner anomalous arms, a signature of jet interaction with the galaxy disk. The spectrum is that of a molecular hydrogen emission galaxy (MOHEG), with a large ratio of H{sub 2} over 7.7 ?m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission (0.37), characteristic of shocked molecular gas. We find close spatial correspondence between the H{sub 2} and CO emission from the anomalous arms. Our estimate of cold molecular gas mass based on CO emission is 10times greater than our estimate of 1.0 10{sup 8} M {sub ?} based on dust emission. We suggest that the X {sub CO} value is 10times lower than the Milky Way value because of high kinetic temperature and enhanced turbulence. The H{sub 2} disk has been overrun and is being shocked by the jet cocoon, and much of the gas originally in the disk has been ejected into the galaxy halo in an X-ray hot outflow. We measure a modest star formation rate of 0.08 M {sub ?} yr{sup 1} in the central 3.4kpc{sup 2} that is consistent with the remaining gas surface density.

  13. Study of anomalous top quark flavor-changing neutral current interactions via the tW channel of single-top-quark production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etesami, S. M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.

    2010-06-01

    The potential of the LHC for investigation of anomalous top quark interactions with gluon (tug,tcg) through the production of tW channel of single top quarks is studied. In the standard model, the single top quarks in the tW-channel mode are charge symmetric, meaning that {sigma}(pp{yields}t+W{sup -})={sigma}(pp{yields}t+W{sup +}). However, the presence of anomalous flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC) couplings leads to charge asymmetry. In this paper, a method is proposed in which this charge asymmetry may be used to constrain anomalous FCNC couplings. The strength of resulting constraints is estimated for the LHC for the center of mass energies of 7 and 14 TeV.

  14. Method and apparatus for analyzing error conditions in a massively parallel computer system by identifying anomalous nodes within a communicator set

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gooding, Thomas Michael

    2011-04-19

    An analytical mechanism for a massively parallel computer system automatically analyzes data retrieved from the system, and identifies nodes which exhibit anomalous behavior in comparison to their immediate neighbors. Preferably, anomalous behavior is determined by comparing call-return stack tracebacks for each node, grouping like nodes together, and identifying neighboring nodes which do not themselves belong to the group. A node, not itself in the group, having a large number of neighbors in the group, is a likely locality of error. The analyzer preferably presents this information to the user by sorting the neighbors according to number of adjoining members of the group.

  15. Metallic transport and large anomalous Hall effect at room temperature in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Xi; Shigematsu, Kei; Chikamatsu, Akira Fukumura, Tomoteru; Hirose, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2014-08-18

    We report the electrical transport properties of ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N (001) epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition on MgO (001) substrates. The Mn{sub 4}N thin films were tetragonally distorted with a ratio of out-of-plane to in-plane lattice constants of 0.987 and showed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with an effective magnetic anisotropy constant of 0.16?MJ/m{sup 3}, which is comparable with that of a recently reported molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown film. The thin films exhibited metallic transport with a room temperature resistivity of 125??? cm in addition to a large anomalous Hall effect with a Hall angle tangent of 0.023.

  16. Anomalous magnetic behavior in nanocomposite materials of reduced graphene oxide-Ni/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollu, Pratap E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in; Prathapani, Sateesh; Varaprasadarao, Eswara K.; Mallick, Sudhanshu; Bahadur, D. E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in; Santosh, Chella; Grace, Andrews Nirmala E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in

    2014-08-04

    Magnetic Reduced Graphene Oxide-Nickel/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (RGO-Ni/NF) nanocomposite has been synthesized by one pot solvothermal method. Respective phase formations and their purities in the composite are confirmed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope and X Ray Diffraction, respectively. For the RGO-Ni/NF composite material finite-size effects lead to the anomalous magnetic behavior, which is corroborated in temperature and field dependent magnetization curves. Here, we are reporting the behavior of higher magnetization values for Zero Field Cooled condition to that of Field Cooled for the RGO-Ni/NF nanocomposite. Also, the observed negative and positive moments in Hysteresis loops at relatively smaller applied fields (100?Oe and 200?Oe) are explained on the basis of surface spin disorder.

  17. Polarity characterization by anomalous x-ray dispersion of ZnO films and GaN lateral polar structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, Christopher T.; Sachet, Edward; Paisley, Elizabeth A.; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Rajan, Joseph; Collazo, Ramn; Sitar, Zlatko; Maria, Jon-Paul

    2014-01-28

    We demonstrate the use of anomalous x-ray scattering of constituent cations at their absorption edge, in a conventional Bragg-Brentano diffractometer, to measure absolutely and quantitatively the polar orientation and polarity fraction of unipolar and mixed polar wurtzitic crystals. In one set of experiments, the gradual transition between c+ and c? polarity of epitaxial ZnO films on sapphire as a function of MgO buffer layer thickness is monitored quantitatively, while in a second experiment, we map the polarity of a lateral polar homojunction in GaN. The dispersion measurements are compared with piezoforce microscopy images, and we demonstrate how x-ray dispersion and scanning probe methods can provide complementary information that can discriminate between polarity fractions at a material surface and polarity fractions averaged over the film bulk.

  18. Local structure underlying anomalous tetragonal distortions in BiFeO{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, I.; Krayzman, V.; Woicik, J. C.; Tucker, M. G.

    2014-06-16

    The local structure of tetragonal BiFeO{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} solid solutions featuring anomalous lattice distortions has been determined using simultaneous fitting of neutron total scattering and extended X-ray absorption fine structure data. On the local scale, the large tetragonal distortion, promoted by the displacements of the A-cations (Bi and Pb), is accommodated primarily by the [FeO{sub 6}] octahedra, even though both Fe and Ti acquire (5+1)-fold coordination. Bi cations exhibit considerably larger displacements than Pb. The combination of the A-cation displacements and the ability of M-cations to adopt 5-fold coordination is suggested as key for stabilizing the large tetragonality in BiMO{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} systems.

  19. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2? were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System 1984 (WGS 1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  20. Structural behavior and dynamics of an anomalous fluid between attractive and repulsive walls: Templating, molding, and superdiffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoni, Fabio; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2014-11-07

    Confinement can modify the dynamics, the thermodynamics, and the structural properties of liquid water, the prototypical anomalous liquid. By considering a generic model for anomalous liquids, suitable for describing solutions of globular proteins, colloids, or liquid metals, we study by molecular dynamics simulations the effect that an attractive wall with structure and a repulsive wall without structure have on the phases, the crystal nucleation, and the dynamics of the fluid. We find that at low temperatures the large density of the attractive wall induces a high-density, high-energy structure in the first layer (templating effect). In turn, the first layer induces a molding effect on the second layer determining a structure with reduced energy and density, closer to the average density of the system. This low-density, low-energy structure propagates further through the layers by templating effect and can involve all the existing layers at the lowest temperatures investigated. Therefore, although the high-density, high-energy structure does not self-reproduce further than the first layer, the structured wall can have a long-range influence thanks to a sequence of templating, molding, and templating effects through the layers. We find that the walls also have an influence on the dynamics of the liquid, with a stronger effect near the attractive wall. In particular, we observe that the dynamics is largely heterogeneous (i) among the layers, as a consequence of the sequence of structures caused by the walls presence, and (ii) within the same layer, due to superdiffusive liquid veins within a frozen matrix of particles near the walls at low temperature and high density. Hence, the partial freezing of the first layer does not correspond necessarily to an effective reduction of the channel's section in terms of transport properties, as suggested by other authors.

  1. Bounds on an Anomalous Dijet Resonance in W+ jets Production in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-06-30

    We present a study of the dijet invariant mass spectrum in events with two jets produced in association with a W boson in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb⁻¹ collected with the D0 detector at s√=1.96 TeV. We find no evidence for anomalous resonant dijet production and derive upper limits on the production cross section of an anomalous dijet resonance recently reported by the CDF Collaboration, investigating the range of dijet invariant mass from 110 to 170 GeV/c². The probability of the D0 data being consistent with the presence of a dijet resonance with 4 pb productionmore » cross section at 145 GeV/c² is 8×10⁻⁶.« less

  2. Bounds on an Anomalous Dijet Resonance in W+ jets Production in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2011-06-30

    We present a study of the dijet invariant mass spectrum in events with two jets produced in association with a W boson in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb? collected with the D0 detector at s?=1.96 TeV. We find no evidence for anomalous resonant dijet production and derive upper limits on the production cross section of an anomalous dijet resonance recently reported by the CDF Collaboration, investigating the range of dijet invariant mass from 110 to 170 GeV/c. The probability of the D0 data being consistent with the presence of a dijet resonance with 4 pb production cross section at 145 GeV/c is 810??.

  3. Anomalous pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperature in Tb revealed by resistivity measurements to 141 GPa. Comparison with Gd and Dy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-05-26

    In previous studies the pressure dependence of the magnetic ordering temperature To of Dy was found to exhibit a sharp increase above its volume collapse pressure of 73 GPa, appearing to reach temperatures well above ambient at 157 GPa. In a search for a second such lanthanide, electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on neighboring Tb to 141 GPa over the temperature range 3.8 - 295 K. Below Tbs volume collapse pressure of 53 GPa, the pressure dependence To(P) mirrors that of both Dy and Gd. However, at higher pressures To(P) for Tb becomes highly anomalous. This result, together with the very strong suppression of superconductivity by dilute Tb ions in Y, suggests that extreme pressure transports Tb into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.

  4. Bounds on an Anomalous Dijet Resonance in W+ jets Production in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-06-30

    We present a study of the dijet invariant mass spectrum in events with two jets produced in association with a W boson in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb⁻¹ collected with the D0 detector at s√=1.96 TeV. We find no evidence for anomalous resonant dijet production and derive upper limits on the production cross section of an anomalous dijet resonance recently reported by the CDF Collaboration, investigating the range of dijet invariant mass from 110 to 170 GeV/c². The probability of the D0 data being consistent with the presence of a dijet resonance with 4 pb productionmore »cross section at 145 GeV/c² is 8×10⁻⁶.« less

  5. Anomalous pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperature in Tb revealed by resistivity measurements to 141 GPa. Comparison with Gd and Dy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-05-26

    In previous studies the pressure dependence of the magnetic ordering temperature To of Dy was found to exhibit a sharp increase above its volume collapse pressure of 73 GPa, appearing to reach temperatures well above ambient at 157 GPa. In a search for a second such lanthanide, electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on neighboring Tb to 141 GPa over the temperature range 3.8 - 295 K. Below Tb’s volume collapse pressure of 53 GPa, the pressure dependence To(P) mirrors that of both Dy and Gd. However, at higher pressures To(P) for Tb becomes highly anomalous. This result, together withmore » the very strong suppression of superconductivity by dilute Tb ions in Y, suggests that extreme pressure transports Tb into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.« less

  6. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oveshnikov, L. N.; Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Davydov, A. B.; Aronzon, B. A.; Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Kugel, K. I.; Tripathi, V.

    2015-11-24

    In this study, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises from the interplay of spin-orbit interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a potentially useful probe of electron spin polarization, especially in nanoscale systems where direct measurement is not feasible. While AHE is rather well-understood in metallic ferromagnets, much less is known about the relevance of different physical mechanisms governing AHE in insulators. As ferromagnetic insulators, but not metals, lend themselves to gatecontrol of electron spin polarization, understanding AHE in the insulating state is valuable from the point of view of spintronic applications. Among the mechanisms proposed in the literature for AHEmore » in insulators, the one related to a geometric (Berry) phase effect has been elusive in past studies. The recent discovery of quantized AHE in magnetically doped topological insulators - essentially a Berry phase effect - provides strong additional motivation to undertake more careful search for geometric phase effects in AHE in the magnetic semiconductors. Here we report our experiments on the temperature and magnetic field dependences of AHE in insulating, strongly-disordered two-dimensional Mn delta-doped semiconductor heterostructures in the hopping regime. In particular, it is shown that at sufficiently low temperatures, the mechanism of AHE related to the Berry phase is favoured.« less

  7. Anomalous porosity preservation and preferential accumulation of gas hydrate in the Andaman accretionary wedge, NGHP-01 site 17A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Kelly K.; Johnson, Joel E.; Torres, Marta E.; Hong, WeiLi; Giosan, Liviu; Solomon, E.; Kastner, Miriam; Cawthern, Thomas; Long, Philip E.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2014-12-01

    In addition to well established properties that control the presence or absence of the hydrate stability zone, such as pressure, temperature, and salinity, additional parameters appear to influence the concentration of gas hydrate in host sediments. The stratigraphic record at Site 17A in the Andaman Sea, eastern Indian Ocean, illustrates the need to better understand the role pore-scale phenomena play in the distribution and presence of marine gas hydrates in a variety of subsurface settings. In this paper we integrate field-generated datasets with newly acquired sedimentology, physical property, imaging and geochemical data with mineral saturation and ion activity products of key mineral phases such as amorphous silica and calcite, to document the presence and nature of secondary precipitates that contributed to anomalous porosity preservation at Site 17A in the Andaman Sea. This study demonstrates the importance of grain-scale subsurface heterogeneities in controlling the occurrence and distribution of concentrated gas hydrate accumulations in marine sediments, and document the importance that increased permeability and enhanced porosity play in supporting gas concentrations sufficient to support gas hydrate formation. The grain scale relationships between porosity, permeability, and gas hydrate saturation documented at Site 17A likely offer insights into what may control the occurrence and distribution of gas hydrate in other sedimentary settings.

  8. Combination of searches for anomalous top quark couplings with 5.4 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J. A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Lashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffe, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-07-09

    We present measurements of the tWb coupling form factors using information from electroweak single top quark production and from the helicity of W bosons from top quark decays in t{bar t} events. We set upper limits on anomalous tWb coupling form factors using data collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}.

  9. Anomalous resistivity effect on multiple ion beam emission and hard x-ray generation in a Mather type plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behbahani, R. A.; Aghamir, F. M.

    2011-10-15

    Multi ion beam and hard x-ray emissions were detected in a high inductance (more than 100 nH) Mather type plasma focus (PF) device at different filling gas pressures and charging voltages. The signal analysis was performed through the current trace, as it is the fundamental signal from which all of the phenomena in a PF device can be extracted. Two different fitting processes were carried out according to Lee's computational (snow-plow) model. In the first process, only plasma dynamics and classical (Spitzer) resistances were considered as energy consumer parameters for plasma. This led to an unsuccessful fitting and did not answer the energy transfer mechanism into plasma. A second fitting process was considered through the addition of anomalous resistance, which provided the best fit. Anomalous resistance was the source of long decrease in current trace, and multi dips and multi peaks of high voltage probe. Multi-peak features were interpreted considering the second fitting process along with the mechanisms for ion beam production and hard x-ray emission. To show the important role of the anomalous resistance, the duration of the current drop was discussed.

  10. Search for anomalous quartic WW?? couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Holzbauer, J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.

    2013-07-29

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WW?? in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb? of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp? collisions at s?=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with ?cutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed upper limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/?|<0.0025 GeV? and |aWC/?|<0.0092 GeV?.

  11. Geochemical provenance of anomalous metal concentrations in stream sediments in the Ashton 1:250,000 quadrangle, Idaho/Montana/Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Stream-sediment samples from 1500 sites in the Ashton, Idaho/Montana/Wyoming 1:250,000 quadrangle were analyzed for 45 elements. Almost all samples containing anomalous concentrations (exceeding one standard deviation above the mean value of any element) were derived from drainage basins underlain by Quaternary rhyolite, Tertiary andesite or Precambrian gneiss and schist. Aluminum, barium, calcium, cobalt, iron, nickel, magnesium, scandium, sodium, strontium, and vanadium have no andesite provenance. Most anomalous manganese, europium, hafnium, and zirconium values were derived from Precambrian rocks. All other anomalous elemental concentrations are related to Quaternary rhyolite. This study demonstrates that multielemental stream-sediment analyses can be used to infer the provenance of stream sediments. Such data are available for many parts of the country as a result of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. This study suggests that stream-sediment samples collected in the Rocky Mountains can be used either as pathfinders or as direct indicators to select targets for mineral exploration for a host of metals.

  12. Understanding the dramatic role of anomalous dispersion on the measurement of electron densities in plasmas using interferometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2005-07-20

    For decades the electron density of plasmas has been measured using optical interferometers. With the availability of good X-ray laser sources in the last decade interferometers have been extended into the wavelength range 14-47 nm, which has enabled researchers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index less than one. Recent interferometer experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with index of refraction greater than one at 14 nm and brought into question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index. In this paper we show how the anomalous dispersion from bound electrons can dominate the free electron contribution to the index of refraction in many plasmas and make the index greater than one or enhance the contribution to the index such that one would greatly overestimate the density of the plasma using interferometers. Using a new average-atom code we calculate the index of refraction in many plasmas at different temperatures for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV and compare against calculations done with OPAL. We also present examples of other plasmas that may have index of refraction greater than one at X-ray laser energies. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  13. Characteristics of anomalous skin effect and evolution of power absorption regions in a cylindrical radio frequency inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Z. F.; Sun, B.; Huo, W. G.

    2015-06-15

    In a low-pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz), inductively coupled argon plasma generated by a normal cylindrical rf coil, electric field, current density, and absorbed power density is calculated from magnetic field measured with a phase-resolved magnetic probe. The anomalous skin effect (ASE) for the cylindrical rf coil is compared to those previously reported for the planar and re-entrant cylindrical rf coils. Physical reasons for our observed characteristics of ASE are presented. With the increasing discharge power, the size and the number of negative and positive power absorption regions evolve into several distinct patterns. For the low discharge power (at 156.9 W), there is one area of positive and one area of negative power absorption in the radial direction. For the medium discharge power (279 W–683.5 W), there are two areas of negative and two areas of positive power absorption. For the even higher discharge power (above 803.5 W), the number of areas is the same as that of the medium discharge power, but the size of the inner positive and negative power absorption areas is approximately doubled and halved, respectively, while the outer positive and negative power absorption areas slightly shrinks. The evolution of positive and negative power absorption regions is explained as a result of electron thermal diffusion and the energy conversion between rf current and electric field. The spatial decays of electric field and current density are also elucidated by linking them with the positive and negative power absorption pattern.

  14. ANOMALOUS ANISOTROPIC CROSS-CORRELATIONS BETWEEN WMAP CMB MAPS AND SDSS GALAXY DISTRIBUTION AND IMPLICATIONS ON THE DARK FLOW SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhigang; Chen Xuelei; Zhang Pengjie E-mail: pjzhang@shao.ac.cn

    2012-10-20

    We search for the dark flow induced diffuse kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect through CMB-galaxy cross-correlation. Such angular correlation is anisotropic, with a unique cos ({theta}{sub DF}) angular dependence, and hence can be distinguished from other components. Here, {theta}{sub DF} is the angle between the opposite dark flow direction and the direction of the sky where the correlation is measured. We analyze the KIAS-VAGC galaxy catalog of SDSS-DR7 and the WMAP seven-year temperature maps, applying an unbiased optimal weighting scheme to eliminate any statistically isotropic components and to enhance the dark flow detection signal. Non-zero weighted cross-correlations are detected at 3.5 {sigma} for the redshift bin z < 0.1 and at 3 {sigma} for the bin 0.1 < z < 0.2, implying the existence of statistically anisotropic components in CMB. However, further analysis does not support the dark flow explanation. The observed directional dependence deviates from the {proportional_to}cos {theta}{sub DF} relation expected, and hence cannot be explained by the presence of a single dark flow, and if the observed cross-correlation is generated by the dark flow induced kSZ effect, the velocity would be too high ({approx}> 6000 km s{sup -1}). We report this work as the first attempt to search for dark flow through weighted CMB-galaxy cross-correlation and to draw the attention on the sources of the detected anomalous CMB-galaxy cross-correlation.

  15. Anomalous behaviour of DSSSDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grassi, L.; Torresi, D.; Acosta, L.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Grilj, V.; Jaksic, M.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatovic, T.; Milin, M.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Tokic, V.; Uroic, M.

    2012-10-20

    Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) are often used in nuclear physics experiments in a wide energy range. According to the previous experiments, when a particle hits the interstrip region of these detectors, different effects may occur. Charge sharing, pulse height deficits and inverse polarity pulses on adjacent strips can influence the measured charge. In order to understand these effects and improve DSSSD utilization, an experiment was performed at the scanning proton microbeam of the Ruder Boskovic Institute (RBI) using low proton microbeam intensity ({approx}fA) and two DSSSDs of thickness 75 {mu}m and 998 {mu}m.

  16. Anomalous diffusion of field lines and charged particles in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress force-free magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, Abhay K.; Dasgupta, Brahmananda; Krishnamurthy, V.; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2014-07-15

    The cosmic magnetic fields in regions of low plasma pressure and large currents, such as in interstellar space and gaseous nebulae, are force-free in the sense that the Lorentz force vanishes. The three-dimensional Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) field is an example of a force-free, helical magnetic field. In fluid dynamics, ABC flows are steady state solutions of the Euler equation. The ABC magnetic field lines exhibit a complex and varied structure that is a mix of regular and chaotic trajectories in phase space. The characteristic features of field line trajectories are illustrated through the phase space distribution of finite-distance and asymptotic-distance Lyapunov exponents. In regions of chaotic trajectories, an ensemble-averaged variance of the distance between field lines reveals anomalous diffusion—in fact, superdiffusion—of the field lines. The motion of charged particles in the force-free ABC magnetic fields is different from the flow of passive scalars in ABC flows. The particles do not necessarily follow the field lines and display a variety of dynamical behavior depending on their energy, and their initial pitch-angle. There is an overlap, in space, of the regions in which the field lines and the particle orbits are chaotic. The time evolution of an ensemble of particles, in such regions, can be divided into three categories. For short times, the motion of the particles is essentially ballistic; the ensemble-averaged, mean square displacement is approximately proportional to t{sup 2}, where t is the time of evolution. The intermediate time region is defined by a decay of the velocity autocorrelation function—this being a measure of the time after which the collective dynamics is independent of the initial conditions. For longer times, the particles undergo superdiffusion—the mean square displacement is proportional to t{sup α}, where α > 1, and is weakly dependent on the energy of the particles. These super-diffusive characteristics, both of magnetic field lines and of particles moving in these fields, strongly suggest that theories of transport in three-dimensional chaotic magnetic fields need a shift from the usual paradigm of quasilinear diffusion.

  17. Evidence of Wγγ Production in pp Collisions at s=8  TeV and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-07-16

    Here we report evidence of triple gauge boson production pp→W(ℓν)γγ+X, which is accessible for the first time with the 8 TeV LHC data set. The fiducial cross section for this process is measured in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb₋1, collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012. Events are selected using the W boson decay to eν or μν as well as requiring two isolated photons. The measured cross section is used to set limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings in the high diphoton mass region.

  18. Search for anomalous Wtb couplings in single top quark production in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beni S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-02-14

    We present new direct constraints on a general Wtb interaction using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The standard model provides a purely left-handed vector coupling at the Wtb vertex, while the most general, lowest dimension Lagrangian allows right-handed vector and left- or right-handed tensor couplings as well. We obtain precise limits on these anomalous couplings by comparing the data to the expectations from different assumptions on the Wtb coupling.

  19. Evidence of W γ γ Production in p p Collisions at s = 8 TeV and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-07-16

    This Letter reports evidence of triple gauge boson production pp → W (lν)γγ + X, which is accessible for the first time with the 8 TeV LHC data set. The fiducial cross section for this process is measured in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1, collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012. Events are selected using the W boson decay to eν or μν as well as requiring two isolated photons. The measured cross section is used to set limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings in the high diphoton mass region.

  20. CP violating anomalous top-quark coupling in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sehwook; /Iowa State U.

    2011-04-01

    We conduct the first study of the T-odd correlations in tt events produced in p{bar p} collision at the Fermilab Tevatron collider that can be used to search for CP violation. We select events which have lepton+jets final states to identify t{bar t} events and measure counting asymmetries of several physics observables. Based on the result, we search the top quark anomalous couplings at the production vertex at the Tevatron. In addition, Geant4 development, photon identification, the discrimination of a single photon and a photon doublet from {pi}{sup 0} decay are discussed in this thesis.

  1. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes...

  2. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous HVV couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-13

    Our study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the H→ZZ,Zγ*,γ*γ*→4ℓ, H→WW→ℓνℓν, and H→γγ decay modes. The full data set recorded by the CMS experiment during the LHC run 1 is used, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. A wide range of spin-two models is excluded at a 99% confidence level or higher, or at a 99.87% confidence level for the minimal gravitylike couplings, regardless of whether assumptions are mademore » on the production mechanism. Any mixed-parity spin-one state is excluded in the ZZ and WW modes at a greater than 99.999% confidence level. Under the hypothesis that the resonance is a spin-zero boson, the tensor structure of the interactions of the Higgs boson with two vector bosons ZZ, Zγ, γγ, and WW is investigated and limits on eleven anomalous contributions are set. Furthermore, the tighter constraints on anomalous HVV interactions are obtained by combining the HZZand HWW measurements. All observations are consistent with the expectations for the standard model Higgs boson with the quantum numbers JPC=0++.« less

  3. Search for anomalous production of prompt like-sign lepton pairs at $$ \\sqrt{s}=7\\;\\mathrm{TeV} $$ with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2012-12-03

    An inclusive search for anomalous production of two prompt, isolated leptons with the same electric charge is presented. The search is performed in a data sample corresponding to 4.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected in 2011 at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Pairs of leptons (e± e±, e± μ±, and μ± μ±) with large transverse momentum are selected, and the dilepton invariant mass distribution is examined for any deviation from the Standard Model expectation. No excess is found, and upper limits on the production cross section of like-sign lepton pairs from physics processes beyondmore » the Standard Model are placed as a function of the dilepton invariant mass within a fiducial region close to the experimental selection criteria. The 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section of anomalous e± e±, e± μ±, or μ± μ± production range between 1.7 fb and 64 fb depending on the dilepton mass and flavour combination.« less

  4. Correlation of anomalous write error rates and ferromagnetic resonance spectrum in spin-transfer-torque-magnetic-random-access-memory devices containing in-plane free layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evarts, Eric R.; Rippard, William H.; Pufall, Matthew R.; Heindl, Ranko

    2014-05-26

    In a small fraction of magnetic-tunnel-junction-based magnetic random-access memory devices with in-plane free layers, the write-error rates (WERs) are higher than expected on the basis of the macrospin or quasi-uniform magnetization reversal models. In devices with increased WERs, the product of effective resistance and area, tunneling magnetoresistance, and coercivity do not deviate from typical device properties. However, the field-swept, spin-torque, ferromagnetic resonance (FS-ST-FMR) spectra with an applied DC bias current deviate significantly for such devices. With a DC bias of 300 mV (producing 9.9 × 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}) or greater, these anomalous devices show an increase in the fraction of the power present in FS-ST-FMR modes corresponding to higher-order excitations of the free-layer magnetization. As much as 70% of the power is contained in higher-order modes compared to ≈20% in typical devices. Additionally, a shift in the uniform-mode resonant field that is correlated with the magnitude of the WER anomaly is detected at DC biases greater than 300 mV. These differences in the anomalous devices indicate a change in the micromagnetic resonant mode structure at high applied bias.

  5. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous HVV couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-13

    Our study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the H→ZZ,Zγ*,γ*γ*→4ℓ, H→WW→ℓνℓν, and H→γγ decay modes. The full data set recorded by the CMS experiment during the LHC run 1 is used, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. A wide range of spin-two models is excluded at a 99% confidence level or higher, or at a 99.87% confidence level for the minimal gravitylike couplings, regardless of whether assumptions are made on the production mechanism. Any mixed-parity spin-one state is excluded in the ZZ and WW modes at a greater than 99.999% confidence level. Under the hypothesis that the resonance is a spin-zero boson, the tensor structure of the interactions of the Higgs boson with two vector bosons ZZ, Zγ, γγ, and WW is investigated and limits on eleven anomalous contributions are set. Furthermore, the tighter constraints on anomalous HVV interactions are obtained by combining the HZZand HWW measurements. All observations are consistent with the expectations for the standard model Higgs boson with the quantum numbers JPC=0++.

  6. Anomalous momentum and energy transfer rates for electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence in downward auroral-current regions of the Earth's magnetosphere. III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasperse, John R.; Basu, Bamandas; Lund, Eric J.; Grossbard, Neil

    2010-06-15

    Recently, a new multimoment fluid theory was developed for inhomogeneous, nonuniformly magnetized plasma in the guiding-center and gyrotropic approximation that includes the effect of electrostatic, turbulent, wave-particle interactions (see Jasperse et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 072903 (2006); ibid.13, 112902 (2006)]). In the present paper, which is intended as a sequel, it is concluded from FAST satellite data that the electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence that appears is due to the operation of an electron, bump-on-tail-driven ion-cyclotron instability for downward currents in the long-range potential region of the Earth's magnetosphere. Approximate closed-form expressions for the anomalous momentum and energy transfer rates for the ion-cyclotron turbulence are obtained. The turbulent, inhomogeneous, nonuniformly magnetized, multimoment fluid theory given above, in the limit of a turbulent, homogeneous, uniformly magnetized, quasisteady plasma, yields the well-known formula for the anomalous resistivity given by Gary and Paul [Phys. Rev. Lett. 26, 1097 (1971)] and Tange and Ichimaru [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 36, 1437 (1974)].

  7. First-principles study on the relationship between magnetic anisotropy and anomalous Hall effect of bct-Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyodo, Kazushige Sakuma, Akimasa; Kota, Yohei

    2014-05-07

    We studied quantitative relationship between the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity (σ{sub xy}) and the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant (K{sub u}) of bct-Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} using first-principles calculation because these quantities originate from spin-orbit interaction. We found that the obtained σ{sub xy} and K{sub u} with changing the axial ratio c/a (1≤c/a≤√(2)) exhibit similar behavior mainly arising from the common band mixing of the minority-spin d{sub xy} and d{sub x{sup 2}−y{sup 2}} states near the Fermi level which is sensitive to c/a.

  8. Anomalous grain growth in the surface region of a nanocrystalline CeO2 film under low-temperature heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Zhang, Yanwen; Moll, Sandra J.; Varga, Tamas; Namavar, Fereydoon; Weber, William J.

    2012-06-15

    Grain growth and phase stability of nanocrystalline ceria are investigated under ion irradiation at different temperatures. Irradiations at temperatures of 300 and 400 K result in uniform grain growth throughout the film. Anomalous grain growth is observed in thin films of nanocrystalline ceria under 3 MeV Au+ irradiation at 160 K. At this low temperature, significant grain growth is observed within 100 nm from the surface, no obvious growth is detected in the rest of the films. While the grain growth is attributed to a defect-stimulated mechanism at room temperature and above, a defect diffusion-limited mechanism is significant at low temperature with the primary defect responsible being the oxygen vacancy. The nanocrystalline grains remain in the cubic phase regardless of defect kinetics.

  9. Measurement of the Z? production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Z? in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb?. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. The differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. The observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZ? and Z?? are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.

  10. Anomalous temperature dependence in valence band spectra: A resonant photoemission study of layered perovskite Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, Pankaj K.; Choudhary, R. J. Phase, D. M.

    2014-05-05

    Valence band spectra (VBS) and its modification across Curie temperature (T{sub C}) of Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4} thin film are studied using resonant photoemission spectroscopy. It is found that VBS mainly consists of hybridized states of Co-3d t{sub 2g}e{sub g} and O-2p; however, Co-3d e{sub g} states show its prominence only in the ferromagnetic temperature regime. Below T{sub C}, spectral weight transfer takes place anomalously from high binding energy (B.E.) region to low B.E. region, signifying the enhanced intermediate or low spin state Co{sup 4+} ions. It is suggested that spin-lattice coupling and many-body effects in Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4} derived from the strong electron correlations lead to such temperature dependence of VBS.

  11. Hadron production in e+e- annihilation at BABAR, and implication for the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Frank C.

    2015-04-29

    The BABAR collaboration has an extensive program of studying hadronic cross sections in low-energy e+e- collisions, accessible via initial-state radiation. Our measurements allow significant improvements in the precision of the predicted value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. These improvements are necessary for illuminating the current 3.6 sigma difference between the predicted and the experimental values. We have published results on a number of processes with two to six hadrons in the final state. We report here the results of recent studies with final states that constitute the main contribution to the hadronic cross section in the energy region between 1 and 3 GeV, as e+e- → K+K-, π+π-, and e+e- → 4 hadrons

  12. Wγ Production and Limits on Anomalous WWγ Couplings in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-12-09

    We measure the cross section and the difference in rapidities between photons and charged leptons for inclusive W(→lν)+γ production in eγ and μγ final states. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb⁻¹ collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, the measured cross section times branching fraction for the process pp̄→Wγ+X→lνγ+X and the distribution of the charge-signed photon-lepton rapidity difference are found to be in agreement with the standard model. These results provide the most stringent limits on anomalous WWγ couplings for data from hadron colliders: -0.4<Δκγ<0.4 and -0.08<λγ<0.07 at the 95% C.L.

  13. W? Production and Limits on Anomalous WW? Couplings in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; deJong, S. J.; DeLaCruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.

    2011-12-09

    We measure the cross section and the difference in rapidities between photons and charged leptons for inclusive W(?l?)+? production in e? and ?? final states. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb? collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, the measured cross section times branching fraction for the process pp??W?+X?l??+X and the distribution of the charge-signed photon-lepton rapidity difference are found to be in agreement with the standard model. These results provide the most stringent limits on anomalous WW? couplings for data from hadron colliders: -0.4?<0.4 and -0.08?<0.07 at the 95% C.L.

  14. Anomalous phonon behavior in the high-temperature shape-memory alloy Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50-x}Cr{sub x}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, S. M.; Xu Guangyong; Winn, B. L.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T.; Erwin, R.

    2007-08-01

    Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50-x}Cr{sub x} is a high-temperature shape-memory alloy with a martensitic transformation temperature strongly dependent on the Cr composition. Prior to the transformation, a premartensitic phase is present with an incommensurate modulated cubic lattice with wave vector of q{sub 0}=(0.22,0.22,0). The temperature dependence of the diffuse scattering in the cubic phase is measured as a function temperature for x=6.5, 8.5, and 10 at. %. The lattice dynamics has been studied and reveals anomalous temperature and q dependences of the [110]-TA{sub 2} transverse phonon branch. The phonon linewidth is broad over the entire Brillouin zone and increases with decreasing temperature, contrary to the behavior expected for anharmonicity. No anomaly is observed at q{sub 0}. The results are compared with first principles calculation of the phonon structure.

  15. Measurement of the Z? production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Z? in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb?. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. The differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. The observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZ? andmoreZ?? are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.less

  16. Nanodomain induced anomalous magnetic and electronic transport properties of LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+?} highly epitaxial thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Zepeda, F.; Ma, C.; Bahena Uribe, D.; Cantu-Valle, J.; Wang, H.; Xu, Xing; Yacaman, M. J.; Ponce, A.; Chen, C.; Lorenz, B.; Jacobson, A. J.; Chu, P. C. W.

    2014-01-14

    A giant magnetoresistance effect (?46% at 20?K under 7?T) and anomalous magnetic properties were found in a highly epitaxial double perovskite LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+?} (LBCO) thin film on (001) MgO. Aberration-corrected Electron Microscopy and related analytical techniques were employed to understand the nature of these unusual physical properties. The as-grown film is epitaxial with the c-axis of the LBCO structure lying in the film plane and with an interface relationship given by (100){sub LBCO} || (001){sub MgO} and [001]{sub LBCO} || [100]{sub MgO} or [010]{sub MgO}. Orderly oxygen vacancies were observed by line profile electron energy loss spectroscopy and by atomic resolution imaging. Especially, oxygen vacancy and nanodomain structures were found to have a crucial effect on the electronic transport and magnetic properties.

  17. Measurement of the Zγ production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Zγ in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. Furthermore, the differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. These observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. As a result, limits on anomalous triple gaugemore » couplings of ZZγ and Zγγ are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.« less

  18. Synthesis, characterization, and anomalous dielectric and conductivity performance of one-dimensional (bdaH)InSe{sub 2} (bda = 1,4-butanediamine)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Ke-Zhao; Hu, Wan-Biao; Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 ; Hu, Bing; Guan, Xiang-Feng; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2011-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Anomalous dielectric and conductivity performance have been observed in the organic-containing indium selenide (bdaH)InSe{sub 2}, which are attributed to the water molecules existing in the crystal boundary rather than phase transition. Highlights: {yields} The title compound is the first example of organic-containing one-dimensional indium selenide. {yields} The anomalous dielectric peak is attributed to water molecules in crystal boundary. {yields} The inorganic and organic components of the title compound are connected via hydrogen bonding to form a supramolecular three-dimensional network. -- Abstract: A new indium selenide, namely (bdaH)InSe{sub 2} (1) (bda = 1,4-butanediamine) has been solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. It belongs to the non-centrosymmetric space group Fdd2. Its structure features an infinite one-dimensional anionic chain of [InSe{sub 2}]{sub n}{sup n-} with monoprotonated [bdaH]{sup +} as charge compensating cation. The organic [bdaH]{sup +} cations are joined into a supramolecular one-dimensional chain via N-H...N hydrogen bonding, which further interacts with the inorganic chain via N-H...Se and C-H...Se hydrogen bonding, forming a supramolecular three-dimensional network. Based on such a well-defined structure, the thermal stability, optical, conductivity, and dielectric properties were systematically investigated, showing that dielectric constant, as well as conductivity, had a hump at about 95 {sup o}C, which could be attributed to water molecules in the crystal boundary.

  19. Structural and chemical ordering of Heusler CoxMnyGez epitaxial films on Ge (111). Quantitative study using traditional and anomalous x-ray diffraction techniques

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collins, B. A.; Chu, Y.; He, L.; Haskel, D.; Tsui, F.

    2015-12-14

    We found that epitaxial films of CoxMnyGez grown on Ge (111) substrates by molecular-beam-epitaxy techniques have been investigated as a continuous function of composition using combinatorial synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy techniques. A high-resolution ternary epitaxial phase diagram is obtained, revealing a small number of structural phases stabilized over large compositional regions. Ordering of the constituent elements in the compositional region near the full Heusler alloy Co2MnGe has been examined in detail using both traditional XRD and a new multiple-edge anomalous diffraction (MEAD) technique. Multiple-edge anomalous diffraction involves analyzing the energy dependence of multiple reflections acrossmore » each constituent absorption edge in order to detect and quantify the elemental distribution of occupation in specific lattice sites. Results of this paper show that structural and chemical ordering are very sensitive to the Co : Mn atomic ratio, such that the ordering is the highest at an atomic ratio of 2 but significantly reduced even a few percent off this ratio. The in-plane lattice is nearly coherent with that of the Ge substrate, while the approximately 2% lattice mismatch is accommodated by the out-of-plane tetragonal strain. Furthermore, the quantitative MEAD analysis reveals no detectable amount (<0.5%) of Co-Mn site swapping, but instead high levels (26%) of Mn-Ge site swapping. Increasing Ge concentration above the Heusler stoichiometry (Co 0.5 Mn 0.25 Ge 0.25 ) is shown to correlate with increased lattice vacancies, antisites, and stacking faults, but reduced lattice relaxation. The highest degree of chemical ordering is observed off the Heusler stoichiometry with a Ge enrichment of 5 at.%.« less

  20. Search for anomalous production of multi-lepton events in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a search for the anomalous production of events with multiple charged leptons in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 346 pb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The search is divided into three-lepton and four-or-more-lepton data samples. They observe six events in the three-lepton sample and zero events in the {ge}4-lepton sample. Both numbers of events are consistent with standard model background expectations. Within the framework of an R-parity violating supergravity model, the results are interpreted as mass limits on the lightest neutralino ({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) and chargino ({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) particles. For one particular choice of model parameters, the limits are M({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) > 110 GeV/c{sup 2} and M({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) > 203 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level; the variation of these mass limits with model parameters is presented.

  1. Search for anomalous single top quark production in association with a photon in pp collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-13

    We found the results of a search for flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) through single top quark production in association with a photon is presented. The study is based on proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.8 fb-1. The search for tγ events where t → Wb andW → μn is conducted in final states with a muon, a photon, at least one hadronic jet with at most one being consistent with originating from a bottom quark, and missing transverse momentum. Furthermore, there was no evidence of single top quark production in association with a photon through a FCNC is observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the tug and tcg anomalous couplings and translated into upper limits on the branching fraction of the FCNC top quark decays: B(t → uγ) < 1.3 x 10-4 and B(t →cγ) < 1.7 x 10-3. Upper limits are also set on the cross section of associated tγ production in a restricted phase-space region. These are the most stringent limits currently available.

  2. Limits on Anomalous Trilinear Gauge Couplings in $Z\\gamma$ Events from $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    Using Z{gamma} candidate events collected by the CDF detector at the Tevatron Collider, we search for potential anomalous (non-standard-model) couplings between the Z boson and the photon. At the hard scatter energies typical of the Tevatron, standard model Z{gamma} couplings are too weak to be detected by current experiments; hence any evidence of couplings indicates new physics. Measurements are performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb{sup -1} in the Z {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}} decay channel and 5.1 fb{sup -1} in the Z {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -} (l = {mu}, e) decay channels. The combination of these measurements provides the most stringent limits to date on Z{gamma} trilinear gauge couplings. Using an energy scale of {Lambda} = 1.5 TeV to allow for a direct comparison with previous measurements, we find limits on the CP-conserving parameters that describe Z{gamma} couplings to be |h{sub 3}{sup {gamma},Z}| < 0.017 and |h{sub 4}{sup {gamma},Z}| < 0.0006. These results are consistent with standard model predictions.

  3. WW production cross section measurement and limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings at sqrt(s) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Michael P.; /Rice U.

    2008-04-01

    The cross section for WW production is measured and limits on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ trilinear gauge couplings are set using WW {yields} ee/e{mu}/{mu}{mu} events collected by the Run II D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Across the three final states, 108 candidate events are observed with 40.8 {+-} 3.8 total background expected, consistent with {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WW) = 11.6 {+-} 1.8(stat) {+-} 0.7(syst) {+-} 0.7(lumi) pb. Using a set of SU(2){sub L} {direct_product} U(1){sub Y} conserving constraints, the one-dimensional 95% C.L. limits on trilinear gauge couplings are -0.63 < {Delta}{kappa}{sub {gamma}} < 0.99, -0.15 < {lambda}{sub {gamma}} < 0.19, and -0.14 < {Delta}g{sub 1}{sup Z} < 0.34.

  4. Role of pressure in understanding the anomalous superconductivity in europium (molybdenum)/sub 6/(sulfur)/sub 8/ and (TMTSF)/sub 2/FSO/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, S.A.; Huang, C.Y.; Lacoe, R.C.; Chaikin, P.M.; Fuller, W.W.; Luo, H.L.; Wudl, F.

    1983-01-01

    Both the Chevrel phase compound EuMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/ and the organic material, (TMTSF)/sub 2/FSO/sub 3/ are superconducting only under moderate pressure. In both instances the absence of superconductivity at ambient pressure is directly attributed to a low temperature structural distortion that introduces a gap over all or part of the Fermi surface. The role of pressure is to suppress the transition and thus allow the electrons to condense into the superconducting state. In EuMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/, details of the pressure dependence of both the structural and superconducting transition have been explained on the basis of a competition between a charge density wave-type state and superconductivity. In the case of (TMTSF)/sub 2/FSO/sub 3/ an anion ordering giving rise to a metal-insulator transition is responsible for suppressing superconductivity. The critical magnetic fields of EuMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/ are extremely anomalous and are related to the magnetism of the Eu as well as the structure of the compound.

  5. A TALE OF THREE GALAXIES: ANOMALOUS DUST PROPERTIES IN IRASF10398+1455, IRASF210130739, AND SDSSJ0808+3948

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Yanxia; Hao, Lei; Li, Aigen

    2014-10-20

    On a galactic scale, the 9.7 ?m silicate emission is usually only seen in type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs). They usually also display a flat emission continuum at ?5-8 ?m and the absence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission bands. In contrast, starburst galaxies, luminous infrared (IR) galaxies, and ultraluminous IR galaxies exhibit a red 5-8 ?m emission continuum, strong 9.7 ?m and 18 ?m silicate absorption features, and strong PAH emission bands. Here, we report the detection of anomalous dust properties by the Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph in three galaxies (IRASF10398+1455, IRASF21013-0739, and SDSSJ0808+3948) which are characterized by the simultaneous detection of a red 5-8 ?m emission continuum, the 9.7 and 18 ?m silicate emission features, as well as strong PAH emission bands. These apparently contradictory dust IR emission properties are discussed in terms of iron-poor silicate composition, carbon dust deficit, small grain size, and low dust temperature in the young AGN phase of these three galaxies.

  6. Anomalous scaling of Δ C versus T c in the Fe-based superconductors: the $${S}_{\\pm }$$-wave pairing state model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bang, Yunkyu; Stewart, G. R.

    2016-02-01

    The strong power law behavior of the specific heat jumpmore » $${\\rm{\\Delta }}C\\;$$ versus T c $$({\\rm{\\Delta }}C/{T}_{{\\rm{c}}}\\sim {T}_{{\\rm{c}}}^{\\alpha },\\alpha \\approx 2)$$, first observed by Bud'ko et al (2009 Phys. Rev. B 79 220516), has been confirmed with several families of the Fe-based superconducting compounds with various dopings. We tested a minimal two band BCS model to understand this anomalous behavior and showed that this non-BCS relation between $${\\rm{\\Delta }}C\\;$$ versus T c is a generic property of the multiband superconducting state paired by a dominant interband interaction ($${V}_{\\mathrm{inter}}\\gt {V}_{\\mathrm{intra}}$$) reflecting the relation $$\\frac{{{\\rm{\\Delta }}}_{{\\rm{h}}}}{{{\\rm{\\Delta }}}_{{\\rm{e}}}}\\sim \\sqrt{\\frac{{N}_{{\\rm{e}}}}{{N}_{{\\rm{h}}}}}$$ near T c, as in the $${S}_{\\pm }$$-wave pairing state. We also found that this $${\\rm{\\Delta }}C\\;$$ versus T c power law can continuously change from the ideal BNC scaling to a considerable deviation by a moderate variation of the impurity scattering rate $${{\\rm{\\Gamma }}}_{0}$$ (non-pair-breaking). Finally, as a result, our model provides a consistent explanation why the electron-doped Fe-based superconductors follow the ideal BNC scaling very well while the hole-doped systems often show varying degree of deviations.« less

  7. Search for anomalous quartic WWγγ couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2013-07-29

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WWγγ in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp̄ collisions at s√=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with Λcutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed uppermore » limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/Λ²|<0.0025 GeV⁻² and |aWC/Λ²|<0.0092 GeV⁻².« less

  8. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV and limits on anomalous gauge couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-14

    A measurement of the W boson pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at ? s = 8 TeV is presented. The data we collected with the CMS detector at the LHC correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.4 fb-1 . The W+W- candidates are selected from events with two charged leptons, electrons or muons, and large missing transverse energy. The measured W+W- cross section is 60.1 0.9 (stat) 3.2 (exp) 3.1 (theo) 1.6 (lumi) pb = 60.1 4.8 pb, consistent with the standard model prediction. The W+W-cross sections are also measured in two different fiducial phase space regions. The normalized differential cross section is measured as a function of kinematic variables of the final-state charged leptons and compared with several perturbative QCD predictions. Limits on anomalous gauge couplings associated with dimension-six operators are also given in the framework of an effective field theory. Finally, the corresponding 95% confidence level intervals are -5.7 < cWWW/?2 < 5.9 TeV-2 , -11.4 < cW/?2 < 5.4 TeV-2 , -29.2 < cB/?2 < 23.9 TeV-2 , in the HISZ basis.

  9. Anomalous change detection in imagery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theiler, James P.; Perkins, Simon J.

    2011-05-31

    A distribution-based anomaly detection platform is described that identifies a non-flat background that is specified in terms of the distribution of the data. A resampling approach is also disclosed employing scrambled resampling of the original data with one class specified by the data and the other by the explicit distribution, and solving using binary classification.

  10. Determination of the optical properties of La2-xBaxCuO₄ for several dopings, including the anomalous x=1/8 phase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Homes, C. C.; Hücker, M.; Li, Q.; Xu, Z. J.; Wen, J. S.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2012-04-11

    The optical properties of single crystals of the high-temperature superconductor La2-xBaxCuO₄ have been measured over a wide frequency and temperature range for light polarized in the a-b planes and along the c axis. Three different Ba concentrations have been examined, x=0.095 with a critical temperature Tc=32 K, x=0.125 where the superconductivity is dramatically weakened with Tc≅2.4 K, and x=0.145 with Tc≅24 K. The in-plane behavior of the optical conductivity for these materials at high temperature is described by a Drude-like response with a scattering rate that decreases with temperature. Below Tc in the x=0.095 and 0.145 materials there is amore » clear signature of the formation of a superconducting state in the optical properties allowing the superfluid density (ρs0) and the penetration depth to be determined. In the anomalous 1/8 phase, some spectral weight shifts from lower to higher frequency (≳300 cm⁻¹) on cooling below the spin-ordering temperature Tso≅42 K, associated with the onset of spin-stripe order; we discuss alternative interpretations in terms of a conventional density-wave gap versus the response to pair-density-wave superconductivity. The two dopings for which a superconducting response is observed both fall on the universal scaling line ρs0/8≅4.4σdcTc, which is consistent with the observation of strong dissipation within the a-b planes. The optical properties for light polarized along the c axis reveal an insulating character dominated by lattice vibrations, superimposed on a weak electronic background. No Josephson plasma edge is observed in the low-frequency reflectance along the c axis for x=1/8; however, sharp plasma edges are observed for x=0.095 and 0.145 below Tc.« less

  11. Anomalous C-V response correlated to relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} thin film based-metal-insulator-metal capacitor: Effect of titanium and oxygen defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahouli, A.; Marichy, C.; Pinna, N.

    2015-04-21

    Capacitance-voltage (C–V) and capacitance-frequency (C–f) measurements are performed on atomic layer deposited TiO{sub 2} thin films with top and bottom Au and Pt electrodes, respectively, over a large temperature and frequency range. A sharp capacitance peak/discontinuity (C–V anomalous) is observed in the C–V characteristics at various temperatures and voltages. It is demonstrated that this phenomenon is directly associated with oxygen vacancies. The C–V peak irreversibility and dissymmetry at the reversal dc voltage are attributed to difference between the Schottky contacts at the metal/TiO{sub 2} interfaces. Dielectric analyses reveal two relaxation processes with degeneration of the activation energy. The low trap level of 0.60–0.65 eV is associated with the first ionized oxygen vacancy at low temperature, while the deep trap level of 1.05 eV is associated to the second ionized oxygen vacancy at high temperature. The DC conductivity of the films exhibits a transition temperature at 200 °C, suggesting a transition from a conduction regime governed by ionized oxygen vacancies to one governed by interstitial Ti{sup 3+} ions. Both the C–V anomalous and relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} arise from oxygen vacancies, while the conduction mechanism at high temperature is governed by interstitial titanium ions.

  12. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ Production Cross Section and Search for Anomalous $WW\\gamma$ and $WWZ$ Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the W boson pair production cross section and most sensitive test of anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The WW candidates are reconstructed from decays containing two charged leptons and two neutrinos, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector from 3.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, a total of 654 candidate events are observed with an expected background contribution of 320 {+-} 47 events. The measured total cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} + X) = 12.1 {+-} 0.9 (stat){sub -1.4}{sup +1.6} (syst) pb, which is in good agreement with the standard model prediction. The same data sample is used to place constraints on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings.

  13. ALSNews Vol. 326

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    crystallography beamlines at the ALS and hosts over 100 industrial and academic research groups each year. During his tenure as head of the BCSB, Adams oversaw performance...

  14. Crystallographic Consulting Brings Research to the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the participating research team (PRT) members at the Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB), which operates five ALS beamlines. As PRT members, companies are...

  15. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes...

  16. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION...

  17. Footprinting Technique Gives ALS Users New Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    left: Research Scientist Sayan Gupta, Beamline 5.3.1 Scientist Rich Celestre, and BCSB Head Corie Ralston. XFP, a powerful technique for the study of macromolecular structures...

  18. Anomalous lattice expansion in yttria stabilized zirconia under simultaneous applied electric and thermal fields: A time-resolved in situ energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry study with an ultrahigh energy synchrotron probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akdogan, E. K.; Savkl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I y Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I ld Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I z, I.; Bicer, H.; Paxton, W.; Toksoy, F.; Tsakalakos, T.; Zhong, Z.

    2013-06-21

    Nonisothermal densification in 8% yttria doped zirconia (8YSZ) particulate matter of 250 nm median particle size was studied under 215 V/cm dc electric field and 9 Degree-Sign C/min heating rate, using time-resolved in-situ high temperature energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry with a polychromatic 200 keV synchrotron probe. Densification occurred in the 876-905 Degree-Sign C range, which resulted in 97% of the theoretical density. No local melting at particle-particle contacts was observed in scanning electron micrographs, implying densification was due to solid state mass transport processes. The maximum current draw at 905 Degree-Sign C was 3 A, corresponding to instantaneous absorbed power density of 570 W/cm{sup 3}. Densification of 8YSZ was accompanied by anomalous elastic volume expansions of the unit cell by 0.45% and 2.80% at 847 Degree-Sign C and 905 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The anomalous expansion at 905 Degree-Sign C at which maximum densification was observed is characterized by three stages: (I) linear stage, (II) anomalous stage, and (III) anelastic recovery stage. The densification in stage I (184 s) and II (15 s) was completed in 199 s, while anelastic relaxation in stage III lasted 130 s. The residual strains ({epsilon}) at room temperature, as computed from tetragonal (112) and (211) reflections, are {epsilon}{sub (112)} = 0.05% and {epsilon}{sub (211)} = 0.13%, respectively. Time dependence of (211) and (112) peak widths ({beta}) show a decrease with both exhibiting a singularity at 905 Degree-Sign C. An anisotropy in (112) and (211) peak widths of {l_brace} {beta}{sub (112)}/{beta}{sub (211)}{r_brace} = (3:1) magnitude was observed. No phase transformation occurred at 905 Degree-Sign C as verified from diffraction spectra on both sides of the singularity, i.e., the unit cell symmetry remains tetragonal. We attribute the reduction in densification temperature and time to ultrafast ambipolar diffusion of species arising from the superposition of mass fluxes due to Fickian diffusion, thermodiffusion (Soret effect), and electromigration, which in turn are a consequence of a superposition of chemical, temperature, and electrical potential gradients. On the other hand, we propose defect pile-up at particle-particle contacts and subsequent tunneling as a mechanism creating the 'burst-mode' discontinuous densification at the singularities observed at 847 and 905 Degree-Sign C.

  19. Z(gamma) production and limits on anomalous ZZ(gamma) and Z(gamma gamma) couplings in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kobach, A. C.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; et al.

    2012-03-01

    We present a measurement of p{bar p} {yields} Z{sub {gamma}} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{sub {gamma}} ({ell} = e, {mu}) production with a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.2 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The results of the electron and muon channels are combined, and we measure the total production cross section and the differential cross section d{sigma}/dp{sub T}{sup {gamma}}, where p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} is the momentum of the photon in the plane transverse to the beam line. The results obtained are consistent with the standard model predictions from next-to-leading order use ttransverse momentum spectrum of the photon to place limits on anomalous ZZ{gamma} and Z{gamma}{gamma} couplings.

  20. Structural and chemical ordering of Heusler CoxMnyGez epitaxial films on Ge (111). Quantitative study using traditional and anomalous x-ray diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, B. A.; Chu, Y.; He, L.; Haskel, D.; Tsui, F.

    2015-12-14

    We found that epitaxial films of CoxMnyGez grown on Ge (111) substrates by molecular-beam-epitaxy techniques have been investigated as a continuous function of composition using combinatorial synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy techniques. A high-resolution ternary epitaxial phase diagram is obtained, revealing a small number of structural phases stabilized over large compositional regions. Ordering of the constituent elements in the compositional region near the full Heusler alloy Co2MnGe has been examined in detail using both traditional XRD and a new multiple-edge anomalous diffraction (MEAD) technique. Multiple-edge anomalous diffraction involves analyzing the energy dependence of multiple reflections across each constituent absorption edge in order to detect and quantify the elemental distribution of occupation in specific lattice sites. Results of this paper show that structural and chemical ordering are very sensitive to the Co : Mn atomic ratio, such that the ordering is the highest at an atomic ratio of 2 but significantly reduced even a few percent off this ratio. The in-plane lattice is nearly coherent with that of the Ge substrate, while the approximately 2% lattice mismatch is accommodated by the out-of-plane tetragonal strain. Furthermore, the quantitative MEAD analysis reveals no detectable amount (<0.5%) of Co-Mn site swapping, but instead high levels (26%) of Mn-Ge site swapping. Increasing Ge concentration above the Heusler stoichiometry (Co 0.5 Mn 0.25 Ge 0.25 ) is shown to correlate with increased lattice vacancies, antisites, and stacking faults, but reduced lattice relaxation. The highest degree of chemical ordering is observed off the Heusler stoichiometry with a Ge enrichment of 5 at.%.

  1. Beamline 4.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4.2.2 Print Molecular Biology Consortium Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5,500-16,000eV Monochromator Rosenbaum-Rock Si(111) sagitally focused monochromator Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 photons/s at 12 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 with Si(111) crystals Endstations Minihutch Detectors

  2. Beamline 4.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4.2.2 Print Molecular Biology Consortium Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5,500-16,000eV Monochromator Rosenbaum-Rock Si(111) sagitally focused monochromator Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 photons/s at 12 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 with Si(111) crystals Endstations Minihutch Detectors

  3. Beamline 4.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4.2.2 Print Molecular Biology Consortium Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5,500-16,000eV Monochromator Rosenbaum-Rock Si(111) sagitally focused monochromator Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 photons/s at 12 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 with Si(111) crystals Endstations Minihutch Detectors

  4. Beamline 4.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4.2.2 Print Molecular Biology Consortium Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5,500-16,000eV Monochromator Rosenbaum-Rock Si(111) sagitally focused monochromator Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 photons/s at 12 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 with Si(111) crystals Endstations Minihutch Detectors

  5. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  6. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  7. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  8. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  9. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  10. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8.3.1 Beamline 8.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:55 Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x

  11. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  12. Beamline 4.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4.2.2 Print Molecular Biology Consortium Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5,500-16,000eV Monochromator Rosenbaum-Rock Si(111) sagitally focused monochromator Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 photons/s at 12 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 with Si(111) crystals Endstations Minihutch Detectors

  13. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  14. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  15. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8.3.1 Beamline 8.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:55 Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x

  16. Broken Scale Invariance and Anomalous Dimensions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Wilson, K. G.

    1970-05-01

    Mack and Kastrup have proposed that broken scale invariance is a symmetry of strong interactions. There is evidence from the Thirring model and perturbation theory that the dimensions of fields defined by scale transformations will be changed by the interaction from their canonical values. We review these ideas and their consequences for strong interactions.

  17. Anomalous liquid scintillation counting of chromium-51

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charig, A.; Blake-Haskins, J.; Eigen, E.

    1985-12-01

    Unusual behavior of chromium-51 in liquid scintillation cocktail is described. Rapidly declining count rate is attributed to first-order binding of chromate to glass vials.

  18. ALSNews Vol. 280

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the recent shutdown. It is compatible with other automounters at the ALS and has a Java control system that has been integrated into the BCSB BOS beamline control software. An...

  19. Footprinting Technique Gives ALS Users New Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    formation. The ALS XFP experts at Beamline 5.3.1. From left: Research Scientist Sayan Gupta, Beamline 5.3.1 Scientist Rich Celestre, and BCSB Head Corie Ralston. XFP, a powerful...

  20. 24th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference. Book of abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report contains abstracts on topics in the following areas: parametric instabilities; hohlraum physics; laser plasma physics with short pulses; and rayleigh-taylor instability and hydrodynamics.

  1. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bueno, J. Baselmans, J. J. A; Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G.; Visser, P. J. de; Klapwijk, T. M.; Driessen, E. F. C.; Doyle, S.

    2014-11-10

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations.

  2. Origin of anomalous Xe-H in nanodiamond stardust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kratz, K. L.; Farouqi, K.; Hallmann, O.; Pfeiffer, B.; Ott, U.

    2014-05-09

    Still today, the nucleosynthesis origin of Xe-H in presolar nanodiamonds is far from understood. Historically possible explanations were proposed by a secondary neutron-burst process occurring in the He- or C/O-shells of a type-II supernova (SN-II), which are, however, not fully convincing in terms of modern nucleosynthesis conditions. Therefore, we have investigated Xe isotopic abundance features that may be diagnostic for different versions of a classical, primary r-process in high-entropy-wind (HEW) ejecta of core-collapse SN-II. We report here on parameter tests for non-standard r-process variants, by varying electron abundances (Y{sub e}), ranges of entropies (S) and expansion velocities (V{sub exp}) with their correlated neutron-freezeout times (?(freeze)) and temperatures (T{sub 9}(freeze)). From this study, we conclude that a best fi to the measured Xe-H abundance ratios {sup i}Xe/{sup 136}Xe can be obtained with the high-S main component of a cold r-process variant.

  3. The mystery of milk: SAXS, anomalous SAXS, and resonant soft...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Bridget Ingham, Callaghan Innovation (Wellington, New Zealand) Program Description Most of the dietary calcium in milk is contained...

  4. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We use the same kinematic selection criteria as in a previous CDF search, but with a substantially larger data set, 305 pbsup -1, a pbar p collision energy of 1.96 TeV, and the ...

  5. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Dolan, K.W.; Perkins, D.E.

    1995-08-22

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation is disclosed. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features. 1 fig.

  6. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, Nancy K.; Durbin, Philip F.; Dolan, Kenneth W.; Perkins, Dwight E.

    1995-01-01

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features.

  7. GROUND LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF ANOMALOUS RADIATION LEVELS IN NIAGARA...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ;v ;);;J; '9;) -i, - 'L." ; i--j -7,) ;3 i, Work performed by Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37630 O&J. 2,7 +, 7&y'...

  8. Anomalous Zeeman response of the coexisting superconducting and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Date: 2011-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 1099678 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 83; Journal...

  9. Center for Inverse Design Highlight: Anomalous Surface Conductivity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O 3 ) films grown by pulsed laser deposition. This desirable, but unexpected, effect produces conductivities at the surface comparable to intentionally doped commercial materials. ...

  10. Scattering universality classes of side jump in the anomalous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 83; ... Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text Accepted ...

  11. Demonstration of anomalous heat from the cold fusion effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storms, E.

    1995-12-01

    Heat production by an unexpected process is the most challenging aspect of the {open_quotes}cold fusion{close_quotes} phenomenon to accept. Many studies have been done in ways that invite criticism and easy rejection. A few recent studies have attempted to eliminate obvious errors and, thereby, reduce the ease of rejection. In addition, several of these studies have revealed important variables related to improving reproducibility. This paper will describe heat measurements done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory using a closed, pressurized, stirred calorimeter having two independent methods of calibration. Results using several batches of palladium are discussed in terms of those characteristics that lead to reproducibility using the electrolytic loading technique.

  12. Anomalous compression behavior of germanium during phase transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Xiaozhi; Tan, Dayong; Ren, Xiangting; Yang, Wenge E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn; He, Duanwei E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2015-04-27

    In this article, we present the abnormal compression and plastic behavior of germanium during the pressure-induced cubic diamond to β-tin structure transition. Between 8.6 GPa and 13.8 GPa, in which pressure range both phases are co-existing, first softening and followed by hardening for both phases were observed via synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. These unusual behaviors can be interpreted as the volume misfit between different phases. Following Eshelby, the strain energy density reaches the maximum in the middle of the transition zone, where the switch happens from softening to hardening. Insight into these mechanical properties during phase transformation is relevant for the understanding of plasticity and compressibility of crystal materials when different phases coexist during a phase transition.

  13. Combined search for anomalous pseudoscalar HVV couplings in VH...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... with a definition of the coordinate system used and the relevant kinematic ... background samples to assess the system- atic uncertainty related to event ...

  14. Anomalous negative electrocaloric effect in a relaxor/normal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    polymer blend with controlled nano- and meso-dipolar couplings Authors: Qian, ... Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters Additional ...

  15. Anomalous Dimensions and Non-Gaussianity (Journal Article) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ... Authors: Green, Daniel ; Lewandowski, Matthew ; Senatore, Leonardo ; Silverstein, Eva ; ...

  16. Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text Accepted...

  17. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text Accepted...

  18. Top quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to Email Send to Email Email address: Content: Close Send Cite: MLA Format Close Cite: APA ...

  19. Combined search for anomalous pseudoscalar HVV couplings in VH...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bosons V ( W or Z) in a sample of proton-proton collision events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.9 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV is presented. ...

  20. Anomalous Density Properties and Ion Solvation in Liquid Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to a number of fields, ranging from biologybiochemistry to energy storage and electrochemistry. Several key properties of water, are crucial for understanding and predicting...

  1. Neutron diffraction study and anomalous negative thermal expansion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    does not result in the emergence of superconductivity or any other new ground state. ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY ...

  2. Testing of the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (x D eff ) resulted in a wide variation in Q ext values, posing a challenging test of theory. Using a photon-tunneling factor around 0.6, the mean difference between...

  3. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; et al

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore » in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  4. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T. J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  5. Anomalous magnetic structure and spin dynamics in magnetoelectric LiFePO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toft-Petersen, Rasmus; Reehuis, Manfred; Jensen, Thomas B. S.; Andersen, Niels H.; Li, Jiying; Le, Manh Duc; Laver, Mark; Niedermayer, Christof; Klemke, Bastian; Lefmann, Kim; Vaknin, David

    2015-07-06

    We report significant details of the magnetic structure and spin dynamics of LiFePO4 obtained by single-crystal neutron scattering. Our results confirm a previously reported collinear rotation of the spins away from the principal b axis, and they determine that the rotation is toward the a axis. In addition, we find a significant spin-canting component along c. Furthermore, the possible causes of these components are discussed, and their significance for the magnetoelectric effect is analyzed. Inelastic neutron scattering along the three principal directions reveals a highly anisotropic hard plane consistent with earlier susceptibility measurements. While using a spin Hamiltonian, we show that the spin dimensionality is intermediate between XY- and Ising-like, with an easy b axis and a hard c axis. As a result, it is shown that both next-nearest neighbor exchange couplings in the bc plane are in competition with the strongest nearest neighbor coupling.

  6. Anomalous magnetic structure and spin dynamics in magnetoelectric LiFePO4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Toft-Petersen, Rasmus; Reehuis, Manfred; Jensen, Thomas B. S.; Andersen, Niels H.; Li, Jiying; Le, Manh Duc; Laver, Mark; Niedermayer, Christof; Klemke, Bastian; Lefmann, Kim; et al

    2015-07-06

    We report significant details of the magnetic structure and spin dynamics of LiFePO4 obtained by single-crystal neutron scattering. Our results confirm a previously reported collinear rotation of the spins away from the principal b axis, and they determine that the rotation is toward the a axis. In addition, we find a significant spin-canting component along c. Furthermore, the possible causes of these components are discussed, and their significance for the magnetoelectric effect is analyzed. Inelastic neutron scattering along the three principal directions reveals a highly anisotropic hard plane consistent with earlier susceptibility measurements. While using a spin Hamiltonian, we showmore » that the spin dimensionality is intermediate between XY- and Ising-like, with an easy b axis and a hard c axis. As a result, it is shown that both next-nearest neighbor exchange couplings in the bc plane are in competition with the strongest nearest neighbor coupling.« less

  7. Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-Doped High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; FERMI LEVEL; HIGH-TC SUPERCONDUCTORS; VALENCE; BARIUM OXIDES; CALCIUM OXIDES; COPPER OXIDES; BARIUM FLUORIDES; CALCIUM FLUORIDES; COPPER FLUORIDES; ...

  8. Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-Doped High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Chen, Yulin ; Iyo, Akira ; Yang, Wanli ; Zhou, Xingjiang ; Lu, Donghui ; Eisaki, Hiroshi ; Devereaux, Thomas P. ; Hussain, Zahid ; Shen, Z.-X. ; Stanford U., Phys. Dept. ...

  9. Molecular ferroelectric contributions to anomalous hysteresis in hybrid perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, Jarvist M.; Butler, Keith T.; Walsh, Aron

    2014-08-01

    We report a model describing the molecular orientation disorder in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}, solving a classical Hamiltonian parametrised with electronic structure calculations, with the nature of the motions informed by ab initio molecular dynamics. We investigate the temperature and static electric field dependence of the equilibrium ferroelectric (molecular) domain structure and resulting polarisability. A rich domain structure of twinned molecular dipoles is observed, strongly varying as a function of temperature and applied electric field. We propose that the internal electrical fields associated with microscopic polarisation domains contribute to hysteretic anomalies in the current-voltage response of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells due to variations in electron-hole recombination in the bulk.

  10. Anomalous Transport in Sketched Nanostructures at the LaAlO3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Mengchen ; Lu, Shicheng ; Bark, Chung-Wung ; Ryu, Sangwoo ; Cho, Kwang-Hwan ; Eom, Chang-Beom ; Levy, Jeremy Publication Date: 2013-03-26 OSTI Identifier: 1103977 Type: ...

  11. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The recent discovery of quantized AHE in magnetically doped topological insulators - essentially a Berry phase effect - provides strong additional motivation to undertake more ...

  12. tan{beta}-enhanced supersymmetric corrections to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Schedar; Mertens, Susanne; Nierste, Ulrich; Stoeckinger, Dominik

    2009-01-01

    We report on a two-loop supersymmetric contribution to the magnetic moment (g-2){sub {mu}} of the muon which is enhanced by two powers of tan{beta}. This contribution arises from a shift in the relation between the muon mass and Yukawa coupling and can increase the supersymmetric contribution to (g-2){sub {mu}} sizably. As a result, if the currently observed 3{sigma} deviation between the experimental and SM theory value of (g-2){sub {mu}} is analyzed within the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), the derived constraints on the parameter space are modified significantly: If (g-2){sub {mu}} is used to determine tan{beta} as a function of the other MSSM parameters, our corrections decrease tan{beta} by roughly 10% for tan{beta}=50.

  13. Crossover of two power laws in the anomalous diffusion of a two lipid membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakalis, Evangelos E-mail: francesco.zerbetto@unibo.it; Höfinger, Siegfried; Zerbetto, Francesco E-mail: francesco.zerbetto@unibo.it; Venturini, Alessandro

    2015-06-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a bi-layer membrane made by the same number of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine and palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylserine lipids reveal sub-diffusional motion, which presents a crossover between two different power laws. Fractional Brownian motion is the stochastic mechanism that governs the motion in both regimes. The location of the crossover point is justified with simple geometrical arguments and is due to the activation of the mechanism of circumrotation of lipids about each other.

  14. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 83; Journal Issue: 15; Journal ID: ISSN 1098-0121 Publisher: American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of...

  15. A Numerical Investigation into the Anomalous Slight NOx Increase when Burning Biodiesel: A New (Old) Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, G A; Chen, J Y; Buchholz, B A; Dibble, R W

    2007-01-30

    Biodiesel is a notable alternative to petroleum derived diesel fuel because it comes from natural domestic sources and thus reduces dependence on diminishing petroleum fuel from foreign sources, it likely lowers lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, and it lowers an engine's emission of most pollutants as compared to petroleum derived diesel. However, the use of biodiesel often slightly increases a diesel engine's emission of smog forming nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) relative to petroleum diesel. In this paper, previously proposed theories for this slight NOx increase are reviewed, including theories based on biodiesel's cetane number, which leads to differing amounts of charge preheating, and theories based on the fuel's bulk modulus, which affects injection timing. This paper proposes an additional theory for the slight NO{sub x} increase of biodiesel. Biodiesel typically contains more double bonded molecules than petroleum derived diesel. These double bonded molecules have a slightly higher adiabatic flame temperature, which leads to the increase in NOx production for biodiesel. Our theory was verified using numerical simulations to show a NOx increase, due to the double bonded molecules, that is consistent with observation. Further, the details of these numerical simulations show that NOx is predominantly due to the Zeldovich mechanism.

  16. Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling in an open

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Connect Quantum chaos in Aharonov-Bohm oscillations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum chaos in Aharonov-Bohm oscillations Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in a mesoscopic ballistic ring are considered under the influence of a resonant magnetic field with one and two frequencies. The authors investigate the oscillations of the time-averaged electron energy at zero temperature in the regime of an isolated quantum nonlinear resonance and at the transition to quantum chaos, when two

  17. Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-DopedHigh...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 97; Related Information: Journal ...

  18. Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere\tby Anomalous/Lévy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... can always be found to fit any FORT data (even if it is linear rather than harmonic). ... W., 1996: A parameterization for computing grid-averaged solar fluxes for inhomogeneous ...

  19. Anomalous QCD contribution to the Debye screening in an external field via holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsky, A.; Kopnin, P. N.; Krikun, A.

    2011-03-15

    In this paper we discuss the QCD contribution to the Abelian Debye and magnetic screening masses in a deconfined QCD plasma at finite temperature in the presence of an external magnetic field B. We use a holographic AdS/QCD setup in an AdS Schwarzschild black hole background and show that the electric screening mass has a form similar to the one-loop result in QED. Moreover, we calculate the corrections due to the magnetic field to all orders of B and demonstrate that in the case when the magnetic field is large the Debye mass grows linearly with B, while the magnetic screening mass vanishes. The whole effect of the magnetic field turns out to stem from the Chern-Simons action. We also discuss the zero temperature case in the chiral perturbation theory.

  20. Anomalous Dynamical Line Shapes in a Quantum Magnet at Finite Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant D. A.; James A.; Lake, B.; Essler, F.H.L.; Notbohm, S.; Mikeska, H.-J.; Fielden, J.; Kogerler,, P.; Canfield, P.C.; Telling, M.T.F.

    2012-01-04

    The effect of thermal fluctuations on the dynamics of a gapped quantum magnet is studied using inelastic neutron scattering on copper nitrate, a model material for the spin-1/2, one-dimensional (1D) bond alternating Heisenberg chain. A large, highly deuterated, single-crystal sample of copper nitrate is produced using a solution growth method and measurements are made using the high-resolution backscattering spectrometer OSIRIS at the ISIS Facility. Theoretical calculations and numerical analysis are combined to interpret the physical origin of the thermal effects observed in the magnetic spectra. The primary observations are (1) a thermally induced central peak due to intraband scattering, which is similar to Villain scattering familiar from soliton systems in 1D, and (2) the one-magnon quasiparticle pole is seen to develop with temperature into an asymmetric continuum of scattering. We relate this asymmetric line broadening to a thermal strongly correlated state caused by hard-core constraints and quasiparticle interactions. These findings are a counter example to recent assertions of the universality of line broadening in 1D systems and are applicable to a broad range of quantum systems.

  1. Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiter, George F; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Paddison, Stephen J; Platzman, P. M.; Moravsky, Alexander P.; Adams, Mark A.; Mayers, Dr. Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Deep inelastic neutron scattering provides a means of directly and accurately measuring the momentum distribution of protons in water, which is determined primarily by the proton ground-state wave function.We find that in water confined on scales of 20 A, this wave function responds to the details of the confinement, corresponds to a strongly anharmonic local potential, shows evidence in some cases of coherent delocalization in double wells, and involves changes in zero-point kinetic energy of the protons from 40 to +120 meV difference from that of bulk water at room temperature. This behavior appears to be a generic feature of nanoscale confinement. It is exhibited here in 16 A inner diameter carbon nanotubes, two different hydrated proton exchange membranes (PEMs), Nafion 1120 and Dow 858, and has been seen earlier in xerogel and 14 A diameter carbon nanotubes. The proton conductivity in the PEM samples correlates with the degree of coherent delocalization of the proton.

  2. Phonon self-energy and origin of anomalous neutron scattering spectra in SnTe and PbTe thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Chen [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL] [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL] [ORNL; Cao, Huibo [ORNL] [ORNL; Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL] [ORNL; Ehlers, Georg [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL] [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL] [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The anharmonic lattice dynamics of rock-salt thermoelectric compounds SnTe and PbTe are investigated with inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and first-principles calculations. The experiments show that, surprisingly, although SnTe is closer to the ferroelectric instability, phonon spectra in PbTe exhibit a more anharmonic character. This behavior is reproduced in first-principles calculations of the temperature-dependent phonon self-energy. Our simulations reveal how the nesting of phonon dispersions induces prominent features in the self-energy, which account for the measured INS spectra and their temperature dependence. We establish that the phase-space for three-phonon scattering processes, rather than just the proximity to the lattice instability, is the mechanism determining the complex spectrum of the transverse-optical ferroelectric mode.

  3. MO-G-BRF-07: Anomalously Fast Diffusion of Carbon Nanotubes Carriers in 3D Tissue Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y; Bahng, J; Kotov, N

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We aim to investigate and understand diffusion process of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and other nanoscale particles in tissue and organs. Methods: In this research, we utilized a 3D model tissue of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)cultured in inverted colloidal crystal (ICC) scaffolds to compare the diffusivity of CNTs with small molecules such as Rhodamine and FITC in vitro, and further investigated the transportation of CNTs with and without targeting ligand, TGFβ1. The real-time permeation profiles of CNTs in HCC tissue model with high temporal and spatial resolution was demonstrated by using standard confocal microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the diffusion process in 3D was carried out using luminescence intensity in a series of Z-stack images obtained for different time points of the diffusion process after initial addition of CNTs or small molecules to the cell culture and the image data was analyzed by software ImageJ and Mathematica. Results: CNTs display diffusion rate in model tissues substantially faster than small molecules of the similar charge such as FITC, and the diffusion rate of CNTs are significantly enhanced with targeting ligand, TGFβ1. Conclusion: In terms of the advantages of in-vitro model, we were able to have access to measuring the rate of CNT penetration at designed conditions with variable parameters. And the findings by using this model, changed our understanding about advantages of CNTs as nanoscale drug carriers and provides design principles for making new drug carriers for both treatment and diagnostics. Additionally the fast diffusion opens the discussion of the best possible drug carriers to reach deep parts of cancerous tissues, which is often a prerequisite for successful cancer treatment. This work was supported by the Center for Photonic and Multiscale Nanomaterials funded by National Science Foundation Materials Research Science and Engineering Center program DMR 1120923. The work was also partially supported by NSF grant ECS-0601345; EFRI-BSBA 0938019; CBET 0933384; CBET 0932823; CBET 1036672, AFOSR MURI 444286-P061716 and NIH 1R21CA121841-01A2.

  4. Drifting localization of ionization runaway: Unraveling the nature of anomalous transport in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Pavel; Rauch, Albert

    2011-12-04

    The plasma over the magnetrons erosion racetrack is not azimuthally uniform but concentrated in distinct dense plasma zones which move in the {vector E}{vector B} direction with about 10% of the electrons {vector E}{vector B}/B{sup 2} drift velocity. The plasma zones are investigated with a gated camera working in concert with a streak camera for Al, Nb, Cu, and W targets in Ar or Kr background gas. It is found that each plasma zone has a high density edge which is the origin of a plasma-generating electron jet leaving the target zone. Each region of strong azimuthal density gradient generates an azimuthal electric field which promotes the escape of magnetized electrons and the formation of electron jets and plasma flares. The phenomena are proposed to be caused by an ionization instability where each dense plasma zone exhibits a high stopping power for drifting high energy electrons, thereby enhancing itself.

  5. Theoretical Framework for Anomalous Heat Without High-Energy Particles from Deuteron Fusion in Deuterium-Transition Metal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott R. Chubb; Talbot A. Chubb

    2000-11-12

    In cold fusion, two conflicting intuitive pictures have caused confusion. A local picture, involving particle-particle interaction, has been dominant for most physicists. However, we suggest that a second, nonlocal, 'counter-intuitive' picture is more appropriate because it places greater emphasis on the behavior of matter distributions and their interaction with the associated environment. This picture is relevant in solids because when charged particles possess large DeBroglie wavelengths, they frequently interact coherently, in a wavelike fashion, in which momentum is conserved globally but not locally. These wavelike effects can become important in periodically ordered solids since they may lead to large momentum transfer from an isolated location to many locations at once. The local picture fails to incorporate these kinds of effects. How hydrogen (H) nuclei can become delocalized is illustrated by anomalies in the diffusivity and vibrational behavior of H in transition metals. Also, it is well-known that in many-body systems, discontinuities in the local momentum (wave function cusps) can explain how near-perfect overlap between charged particles can occur at close separation (which may explain how the Coulomb barrier can be circumvented). We explore implications of these effects on cold fusion.

  6. Erratum: Search for Anomalous $t\\bar{t}$ Production in the Highly-Boosted All-Hadronic Final State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-28

    A search is presented for a massive particle, generically referred to as a Z', decaying into a t t-bar pair. The search focuses on Z' resonances that are sufficiently massive to produce highly Lorentz-boosted top quarks, which yield collimated decay products that are partially or fully merged into single jets. The analysis uses new methods to analyze jet substructure, providing suppression of the non-top multijet backgrounds. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Upper limits in the range of 1 pb are set on the product of the production cross section and branching fraction for a topcolor Z' modeled for several widths, as well as for a Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gluon. In addition, the results constrain any enhancement in t t-bar production beyond expectations of the standard model for t t-bar invariant masses larger than 1 TeV.

  7. Role of channel coupling and deuteron-exchange mechanisms in anomalous alpha-particle scattering on {sup 6}Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakuta, S. B.; Artemov, S.V.; Burtebaev, N.; Kerimkulov, Zh.; Novatsky, B. G.; Stepanov, D.N.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2009-12-15

    A unified description of existing experimental data on alpha-particle scattering by {sup 6}Li over the broad energy range from 18 to 166 MeV was obtained with allowance for channel-coupling effects and mechanisms involving the exchange of a deuteron cluster. Angular distributions were analyzed on the basis of the optical model and the coupled reaction channels method. It was shown that the inclusion of channel coupling and the contributions from one- and two-step exchangemechanismsmakes it possible to describe special features of the behavior of differential cross sections for both elastic and inelastic scattering in a full energy range. Optimum values found for the parameters of optical potentials agree with the parameters of the global potential proposed previously for nuclei in the mass region A > 12.

  8. Pulsed laser-induced oxygen deficiency at TiO{sub 2} surface: Anomalous structure and electrical transport properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, Tomohiko; Tsuchiya, Tetsuo; Kumagai, Toshiya

    2009-09-15

    We have studied pulsed laser-induced oxygen deficiencies at rutile TiO{sub 2} surfaces. The crystal surface was successfully reduced by excimer laser irradiation, and an oxygen-deficient TiO{sub 2-{delta}} layer with 160 nm thickness was formed by means of ArF laser irradiation at 140 mJ/cm{sup 2} for 2000 pulses. The TiO{sub 2-{delta}} layer fundamentally maintained a rutile structure, though this structure was distorted by many stacking faults caused by the large oxygen deficiency. The electrical resistivity of the obtained TiO{sub 2-{delta}} layer exhibited unconventional metallic behavior with hysteresis. A metal-insulator transition occurred at 42 K, and the electrical resistivity exceeded 10{sup 4} OMEGA cm below 42 K. This metal-insulator transition could be caused by bipolaronic ordering derived from Ti-Ti pairings that formed along the stacking faults. The constant magnetization behavior observed below 42 K is consistent with the bipolaronic scenario that has been observed previously for Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}. These peculiar electrical properties are strongly linked to the oxygen-deficient crystal structure, which contains many stacking faults formed by instantaneous heating during excimer laser irradiation. - Graphical abstract: A pulsed laser-irradiated TiO{sub 2-{delta}} substrate showed an unconventional metallic phase, with hysteresis over a wide range of temperatures and a metal-insulator transition at 42 K.

  9. Erratum: Search for Anomalous $$t\\bar{t}$$ Production in the Highly-Boosted All-Hadronic Final State

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-28

    A search is presented for a massive particle, generically referred to as a Z', decaying into a t t-bar pair. The search focuses on Z' resonances that are sufficiently massive to produce highly Lorentz-boosted top quarks, which yield collimated decay products that are partially or fully merged into single jets. The analysis uses new methods to analyze jet substructure, providing suppression of the non-top multijet backgrounds. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Upper limits in the range of 1more » pb are set on the product of the production cross section and branching fraction for a topcolor Z' modeled for several widths, as well as for a Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gluon. In addition, the results constrain any enhancement in t t-bar production beyond expectations of the standard model for t t-bar invariant masses larger than 1 TeV.« less

  10. Anomalous dynamics of aqueous solutions of di-propylene glycol methylether confined in MCM-41 by quasielastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swenson, Jan Elamin, Khalid; Chen, Guo; Lohstroh, Wiebke; Sakai, Victoria Garcia

    2014-12-07

    The molecular dynamics of solutions of di-propylene glycol methylether (2PGME) and H{sub 2}O (or D{sub 2}O) confined in 28 Å pores of MCM-41 have been studied by quasielastic neutron scattering and differential scanning calorimetry over the concentration range 0–90 wt.% water. This system is of particular interest due to its pronounced non-monotonic concentration dependent dynamics of 2PGME in the corresponding bulk system, showing the important role of hydrogen bonding for the dynamics. In this study we have elucidated how this non-monotonic concentration dependence is affected by the confined geometry. The results show that this behaviour is maintained in the confinement, but the slowest diffusive dynamics of 2PGME is now observed at a considerably higher water concentration; at 75 wt.% water in MCM-41 compared to 30 wt.% water in the corresponding bulk system. This difference can be explained by an improper mixing of the two confined liquids. The results suggest that water up to a concentration of about 20 wt.% is used to hydrate the hydrophilic hydroxyl surface groups of the silica pores, and that it is only at higher water contents the water becomes partly mixed with 2PGME. Hence, due to this partial micro-phase separation of the two liquids larger, and thereby slower relaxing, structural entities of hydrogen bonded water and 2PGME molecules can only be formed at higher water contents than in the bulk system. However, the Q-dependence is unchanged with confinement, showing that the nature of the molecular motions is preserved. Thus, there is no indication of localization of the dynamics at length scales of less than 20 Å. The dynamics of both water and 2PGME is strongly dominated by translational diffusion at a temperature of 280 K.

  11. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v)

  12. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v)

  13. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0

  14. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0

  15. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.1 Beamline 5.0.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:32 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  16. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v)

  17. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v)

  18. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole

  19. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole

  20. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm

  1. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm

  2. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.3 Beamline 5.0.3 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:36 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring

  3. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole

  4. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole

  5. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v)

  6. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v)

  7. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole

  8. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous HVV couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.,

    2014-11-14

    The study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the $\\mathrm{H} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{Z} \\mathrm{Z}$, $\\mathrm{Z}\\gamma^*$, $\\gamma^*\\gamma^* \\rightarrow 4\\ell$, $\\mathrm{H} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{W} \\mathrm{W} \\rightarrow \\ell\

  9. Search for anomalous production of events with three or more leptons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2014-08-01

    A search for physics beyond the standard model in events with at least three leptons is presented. The data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns of proton-proton collisions with center-of-mass energy sqrt(s) = 8 TeV, was collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC during 2012. The data are divided into exclusive categories based on the number of leptons and their flavor, the presence or absence of an opposite-sign, same-flavor lepton pair (OSSF), the invariant mass of the OSSF pair, the presence or absence of a tagged bottom-quark jet, the number of identified hadronically decaying tau leptons, and the magnitude of the missing transverse energy and of the scalar sum of jet transverse momenta. The numbers of observed events are found to be consistent with the expected numbers from standard model processes, and limits are placed on new-physics scenarios that yield multilepton final states. In particular, scenarios that predict Higgs boson production in the context of supersymmetric decay chains are examined. We also place a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.3% on the branching fraction for the decay of a top quark to a charm quark and a Higgs boson (t to c H), which translates to a bound on the left- and right-handed top-charm flavor-violating Higgs Yukawa couplings, lambda[H, tc] and lambda[H, ct], respectively, of sqrt(abs(lambda[H, tc])^2 + abs(lambda[H, ct])^2) < 0.21.

  10. Reply to "Comment on papers by K. Shanahan that propose to explain anomalous heat generated by cold fusion", E. Storms, Thermochim. Acta (2005)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanahan, Kirk

    2005-09-21

    Dr. E. Storms has published a Letter [1] in which he argues that in a sequence of recent papers [2-5], the apparent excess heat signal claimed by Dr. Shanahan to arise from a calibration constant shift is actually true excess heat. In particular he proposes that the mechanisms proposed that foster the proposed calibration constant shifts [3,5] cannot occur as postulated for several reasons. As well, he proposes Shanahan has ignored the extant data proving this. Because this Letter may lend unwarranted support to acceptance of cold fusion claims, these erroneous arguments used by Storms need to be answered.

  11. Communication: Localized molecular orbital analysis of the effect of electron correlation on the anomalous isotope effect in the NMR spin-spin coupling constant in methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarycz, M. Natalia C. Provasi, Patricio F.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2014-10-21

    We discuss the effect of electron correlation on the unexpected differential sensitivity (UDS) in the {sup 1}J(CH) coupling constant of CH{sub 4} using a decomposition into contributions from localized molecular orbitals and compare with the {sup 1}J(NH) coupling constant in NH{sub 3}. In particular, we discuss the well known fact that uncorrelated coupled Hartree-Fock (CHF) calculations are not able to reproduce the UDS in methane. For this purpose we have implemented for the first time a localized molecular orbital analysis for the second order polarization propagator approximation with coupled cluster singles and doubles amplitudesSOPPA(CCSD) in the DALTON program. Comparing the changes in the localized orbital contributions at the correlated SOPPA and SOPPA(CCSD) levels and at the uncorrelated CHF level, we find that the latter overestimates the effect of stretching the bond between the coupled atoms on the contribution to the coupling from the localized bonding orbital between these atoms. This disturbs the subtle balance between the molecular orbital contributions, which lead to the UDS in methane.

  12. Anomalous change in dielectric constant of CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} under violet-to-ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masingboon, C.; Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kasetsart University, Chalermphrakiat Sakon Nakhon Province Campus, Sakon Nakhon 47000 ; Eknapakul, T.; Suwanwong, S.; Buaphet, P.; Nakajima, H.; Mo, S.-K.; Thongbai, P.; King, P. D. C.; Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 ; Maensiri, S.; Meevasana, W.; Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Bangkok 10400; NANOTEC-SUT Center of Excellence on Advanced Functional Nanomaterials, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000

    2013-05-20

    The influence of light illumination on the dielectric constant of CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} (CCTO) polycrystals is studied in this work. When exposed to 405-nm laser light, a reversible enhancement in the room temperature capacitance as high as 22% was observed, suggesting application of light-sensitive capacitance devices. To uncover the microscopic mechanisms mediating this change, we performed electronic structure measurements, using photoemission spectroscopy, and measured the electrical conductivity of the CCTO samples under different conditions of light exposure and oxygen partial pressure. Together, these results suggest that the large capacitance enhancement is driven by oxygen vacancies induced by the irradiation.

  13. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous HVV couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-13

    The study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the $\\mathrm{H} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{Z} \\mathrm{Z}$, $\\mathrm{Z}\\gamma^*$, $\\gamma^*\\gamma^* \\rightarrow 4\\ell$, $\\mathrm{H} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{W} \\mathrm{W} \\rightarrow \\ell\

  14. Structure-Curie temperature relationships in BaTiO 3 -based ferroelect...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ferroelectric perovskites: Anomalous behavior of ( Ba , Cd ) TiO 3 from DFT, ... ferroelectric perovskites: Anomalous behavior of ( Ba , Cd ) TiO 3 from DFT, ...

  15. SASSI Subtraction Method Effects at Various DOE projects

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Building, Vertical Roof Response CJCAssociates 21 Lessons Learned Subtraction can lead to anomalous response Anomalous response occurs at and above the natural...

  16. Semiconductor laser with multiple lasing wavelengths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-07-29

    A new class of multi-terminal vertical-cavity semiconductor laser components has been developed. These multi-terminal laser components can be switched, either electrically or optically, between distinct lasing wavelengths, or can be made to lase simultaneously at multiple wavelengths.

  17. Modification of solid state CdZnTe (CZT) radiation detectors with high sensitivity or high resolution operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Washington, II, Aaron L; Duff, Martine C; Teague, Lucile C; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael

    2014-11-11

    An apparatus and process is provided to illustrate the manipulation of the internal electric field of CZT using multiple wavelength light illumination on the crystal surface at RT. The control of the internal electric field is shown through the polarization in the IR transmission image under illumination as a result of the Pockels effect.

  18. A double crystal monochromator using tangentially bend crystals in combination with toroidal mirror focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Jun, Thompson,A.C.; Padmore,H.A.

    2000-02-24

    In collaboration with the Chemistry Department at the University of California at Berkeley, the ALS is building a beamline for structural determination in materials chemistry. The system will be used for single crystal x-ray diffraction on crystals that are too small or disordered for examination on laboratory systems, and typically will be used for crystals in the 5 - 20 micron regime. As some of the materials being designed are of the size of small proteins, phasing using direct methods is problematic, and so use of multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion techniques will be employed in many cases. The production of new compounds has been revolutionized in recent years with the development of combinatorial synthesis techniques, and a major b2048 to further advances in this field is access to rapid measurement of structural parameters. The specification of the beamline follows from these points. It must have a small focal spot to match closely the size of the crystals, high resolution for MAD techniques, and a high flux in the small focus. The strategy for satisfying these constraints is to us a system which is compact and which uses the minimum number of components. This is done in this case by using a pseudo channel cut crystal monochromator with tangentially bent crystals, in combination with a 1:1 focusing toroidal mirror. The toroidal mirror at 1:1 magnification has only very small aberrations, and from a 220 (h) by 25 (v) [micro] m FWHM source, an image of 220 by 45 [micro]m FWHM should be produced for a 3 mrad horizontal aperture for a full vertical aperture. This has already been achieved on an existing beamline. The crystal monochromator uses tangentially bent crystals in a concave - convex configuration to achieve matching of Bragg angles to the divergent source, while maintaining zero focusing power. A useful feature of this arrangement is that while there is an optimum crystal curvature for each energy that gives the expected Darwin width limited resolution, fixing the curvature gives approximately ideal resolution over typically 2 keV for the ALS bending magnet source. A further simplification is that the whole optical system will be inside the shield wall, with only a small pipe emerging from the shield wall to feed a standard commercial diffraction system. This means that the mirror will be at only 6.5 m from the source. This means that the toroidal mirror can be as short as 300 mm while collecting most of the vertical radiation fan. In addition, as the required tangential slope error is related to the angular size of the source, putting the mirror close reduces the slope error requirements substantially. These aspects together should result in a simple, low cost and very high performance system for small crystal, small molecule cr2048llography.

  19. Influence of Ga content on the structure and anomalous Hall effect of Fe{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x} thin films on GaSb(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anh Tuan, Duong; Shin, Yooleemi; Viet Cuong, Tran; Cho, Sunglae; Phan, The-Long

    2014-05-07

    The Fe{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x} thin films (x = 0.4, 0.5) have been grown on GaSb(100) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy. An epitaxial film with bcc α-Fe crystal structure (A2) is observed in Fe{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4} film, while an impure Fe{sub 3}Ga phase with DO{sub 3} structure is appeared in Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5} film. The saturated magnetizations at room temperature are observed to be 570 emu/cm{sup 3} and 180 emu/cm{sup 3} and the coercivities to be 170 and 364 Oe for Fe{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4} and Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}, respectively. A hysteresis trend in Hall resistance vs. magnetic field is observed for Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5} film. However, there is a weak hysteresis noticed in Fe{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6} thin film.

  20. Final Technical Report for SBIR entitled Four-Dimensional Finite-Orbit-Width Fokker-Planck Code with Sources, for Neoclassical/Anomalous Transport Simulation of Ion and Electron Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu. V.

    2013-12-03

    Within the US Department of Energy/Office of Fusion Energy magnetic fusion research program, there is an important whole-plasma-modeling need for a radio-frequency/neutral-beam-injection (RF/NBI) transport-oriented finite-difference Fokker-Planck (FP) code with combined capabilities for 4D (2R2V) geometry near the fusion plasma periphery, and computationally less demanding 3D (1R2V) bounce-averaged capabilities for plasma in the core of fusion devices. Demonstration of proof-of-principle achievement of this goal has been carried out in research carried out under Phase I of the SBIR award. Two DOE-sponsored codes, the CQL3D bounce-average Fokker-Planck code in which CompX has specialized, and the COGENT 4D, plasma edge-oriented Fokker-Planck code which has been constructed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory scientists, where coupled. Coupling was achieved by using CQL3D calculated velocity distributions including an energetic tail resulting from NBI, as boundary conditions for the COGENT code over the two-dimensional velocity space on a spatial interface (flux) surface at a given radius near the plasma periphery. The finite-orbit-width fast ions from the CQL3D distributions penetrated into the peripheral plasma modeled by the COGENT code. This combined code demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed 3D/4D code. By combining these codes, the greatest computational efficiency is achieved subject to present modeling needs in toroidally symmetric magnetic fusion devices. The more efficient 3D code can be used in its regions of applicability, coupled to the more computationally demanding 4D code in higher collisionality edge plasma regions where that extended capability is necessary for accurate representation of the plasma. More efficient code leads to greater use and utility of the model. An ancillary aim of the project is to make the combined 3D/4D code user friendly. Achievement of full-coupling of these two Fokker-Planck codes will advance computational modeling of plasma devices important to the USDOE magnetic fusion energy program, in particular the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics, San Diego, the NSTX spherical tokamak at Princeton, New Jersey, and the MST reversed-field-pinch Madison, Wisconsin. The validation studies of the code against the experiments will improve understanding of physics important for magnetic fusion, and will increase our design capabilities for achieving the goals of the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) project in which the US is a participant and which seeks to demonstrate at least a factor of five in fusion power production divided by input power.

  1. Search for anomalous couplings in the W tb vertex from the measurement of double differential angular decay rates of single top quarks produced in the t-channel with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-04-05

    The electroweak production and subsequent decay of single top quarks is determined by the properties of the Wtb vertex. This vertex can be described by the complex parameters of an effective Lagrangian. An analysis of angular distributions of the decay products of single top quarks produced in the t -channel constrains these parameters simultaneously. The analysis described in this paper uses 4.6 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √s=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Two parameters are measured simultaneously in this analysis. The fraction f 1 of decays containing transversely polarised W bosons is measured tomore » be 0.37 ± 0.07 (stat.⊕syst.). The phase δ - between amplitudes for transversely and longitudinally polarised W bosons recoiling against left-handed b-quarks is measured to be -0.014π ± 0.036π (stat.⊕syst.). The correlation in the measurement of these parameters is 0.15. These values result in two-dimensional limits at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the complex coupling parameters g R and V L, yielding Re[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.36, 0.10] and Im[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.17, 0.23] with a correlation of 0.11. We find the results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model.« less

  2. Anomalous magnetic configuration of Mn{sub 2}NiAl ribbon and the role of hybridization in the martensitic transformation of Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 50−x}Al{sub x} ribbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, R. B.; Zhao, D. W.; Li, G. K.; Ma, L. E-mail: houdenglu@mail.hebtu.edu.cn; Zhen, C. M.; Hou, D. L. E-mail: houdenglu@mail.hebtu.edu.cn; Wang, W. H.; Liu, E. K.; Chen, J. L.; Wu, G. H.

    2014-12-08

    The magnetic configuration of Mn{sub 2}NiAl ribbon has been investigated. In contrast to Ni{sub 2}MnAl, the compound Mn{sub 2}NiAl with considerable disorder does exhibit ferromagnetism and, due to exchange interaction competition, both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic moment orientations can coexist between nearest neighbor Mn atoms. This is unexpected in Heusler alloys. Regarding the mechanism of the martensitic transformation in Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 50−x}Al{sub x}, it is found that increasing the Al content results in an unusual change in the lattice constant, a decrease of the transformation entropy change, and enhancement of the calculated electron localization. These results indicate that the p-d covalent hybridization between Mn (or Ni) and Al atoms gradually increases at the expense of the d-d hybridization between Ni and Mn atoms. This leads to an increased stability of the austenite phase and a decrease of the martensitic transformation temperature. For 11 ≤ x ≤ 14, Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 50−x}Al{sub x} ferromagnetic shape memory alloys are obtained.

  3. Eu3Ir2In15: A mixed-valent and vacancy-filled variant of the Sc5Co4Si10 structure type with anomalous magnetic properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sarkar, Sumanta; Jana, Rajkumar; Siva, Ramesh; Banerjee, Swastika; Pati, Swapan K.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Peter, Sebastian C.

    2015-10-27

    Here, a new compound, Eu3Ir2In15 has been synthesized using indium as an active metal flux. The compound crystallizes in tetragonal P4/mbm space group with lattice parameters, a = 14.8580(4) Å, b = 14.8580(4) Å, c = 4.3901(2) Å. It was further characterized by SEM-EDX studies. The temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility suggests that Eu in this compound is exclusively in divalent state. The effective magnetic moment (μeff) of this compound is 7.35 μB/Eu ion with paramagnetic Curie temperature (θp) of -28 K suggesting antiferromagnetic interaction. The mixed valent nature of Eu observed in magnetic measurements was confirmed by XANES measurements. Themore » compound undergoes demagnetization at a low magnetic field (10 Oe), which is quite unusual for Eu based intermetallic compounds. Temperature dependent resistivity studies reveal that the compound is metallic in nature. A comparative study was made between Eu3Ir2In15 and hypothetical vacancy variant Eu5Ir4In10 which also crystallizes in the same crystal structure However our computational studies along with control experiments suggest that the latter is thermodynamically less feasible compared to the former and hence we proposed that it is highly unlikely that a RE5T4X10 would exist with X as a group 13 elements.« less

  4. A Meaurement of the W+- production cross section in p anti-p collisions at sqroot(s)=1.96 TeV in the DiLepton channel and limits on anomalous WWZ/gamma couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGivern, Dustin; /University Coll. London

    2005-12-01

    Measurements of the production cross section of W{sup +}W{sup -} pairs in p{bar p} collisions at 1.96 TeV and limits on trilinear gauge boson coupling (TGC) parameters are presented. The data were recorded with the CDF experiment at Tevatron during the 2001 and 2002 data taking periods in which a total integrated luminosity of 184 pb{sup -1} was collected. The data sample was filtered for events with two leptonic w boson decays where the charged leptons can be either electrons or muons. 17 events are observed against an expected background of 5.0{sub -0.8}{sup +2.2} events. The resulting cross-section is found to be {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) = 14.5{sub -5.1}{sup +5.8}(stat){sub -3.0}{sup +1.8}(syst) {+-} 0.9(lum) pb and agrees well with the Standard Model expectation. Limits on the TGC parameters {Delta}{kappa} and {lambda} are set under both the equal coupling scheme, that assumes the W boson couples identically to the Z and {gamma}, and the HISZ coupling scheme, that requires the couplings to respect SU(2){sub L} x &(1){sub Y} gauge symmetry. In both cases this is achieved by using a likelihood fit to the lepton-P{sub T} distribution of the 17 candidate events. The resulting limits are found to be: -0.4 < {Delta}{kappa} < +0.6({lambda} = 0); -0.3 < {lambda} < +0.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) for the EQUAL couplings and -0.7 < {Delta}{kappa} < +0.9 ({lambda} = 0); -0.4 < {lambda} < +0.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) for the HISZ couplings.

  5. Apparatus and method for measuring fluorescence intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buican, Tudor N.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for measuring intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes. A source of multiple-wavelength electromagnetic radiation is passed through a first interferometer modulated at a first frequency, the output thereof being directed into a sample to be investigated. The light emitted from the sample as a result of the interaction thereof with the excitation radiation is directed into a second interferometer modulated at a second frequency, and the output detected and analyzed. In this manner excitation, emission, and lifetime information may be obtained for a multiplicity of fluorochomes in the sample.

  6. Apparatus and method for measuring fluorescence intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buican, T.N.

    1993-05-04

    Apparatus and method is described for measuring intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes. A source of multiple-wavelength electromagnetic radiation is passed through a first interferometer modulated at a first frequency, the output thereof being directed into a sample to be investigated. The light emitted from the sample as a result of the interaction thereof with the excitation radiation is directed into a second interferometer modulated at a second frequency, and the output detected and analyzed. In this manner excitation, emission, and lifetime information may be obtained for a multiplicity of fluorochromes in the sample.

  7. Eu3Ir2In15: A mixed-valent and vacancy-filled variant of the Sc5Co4Si10 structure type with anomalous magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Sumanta; Jana, Rajkumar; Siva, Ramesh; Banerjee, Swastika; Pati, Swapan K.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Peter, Sebastian C.

    2015-10-27

    Here, a new compound, Eu3Ir2In15 has been synthesized using indium as an active metal flux. The compound crystallizes in tetragonal P4/mbm space group with lattice parameters, a = 14.8580(4) Å, b = 14.8580(4) Å, c = 4.3901(2) Å. It was further characterized by SEM-EDX studies. The temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility suggests that Eu in this compound is exclusively in divalent state. The effective magnetic moment (μeff) of this compound is 7.35 μB/Eu ion with paramagnetic Curie temperature (θp) of -28 K suggesting antiferromagnetic interaction. The mixed valent nature of Eu observed in magnetic measurements was confirmed by XANES measurements. The compound undergoes demagnetization at a low magnetic field (10 Oe), which is quite unusual for Eu based intermetallic compounds. Temperature dependent resistivity studies reveal that the compound is metallic in nature. A comparative study was made between Eu3Ir2In15 and hypothetical vacancy variant Eu5Ir4In10 which also crystallizes in the same crystal structure However our computational studies along with control experiments suggest that the latter is thermodynamically less feasible compared to the former and hence we proposed that it is highly unlikely that a RE5T4X10 would exist with X as a group 13 elements.

  8. Efficient merging of data from multiple samples for determination of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    anomalous substructure (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Efficient merging of data from multiple samples for determination of anomalous substructure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Efficient merging of data from multiple samples for determination of anomalous substructure Authors: Akey, David L. ; Terwilliger, Thomas C. ; Smith, Janet L. [1] ; LANL) [2] + Show Author Affiliations Michigan ( Publication Date: 2016-03-07 OSTI Identifier: 1241062 Resource Type: Journal Article

  9. Hadron production in e+e- annihilation at BABAR, and implication for the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    muon anomalous magnetic moment (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Hadron production in e+e- annihilation at BABAR, and implication for the muon anomalous magnetic moment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hadron production in e+e- annihilation at BABAR, and implication for the muon anomalous magnetic moment The BABAR collaboration has an extensive program of studying hadronic cross sections in low-energy e+e- collisions, accessible via initial-state radiation. Our

  10. FWP-FEW0085-01104-0097 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... anomalous conditions such as plant kills and linear species modifications caused by subtle hidden faults, modifications of the terrain due to pipeline work or encroachment. ...

  11. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... V. ; Haraldsen, Jason T. Full Text Available July 2015 , American Chemical Society Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor junctions Ren, Jie ; ...

  12. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... V. ; Haraldsen, Jason T. Full Text Available July 2015 , American Chemical Society Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor junctions Ren, Jie ; ...

  13. Efficient merging of data from multiple samples for determination...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Efficient merging of data from multiple samples for determination of anomalous substructure Authors: Akey, David L. ; Terwilliger, Thomas C. ; Smith, Janet L. 1 ; LANL) ...

  14. Evaluation of Techniques to Detect Significant Network Performance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    persistent network problems using anomalous variations analysis in real end-to-end Internet performance measurements. We also provide methods andor guidance for how to set the...

  15. De novo protein crystal structure determination from X-ray free-electron laser data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Barends, Thomas, R.M.

    2013-11-25

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) data of microcrystals of a lysozyme gadolinium derivative. The data was used to demonstrate de-novo phasing by single anomalous dispersion.

  16. Searching for new physics at CDF (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We report on model-independent studies for anomalous production of ellgamma + X, ellgammabEsub T and gammagamma + Esub T, Standard Model tbar tgamma production. ...

  17. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations...

  18. Beamlines Directory | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BSL23 level Coherent x-ray scattering Detector testing Differential phase contrast Diffraction anomalous fine structure Diffuse x-ray scattering Energy dispersive x-ray...

  19. Two-fluid description of wave-particle interactions in strong...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Two-fluid description of wave-particle interactions in strong Buneman turbulence To understand the nature of anomalous resistivity in magnetic reconnection, we investigate ...

  20. Links

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Useful Links BIOSYNC: Structural Biology Synchrotron Users Organization X-ray Anomalous Scattering Going MAD at CHESS Protein Data Bank Protein Data Bank Search International...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... July 2015 Anomalous plasma transport and induced electric field in a stochastic magnetic field structure Kubota, Tetsuyuki ; Itoh, Sanae-I. ; Toda, Shinichiro ; Yamaguchi, Hiroki ...

  2. Evidence for a Crustal Heat Source for Low-Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is anomalously high due to significant concentrations ofradioactive elements U, Th and K. High heat production in granitesmay be responsiblehfor local elevation of the...

  3. Method for non-referential defect characterization using fractal encoding and active contours

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gleason, Shaun S.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed

    2007-05-15

    A method for identification of anomalous structures, such as defects, includes the steps of providing a digital image and applying fractal encoding to identify a location of at least one anomalous portion of the image. The method does not require a reference image to identify the location of the anomalous portion. The method can further include the step of initializing an active contour based on the location information obtained from the fractal encoding step and deforming an active contour to enhance the boundary delineation of the anomalous portion.

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anomalous Radiative Absorption and Unbounded Cascade Models of Cloud Fields Schertzer, D., and Larchevque, M., Universit P.&M. Curie, Paris, France; Lovejoy, S., McGill...

  5. Mixed valency and site-preference chemistry for cerium and its...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from two competing oxidation states-itinerant Ce4+ and localized Ce3+. Under applied stress, anomalous transitions are observed but not well understood. Here we treat mixed...

  6. Geothermometry At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    have been commonly used in Hawaii for identifying geothermal potential (i.e. silica concentration and chloride to magnesium ion ratios) were anomalous in the groundwater of this...

  7. Application Of Remote Sensing To Geothermal Prospecting | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    << signatures a are also presented. Multiband photography in the visible and near infra-red was used to delineate anomalous spectral reflectance associated with hydrothermal...

  8. Autonomous global sky monitoring with real-time robotic follow...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    anomalous behavior, selecting targets for detailed investigation, and making real-time anomaly detection to enable rapid recognition and a swift response to transients as...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    recognizing anomalous behavior, selecting targets for detailed investigation, and making real-time anomaly detection to enable rapid recognition and a swift response to...

  10. Nearly Flatbands with Nontrivial Topology (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nontrivial nearly flatbands may lead to the realization of fractional anomalous quantum Hall states and fractional topological insulators in real materials. Among the models we...

  11. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1983...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Basis To study anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust Notes V s and V p wave amplitudes were measured from vertical component seismograms of...

  12. OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Informatio...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... free service to enhance the Department of Energy's management of this important resource. ... their properties display unexpected, anomalous behavior as a result of the Kondo effect. ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... (IA) (United States) USDOE Office of Management and Administration (United States) ... Anomalous Elastic Behavior in hcp- and Sm-Type Dysprosium Tschauner, Oliver ; ...

  14. Experimental Station 14-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Single wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) Main Scientific Disciplines Structural Molecular Biology Beam Line Specifications Source Bending Magnet Source Bending magnet, side...

  15. Direct Measurement of the Neutral Weak Dipole Moments of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ... We present direct measurements of the neutral weak anomalous magnetic dipole moment, asub ...

  16. Free-Space optical interconnects for cable-less readout in particle physics detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chramowicz, John; Kwan, Simon; Moretti, Tony; Sugg, Alan; Prosser, Alan; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Particle physics detectors utilize readout data links requiring a complicated network of copper wires or optical fibers. These links are both massive and costly. Upgrades to such detectors may require additional bandwidth to be provisioned with limited space available to route new cables or fibers. In contrast, free-space optical interconnects will offer cable-less readout, thereby resulting in significant reductions of material and labor. A collaborative effort between Fermilab and Vega Wave Systems is pursuing the development of a unique free-space optical link design that utilizes the transparency of silicon at wavelengths including 1310 nm and multiple wavelengths used in standard telecommunications applications such as coarse wavelength division multiplexing (CWDM). The first step in the pursuit of that design is a proof that the concept may be viable. To that end, experiments have been performed to characterize the bit error rate performance of a prototype link over a free-space optical path and through doped silicon at multi-gigabit rates. These experiments have demonstrated that operation within acceptable bit error rates is possible using single and multiple wavelength transmission arrangements.

  17. Polarization-independent optical wavelength filter for channel dropping applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deri, Robert J.; Patterson, Frank

    1996-01-01

    The polarization dependence of optical wavelength filters is eliminated by using waveguide directional couplers. Material birefringence is used to compensate for the waveguide (electromagnetic) birefringence which is the original cause of the polarization dependence. Material birefringence is introduced in a controllable fashion by replacing bulk waveguide layers by finely layered composites, such as multiple quantum wells using III-V semiconductor materials. The filter has use in wavelength-division-multiplexed fiber optic communication systems. This filter has broad application for wavelength-tunable receivers in fiber optic communication links, which may be used for telecommunications, optical computer interconnect links, or fiber optic sensor systems. Since multiple-wavelength systems are increasingly being used for all of these applications, the filter is useable whenever a rapidly tunable, wavelength-filtering receiver is required.

  18. Polarization-independent optical wavelength filter for channel dropping applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deri, R.J.; Patterson, F.

    1996-05-07

    The polarization dependence of optical wavelength filters is eliminated by using waveguide directional couplers. Material birefringence is used to compensate for the waveguide (electromagnetic) birefringence which is the original cause of the polarization dependence. Material birefringence is introduced in a controllable fashion by replacing bulk waveguide layers by finely layered composites, such as multiple quantum wells using III-V semiconductor materials. The filter has use in wavelength-division multiplexed fiber optic communication systems. This filter has broad application for wavelength-tunable receivers in fiber optic communication links, which may be used for telecommunications, optical computer interconnect links, or fiber optic sensor systems. Since multiple-wavelength systems are increasingly being used for all of these applications, the filter is useable whenever a rapidly tunable, wavelength-filtering receiver is required. 14 figs.

  19. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Biefeld, Robert M.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    1999-01-01

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  20. Optical steam quality measurement system and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, James R.; Partin, Judy K.

    2006-04-25

    An optical measurement system is presented that offers precision on-line monitoring of the quality of steam. Multiple wavelengths of radiant energy are passed through the steam from an emitter to a detector. By comparing the amount of radiant energy absorbed by the flow of steam for each wavelength, a highly accurate measurement of the steam quality can be determined on a continuous basis in real-time. In an embodiment of the present invention, the emitter, comprises three separate radiant energy sources for transmitting specific wavelengths of radiant energy through the steam. In a further embodiment, the wavelengths of radiant energy are combined into a single beam of radiant energy for transmission through the steam using time or wavelength division multiplexing. In yet a further embodiment, the single beam of radiant energy is transmitted using specialized optical elements.

  1. Gemini Planet Imager Spectroscopy of the HR 8799 Planets c and d

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ingraham, Patrick; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Marois, Christian; Macintosh, Bruce; Barman, Travis; Bauman, Brian; Burrows, Adam; Chilcote, Jeffrey K.; De Rosa, Robert J.; et al

    2014-09-30

    During the first-light run of the Gemini Planet Imager we obtained K-band spectra of exoplanets HR 8799 c and d. Analysis of the spectra indicates that planet d may be warmer than planet c. Comparisons to recent patchy cloud models and previously obtained observations over multiple wavelengths confirm that thick clouds combined with horizontal variation in the cloud cover generally reproduce the planets’ spectral energy distributions.When combined with the 3 to 4μm photometric data points, the observations provide strong constraints on the atmospheric methane content for both planets. Lastly, the data also provide further evidence that future modeling efforts mustmore » include cloud opacity, possibly including cloud holes, disequilibrium chemistry, and super-solar metallicity.« less

  2. ALSNews Vol. 363

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p.m. Friday. The ring status can be seen in real time at http:www-als.lbl.govindex.phpbeamlinesbeam-status.html. newslinks ALS in the News Anomalous Light-Like Behavior...

  3. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Anomalous Coulomb Drag in Electron-Hole Bilayers due to the Formation of Excitons Efimkin, Dmitry K. ; Galitski, ...

  4. An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of Tule...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    bounds characterizing axisymmetric bodies from a set of gravity data. Bounds on the density contrast as a function of depth to the top and thickness of the anomalous source are...

  5. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene Tse, Wang-Kong ; Qiao, Zhenhua ; Yao, Yugui ; MacDonald, A. H. ; Niu, Qian Full Text Available April 2011 , ...

  6. Elevated carbon dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    site near the Stillwater Fault to 0.1 t dayy1 from a 0.01-km2 location of steaming ground on the valley floor. Anomalous CO2 flux is positively correlated with shallow...

  7. Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Quarterly Progress...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... turbidity, and temperature recorded at the time ... was anomalously low at 0.048 milligrams per liter (mgL). ... chemical is added to the treatment system influent water for ...

  8. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of high b-value anomalies withmagma reservoirs is confirmed. References M. Wyss, F. Klein, K. Nagamine, S. Wiemer (2001) Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea...

  9. Structure-Curie temperature relationships in BaTiO 3 -based ferroelectric

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    perovskites: Anomalous behavior of ( Ba , Cd ) TiO 3 from DFT, statistical inference, and experiments (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Structure-Curie temperature relationships in BaTiO 3 -based ferroelectric perovskites: Anomalous behavior of ( Ba , Cd ) TiO 3 from DFT, statistical inference, and experiments Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on April 11, 2017 Title: Structure-Curie temperature relationships in BaTiO 3 -based ferroelectric

  10. Producing a Radioactive Source in a Deuterated Palladium Electrode Under Direct-Current Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Kazuyoshi; Kawata, Nobuhiko; Kurisawa, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Mitsuru

    2001-03-15

    Anomalous gamma emission was rarely observed during direct-current glow discharge in {approx}3 Torrs of deuterium gas using a deuterated palladium foil cathode. Autoradiography after the discharge experiment showed that isotopes with low- and high-energy radiation components were produced before or during the discharge. The palladium foil after the anomalous gamma-ray emission was analyzed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy, which revealed a considerable increase in the content of iron and copper on the surface.

  11. Magnetic measurements on ??CS{sub 2}U{sub 4}O{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanrar, Buddhadev Misra, N. L.; Sastry, P. U.; Dube, V.; Ravikumar, G.

    2014-04-24

    Magnetic and XRD measurements on ??CS{sub 2}U{sub 4}O{sub 12} having uranium in mixed valent states of U (V) and U (VI) have been made. The study reveals that the compound undergoes an antiferromagnetic transition below 25K and an anomalous magnetic behavior was seen around 75K. This anomalous behavior indicates towards a structural phase transition. However, the low temperature XRD could not confirm this observation.

  12. Infrared singularities of scattering amplitudes in perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becher, Thomas; Neubert, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    An exact formula is derived for the infrared singularities of dimensionally regularized scattering amplitudes in massless QCD with an arbitrary number of legs, valid at any number of loops. It is based on the conjecture that the anomalous-dimension matrix of n-jet operators in soft-collinear effective theory contains only a single non-trivial color structure, whose coefficient is the cusp anomalous dimension of Wilson loops with light-like segments. Its color-diagonal part is characterized by two anomalous dimensions, which are extracted to three-loop order from known perturbative results for the quark and gluon form factors. This allows us to predict the three-loop coefficients of all 1/epsilon^k poles for an arbitrary n-parton scattering amplitudes, generalizing existing two-loop results.

  13. Ion Thermal Decoupling and Species Separation in Shock-Driven Implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kagan, G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sio, H.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P.; Bellei, C.; Wilks, S.; Delettrez, J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2015-01-14

    Anomalous reduction of the fusion yields by 50% and anomalous scaling of the burn-averaged ion temperatures with the ion-species fraction has been observed for the first time in DHe3-filled shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions. Two ion kinetic mechanisms are used to explain the anomalous observations: thermal decoupling of the D and He3 populations and diffusive species separation. The observed insensitivity of ion temperature to a varying deuterium fraction is shown to be a signature of ion thermal decoupling in shock-heated plasmas. The burn-averaged deuterium fraction calculated from the experimental data demonstrates a reduction in the average core deuterium density, as predicted by simulations that use a diffusion model. Accounting for each of these effects in simulations reproduces the observed yield trends.

  14. Ion Thermal Decoupling and Species Separation in Shock-Driven Implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kagan, G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sio, H.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; et al

    2015-01-14

    Anomalous reduction of the fusion yields by 50% and anomalous scaling of the burn-averaged ion temperatures with the ion-species fraction has been observed for the first time in DHe3-filled shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions. Two ion kinetic mechanisms are used to explain the anomalous observations: thermal decoupling of the D and He3 populations and diffusive species separation. The observed insensitivity of ion temperature to a varying deuterium fraction is shown to be a signature of ion thermal decoupling in shock-heated plasmas. The burn-averaged deuterium fraction calculated from the experimental data demonstrates a reduction in the average core deuterium density, asmore » predicted by simulations that use a diffusion model. Accounting for each of these effects in simulations reproduces the observed yield trends.« less

  15. Single field inflation in supergravity with a U(1) gauge symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heurtier, L.; Khalil, S.; Moursy, A.

    2015-10-19

    A single field inflation based on a supergravity model with a shift symmetry and U(1) extension of the MSSM is analyzed. We show that one of the real components of the two U(1) charged scalar fields plays the role of inflaton with an effective scalar potential similar to the “new chaotic inflation” scenario. Both non-anomalous and anomalous (with Fayet-Iliopoulos term) U(1) are studied. We show that the non-anomalous U(1) scenario is consistent with data of the cosmic microwave background and recent astrophysical measurements. A possible kinetic mixing between U(1) and U(1){sub B−L} is considered in order to allow for natural decay channels of the inflaton, leading to a reheating epoch. Upper limits on the reheating temperature thus turn out to favour an intermediate (∼O(10{sup 13}) GeV) scale B−L symmetry breaking.

  16. Ion Thermal Decoupling and Species Separation in Shock-Driven Implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kagan, G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sio, H.; Frenje, J. A,; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P.; Bellei, C.; Wilks, S.; Delettrez, J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous reduction of the fusion yields by 50% and anomalous scaling of the burn-averaged ion temperatures with the ion-species fraction has been observed for the first time in DHe3-filled shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions. Two ion kinetic mechanisms are used to explain the anomalous observations: thermal decoupling of the D and He3 populations and diffusive species separation. The observed insensitivity of ion temperature to a varying deuterium fraction is shown to be a signature of ion thermal decoupling in shock-heated plasmas. The burn-averaged deuterium fraction calculated from the experimental data demonstrates a reduction in the average core deuterium density, as predicted by simulations that use a diffusion model. Accounting for each of these effects in simulations reproduces the observed yield trends.

  17. This content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23/07/2015 at 15:15 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Dynamo and anomalous transport in the reversed field pinch View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 1999 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41 A129 (http://iopscience.iop.org/0741-3335/41/3A/008) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41 (1999) A129-A142. Printed in the UK PII: S0741-3335(99)97508-5 Dynamo and anomalous transport in the

  18. Exotic physics: search for new physics leading to high mass tau pairs with ppbar collisions at 1.96 tev using cdf ii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-06-14

    We present the results of a search for anomalous resonant production of tau lepton pairs with large invariant mass, the first such search using the CDF II Detector in Run II of the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Such anomalous production could arise from various new physics processes. In a data sample corresponding to 195 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity we predict 2.8 {+-} 0.5 events from Standard Model background processes and observe 4. We use this result to set limits on the production of heavy scalar and vector particles decaying to tau lepton pairs.

  19. Analysis of the published calorimetric evidence for electrochemical fusion of deuterium in palladium. Technical report. [Cold fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miskelly, G.M.; Heben, M.J.; Kumar, A.; Penner, R.M.; Sailor, M.J.

    1989-11-10

    Estimates are given of the raw data that are the basis for the claims of excess power production by the electrochemical charging of palladium in deuterium oxide (D2O). Calorimetric results are also presented that show no anomalous power production in either 0.1 M LiOD/D2O or 0.1 M LiOH/H2O (LiOH is lithium hydroxide). Several possible sources of error in open-system calorimetry are discussed that can confound interpretation of temperature changes in terms of anomalous power production.

  20. Analysis of the published calorimetric evidence for electrochemical fusion of deuterium in palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miskelly, G.M.; Heben, M.J.; Kumar, A.; Penner, R.M.; Sailor, M.J.; Lewis, N.S. )

    1989-11-10

    Estimates are given of the raw data that are the basis for the claims of excess power production by the electrochemical charging of palladium in deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O). Calorimetric results are also presented that show no anomalous power production in either 0.1M LiOD/D{sub 2}O or 0.1M LiOH/H{sub 2}O (LiOH is lithium hydroxide). Several possible sources of error in open-system calorimetry are discussed that can confound interpretation of temperature changes in terms of anomalous power production. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tab.

  1. Synoptic Overview of RACORO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synoptic Overview of RACORO Daniel Hartsock and Pete Lamb - OU CIMMS Jason Tomlinson - PNNL 2009 ARM Science Team Meeting March 31 st , 2009 Louisville, KY Synoptic Overview * What is going on with the weather? * The following slides will give some insight into why the weather has been so anomalous Anomalously Dry 2009 Below Average Precipitation Oklahoma State-wide Precipitation Data March 1-30, 2009: 2.36 in Below Average Precipitation Warm January & February 2009 January 1-2 deg F warmer

  2. Resolving Material-Specific Structures within Fe[subscript 3]O[subscript

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    4]|[gamma]-Mn[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] Core|Shell Nanoparticles Using Anomalous Small-Angle X-ray Scattering (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Resolving Material-Specific Structures within Fe[subscript 3]O[subscript 4]|[gamma]-Mn[subscript 2]O[subscript 3] Core|Shell Nanoparticles Using Anomalous Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Resolving Material-Specific Structures within Fe[subscript 3]O[subscript 4]|[gamma]-Mn[subscript 2]O[subscript 3]

  3. Photoplethysmography beyond perfusion and oxygenation monitoring: Pulse wave analysis for hepatic graft monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akl, Tony; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Cote, Gerard L.

    2014-01-01

    Photoplethysmography is a widely used technique in monitoring perfusion and blood oxygen saturation by using the amplitude of the pulsatile signal on one or multiple wavelengths. However, the pulsatile signal carries in its waveform a substantial amount of information about the mechanical properties of the tissue and vasculature under investigation that is still yet to be utilized to its full potential. In this work, we present the feasibility of pulse wave analysis for the application of monitoring hepatic implants and diagnosing graft complications. In particular, we show the possibility of computing the slope of the pulse during the diastole phase to assess the location of vascular complications when they take place. This hypothesis was tested in a series of in vitro experiments using a PDMS based phantom mimicking the optical and mechanical properties of the portal vein. The emptying time of the vessel increased from 305 ms to 515 ms when an occlusion was induced downstream from the phantom. However, in the case of upstream occlusions, the emptying time remained constant. In both cases, a decrease in the amplitude of the pulse was recorded indicating the drop in flow levels. In addition, we show that quantifying the emptying time of the vasculature under investigation can be used to assess its compliance. The emptying time decreased from 305 ms for phantoms with compliance of 15 KPa to 195 ms for phantoms with compliance of 100 KPa. These compliance levels mimic those seen for normal and fibrotic hepatic tissue respectively.

  4. Systematic wavelength selection for improved multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Edward V.; Robinson, Mark R.; Haaland, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for determining in a biological material one or more unknown values of at least one known characteristic (e.g. the concentration of an analyte such as glucose in blood or the concentration of one or more blood gas parameters) with a model based on a set of samples with known values of the known characteristics and a multivariate algorithm using several wavelength subsets. The method includes selecting multiple wavelength subsets, from the electromagnetic spectral region appropriate for determining the known characteristic, for use by an algorithm wherein the selection of wavelength subsets improves the model's fitness of the determination for the unknown values of the known characteristic. The selection process utilizes multivariate search methods that select both predictive and synergistic wavelengths within the range of wavelengths utilized. The fitness of the wavelength subsets is determined by the fitness function F=.function.(cost, performance). The method includes the steps of: (1) using one or more applications of a genetic algorithm to produce one or more count spectra, with multiple count spectra then combined to produce a combined count spectrum; (2) smoothing the count spectrum; (3) selecting a threshold count from a count spectrum to select these wavelength subsets which optimize the fitness function; and (4) eliminating a portion of the selected wavelength subsets. The determination of the unknown values can be made: (1) noninvasively and in vivo; (2) invasively and in vivo; or (3) in vitro.

  5. Distributed low-mass star formation in the IRDC G34.43+00.24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, Jonathan B.; Arce, Hctor G.; Offner, Stella; Kassis, Marc; Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, James M.; Finn, Susanna C.; Sakai, Takeshi; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Guzmn, Andrs E.; Rathborne, Jill M.

    2014-08-20

    We have used deep near-infrared observations with adaptive optics to discover a distributed population of low-mass protostars within the filamentary Infrared Dark Cloud G34.43+00.24. We use maps of dust emission at multiple wavelengths to determine the column density structure of the cloud. In combination with an empirically verified model of the magnitude distribution of background stars, this column density map allows us to reliably determine overdensities of red sources that are due to embedded protostars in the cloud. We also identify protostars through their extended emission in the K band, which comes from excited H{sub 2} in protostellar outflows or reflection nebulosity. We find a population of distributed low-mass protostars, suggesting that low-mass protostars may form earlier than, or contemporaneously with, high-mass protostars in such a filament. The low-mass protostellar population may also produce the narrow line-width SiO emission observed in some clouds without high-mass protostars. Finally, we use a molecular line map of the cloud to determine the virial parameter per unit length along the filament and find that the highest mass protostars form in the most bound portion of the filament, as suggested by theoretical models.

  6. SSRL HEADLINES Nov 2002

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 November, 2002 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Towards the Chemically Specific Structure of Amorphous Materials: Anomalous X-ray Scattering from a Molybdenum-Germanium Alloy U.S. Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham Visits SLAC Critical Decision 1 Approval Moves LCLS Project Forward SLAC-DESY MOU Amped Up and Ready to Go! Organizational Changes in Macromolecular Crystallography Group User Research

  7. Using analytic continuation for the hadronic vacuum polarization computation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Xu; Hashimoto, Shoji; Hotzel, Grit; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus; Renner Dru B

    2014-11-01

    We present two examples of applications of the analytic continuation method for computing the hadronic vacuum polarization function in space- and time-like momentum regions. These examples are the Adler function and the leading order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment. We comment on the feasibility of the analytic continuation method and provide an outlook for possible further applications.

  8. Investigation of ELM [edge localized mode] Dynamics with the Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pankin, Alexei Y.; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2011-07-19

    Topics covered are: anomalous transport and E x B flow shear effects in the H-mode pedestal; RMP (resonant magnetic perturbation) effects in NSTX discharges; development of a scaling of H-mode pedestal in tokamak plasmas with type I ELMs (edge localized modes); and divertor heat load studies.

  9. The search for extended air showers at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, D.; Chau, J.; Galindo, F.; Huaman, A.; Solano, C. J.

    2009-04-30

    This paper presents the status of the project to detect extended air showers at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. We report on detected anomalous signals and present a toy model to estimate at what altitudes we might expect to see air shower signals. According to this model, a significant number of high altitude horizontal air showers could be observed by radar techniques.

  10. Detector signal correction method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, Robert M. (Glastonbury, CT); Duran, Andrew J. (Oviedo, FL); Kudman, Irwin (Boca Raton, FL)

    1995-07-11

    Corrective factors are applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factors may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects.

  11. TEMPEST Simulations of the Plasma Transport in a Single-Null Tokamak Geometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    X. Q. Xu; Bodi, K.; Cohen, R. H.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2010-05-28

    We present edge kinetic ion transport simulations of tokamak plasmas in magnetic divertor geometry using the fully nonlinear (full-f) continuum code TEMPEST. Besides neoclassical transport, a term for divergence of anomalous kinetic radial flux is added to mock up the effect of turbulent transport. In order to study the relative roles of neoclassical and anomalous transport, TEMPEST simulations were carried out for plasma transport and flow dynamics in a single-null tokamak geometry, including the pedestal region that extends across the separatrix into the scrape-off layer and private flux region. In a series of TEMPEST simulations were conducted to investigate themore » transition of midplane pedestal heat flux and flow from the neoclassical to the turbulent limit and the transition of divertor heat flux and flow from the kinetic to the fluid regime via an anomalous transport scan and a density scan. The TEMPEST simulation results demonstrate that turbulent transport (as modelled by large diffusion) plays a similar role to collisional decorrelation of particle orbits and that the large turbulent transport (large diffusion) leads to an apparent Maxwellianization of the particle distribution. Moreover, we show the transition of parallel heat flux and flow at the entrance to the divertor plates from the fluid to the kinetic regime. For an absorbing divertor plate boundary condition, a non-half-Maxwellian is found due to the balance between upstream radial anomalous transport and energetic ion endloss.« less

  12. Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe Fetterman, Yevgeny Raitses, and Michael Keidar

    2008-04-08

    The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

  13. FY2014 Parameters for Helions and Gold Ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, C. J.

    2014-08-15

    The nominal parameters for helions (helion is the bound state of two protons and one neutron, the nucleus of a helium-3 atom) and gold ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC are given for the FY2014 running period. The parameters are found using various formulas to derive mass, helion anomalous g-factor, kinetic parameters, RF parameters, ring parameters, etc..

  14. METHANE IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF THE TRANSITING HOT NEPTUNE GJ436B?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, J.-P.; Batista, V.; Tinetti, G.; Kipping, D. M.; Barber, R. J.; Tennyson, J.; Waldmann, I.; Miller, S.; Fossey, S. J.; Aylward, A.; Ribas, I.; Cho, J. Y.-K.; Polichtchouk, I.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Griffith, C. A.; Carey, S.; Mousis, O.

    2011-04-10

    We present an analysis of seven primary transit observations of the hot Neptune GJ436b at 3.6, 4.5, and 8 {mu}m obtained with the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope. After correcting for systematic effects, we fitted the light curves using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique. Combining these new data with the EPOXI, Hubble Space Telescope, and ground-based V, I, H, and K{sub s} published observations, the range 0.5-10 {mu}m can be covered. Due to the low level of activity of GJ436, the effect of starspots on the combination of transits at different epochs is negligible at the accuracy of the data set. Representative climate models were calculated by using a three-dimensional, pseudospectral general circulation model with idealized thermal forcing. Simulated transit spectra of GJ436b were generated using line-by-line radiative transfer models including the opacities of the molecular species expected to be present in such a planetary atmosphere. A new, ab-initio-calculated, line list for hot ammonia has been used for the first time. The photometric data observed at multiple wavelengths can be interpreted with methane being the dominant absorption after molecular hydrogen, possibly with minor contributions from ammonia, water, and other molecules. No clear evidence of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide is found from transit photometry. We discuss this result in the light of a recent paper where photochemical disequilibrium is hypothesized to interpret secondary transit photometric data. We show that the emission photometric data are not incompatible with the presence of abundant methane, but further spectroscopic data are desirable to confirm this scenario.

  15. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIO AND X-RAY MODELING AND DATA ANALYSIS SOFTWARE: REVEALING FLARE COMPLEXITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nita, Gelu M.; Fleishman, Gregory D.; Gary, Dale E.; Kuznetsov, Alexey A.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2015-02-01

    Many problems in solar physics require analysis of imaging data obtained in multiple wavelength domains with differing spatial resolution in a framework supplied by advanced three-dimensional (3D) physical models. To facilitate this goal, we have undertaken a major enhancement of our IDL-based simulation tools developed earlier for modeling microwave and X-ray emission. The enhanced software architecture allows the user to (1) import photospheric magnetic field maps and perform magnetic field extrapolations to generate 3D magnetic field models; (2) investigate the magnetic topology by interactively creating field lines and associated flux tubes; (3) populate the flux tubes with user-defined nonuniform thermal plasma and anisotropic, nonuniform, nonthermal electron distributions; (4) investigate the spatial and spectral properties of radio and X-ray emission calculated from the model; and (5) compare the model-derived images and spectra with observational data. The package integrates shared-object libraries containing fast gyrosynchrotron emission codes, IDL-based soft and hard X-ray codes, and potential and linear force-free field extrapolation routines. The package accepts user-defined radiation and magnetic field extrapolation plug-ins. We use this tool to analyze a relatively simple single-loop flare and use the model to constrain the magnetic 3D structure and spatial distribution of the fast electrons inside this loop. We iteratively compute multi-frequency microwave and multi-energy X-ray images from realistic magnetic flux tubes obtained from pre-flare extrapolations, and compare them with imaging data obtained by SDO, NoRH, and RHESSI. We use this event to illustrate the tool's use for the general interpretation of solar flares to address disparate problems in solar physics.

  16. SU-E-T-20: A Novel Hybrid CBCT, Bioluminescence and Fluorescence Tomography System for Preclinical Radiation Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, B; Eslami, S; Iordachita, I; Yang, Y; Patterson, M; Wong, J; Wang, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A novel standalone bioluminescence and fluorescence tomography (BLT and FT) system equipped with high resolution CBCT has been built in our group. In this work, we present the system calibration method and validate our system in both phantom and in vivo environment. Methods: The CBCT is acquired by rotating the animal stage while keeping the x-ray source and detector panel static. The optical signal is reflected by the 3-mirror system to a multispectral filter set and then delivered to the CCD camera with f/1.4 lens mounted. Nine fibers passing through the stage and in contact with the mouse skin serve as the light sources for diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and FT. The anatomical information and optical properties acquired from the CBCT and DOT, respectively, are used as the priori information to improve the BLT/FT reconstruction accuracy. Flat field correction for the optical system was acquired at multiple wavelengths. A home-built phantom is used to register the optical and CBCT coordinates. An absolute calibration relating the CCD photon counts rate to the light fluence rate emitted at animal surface was developed to quantify the bioluminescence power or fluorophore concentration. Results: An optical inhomogeneous phantom with 2 light sources (3mm separation) imbedded is used to test the system. The optical signal is mapped onto the mesh generated from CBCT for optical reconstruction. Our preliminary results show that the center of mass can be reconstructed within 2.8mm accuracy. A live mouse with the light source imbedded is also used to validate our system. Liver or lung metastatic luminescence tumor model will be used for further testing. Conclusion: This hybrid system transforms preclinical research to a level that even sub-palpable volume of cells can be imaged rapidly and non-invasively, which largely extends the scope of radiobiological research. The research is supported by the NCI grant R01CA158100-01.

  17. Enhanced densification under shock compression in porous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, J. Matthew; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Vogler, Tracy

    2014-10-27

    Under shock compression, most porous materials exhibit lower densities for a given pressure than that of a full-dense sample of the same material. However, some porous materials exhibit an anomalous, or enhanced, densification under shock compression. The mechanism driving this behavior was not completely determined. We present evidence from atomistic simulation that pure silicon belongs to this anomalous class of materials and demonstrate the associated mechanisms responsible for the effect in porous silicon. Atomistic response indicates that local shear strain in the neighborhood of collapsing pores catalyzes a local solid-solid phase transformation even when bulk pressures are below the thermodynamic phase transformation pressure. This metastable, local, and partial, solid-solid phase transformation, which accounts for the enhanced densification in silicon, is driven by the local stress state near the void, not equilibrium thermodynamics. This mechanism may also explain the phenomenon in other covalently bonded materials.

  18. Raman scattering as a tool for the evaluation of strain in GaN/AlN quantum dots: The effect of capping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.; Garro, N.; Coraux, J.; Daudin, B.

    2007-10-15

    The strain state of GaN/AlN quantum dots grown on 6H-SiC has been investigated as a function of AlN capping thickness by three different techniques. On the one hand, resonant Raman scattering allowed the detection of the A{sub 1}(LO) quasiconfined mode. It was found that its frequency increases with AlN deposition, while its linewidth did not evolve significantly. Available experiments of multiwavelength anomalous diffraction and diffraction anomalous fine structure on the same samples provided the determination of the wurtzite lattice parameters a and c of the quantum dots. A very good agreement is found between resonant Raman scattering and x-ray measurements, especially concerning the in-plane strain state. The results demonstrate the adequacy of Raman scattering, in combination with the deformation potential and biaxial approximations, to determine quantitatively values of strain in GaN quantum dot layers.

  19. Situ

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-06-16

    Rapidly discovering novel and sophisticated cyber attacks and providing situation aware-ness to analysts are unsolved problems in cyber security. We have developed a platform that scores events in real-time based on probabilistic models to define how typical an event is. This anomaly detection approach is based on unsupervised, probabilistic modeling of data at multiple scales. Scoring events based on multiple scales allows the system to 1) score anomalousness at different levels to detect important eventsmore » that would otherwise be hidden, and 2) explain to users why an event is anomalous, not just that it is. The system was designed to address several challenges: 1) scaling to very high volume, heterogeneous, streaming data, and 2) minimizing the time from observation to discovery to understanding. The prototype has the real-time framework for pushing scored events to a web-based visualization.« less

  20. Impact of biomass burning aerosol on the monsoon circulation transition over Amazonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Fu, Rong; Yu, Hongbin; Qian, Yun; Dickinson, Robert; Silva Dias, Maria Assuncao F.; da Silva Dias, Pedro L.; Fernandes, Katia

    2009-05-30

    Ensemble simulations of a regional climate model (RegCM3) forced by aerosol radiative forcing suggest that biomass burning aerosols can work against the seasonal monsoon circulation transition, thus re-enforce the dry season rainfall pattern for Southern Amazonia. Strongly absorbing smoke aerosols warm and stabilize the lower troposphere within the smoke center in southern Amazonia (where aerosol optical depth > 0.3). These changes increase the surface pressure in the smoke center, weaken the southward surface pressure gradient between northern and southern Amazonia, and consequently induce an anomalous moisture divergence in the smoke center and an anomalous convergence occurs in northwestern Amazonia (5S-5N, 60W-40 70W). The increased atmospheric thermodynamic stability, surface pressure, and divergent flow in Southern Amazonia may inhibit synoptic cyclonic activities propagated from extratropical South America, and re-enforce winter-like synoptic cyclonic activities and rainfall in southeastern Brazil, Paraguay and northeastern Argentina.

  1. Enhanced densification under shock compression in porous silicon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lane, J. Matthew; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Vogler, Tracy

    2014-10-27

    Under shock compression, most porous materials exhibit lower densities for a given pressure than that of a full-dense sample of the same material. However, some porous materials exhibit an anomalous, or enhanced, densification under shock compression. The mechanism driving this behavior was not completely determined. We present evidence from atomistic simulation that pure silicon belongs to this anomalous class of materials and demonstrate the associated mechanisms responsible for the effect in porous silicon. Atomistic response indicates that local shear strain in the neighborhood of collapsing pores catalyzes a local solid-solid phase transformation even when bulk pressures are below the thermodynamicmore » phase transformation pressure. This metastable, local, and partial, solid-solid phase transformation, which accounts for the enhanced densification in silicon, is driven by the local stress state near the void, not equilibrium thermodynamics. This mechanism may also explain the phenomenon in other covalently bonded materials.« less

  2. Measurement of the $WZ$ Cross Section and Triple Gauge Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-02-01

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the WZ production cross section as well as limits on anomalous WWZ couplings at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions. The WZ candidates are reconstructed from decays containing three charged leptons and missing energy from a neutrino, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector (7.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity), 64 candidate events are observed with the expected background contributing 8 {+-} 1 events. The measured total cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WZ) = 3.93{sub -0.53}{sup +0.60}(stat){sub -0.46}{sup +0.59}(syst) pb is in good agreement with the standard model prediction of 3.50 {+-} 0.21. The same sample is used to set limits on anomalous WWZ couplings.

  3. Observation of meshlike traces on nuclear emulsions during cold fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumoto, Takaaki )

    1993-01-01

    Cold fusion products from the electrolysis of heavy water have been directly measured by using a thin palladium foil. Several anomalous traces have been clearly recorded on nuclear emulsions. Some traces have meshlike structures, which are classified into two types: (a) ones associated with ring traces that are caused by the gravity decay of quad-neutrons and (b) ones with no ring traces. The mechanisms that form these meshlike traces are discussed in terms of the Nattoh model. It is inferred that multiple-neutron nuclei such as quad-neutrons, covered by itonic mesh and iton beads, are born during cold fusion. Furthermore, other anomalous traces suggest the production of a new heavy particle during gravity decay. 14 refs., 10 figs.

  4. System and method for the detection of anomalies in an image

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Lakshman; Swaminarayan, Sriram

    2013-09-03

    Preferred aspects of the present invention can include receiving a digital image at a processor; segmenting the digital image into a hierarchy of feature layers comprising one or more fine-scale features defining a foreground object embedded in one or more coarser-scale features defining a background to the one or more fine-scale features in the segmentation hierarchy; detecting a first fine-scale foreground feature as an anomaly with respect to a first background feature within which it is embedded; and constructing an anomalous feature layer by synthesizing spatially contiguous anomalous fine-scale features. Additional preferred aspects of the present invention can include detecting non-pervasive changes between sets of images in response at least in part to one or more difference images between the sets of images.

  5. High speed measurements of neutral beam turn-on and impact of beam modulation on measurements of ion density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grierson, B. A. Grisham, L.; Burrell, K. H.; Crowley, B.; Scoville, J. T.

    2014-10-15

    Modulation of neutral beams on tokamaks is performed routinely, enabling background rejection for active spectroscopic diagnostics, and control of injected power and torque. We find that there exists an anomalous initial transient in the beam neutrals delivered to the tokamak that is not accounted for by the accelerator voltage and power supply current. Measurements of the charge-exchange and beam photoemission on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] at high speed (200 ?s) reveal that the energy of the beam neutrals is constant, but the density of beam neutrals displays dramatic variation in the first 23 ms following beam turn-on. The impact of this beam density variation on inferred ion densities and impurity transport is presented, with suggested means to correct for the anomalous transient.

  6. Situ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-06-16

    Rapidly discovering novel and sophisticated cyber attacks and providing situation aware-ness to analysts are unsolved problems in cyber security. We have developed a platform that scores events in real-time based on probabilistic models to define how typical an event is. This anomaly detection approach is based on unsupervised, probabilistic modeling of data at multiple scales. Scoring events based on multiple scales allows the system to 1) score anomalousness at different levels to detect important events that would otherwise be hidden, and 2) explain to users why an event is anomalous, not just that it is. The system was designed to address several challenges: 1) scaling to very high volume, heterogeneous, streaming data, and 2) minimizing the time from observation to discovery to understanding. The prototype has the real-time framework for pushing scored events to a web-based visualization.

  7. Gyrokinetic approach in particle simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, W.W.

    1981-10-01

    A new scheme for particle simulation based on the gyrophase-averaged Vlasov equation has been developed. It is suitable for studying low-frequency microinstabilities and the associated anomalous transport in magnetically confined plasmas. The scheme retains the gyroradius effects but not the gyromotion; it is, therefore, far more efficient and versatile than the conventional ones. Furthermore, the reduced Vlasov equation is also amenable to analytical studies.

  8. Detector signal correction method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, R.M.; Duran, A.J.; Kudman, I.

    1995-07-11

    Corrective factors are applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factors may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects. 5 figs.

  9. Method and system for photoconductive detector signal correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, R.M.; Hamblen, D.G.; Brouillette, C.R.

    1992-08-04

    A corrective factor is applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factor may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects. 5 figs.

  10. Canadian House Dust Study: Lead Bioaccessibility and Speciation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P Rasmussen; S Beauchemin; M Chenier; C Levesque; L MacLean; L Marrow; H Jones-Otazo; S Petrovic; L McDonald; H Gardner

    2011-12-31

    Vacuum samples were collected from 1025 randomly selected urban Canadian homes to investigate bioaccessible Pb (Pb{sub S}) concentrations in settled house dust. Results indicate a polymodal frequency distribution, consisting of three lognormally distributed subpopulations defined as 'urban background' (geomean 58 {micro}g g{sup -1}), 'elevated' (geomean 447 {micro}g g{sup -1}), and 'anomalous' (geomean 1730 {micro}g g{sup -1}). Dust Pb{sub S} concentrations in 924 homes (90%) fall into the 'urban background' category. The elevated and anomalous subpopulations predominantly consist of older homes located in central core areas of cities. The influence of house age is evidenced by a moderate correlation between house age and dust Pb{sub S} content (R{sup 2} = 0.34; n = 1025; p < 0.01), but it is notable that more than 10% of homes in the elevated/anomalous category were built after 1980. Conversely, the benefit of home remediation is evidenced by the large number of homes (33%) in the background category that were built before 1960. The dominant dust Pb species determined using X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy were as follows: Pb carbonate, Pb hydroxyl carbonate, Pb sulfate, Pb chromate, Pb oxide, Pb citrate, Pb metal, Pb adsorbed to Fe- and Al-oxyhydroxides, and Pb adsorbed to humate. Pb bioaccessibility estimated from solid phase speciation predicts Pb bioaccessibility measured using a simulated gastric extraction (R{sup 2} = 0.85; n = 12; p < 0.0001). The trend toward increased Pb bioaccessibility in the elevated and anomalous subpopulations (75% {+-} 18% and 81% {+-} 8%, respectively) compared to background (63% {+-} 18%) is explained by the higher proportion of bioaccessible compounds used as pigments in older paints (Pb carbonate and Pb hydroxyl carbonate). This population-based study provides a nationally representative urban baseline for applications in human health risk assessment and risk management.

  11. Diboson physics at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, Mark S.; /UC, San Diego

    2006-05-01

    At the Fermilab Tevatron, the CDF and D0 detectors are being used to study diboson production in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The authors summarize recent measurements of the W{gamma}, Z{gamma}, and WW cross-sections and limits on WZ and ZZ production. Limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings are also presented.

  12. Deconfinement to quark matter in neutron stars - The influence of strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexheimer, V.; Negreiros, R.; Schramm, S.; Hempel, M.

    2013-03-25

    We use an extended version of the hadronic SU(3) non-linear realization of the sigma model that also includes quarks to study hybrid stars. Within this approach, the degrees of freedom change naturally as the temperature/density increases. Different prescriptions of charge neutrality, local and global, are tested and the influence of strong magnetic fields and the anomalous magnetic moment on the particle population is discussed.

  13. davis-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anomalous/Lévy Photon Diffusion Theory: Toward a New Parameterization of Shortwave Transport in Cloudy Columns A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Space and Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Climate and Radiation Branch Greenbelt, Maryland K. P. Pfeilsticker University of Heidelberg Institute for Environmental Physics Heidelberg, Germany Introduction Optically speaking, the earth's

  14. A predictive standard model for heavy electron systems (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Conference: A predictive standard model for heavy electron systems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A predictive standard model for heavy electron systems We propose a predictive standard model for heavy electron systems based on a detailed phenomenological two-fluid description of existing experimental data. It leads to a new phase diagram that replaces the Doniach picture, describes the emergent anomalous scaling behavior of the

  15. Are GRACE-era Terrestrial Water Trends Driven by Anthropogenic Climate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Change? (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Are GRACE-era Terrestrial Water Trends Driven by Anthropogenic Climate Change? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Are GRACE-era Terrestrial Water Trends Driven by Anthropogenic Climate Change? To provide context for observed trends in terrestrial water storage (TWS) during GRACE (2003-2014), trends and variability in the CESM1-CAM5 Large Ensemble (LE) are examined. Motivated in part by the anomalous nature of climate variability during

  16. A novel precision measurement of muon g - 2 and EDM at J-PARC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Naohito; Collaboration: J-PARC g-2 /EDM Collaboration

    2012-07-27

    We propose a new experiment to measure the muon anomalous magnetic moment g - 2 and electric dipole moment with a novel technique called ultra-slow muon beam at J-PARC. Precision measurement of these dipole moments plays an important role in fundamental physics to search for a new physics beynd standard model. The concept of the experiment and its current status is described.

  17. Statistics for characterizing data on the periphery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Hush, Donald R

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a class of statistics for characterizing the periphery of a distribution, and show that these statistics are particularly valuable for problems in target detection. Because so many detection algorithms are rooted in Gaussian statistics, we concentrate on ellipsoidal models of high-dimensional data distributions (that is to say: covariance matrices), but we recommend several alternatives to the sample covariance matrix that more efficiently model the periphery of a distribution, and can more effectively detect anomalous data samples.

  18. Superconducting surface impedance under radiofrequency field

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Binping P.; Reece, Charles E.; Kelley, Michael J.

    2013-04-26

    Based on BCS theory with moving Cooper pairs, the electron states distribution at 0K and the probability of electron occupation with finite temperature have been derived and applied to anomalous skin effect theory to obtain the surface impedance of a superconductor under radiofrequency (RF) field. We present the numerical results for Nb and compare these with representative RF field-dependent effective surface resistance measurements from a 1.5 GHz resonant structure.

  19. Averaged null energy condition violation in a conformally flat spacetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, Douglas; Olum, Ken D.

    2010-01-15

    We show that the averaged null energy condition can be violated by a conformally coupled scalar field in a conformally flat spacetime in 3+1 dimensions. The violation is dependent on the quantum state and can be made as large as desired. It does not arise from the presence of anomalies, although anomalous violations are also possible. Since all geodesics in conformally flat spacetimes are achronal, the achronal averaged null energy condition is likewise violated.

  20. Quantum diffusion dynamics in nonlinear systems: A modified kicked-rotor model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong Jiangbin [Department of Physics and Centre of Computational Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 117542 (Singapore); Wang Jiao [Temasek Laboratories and Beijing-Hong Kong-Singapore Joint Center for Nonlinear and Complex Systems (Singapore), National University of Singapore, 117542 (Singapore)

    2007-09-15

    Using a simple method analogous to a quantum rephasing technique, a simple modification to a paradigm of classical and quantum chaos is proposed. The interesting quantum maps thus obtained display remarkably rich quantum dynamics. Emphasis is placed on the destruction of dynamical localization without breaking periodicity, unbounded quantum anomalous diffusion in integrable systems, and transient dynamical localization. Experimental realizations of this work are also discussed.

  1. Final report. Superconducting materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Ruvalds

    1999-09-11

    Our group has discovered a many body effect that explains the surprising divergence of the spin susceptibility which has been measured by neutron scattering experiments on high temperature superconductors and vanadium oxide metals. Electron interactions on nested - i.e., nearly parallel paths - have been analyzed extensively by our group, and such processes provide a physical explanation for many anomalous features that distinguish cuprate superconductors from ordinary metals.

  2. Automated defect spatial signature analysis for semiconductor manufacturing process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth W.; Gleason, Shaun S.; Karnowski, Thomas P.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed

    1999-01-01

    An apparatus and method for performing automated defect spatial signature alysis on a data set representing defect coordinates and wafer processing information includes categorizing data from the data set into a plurality of high level categories, classifying the categorized data contained in each high level category into user-labeled signature events, and correlating the categorized, classified signature events to a present or incipient anomalous process condition.

  3. Flow Intermittency, Dispersion, and Correlated Continuous Time Random Walks in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Anna, Pietro; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Dentz, Marco; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Bolster, Diogo; Davy, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We study the intermittency of fluid velocities in porous media and its relation to anomalous dispersion. Lagrangian velocities measured at equidistant points along streamlines are shown to form a spatial Markov process. As a consequence of this remarkable property, the dispersion of fluid particles can be described by a continuous time random walk with correlated temporal increments. This new dynamical picture of intermittency provides a direct link between the microscale flow, its intermittent properties, and non-Fickian dispersion.

  4. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minimal Shortwave Anomalous Absorption Found over ACRF Sites Download a printable PDF Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Minnis, P., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Dong, X, BA Wielicki, B Xi, Y Hu, GG Mace, S Benson, F Rose, S Kato, T Charlock, and P Minnis. 2008. "Using observations of deep convective systems to constrain atmospheric column absorption of solar radiation in the

  5. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantifying the Magnitude of Anomalous Solar Absorption Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Spurred by a series of articles published in 1995 claiming solar absorption in cloudy atmospheres far exceeded model predictions, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program researchers at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma

  6. Parity-violating anomalies from stochastic quantization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reuter, M.

    1987-05-15

    It is shown that the anomalous contribution to the vacuum current in (2n+1)-dimensional theories of massive fermions interacting with classical Yang-Mills and gravitational fields at zero and finite temperature is correctly reproduced by the stochastic quantization procedure. For massless fermions an ambiguity arises. This can be traced to the fact that the stochastic time acts as an additional IR cutoff.

  7. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  8. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  9. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  10. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  11. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's

  12. Diluted magnetic semiconductors based on Sb2-xVxTe3 | Energy Frontier

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Centers Diluted magnetic semiconductors based on Sb2-xVxTe3 Home Author: J. S. Dyck, P. Hajek, P. Lostak, C. Uher Year: 2002 Abstract: We report on a diluted magnetic semiconductor based on the Sb2Te3 tetradymite structure doped with very low concentrations of vanadium (1-3 at. %). The anomalous transport behavior and robust magnetic hysteresis loops observed in magnetotransport and magnetic measurements are experimental manifestations of the ferromagnetic state in these materials.

  13. Onset of Turbulence and Profile Resilience in the Helimak Configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rypdal, K.; Ratynskaia, S.

    2005-06-10

    An experimental study of the onset of drift wave and flute interchange instabilities in the Helimak configuration is presented. It is shown that the Helimak offers the opportunity to separate the regions where these instabilities are active and to assess their relative role in cross-field anomalous transport and in the self-organization of exponential plasma density profiles with resilient scale length. Some results indicating a period doubling route to turbulence are also presented.

  14. Method and system for photoconductive detector signal correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, Robert M. (Glastonbury, CT); Hamblen, David G. (East Hampton, CT); Brouillette, Carl R. (West Hartford, CT)

    1992-08-04

    A corrective factor is applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factor may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects.

  15. Using PHP format

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ion heating from ambipolar-constrained magnetic fluctuation-induced transport R. Gatto a) and P. W. Terry Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 ͑Received 22 June 2000; accepted 14 December 2000͒ A kinetic theory for the anomalous heating of ions from energy stored in magnetic turbulence is presented. Imposing self-consistency through the constitutive relations between particle distributions and fields, a turbulent Kirchhoff's Law is derived that

  16. ARQ05-4.final.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quarterly Actinide Research Actinide Research 3rd/4th quarter 2005 Los Alamos National Laboratory Correlation effects in actinide systems Correlation effects in actinide systems Nuclear Materials Technology/Los Alamos National Laboratory Actinide Research Quarterly Contents Actinide Research Quarterly 1 Correlated electron effects for anomalous properties of elemental actinides 5 The gamma-to-alpha transition in cerium 10 ARQ scientifi c advisor named AAAS Fellow 11 Plutonium and quantum

  17. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure Print Graphene, because of its unusual electron properties, reduced dimensionality, and scale, has enormous potential for use in ultrafast electronic transistors. It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its novel properties, graphene's electrical charge carriers (electrons and holes) move through a solid with

  18. Two-fluid description of wave-particle interactions in strong Buneman

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    turbulence (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Two-fluid description of wave-particle interactions in strong Buneman turbulence Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Two-fluid description of wave-particle interactions in strong Buneman turbulence To understand the nature of anomalous resistivity in magnetic reconnection, we investigate turbulence-induced momentum transport and energy dissipation while a plasma is unstable to the Buneman instability in force-free current sheets. Using 3D

  19. METHOD OF IMPROVING CORROSION RESISTANCE OF ZIRCONIUM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shannon, D.W.

    1961-03-28

    An improved intermediate rinse for zirconium counteracts an anomalous deposit that often results in crevices and outof-the-way places when ordinary water is used to rinse away a strong fluoride etching solution designed to promote passivation of the metal. The intermediate rinse, which is used after the etching solution and before the water, is characterized by a complexing agent for fluoride ions such as aluminum or zirconium nitrates or chlorides.

  20. Amorphous Binary Alloy Structures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hope Ishii, Sean Brennan and Arthur Bienenstock SSRL/SLAC Figure 1: Partial Pair Distribution Functions extracted from the scattering patterns obtained at four different photon energies near the Ge and Mo K-absorption edges. Attempting to determine and describe the atomic arrangements in an amorphous material is a daunting prospect. A considerable advance has been made in the anomalous X-ray scattering approach to determining these arrangements in materials containing two atomic species. Up

  1. Internal corrosion monitoring of subsea production flowlines -- probe design and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joosten, M.W.; Kolts, J.; Humble, P.G.; Blakset, T.J.; Keilty, D.M.

    1998-12-31

    This paper addresses one technique for acquiring subsea corrosion rate data. Subsea monitoring provides the advantage of measuring the corrosion inhibitor efficacy at the point of injection, rather than inferring performance from platform measurements. The internal condition of pipelines can be monitored in a variety of ways. The optimum monitoring technique will change with pipeline age, location, accessibility, and operating conditions. More importantly, the applicable methods may change based on the type of information required. For evaluation of corrosion inhibitor performance a high-sensitivity corrosion monitor is required. A prototype dual-element, electric-resistance probe has been evaluated for pressure and temperature stability under simulated Britannia subsea operating conditions. The probe functioned well under all conditions over an extensive test period. As expected, temperature had the greatest impact on the stability of the corrosion measurements. Interpretation of the relative response of the dual probes to the variety of test conditions is useful in evaluating the validity of field data and the functionality of the probe. Issues, revealed by the testing program, included anomalous data points and fluid behind the probe elements. The anomalous data were easily identifiable, but disrupted the automated calculation of the corrosion rate. A loose connection caused the anomalous data points. Ingress of fluid behind the probe element is still a concern for long term exposures.

  2. Pressure-composition-isotherms of palladium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flanagan, T.B.

    1996-11-01

    About one year ago a summary report was submitted covering the previous three years of the contract. This earlier report should be consulted as a useful survey and evaluation of the research carried out by the authors. Because of difficulties during the current contract period arising from the anomalous nature of the melt-spun alloys received from LANL, it is not possible to contribute much beyond that given in last year's summary with regard to the overall picture of the behavior of Pd-rich alloys towards hydrogen and its isotopes. In this contract year deuterium was employed instead of hydrogen and instead of using cycled alloys, the alloys employed for each isotherm measurement were in their virgin condition. Because of the anomalous behavior of the melt-spun alloys, it was not feasible or worthwhile in some cases, e.g., when the alloy behaved anomalously, to carry out all of the originally proposed work. Nonetheless considering these obstacles, some useful data were obtained. For example, the obtaining of deuterium isotherms for the Pd-Rh alloys down to {minus}40 C using internally oxidized melt-spun alloys may prove to be useful.

  3. Probable Causes of the Abnormal Ridge Accompanying the 2013-2014 California Drought: ENSO Precursor and Anthropogenic Warming Footprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, S-Y; Hipps, Lawrence; Gillies, Robert R.; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-05-16

    The 2013-14 California drought was accompanied by an anomalous high-amplitude ridge system. The anomalous ridge was investigated using reanalysis data and the Community Earth System Model (CESM). It was found that the ridge emerged from continual sources of Rossby wave energy in the western North Pacific starting in late summer, and subsequently intensified into winter. The ridge generated a surge of wave energy downwind and deepened further the trough over the northeast U.S., forming a dipole. The dipole and associated circulation pattern is not linked directly with either ENSO or Pacific Decadal Oscillation; instead it is correlated with a type of ENSO precursor. The connection between the dipole and ENSO precursor has become stronger since the 1970s, and this is attributed to increased GHG loading as simulated by the CESM. Therefore, there is a traceable anthropogenic warming footprint in the enormous intensity of the anomalous ridge during winter 2013-14, the associated drought and its intensity.

  4. Rotating magnetic field current drive of high-temperature field reversed configurations with high {zeta} scaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, H. Y.; Hoffman, A. L.; Milroy, R. D.

    2007-11-15

    Greatly reduced recycling and impurity ingestion in the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment--Upgrade (TCSU) device has allowed much higher plasma temperatures to be achieved in the field reversed configurations (FRC) under rotating magnetic field (RMF) formation and sustainment. The hotter plasmas have higher magnetic fields and much higher diamagnetic electron rotation rates so that the important ratio of average electron rotation frequency to RMF frequency, called {zeta}, approaches unity, for the first time, in TCSU. A large fraction of the RMF power is absorbed by an as yet unexplained (anomalous) mechanism directly proportional to the square of the RMF magnitude. It becomes of relatively lesser significance as the FRC current increases, and simple resistive heating begins to dominate, but the anomalous absorption is useful for initial plasma heating. Measurements of total absorbed power, and comparisons of applied RMF torque to torque on the electrons due to electron-ion friction under high-{zeta} operation, over a range of temperatures and fields, have allowed the separation of the classical Ohmic and anomalous heating to be inferred, and cross-field plasma resistivities to be calculated.

  5. Basic Physics of Tokamak Transport Final Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, Amiya K.

    2014-05-12

    The goal of this grant has been to study the basic physics of various sources of anomalous transport in tokamaks. Anomalous transport in tokamaks continues to be one of the major problems in magnetic fusion research. As a tokamak is not a physics device by design, direct experimental observation and identification of the instabilities responsible for transport, as well as physics studies of the transport in tokamaks, have been difficult and of limited value. It is noted that direct experimental observation, identification and physics study of microinstabilities including ITG, ETG, and trapped electron/ion modes in tokamaks has been very difficult and nearly impossible. The primary reasons are co-existence of many instabilities, their broadband fluctuation spectra, lack of flexibility for parameter scans and absence of good local diagnostics. This has motivated us to study the suspected tokamak instabilities and their transport consequences in a simpler, steady state Columbia Linear Machine (CLM) with collisionless plasma and the flexibility of wide parameter variations. Earlier work as part of this grant was focused on both ITG turbulence, widely believed to be a primary source of ion thermal transport in tokamaks, and the effects of isotope scaling on transport levels. Prior work from our research team has produced and definitively identified both the slab and toroidal branches of this instability and determined the physics criteria for their existence. All the experimentally observed linear physics corroborate well with theoretical predictions. However, one of the large areas of research dealt with turbulent transport results that indicate some significant differences between our experimental results and most theoretical predictions. Latter years of this proposal were focused on anomalous electron transport with a special focus on ETG. There are several advanced tokamak scenarios with internal transport barriers (ITB), when the ion transport is reduced to neoclassical values by combined mechanisms of ExB and diamagnetic flow shear suppression of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. However, even when the ion transport is strongly suppressed, the electron transport remains highly anomalous. The most plausible physics scenario for the anomalous electron transport is based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) instabilities. This instability is an electron analog of and nearly isomorphic to the ITG instability, which we had studied before extensively. However, this isomorphism is broken nonlinearily. It is noted that as the typical ETG mode growth rates are larger (in contrast to ITG modes) than ExB shearing rates in usual tokamaks, the flow shear suppression of ETG modes is highly unlikely. This motivated a broader range of investigations of other physics scenarios of nonlinear saturation and transport scaling of ETG modes.

  6. Anomaly Detection in Dynamic Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turcotte, Melissa

    2014-10-14

    Anomaly detection in dynamic communication networks has many important security applications. These networks can be extremely large and so detecting any changes in their structure can be computationally challenging; hence, computationally fast, parallelisable methods for monitoring the network are paramount. For this reason the methods presented here use independent node and edge based models to detect locally anomalous substructures within communication networks. As a first stage, the aim is to detect changes in the data streams arising from node or edge communications. Throughout the thesis simple, conjugate Bayesian models for counting processes are used to model these data streams. A second stage of analysis can then be performed on a much reduced subset of the network comprising nodes and edges which have been identified as potentially anomalous in the first stage. The first method assumes communications in a network arise from an inhomogeneous Poisson process with piecewise constant intensity. Anomaly detection is then treated as a changepoint problem on the intensities. The changepoint model is extended to incorporate seasonal behavior inherent in communication networks. This seasonal behavior is also viewed as a changepoint problem acting on a piecewise constant Poisson process. In a static time frame, inference is made on this extended model via a Gibbs sampling strategy. In a sequential time frame, where the data arrive as a stream, a novel, fast Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) algorithm is introduced to sample from the sequence of posterior distributions of the change points over time. A second method is considered for monitoring communications in a large scale computer network. The usage patterns in these types of networks are very bursty in nature and don’t fit a Poisson process model. For tractable inference, discrete time models are considered, where the data are aggregated into discrete time periods and probability models are fitted to the communication counts. In a sequential analysis, anomalous behavior is then identified from outlying behavior with respect to the fitted predictive probability models. Seasonality is again incorporated into the model and is treated as a changepoint model on the transition probabilities of a discrete time Markov process. Second stage analytics are then developed which combine anomalous edges to identify anomalous substructures in the network.

  7. A revised partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for X-ray free-electron laser data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginn, Helen Mary; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wagner, Armin; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David Ian

    2015-05-23

    Research towards using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to solve structures using experimental phasing methods such as sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) has been hampered by shortcomings in the diffraction models for X-ray diffraction from FELs. Owing to errors in the orientation matrix and overly simple partiality models, researchers have required large numbers of images to converge to reliable estimates for the structure-factor amplitudes, which may not be feasible for all biological systems. Here, data for cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 17 (CPV17) collected at 1.3 wavelength at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) are revisited. A previously published definition of a partiality model for reflections illuminated by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) pulses is built upon, which defines a fraction between 0 and 1 based on the intersection of a reflection with a spread of Ewald spheres modelled by a super-Gaussian wavelength distribution in the X-ray beam. A method of post-refinement to refine the parameters of this model is suggested. This has generated a merged data set with an overall discrepancy (by calculating theRsplitvalue) of 3.15% to 1.46 resolution from a 7225-image data set. The atomic numbers of C, N and O atoms in the structure are distinguishable in the electron-density map. There are 13 S atoms within the 237 residues of CPV17, excluding the initial disordered methionine. These only possess 0.42 anomalous scattering electrons each at 1.3 wavelength, but the 12 that have single predominant positions are easily detectable in the anomalous difference Fourier map. It is hoped that these improvements will lead towards XFEL experimental phase determination and structure determination by sulfur SAD and will generally increase the utility of the method for difficult cases.

  8. Toward a Classical Thermodynamic Model for Retro-cognition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Edwin C.

    2011-11-29

    Retro-cognition--a human response before a randomly determined future stimulus--has always been part of our experience. Experiments over the last 80 years show a small but statistically significant effect. If this turns out to be true, then it suggests a form of macroscopic retro-causation. The 2nd Law of Thermodynamics provides an explanation for the apparent single direction of time at the macroscopic level although time is reversible at the microscopic level. In a preliminary study, I examined seven anomalous cognition (a.k.a., ESP) studies in which the entropic gradients and the entropy of their associated target systems were calculated, and the quality of the response was estimated by a rating system called the figure of merit. The combined Spearman's correlation coefficient for these variables for the seven studies was 0.211 (p = 6.4x10{sup -4}) with a 95% confidence interval for the correlation of [0.084, 0.332]; whereas, the same data for a correlation with the entropy itself was 0.028 (p = 0.36; 95% confidence interval of [-0.120-0.175]). This suggests that anomalous cognition is mediated via some kind of a sensory system in that all the normal sensory systems are more sensitive to changes than they are to inputs that are not changing. A standard relationship for the change of entropy of a binary sequence appears to provide an upper limit to anomalous cognition functioning for free response and for forced-choice Zener card guessing. This entropic relation and an apparent limit set by the entropy may provide a clue for understanding macroscopic retro-causation.

  9. How does pressure gravitate? Cosmological constant problem confronts observational cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narimani, Ali; Scott, Douglas; Afshordi, Niayesh E-mail: nafshordi@pitp.ca

    2014-08-01

    An important and long-standing puzzle in the history of modern physics is the gross inconsistency between theoretical expectations and cosmological observations of the vacuum energy density, by at least 60 orders of magnitude, otherwise known as the cosmological constant problem. A characteristic feature of vacuum energy is that it has a pressure with the same amplitude, but opposite sign to its energy density, while all the precision tests of General Relativity are either in vacuum, or for media with negligible pressure. Therefore, one may wonder whether an anomalous coupling to pressure might be responsible for decoupling vacuum from gravity. We test this possibility in the context of the Gravitational Aether proposal, using current cosmological observations, which probe the gravity of relativistic pressure in the radiation era. Interestingly, we find that the best fit for anomalous pressure coupling is about half-way between General Relativity (GR), and Gravitational Aether (GA), if we include Planck together with WMAP and BICEP2 polarization cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations. Taken at face value, this data combination excludes both GR and GA at around the 3 σ level. However, including higher resolution CMB observations (''highL'') or baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) pushes the best fit closer to GR, excluding the Gravitational Aether solution to the cosmological constant problem at the 4- 5 σ level. This constraint effectively places a limit on the anomalous coupling to pressure in the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) expansion, ζ{sub 4} = 0.105 ± 0.049 (+highL CMB), or ζ{sub 4} = 0.066 ± 0.039 (+BAO). These represent the most precise measurement of this parameter to date, indicating a mild tension with GR (for ΛCDM including tensors, with 0ζ{sub 4}=), and also among different data sets.

  10. A revised partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for X-ray free-electron laser data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ginn, Helen Mary; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wagner, Armin; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David Ian

    2015-05-23

    Research towards using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to solve structures using experimental phasing methods such as sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) has been hampered by shortcomings in the diffraction models for X-ray diffraction from FELs. Owing to errors in the orientation matrix and overly simple partiality models, researchers have required large numbers of images to converge to reliable estimates for the structure-factor amplitudes, which may not be feasible for all biological systems. Here, data for cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 17 (CPV17) collected at 1.3 Å wavelength at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) are revisited. A previously published definitionmore » of a partiality model for reflections illuminated by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) pulses is built upon, which defines a fraction between 0 and 1 based on the intersection of a reflection with a spread of Ewald spheres modelled by a super-Gaussian wavelength distribution in the X-ray beam. A method of post-refinement to refine the parameters of this model is suggested. This has generated a merged data set with an overall discrepancy (by calculating theRsplitvalue) of 3.15% to 1.46 Å resolution from a 7225-image data set. The atomic numbers of C, N and O atoms in the structure are distinguishable in the electron-density map. There are 13 S atoms within the 237 residues of CPV17, excluding the initial disordered methionine. These only possess 0.42 anomalous scattering electrons each at 1.3 Å wavelength, but the 12 that have single predominant positions are easily detectable in the anomalous difference Fourier map. It is hoped that these improvements will lead towards XFEL experimental phase determination and structure determination by sulfur SAD and will generally increase the utility of the method for difficult cases.« less

  11. Gamma-Ray Observations of a Giant Flare From the Magnetar Sgr 1806-20

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Gamma-Ray Observations of a Giant Flare From the Magnetar Sgr 1806-20 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Gamma-Ray Observations of a Giant Flare From the Magnetar Sgr 1806-20 Magnetars comprise two classes of rotating neutron stars (Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs) and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars), whose X-ray emission is powered by an ultrastrong magnetic field, B {approx} 10{sup 15} G. Occasionally SGRs enter into active episodes producing many short

  12. Improved dark matter search results from PICO-2L Run 2 (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Improved dark matter search results from PICO-2L Run 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Improved dark matter search results from PICO-2L Run 2 New data are reported from a second run of the 2-liter PICO-2L C3F8 bubble chamber with a total exposure of 129 kg-days at a thermodynamic threshold energy of 3.3 keV. These data show that measures taken to control particulate contamination in the superheated fluid resulted in the absence of the anomalous background events

  13. Improved dark matter search results from PICO-2L Run 2 (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Improved dark matter search results from PICO-2L Run 2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Improved dark matter search results from PICO-2L Run 2 New data are reported from a second run of the 2-liter PICO-2L C3F8 bubble chamber with a total exposure of 129 kg-days at a thermodynamic threshold energy of 3.3 keV. These data show that measures taken to control particulate contamination in the superheated fluid resulted in the absence of the anomalous background events

  14. Large scale magnetic fields and coherent structures in nonuniform unmagnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jucker, Martin; Andrushchenko, Zhanna N.; Pavlenko, Vladimir P.

    2006-07-15

    The properties of streamers and zonal magnetic structures in magnetic electron drift mode turbulence are investigated. The stability of such large scale structures is investigated in the kinetic and the hydrodynamic regime, for which an instability criterion similar to the Lighthill criterion for modulational instability is found. Furthermore, these large scale flows can undergo further nonlinear evolution after initial linear growth, which can lead to the formation of long-lived coherent structures consisting of self-bound wave packets between the surfaces of two different flow velocities with an expected modification of the anomalous electron transport properties.

  15. I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - _ I - . - - - SIAC-PUB-1748 May 1976 Threshold and Other Properties of U P a r t i c l e Production i n e*e- Annihilation** sponsored by the UNled St Unitcd States nor the U Enerw, nor any of their contractors, subcontractor any warranly, cxprers o r liability or responsibdity f( or usefulness of any inforr process discload, or rcpre Martin L . Per1 Stanford IiLnear Accelerator Center Stanford University, Stanford, California 943m 1 . INTRODUCTION i - W e have explained t h e anomalous ep

  16. IAEApaper08-3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TH/P8-43 Role of Impurity Cyclotron Damping in Ion Heating and RFP Turbulence P.W. Terry, V. Tangri, J.S. Sarff, G. Fiksel, A.F. Almagri, Y. Ren, and S.C. Prager Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 e-mail contact of main author: pwterry@wisc.edu Abstract: In the reversed field pinch ions are heated anomalously relative to collisional energy exchange with Ohmically heated electrons. The process channels electron energy to ions in a way that is still

  17. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    1 of 2 Search for: All records Bibliographic Data contains: spintronic* × Publication Date from: 01/01/2015 to 12/31/2015 × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Select page number Go to page: 1 of 2 1 » Next » Everything123 Electronic Full Text13 Citations110 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject spintronics (3) condensed matter physics, superconductivity and superfluidity (2) anomalous hall effect (1)

  18. X:\ARM_19~1\P193-223.WPD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Q ext ) (x ¯ D/ , ¯ D ¯ D µm ¯ D µm n r , ¯ D µm n r (D e ) Session Papers 215 Radiative Properties of Ice Clouds D. L. Mitchell, D. Koracin, and E. Carter Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada Introduction A new treatment of cirrus cloud radiative properties has been developed, based on anomalous diffraction theory (ADT), which does not parameterize size distributions in terms of an effective radius (partially published in Mitchell and Arnott 1994). Rather, it uses the size

  19. Reconstruction of the phase separation ordering type and specific heat in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponomarev, Alexander N. E-mail: val110@mail.ru; Egorushkin, Valery E. E-mail: val110@mail.ru; Bobenko, Nadezda G.; Melnikova, Natalia V.

    2014-11-14

    The low-temperature behavior of the specific heat in disordered nanotubes strongly depends on structure changes and was not explained by the phonon contribution. Expression for electronic specific heat was carried out taking into account the multiple elastic scattering of electrons on impurities and structural inhomogeneities of short-range order type, it includes dependence on diameter of nanotube, concentration of impurities, parameters of short-range order (structural heterogeneity) and temperature. Anomalous low-temperature behavior of the specific heat of disordered CNT is shown to have electronic nature and may be associated with the electrons that are involved in restructuring.

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2 of 2 Search for: All records Bibliographic Data contains: spintronic* × Publication Date from: 01/01/2015 to 12/31/2015 × Sort by Relevance Sort by Date (newest first) Sort by Date (oldest first) Sort by Relevance « Prev Select page number Go to page: 2 of 2 2 » Next » Everything123 Electronic Full Text13 Citations110 Multimedia0 Datasets0 Software0 Filter Results Filter by Subject spintronics (3) condensed matter physics, superconductivity and superfluidity (2) anomalous hall effect (1)

  1. Searching for new physics at CDF (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Searching for new physics at CDF Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Searching for new physics at CDF We present recent results on searches for physics beyond the Standard Model obtained from the analysis of 1 fb{sup -1} of data collected at the Tevatron Collider by the CDF Collaboration. We report on model-independent studies for anomalous production of {ell}{gamma} + X, {ell}{gamma}bE{sub T} and {gamma}{gamma} + E{sub T}, Standard Model t{bar t}{gamma} production. We also present

  2. Peculiarly strong room-temperature ferromagnetism from low Mn-doping in ZnO grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo Zheng; Morshed, Muhammad; Liu Jianlin; Beyermann, W. P.; Zheng Jianguo; Xin Yan

    2013-03-15

    Strong room-temperature ferromagnetism is demonstrated in single crystalline Mn-doped ZnO thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Very low Mn doping concentration is investigated, and the measured magnetic moment is much larger than what is expected for an isolated ion based on Hund's rules. The ferromagnetic behavior evolves with Mn concentration. Both magnetic anisotropy and anomalous Hall effect confirm the intrinsic nature of ferromagnetism. While the Mn dopant plays a crucial role, another entity in the system is needed to explain the observed large magnetic moments.

  3. Beamline

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline Scientific Applications SAXS/WAXS Solution Scattering Fiber diffraction Anomalous SAXS Source characteristics Bending Magnet Port 6A Electron Beam energy 1.3 GeV Dipole field 1.48 T Characteristic energy 1.66 keV Optics LNLS double crystal monochromator Si 111 and Ge 220 crystals Practical energy range from 3 to 14 keV Distance from source Acceptance 2 mrad Energy resolution dE/E Flux before pinholes = 7 x 109 @ 8keV Flux at sample = Experimental setup 2D control for sample alignment

  4. Enhanced flexoelectricity through residual ferroelectricity in barium strontium titanate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garten, Lauren M. Trolier-McKinstry, Susan

    2015-03-07

    Residual ferroelectricity is observed in barium strontium titanate ceramics over 30 °C above the global phase transition temperature, in the same temperature range in which anomalously large flexoelectric coefficients are reported. The application of a strain gradient leads to strain gradient-induced poling or flexoelectric poling. This was observed by the development of a remanent polarization in flexoelectric measurements, an induced d{sub 33} piezoelectric response even after the strain gradient was removed, and the production of an internal bias of 9 kV m{sup −1}. It is concluded that residual ferroelectric response considerably enhances the observed flexoelectric response.

  5. A search for anomalies in the palladium-deuterium system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillespie, D.J.; Kamm, G.N.; Ehrlich, A.C. ); Mart, P.L. )

    1989-12-01

    A polycrystalline palladium rod is electrolytically charged with deuterium up to a deuterium/palladium ratio of 0.81 while several sample parameters are simultaneously measured in situ, including electrical resistivity, sample dimensions, cell temperature, and neutron production. Various charging rates are used in an attempt to provoke any anomalous behavior, such as a previously unknown crystallographic or chemical phase change, that might account for reports of heat or neutron production. Neither the electrical resistivity nor sample dimensions manifest evidence of any anomaly.

  6. Graphene in proximity to magnetic insulating LaMnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Guanghui; Wei, Laiming, E-mail: laiming@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: cgzeng@ustc.edu.cn; Cheng, Long; Liang, Haixing; Zhang, Xiaoqiang; Li, Hui [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale (HFNL) and Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Yu, Guolin [Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Shanghai 200083 (China); Zeng, Changgan, E-mail: laiming@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: cgzeng@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale (HFNL) and Department of Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); International Center for Quantum Design of Functional Materials (ICQD), HFNL, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-09-29

    Proximity to functional substrates may enhance the coupling between the quantum degrees of freedom and thus develop nontrivial quantum effects in graphene. Here, we demonstrate the successful fabrication of graphene in proximity to atomically flat magnetic insulating LaMnO{sub 3} films. The insulating nature of the LaMnO{sub 3} films not only ensures the electronic transport only occur in the graphene layers but also allow them to serve as dielectric layers for gating. Transport measurements reveal anomalous behaviors, including asymmetrical longitudinal magnetoresistivity and nonlinear Hall effect. This work may pave a way toward the realization of intriguing quantum phases in graphene.

  7. Kinetics of monolayer graphene growth by segregation on Pd(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mok, H. S.; Murata, Y.; Kodambaka, S., E-mail: kodambaka@ucla.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Ebnonnasir, A.; Ciobanu, C. V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science Program, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Nie, S.; McCarty, K. F. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-03-10

    Using in situ low-energy electron microscopy and density functional theory calculations, we follow the growth of monolayer graphene on Pd(111) via surface segregation of bulk-dissolved carbon. Upon lowering the substrate temperature, nucleation of graphene begins on graphene-free Pd surface and continues to occur during graphene growth. Measurements of graphene growth rates and Pd surface work functions establish that this continued nucleation is due to increasing C adatom concentration on the Pd surface with time. We attribute this anomalous phenomenon to a large barrier for attachment of C adatoms to graphene coupled with a strong binding of the non-graphitic C to the Pd surface.

  8. A revised partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for X-ray free-electron laser data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginn, Helen Mary; Brewster, Aaron S.; Hattne, Johan; Evans, Gwyndaf; Wagner, Armin; Grimes, Jonathan M.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Sutton, Geoff; Stuart, David Ian

    2015-05-23

    An updated partiality model and post-refinement algorithm for XFEL snapshot diffraction data is presented and confirmed by observing anomalous density for S atoms at an X-ray wavelength of 1.3 . Research towards using X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) data to solve structures using experimental phasing methods such as sulfur single-wavelength anomalous dispersion (SAD) has been hampered by shortcomings in the diffraction models for X-ray diffraction from FELs. Owing to errors in the orientation matrix and overly simple partiality models, researchers have required large numbers of images to converge to reliable estimates for the structure-factor amplitudes, which may not be feasible for all biological systems. Here, data for cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 17 (CPV17) collected at 1.3 wavelength at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) are revisited. A previously published definition of a partiality model for reflections illuminated by self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) pulses is built upon, which defines a fraction between 0 and 1 based on the intersection of a reflection with a spread of Ewald spheres modelled by a super-Gaussian wavelength distribution in the X-ray beam. A method of post-refinement to refine the parameters of this model is suggested. This has generated a merged data set with an overall discrepancy (by calculating the R{sub split} value) of 3.15% to 1.46 resolution from a 7225-image data set. The atomic numbers of C, N and O atoms in the structure are distinguishable in the electron-density map. There are 13 S atoms within the 237 residues of CPV17, excluding the initial disordered methionine. These only possess 0.42 anomalous scattering electrons each at 1.3 wavelength, but the 12 that have single predominant positions are easily detectable in the anomalous difference Fourier map. It is hoped that these improvements will lead towards XFEL experimental phase determination and structure determination by sulfur SAD and will generally increase the utility of the method for difficult cases.

  9. Casimir energy and entropy in the sphere-sphere geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez-Lopez, Pablo

    2011-08-15

    We calculate the Casimir energy and entropy for two spheres described by the perfect-metal model, plasma model, and Drude model in the large-separation limit. We obtain nonmonotonic behavior of the Helmholtz free energy as a function of separation and temperature for the perfect-metal and plasma models, leading to parameter ranges with negative entropy, and also we obtain nonmonotonic behavior of the entropy as a function of temperature and the separation between the spheres. This nonmonotonic behavior has not been found for the Drude model. The appearance of this anomalous behavior of the entropy as well as its thermodynamic consequences are discussed.

  10. On the heat capacity of Ce{sub 3}Al

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Durgesh Samatham, S. Shanmukharao Venkateshwarlu, D. Gangrade, Mohan Ganesan, V.

    2014-04-24

    Electrical resistivity and heat capacity measurements on Cerium based dense Kondo compound Ce{sub 3}Al have been reported. Clear signatures of first order structural transition at 108K, followed by a Kondo minimum and coherence are clearly seen in resistivity. The structural transition is robust and is not affected by magnetic fields. Heat capacity measurements reveal an anomalous enhancement in the heavy fermion character upon magnetic fields. Vollhardt invariance in specific heat C(T.H) curves have been observed at T=3.7K and at H ≈ 6T.

  11. E1 and E3 transition rates in the sdf-IBA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamfir, N.V. ||

    1994-11-01

    The E1 and E3 transition operators in the sdf-IBA model are discussed. An effective E1 operator containing one- and two-body terms explains very well the E1 data in transitional and rotational nuclei. The E1 parameters for rotational nuclei are obtained by imposing a constraint on the IBA model namely, the validity of Alaga rules for ``pure K`` states. The systematic behavior of the octupole strength is well reproduced using a one-body octupole operator. The anomalously large fragmentation of the low-energy octupole strength in non-rotational nuclei is shown to be a signature of the O(6) dynamical symmetry.

  12. qFeature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-09-14

    This package contains statistical routines for extracting features from multivariate time-series data which can then be used for subsequent multivariate statistical analysis to identify patterns and anomalous behavior. It calculates local linear or quadratic regression model fits to moving windows for each series and then summarizes the model coefficients across user-defined time intervals for each series. These methods are domain agnostic?but they have been successfully applied to a variety of domains, including commercial aviation and electric power grid data.

  13. Is the baryon asymmetry of the Universe related to galactic magnetic fields?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semikoz, V. B.; Sokoloff, D. D.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2009-10-15

    A tiny hypermagnetic field generated before the electroweak phase transition (EWPT) associated to the generation of elementary particle masses can polarize the early Universe hot plasma at huge redshifts z > or approx. 10{sup 15}. The anomalous violation of the right-handed electron current characteristic of the EWPT converts the lepton asymmetry into a baryon asymmetry. Under reasonable approximations, the magnetic field strength inferred by requiring such 'leptogenic' origin for the observed baryon asymmetry of the Universe matches the large-scale cosmological magnetic field strengths estimated from current astronomical observations.

  14. Computer experiments concerning palladium-deuterium and titanium-deuterium lattices - implications to phenomenon of low-energy nuclear reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, K.R.; Chaplot, S.L.

    1996-12-01

    Short-lived large energy fluctuations (SLEFs) in solids, proposed by Khait, are known to be responsible for several anomalous properties in a variety of materials. The study of SLEFs in palladium-deuterium and titanium-deuterium lattices via computer experiments is reported. The relevance of these large energy fluctuations in penetrating coulombic barriers in these systems is discussed. Such dynamical effects arising from the phonon bath in solids may enhance nuclear reaction probabilities leading to cold fusion. Expected cold fusion reaction rates are reported taking into account the effective charges of the deuterium atoms in the solid and SLEF frequencies. 25 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. COMMENTS ON "A NEW LOOK AT LOW-ENERGY NUCLEAR REACTION RESEARCH"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanahan, K.

    2009-12-30

    Cold fusion researchers have accumulated a large body of anomalous results over the last 20 years that they claim proves a new, mysterious nuclear reaction is active in systems they study. Krivit and Marwan give a brief and wholly positive view of this body of research. Unfortunately, cold fusion researchers routinely ignore conventional explanations of their observations, and claim much greater than real accuracy and precision for their techniques. This paper attempts to equally briefly address those aspects of the field with the intent of providing a balanced view of the field, and to establish some criteria for subsequent publications in this arena.

  16. Cold fusion, Alchemist's dream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, E.D.

    1989-09-01

    In this report the following topics relating to cold fusion are discussed: muon catalysed cold fusion; piezonuclear fusion; sundry explanations pertaining to cold fusion; cosmic ray muon catalysed cold fusion; vibrational mechanisms in excited states of D{sub 2} molecules; barrier penetration probabilities within the hydrogenated metal lattice/piezonuclear fusion; branching ratios of D{sub 2} fusion at low energies; fusion of deuterons into {sup 4}He; secondary D+T fusion within the hydrogenated metal lattice; {sup 3}He to {sup 4}He ratio within the metal lattice; shock induced fusion; and anomalously high isotopic ratios of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He.

  17. Real-time study of fast-electron transport inside dense hot plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandhu, A.S.; Kumar, G. Ravindra; Sengupta, S.; Das, A.; Kaw, P.K.

    2006-03-15

    We offer a method to study transport of fast electrons in dense hot media. The technique relies on temporal profiling of the laser induced magnetic fields and offers a unique capability to map the hot electron currents and their neutralization (or lack of it) by the return currents in the plasma. We report direct quantitative measurements of strong electric inhibition in insulators and turbulence induced anomalous stopping of hot electrons in conductors. The present technique can prove extremely important from the point of view of fast ignition scheme, which relies on the penetration of fast electrons into the fusion core.

  18. Ferromagnetic Kondo lattice CeRuSi{sub 2} with non-Fermi-liquid behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikiforov, V. N.; Baran, M.; Irkhin, V. Yu.

    2013-05-15

    The structure, electronic, thermodynamic, and magnetic properties of the CeRuSi{sub 2} Kondo lattice with ferromagnetic ordering characterized by a small moment of the ground state are investigated. Anomalies in the temperature dependences of heat capacity and resistivity (unusual power or logarithmic behavior) observed in the low-temperature range indicate a non-Fermi-liquid behavior. The results are compared with those for other Ce{sub l}Ru{sub n}X{sub m} compounds and anomalous systems based on rare-earth elements and actinides that had been studied earlier.

  19. Multichannel Pseudogap Kondo Model: Large-N Solution and Quantum-Critical Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vojta, Matthias

    2001-08-27

    We discuss a multichannel SU(N) Kondo model which displays nontrivial zero-temperature phase transitions due to a conduction electron density of states vanishing with a power law at the Fermi level. In a particular large-N limit, the system is described by coupled integral equations corresponding to a dynamic saddle point. We exactly determine the universal low-energy behavior of spectral densities at the scale-invariant fixed points, obtain anomalous exponents, and compute scaling functions describing the crossover near the quantum-critical points. We argue that our findings are relevant to recent experiments on impurity-doped d -wave superconductors.

  20. Overview of the Fermilab Muon g-2 Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, SeungCheon

    2015-01-01

    The measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of muon provides a precision test of the Standard Model. The Brookhaven muon g-2 experiment (E821) measured the muon magnetic moment anomaly with 0.54 ppm precision, a more than 3 deviation from the Standard Model predictions, spurring speculation about the possibility of new physics. The new g-2 experiment at Fermilab (E989) will reduce the combined statistical and systematic error of the BNL experiment by a factor of 4. An overview of the new experiment is described in this article.