National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for bcsb multiple-wavelength anomalous

  1. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology ...

  2. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology ...

  3. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION...

  4. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural...

  5. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural...

  6. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  7. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  8. Anomalous

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    impurity ion heating from Alfvénic cascade in the reversed field pinch Varun Tangri, P. W. Terry, and Gennady Fiksel Center for Magnetic Self-Organization in Laboratory and Astrophysical Plasmas and Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA ͑Received 15 January 2008; accepted 19 September 2008; published online 3 November 2008͒ Anomalous ion and impurity heating in reversed field pinch plasmas is addressed. Previous work ͓N.

  9. Three Dimensional Imaging with Multiple Wavelength Speckle Interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Cannon, Bret D.; Schiffern, John T.; Mendoza, Albert

    2014-05-28

    We present the design, modeling, construction, and results of a three-dimensional imager based upon multiple-wavelength speckle interferometry. A surface under test is illuminated with tunable laser light in a Michelson interferometer configuration while a speckled image is acquired at each laser frequency step. The resulting hypercube is Fourier transformed in the frequency dimension and the beat frequencies that result map the relative offsets of surface features. Synthetic wavelengths resulting from the laser tuning can probe features ranging from 18 microns to hundreds of millimeters. Three dimensional images will be presented along with modeling results.

  10. Multiple-wavelength spectroscopic quantitation of light-absorbing species in scattering media

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nathel, Howard; Cartland, Harry E.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Everett, Matthew J.; Roe, Jeffery N.

    2000-01-01

    An oxygen concentration measurement system for blood hemoglobin comprises a multiple-wavelength low-coherence optical light source that is coupled by single mode fibers through a splitter and combiner and focused on both a target tissue sample and a reference mirror. Reflections from both the reference mirror and from the depths of the target tissue sample are carried back and mixed to produce interference fringes in the splitter and combiner. The reference mirror is set such that the distance traversed in the reference path is the same as the distance traversed into and back from the target tissue sample at some depth in the sample that will provide light attenuation information that is dependent on the oxygen in blood hemoglobin in the target tissue sample. Two wavelengths of light are used to obtain concentrations. The method can be used to measure total hemoglobin concentration [Hb.sub.deoxy +Hb.sub.oxy ] or total blood volume in tissue and in conjunction with oxygen saturation measurements from pulse oximetry can be used to absolutely quantify oxyhemoglobin [HbO.sub.2 ] in tissue. The apparatus and method provide a general means for absolute quantitation of an absorber dispersed in a highly scattering medium.

  11. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  12. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  13. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator

  14. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator

  15. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.2 Beamline 5.0.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:35 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad

  16. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.2 Beamline 5.0.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:35 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with

  17. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  18. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  19. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max

  20. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max

  1. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max

  2. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max

  3. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max

  4. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max

  5. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  6. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  7. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  8. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  9. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  10. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Beamline 8.2.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:54 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size

  11. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  12. Beamline 5.0.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm period wiggler (W11) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double-crystal, Si(111) liquid N2 cooled Measured flux at 12.4 keV 8.0 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad convergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  13. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max

  14. Beamline 8.2.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Beamline 8.2.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:53 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV (standard monochromator); 10-13 keV (multilayer) Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec

  15. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size at sample (FWHM) 100 µm Endstations Minihutch

  16. Beamline 8.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Beamline 8.2.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:54 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend (5.0 T, single pole) Energy range 5-16 keV Monochromator Double crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 3.0 x 1011 photons/sec Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0(h) x 0.5(v) mrad Measured spot size

  17. Anomalous is ubiquitous

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliazar, Iddo; Klafter, Joseph

    2011-09-15

    Brownian motion is widely considered the quintessential model of diffusion processes-the most elemental random transport processes in Science and Engineering. Yet so, examples of diffusion processes displaying highly non-Brownian statistics-commonly termed 'Anomalous Diffusion' processes-are omnipresent both in the natural sciences and in engineered systems. The scientific interest in Anomalous Diffusion and its applications is growing exponentially in the recent years. In this Paper we review the key statistics of Anomalous Diffusion processes: sub-diffusion and super-diffusion, long-range dependence and the Joseph effect, Levy statistics and the Noah effect, and 1/f noise. We further present a theoretical model-generalizing the Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model-which provides a unified explanation for the prevalence of Anomalous Diffusion statistics. Our model shows that what is commonly perceived as 'anomalous' is in effect ubiquitous. - Highlights: > The article provides an overview of Anomalous Diffusion (AD) statistics. > The Einstein-Smoluchowski diffusion model is extended and generalized. > The generalized model universally generates AD statistics. > A unified 'universal macroscopic explanation' for AD statistics is established. > AD statistics are shown to be fundamentally connected to robustness.

  18. Anomalous law of cooling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  19. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  20. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion wemore » illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.« less

  1. Detection of anomalous events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Laska, Jason A.; Bridges, Robert A.

    2016-06-07

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low-probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The anomaly detector provides for comparability of disparate sources of data (e.g., network flow data and firewall logs.) Additionally, the anomaly detector allows for regulatability, meaning that the algorithm can be user configurable to adjust a number of false alerts. The anomaly detector can be used for a variety of probability density functions, including normal Gaussian distributions, irregular distributions, as well as functions associated with continuous or discrete variables.

  2. Multiple wavelength photolithography for preparing multilayer microstructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dentinger, Paul Michael (Livermore, CA); Krafcik, Karen Lee (Livermore, CA)

    2003-06-24

    The invention relates to a multilayer microstructure and a method for preparing thereof. The method involves first applying a first photodefinable composition having a first exposure wavelength on a substrate to form a first polymeric layer. A portion of the first photodefinable composition is then exposed to electromagnetic radiation of the first exposure wavelength to form a first pattern in the first polymeric layer. After exposing the first polymeric layer, a second photodefinable composition having a second exposure wavelength is applied on the first polymeric layer to form a second polymeric layer. A portion of the second photodefinable composition is then exposed to electromagnetic radiation of the second exposure wavelength to form a second pattern in the second polymeric layer. In addition, a portion of each layer is removed according to the patterns to form a multilayer microstructure having a cavity having a shape that corresponds to the portions removed.

  3. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, P.A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focusing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points. 3 figs.

  4. Multiple wavelength X-ray monochromators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steinmeyer, Peter A.

    1992-11-17

    An improved apparatus and method is provided for separating input x-ray radiation containing first and second x-ray wavelengths into spatially separate first and second output radiation which contain the first and second x-ray wavelengths, respectively. The apparatus includes a crystalline diffractor which includes a first set of parallel crystal planes, where each of the planes is spaced a predetermined first distance from one another. The crystalline diffractor also includes a second set of parallel crystal planes inclined at an angle with respect to the first set of crystal planes where each of the planes of the second set of parallel crystal planes is spaced a predetermined second distance from one another. In one embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a single crystal. In a second embodiment, the crystalline diffractor is comprised of a stack of two crystals. In a third embodiment, the crystalline diffractor includes a single crystal that is bent for focussing the separate first and second output x-ray radiation wavelengths into separate focal points.

  5. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stix, Thomas H.; Ono, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  6. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  7. Scattering universality classes of side jump in the anomalous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scattering universality classes of side jump in the anomalous Hall effect Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Scattering universality classes of side jump in the anomalous ...

  8. Anomalous spin precession and spin Hall effect in semiconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Anomalous spin precession and spin Hall effect in semiconductor quantum wells Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous ...

  9. Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene Authors: ...

  10. Anomalous Behavior of the Homogeneous Ice Nucleation Rate in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Published Article: Anomalous Behavior of the Homogeneous Ice Nucleation Rate in "No-Man's Land" Prev Next Title: Anomalous Behavior of the Homogeneous Ice Nucleation Rate in ...

  11. The charmonium dissociation in an ''anomalous wind''

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sadofyev, Andrey V.; Yin, Yi

    2016-01-11

    We study the charmonium dissociation in a strongly coupled chiral plasma in the presence of magnetic field and axial charge imbalance. This type of plasma carries "anomalous flow" induced by the chiral anomaly and exhibits novel transport phenomena such as chiral magnetic effect. We found that the "anomalous flow" would modify the charmonium color screening length by using the gauge/gravity correspondence. We derive an analytical expression quantifying the "anomalous flow" experienced by a charmonium for a large class of chiral plasma with a gravity dual. We elaborate on the similarity and it qualitative difference between anomalous effects on the charmoniummore » color screening length which are model-dependent and those on the heavy quark drag force which are fixed by the second law of thermodynamics. As a result, we speculate on the possible charmonium dissociation induced by the chiral anomaly in heavy ion collisions.« less

  12. Parametric probability distributions for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Foy, Bernard R; Wohlberg, Brendt E; Scovel, James C

    2010-01-01

    The problem of anomalous change detection arises when two (or possibly more) images are taken of the same scene, but at different times. The aim is to discount the 'pervasive differences' that occur thoughout the imagery, due to the inevitably different conditions under which the images were taken (caused, for instance, by differences in illumination, atmospheric conditions, sensor calibration, or misregistration), and to focus instead on the 'anomalous changes' that actually take place in the scene. In general, anomalous change detection algorithms attempt to model these normal or pervasive differences, based on data taken directly from the imagery, and then identify as anomalous those pixels for which the model does not hold. For many algorithms, these models are expressed in terms of probability distributions, and there is a class of such algorithms that assume the distributions are Gaussian. By considering a broader class of distributions, however, a new class of anomalous change detection algorithms can be developed. We consider several parametric families of such distributions, derive the associated change detection algorithms, and compare the performance with standard algorithms that are based on Gaussian distributions. We find that it is often possible to significantly outperform these standard algorithms, even using relatively simple non-Gaussian models.

  13. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for anomalous production of events with a high energy lepton and photon at the Tevatron Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for anomalous production of events with ...

  14. Total least squares for anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Matsekh, Anna M

    2010-01-01

    A family of difference-based anomalous change detection algorithms is derived from a total least squares (TLSQ) framework. This provides an alternative to the well-known chronochrome algorithm, which is derived from ordinary least squares. In both cases, the most anomalous changes are identified with the pixels that exhibit the largest residuals with respect to the regression of the two images against each other. The family of TLSQ-based anomalous change detectors is shown to be equivalent to the subspace RX formulation for straight anomaly detection, but applied to the stacked space. However, this family is not invariant to linear coordinate transforms. On the other hand, whitened TLSQ is coordinate invariant, and furthermore it is shown to be equivalent to the optimized covariance equalization algorithm. What whitened TLSQ offers, in addition to connecting with a common language the derivations of two of the most popular anomalous change detection algorithms - chronochrome and covariance equalization - is a generalization of these algorithms with the potential for better performance.

  15. Anomalous density for Bose gases at finite temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudjemaa, A.; Benarous, M.

    2011-10-15

    We analyze the behavior of the anomalous density as function of the radial distance at different temperatures in a variational framework. We show that the temperature dependence of the anomalous density agrees with the Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (HFB) calculations. Comparisons between the normal and anomalous fractions at low temperature show that the latter remains higher and, consequently, the neglect of the anomalous density may destabilize the condensate. These results are compatible with those of Yukalov. Surprisingly, the study of the anomalous density in terms of the interaction parameter shows that the dip in the central density is destroyed for sufficiently weak interactions. We explain this effect.

  16. Method for identifying anomalous terrestrial heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, Nancy Kerr

    1977-01-25

    A method for locating and mapping the magnitude and extent of terrestrial heat-flow anomalies from 5 to 50 times average with a tenfold improved sensitivity over orthodox applications of aerial temperature-sensing surveys as used for geothermal reconnaissance. The method remotely senses surface temperature anomalies such as occur from geothermal resources or oxidizing ore bodies by: measuring the spectral, spatial, statistical, thermal, and temporal features characterizing infrared radiation emitted by natural terrestrial surfaces; deriving from these measurements the true surface temperature with uncertainties as small as 0.05 to 0.5 K; removing effects related to natural temperature variations of topographic, hydrologic, or meteoric origin, the surface composition, detector noise, and atmospheric conditions; factoring out the ambient normal-surface temperature for non-thermally enhanced areas surveyed under otherwise identical environmental conditions; distinguishing significant residual temperature enhancements characteristic of anomalous heat flows and mapping the extent and magnitude of anomalous heat flows where they occur.

  17. Anomalous Charge Transport in Disordered Organic Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muniandy, S. V.; Woon, K. L.; Choo, K. Y.

    2011-03-30

    Anomalous charge carrier transport in disordered organic semiconductors is studied using fractional differential equations. The connection between index of fractional derivative and dispersion exponent is examined from the perspective of fractional Fokker-Planck equation and its link to the continuous time random walk formalism. The fractional model is used to describe the bi-scaling power-laws observed in the time-of flight photo-current transient data for two different types of organic semiconductors.

  18. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational...

  19. Beamline 4.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Biology Consortium Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE ...

  20. Anomalous Dimensions and Non-Gaussianity (Journal Article) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Anomalous Dimensions and Non-Gaussianity Authors: Green, Daniel ; Lewandowski, ... Sponsoring Org: US DOE Office of Science (DOE SC);High Energy Physics (HEP);National ...

  1. Anomalous Zeeman response of the coexisting superconducting and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    s -wave pairing in ferropnictide superconductors Title: Anomalous Zeeman response of ... s -wave pairing in ferropnictide superconductors Authors: Ghaemi, Pouyan ; Vishwanath, ...

  2. Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of protons in nanoconfined water Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water Deep inelastic neutron ...

  3. Phase-space jets drive transport and anomalous resistivity (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    transport and anomalous resistivity In the presence of wave dissipation, phase-space structures spontaneously emerge in nonlinear Vlasov dynamics. These structures include not only...

  4. Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    volcanic region, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust beneath the...

  5. The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: The...

  6. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-03-03

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I. Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has expanded

  7. Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxygen distance in supercondu...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxygen distance in superconducting cuprate bilayers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxy...

  8. Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Settlemyer, Bradley W; Hodson, Stephen W; Kuehn, Jeffery A; Poole, Stephen W

    2011-04-01

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnec- tion networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; how- ever, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to under- stand anomalous network performance. Our tool, Confidence, instead uses an empirically derived probability distribution to characterize network performance. In this paper we describe several instances where the Confidence toolkit allowed us to understand and diagnose network performance anomalies that we could not adequately explore with the simple summary statis- tics provided by traditional measurement tools. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  9. Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum transport, anomalous dephasing, and spin-orbit coupling in an open ballistic bismuth nanocavity Home Author: B. Hackens, J. P. Minet, S. Faniel, G. Farhi, C. Gustin, J. P....

  10. Understanding the anomalous dispersion of doubly-ionized carbon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of doubly-ionized carbon plasmas near 47 nm Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Understanding the anomalous dispersion of doubly-ionized carbon plasmas near 47 nm Over ...

  11. Apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, David R.; Fox, Joe; Wilde, Tyson; Barlow, Jonathan S.

    2010-04-13

    A method of responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a bore hole comprises detecting the anomalous change in downhole pressure, sending a signal along the segmented electromagnetic transmission path, receiving the signal, and performing a automated response. The anomalous change in downhole pressure is detected at a first location along a segmented electromagnetic transmission path, and the segmented electromagnetic transmission path is integrated into the tool string. The signal is received by at least one receiver in communication with the segmented electromagnetic transmission path. The automated response is performed along the tool string. Disclosed is an apparatus for responding to an anomalous change in downhole pressure in a downhole tool string, comprising a segmented electromagnetic transmission path connecting one or more receivers and at least one pressure sensor.

  12. NLO BFKL and anomalous dimensions of light-ray operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balitsky, Ian

    2013-05-01

    This presentation covers: Regge limit in the coordinate space; BFKL representation of 4-point correlation function in N = 4 SYM; light-ray operators; DGLAP representation of 4-point correlation function; and anomalous dimensions from DGAP vs BFKL representations.

  13. CP violating anomalous top-quark couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Sudhir Kumar; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Valencia, G.

    2009-08-01

    We study the T odd correlations induced by CP violating anomalous top-quark couplings at both production and decay level in the process gg{yields}tt{yields}(b{mu}{sup +}{nu}{sub {mu}})(b{mu}{sup -}{nu}{sub {mu}}). We consider several counting asymmetries at the parton level and find the ones with the most sensitivity to each of these anomalous couplings at the LHC.

  14. Simulation framework for spatio-spectral anomalous change detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Harvey, Neal R; Porter, Reid B; Wohlberg, Brendt E

    2009-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a simulation framework for anomalous change detection that considers both the spatial and spectral aspects of the imagery. A purely spectral framework has previously been introduced, but the extension to spatio-spectral requires attention to a variety of new issues, and requires more careful modeling of the anomalous changes. Using this extended framework, they evaluate the utility of spatial image processing operators to enhance change detection sensitivity in (simulated) remote sensing imagery.

  15. Method for processing seismic data to identify anomalous absorption zones

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taner, M. Turhan

    2006-01-03

    A method is disclosed for identifying zones anomalously absorptive of seismic energy. The method includes jointly time-frequency decomposing seismic traces, low frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine a general trend of mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces, and high frequency bandpass filtering the decomposed traces to determine local variations in the mean frequency and bandwidth of the seismic traces. Anomalous zones are determined where there is difference between the general trend and the local variations.

  16. Anomalous Hall effect in YIG|Pt bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Sibylle Schlitz, Richard; Geprägs, Stephan; Opel, Matthias; Huebl, Hans; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gross, Rudolf

    2015-03-30

    We measure the ordinary and the anomalous Hall effect in a set of yttrium iron garnet|platinum (YIG|Pt) bilayers via magnetization orientation dependent magnetoresistance experiments. Our data show that the presence of the ferrimagnetic insulator YIG leads to an anomalous Hall effect like voltage in Pt, which is sensitive to both Pt thickness and temperature. Interpretation of the experimental findings in terms of the spin Hall anomalous Hall effect indicates that the imaginary part of the spin mixing conductance G{sub i} plays a crucial role in YIG|Pt bilayers. In particular, our data suggest a sign change in G{sub i} between 10 K and 300 K. Additionally, we report a higher order Hall effect contribution, which appears in thin Pt films on YIG at low temperatures.

  17. No-Drag Frame for Anomalous Chiral Fluid

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stephanov, Mikhail A.; Yee, Ho-Ung

    2016-03-24

    For an anomalous fluid carrying dissipationless chiral magnetic and/or vortical currents we show that there is a frame in which a stationary obstacle experiences no drag, but energy and charge currents do not vanish, resembling superfluidity. Unlike ordinary superfluid flow, the anomalous chiral currents can transport entropy in this frame. Moreover, we show that the second law of thermodynamics completely determines the amounts of these anomalous nondissipative currents in the “no-drag frame” as polynomials in temperature and chemical potential with known anomaly coefficients. These general results are illustrated and confirmed by a calculation in the chiral kinetic theory and inmore » the quark-gluon plasma at high temperature.« less

  18. Anomalous fast ion losses at high β on the tokamak fusion test...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Anomalous fast ion losses at high on the tokamak fusion test reactor Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Anomalous fast ion losses at high on the tokamak fusion test ...

  19. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene ...

  20. Can I solve my structure by SAD phasing? Planning an experiment, scaling data and evaluating the useful anomalous correlation and anomalous signal

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Bunkóczi, Gábor; Hung, Li-Wei; Zwart, Peter H.; Smith, Janet L.; Akey, David L.; Adams, Paul D.

    2016-03-01

    A key challenge in the SAD phasing method is solving a structure when the anomalous signal-to-noise ratio is low. Here, we describe algorithms and tools for evaluating and optimizing the useful anomalous correlation and the anomalous signal in a SAD experiment. A simple theoretical framework [Terwilliger et al.(2016),Acta Cryst.D72, 346–358] is used to develop methods for planning a SAD experiment, scaling SAD data sets and estimating the useful anomalous correlation and anomalous signal in a SAD data set. Thephenix.plan_sad_experimenttool uses a database of solved and unsolved SAD data sets and the expected characteristics of a SAD data set to estimatemore » the probability that the anomalous substructure will be found in the SAD experiment and the expected map quality that would be obtained if the substructure were found. Thephenix.scale_and_mergetool scales unmerged SAD data from one or more crystals using local scaling and optimizes the anomalous signal by identifying the systematic differences among data sets, and thephenix.anomalous_signaltool estimates the useful anomalous correlation and anomalous signal after collecting SAD data and estimates the probability that the data set can be solved and the likely figure of merit of phasing.« less

  1. Can I solve my structure by SAD phasing? Anomalous signal in SAD phasing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Bunkóczi, Gábor; Hung, Li-Wei; Zwart, Peter H.; Smith, Janet L.; Akey, David L.; Adams, Paul D.

    2016-03-01

    A key challenge in the SAD phasing method is solving a structure when the anomalous signal-to-noise ratio is low. We present a simple theoretical framework for describing measurements of anomalous differences and the resulting useful anomalous correlation and anomalous signal in a SAD experiment. Here, the useful anomalous correlation is defined as the correlation of anomalous differences with ideal anomalous differences from the anomalous substructure. The useful anomalous correlation reflects the accuracy of the data and the absence of minor sites. The useful anomalous correlation also reflects the information available for estimating crystallographic phases once the substructure has been determined.more » In contrast, the anomalous signal (the peak height in a model-phased anomalous difference Fourier at the coordinates of atoms in the anomalous substructure) reflects the information available about each site in the substructure and is related to the ability to find the substructure. A theoretical analysis shows that the expected value of the anomalous signal is the product of the useful anomalous correlation, the square root of the ratio of the number of unique reflections in the data set to the number of sites in the substructure, and a function that decreases with increasing values of the atomic displacement factor for the atoms in the substructure. In conclusion, this means that the ability to find the substructure in a SAD experiment is increased by high data quality and by a high ratio of reflections to sites in the substructure, and is decreased by high atomic displacement factors for the substructure.« less

  2. Effective field theory: A modern approach to anomalous couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degrande, Cline; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Universit Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve ; Greiner, Nicolas; Max-Planck-Institut fr Physik, Fhringer Ring 6, 80805 Mnchen ; Kilian, Wolfgang; University of Siegen, Fachbereich Physik, D-57068 Siegen ; Mattelaer, Olivier; Mebane, Harrison; Stelzer, Tim; Willenbrock, Scott; Zhang, Cen; Centre for Particle Physics and Phenomenology , Universit Catholique de Louvain, Chemin du Cyclotron 2, B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve

    2013-08-15

    We advocate an effective field theory approach to anomalous couplings. The effective field theory approach is the natural way to extend the standard model such that the gauge symmetries are respected. It is general enough to capture any physics beyond the standard model, yet also provides guidance as to the most likely place to see the effects of new physics. The effective field theory approach also clarifies that one need not be concerned with the violation of unitarity in scattering processes at high energy. We apply these ideas to pair production of electroweak vector bosons. -- Highlights: We discuss the advantages of effective field theories compared to anomalous couplings. We show that one need not be concerned with unitarity violation at high energy. We discuss the application of effective field theory to weak boson physics.

  3. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1σ and 2σ were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies). Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144825.235807 m Left: 285446.256851 m Right: 350577.338852 m Bottom: 4096962.250137 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO

  4. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1σ and 2σ were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359411.975000 m Bottom: 4447521.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code

  5. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature between 1σ and 2σ were considered ASTER modeled warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4442180.552290 m Left: 268655.053363 m Right: 359915.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal

  6. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolores County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO

  7. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB

  8. Areas of Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Note: This “Weakly Anomalous to Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset differs from the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset for this county (another remotely sensed CIRES product) by showing areas of modeled temperatures between 1σ and 2σ above the mean, as opposed to the greater than 2σ temperatures contained in the “Anomalous Surface Temperature” dataset. Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO

  9. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 8.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:55 Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural...

  10. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3.1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational...

  11. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Beamline 8.3.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:55 Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural...

  12. Beamline 4.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4.2.2 Print Molecular Biology Consortium Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL...

  13. Anomalous diffusion and Tsallis statistics in an optical lattice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Eric

    2003-05-01

    We point out a connection between anomalous transport in an optical lattice and Tsallis' generalized statistics. Specifically, we show that the momentum equation for the semiclassical Wigner function which describes atomic motion in the optical potential, belongs to a class of transport equations recently studied by Borland [Phys. Lett. A 245, 67 (1998)]. The important property of these ordinary linear Fokker-Planck equations is that their stationary solutions are exactly given by Tsallis distributions. An analytical expression of the Tsallis index q in terms of the microscopic parameters of the quantum-optical problem is given and the spatial coherence of the atomic wave packets is discussed.

  14. Constraints on anomalous top quark couplings at the LHC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizzo, T.G.

    1996-09-01

    Measurements of distributions associated with the pair production of top quarks at the LHC can be used to constrain (or observe) the anomalous chromomagnetic dipole moment(k) of the top. For example, using either the tt(bar) invariant mass or the Pt distribution of top we find that sensitivities to ; k; of order 0.05 are obtainable with 100 /fb of integrated luminosity. This is similar in magnitude to what can be obtained at a 500 GeV NLC with an integrated luminosity of 50 /fb through an examination of the e(+)e(-) right arrow tt(bar)g process.

  15. Nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung: Anomalous magnetic moment effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timmermans, R.G.E.; Penninga, T.D.; Gibson, B.F.; Liou, M.K.

    2006-03-15

    Background: Two soft-photon amplitudes, the two-u-two-t special (TuTts) amplitude and the Low amplitude, are known to produce quantitatively similar np{gamma} cross sections, but they predict quite different pp{gamma} cross sections for those kinematic conditions in which the nucleon scattering angles are small (less than 25 deg.). Purpose: These two amplitudes have been applied to systematically investigate three different nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung (NN{gamma}) processes: pp{gamma},np{gamma}, and nn{gamma}. The nn{gamma} process is explored for the first time. The primary focus of this work is to investigate the contribution of the proton and the neutron anomalous magnetic moments to all three NN{gamma} processes for projectile energies above 150 MeV and for laboratory scattering angles ({theta}{sub 1} and {theta}{sub 2}) lying between 8 deg. and 40 deg.. Method: A special soft-photon expansion in which the TuTts amplitude is expanded in terms of the Low amplitude plus additional amplitudes is utilized to explore the relationship between the TuTts and Low amplitudes and the reasons why they agree and disagree. We also used the TuTts amplitude to calculate the NN{gamma} cross section with and without the anomalous magnetic moment contributions to explore the importance of that element of the electromagnetic current. Results: The TuTts amplitude describes well the available pp{gamma} cross-section data. The anomalous magnetic moment contribution is (i) significant in the pp{gamma} process when each scattering angle is less than 25 deg. but insignificant when each scattering angle is 40 deg. or greater and (ii) insignificant in the np{gamma} process for all scattering angles. The nn{gamma} cross sections for the TuTts and Low amplitudes differ substantially for the kinematics investigated. Conclusions: In general, the Low amplitude agrees well with the TuTts amplitude when anomalous magnetic moment effects are not significant, but the two amplitudes can yield

  16. Anomalous magnetic behavior at the graphene/Co interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, Sumit; Saha, Shyamal K., E-mail: cnssks@iacs.res.in [Department of Materials Science, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-07-14

    An intensive theoretical study on the interaction between graphene and transition metal atom has been carried out; however, its experimental verification is still lacking. To explore the theoretical prediction of antiferromagnetic coupling due to charge transfer between graphene and cobalt, epitaxial layer of cobalt is grown on graphene surface. Predicted antiferromagnetic interaction with Neel temperature (T{sub N}???32?K) which anomalously shifts to higher temperature (34?K) and becomes more prominent under application of magnetic field of 1 T is reported. Lowering of magnetoresistance as a consequence of this antiferromagnetic coupling at the interface is also observed.

  17. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in topological insulator memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Tan, S. G.; Siu, Z. B.

    2015-05-07

    We theoretically investigate the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in a magnetically coupled three-dimensional-topological insulator (3D-TI) system. We apply the generalized spin-orbit coupling Hamiltonian to obtain the Hall conductivity σ{sup xy} of the system. The underlying topology of the QAHE phenomenon is then analyzed to show the quantization of σ{sup xy} and its relation to the Berry phase of the system. Finally, we analyze the feasibility of utilizing σ{sup xy} as a memory read-out in a 3D-TI based memory at finite temperatures, with comparison to known magnetically doped 3D-TIs.

  18. A fractional Fokker-Planck model for anomalous diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Johan; Kim, Eun-jin; Moradi, Sara

    2014-12-15

    In this paper, we present a study of anomalous diffusion using a Fokker-Planck description with fractional velocity derivatives. The distribution functions are found using numerical means for varying degree of fractionality of the stable Lévy distribution. The statistical properties of the distribution functions are assessed by a generalized normalized expectation measure and entropy in terms of Tsallis statistical mechanics. We find that the ratio of the generalized entropy and expectation is increasing with decreasing fractionality towards the well known so-called sub-diffusive domain, indicating a self-organising behavior.

  19. Crowding and Anomalous Capacitance at an Electrode–Ionic Liquid...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Crowding and Anomalous Capacitance at an ElectrodeIonic Liquid Interface Observed Using Operando X-ray Scattering Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Crowding and ...

  20. Reduced Lorenz models for anomalous transport and profile resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rypdal, K.; Garcia, O. E.

    2007-02-15

    The physical basis for the Lorenz equations for convective cells in stratified fluids, and for magnetized plasmas imbedded in curved magnetic fields, are reexamined with emphasis on anomalous transport. It is shown that the Galerkin truncation leading to the Lorenz equations for the closed boundary problem is incompatible with finite fluxes through the system in the limit of vanishing diffusion. An alternative formulation leading to the Lorenz equations is proposed, invoking open boundaries and the notion of convective streamers and their back-reaction on the profile gradient, giving rise to resilience of the profile. Particular emphasis is put on the diffusionless limit, where these equations reduce to a simple dynamical system depending only on one single forcing parameter. This model is studied numerically, stressing experimentally observable signatures, and some of the perils of dimension-reducing approximations are discussed.

  1. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bestwick, A. J.; Fox, E. J.; Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Kang L.; Goldhaber-Gordon, D.

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  2. Sensor fusion and nonlinear prediction for anomalous event detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernandez, J.V.; Moore, K.R.; Elphic, R.C.

    1995-03-07

    The authors consider the problem of using the information from various time series, each one characterizing a different physical quantity, to predict the future state of the system and, based on that information, to detect and classify anomalous events. They stress the application of principal components analysis (PCA) to analyze and combine data from different sensors. They construct both linear and nonlinear predictors. In particular, for linear prediction the authors use the least-mean-square (LMS) algorithm and for nonlinear prediction they use both backpropagation (BP) networks and fuzzy predictors (FP). As an application, they consider the prediction of gamma counts from past values of electron and gamma counts recorded by the instruments of a high altitude satellite.

  3. Tuning giant anomalous Hall resistance ratio in perpendicular Hall balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Yang, G.; Wang, S. G. E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Liu, J. L.; Wang, R. M.; Amsellem, E.; Kohn, A.; Yu, G. H. E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn

    2015-04-13

    Anomalous Hall effect at room temperature in perpendicular Hall balance with a core structure of [Pt/Co]{sub 4}/NiO/[Co/Pt]{sub 4} has been tuned by functional CoO layers, where [Pt/Co]{sub 4} multilayers exhibit perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. A giant Hall resistance ratio up to 69 900% and saturation Hall resistance (R{sub S}{sup P}) up to 2590 mΩ were obtained in CoO/[Pt/Co]{sub 4}/NiO/[Co/Pt]{sub 4}/CoO system, which is 302% and 146% larger than that in the structure without CoO layers, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy shows highly textured [Co/Pt]{sub 4} multilayers and oxide layers with local epitaxial relations, indicating that the crystallographic structure has significant influence on spin dependent transport properties.

  4. Ultrahigh sensitivity of anomalous Hall effect sensor based on Cr-doped

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bi2Te3 topological insulator thin films (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Ultrahigh sensitivity of anomalous Hall effect sensor based on Cr-doped Bi2Te3 topological insulator thin films Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on July 1, 2017 Title: Ultrahigh sensitivity of anomalous Hall effect sensor based on Cr-doped Bi2Te3 topological insulator thin films Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) was recently discovered in magnetic element-doped topological

  5. Metal-to-insulator switching in quantum anomalous Hall states

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Jing; Fan, Yabin; Choi, Eun Sang; Lee, Wei -Li; Nie, Tianxiao; Murata, Koichi; Shao, Qiming; Zhang, Shou -Cheng; et al

    2015-10-07

    After decades of searching for the dissipationless transport in the absence of any external magnetic field, quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) was recently achieved in magnetic topological insulator films. However, the universal phase diagram of QAHE and its relation with quantum Hall effect (QHE) remain to be investigated. Here, we report the experimental observation of the giant longitudinal resistance peak and zero Hall conductance plateau at the coercive field in the six quintuple-layer (Cr0.12Bi0.26Sb0.62)2Te3 film, and demonstrate the metal-to-insulator switching between two opposite QAHE plateau states up to 0.3 K. Moreover, the universal QAHE phase diagram is confirmed through themore » angle-dependent measurements. Our results address that the quantum phase transitions in both QAHE and QHE regimes are in the same universality class, yet the microscopic details are different. Additionally, the realization of the QAHE insulating state unveils new ways to explore quantum phase-related physics and applications.« less

  6. Metal-to-insulator switching in quantum anomalous Hall states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Xufeng; Pan, Lei; Wang, Jing; Fan, Yabin; Choi, Eun Sang; Lee, Wei -Li; Nie, Tianxiao; Murata, Koichi; Shao, Qiming; Zhang, Shou -Cheng; Wang, Kang L.

    2015-10-07

    After decades of searching for the dissipationless transport in the absence of any external magnetic field, quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) was recently achieved in magnetic topological insulator films. However, the universal phase diagram of QAHE and its relation with quantum Hall effect (QHE) remain to be investigated. Here, we report the experimental observation of the giant longitudinal resistance peak and zero Hall conductance plateau at the coercive field in the six quintuple-layer (Cr0.12Bi0.26Sb0.62)2Te3 film, and demonstrate the metal-to-insulator switching between two opposite QAHE plateau states up to 0.3 K. Moreover, the universal QAHE phase diagram is confirmed through the angle-dependent measurements. Our results address that the quantum phase transitions in both QAHE and QHE regimes are in the same universality class, yet the microscopic details are different. Additionally, the realization of the QAHE insulating state unveils new ways to explore quantum phase-related physics and applications.

  7. Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea Volcano...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    down rift. The anomalously high b-values at the center of the South Flank, several kilometers away from the rift, may be explained by unusually high pore pressure throughout the...

  8. Anomalous Hall effect in magnetic disordered alloys: Effects of spin orbital coupling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, L.; Gao, W. B.; Zhou, S. M.; Shi, Z.; He, P.; Miao, J.; Jiang, Y.

    2013-12-28

    For disordered ternary Fe{sub 0.5}(Pd{sub 1−x}Pt{sub x}){sub 0.5} alloy films, the anomalous Hall effect obeys the conventional scaling law ρ{sub AH}=aρ{sub xx}+bρ{sub xx}{sup 2} with the longitudinal resistivity ρ{sub xx} and anomalous Hall resistivity ρ{sub AH}. Contributed by the intrinsic term and the extrinsic side-jump one, the scattering-independent anomalous Hall conductivity b increases with increasing Pt/Pd concentration. In contrast, the skew scattering parameter a is mainly influenced by the residual resistivity. The present results will facilitate the theoretical studies of the anomalous Hall effect in magnetic disordered alloys.

  9. Violations of Lorentz invariance in the neutrino sector: an improved analysis of anomalous threshold constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maccione, Luca; Liberati, Stefano; Mattingly, David M. E-mail: liberati@sissa.it

    2013-03-01

    Recently there has been a renewed activity in the physics of violations of Lorentz invariance in the neutrino sector. Flavor dependent Lorentz violation, which generically changes the pattern of neutrino oscillations, is extremely tightly constrained by oscillation experiments. Flavor independent Lorentz violation, which does not introduce new oscillation phenomena, is much more weakly constrained with constraints coming from time of flight and anomalous threshold analyses. We use a simplified rotationally invariant model to investigate the effects of finite baselines and energy dependent dispersion on anomalous reaction rates in long baseline experiments and show numerically that anomalous reactions do not necessarily cut off the spectrum quite as sharply as currently assumed. We also present a revised analysis of how anomalous reactions can be used to cast constraints from the observed atmospheric high energy neutrinos and the expected cosmogenic ones.

  10. Impact of anomalous dispersion on the interferometer measurements of plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2004-12-16

    For many decades optical interferometers have been used to measure the electron density of plasmas. During the last ten years X-ray lasers in the wavelength range 14 to 47 nm have enabled researchers to use interferometers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes that the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index of refraction less than one and the electron density proportional to the number of fringe shifts. Recent experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one and made us question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction. Recent calculations showed how the anomalous dispersion from the bound electrons can dominate the index of refraction in many types of plasma and make the index greater than one or enhance the index such that one would greatly overestimate the electron density of the plasma using interferometers. In this work we calculate the index of refraction of C, Al, Ti, and Pd plasmas for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV (12.4 nm) using a new average-atom code. The results show large variations from the free electron approximation under many different plasma conditions. We validate the average-atom code against the more detailed OPAL code for carbon and aluminum plasmas. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  11. Origin of the Anomalous Long Lifetime of 14C | Argonne Leadership Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Origin of the Anomalous Long Lifetime of 14C Authors: Maris, P., Vary, J.P., Navratil, P., Ormand, W.E., Nam, H., Dean, D.J. We report the microscopic origins of the anomalously suppressed beta decay of 14C to 14N using the ab initio no-core shell model with the Hamiltonian from the chiral effective field theory including three-nucleon force terms. The three-nucleon force induces unexpectedly large cancellations within the p shell between contributions to beta decay, which reduce

  12. Enhanced anomalous photo-absorption from TiO{sub 2} nanostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solanki, Vanaraj; Majumder, Subrata; Mishra, Indrani; Varma, Shikha; Dash, P.; Singh, C.; Kanjilal, D.

    2014-03-28

    Two dimensional nanostructures have been created on the rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) surfaces via ion irradiation technique. Enhanced anomalous photo- absorption response is displayed, where nanostructures of 15?nm diameter with 0.5?nm height, and not the smaller nanostructures with larger surface area, delineate highest absorbance. Comprehensive investigations of oxygen vacancy states, on ion- irradiated surfaces, display a remarkable result that the number of vacancies saturates for higher fluences. A competition between the number of vacancy sites on the nanostructure in conjunction with its size is responsible for the observed anomalous photo-absorption.

  13. Studies of [ital WW] and [ital WZ] production and limits on anomalous [ital WW[gamma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, S.; Mostafa, M.; Piegaia, R. ); Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; da Motta, H.; Santoro, A. ); Lima, J.G.; Oguri, V. ); Mao, H.S. ); Gomez, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P. ); Hoeneisen, B. ); Parua, N. ); Ducros, Y. ); Beri, S.B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kohli, J.M.; Singh, J.B. ); Shivpuri, R.K. ); Acharya, B.S.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.R.; Gupta, A.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Mondal, N.K.; Narasimham, V.S.; Shankar, H.C. (Tata Inst.

    1999-10-01

    Evidence of anomalous WW and WZ production was sought in p[bar p] collisions at a center-of-mass energy of [radical] (s) =1.8 hthinsp;TeV. The final states WW(WZ)[r arrow][mu][nu] jet jet+X, WZ[r arrow][mu][nu]ee+X and WZ[r arrow]e[nu]ee+X were studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 90 hthinsp;pb[sup [minus]1]. No evidence of anomalous diboson production was found. Limits were set on anomalous WW[gamma] and WWZ couplings and were combined with our previous results. The combined 95[percent] confidence level anomalous coupling limits for [Lambda]=2 hthinsp;TeV are [minus]0.25[le][Delta][kappa][le]0.39 ([lambda]=0) and [minus]0.18[le][lambda][le]0.19 ([Delta][kappa]=0), assuming the WW[gamma] couplings are equal to the WWZ couplings. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  14. Measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry with 9 fb? of pp? collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2011-09-16

    We present an updated measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry Absl for semileptonic b-hadron decays in 9.0 fb? of pp? collisions recorded with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of ?s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We obtain Absl=(-0.7870.172(stat)0.093(syst))%. This result differs by 3.9 standard deviations from the prediction of the standard model and provides evidence for anomalously large CP violation in semileptonic neutral B decay. The dependence of the asymmetry on the muon impact parameter is consistent with the hypothesis that it originates from semileptonic b-hadron decays.

  15. Soliton formation and evolution in passively-mode-locked lasers with ultralong anomalous-dispersion fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Xueming

    2011-08-15

    The soliton formation and evolution are numerically and experimentally investigated in passively-mode-locked lasers where pulses encounter ultralong anomalous-dispersion fibers. The pulse formation and evolution in lasers are determined by two balances, namely, nonlinearity and anomalous-dispersion balance and intracavity filtering and self-amplitude modulation balance. It is numerically found that a higher-energy soliton can be split into identical lower-energy multisolitons with exactly the same physical properties. Simulation results show that the separation of neighboring solitons is variational in the temporal domain. The temporal and spectral characteristics of solitons have large variations throughout the laser cavity, qualitatively distinct from the steady state of conventional solitons. The experimental observations confirm the theoretical predictions.

  16. Chemical reaction at ferromagnet/oxide interface and its influence on anomalous Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yi-Wei; Teng, Jiao E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Zhang, Jing-Yan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xi; Li, Xu-Jing; Feng, Chun; Wang, Hai-Cheng; Li, Ming-Hua; Yu, Guang-Hua E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn; Wu, Zheng-Long

    2014-09-08

    Chemical reactions at the ferromagnet/oxide interface in [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/MgO and [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} multilayers before and after annealing were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results show that Fe atoms at the Fe/MgO interface were completely oxidized in the as-grown state and significantly deoxidized after vacuum annealing. However, only some of the Fe atoms at the Fe/SiO{sub 2} interface were oxidized and rarely deoxidized after annealing. The anomalous Hall effect was modified by this interfacial chemical reaction. The saturation anomalous Hall resistance (R{sub xy}) was greatly increased in the [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/MgO multilayers after annealing and was 350% higher than that in the as-deposited film, while R{sub xy} of the [Pt/Fe]{sub 3}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer only increased 10% after annealing.

  17. Engineering the quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene with uniaxial strains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diniz, G. S. Guassi, M. R.; Qu, F.

    2013-12-28

    We theoretically investigate the manipulation of the quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE) in graphene by means of the uniaxial strain. The values of Chern number and Hall conductance demonstrate that the strained graphene in presence of Rashba spin-orbit coupling and exchange field, for vanishing intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, possesses non-trivial topological phase, which is robust against the direction and modulus of the strain. Besides, we also find that the interplay between Rashba and intrinsic spin-orbit couplings results in a topological phase transition in the strained graphene. Remarkably, as the strain strength is increased beyond approximately 7%, the critical parameters of the exchange field for triggering the quantum anomalous Hall phase transition show distinct behaviors—decrease (increase) for strains along zigzag (armchair) direction. Our findings open up a new platform for manipulation of the QAHE by an experimentally accessible strain deformation of the graphene structure, with promising application on novel quantum electronic devices with high efficiency.

  18. Determination of the polarization state of x rays with the help of anomalous transmission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulze, K. S. Uschmann, I.; Frster, E.; Marx, B.; Paulus, G. G.; Sthlker, T.

    2014-04-14

    Besides intensity and direction, the polarization of an electromagnetic wave provides characteristic information on the crossed medium. Here, we present two methods for the determination of the polarization state of x rays by polarizers based on anomalous transmission (Borrmann effect). Using a polarizer-analyzer setup, we have measured a polarization purity of less than 1.5??10{sup ?5}, three orders of magnitude better than obtained in earlier work. Using the analyzer crystal in multiple-beam case with slightly detuned azimuth, we show how the first three Stokes parameters can be determined with a single angular scan. Thus, polarization analyzers based on anomalous transmission make it possible to detect changes of the polarization in a range from degrees down to arcseconds.

  19. The measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon at Fermilab

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Logashenko, I.

    2015-06-17

    The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon is one of the most precisely measured quantities in experimental particle physics. Its latest measurement at Brookhaven National Laboratory deviates from the Standard Model expectation by approximately 3.5 standard deviations. The goal of the new experiment, E989, now under construction at Fermilab, is a fourfold improvement in precision. Furthermore, we discuss the details of the future measurement and its current status.

  20. Anomalous {gamma} {r_arrow} 3{pi} amplitude in a bound-state approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bojan Bistrovic; Dubravko Klabucar

    2000-01-01

    The form factor for the anomalous process {gamma}{pi}{sup +} {r_arrow} pi{sub +}{pi}{sup 0}, which is presently being measured at CEBAF, is calculated in the Schwinger-Dyson approach in conjunction with an impulse approximation. The form factors obtained by the author are compared with the ones predicted by the simple constituent quark loop model, vector meson dominance and chiral perturbation theory, as well as the scarce already available data.

  1. Effect of entropy on anomalous transport in electron-temperature-gradient-modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaqub Khan, M.; Iqbal, J.; Ul Haq, A.

    2014-05-15

    Due to the interconnection of entropy with temperature and density of plasma, it would be interesting to investigate plasma related phenomena with respect to entropy. By employing Braginskii transport equations, it is proved that entropy is proportional to a function of potential and distribution function of entropy is re-defined, ∇S–drift in obtained. New dispersion relation is derived; it is found that the anomalous transport depends on the gradient of the entropy.

  2. The Hadronic Contribution to the Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the Muon |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Hadronic Contribution to the Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the Muon PI Name: Paul Mackenzie PI Email: mackenzie@fnal.gov Institution: Fermilab Allocation Program: ESP Year: 2015 Research Domain: Physics Tier 2 Code Development Project Numerical Methods/Algorithms Two codes are involved in this project: MILC and the Columbia Physics System (CPS). The application operates on a four-dimensional hypercubic lattice (grid) with quark data as- associated with

  3. A spin-filter made of quantum anomalous Hall insulator nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jiansheng

    2014-07-28

    Topological end states (TES) in quantum anomalous Hall insulator nanowires can induce tunneling within the gap. Such TES are spin polarized, thus the induced current is spin polarized as well, which can be used to construct a spin-filter applied in spintronics. An interferometry device is designed to control the polarized current as well. The advantage and finite size effect on this system are discussed.

  4. COMMENTS ON ANOMALOUS EFFECTS IN CHARGING OF PD POWDERS WITH HIGH DENSITY HYDROGEN ISOTOPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanahan, K.

    2009-10-01

    In Kitamura, et al, Pd-containing materials are exposed to isotopes of hydrogen and anomalous results obtained. These are claimed to be a replication of another experiment conducted by Arata and Zhang. Erroneous basic assumptions are pointed out herein that alter the derived conclusions significantly. The final conclusion is that the reported results are likely normal chemistry combined with noise. Thus the claim to have proven that cold fusion is occurring in these systems is both premature and unlikely.

  5. Critical review of theoretical models for anomalous effects in deuterated metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chechin, V.A.; Tsarev, V.A. ); Rabinowitz, M. ); Kim, Y.E. )

    1994-03-01

    The authors briefly summarize the reported anomalous effects in deuterated metals at ambient temperature commonly known as [open quotes]cold fusion[close quotes] (CF) with an emphasis on the latest experiments, as well as the theoretical basis for the opposition to interpreting them as cold fusion. Then they critically examine more than 25 theoretical models for CF, including unusual nuclear and exotic chemical hypotheses. They conclude that they do not explain the data.

  6. Evaluating a heated metal scrubber's effectiveness in preventing ozone monitors' anomalous behavior during hot and humid ambient sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddy, J.A.

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to verify West Virginia's Wet/Dry test's prediction that Advanced Pollution Instrumentation's (API) ozone monitors, when using a heated metal scrubber in lieu of a standard MnO{sub 2} scrubber, would be made insensitive to sampling conditions which provoke anomalous behavior. Field trials involving two identical API model 400 ozone monitors, a Horiba APOA 360 ozone monitor, MnO{sub 2} scrubbers and API's optional heated metal scrubber would determine this. The heated metal scrubber succeeded in effectively eliminating the anomalous behavior. Evaluation results further verify the accuracy of West Virginia's Wet/Dry test. During the evaluation, a serendipitous event led to observations that confirmed previous observations by The Commonwealth of Virginia's monitoring staff, linking contamination of UV monitors' optics with anomalous behavior. Also, a partial summation of observations concerning ultraviolet ozone monitors' anomalous behavior, drawn from several sources, illustrates its complex nature.

  7. The apparent anomalous, weak, long-range acceleration of Pioneer 10 and 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.D.; Lau, E.L.; Turyshev, S.G.; Laing, P.A.; Liu, A.S.; Nieto, M.M.

    1999-07-01

    Recently the authors reported that radio Doppler data generated by NASA`s Deep Space Network (DSN) with the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecraft indicate an apparent anomalous, constant, spacecraft acceleration with a magnitude {approximately}8.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm s{sup {minus}2}, directed towards the Sun. Analysis of similar Doppler and ranging data from the Galileo and Ulysses spacecraft yielded ambiguous results for the anomalous acceleration, but the analysis was useful in that it ruled out the possibility of a systematic error in the DSN Doppler system that could easily be mistaken as a spacecraft acceleration. Here they present some new results, including a critique of the suggestion that the anomalous acceleration could be caused by collimated thermal emission. Based on upgraded JPL software for the Pioneer 10 orbit determination, and on a new data interval from January 1987 to July 1998, their best estimate of the average Pioneer 10 acceleration directed towards the Sun is 7.20 {sup {minus}} 0.11 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} cm s{sup {minus}2}.

  8. Uncorrelated versus independent elliptically-contoured distributions for anomalous change detection in hyperspectral imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Scovel, James C

    2008-01-01

    The detection of actual changes in a pair of images is confounded by the inadvertent but pervasive differences that inevitably arise whenever two pictures are taken of the same scene, but at different times and under different conditions. These differences include effects due to illumination, calibration, misregistration, etc. If the actual changes are assumed to be rare, then one can 'learn' what the pervasive differences are, and can identify the deviations from this pattern as the anomalous changes. A recently proposed framework for anomalous change detection recasts the problem as one of binary classification between pixel pairs in the data and pixel pairs that are independently chosen from the two images. When an elliptically-contoured (EC) distribution is assumed for the data, then analytical expressions can be derived for the measure of anomalousness of change. However, these expression are only available for a limited class of EC distributions. By replacing independent pixel pairs with uncorrelated pixel pairs, an approximate solution can be found for a much broader class of EC distributions. The performance of this approximation is investigated analytically and empirically, and includes experiments comparing the detection of real changes in real data.

  9. Fingerprints of anomalous primordial Universe on the abundance of large scale structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baghram, Shant; Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Namjoo, Mohammad Hossein E-mail: abolhasani@ipm.ir E-mail: MohammadHossein.Namjoo@utdallas.edu

    2014-12-01

    We study the predictions of anomalous inflationary models on the abundance of structures in large scale structure observations. The anomalous features encoded in primordial curvature perturbation power spectrum are (a): localized feature in momentum space, (b): hemispherical asymmetry and (c): statistical anisotropies. We present a model-independent expression relating the number density of structures to the changes in the matter density variance. Models with localized feature can alleviate the tension between observations and numerical simulations of cold dark matter structures on galactic scales as a possible solution to the missing satellite problem. In models with hemispherical asymmetry we show that the abundance of structures becomes asymmetric depending on the direction of observation to sky. In addition, we study the effects of scale-dependent dipole amplitude on the abundance of structures. Using the quasars data and adopting the power-law scaling k{sup n{sub A}-1} for the amplitude of dipole we find the upper bound n{sub A}<0.6 for the spectral index of the dipole asymmetry. In all cases there is a critical mass scale M{sub c} in which for MM{sub c}) the enhancement in variance induced from anomalous feature decreases (increases) the abundance of dark matter structures in Universe.

  10. The precise time-dependent solution of the Fokker–Planck equation with anomalous diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Ran; Du, Jiulin

    2015-08-15

    We study the time behavior of the Fokker–Planck equation in Zwanzig’s rule (the backward-Ito’s rule) based on the Langevin equation of Brownian motion with an anomalous diffusion in a complex medium. The diffusion coefficient is a function in momentum space and follows a generalized fluctuation–dissipation relation. We obtain the precise time-dependent analytical solution of the Fokker–Planck equation and at long time the solution approaches to a stationary power-law distribution in nonextensive statistics. As a test, numerically we have demonstrated the accuracy and validity of the time-dependent solution. - Highlights: • The precise time-dependent solution of the Fokker–Planck equation with anomalous diffusion is found. • The anomalous diffusion satisfies a generalized fluctuation–dissipation relation. • At long time the time-dependent solution approaches to a power-law distribution in nonextensive statistics. • Numerically we have demonstrated the accuracy and validity of the time-dependent solution.

  11. Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere by Anomalous/Lévy Diffusion: New Diagnostics Using FORTÉ Lightning Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shortwave Transport in the Cloudy Atmosphere by Anomalous/Lévy Diffusion: New Diagnostics Using FORTÉ Lightning Data A. B. Davis Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Remote Sensing Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico D. M. Suszcynsky Los Alamos National Laboratory Space & Atmospheric Sciences Group Los Alamos, New Mexico A. Marshak National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland Introduction Anomalous photon diffusion can be described

  12. Beamline 4.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 4.2.2 Beamline 4.2.2 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:31 Molecular Biology Consortium Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography...

  13. Detection of Anomalous Gamma-Ray Spectra for On-Site Inspection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seifert, Carolyn E.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Pfund, David M.

    2009-05-29

    This work aims to solve some of the technical and logistical challenges inherent in performing On Site Inspection activities under the authority of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Inspectors require equipment that can reliably identify the radionuclide signatures of nuclear test explosions amid a background of environmental contamination. Detection of these radiation anomalies by mobile search teams in the air or on the ground can narrow the search field and target specific areas for more detailed inspection or sampling. The need to protect confidential information of the inspected State Party, especially regarding past nuclear testing activities, suggests that full access to measured gamma-ray spectra should be limited. Spectral blinding techniques---in which only a fraction of the information derived from the spectra is displayed and stored---have the potential to meet the needs of both the OSI team and the State Party. In this paper, we describe one such algorithm that we have developed for identifying anomalous spectra from handheld, mobile, or aerial sensors. The algorithm avoids potential sensitivities by reducing the gamma-ray spectrum into a single number that is displayed and stored. A high value indicates that the spectrum is anomalous. The proposed technique does not rely on identifying specific radionuclides, operates well in the presence of high background variability, and can be configured to ignore specific spectral components. In previous work, the algorithm has proven very effective in classifying gamma-ray spectra as anomalous or not, even with poor statistical information. We performed a limited simulation of an airborne search scenario to demonstrate the potential algorithm for OSI missions. The technique successfully detected an injected source of interest whose count rate was an order of magnitude below background levels. We also configured the algorithm to ignore 137Cs as irrelevant to the mission. The resulting alarm metrics were

  14. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Hg_1-yMn_yTe Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The quantum Hall effect is usually observed when the two-dimensional electron gas is subjected to an external magnetic field, so that their quantum states form Landau levels. In this work we predict that a new phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, can be realized in Hg{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}Te quantum wells, without the external magnetic field and the associated Landau levels. This effect arises purely from the spin polarization of the Mn atoms, and the quantized Hall conductance is predicted for a range of quantum well thickness and the concentration of the Mn atoms. This effect enables dissipationless charge current in spintronics devices.

  15. Electron Anomalous Magnetic Moment in Basis Light-Front Quantization Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xingbo; Honkanen, Heli; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.; Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We apply the Basis Light-Front Quantization (BLFQ) approach to the Hamiltonian field theory of Quantum Electrodynamics (QED) in free space. We solve for the mass eigenstates corresponding to an electron interacting with a single photon in light-front gauge. Based on the resulting non-perturbative ground state light-front amplitude we evaluate the electron anomalous magnetic moment. The numerical results from extrapolating to the infinite basis limit reproduce the perturbative Schwinger result with relative deviation less than 1.2%. We report significant improvements over previous works including the development of analytic methods for evaluating the vertex matrix elements of QED.

  16. Spin-fluctuation mechanism of anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in itinerant magnets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhuravlev, I. A.; Antropov, V. P.; Belashchenko, K. D.

    2015-11-16

    The origins of the anomalous temperature dependence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in (Fe1–xCox)2B alloys are elucidated using first-principles calculations within the disordered local moment model. Excellent agreement with experimental data is obtained. The anomalies are associated with the changes in band occupations due to Stoner-like band shifts and with the selective suppression of spin-orbit “hot spots” by thermal spin fluctuations. Under certain conditions, the anisotropy can increase, rather than decrease, with decreasing magnetization. These peculiar electronic mechanisms are in stark contrast to the assumptions of the existing models.

  17. Decaying neutralino dark matter in anomalous U(1){sub H} models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sierra, D. Aristizabal; Restrepo, D.; Zapata, Oscar

    2009-09-01

    In supersymmetric models extended with an anomalous U(1){sub H} different R-parity violating couplings can yield an unstable neutralino. We show that in this context astrophysical and cosmological constraints on neutralino decaying dark matter forbid bilinear R-parity breaking neutralino decays and lead to a class of purely trilinear R-parity violating scenarios in which the neutralino is stable on cosmological scales. We have found that among the resulting models some of them become suitable to explain the observed anomalies in cosmic-ray electron/positron fluxes.

  18. Anomalous complete opaqueness in a sparse array of gold nanoparticle chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai Benfeng; Li Xiaowei; Vartiainen, Ismo; Lehmuskero, Anni; Turunen, Jari; Kuittinen, Markku; Vahimaa, Pasi; Kang Guoguo

    2011-08-22

    We report on an anomalous polarization-switching extinction effect in a sparse array of gold nanoparticle chains: under normal incidence of light, the array is almost transparent for one polarization; whereas it is fully opaque (with nearly zero transmittance) for the orthogonal polarization within a narrow band, even though the nanoparticles cover only a tiny fraction (say, 3.5%) of the transparent substrate surface. We reveal that the strong polarization-dependent short-range dipolar coupling and long-range radiative coupling of gold nanoparticles in this highly asymmetric array is responsible for this extraordinary effect.

  19. Search for Anomalous Production of Events with Two Photons and Additional Energetic Objects at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-10-01

    The authors present results of a search for anomalous production of two photons together with an electron, muon, {tau} lepton, missing transverse energy, or jets using p{bar p} collision data from 1.1-2.0 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The event yields and kinematic distributions are examined for signs for new physics without favoring a specific model of new physics. The results are consistent with the standard model expectations. The search employs several new analysis techniques that significantly reduce instrumental backgrounds in channels with an electron and missing transverse energy.

  20. Femtosecond laser pulse filamentation under anomalous dispersion in fused silica. Part 1. Numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smetanina, E O; Kompanets, V O; Chekalin, Sergei V; Kandidov, V P

    2012-10-31

    We report the results of investigation of femtosecond laser pulse filamentation in fused silica by varying the wavelength in the range from 800 to 2300 nm. It is shown that in the case of the anomalous group-velocity dispersion, a sequence of 'light bullets' with a high spatial and temporal localisation of the light field is formed along the filament. The relation of the formation and propagation of light bullets with the formation of an isolated anti-Stokes wing of the supercontinuum spectrum is established. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  1. Hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment from lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blum, Thomas; Chowdhury, Saumitra; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku

    2015-01-07

    The form factor that yields the light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment is computed in lattice QCD+QED and QED. A non-perturbative treatment of QED is used and is checked against perturbation theory. The hadronic contribution is calculated for unphysical quark and muon masses, and only the diagram with a single quark loop is computed. Statistically significant signals are obtained. Initial results appear promising, and the prospect for a complete calculation with physical masses and controlled errors is discussed.

  2. Anomalous deflection of a charged-particle beam by bent crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taratin, A.M.; Vorobev, S.A.

    1986-05-01

    Using computer simulations of particle trajectory, a deflection of part of the beam in the direction opposite to the curvature is discovered for charged particles passing through a bent crystal. The passage of a proton beam of energy E(0) = 1 GeV through a curved silicon single crystal is considered, and only particles that move through the single crystal in a quasi-channel mode are deflected. It is suggested that the observed anomalous deflection can be used to deflect beams of high energy charged particles through angles that are tens of times greater than the critical angle for channeling, with application to experimental nuclear physics. 6 references.

  3. Hysteretic magnetoresistance and unconventional anomalous Hall effect in the frustrated magnet TmB4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sunku, Sai Swaroop; Kong, Tai; Ito, Toshimitsu; Canfield, Paul C.; Shastry, B. Sriram; Sengupta, Pinaki; Panagopoulos, Christos

    2016-05-11

    We study TmB4, a frustrated magnet on the Archimedean Shastry-Sutherland lattice, through magnetization and transport experiments. The lack of anisotropy in resistivity shows that TmB4 is an electronically three-dimensional system. The magnetoresistance (MR) is hysteretic at low temperature even though a corresponding hysteresis in magnetization is absent. The Hall resistivity shows unconventional anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and is linear above saturation despite a large MR. In conclusion, we propose that complex structures at magnetic domain walls may be responsible for the hysteretic MR and may also lead to the AHE.

  4. Real-time detection and classification of anomalous events in streaming data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ferragut, Erik M.; Goodall, John R.; Iannacone, Michael D.; Laska, Jason A.; Harrison, Lane T.

    2016-04-19

    A system is described for receiving a stream of events and scoring the events based on anomalousness and maliciousness (or other classification). The events can be displayed to a user in user-defined groupings in an animated fashion. The system can include a plurality of anomaly detectors that together implement an algorithm to identify low probability events and detect atypical traffic patterns. The atypical traffic patterns can then be classified as being of interest or not. In one particular example, in a network environment, the classification can be whether the network traffic is malicious or not.

  5. Anomalous photoconductive behavior of a single InAs nanowire photodetector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Junshuai; Yan, Xin; Sun, Fukuan; Zhang, Xia Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-12-28

    We report on a bare InAs nanowire photodetector which exhibits an anomalous photoconductive behavior. Under low-power illumination, the current is smaller than the dark current, and monotonously decreases as the excitation power increases. When the excitation power is high enough, the current starts to increase normally. The phenomenon is attributed to different electron mobilities in the “core” and “shell” of a relatively thick nanowire originating from the surface effect, which result in a quickly dropped “core current” and slowly increased “shell current” under illumination.

  6. Lattice calculation of hadronic light-by-light contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blum, Thomas; Christ, Norman; Hayakawa, Masashi; Izubuchi, Taku; Jin, Luchang; Lehner, Christoph

    2016-01-12

    The quark-connected part of the hadronic light-by-light scattering contribution to the muon’s anomalous magnetic moment is computed using lattice QCD with chiral fermions. Here we report several significant algorithmic improvements and demonstrate their effectiveness through specific calculations which show a reduction in statistical errors by more than an order of magnitude. The most realistic of these calculations is performed with a near-physical 171 MeV pion mass on a (4.6 fm)3 spatial volume using the 323×64 Iwasaki+DSDR gauge ensemble of the RBC/UKQCD Collaboration.

  7. GROUND LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF ANOMALOUS RADIATION LEVELS IN NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    GROUND LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF ANOMALOUS RADIATION LEVELS IN NIAGARA FALLS, NEW YORK W. D. Cottrell, D. J. Christian, and F. F. Haywood ,d ;v ~ !;);;J;$ '9;) -i, - 'L." ; i--j -7,) ;3 i, Work performed by Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37630 O&J. 2,7 +, / 7&y' March 1979 \ operated by UNION CARBIDE CORPORATIOII for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites- Remedial Action Program

  8. Photon equation of motion with application to the electron's anomalous magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritchie, A B

    2007-12-06

    The photon equation of motion previously applied to the Lamb shift is here applied to the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron. Exact agreement is obtained with the QED result of Schwinger. The photon theory treats the radiative correction to the photon in the presence of the electron rather than its inverse as in standard QED. The result is found to be first-order in the photon-electron interaction rather than second-order as in standard QED, introducing an ease of calculation hitherto unavailable.

  9. Leptophilic dark matter and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Chacko, Zackaria; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2014-08-26

    We consider renormalizable theories such that the scattering of dark matter off leptons arises at tree level, but scattering off nuclei only arises at loop. In this framework, the various dark matter candidates can be classified by their spins and by the forms of their interactions with leptons. In this study, we determine the corrections to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon that arise from its interactions with dark matter. We then consider the implications of these results for a set of simplified models of leptophilic dark matter. When a dark matter candidate reduces the existing tension between the standard model prediction of the anomalous magnetic moment and the experimental measurement, the region of parameter space favored to completely remove the discrepancy is highlighted. Conversely, when agreement is worsened, we place limits on the parameters of the corresponding simplified model. These bounds and favored regions are compared against the experimental constraints on the simplified model from direct detection and from collider searches. Although these constraints are severe, we find there do exist limited regions of parameter space in these simple theories that can explain the observed anomaly in the muon magnetic moment while remaining consistent with all experimental bounds.

  10. Leptophilic dark matter and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agrawal, Prateek; Chacko, Zackaria; Verhaaren, Christopher B.

    2014-08-26

    We consider renormalizable theories such that the scattering of dark matter off leptons arises at tree level, but scattering off nuclei only arises at loop. In this framework, the various dark matter candidates can be classified by their spins and by the forms of their interactions with leptons. In this study, we determine the corrections to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon that arise from its interactions with dark matter. We then consider the implications of these results for a set of simplified models of leptophilic dark matter. When a dark matter candidate reduces the existing tension between themore » standard model prediction of the anomalous magnetic moment and the experimental measurement, the region of parameter space favored to completely remove the discrepancy is highlighted. Conversely, when agreement is worsened, we place limits on the parameters of the corresponding simplified model. These bounds and favored regions are compared against the experimental constraints on the simplified model from direct detection and from collider searches. Although these constraints are severe, we find there do exist limited regions of parameter space in these simple theories that can explain the observed anomaly in the muon magnetic moment while remaining consistent with all experimental bounds.« less

  11. Anomalous fast ion losses at high β on the tokamak fusion test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fredrickson, E. D.; Bell, M. G.; Budny, R. V.; Darrow, D. S.; White, R.

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes experiments carried out on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [R. J. Hawryluk et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 33, 1509 (1991)] to investigate the dependence of β-limiting disruption characteristics on toroidal field strength. The hard disruptions found at the β-limit in high field plasmas were not found at low field, even for β's 50% higher than the empirical β-limit of β{sub n} ≈ 2 at high field. Comparisons of experimentally measured β's to TRANSP simulations suggest anomalous loss of up to half of the beam fast ions in the highest β, low field shots. The anomalous transport responsible for the fast ion losses may at the same time broaden the pressure profile. Toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes, fishbone instabilities, and Geodesic Acoustic Modes are investigated as possible causes of the enhanced losses. Here, we present the first observations of high frequency fishbones [F. Zonca et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 085009 (2009)] on TFTR. The interpretation of Axi-symmetric Beam-driven Modes as Geodesic Acoustic Modes and their possible correlation with transport barrier formation are also presented.

  12. Nonlinear simulations of peeling-ballooning modes with anomalous electron viscosity and their role in edge localized mode crashes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, X. Q.; Dudson, B.; Snyder, P. B.; Umansky, M. V.; Wilson, H.

    2010-10-22

    A minimum set of equations based on the peeling-ballooning (P-B) model with nonideal physics effects (diamagnetic drift, E×B drift, resistivity, and anomalous electron viscosity) is found to simulate pedestal collapse when using the new BOUT++ simulation code, developed in part from the original fluid edge code BOUT. Nonlinear simulations of P-B modes demonstrate that the P-B modes trigger magnetic reconnection, which leads to the pedestal collapse. With the addition of a model of the anomalous electron viscosity under the assumption that the electron viscosity is comparable to the anomalous electron thermal diffusivity, it is found from simulations using a realisticmore » high-Lundquist number that the pedestal collapse is limited to the edge region and the edge localized mode (ELM) size is about 5–10% of the pedestal stored energy. Furthermore, this is consistent with many observations of large ELMs.« less

  13. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindsay, Lucas R; Broido, David; Carrete, Jesus; Mingo, Natalio; Reinecke, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The lattice thermal conductivities ( ) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure, P, using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of . This anomalous P dependence of arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with small mass ratios. This work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.

  14. Anomalous behavior of the Pd/D system. Final report, June 1989-August 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpak, S.J.; Mosier-Boss, P.A.

    1995-09-01

    In a news conference on 23 March 1989, Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons announced that nuclear events could be initiated by the electrochemical compression of deuterium into a palladium lattice. When researchers around the world tried to reproduce the effects described by Pons and Fleischmann in their laboratories, the results were mixed. The nature of the announcement and the Irreproducibility of the effect divided the scientific community into believers and skeptics, indicating religious fervor rather than scientific reasoning. Shortly after the Fleischmann-Pons announcement, a program at NRaD investigated anomalous effects in the Pd/D system. The NRaD program investigated the Pd/D system using standard electrochemical techniques to determine conditions for achieving high Pd/D loadings. Metallurgical aspects of the Pd/D system and the effect of additives were also examined. Tritium content in the gas/liquid phases and radiation emissions were monitored during electrolysis. This report summarizes the investigation results.

  15. Four-flavour leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burger, Florian; Feng, Xu; Hotzel, Grit; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus; Renner, Dru B.

    2014-02-24

    We present a four-flavour lattice calculation of the leading-order hadronic vacuum polarisation contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, aμhvp, arising from quark-connected Feynman graphs. It is based on ensembles featuring Nf=2+1+1 dynamical twisted mass fermions generated by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration (ETMC). Several light quark masses are used in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass. We employ three lattice spacings to examine lattice artefacts and several different volumes to check for finite-size effects. Including the complete first two generations of quarks allows for a direct comparison with phenomenological determinations of amore » μhvp. The final result involving an estimate of the systematic uncertainty aμhvp=6.74 (21)(18) 10-8 shows a good overall agreement with these computations.« less

  16. Generation of anomalously energetic suprathermal electrons by an electron beam interacting with a nonuniform plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sydorenko, D.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Chen, L.; Ventzek, P. L. G.

    2015-12-15

    Generation of anomalously energetic suprathermal electrons was observed in simulation of a high-voltage dc discharge with electron emission from the cathode. An electron beam produced by the emission interacts with the nonuniform plasma in the discharge via a two-stream instability. The energy transfer from the beam to the plasma electrons is ensured by the plasma nonuniformity. The electron beam excites plasma waves whose wavelength and phase speed gradually decrease towards anode. The waves with short wavelength near the anode accelerate plasma bulk electrons to suprathermal energies. The sheath near the anode reflects some of the accelerated electrons back into the plasma. These electrons travel through the plasma, reflect near the cathode, and enter the accelerating area again but with a higher energy than before. Such particles are accelerated to energies much higher than after the first acceleration. This mechanism plays a role in explaining earlier experimental observations of energetic suprathermal electrons in similar discharges.

  17. Search for anomalous production of multiple leptons in association with $W$ and $Z$ bosons at CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a search for anomalous production of multiple low-energy leptons in association with a W or Z boson using events collected at the CDF experiment corresponding to 5.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. This search is sensitive to a wide range of topologies with low-momentum leptons, including those with the leptons near one another. The observed rates of production of additional electrons and muons are compared with the standard model predictions. No indications of phenomena beyond the standard model are found. A 95% confidence level limit is presented on the production cross section for a benchmark model of supersymmetric hidden-valley Higgs production. Particle identification efficiencies are also provided to enable the calculation of limits on additional models.

  18. Four-flavour leading-order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Florian; Feng, Xu; Hotzel, Grit; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus; Renner, Dru B.

    2014-02-24

    We present a four-flavour lattice calculation of the leading-order hadronic vacuum polarisation contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, a?hvp, arising from quark-connected Feynman graphs. It is based on ensembles featuring Nf=2+1+1 dynamical twisted mass fermions generated by the European Twisted Mass Collaboration (ETMC). Several light quark masses are used in order to yield a controlled extrapolation to the physical pion mass. We employ three lattice spacings to examine lattice artefacts and several different volumes to check for finite-size effects. Including the complete first two generations of quarks allows for a direct comparison with phenomenological determinations of a ?hvp. The final result involving an estimate of the systematic uncertainty a?hvp=6.74 (21)(18) 10-8 shows a good overall agreement with these computations.

  19. Extrinsic anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial Mn{sub 4}N films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X. Ren, L. Z.; Zhou, W. Q.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W.

    2015-01-19

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy is investigated. The longitudinal conductivity σ{sub xx} is within the superclean regime, indicating Mn{sub 4}N is a highly conducting material. We further demonstrate that the AHE signal in 40-nm-thick films is mainly due to the extrinsic contributions based on the analysis fitted by ρ{sub AH}=a′ρ{sub xx0}+bρ{sub xx}{sup 2} and σ{sub AH}∝σ{sub xx}. Our study not only provide a strategy for further theoretical work on antiperovskite manganese nitrides but also shed promising light on utilizing their extrinsic AHE to fabricate spintronic devices.

  20. Anomalous pressure dependence of thermal conductivities of large mass ratio compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lindsay, Lucas R; Broido, David; Carrete, Jesus; Mingo, Natalio; Reinecke, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The lattice thermal conductivities ( ) of binary compound materials are examined as a function of hydrostatic pressure, P, using a first-principles approach. Compound materials with relatively small mass ratios, such as MgO, show an increase in with P, consistent with measurements. Conversely, compounds with large mass ratios (e.g., BSb, BAs, BeTe, BeSe) exhibit decreasing with increasing P, a behavior that cannot be understood using simple theories of . This anomalous P dependence of arises from the fundamentally different nature of the intrinsic scattering processes for heat-carrying acoustic phonons in large mass ratio compounds compared to those with small massmore » ratios. This work demonstrates the power of first principles methods for thermal properties and advances the understanding of thermal transport in non-metals.« less

  1. On the explanation and calculation of anomalous reflood hydrodynamics in large PWR cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    Reflood hydrodynamics from large-scale (1:20) test facilities in Japan have yielded apparently anomalous behavior relative to FLECHT tests. Namely, even at reflooding rates below one inch per second, very large liquid volume fractions (10-15%) exist above the quench fronts shortly after flood begins; thus cladding temperature excursions are terminated early in the reflood phase. This paper discusses an explanation for this behavior: liquid films on the core's unheated rods. The experimental findings are shown to be correctly simulated with a new four-field (vapor, films, droplets) version of the best-estimate TRAC-PF1 computer code, TRAC-FF. These experimental and analytical findings have important implications for PWR large-break LOCA licensing.

  2. Multi-fluid code simulations including anomalous non-diffusive transport of plasma and impurities in the tokamak SOL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigarov, A Y; West, W; Soukhanovskii, V; Rognlien, T; Maingi, R; Lipschultz, B; Krasheninnikov, S; LaBombard, B

    2003-11-25

    Fast intermittent transport has been observed in the scrape-off layer (SOL) of major tokamaks including Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, and NSTX. This kind of transport is not diffusive but rather convective. It strongly increases plasma flux to the chamber walls and enhances the recycling of neutral particles in the main chamber. We discuss anomalous cross-field convection (ACFC) model for impurity and main plasma ions and its relation to intermittent transport events, i.e. plasma density blobs and holes in the SOL. Along with plasma diffusivity coefficients, our transport model introduces time-independent anomalous cross-field convective velocity. In the discharge modelling, diffusivity coefficients and ACFC velocity profiles are adjusted to match a set of representative experimental data. We use this model in the edge plasma physics code UEDGE to simulate the multi-fluid two-dimensional transport for these three tokamaks. We present simulation results suggesting the dominance of anomalous convection in the far SOL transport. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the chamber wall is an important source of impurities and that different impurity charge states have different directions of anomalous convective velocity.

  3. Studies of {ital WW} and {ital WZ} production and limits on anomalous {ital WW{gamma}} and {ital WWZ} couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, S.; Mostafa, M.; Piegaia, R.; Alves, G.A.; Carvalho, W.; da Motta, H.; Santoro, A.; Lima, J.G.; Oguri, V.; Mao, H.S.; Gomez, B.; Mooney, P.; Negret, J.P.; Hoeneisen, B.; Parua, N.; Ducros, Y.; Shivpuri, R.K.; Acharya, B.S.; Banerjee, S.; Dugad, S.R.; Gupta, A.; Krishnaswamy, M.R.; Mondal, N.K.; Narasimham, V.S.; Shankar, H.C.; Park, Y.M.; Choi, S.; Kim, S.K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Gonzalez Solis, J.L.; Hernandez-Montoya, R.; Magana-Mendoza, L.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Pawlik, B.; Akimov, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Kuleshov, S.; Belyaev, A.; Dudko, L.V.; Ermolov, P.; Karmanov, D.; Leflat, A.; Manankov, V.; Merkin, M.; Shabalina, E.; Abramov, V.; Babintsev, V.V.; Bezzubov, V.A.; Bojko, N.I.; Burtovoi, V.S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Denisov, S.P.; Dyshkant, A.; Eroshin, O.V.; Evdokimov, V.N.; Galyaev, A.N.; Goncharov, P.I.; Gurzhiev, S.N.; Kostritskiy, A.V.; Kozelov, A.V.; Kozlovsky, E.A.; Mayorov, A.A.; Bertram, I.

    1999-10-01

    Evidence of anomalous WW and WZ production was sought in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of {radical} (s) =1.8&hthinsp;TeV. The final states WW(WZ){r_arrow}{mu}{nu} jet jet+X, WZ{r_arrow}{mu}{nu}ee+X and WZ{r_arrow}e{nu}ee+X were studied using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 90&hthinsp;pb{sup {minus}1}. No evidence of anomalous diboson production was found. Limits were set on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings and were combined with our previous results. The combined 95{percent} confidence level anomalous coupling limits for {Lambda}=2&hthinsp;TeV are {minus}0.25{le}{Delta}{kappa}{le}0.39 ({lambda}=0) and {minus}0.18{le}{lambda}{le}0.19 ({Delta}{kappa}=0), assuming the WW{gamma} couplings are equal to the WWZ couplings. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Dynamics of frequency-modulated soliton-like pulses in a longitudinally inhomogeneous, anomalous group velocity dispersion fibre amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolotovskii, Igor' O; Korobko, D A; Okhotnikov, Oleg G; Sysolyatin, A A; Fotiadi, A A

    2012-09-30

    We examine conditions for the formation and amplification of frequency-modulated soliton-like pulses in longitudinally inhomogeneous, anomalous group velocity dispersion fibres. The group velocity dispersion profiles necessary for the existence and amplification of such pulses in active fibres are identified and the pulse duration and chirp are determined as functions of propagation distance. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  5. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Archuleta County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Archuleta Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Archuleta County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4144691.792023 m Left: 285531.662851 m Right: 348694.182686 m Bottom: 4097005.210304 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984

  6. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Chaffee County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Chaffee Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Chaffee County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4333432.368072 m Left: 366907.700763 m Right: 452457.816015 m Bottom: 4208271.566715 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS

  7. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Garfield County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Garfield Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Garfield County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4441550.552290 m Left: 271445.053363 m Right: 359825.053363 m Bottom: 4312490.552290 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984

  8. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Dolored County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Dolores Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Dolores County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4186234.213315 m Left: 212558.673056 m Right: 232922.811862 m Bottom: 4176781.467043 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS

  9. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Routt County, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Routt Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Routt County identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4501071.574000 m Left: 311351.975000 m Right: 359681.975000 m Bottom: 4447251.574000 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS

  10. Anomalous temperature dependence of flow stress in a Fe{sub 3}Al alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, J.H.; Ha, T.K.; Chang, Y.W.

    2000-01-01

    Iron aluminides have attracted much interest since 1930s when the excellent corrosion resistance was noted in alloys with the composition of more than about 18 at.% Al. These alloys have relatively low material cost, due to the reduced usage of strategic elements like Cr, Mo and Ni, and a lower density than stainless steels. Their tensile strength is also comparable to those of ferritic and austenitic steels. These advantages have led the iron aluminide alloys being considered for many applications in industries needing sulfidation and oxidation resistance (1). However, the poor ductility at ambient temperatures and an abrupt drop in strength above 600 C have limited these alloys for structural applications. In the past years, extensive efforts have been devoted to understanding and improving the metallurgical properties of iron aluminides with the aim of producing more strong, ductile, and corrosion-resistant materials for structural applications. These studies have resulted in significant contributions to the understanding of the fabrication and mechanical properties of iron aluminides. Deformation behavior in iron aluminides is now known to depend on composition, temperature, and the presence or absence of ordered structures. Recent studies have demonstrated that improved engineering ductility of 10--15% can be achieved in wrought Fe{sub 3}Al-based iron aluminide alloys, through the control of composition and microstructure. The effect of strain rate on the deformation behavior of Fe{sub 3}Al alloys, especially on the anomalous temperature dependence of strength is of interest recently and more systematic investigation is now necessitated. Load relaxation test has been generally regarded as a very effective technique to measure the strain rate sensitivity over a wider range of strain rates with very little microstructural changes and has been applied to the plasticity of various rate-sensitive materials. In the present study, the iron aluminide alloys with 27

  11. Intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the kagome lattice Cs2LiMn3F12

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-10-27

    In a kagome lattice, the time reversal symmetry can be broken by a staggered magnetic flux emerging from ferromagnetic ordering and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, leading to several well-separated nontrivial Chern bands and intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on this idea and ab initio calculations, we propose the realization of the intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the single layer Cs2Mn3F12 kagome lattice and on the (001) surface of a Cs2LiMn3F12 single crystal by modifying the carrier coverage on it, where the band gap is around 20 meV. Furthermore, a simplified tight binding model based on the in-plane ddσ antibondingmore » states is constructed to understand the topological band structures of the system.« less

  12. Measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry with 9 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-09-16

    We present an updated measurement of the anomalous like-sign dimuon charge asymmetry Absl for semileptonic b-hadron decays in 9.0 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ collisions recorded with the D0 detector at a center-of-mass energy of √s=1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. We obtain Absl=(-0.787±0.172(stat)±0.093(syst))%. This result differs by 3.9 standard deviations from the prediction of the standard model and provides evidence for anomalously large CP violation in semileptonic neutral B decay. The dependence of the asymmetry on the muon impact parameter is consistent with the hypothesis that it originates from semileptonic b-hadron decays.

  13. HORIZONTAL BRANCH MORPHOLOGY AND MULTIPLE STELLAR POPULATIONS IN THE ANOMALOUS GLOBULAR CLUSTER M 22

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marino, A. F.; Milone, A. P.; Lind, K. E-mail: milone@iac.es

    2013-05-01

    M 22 is an anomalous globular cluster that hosts two groups of stars with different metallicity and s-element abundance. The star-to-star light-element variations in both groups, with the presence of individual Na-O and C-N anticorrelations, demonstrates that this Milky Way satellite has experienced a complex star formation history. We have analyzed FLAMES/UVES spectra for seven stars covering a small color interval on the reddest horizontal branch (HB) portion of this cluster and investigated possible relations between the chemical composition of a star and its location along the HB. Our chemical abundance analysis takes into account effects introduced by deviations from the local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE effects), which are significant for the measured spectral lines in the atmospheric parameters range spanned by our stars. We find that all the analyzed stars are barium-poor and sodium-poor, thus supporting the idea that the position of a star along the HB is strictly related to the chemical composition, and that the HB morphology is influenced by the presence of different stellar populations.

  14. Anomalously Large Polarization Effect Responsible for Excitonic Red Shifts in PbSe Quantum Dot Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A Wolcott; V Doyeux; C Nelson; R Gearba; K Lei; K Yager; A dolocan; K Williams; D Nguyen; X Zhu

    2011-12-31

    The formation of solid thin films from colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is often accompanied by red shifts in excitonic transitions, but the mechanisms responsible for the red shifts are under debate. We quantitatively address this issue using optical absorption spectroscopy of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) arrays of PbSe QDs with controlled inter-QD distance, which was determined by the length of alkanedithiol linking molecules. With decreasing inter-QD distance, the first and second exciton absorption peaks show increasing red shifts. Using thin films consisting of large and isolated QDs embedded in a matrix of small QDs, we determine that a dominant contribution to the observed red shift is due to changes in polarization of the dielectric environment surrounding each QD ({approx}88%), while electronic or transition dipole coupling plays a lesser role. However, the observed red shifts are more than 1 order of magnitude larger than theoretical predictions based on the dielectric polarization effect for spherical QDs. We attribute this anomalously large polarization effect to deviations of the exciton wave functions from eigenfunctions of the idealized spherical quantum well model.

  15. On The Anomalous Fast Ion Energy Diffusion in Toroidal Plasmas Due to Cavity Modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.N. Gorelenkov, N.J. Fisch and E. Fredrickson

    2010-03-09

    An enormous wave-particle diffusion coefficient along paths suitable for alpha channeling had been deduced in mode converted ion Bernstein wave experiments on Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) the only plausible explanation advanced for such a large diffusion coefficient was the excitation of internal cavity modes which induce particle diffusion along identical diffusion paths, but at much higher rates. Although such a mode was conjectured, it was never observed. However, recent detailed observations of high frequency compressional Alfven eigenmodes (CAEs) on the National Spherical torus Experiment (NSTX) indirectly support the existence of the related conjectured modes on TFTR. The eigenmodes responsible for the high frequency magnetic activity can be identified as CAEs through the polarization of the observed magnetic field oscillations in NSTX and through a comparison with the theoretically derived freuency dispersion relation. Here, we show how these recent observations of high frequency CAEs lend support to this explanation of the long-standing puzzle of anomalous fast ion energy diffusion on TFTR. The support of the conjecure that these internal modes could have caused the remarkable ion energy diffusion on TFTR carries significant and favorable implications for the possibilities in achieving the alpha channeling effect with small injected power in a tokamak reactor.

  16. Anomalous hole injection deterioration of organic light-emitting diodes with a manganese phthalocyanine layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyunbok; Lee, Jeihyun; Yi, Yeonjin; Cho, Sang Wan; Kim, Jeong Won

    2015-01-21

    Metal phthalocyanines (MPcs) are well known as an efficient hole injection layer (HIL) in organic devices. They possess a low ionization energy, and so the low-lying highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) gives a small hole injection barrier from an anode in organic light-emitting diodes. However, in this study, we show that the hole injection characteristics of MPc are not only determined by the HOMO position but also significantly affected by the wave function distribution of the HOMO. We show that even with the HOMO level of a manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) HIL located between the Fermi level of an indium tin oxide anode and the HOMO level of a N,N?-bis(1-naphthyl)-N,N?-diphenyl-1,1?-biphenyl-4,4?-diamine hole transport layer the device performance with the MnPc HIL is rather deteriorated. This anomalous hole injection deterioration is due to the contracted HOMO wave function, which leads to small intermolecular electronic coupling. The origin of this contraction is the significant contribution of the Mn d-orbital to the MnPc HOMO.

  17. Stacking order dependence of inverse spin Hall effect and anomalous Hall effect in spin pumping experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-Young; Kim, Dong-Jun; Park, Byong-Guk

    2015-05-07

    The dependence of the measured DC voltage on the non-magnetic material (NM) in NM/CoFeB and CoFeB/NM bilayers is studied under ferromagnetic resonance conditions in a TE{sub 011} resonant cavity. The directional change of the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE) voltage V{sub ISHE} for the stacking order of the bilayer can separate the pure V{sub ISHE} and the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) voltage V{sub AHE} utilizing the method of addition and subtraction. The Ta and Ti NMs show a broad deviation of the spin Hall angle θ{sub ISH}, which originates from the AHE in accordance with the high resistivity of NMs. However, the Pt and Pd NMs show that the kinds of NMs with low resistivity are consistent with the previously reported θ{sub ISH} values. Therefore, the characteristics that NM should simultaneously satisfy to obtain a reasonable V{sub ISHE} value in bilayer systems are large θ{sub ISH} and low resistivity.

  18. Resonant cavity mode dependence of anomalous and inverse spin Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Sang-Il; Seo, Min-Su; Park, Seung-young

    2014-05-07

    The direct current electric voltage induced by the Inverse Spin Hall Effect (ISHE) and Anomalous Hall Effect (AHE) was investigated in the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The ISHE and AHE components were distinguishable through the fitting of the voltage spectrum. The unwanted AHE was minimized by placing the DUT (Device Under Test) at the center of both the TE{sub 011} and TE{sub 102} cavities. The voltage of ISHE in the TE{sub 011} cavity was larger than that in the TE{sub 102} cavity due to the higher quality factor of the former. Despite optimized centering, AHE voltage from TE{sub 011} cavity was also higher. The reason was attributed to the E-field distribution inside the cavity. In the case of the TE{sub 011} cavity, the DUT was easily exposed to the E-field in all directions. Therefore, the parasitic AHE voltage in the TE{sub 102} cavity was less sensitive than that in the TE{sub 011} cavity to decentering problem.

  19. Magnetic modulation doping in topological insulators toward higher-temperature quantum anomalous Hall effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mogi, M. Yoshimi, R.; Yasuda, K.; Kozuka, Y.; Tsukazaki, A.; Takahashi, K. S.; Kawasaki, M.; Tokura, Y.

    2015-11-02

    Quantum anomalous Hall effect (QAHE), which generates dissipation-less edge current without external magnetic field, is observed in magnetic-ion doped topological insulators (TIs) such as Cr- and V-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3}. The QAHE emerges when the Fermi level is inside the magnetically induced gap around the original Dirac point of the TI surface state. Although the size of gap is reported to be about 50 meV, the observable temperature of QAHE has been limited below 300 mK. We attempt magnetic-Cr modulation doping into topological insulator (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films to increase the observable temperature of QAHE. By introducing the rich-Cr-doped thin (1 nm) layers at the vicinity of both the surfaces based on non-Cr-doped (Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} films, we have succeeded in observing the QAHE up to 2 K. The improvement in the observable temperature achieved by this modulation-doping appears to be originating from the suppression of the disorder in the surface state interacting with the rich magnetic moments. Such a superlattice designing of the stabilized QAHE may pave a way to dissipation-less electronics based on the higher-temperature and zero magnetic-field quantum conduction.

  20. Large anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnetic insulator-topological insulator heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alegria, L. D.; Petta, J. R.; Ji, H.; Cava, R. J.; Yao, N.; Clarke, J. J.

    2014-08-04

    We demonstrate the van der Waals epitaxy of the topological insulator compound Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on the ferromagnetic insulator Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The layers are oriented with (001)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(001)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and (110)Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}||(100)Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy indicates the formation of a sharp interface. At low temperatures, bilayers consisting of Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} on Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} exhibit a large anomalous Hall effect (AHE). Tilted field studies of the AHE indicate that the easy axis lies along the c-axis of the heterostructure, consistent with magnetization measurements in bulk Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6}. The 61 K Curie temperature of Cr{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}Te{sub 6} and the use of near-stoichiometric materials may lead to the development of spintronic devices based on the AHE.

  1. Yukawa coupling and anomalous magnetic moment of the muon: An update for the LHC era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crivellin, Andreas; Girrbach, Jennifer; Nierste, Ulrich

    2011-03-01

    We study the interplay between a soft muon Yukawa coupling generated radiatively with the trilinear A-terms of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) and the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon. In the absence of a tree-level muon Yukawa coupling the lightest smuon mass is predicted to be in the range between 600 GeV and 2200 GeV at 2{sigma}, if the bino mass M{sub 1} is below 1 TeV. Therefore, a detection of a smuon (in conjunction with a sub-TeV bino) at the LHC would directly imply a nonzero muon Yukawa coupling in the MSSM superpotential. Inclusion of slepton flavor mixing could in principle lower the mass of one smuonlike slepton below 600 GeV. However, the experimental bounds on radiative lepton decays instead strengthen the lower mass bound, with larger effects for smaller M{sub 1}, We also extend the analysis to the electron case and find that a light selectron close to the current experimental search limit may prove the MSSM electron Yukawa coupling to be nonzero.

  2. Layer-dependent quantum cooperation of electron and hole states in the anomalous semimetal WTe2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Das, Pranab Kumar; Di Sante, D.; Vobornik, I.; Fujii, J.; Okuda, T.; Bruyer, E.; Gyenis, A.; Feldman, B. E.; Tao, J.; Ciancio, R.; et al

    2016-02-29

    The behaviour of electrons and holes in a crystal lattice is a fundamental quantum phenomenon, accounting for a rich variety of material properties. Boosted by the remarkable electronic and physical properties of two-dimensional materials such as graphene and topological insulators, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently received renewed attention. In this context, the anomalous bulk properties of semimetallic WTe2 have attracted considerable interest. We report angle- and spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy of WTe2 single crystals, through which we disentangle the role of W and Te atoms in the formation of the band structure and identify the interplay of charge, spin and orbitalmore » degrees of freedom. Supported by first-principles calculations and high-resolution surface topography, we also reveal the existence of a layer-dependent behaviour. The balance of electron and hole states is found only when considering at least three Te–W–Te layers, showing that the behaviour of WTe2 is not strictly two dimensional.« less

  3. Synthesis and anomalous magnetic properties of hexagonal CoO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Xuemin; Shi, Huigang

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: {yields} The as-synthesized CoO nanoparticles are of pyramid configuration with hcp structure. {yields} The hexagonal CoO particles do not exhibit antiferromagnetic transition around 300 K. {yields} The CoO particles have relative large saturation magnetization and coercivity at 5 K. {yields} The shift of hysteresis loops is consistent with the result of multisublattice model. {yields} The particles contain intrinsic antiferromagnetic structure and uncompensated spins. -- Abstract: CoO nanoparticles in the 38-93 nm range have been prepared by thermal decomposition. The particles were characterized to be pyramid shape with a hexagonal close-packed structure. Their anomalous magnetic behavior includes: (i) vanishing of antiferromagnetic transition around 300 K; (ii) creation of hysteresis below a blocking temperature of 6-11 K; (iii) presence of relatively large moments and coercivities accompany with specific loop shifts at 5 K; and (iv) appearance of an additional small peak located in low field in the electron spin resonance spectrum. Further, the present results provide evidence for the existence of uncompensated surface spins. The coercivity and exchange bias decrease with increasing particle size, indicating a distinct size effect. These observations can be explained by the multisublattice model, in which the reduced coordination of surface spins causes a fundamental change in the magnetic order throughout the total CoO particle.

  4. Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Study of the Origins of Anomalous Particle Size Distributions in Supported Metal Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benavidez, Angelica D.; Kovarik, Libor; Genc, Arda; Agrawal, Nitin; Larsson, Elin M.; Hansen, Thomas W.; Karim, Ayman M.; Datye, Abhaya K.

    2012-10-31

    In this Environmental TEM (ETEM) study of supported Pt and Pd model catalysts, individual nanoparticles were tracked during heat treatments at temperatures up to 600C in H2, O2, and vacuum. We found anomalous growth of nanoparticles occurred during the early stages of catalyst sintering wherein some particles started to grow significantly larger than the mean, resulting in a broadening of the particle size distribution. We can rule out sample non-uniformity as a cause for the growth of these large particles, since images were recorded prior to heat treatments. The anomalous growth of these particles may help explain particle size distributions in heterogeneous catalysts which often show particles that are significantly larger than the mean, resulting in a long tail to the right. It has been suggested that particle migration and coalescence could be the likely cause for the broad size distributions. This study shows that anomalous growth of nanoparticles can occur under conditions where Ostwald ripening is the primary sintering mechanism.

  5. Anomalous tensor magnetic moments and form factors of the proton in the self-consistent chiral quark-soliton model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledwig, Tim; Silva, Antonio

    2010-09-01

    We investigate the form factors of the chiral-odd nucleon matrix element of the tensor current. In particular, we aim at the anomalous tensor magnetic form factors of the nucleon within the framework of the SU(3) and SU(2) chiral quark-soliton model. We consider 1/N{sub c} rotational corrections and linear effects of SU(3) symmetry breaking with the symmetry-conserving quantization employed. We first obtain the results of the anomalous tensor magnetic moments for the up and down quarks: {kappa}{sub T}{sup u}=3.56 and {kappa}{sub T}{sup d}=1.83, respectively. The strange anomalous tensor magnetic moment is yielded to be {kappa}{sub T}{sup s}=0.2{approx}-0.2, that is compatible with zero. We also calculate the corresponding form factors {kappa}{sub T}{sup q}(Q{sup 2}) up to a momentum transfer Q{sup 2{<=}}1 GeV{sup 2} at a renormalization scale of 0.36 GeV{sup 2}.

  6. Anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering of nanoporous two-phase atomistic models for amorphous silicon–germanium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chehaidar, A.

    2015-09-15

    The present work deals with a detailed analysis of the anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering in amorphous silicon–germanium alloy using the simulation technique. We envisage the nanoporous two-phase alloy model consisting in a mixture of Ge-rich and Ge-poor domains and voids at the nanoscale. By substituting Ge atoms for Si atoms in nanoporous amorphous silicon network, compositionally heterogeneous alloys are generated with various composition-contrasts between the two phases. After relaxing the as-generated structure, we compute its radial distribution function, and then we deduce by the Fourier transform technique its anomalous X-ray scattering pattern. Using a smoothing procedure, the computed X-ray scattering patterns are corrected for the termination errors due to the finite size of the model, allowing so a rigorous quantitative analysis of the anomalous small-angle scattering. Our simulation shows that, as expected, the anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering technique is a tool of choice for characterizing compositional heterogeneities coexisting with structural inhomogeneities in an amorphous alloy. Furthermore, the sizes of the compositional nanoheterogeneities, as measured by anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering technique, are X-ray energy independent. A quantitative analysis of the separated reduced anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering, as defined in this work, provided a good estimate of their size.

  7. Anomalous magnetic moment contributions to NN bremsstrahlung in the soft-photon approximation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, B.F.; Penninga, T.D.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Liou, M.K.

    2005-05-06

    The soft photon approximation (SPA), which is relativistic and based upon a fundamental theorem for photon emission, is applied to explore two separate nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung (NN{gamma}) processes: pp{gamma} and np{gamma}. They are examined together in an effort to understand the mechanism which governs photon emission from these basic two-nucleon systems. In this investigation we focus upon the effect of the anomalous magnetic moments of the proton ({kappa}p) and the neutron ({kappa}n). In our SPA calculation we use the standard Low amplitude M{sub {mu}}{sup Low} as derived by Nyman plus the more recently developed amplitude M{sub {mu}}{sup TuTts}, referred to as the two-u-two-t special (TuTts) amplitude. The amplitude M{sub {mu}}{sup TuTts} is identical to the amplitude M{sub {mu}}{sup Low} through order K0 in the soft-photon expansion. However, M{sub {mu}}{sup TuTts} includes an additional term M{sub {mu}}{sup (3)}(K{sup 1}; {kappa}) (plus higher order terms). The term M{sub {mu}}{sup (3)}(K{sup 1}; {kappa}) is of order K1 in the soft-photon expansion and it is a function of {kappa}p and {kappa}n. Using the amplitudes M{sub {mu}}{sup TuTts} and M{sub {mu}}{sup Low}, we have calculated pp{gamma} and np{gamma} cross sections as a function of photon angle {psi}{gamma} with and without contributions from {kappa}p and {kappa}n. Comparison with available pp{gamma} data has been made; in particular, the contribution from M{sub {mu}}{sup (3)}(K{sup 1}; {kappa}) has been investigated. Results will be presented and discussed which relate to the following: (i) The anomalous magnetic moment effect is significant in pp{gamma}; however, it is small in np{gamma}. That is, the two amplitudes M{sub {mu}}{sup TuTts} and M{sub {mu}}{sup Low} yield very similar np{gamma} cross sections, but they predict very different pp{gamma} cross sections. (ii) M{sub {mu}}{sup TuTts} appears to provide a better SPA than M{sub {mu}}{sup Low} in the case of pp{gamma}. Because {kappa

  8. Understanding the anomalous dispersion of doubly-ionized carbon plasmas near 47 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Castor, J I; Iglesias, C A; Cheng, K T; Dunn, J; Johnson, W R; Filevich, J; Purvis, M A; Grava, J; Rocca, J J

    2008-04-15

    Over the last several years we have predicted and observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one in the soft X-ray regime. These plasmas are usually a few times ionized and have ranged from low-Z carbon plasmas to mid-Z tin plasmas. Our main calculational tool has been the average atom code. We have recently observed C{sup 2+} plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one at a wavelength of 46.9 nm (26.44 eV). In this paper we compare the average atom method, AVATOMKG, against two more detailed methods, OPAL and CAK, for calculating the index of refraction for the carbon plasmas and discuss the different approximations used. We present experimental measurements of carbon plasmas that display this anomalous dispersion phenomenon. It is shown that the average atom calculation is a good approximation when the strongest lines dominate the dispersion. However, when weaker lines make a significant contribution, the more detailed calculations such as OPAL and CAK are essential. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential. With the advent of tunable X-ray lasers the frequency dependent interferometer measurements of the index of refraction may enable us to determine the absorption coefficients and line-shapes and make detailed comparisons against our atomic physics codes.

  9. Anomalous ion heating and superthermal electrons in the MST reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hokin, S.; Almagri, A.; Assadi, S.; Cekic, M.; Chapman, B.; Chartas, G.; Crocker, N.; Cudzinovic, M.; Den Hartog, D.J.; Dexter, R.; Fiksel, G.; Fonck, R.; Henry, J.; Holly, D.; Prager, S.; Rempel, T.; Sarff, J.; Scime, E.; Shen, W.; Sprott, C.; Stoneking, M.; Watts, C.

    1992-09-01

    Anomalous ion heating and superthermal electron populations have been studied in the MST reversed-field pinch. The ion heating is much stronger than that given by classical electron-ion friction, and is particularly strong during dynamo bursts. The heating displays a marked density dependence: in a 350-kA discharge with a maximum {bar n} = 0.9 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus} 3}, T{sub i} rises sharply as {bar n} drops below 0.4 {times} 10{sub 13} cm{sup {minus}3} late in the discharge. Superthermal electrons are produced in the core, with temperatures of T{sub eh}, = 350--700 eV while the bulk core temperature is T{sub e}o = 130--230 eV. The fraction of superthermal electrons decreases with increasing density, from 40% at {bar n} = 0.5 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} to 8% at {bar n} = 1.9 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} at I = 350 kA. However, data with similar plasma parameters but higher oxygen impurity content had a lower T{sub eh} and higher hot fraction. The edge superthermal electron distribution is well fit by a drifted bi-Maxwellian distribution with T{sub {parallel}} {approximately} T{sub e0} and relative drift speed v{sub d}/v{sub th} = 0.4. With the assumption that the parallel heat flux measured with a pyroelectric probe is carried by superthermal electrons, the measured electron current is consistent with T{sub {perpendicular}} {approximately} T{sub ea} {approximately} T{sub e0}/3 and accounts for over half of the total edge parallel current measured with magnetic probes.

  10. Hydrophobic hydration and the anomalous partial molar volumes in ethanol-water mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Ming-Liang; Te, Jerez; Cendagorta, Joseph R.; Miller, Benjamin T.; Brooks, Bernard R.; Ichiye, Toshiko

    2015-02-14

    The anomalous behavior in the partial molar volumes of ethanol-water mixtures at low concentrations of ethanol is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. Previous work indicates that the striking minimum in the partial molar volume of ethanol V{sub E} as a function of ethanol mole fraction X{sub E} is determined mainly by water-water interactions. These results were based on simulations that used one water model for the solute-water interactions but two different water models for the water-water interactions. This is confirmed here by using two more water models for the water-water interactions. Furthermore, the previous work indicates that the initial decrease is caused by association of the hydration shells of the hydrocarbon tails, and the minimum occurs at the concentration where all of the hydration shells are touching each other. Thus, the characteristics of the hydration of the tail that cause the decrease and the features of the water models that reproduce this type of hydration are also examined here. The results show that a single-site multipole water model with a charge distribution that mimics the large quadrupole and the p-orbital type electron density out of the molecular plane has “brittle” hydration with hydrogen bonds that break as the tails touch, which reproduces the deep minimum. However, water models with more typical site representations with partial charges lead to flexible hydration that tends to stay intact, which produces a shallow minimum. Thus, brittle hydration may play an essential role in hydrophobic association in water.

  11. Is the acceleration of anomalous cosmic rays affected by the geometry of the termination shock?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senanayake, U. K.; Florinski, V. E-mail: vaf0001@uah.edu

    2013-12-01

    Historically, anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs) were thought to be accelerated at the solar-wind termination shock (TS) by the diffusive shock acceleration process. When Voyager 1 crossed the TS in 2004, the measured ACR spectra did not match the theoretical prediction of a continuous power law, and the source of the high-energy ACRs was not observed. When the Voyager 2 crossed the TS in 2007, it produced similar results. Several possible explanations have since appeared in the literature, but we follow the suggestion that ACRs are still accelerated at the shock, only away from the Voyager crossing points. To investigate this hypothesis closer, we study ACR acceleration using a three-dimensional, non-spherical model of the heliosphere that is axisymmetric with respect to the interstellar flow direction. We then compare the results with those obtained for a spherical TS. A semi-analytic model of the plasma and magnetic field backgrounds is developed to permit an investigation over a wide range of parameters under controlled conditions. The model is applied to helium ACRs, whose phase-space trajectories are stochastically integrated backward in time until a pre-specified, low-energy boundary, taken to be 0.5 MeV n{sup 1} (the so-called injection energy), is reached. Our results show that ACR acceleration is quite efficient on the heliotail-facing part of the TS. For small values of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient, our model yields a positive intensity gradient between the TS and about midway through the heliosheath, in agreement with the Voyager observations.

  12. Apex-oxygen-atom tunneling as source of anomalous low-temperature specific heat in high- T sub c superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zoli, M. )

    1991-10-01

    A model is proposed in which the quantum tunneling of the apex oxygen atom is coupled to the quasiparticle excitations of the superconducting state. A path-integral formulation allows one to renormalize the coupling constant as a function of temperature. It is shown that such a model can account for the anomalous low-temperature specific heat observed in high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7{minus}{delta}} superconductors.

  13. Prediction of anomalous diffusion and algebraic relaxations for long-range interacting systems, using classical statistical mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouchet, Freddy; Dauxois, Thierry

    2005-10-01

    We explain the ubiquity and extremely slow evolution of non-Gaussian out-of-equilibrium distributions for the Hamiltonian mean-field model, by means of traditional kinetic theory. Deriving the Fokker-Planck equation for a test particle, one also unambiguously explains and predicts striking slow algebraic relaxation of the momenta autocorrelation, previously found in numerical simulations. Finally, angular anomalous diffusion are predicted for a large class of initial distributions. Nonextensive statistical mechanics is shown to be unnecessary for the interpretation of these phenomena.

  14. JET-SHOCKED H{sub 2} AND CO IN THE ANOMALOUS ARMS OF MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION GALAXY NGC4258

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ogle, P. M.; Lanz, L.; Appleton, P. N.

    2014-06-20

    We present a Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph map of H{sub 2} emission from the nearby galaxy NGC4258 (Messier 106). The H{sub 2} emission comes from 9.4 0.4 10{sup 6} M {sub ?} of warm molecular hydrogen heated to 240-1040K in the inner anomalous arms, a signature of jet interaction with the galaxy disk. The spectrum is that of a molecular hydrogen emission galaxy (MOHEG), with a large ratio of H{sub 2} over 7.7 ?m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission (0.37), characteristic of shocked molecular gas. We find close spatial correspondence between the H{sub 2} and CO emission from the anomalous arms. Our estimate of cold molecular gas mass based on CO emission is 10times greater than our estimate of 1.0 10{sup 8} M {sub ?} based on dust emission. We suggest that the X {sub CO} value is 10times lower than the Milky Way value because of high kinetic temperature and enhanced turbulence. The H{sub 2} disk has been overrun and is being shocked by the jet cocoon, and much of the gas originally in the disk has been ejected into the galaxy halo in an X-ray hot outflow. We measure a modest star formation rate of 0.08 M {sub ?} yr{sup 1} in the central 3.4kpc{sup 2} that is consistent with the remaining gas surface density.

  15. Study of anomalous top quark flavor-changing neutral current interactions via the tW channel of single-top-quark production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etesami, S. M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.

    2010-06-01

    The potential of the LHC for investigation of anomalous top quark interactions with gluon (tug,tcg) through the production of tW channel of single top quarks is studied. In the standard model, the single top quarks in the tW-channel mode are charge symmetric, meaning that {sigma}(pp{yields}t+W{sup -})={sigma}(pp{yields}t+W{sup +}). However, the presence of anomalous flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC) couplings leads to charge asymmetry. In this paper, a method is proposed in which this charge asymmetry may be used to constrain anomalous FCNC couplings. The strength of resulting constraints is estimated for the LHC for the center of mass energies of 7 and 14 TeV.

  16. Method and apparatus for analyzing error conditions in a massively parallel computer system by identifying anomalous nodes within a communicator set

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gooding, Thomas Michael

    2011-04-19

    An analytical mechanism for a massively parallel computer system automatically analyzes data retrieved from the system, and identifies nodes which exhibit anomalous behavior in comparison to their immediate neighbors. Preferably, anomalous behavior is determined by comparing call-return stack tracebacks for each node, grouping like nodes together, and identifying neighboring nodes which do not themselves belong to the group. A node, not itself in the group, having a large number of neighbors in the group, is a likely locality of error. The analyzer preferably presents this information to the user by sorting the neighbors according to number of adjoining members of the group.

  17. Polarity characterization by anomalous x-ray dispersion of ZnO films and GaN lateral polar structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, Christopher T.; Sachet, Edward; Paisley, Elizabeth A.; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Rajan, Joseph; Collazo, Ramn; Sitar, Zlatko; Maria, Jon-Paul

    2014-01-28

    We demonstrate the use of anomalous x-ray scattering of constituent cations at their absorption edge, in a conventional Bragg-Brentano diffractometer, to measure absolutely and quantitatively the polar orientation and polarity fraction of unipolar and mixed polar wurtzitic crystals. In one set of experiments, the gradual transition between c+ and c? polarity of epitaxial ZnO films on sapphire as a function of MgO buffer layer thickness is monitored quantitatively, while in a second experiment, we map the polarity of a lateral polar homojunction in GaN. The dispersion measurements are compared with piezoforce microscopy images, and we demonstrate how x-ray dispersion and scanning probe methods can provide complementary information that can discriminate between polarity fractions at a material surface and polarity fractions averaged over the film bulk.

  18. Anomalous magnetic behavior in nanocomposite materials of reduced graphene oxide-Ni/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollu, Pratap E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in; Prathapani, Sateesh; Varaprasadarao, Eswara K.; Mallick, Sudhanshu; Bahadur, D. E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in; Santosh, Chella; Grace, Andrews Nirmala E-mail: anirmalagrace@vit.ac.in

    2014-08-04

    Magnetic Reduced Graphene Oxide-Nickel/NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (RGO-Ni/NF) nanocomposite has been synthesized by one pot solvothermal method. Respective phase formations and their purities in the composite are confirmed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope and X Ray Diffraction, respectively. For the RGO-Ni/NF composite material finite-size effects lead to the anomalous magnetic behavior, which is corroborated in temperature and field dependent magnetization curves. Here, we are reporting the behavior of higher magnetization values for Zero Field Cooled condition to that of Field Cooled for the RGO-Ni/NF nanocomposite. Also, the observed negative and positive moments in Hysteresis loops at relatively smaller applied fields (100?Oe and 200?Oe) are explained on the basis of surface spin disorder.

  19. Quantized spin waves in single Co/Pt dots detected by anomalous Hall effect based ferromagnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kikuchi, N. Furuta, M.; Okamoto, S.; Kitakami, O.; Shimatsu, T.

    2014-12-15

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) based ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) measurements were carried out on perpendicularly magnetized Co/Pt multilayer single dots of 0.4–3 μm in diameter. The resonance behavior was measured by detecting the decrease of perpendicular magnetization component due to magnetization precession. Resonance behavior was observed as a clear decrease of Hall voltages, and the obtained resonance fields were consistent with the results of vector-network-analyzer FMR. Spin-waves with cylindrical symmetry became significant by decreasing the dot diameter, and quantized multiple resonances were observed in the dot of 0.4 μm in diameter. The AHE based FMR proposed here is a powerful method to approach magnetization dynamics including spin waves and non-linear behavior excited in a finite nanostructure.

  20. Metallic transport and large anomalous Hall effect at room temperature in ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N epitaxial thin film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Xi; Shigematsu, Kei; Chikamatsu, Akira Fukumura, Tomoteru; Hirose, Yasushi; Hasegawa, Tetsuya

    2014-08-18

    We report the electrical transport properties of ferrimagnetic Mn{sub 4}N (001) epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition on MgO (001) substrates. The Mn{sub 4}N thin films were tetragonally distorted with a ratio of out-of-plane to in-plane lattice constants of 0.987 and showed perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with an effective magnetic anisotropy constant of 0.16 MJ/m{sup 3}, which is comparable with that of a recently reported molecular-beam-epitaxy-grown film. The thin films exhibited metallic transport with a room temperature resistivity of 125 μΩ cm in addition to a large anomalous Hall effect with a Hall angle tangent of 0.023.

  1. Local structure underlying anomalous tetragonal distortions in BiFeO{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} ferroelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levin, I.; Krayzman, V.; Woicik, J. C.; Tucker, M. G.

    2014-06-16

    The local structure of tetragonal BiFeO{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} solid solutions featuring anomalous lattice distortions has been determined using simultaneous fitting of neutron total scattering and extended X-ray absorption fine structure data. On the local scale, the large tetragonal distortion, promoted by the displacements of the A-cations (Bi and Pb), is accommodated primarily by the [FeO{sub 6}] octahedra, even though both Fe and Ti acquire (5+1)-fold coordination. Bi cations exhibit considerably larger displacements than Pb. The combination of the A-cation displacements and the ability of M-cations to adopt 5-fold coordination is suggested as key for stabilizing the large tetragonality in BiMO{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} systems.

  2. Areas of Anomalous Surface Temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties, Colorado, as Identified from ASTER Thermal Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hussein, Khalid

    2012-02-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Very Warm Modeled Temperature Alamosa Saguache Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains areas of anomalous surface temperature in Alamosa and Saguache Counties identified from ASTER thermal data and spatial based insolation model. The temperature is calculated using the Emissivity Normalization Algorithm that separate temperature from emissivity. The incoming solar radiation was calculated using spatial based insolation model developed by Fu and Rich (1999). Then the temperature due to solar radiation was calculated using emissivity derived from ASTER data. The residual temperature, i.e. temperature due to solar radiation subtracted from ASTER temperature was used to identify thermally anomalous areas. Areas that had temperature greater than 2σ were considered ASTER modeled very warm surface exposures (thermal anomalies) Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4217727.601630 m Left: 394390.400264 m Right: 460179.841813 m Bottom: 4156258.036086 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World

  3. Structural behavior and dynamics of an anomalous fluid between attractive and repulsive walls: Templating, molding, and superdiffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoni, Fabio; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2014-11-07

    Confinement can modify the dynamics, the thermodynamics, and the structural properties of liquid water, the prototypical anomalous liquid. By considering a generic model for anomalous liquids, suitable for describing solutions of globular proteins, colloids, or liquid metals, we study by molecular dynamics simulations the effect that an attractive wall with structure and a repulsive wall without structure have on the phases, the crystal nucleation, and the dynamics of the fluid. We find that at low temperatures the large density of the attractive wall induces a high-density, high-energy structure in the first layer (templating effect). In turn, the first layer induces a molding effect on the second layer determining a structure with reduced energy and density, closer to the average density of the system. This low-density, low-energy structure propagates further through the layers by templating effect and can involve all the existing layers at the lowest temperatures investigated. Therefore, although the high-density, high-energy structure does not self-reproduce further than the first layer, the structured wall can have a long-range influence thanks to a sequence of templating, molding, and templating effects through the layers. We find that the walls also have an influence on the dynamics of the liquid, with a stronger effect near the attractive wall. In particular, we observe that the dynamics is largely heterogeneous (i) among the layers, as a consequence of the sequence of structures caused by the walls presence, and (ii) within the same layer, due to superdiffusive liquid veins within a frozen matrix of particles near the walls at low temperature and high density. Hence, the partial freezing of the first layer does not correspond necessarily to an effective reduction of the channel's section in terms of transport properties, as suggested by other authors.

  4. Anomalous pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperature in Tb revealed by resistivity measurements to 141 GPa. Comparison with Gd and Dy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-05-26

    In previous studies the pressure dependence of the magnetic ordering temperature To of Dy was found to exhibit a sharp increase above its volume collapse pressure of 73 GPa, appearing to reach temperatures well above ambient at 157 GPa. In a search for a second such lanthanide, electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on neighboring Tb to 141 GPa over the temperature range 3.8 - 295 K. Below Tb’s volume collapse pressure of 53 GPa, the pressure dependence To(P) mirrors that of both Dy and Gd. However, at higher pressures To(P) for Tb becomes highly anomalous. This result, together with the very strong suppression of superconductivity by dilute Tb ions in Y, suggests that extreme pressure transports Tb into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.

  5. Anomalous pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperature in Tb revealed by resistivity measurements to 141 GPa. Comparison with Gd and Dy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-05-26

    In previous studies the pressure dependence of the magnetic ordering temperature To of Dy was found to exhibit a sharp increase above its volume collapse pressure of 73 GPa, appearing to reach temperatures well above ambient at 157 GPa. In a search for a second such lanthanide, electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on neighboring Tb to 141 GPa over the temperature range 3.8 - 295 K. Below Tb’s volume collapse pressure of 53 GPa, the pressure dependence To(P) mirrors that of both Dy and Gd. However, at higher pressures To(P) for Tb becomes highly anomalous. This result, together withmore » the very strong suppression of superconductivity by dilute Tb ions in Y, suggests that extreme pressure transports Tb into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.« less

  6. Bounds on an Anomalous Dijet Resonance in W+ jets Production in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atramentov, O.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Beale, S.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Guo, F.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnston, D.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kirby, M. H.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.

    2011-06-30

    We present a study of the dijet invariant mass spectrum in events with two jets produced in association with a W boson in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb? collected with the D0 detector at s?=1.96 TeV. We find no evidence for anomalous resonant dijet production and derive upper limits on the production cross section of an anomalous dijet resonance recently reported by the CDF Collaboration, investigating the range of dijet invariant mass from 110 to 170 GeV/c. The probability of the D0 data being consistent with the presence of a dijet resonance with 4 pb production cross section at 145 GeV/c is 810??.

  7. Anomalous pressure dependence of magnetic ordering temperature in Tb revealed by resistivity measurements to 141 GPa. Comparison with Gd and Dy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, J.; Fabbris, G.; Haskel, D.; Schilling, J. S.

    2015-05-26

    In previous studies the pressure dependence of the magnetic ordering temperature To of Dy was found to exhibit a sharp increase above its volume collapse pressure of 73 GPa, appearing to reach temperatures well above ambient at 157 GPa. In a search for a second such lanthanide, electrical resistivity measurements were carried out on neighboring Tb to 141 GPa over the temperature range 3.8 - 295 K. Below Tbs volume collapse pressure of 53 GPa, the pressure dependence To(P) mirrors that of both Dy and Gd. However, at higher pressures To(P) for Tb becomes highly anomalous. This result, together with the very strong suppression of superconductivity by dilute Tb ions in Y, suggests that extreme pressure transports Tb into an unconventional magnetic state with an anomalously high magnetic ordering temperature.

  8. Bounds on an Anomalous Dijet Resonance in W+ jets Production in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-06-30

    We present a study of the dijet invariant mass spectrum in events with two jets produced in association with a W boson in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb⁻¹ collected with the D0 detector at s√=1.96 TeV. We find no evidence for anomalous resonant dijet production and derive upper limits on the production cross section of an anomalous dijet resonance recently reported by the CDF Collaboration, investigating the range of dijet invariant mass from 110 to 170 GeV/c². The probability of the D0 data being consistent with the presence of a dijet resonance with 4 pb productionmore »cross section at 145 GeV/c² is 8×10⁻⁶.« less

  9. Bounds on an Anomalous Dijet Resonance in W+ jets Production in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-06-30

    We present a study of the dijet invariant mass spectrum in events with two jets produced in association with a W boson in data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb⁻¹ collected with the D0 detector at s√=1.96 TeV. We find no evidence for anomalous resonant dijet production and derive upper limits on the production cross section of an anomalous dijet resonance recently reported by the CDF Collaboration, investigating the range of dijet invariant mass from 110 to 170 GeV/c². The probability of the D0 data being consistent with the presence of a dijet resonance with 4 pb productionmore » cross section at 145 GeV/c² is 8×10⁻⁶.« less

  10. Intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the kagome lattice Cs2LiMn3F12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Gang; Lian, Biao; Zhang, Shou -Cheng

    2015-10-27

    In a kagome lattice, the time reversal symmetry can be broken by a staggered magnetic flux emerging from ferromagnetic ordering and intrinsic spin-orbit coupling, leading to several well-separated nontrivial Chern bands and intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect. Based on this idea and ab initio calculations, we propose the realization of the intrinsic quantum anomalous Hall effect in the single layer Cs2Mn3F12 kagome lattice and on the (001) surface of a Cs2LiMn3F12 single crystal by modifying the carrier coverage on it, where the band gap is around 20 meV. Furthermore, a simplified tight binding model based on the in-plane ddσ antibonding states is constructed to understand the topological band structures of the system.

  11. Anomalous Hall effect in epitaxial ferrimagnetic anti-perovskite Mn{sub 4−x}Dy{sub x}N films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, M.; Wu, S. X. Zhou, W. Q.; Ren, L. Z.; Wang, Y. J.; Wang, G. L.; Li, S. W.

    2015-08-07

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) has been studied for ferrimagnetic antiperovskite Mn{sub 4−x}Dy{sub x}N films grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. The introduction of Dy changes the AHE dramatically, even changes its sign, while the variations in magnetization are negligible. Two sign reversals of the AHE (negative-positive-negative) are ascribed to the variation of charge carriers as a result of Fermi surface reconstruction. We further demonstrate that the AHE current J{sub AH} is dissipationless (independent of the scattering rate), by confirming that anomalous Hall conductivity, σ{sub AH}, is proportional to the carrier density n at 5 K. Our study may provide a route to further utilize antiperovskite manganese nitrides in spintronics.

  12. Quantum anomalous Hall effect and a nontrivial spin-texture in ultra-thin films of magnetic topological insulators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duong, Le Quy; Das, Tanmoy; Feng, Y. P.; Lin, Hsin

    2015-05-07

    We study the evolution of quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect for a Z{sub 2} topological insulator (TI) thin films in a proximity induced magnetic phase by a realistic layered k·p model with interlayer coupling. We examine three different magnetic configurations in which ferromagnetic (FM) layer(s) is added either from one side (FM-TI), from both sides (FM-TI-FM), or homogeneously distributed (magnetically doped) in a TI slab. We map out the thickness-dependent topological phase diagram under various experimental conditions. The critical magnetic exchange energy for the emergence of QAH effect in the latter two cases decreases monotonically with increasing number of quintuple layers (QLs), while it becomes surprisingly independent of the film thickness in the former case. The gap size of the emergent QAH insulator depends on the non-magnetic “parent” gap of the TI thin film and is tuned by the FM exchange energy, opening a versatile possibility to achieve room-temperature QAH insulator in various topological nanomaterials. Finally, we find that the emergent spin-texture in the QAH effect is very unconventional, non-“hedgehog” type; and it exhibits a chiral out-of-plane spin-flip texture within the same valence band which is reminiscent of dynamical “skyrmion” pattern, except our results are in the momentum space.

  13. Anomalous porosity preservation and preferential accumulation of gas hydrate in the Andaman accretionary wedge, NGHP-01 site 17A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Kelly K.; Johnson, Joel E.; Torres, Marta E.; Hong, WeiLi; Giosan, Liviu; Solomon, E.; Kastner, Miriam; Cawthern, Thomas; Long, Philip E.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2014-12-01

    In addition to well established properties that control the presence or absence of the hydrate stability zone, such as pressure, temperature, and salinity, additional parameters appear to influence the concentration of gas hydrate in host sediments. The stratigraphic record at Site 17A in the Andaman Sea, eastern Indian Ocean, illustrates the need to better understand the role pore-scale phenomena play in the distribution and presence of marine gas hydrates in a variety of subsurface settings. In this paper we integrate field-generated datasets with newly acquired sedimentology, physical property, imaging and geochemical data with mineral saturation and ion activity products of key mineral phases such as amorphous silica and calcite, to document the presence and nature of secondary precipitates that contributed to anomalous porosity preservation at Site 17A in the Andaman Sea. This study demonstrates the importance of grain-scale subsurface heterogeneities in controlling the occurrence and distribution of concentrated gas hydrate accumulations in marine sediments, and document the importance that increased permeability and enhanced porosity play in supporting gas concentrations sufficient to support gas hydrate formation. The grain scale relationships between porosity, permeability, and gas hydrate saturation documented at Site 17A likely offer insights into what may control the occurrence and distribution of gas hydrate in other sedimentary settings.

  14. Anomalous temperature-dependent Young's modulus of a cast LAST (Pb-Sb-Ag-Te) thermoelectric material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Fei; Case, Eldon D; Timm, Edward J; Lara-Curzio, Edgar; Trejo, Rosa M

    2010-01-01

    Thermomechanical characterization is important to material evaluation and device design in the development of thermoelectric technology. In this study, we utilize the resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (RUS) technique to examine the elastic behavior of a cast LAST (Pb Sb Ag Te) material with a composition of Ag0.86Pb19Sb1.0Te20 between room temperature and 823 K. The temperature-dependent Young s modulus exhibits a monotonically decreasing trend with increasing temperature. However, an abnormal slope change in the Young s modulus temperature curve around 500 K is observed. In addition, hysteresis between heating and cooling data in the temperature range of 450 550 K is observed, which appears to be dependent on the heating/cooling rate during the RUS experiments such that the hysteresis disappears when the heating/cooling rate was decreased from 5 to 2 K min 1. In this study we propose an order disorder transition model for the anomalous temperature-dependent Young s modulus behavior observed in this study.

  15. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oveshnikov, L. N.; Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Davydov, A. B.; Aronzon, B. A.; Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Kugel, K. I.; Tripathi, V.

    2015-11-24

    In this study, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises from the interplay of spin-orbit interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a potentially useful probe of electron spin polarization, especially in nanoscale systems where direct measurement is not feasible. While AHE is rather well-understood in metallic ferromagnets, much less is known about the relevance of different physical mechanisms governing AHE in insulators. As ferromagnetic insulators, but not metals, lend themselves to gatecontrol of electron spin polarization, understanding AHE in the insulating state is valuable from the point of view of spintronic applications. Among the mechanisms proposed in the literature for AHEmore » in insulators, the one related to a geometric (Berry) phase effect has been elusive in past studies. The recent discovery of quantized AHE in magnetically doped topological insulators - essentially a Berry phase effect - provides strong additional motivation to undertake more careful search for geometric phase effects in AHE in the magnetic semiconductors. Here we report our experiments on the temperature and magnetic field dependences of AHE in insulating, strongly-disordered two-dimensional Mn delta-doped semiconductor heterostructures in the hopping regime. In particular, it is shown that at sufficiently low temperatures, the mechanism of AHE related to the Berry phase is favoured.« less

  16. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered two-dimensional magnetic semiconductor structure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oveshnikov, L. N.; Kulbachinskii, V. A.; Davydov, A. B.; Aronzon, B. A.; Rozhansky, I. V.; Averkiev, N. S.; Kugel, K. I.; Tripathi, V.

    2015-11-24

    In this study, the anomalous Hall effect (AHE) arises from the interplay of spin-orbit interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a potentially useful probe of electron spin polarization, especially in nanoscale systems where direct measurement is not feasible. While AHE is rather well-understood in metallic ferromagnets, much less is known about the relevance of different physical mechanisms governing AHE in insulators. As ferromagnetic insulators, but not metals, lend themselves to gatecontrol of electron spin polarization, understanding AHE in the insulating state is valuable from the point of view of spintronic applications. Among the mechanisms proposed in the literature for AHE in insulators, the one related to a geometric (Berry) phase effect has been elusive in past studies. The recent discovery of quantized AHE in magnetically doped topological insulators - essentially a Berry phase effect - provides strong additional motivation to undertake more careful search for geometric phase effects in AHE in the magnetic semiconductors. Here we report our experiments on the temperature and magnetic field dependences of AHE in insulating, strongly-disordered two-dimensional Mn delta-doped semiconductor heterostructures in the hopping regime. In particular, it is shown that at sufficiently low temperatures, the mechanism of AHE related to the Berry phase is favoured.

  17. Anomalous junctions characterized by Raman spectroscopy in Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1−x} nanowires with axially degraded components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xia, Minggang; Han, Jinyun; Cheng, Zhaofang; Liang, Chunping; Zhang, Shengli

    2014-09-08

    The characterization of junctions in nanowires by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy with spherical aberration correction is tricky and tedious. Many disadvantages also exist, including rigorous sample preparation and structural damage inflicted by high-energy electrons. In this work, we present a simple, low-cost, and non-destructive Raman spectroscopy method of characterizing anomalous junctions in nanowires with axially degraded components. The Raman spectra of Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1−x} nanowires with axially degraded components are studied in detail using a confocal micro-Raman spectrometer. Three Raman peaks (ν{sub Si–Si} = 490 cm{sup −1}, ν{sub Si–Ge} = 400 cm{sup −1}, and ν{sub Ge–Ge} = 284 cm{sup −1}) up-shift with increased Si content. This up-shift originates in the bond compression induced by a confined effect on the radial direction of nanowire. The anomalous junctions in Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1−x} nanowires with axially degraded components are then observed by Raman spectroscopy and verified by transmission electron microscopy energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The anomalous junctions of Si{sub x}Ge{sub 1−x} nanowires with axially degraded components are due to the vortex flow of inlet SiH{sub 4} and GeH{sub 4} gas in their synthesis. The anomalous junctions can be used as raw materials for fabricating devices with special functions.

  18. Combination of searches for anomalous top quark couplings with 5.4 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Gonzalez, J. A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Lashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffe, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

    2012-07-09

    We present measurements of the tWb coupling form factors using information from electroweak single top quark production and from the helicity of W bosons from top quark decays in t{bar t} events. We set upper limits on anomalous tWb coupling form factors using data collected with the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1}.

  19. Anomalous resistivity effect on multiple ion beam emission and hard x-ray generation in a Mather type plasma focus device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behbahani, R. A.; Aghamir, F. M.

    2011-10-15

    Multi ion beam and hard x-ray emissions were detected in a high inductance (more than 100 nH) Mather type plasma focus (PF) device at different filling gas pressures and charging voltages. The signal analysis was performed through the current trace, as it is the fundamental signal from which all of the phenomena in a PF device can be extracted. Two different fitting processes were carried out according to Lee's computational (snow-plow) model. In the first process, only plasma dynamics and classical (Spitzer) resistances were considered as energy consumer parameters for plasma. This led to an unsuccessful fitting and did not answer the energy transfer mechanism into plasma. A second fitting process was considered through the addition of anomalous resistance, which provided the best fit. Anomalous resistance was the source of long decrease in current trace, and multi dips and multi peaks of high voltage probe. Multi-peak features were interpreted considering the second fitting process along with the mechanisms for ion beam production and hard x-ray emission. To show the important role of the anomalous resistance, the duration of the current drop was discussed.

  20. Search for anomalous quartic WW?? couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Holzbauer, J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.

    2013-07-29

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WW?? in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb? of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp? collisions at s?=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with ?cutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed upper limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/?|<0.0025 GeV? and |aWC/?|<0.0092 GeV?.

  1. Geochemical provenance of anomalous metal concentrations in stream sediments in the Ashton 1:250,000 quadrangle, Idaho/Montana/Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shannon, S.S. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Stream-sediment samples from 1500 sites in the Ashton, Idaho/Montana/Wyoming 1:250,000 quadrangle were analyzed for 45 elements. Almost all samples containing anomalous concentrations (exceeding one standard deviation above the mean value of any element) were derived from drainage basins underlain by Quaternary rhyolite, Tertiary andesite or Precambrian gneiss and schist. Aluminum, barium, calcium, cobalt, iron, nickel, magnesium, scandium, sodium, strontium, and vanadium have no andesite provenance. Most anomalous manganese, europium, hafnium, and zirconium values were derived from Precambrian rocks. All other anomalous elemental concentrations are related to Quaternary rhyolite. This study demonstrates that multielemental stream-sediment analyses can be used to infer the provenance of stream sediments. Such data are available for many parts of the country as a result of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. This study suggests that stream-sediment samples collected in the Rocky Mountains can be used either as pathfinders or as direct indicators to select targets for mineral exploration for a host of metals.

  2. Anomalous volume expansion in CaRu{sub 0.85}Fe{sub 0.15}O{sub 3}: Neutron powder diffraction and magnetic Compton scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taniguchi, T.; Mizusaki, S.; Okada, N.; Nagata, Y.; Mori, K.; Wuernisha, T.; Kamiyama, T.; Hiraoka, N.; Itou, M.; Sakurai, Y.; Ozawa, T. C.; Noro, Y.; Samata, H.

    2007-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction and magnetic Compton scattering measurements were conducted for ferromagnetic CaRu{sub 0.85}Fe{sub 0.15}O{sub 3} at temperatures between 10 and 300 K. Anomalous volume expansion was observed in the neutron diffraction measurement below the Curie temperature (85 K), and Invar-like behavior was observed below 40 K. However, no structural phase transition was observed down to 10 K. The strong correlation between the volume expansion, {delta}V, and the square magnetization, M{sup 2}, suggests that the anomalous volume expansion is due to the magnetovolume effect that is caused by the occurrence of ferromagnetism. The magnetic Compton scattering experiments revealed the existence of a magnetic moment on Ru and the antiferromagnetic configuration of Fe and Ru moments. The formation of a ferrimagnetic order through the induction of the magnetic moment on the Ru ion is a possible reason for the anomalous volume expansion observed for CaRu{sub 0.85}Fe{sub 0.15}O{sub 3}.

  3. Understanding the dramatic role of anomalous dispersion on the measurement of electron densities in plasmas using interferometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2005-07-20

    For decades the electron density of plasmas has been measured using optical interferometers. With the availability of good X-ray laser sources in the last decade interferometers have been extended into the wavelength range 14-47 nm, which has enabled researchers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index less than one. Recent interferometer experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with index of refraction greater than one at 14 nm and brought into question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index. In this paper we show how the anomalous dispersion from bound electrons can dominate the free electron contribution to the index of refraction in many plasmas and make the index greater than one or enhance the contribution to the index such that one would greatly overestimate the density of the plasma using interferometers. Using a new average-atom code we calculate the index of refraction in many plasmas at different temperatures for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV and compare against calculations done with OPAL. We also present examples of other plasmas that may have index of refraction greater than one at X-ray laser energies. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  4. Rb+ adsorption at the quartz(101)-aqueous interface: comparison of resonant anomalous x-ray reflectivity with ab initio calculations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Kubicki, James D.; Bandura, Andrei V.; Zhang, Zhan; Wesolowski, David J.; Fenter, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We study adsorption of Rb+ to the quartz(101)–aqueous interface at room temperature with specular X-ray reflectivity, resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity, and density functional theory. The interfacial water structures observed in deionized water and 10 mM RbCl solution at pH 9.8 were similar, having a first water layer at height of 1.7 ± 0.1 Å above the quartz surface and a second layer at 4.8 ± 0.1 Å and 3.9 ± 0.8 Å for the water and RbCl solutions, respectively. The adsorbed Rb+ distribution is broad and consists of presumed inner-sphere (IS) and outer-sphere (OS) complexes at heights of 1.8 ±more » 0.1 and 6.4 ± 1.0 Å, respectively. Projector-augmented planewave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of potential configurations for neutral and negatively charged quartz(101) surfaces at pH 7 and 12, respectively, reveal a water structure in agreement with experimental results. These DFT calculations also show differences in adsorbed speciation of Rb+ between these two conditions. At pH 7, the lowest energy structure shows that Rb+ adsorbs dominantly as an IS complex, whereas at pH 12 IS and OS complexes have equivalent energies. The DFT results at pH 12 are generally consistent with the two site Rb distribution observed from the X-ray data at pH 9.8, albeit with some differences that are discussed. In conclusion, surface charge estimated on the basis of the measured total Rb+ coverage was -0.11 C/m2, in good agreement with the range of the surface charge magnitudes reported in the literature.« less

  5. ANOMALOUS ANISOTROPIC CROSS-CORRELATIONS BETWEEN WMAP CMB MAPS AND SDSS GALAXY DISTRIBUTION AND IMPLICATIONS ON THE DARK FLOW SCENARIO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhigang; Chen Xuelei; Zhang Pengjie E-mail: pjzhang@shao.ac.cn

    2012-10-20

    We search for the dark flow induced diffuse kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect through CMB-galaxy cross-correlation. Such angular correlation is anisotropic, with a unique cos ({theta}{sub DF}) angular dependence, and hence can be distinguished from other components. Here, {theta}{sub DF} is the angle between the opposite dark flow direction and the direction of the sky where the correlation is measured. We analyze the KIAS-VAGC galaxy catalog of SDSS-DR7 and the WMAP seven-year temperature maps, applying an unbiased optimal weighting scheme to eliminate any statistically isotropic components and to enhance the dark flow detection signal. Non-zero weighted cross-correlations are detected at 3.5 {sigma} for the redshift bin z < 0.1 and at 3 {sigma} for the bin 0.1 < z < 0.2, implying the existence of statistically anisotropic components in CMB. However, further analysis does not support the dark flow explanation. The observed directional dependence deviates from the {proportional_to}cos {theta}{sub DF} relation expected, and hence cannot be explained by the presence of a single dark flow, and if the observed cross-correlation is generated by the dark flow induced kSZ effect, the velocity would be too high ({approx}> 6000 km s{sup -1}). We report this work as the first attempt to search for dark flow through weighted CMB-galaxy cross-correlation and to draw the attention on the sources of the detected anomalous CMB-galaxy cross-correlation.

  6. Characteristics of anomalous skin effect and evolution of power absorption regions in a cylindrical radio frequency inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Z. F.; Sun, B.; Huo, W. G.

    2015-06-15

    In a low-pressure radio-frequency (13.56 MHz), inductively coupled argon plasma generated by a normal cylindrical rf coil, electric field, current density, and absorbed power density is calculated from magnetic field measured with a phase-resolved magnetic probe. The anomalous skin effect (ASE) for the cylindrical rf coil is compared to those previously reported for the planar and re-entrant cylindrical rf coils. Physical reasons for our observed characteristics of ASE are presented. With the increasing discharge power, the size and the number of negative and positive power absorption regions evolve into several distinct patterns. For the low discharge power (at 156.9 W), there is one area of positive and one area of negative power absorption in the radial direction. For the medium discharge power (279 W–683.5 W), there are two areas of negative and two areas of positive power absorption. For the even higher discharge power (above 803.5 W), the number of areas is the same as that of the medium discharge power, but the size of the inner positive and negative power absorption areas is approximately doubled and halved, respectively, while the outer positive and negative power absorption areas slightly shrinks. The evolution of positive and negative power absorption regions is explained as a result of electron thermal diffusion and the energy conversion between rf current and electric field. The spatial decays of electric field and current density are also elucidated by linking them with the positive and negative power absorption pattern.

  7. Anomalous behaviour of DSSSDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grassi, L.; Torresi, D.; Acosta, L.; Figuera, P.; Fisichella, M.; Grilj, V.; Jaksic, M.; Lattuada, M.; Mijatovic, T.; Milin, M.; Prepolec, L.; Skukan, N.; Soic, N.; Tokic, V.; Uroic, M.

    2012-10-20

    Double Sided Silicon Strip Detectors (DSSSDs) are often used in nuclear physics experiments in a wide energy range. According to the previous experiments, when a particle hits the interstrip region of these detectors, different effects may occur. Charge sharing, pulse height deficits and inverse polarity pulses on adjacent strips can influence the measured charge. In order to understand these effects and improve DSSSD utilization, an experiment was performed at the scanning proton microbeam of the Ruder Boskovic Institute (RBI) using low proton microbeam intensity ({approx}fA) and two DSSSDs of thickness 75 {mu}m and 998 {mu}m.

  8. Anomalous diffusion of field lines and charged particles in Arnold-Beltrami-Childress force-free magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ram, Abhay K.; Dasgupta, Brahmananda; Krishnamurthy, V.; Mitra, Dhrubaditya

    2014-07-15

    The cosmic magnetic fields in regions of low plasma pressure and large currents, such as in interstellar space and gaseous nebulae, are force-free in the sense that the Lorentz force vanishes. The three-dimensional Arnold-Beltrami-Childress (ABC) field is an example of a force-free, helical magnetic field. In fluid dynamics, ABC flows are steady state solutions of the Euler equation. The ABC magnetic field lines exhibit a complex and varied structure that is a mix of regular and chaotic trajectories in phase space. The characteristic features of field line trajectories are illustrated through the phase space distribution of finite-distance and asymptotic-distance Lyapunov exponents. In regions of chaotic trajectories, an ensemble-averaged variance of the distance between field lines reveals anomalous diffusion—in fact, superdiffusion—of the field lines. The motion of charged particles in the force-free ABC magnetic fields is different from the flow of passive scalars in ABC flows. The particles do not necessarily follow the field lines and display a variety of dynamical behavior depending on their energy, and their initial pitch-angle. There is an overlap, in space, of the regions in which the field lines and the particle orbits are chaotic. The time evolution of an ensemble of particles, in such regions, can be divided into three categories. For short times, the motion of the particles is essentially ballistic; the ensemble-averaged, mean square displacement is approximately proportional to t{sup 2}, where t is the time of evolution. The intermediate time region is defined by a decay of the velocity autocorrelation function—this being a measure of the time after which the collective dynamics is independent of the initial conditions. For longer times, the particles undergo superdiffusion—the mean square displacement is proportional to t{sup α}, where α > 1, and is weakly dependent on the energy of the particles. These super-diffusive characteristics

  9. Search for anomalous Wtb couplings in single top quark production in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Alves G. A.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beni S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M. -C.; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; De K.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph.; Grivaz J. -F.; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Kvita J.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-02-14

    We present new direct constraints on a general Wtb interaction using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.4 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector at the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. The standard model provides a purely left-handed vector coupling at the Wtb vertex, while the most general, lowest dimension Lagrangian allows right-handed vector and left- or right-handed tensor couplings as well. We obtain precise limits on these anomalous couplings by comparing the data to the expectations from different assumptions on the Wtb coupling.

  10. Evidence of Wγγ Production in pp Collisions at s=8  TeV and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-07-16

    Here we report evidence of triple gauge boson production pp→W(ℓν)γγ+X, which is accessible for the first time with the 8 TeV LHC data set. The fiducial cross section for this process is measured in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb₋1, collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012. Events are selected using the W boson decay to eν or μν as well as requiring two isolated photons. The measured cross section is used to set limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings in the high diphoton mass region.

  11. Evidence of W γ γ Production in p p Collisions at s = 8 TeV and Limits on Anomalous Quartic Gauge Couplings with the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; et al

    2015-07-16

    This Letter reports evidence of triple gauge boson production pp → W (lν)γγ + X, which is accessible for the first time with the 8 TeV LHC data set. The fiducial cross section for this process is measured in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1, collected by the ATLAS detector in 2012. Events are selected using the W boson decay to eν or μν as well as requiring two isolated photons. The measured cross section is used to set limits on anomalous quartic gauge couplings in the high diphoton mass region.

  12. CP violating anomalous top-quark coupling in p$\\bar{p}$ collision at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Sehwook; /Iowa State U.

    2011-04-01

    We conduct the first study of the T-odd correlations in tt events produced in p{bar p} collision at the Fermilab Tevatron collider that can be used to search for CP violation. We select events which have lepton+jets final states to identify t{bar t} events and measure counting asymmetries of several physics observables. Based on the result, we search the top quark anomalous couplings at the production vertex at the Tevatron. In addition, Geant4 development, photon identification, the discrimination of a single photon and a photon doublet from {pi}{sup 0} decay are discussed in this thesis.

  13. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes...

  14. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous HVV couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-13

    Our study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the H→ZZ,Zγ*,γ*γ*→4ℓ, H→WW→ℓνℓν, and H→γγ decay modes. The full data set recorded by the CMS experiment during the LHC run 1 is used, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. A wide range of spin-two models is excluded at a 99% confidence level or higher, or at a 99.87% confidence level for the minimal gravitylike couplings, regardless of whether assumptions are made on the production mechanism. Any mixed-parity spin-one state is excluded in the ZZ and WW modes at a greater than 99.999% confidence level. Under the hypothesis that the resonance is a spin-zero boson, the tensor structure of the interactions of the Higgs boson with two vector bosons ZZ, Zγ, γγ, and WW is investigated and limits on eleven anomalous contributions are set. Furthermore, the tighter constraints on anomalous HVV interactions are obtained by combining the HZZand HWW measurements. All observations are consistent with the expectations for the standard model Higgs boson with the quantum numbers JPC=0++.

  15. Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As/GaAs(100) hetermostructures with anomalously high carrier mobility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seredin, P. V. Goloshchapov, D. L.; Lenshin, A. S.; Ternovaya, V. E.; Arsentyev, I. N. Nikolaev, D. N.; Tarasov, I. S.; Shamakhov, V. V.; Popov, A. V.

    2015-08-15

    Structural and spectroscopic methods are used to study the epitaxial layers of n-type Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As solid solutions produced by the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition method. It is shown that, when Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As solid solutions are doped with carbon to a level of (1.2–6.7) × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3}, the electron mobility is anomalously high for the given impurity concentration and twice exceeds the calculated value. It is assumed that the ordered arrangement of carbon in the metal sublattice of the solid solution leads to a change in the average distance between impurity ions, i.e., to an increase in the mean free path of the carriers and, consequently, in the carrier mobility. The observed effect has immediate practical importance in the search for various technological ways of increasing the operating speed of functional elements of modern optoelectronic devices. The effect of the anomalously high carrier mobility in the epitaxial layer of a heteropair opens up new opportunities for the development of new structures on the basis of Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}As compounds.

  16. Anomalous momentum and energy transfer rates for electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence in downward auroral-current regions of the Earth's magnetosphere. III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jasperse, John R.; Basu, Bamandas; Lund, Eric J.; Grossbard, Neil

    2010-06-15

    Recently, a new multimoment fluid theory was developed for inhomogeneous, nonuniformly magnetized plasma in the guiding-center and gyrotropic approximation that includes the effect of electrostatic, turbulent, wave-particle interactions (see Jasperse et al. [Phys. Plasmas 13, 072903 (2006); ibid.13, 112902 (2006)]). In the present paper, which is intended as a sequel, it is concluded from FAST satellite data that the electrostatic ion-cyclotron turbulence that appears is due to the operation of an electron, bump-on-tail-driven ion-cyclotron instability for downward currents in the long-range potential region of the Earth's magnetosphere. Approximate closed-form expressions for the anomalous momentum and energy transfer rates for the ion-cyclotron turbulence are obtained. The turbulent, inhomogeneous, nonuniformly magnetized, multimoment fluid theory given above, in the limit of a turbulent, homogeneous, uniformly magnetized, quasisteady plasma, yields the well-known formula for the anomalous resistivity given by Gary and Paul [Phys. Rev. Lett. 26, 1097 (1971)] and Tange and Ichimaru [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 36, 1437 (1974)].

  17. Search for anomalous production of prompt like-sign lepton pairs at $$ \\sqrt{s}=7\\;\\mathrm{TeV} $$ with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2012-12-03

    An inclusive search for anomalous production of two prompt, isolated leptons with the same electric charge is presented. The search is performed in a data sample corresponding to 4.7 fb-1 of integrated luminosity collected in 2011 at √s = 7 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Pairs of leptons (e± e±, e± μ±, and μ± μ±) with large transverse momentum are selected, and the dilepton invariant mass distribution is examined for any deviation from the Standard Model expectation. No excess is found, and upper limits on the production cross section of like-sign lepton pairs from physics processes beyondmore » the Standard Model are placed as a function of the dilepton invariant mass within a fiducial region close to the experimental selection criteria. The 95% confidence level upper limits on the cross section of anomalous e± e±, e± μ±, or μ± μ± production range between 1.7 fb and 64 fb depending on the dilepton mass and flavour combination.« less

  18. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous HVV couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-13

    Our study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the H→ZZ,Zγ*,γ*γ*→4ℓ, H→WW→ℓνℓν, and H→γγ decay modes. The full data set recorded by the CMS experiment during the LHC run 1 is used, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of up to 5.1 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and up to 19.7 fb-1 at 8 TeV. A wide range of spin-two models is excluded at a 99% confidence level or higher, or at a 99.87% confidence level for the minimal gravitylike couplings, regardless of whether assumptions are mademore » on the production mechanism. Any mixed-parity spin-one state is excluded in the ZZ and WW modes at a greater than 99.999% confidence level. Under the hypothesis that the resonance is a spin-zero boson, the tensor structure of the interactions of the Higgs boson with two vector bosons ZZ, Zγ, γγ, and WW is investigated and limits on eleven anomalous contributions are set. Furthermore, the tighter constraints on anomalous HVV interactions are obtained by combining the HZZand HWW measurements. All observations are consistent with the expectations for the standard model Higgs boson with the quantum numbers JPC=0++.« less

  19. Correlation of anomalous write error rates and ferromagnetic resonance spectrum in spin-transfer-torque-magnetic-random-access-memory devices containing in-plane free layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evarts, Eric R.; Rippard, William H.; Pufall, Matthew R.; Heindl, Ranko

    2014-05-26

    In a small fraction of magnetic-tunnel-junction-based magnetic random-access memory devices with in-plane free layers, the write-error rates (WERs) are higher than expected on the basis of the macrospin or quasi-uniform magnetization reversal models. In devices with increased WERs, the product of effective resistance and area, tunneling magnetoresistance, and coercivity do not deviate from typical device properties. However, the field-swept, spin-torque, ferromagnetic resonance (FS-ST-FMR) spectra with an applied DC bias current deviate significantly for such devices. With a DC bias of 300 mV (producing 9.9 × 10{sup 6} A/cm{sup 2}) or greater, these anomalous devices show an increase in the fraction of the power present in FS-ST-FMR modes corresponding to higher-order excitations of the free-layer magnetization. As much as 70% of the power is contained in higher-order modes compared to ≈20% in typical devices. Additionally, a shift in the uniform-mode resonant field that is correlated with the magnitude of the WER anomaly is detected at DC biases greater than 300 mV. These differences in the anomalous devices indicate a change in the micromagnetic resonant mode structure at high applied bias.

  20. Anomalous grain growth in the surface region of a nanocrystalline CeO2 film under low-temperature heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Zhang, Yanwen; Moll, Sandra J.; Varga, Tamas; Namavar, Fereydoon; Weber, William J.

    2012-06-15

    Grain growth and phase stability of nanocrystalline ceria are investigated under ion irradiation at different temperatures. Irradiations at temperatures of 300 and 400 K result in uniform grain growth throughout the film. Anomalous grain growth is observed in thin films of nanocrystalline ceria under 3 MeV Au+ irradiation at 160 K. At this low temperature, significant grain growth is observed within 100 nm from the surface, no obvious growth is detected in the rest of the films. While the grain growth is attributed to a defect-stimulated mechanism at room temperature and above, a defect diffusion-limited mechanism is significant at low temperature with the primary defect responsible being the oxygen vacancy. The nanocrystalline grains remain in the cubic phase regardless of defect kinetics.

  1. Measurement of the Z? production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Z? in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb?. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. The differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. The observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZ? and Z?? are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.

  2. W? Production and Limits on Anomalous WW? Couplings in pp? Collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; deJong, S. J.; DeLaCruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Muanza, G. S.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Novaes, S. F.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Otero y Garzn, G. J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, K.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schliephake, T.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.

    2011-12-09

    We measure the cross section and the difference in rapidities between photons and charged leptons for inclusive W(?l?)+? production in e? and ?? final states. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb? collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, the measured cross section times branching fraction for the process pp??W?+X?l??+X and the distribution of the charge-signed photon-lepton rapidity difference are found to be in agreement with the standard model. These results provide the most stringent limits on anomalous WW? couplings for data from hadron colliders: -0.4?<0.4 and -0.08?<0.07 at the 95% C.L.

  3. Anomalous temperature dependence in valence band spectra: A resonant photoemission study of layered perovskite Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pandey, Pankaj K.; Choudhary, R. J. Phase, D. M.

    2014-05-05

    Valence band spectra (VBS) and its modification across Curie temperature (T{sub C}) of Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4} thin film are studied using resonant photoemission spectroscopy. It is found that VBS mainly consists of hybridized states of Co-3d t{sub 2g}e{sub g} and O-2p; however, Co-3d e{sub g} states show its prominence only in the ferromagnetic temperature regime. Below T{sub C}, spectral weight transfer takes place anomalously from high binding energy (B.E.) region to low B.E. region, signifying the enhanced intermediate or low spin state Co{sup 4+} ions. It is suggested that spin-lattice coupling and many-body effects in Sr{sub 2}CoO{sub 4} derived from the strong electron correlations lead to such temperature dependence of VBS.

  4. Wγ Production and Limits on Anomalous WWγ Couplings in pp̄ Collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; et al

    2011-12-09

    We measure the cross section and the difference in rapidities between photons and charged leptons for inclusive W(→lν)+γ production in eγ and μγ final states. Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2 fb⁻¹ collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, the measured cross section times branching fraction for the process pp̄→Wγ+X→lνγ+X and the distribution of the charge-signed photon-lepton rapidity difference are found to be in agreement with the standard model. These results provide the most stringent limits on anomalous WWγ couplings for data from hadron colliders: -0.4<Δκγ<0.4 and -0.08<λγ<0.07 at the 95% C.L.

  5. Nanodomain induced anomalous magnetic and electronic transport properties of LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+?} highly epitaxial thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Zepeda, F.; Ma, C.; Bahena Uribe, D.; Cantu-Valle, J.; Wang, H.; Xu, Xing; Yacaman, M. J.; Ponce, A.; Chen, C.; Lorenz, B.; Jacobson, A. J.; Chu, P. C. W.

    2014-01-14

    A giant magnetoresistance effect (?46% at 20?K under 7?T) and anomalous magnetic properties were found in a highly epitaxial double perovskite LaBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+?} (LBCO) thin film on (001) MgO. Aberration-corrected Electron Microscopy and related analytical techniques were employed to understand the nature of these unusual physical properties. The as-grown film is epitaxial with the c-axis of the LBCO structure lying in the film plane and with an interface relationship given by (100){sub LBCO} || (001){sub MgO} and [001]{sub LBCO} || [100]{sub MgO} or [010]{sub MgO}. Orderly oxygen vacancies were observed by line profile electron energy loss spectroscopy and by atomic resolution imaging. Especially, oxygen vacancy and nanodomain structures were found to have a crucial effect on the electronic transport and magnetic properties.

  6. Measurement of the Zγ production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Zγ in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. Furthermore, the differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. These observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. As a result, limits on anomalous triple gaugemore » couplings of ZZγ and Zγγ are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.« less

  7. Anomalous phonon behavior in the high-temperature shape-memory alloy Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50-x}Cr{sub x}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, S. M.; Xu Guangyong; Winn, B. L.; Schlagel, D. L.; Lograsso, T.; Erwin, R.

    2007-08-01

    Ti{sub 50}Pd{sub 50-x}Cr{sub x} is a high-temperature shape-memory alloy with a martensitic transformation temperature strongly dependent on the Cr composition. Prior to the transformation, a premartensitic phase is present with an incommensurate modulated cubic lattice with wave vector of q{sub 0}=(0.22,0.22,0). The temperature dependence of the diffuse scattering in the cubic phase is measured as a function temperature for x=6.5, 8.5, and 10 at. %. The lattice dynamics has been studied and reveals anomalous temperature and q dependences of the [110]-TA{sub 2} transverse phonon branch. The phonon linewidth is broad over the entire Brillouin zone and increases with decreasing temperature, contrary to the behavior expected for anharmonicity. No anomaly is observed at q{sub 0}. The results are compared with first principles calculation of the phonon structure.

  8. Hadron production in e+e- annihilation at BABAR, and implication for the muon anomalous magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Frank C.

    2015-04-29

    The BABAR collaboration has an extensive program of studying hadronic cross sections in low-energy e+e- collisions, accessible via initial-state radiation. Our measurements allow significant improvements in the precision of the predicted value of the muon anomalous magnetic moment. These improvements are necessary for illuminating the current 3.6 sigma difference between the predicted and the experimental values. We have published results on a number of processes with two to six hadrons in the final state. We report here the results of recent studies with final states that constitute the main contribution to the hadronic cross section in the energy region between 1 and 3 GeV, as e+e- → K+K-, π+π-, and e+e- → 4 hadrons

  9. First-principles study on the relationship between magnetic anisotropy and anomalous Hall effect of bct-Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyodo, Kazushige Sakuma, Akimasa; Kota, Yohei

    2014-05-07

    We studied quantitative relationship between the intrinsic anomalous Hall conductivity (σ{sub xy}) and the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy constant (K{sub u}) of bct-Fe{sub 50}Co{sub 50} using first-principles calculation because these quantities originate from spin-orbit interaction. We found that the obtained σ{sub xy} and K{sub u} with changing the axial ratio c/a (1≤c/a≤√(2)) exhibit similar behavior mainly arising from the common band mixing of the minority-spin d{sub xy} and d{sub x{sup 2}−y{sup 2}} states near the Fermi level which is sensitive to c/a.

  10. Channeling of high-power radio waves under conditions of strong anomalous absorption in the presence of an averaged electron heating source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vas'kov, V. V.; Ryabova, N. A.

    2010-02-15

    Strong anomalous absorption of a high-power radio wave by small-scale plasma inhomogeneities in the Earth's ionosphere can lead to the formation of self-consistent channels (solitons) in which the wave propagates along the magnetic field, but has a soliton-like intensity distribution across the field. The structure of a cylindrical soliton as a function of the wave intensity at the soliton axis is analyzed. Averaged density perturbations leading to wave focusing were calculated using the model proposed earlier by Vas'kov and Gurevich (Geomagn. Aeron. 16, 1112 (1976)), in which an averaged electron heating source was used. It is shown that, under conditions of strong electron recombination, the radii of individual solitons do not exceed 650 m.

  11. Measurement of the Z? production cross section in pp collisions at 8 TeV and search for anomalous triple gauge boson couplings

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.

    2015-04-29

    The cross section for the production of Z? in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV is measured based on data collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb?. Events with an oppositely-charged pair of muons or electrons together with an isolated photon are selected. The differential cross section as a function of the photon transverse momentum is measured inclusively and exclusively, where the exclusive selection applies a veto on central jets. The observed cross sections are compatible with the expectations of next-to-next-to-leading-order quantum chromodynamics. Limits on anomalous triple gauge couplings of ZZ? andmoreZ?? are set that improve on previous experimental results obtained with the charged lepton decay modes of the Z boson.less

  12. Search for Anomalous Kinematics of Top Dilepton Events in Proton - Anti-proton Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Andrew Gennadievich

    2004-12-01

    The author presents a search for anomalous kinematics of t{bar t} dilepton events in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using 193 pb{sup -1} of data collected with the CDF II detector. They developed a new a priori technique designed to silate the subset in a data sample revealing the largest deviation from Standard Model expectations and to quantify the significance of this departure. In the four-variable space considered, no particular subset shows a significant discrepancy and they find that the probability to obtain a data sample less consistent with the Standard Model than what is observed is 1.0-4.5%.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and anomalous dielectric and conductivity performance of one-dimensional (bdaH)InSe{sub 2} (bda = 1,4-butanediamine)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Ke-Zhao; Hu, Wan-Biao; Hu, Bing; Guan, Xiang-Feng; Huang, Xiao-Ying

    2011-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Anomalous dielectric and conductivity performance have been observed in the organic-containing indium selenide (bdaH)InSe{sub 2}, which are attributed to the water molecules existing in the crystal boundary rather than phase transition. Highlights: {yields} The title compound is the first example of organic-containing one-dimensional indium selenide. {yields} The anomalous dielectric peak is attributed to water molecules in crystal boundary. {yields} The inorganic and organic components of the title compound are connected via hydrogen bonding to form a supramolecular three-dimensional network. -- Abstract: A new indium selenide, namely (bdaH)InSe{sub 2} (1) (bda = 1,4-butanediamine) has been solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. It belongs to the non-centrosymmetric space group Fdd2. Its structure features an infinite one-dimensional anionic chain of [InSe{sub 2}]{sub n}{sup n-} with monoprotonated [bdaH]{sup +} as charge compensating cation. The organic [bdaH]{sup +} cations are joined into a supramolecular one-dimensional chain via N-H...N hydrogen bonding, which further interacts with the inorganic chain via N-H...Se and C-H...Se hydrogen bonding, forming a supramolecular three-dimensional network. Based on such a well-defined structure, the thermal stability, optical, conductivity, and dielectric properties were systematically investigated, showing that dielectric constant, as well as conductivity, had a hump at about 95 {sup o}C, which could be attributed to water molecules in the crystal boundary.

  14. Structural and chemical ordering of Heusler CoxMnyGez epitaxial films on Ge (111). Quantitative study using traditional and anomalous x-ray diffraction techniques

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collins, B. A.; Chu, Y.; He, L.; Haskel, D.; Tsui, F.

    2015-12-14

    We found that epitaxial films of CoxMnyGez grown on Ge (111) substrates by molecular-beam-epitaxy techniques have been investigated as a continuous function of composition using combinatorial synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy techniques. A high-resolution ternary epitaxial phase diagram is obtained, revealing a small number of structural phases stabilized over large compositional regions. Ordering of the constituent elements in the compositional region near the full Heusler alloy Co2MnGe has been examined in detail using both traditional XRD and a new multiple-edge anomalous diffraction (MEAD) technique. Multiple-edge anomalous diffraction involves analyzing the energy dependence of multiple reflections acrossmore » each constituent absorption edge in order to detect and quantify the elemental distribution of occupation in specific lattice sites. Results of this paper show that structural and chemical ordering are very sensitive to the Co : Mn atomic ratio, such that the ordering is the highest at an atomic ratio of 2 but significantly reduced even a few percent off this ratio. The in-plane lattice is nearly coherent with that of the Ge substrate, while the approximately 2% lattice mismatch is accommodated by the out-of-plane tetragonal strain. Furthermore, the quantitative MEAD analysis reveals no detectable amount (<0.5%) of Co-Mn site swapping, but instead high levels (26%) of Mn-Ge site swapping. Increasing Ge concentration above the Heusler stoichiometry (Co 0.5 Mn 0.25 Ge 0.25 ) is shown to correlate with increased lattice vacancies, antisites, and stacking faults, but reduced lattice relaxation. The highest degree of chemical ordering is observed off the Heusler stoichiometry with a Ge enrichment of 5 at.%.« less

  15. Measurement of the W Gamma --> mu nu gamma Cross-Section, Limits on Anomalous Trilinear Vector Boson Couplings, and the Radiation Amplitude Zero in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askew, Andrew Warren

    2004-11-01

    This thesis details the measurement of the p{bar p} {yields} W{gamma} + X {yields} {mu}{nu}{gamma} + X cross section at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the D0 detector at Fermilab, in 134.5 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. From the photon E{sub T} spectrum limits on anomalous couplings of the photon to the W are obtained. At 95% confidence level, limits of -1.05 < {Delta}{kappa} < 1.04 for {lambda} = 0 and -0.28 < {lambda} < 0.27 for {Delta}{kappa} = 0 are obtained on the anomalous coupling parameters. The charge signed rapidity difference from the data is displayed, and its significance discussed.

  16. Search for anomalous single top quark production in association with a photon in pp collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-06

    We found the results of a search for flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) through single top quark production in association with a photon is presented. The study is based on proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.8 fb-1. The search for tγ events where t → Wb andW → μn is conducted in final states with a muon, a photon, at least one hadronic jet with at most one being consistent with originating from a bottom quark, and missing transverse momentum.more » Furthermore, there was no evidence of single top quark production in association with a photon through a FCNC is observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the tug and tcg anomalous couplings and translated into upper limits on the branching fraction of the FCNC top quark decays: B(t → uγ) < 1.3 x 10-4 and B(t →cγ) < 1.7 x 10-3. Upper limits are also set on the cross section of associated tγ production in a restricted phase-space region. These are the most stringent limits currently available.« less

  17. Search for anomalous single top quark production in association with a photon in pp collisions at √(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-11-13

    We found the results of a search for flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) through single top quark production in association with a photon is presented. The study is based on proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV using data collected with the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.8 fb-1. The search for tγ events where t → Wb andW → μn is conducted in final states with a muon, a photon, at least one hadronic jet with at most one being consistent with originating from a bottom quark, and missing transverse momentum. Furthermore, there was no evidence of single top quark production in association with a photon through a FCNC is observed. Upper limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the tug and tcg anomalous couplings and translated into upper limits on the branching fraction of the FCNC top quark decays: B(t → uγ) < 1.3 x 10-4 and B(t →cγ) < 1.7 x 10-3. Upper limits are also set on the cross section of associated tγ production in a restricted phase-space region. These are the most stringent limits currently available.

  18. WW production cross section measurement and limits on anomalous trilinear gauge couplings at sqrt(s) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooke, Michael P.; /Rice U.

    2008-04-01

    The cross section for WW production is measured and limits on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ trilinear gauge couplings are set using WW {yields} ee/e{mu}/{mu}{mu} events collected by the Run II D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. Across the three final states, 108 candidate events are observed with 40.8 {+-} 3.8 total background expected, consistent with {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WW) = 11.6 {+-} 1.8(stat) {+-} 0.7(syst) {+-} 0.7(lumi) pb. Using a set of SU(2){sub L} {direct_product} U(1){sub Y} conserving constraints, the one-dimensional 95% C.L. limits on trilinear gauge couplings are -0.63 < {Delta}{kappa}{sub {gamma}} < 0.99, -0.15 < {lambda}{sub {gamma}} < 0.19, and -0.14 < {Delta}g{sub 1}{sup Z} < 0.34.

  19. A TALE OF THREE GALAXIES: ANOMALOUS DUST PROPERTIES IN IRASF10398+1455, IRASF210130739, AND SDSSJ0808+3948

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Yanxia; Hao, Lei; Li, Aigen

    2014-10-20

    On a galactic scale, the 9.7 ?m silicate emission is usually only seen in type 1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs). They usually also display a flat emission continuum at ?5-8 ?m and the absence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission bands. In contrast, starburst galaxies, luminous infrared (IR) galaxies, and ultraluminous IR galaxies exhibit a red 5-8 ?m emission continuum, strong 9.7 ?m and 18 ?m silicate absorption features, and strong PAH emission bands. Here, we report the detection of anomalous dust properties by the Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph in three galaxies (IRASF10398+1455, IRASF21013-0739, and SDSSJ0808+3948) which are characterized by the simultaneous detection of a red 5-8 ?m emission continuum, the 9.7 and 18 ?m silicate emission features, as well as strong PAH emission bands. These apparently contradictory dust IR emission properties are discussed in terms of iron-poor silicate composition, carbon dust deficit, small grain size, and low dust temperature in the young AGN phase of these three galaxies.

  20. Limits on Anomalous Trilinear Gauge Couplings in $Z\\gamma$ Events from $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    Using Z{gamma} candidate events collected by the CDF detector at the Tevatron Collider, we search for potential anomalous (non-standard-model) couplings between the Z boson and the photon. At the hard scatter energies typical of the Tevatron, standard model Z{gamma} couplings are too weak to be detected by current experiments; hence any evidence of couplings indicates new physics. Measurements are performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb{sup -1} in the Z {yields} {nu}{bar {nu}} decay channel and 5.1 fb{sup -1} in the Z {yields} l{sup +}l{sup -} (l = {mu}, e) decay channels. The combination of these measurements provides the most stringent limits to date on Z{gamma} trilinear gauge couplings. Using an energy scale of {Lambda} = 1.5 TeV to allow for a direct comparison with previous measurements, we find limits on the CP-conserving parameters that describe Z{gamma} couplings to be |h{sub 3}{sup {gamma},Z}| < 0.017 and |h{sub 4}{sup {gamma},Z}| < 0.0006. These results are consistent with standard model predictions.

  1. Disorder-induced anomalously signed Hall effect in crystalline GeTe/Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} superlattice-like materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tong, H.; Yu, N. N.; Yang, Z.; Cheng, X. M.; Miao, X. S.

    2015-08-21

    Opposite to the almost persistent p-type conductivity of the crystalline chalcogenides along the GeTe-Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} tie line, n-type Hall mobility is observed in crystalline GeTe/Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} superlattice-like material (SLL) with a short period length. We suggest that this unusual carrier characteristic originates from the structural disorder introduced by the lattice strain and dangling bonds at the SLL interfaces, which makes the crystalline SLLs behave like the amorphous chalcogenides. Detailed structural disorder in crystalline SLL has been studied by Raman scattering, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, as well as Variable-energy positron annihilation spectroscopy measurements. First-principles calculations results show that this structural disorder gives rise to three-site junctions that dominate the charge transport as the period length decreases and result in the anomalously signed Hall effect in the crystalline SLL. Our findings indicate a similar tetrahedral structure in the amorphous and crystalline states of SLLs, which can significantly reduce the entropy difference. Due to the reduced entropy loss and increased resistivity of crystalline phase introduced by disorder, it is not surprising that the SLLs exhibit extremely lower RESET current and power consumption.

  2. Role of pressure in understanding the anomalous superconductivity in europium (molybdenum)/sub 6/(sulfur)/sub 8/ and (TMTSF)/sub 2/FSO/sub 3/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, S.A.; Huang, C.Y.; Lacoe, R.C.; Chaikin, P.M.; Fuller, W.W.; Luo, H.L.; Wudl, F.

    1983-01-01

    Both the Chevrel phase compound EuMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/ and the organic material, (TMTSF)/sub 2/FSO/sub 3/ are superconducting only under moderate pressure. In both instances the absence of superconductivity at ambient pressure is directly attributed to a low temperature structural distortion that introduces a gap over all or part of the Fermi surface. The role of pressure is to suppress the transition and thus allow the electrons to condense into the superconducting state. In EuMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/, details of the pressure dependence of both the structural and superconducting transition have been explained on the basis of a competition between a charge density wave-type state and superconductivity. In the case of (TMTSF)/sub 2/FSO/sub 3/ an anion ordering giving rise to a metal-insulator transition is responsible for suppressing superconductivity. The critical magnetic fields of EuMo/sub 6/S/sub 8/ are extremely anomalous and are related to the magnetism of the Eu as well as the structure of the compound.

  3. Anomalous scaling of Δ C versus T c in the Fe-based superconductors: the $${S}_{\\pm }$$-wave pairing state model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bang, Yunkyu; Stewart, G. R.

    2016-02-01

    The strong power law behavior of the specific heat jumpmore » $${\\rm{\\Delta }}C\\;$$ versus T c $$({\\rm{\\Delta }}C/{T}_{{\\rm{c}}}\\sim {T}_{{\\rm{c}}}^{\\alpha },\\alpha \\approx 2)$$, first observed by Bud'ko et al (2009 Phys. Rev. B 79 220516), has been confirmed with several families of the Fe-based superconducting compounds with various dopings. We tested a minimal two band BCS model to understand this anomalous behavior and showed that this non-BCS relation between $${\\rm{\\Delta }}C\\;$$ versus T c is a generic property of the multiband superconducting state paired by a dominant interband interaction ($${V}_{\\mathrm{inter}}\\gt {V}_{\\mathrm{intra}}$$) reflecting the relation $$\\frac{{{\\rm{\\Delta }}}_{{\\rm{h}}}}{{{\\rm{\\Delta }}}_{{\\rm{e}}}}\\sim \\sqrt{\\frac{{N}_{{\\rm{e}}}}{{N}_{{\\rm{h}}}}}$$ near T c, as in the $${S}_{\\pm }$$-wave pairing state. We also found that this $${\\rm{\\Delta }}C\\;$$ versus T c power law can continuously change from the ideal BNC scaling to a considerable deviation by a moderate variation of the impurity scattering rate $${{\\rm{\\Gamma }}}_{0}$$ (non-pair-breaking). Finally, as a result, our model provides a consistent explanation why the electron-doped Fe-based superconductors follow the ideal BNC scaling very well while the hole-doped systems often show varying degree of deviations.« less

  4. Search for anomalous production of multi-lepton events in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; /Taiwan, Inst. Phys. /Argonne /Barcelona, IFAE /Baylor U. /INFN, Bologna /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara

    2007-01-01

    The authors report a search for the anomalous production of events with multiple charged leptons in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 346 pb{sup -1} collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The search is divided into three-lepton and four-or-more-lepton data samples. They observe six events in the three-lepton sample and zero events in the {ge}4-lepton sample. Both numbers of events are consistent with standard model background expectations. Within the framework of an R-parity violating supergravity model, the results are interpreted as mass limits on the lightest neutralino ({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) and chargino ({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) particles. For one particular choice of model parameters, the limits are M({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup 0}) > 110 GeV/c{sup 2} and M({bar {chi}}{sub 1}{sup {+-}}) > 203 GeV/c{sup 2} at 95% confidence level; the variation of these mass limits with model parameters is presented.

  5. Search for anomalous quartic WWγγ couplings in dielectron and missing energy final states in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2013-07-29

    We present a search for anomalous components of the quartic gauge boson coupling WWγγ in events with an electron, a positron and missing transverse energy. The analyzed data correspond to 9.7 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector in pp̄ collisions at s√=1.96 TeV. The presence of anomalous quartic gauge couplings would manifest itself as an excess of boosted WW events. No such excess is found in the data, and we set the most stringent limits to date on the anomalous coupling parameters aW0 and aWC. When a form factor with Λcutoff=0.5 TeV is used, the observed uppermore » limits at 95% C.L. are |aW0/Λ²|<0.0025 GeV⁻² and |aWC/Λ²|<0.0092 GeV⁻².« less

  6. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ cross section in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV and limits on anomalous gauge couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-14

    A measurement of the W boson pair production cross section in proton-proton collisions at √ s = 8 TeV is presented. The data we collected with the CMS detector at the LHC correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.4 fb-1 . The W+W- candidates are selected from events with two charged leptons, electrons or muons, and large missing transverse energy. The measured W+W- cross section is 60.1 ± 0.9 (stat) ± 3.2 (exp) ± 3.1 (theo) ± 1.6 (lumi) pb = 60.1 ± 4.8 pb, consistent with the standard model prediction. The W+W-cross sections are also measured in two different fiducial phase space regions. The normalized differential cross section is measured as a function of kinematic variables of the final-state charged leptons and compared with several perturbative QCD predictions. Limits on anomalous gauge couplings associated with dimension-six operators are also given in the framework of an effective field theory. Finally, the corresponding 95% confidence level intervals are -5.7 < cWWW2 < 5.9 TeV-2 , -11.4 < cW2 < 5.4 TeV-2 , -29.2 < cB2 < 23.9 TeV-2 , in the HISZ basis.

  7. Rb+ adsorption at the quartz(101)-aqueous interface: comparison of resonant anomalous x-ray reflectivity with ab initio calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellucci, Francesco; Lee, Sang Soo; Kubicki, James D.; Bandura, Andrei V.; Zhang, Zhan; Wesolowski, David J.; Fenter, Paul

    2015-01-01

    We study adsorption of Rb+ to the quartz(101)–aqueous interface at room temperature with specular X-ray reflectivity, resonant anomalous X-ray reflectivity, and density functional theory. The interfacial water structures observed in deionized water and 10 mM RbCl solution at pH 9.8 were similar, having a first water layer at height of 1.7 ± 0.1 Å above the quartz surface and a second layer at 4.8 ± 0.1 Å and 3.9 ± 0.8 Å for the water and RbCl solutions, respectively. The adsorbed Rb+ distribution is broad and consists of presumed inner-sphere (IS) and outer-sphere (OS) complexes at heights of 1.8 ± 0.1 and 6.4 ± 1.0 Å, respectively. Projector-augmented planewave density functional theory (DFT) calculations of potential configurations for neutral and negatively charged quartz(101) surfaces at pH 7 and 12, respectively, reveal a water structure in agreement with experimental results. These DFT calculations also show differences in adsorbed speciation of Rb+ between these two conditions. At pH 7, the lowest energy structure shows that Rb+ adsorbs dominantly as an IS complex, whereas at pH 12 IS and OS complexes have equivalent energies. The DFT results at pH 12 are generally consistent with the two site Rb distribution observed from the X-ray data at pH 9.8, albeit with some differences that are discussed. In conclusion, surface charge estimated on the basis of the measured total Rb+ coverage was -0.11 C/m2, in good agreement with the range of the surface charge magnitudes reported in the literature.

  8. Anomalous change detection in imagery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Theiler, James P.; Perkins, Simon J.

    2011-05-31

    A distribution-based anomaly detection platform is described that identifies a non-flat background that is specified in terms of the distribution of the data. A resampling approach is also disclosed employing scrambled resampling of the original data with one class specified by the data and the other by the explicit distribution, and solving using binary classification.

  9. Determination of the normal and anomalous hall effect coefficients in ferromagnetic Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15-x}Si{sub x} Heusler alloys at the martensitic transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Granovskii, A. B. Prudnikov, V. N.; Kazakov, A. P.; Zhukov, A. P.; Dubenko, I. S.

    2012-11-15

    The magnetization, the electrical resistivity, the magnetoresistance, and the Hall resistivity of Ni{sub 50}Mn{sub 35}In{sub 15-x}Si{sub x} (x = 1.0, 3.0, 4.0) Heusler alloys are studied at T = 80-320 K. The martensitic transformation in these alloys occurs at T = 220-280 K from the high-temperature ferromagnetic austenite phase into the low-temperature martensite phase having a substantially lower magnetization. A method is proposed to determine the normal and anomalous Hall effect coefficients in the presence of magnetoresistance and a possible magnetization dependence of these coefficients. The resistivity of the alloys increases jumpwise during the martensitic transformation, reaches 150-200 {mu}{Omega} cm, and is almost temperature-independent. The normal Hall effect coefficient is negative, is higher than that of nickel by an order of magnitude at T = 80 K, decreases monotonically with increasing temperature, approaches zero in austenite, and does not undergo sharp changes in the vicinity of the martensitic transformation. At x = 3, a normal Hall effect nonlinear in magnetization is detected in the immediate vicinity of the martensitic transformation. The temperature dependences of the anomalous Hall effect coefficient in both martensite and austenite and, especially, in the vicinity of the martensitic transformation cannot be described in terms of the skew scattering, the side jump, and the Karplus-Lutinger mechanisms from the anomalous Hall effect theory. The possible causes of this behavior of the magnetotransport properties in Heusler alloys are discussed.

  10. Determination of the optical properties of La2-xBaxCuO₄ for several dopings, including the anomalous x=1/8 phase

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Homes, C. C.; Hücker, M.; Li, Q.; Xu, Z. J.; Wen, J. S.; Gu, G. D.; Tranquada, J. M.

    2012-04-11

    The optical properties of single crystals of the high-temperature superconductor La2-xBaxCuO₄ have been measured over a wide frequency and temperature range for light polarized in the a-b planes and along the c axis. Three different Ba concentrations have been examined, x=0.095 with a critical temperature Tc=32 K, x=0.125 where the superconductivity is dramatically weakened with Tc≅2.4 K, and x=0.145 with Tc≅24 K. The in-plane behavior of the optical conductivity for these materials at high temperature is described by a Drude-like response with a scattering rate that decreases with temperature. Below Tc in the x=0.095 and 0.145 materials there is amore » clear signature of the formation of a superconducting state in the optical properties allowing the superfluid density (ρs0) and the penetration depth to be determined. In the anomalous 1/8 phase, some spectral weight shifts from lower to higher frequency (≳300 cm⁻¹) on cooling below the spin-ordering temperature Tso≅42 K, associated with the onset of spin-stripe order; we discuss alternative interpretations in terms of a conventional density-wave gap versus the response to pair-density-wave superconductivity. The two dopings for which a superconducting response is observed both fall on the universal scaling line ρs0/8≅4.4σdcTc, which is consistent with the observation of strong dissipation within the a-b planes. The optical properties for light polarized along the c axis reveal an insulating character dominated by lattice vibrations, superimposed on a weak electronic background. No Josephson plasma edge is observed in the low-frequency reflectance along the c axis for x=1/8; however, sharp plasma edges are observed for x=0.095 and 0.145 below Tc.« less

  11. Anomalous C-V response correlated to relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} thin film based-metal-insulator-metal capacitor: Effect of titanium and oxygen defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahouli, A.; Marichy, C.; Pinna, N.

    2015-04-21

    Capacitance-voltage (C–V) and capacitance-frequency (C–f) measurements are performed on atomic layer deposited TiO{sub 2} thin films with top and bottom Au and Pt electrodes, respectively, over a large temperature and frequency range. A sharp capacitance peak/discontinuity (C–V anomalous) is observed in the C–V characteristics at various temperatures and voltages. It is demonstrated that this phenomenon is directly associated with oxygen vacancies. The C–V peak irreversibility and dissymmetry at the reversal dc voltage are attributed to difference between the Schottky contacts at the metal/TiO{sub 2} interfaces. Dielectric analyses reveal two relaxation processes with degeneration of the activation energy. The low trap level of 0.60–0.65 eV is associated with the first ionized oxygen vacancy at low temperature, while the deep trap level of 1.05 eV is associated to the second ionized oxygen vacancy at high temperature. The DC conductivity of the films exhibits a transition temperature at 200 °C, suggesting a transition from a conduction regime governed by ionized oxygen vacancies to one governed by interstitial Ti{sup 3+} ions. Both the C–V anomalous and relaxation processes in TiO{sub 2} arise from oxygen vacancies, while the conduction mechanism at high temperature is governed by interstitial titanium ions.

  12. The study of pinch regimes based on radiation-enhanced compression and anomalous resistivity phenomena and their effects on hard x-ray emission in a Mather type dense plasma focus device (SABALAN2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piriaei, D.; Javadi, S.; Ghoranneviss, M.; Mahabadi, T. D.; Saw, S. H.; Lee, S.

    2015-12-15

    In this study, by using argon and nitrogen as the filling gases in a Mather type dense plasma focus device at different values of pressure and charging voltage, two different kinds of pinch regimes were observed for each of the gases. The physics of the pinch regimes could be explained by using the two versions of the Lee's computational model which predicted each of the scenarios and clarified their differences between the two gases according to the radiation-enhanced compression and, additionally, predicted the pinch regimes through the anomalous resistivity effect during the pinch time. This was accomplished through the fitting process (simulation) on the current signal. Moreover, the characteristic amplitude and time scales of the anomalous resistances were obtained. The correlations between the features of the plasma current dip and the emitted hard x-ray pulses were observed. The starting time, intensity, duration, and the multiple or single feature of the emitted hard x-ray strongly correlated to the same respective features of the current dip.

  13. Measurement of the $W^+W^-$ Production Cross Section and Search for Anomalous $WW\\gamma$ and $WWZ$ Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2009-12-01

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the W boson pair production cross section and most sensitive test of anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings in p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The WW candidates are reconstructed from decays containing two charged leptons and two neutrinos, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector from 3.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, a total of 654 candidate events are observed with an expected background contribution of 320 {+-} 47 events. The measured total cross section is {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} + X) = 12.1 {+-} 0.9 (stat){sub -1.4}{sup +1.6} (syst) pb, which is in good agreement with the standard model prediction. The same data sample is used to place constraints on anomalous WW{gamma} and WWZ couplings.

  14. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes...

  15. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION...

  16. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes ...

  17. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION ...

  18. Crystallographic Consulting Brings Research to the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the participating research team (PRT) members at the Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB), which operates five ALS beamlines. As PRT members, companies are...

  19. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION ...

  20. Footprinting Technique Gives ALS Users New Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    left: Research Scientist Sayan Gupta, Beamline 5.3.1 Scientist Rich Celestre, and BCSB Head Corie Ralston. XFP, a powerful technique for the study of macromolecular structures...

  1. Anomalous lattice expansion in yttria stabilized zirconia under simultaneous applied electric and thermal fields: A time-resolved in situ energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry study with an ultrahigh energy synchrotron probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akdogan, E. K.; Savkl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I y Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I ld Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I z, I.; Bicer, H.; Paxton, W.; Toksoy, F.; Tsakalakos, T.; Zhong, Z.

    2013-06-21

    Nonisothermal densification in 8% yttria doped zirconia (8YSZ) particulate matter of 250 nm median particle size was studied under 215 V/cm dc electric field and 9 Degree-Sign C/min heating rate, using time-resolved in-situ high temperature energy dispersive x-ray diffractometry with a polychromatic 200 keV synchrotron probe. Densification occurred in the 876-905 Degree-Sign C range, which resulted in 97% of the theoretical density. No local melting at particle-particle contacts was observed in scanning electron micrographs, implying densification was due to solid state mass transport processes. The maximum current draw at 905 Degree-Sign C was 3 A, corresponding to instantaneous absorbed power density of 570 W/cm{sup 3}. Densification of 8YSZ was accompanied by anomalous elastic volume expansions of the unit cell by 0.45% and 2.80% at 847 Degree-Sign C and 905 Degree-Sign C, respectively. The anomalous expansion at 905 Degree-Sign C at which maximum densification was observed is characterized by three stages: (I) linear stage, (II) anomalous stage, and (III) anelastic recovery stage. The densification in stage I (184 s) and II (15 s) was completed in 199 s, while anelastic relaxation in stage III lasted 130 s. The residual strains ({epsilon}) at room temperature, as computed from tetragonal (112) and (211) reflections, are {epsilon}{sub (112)} = 0.05% and {epsilon}{sub (211)} = 0.13%, respectively. Time dependence of (211) and (112) peak widths ({beta}) show a decrease with both exhibiting a singularity at 905 Degree-Sign C. An anisotropy in (112) and (211) peak widths of {l_brace} {beta}{sub (112)}/{beta}{sub (211)}{r_brace} = (3:1) magnitude was observed. No phase transformation occurred at 905 Degree-Sign C as verified from diffraction spectra on both sides of the singularity, i.e., the unit cell symmetry remains tetragonal. We attribute the reduction in densification temperature and time to ultrafast ambipolar diffusion of species arising from the

  2. Z(gamma) production and limits on anomalous ZZ(gamma) and Z(gamma gamma) couplings in p(p)over-bar collisions at root s 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kobach, A. C.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; et al.

    2012-03-01

    We present a measurement of p{bar p} {yields} Z{sub {gamma}} {yields} {ell}{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{sub {gamma}} ({ell} = e, {mu}) production with a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 6.2 fb{sup -1} collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. The results of the electron and muon channels are combined, and we measure the total production cross section and the differential cross section d{sigma}/dp{sub T}{sup {gamma}}, where p{sub T}{sup {gamma}} is the momentum of the photon in the plane transverse to the beam line. The results obtained are consistent with the standard model predictions from next-to-leading order use ttransverse momentum spectrum of the photon to place limits on anomalous ZZ{gamma} and Z{gamma}{gamma} couplings.

  3. Structural and chemical ordering of Heusler CoxMnyGez epitaxial films on Ge (111). Quantitative study using traditional and anomalous x-ray diffraction techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, B. A.; Chu, Y.; He, L.; Haskel, D.; Tsui, F.

    2015-12-14

    We found that epitaxial films of CoxMnyGez grown on Ge (111) substrates by molecular-beam-epitaxy techniques have been investigated as a continuous function of composition using combinatorial synchrotron x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy techniques. A high-resolution ternary epitaxial phase diagram is obtained, revealing a small number of structural phases stabilized over large compositional regions. Ordering of the constituent elements in the compositional region near the full Heusler alloy Co2MnGe has been examined in detail using both traditional XRD and a new multiple-edge anomalous diffraction (MEAD) technique. Multiple-edge anomalous diffraction involves analyzing the energy dependence of multiple reflections across each constituent absorption edge in order to detect and quantify the elemental distribution of occupation in specific lattice sites. Results of this paper show that structural and chemical ordering are very sensitive to the Co : Mn atomic ratio, such that the ordering is the highest at an atomic ratio of 2 but significantly reduced even a few percent off this ratio. The in-plane lattice is nearly coherent with that of the Ge substrate, while the approximately 2% lattice mismatch is accommodated by the out-of-plane tetragonal strain. Furthermore, the quantitative MEAD analysis reveals no detectable amount (<0.5%) of Co-Mn site swapping, but instead high levels (26%) of Mn-Ge site swapping. Increasing Ge concentration above the Heusler stoichiometry (Co 0.5 Mn 0.25 Ge 0.25 ) is shown to correlate with increased lattice vacancies, antisites, and stacking faults, but reduced lattice relaxation. The highest degree of chemical ordering is observed off the Heusler stoichiometry with a Ge enrichment of 5 at.%.

  4. Beamline 4.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4.2.2 Print Molecular Biology Consortium Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5,500-16,000eV Monochromator Rosenbaum-Rock Si(111) sagitally focused monochromator Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 photons/s at 12 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 with Si(111) crystals Endstations Minihutch Detectors

  5. Beamline 4.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4.2.2 Print Molecular Biology Consortium Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5,500-16,000eV Monochromator Rosenbaum-Rock Si(111) sagitally focused monochromator Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 photons/s at 12 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 with Si(111) crystals Endstations Minihutch Detectors

  6. Beamline 4.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4.2.2 Print Molecular Biology Consortium Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5,500-16,000eV Monochromator Rosenbaum-Rock Si(111) sagitally focused monochromator Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 photons/s at 12 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 with Si(111) crystals Endstations Minihutch Detectors

  7. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  8. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  9. Beamline 4.2.2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4.2.2 Print Molecular Biology Consortium Multiple-Wavelength Anomalous Diffraction (MAD) and Macromolecular Crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend Energy range 5,500-16,000eV Monochromator Rosenbaum-Rock Si(111) sagitally focused monochromator Calculated flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 photons/s at 12 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 with Si(111) crystals Endstations Minihutch Detectors

  10. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  11. Beamline 8.3.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Multiple-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and macromolecular crystallography (MX) Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics Superbend magnet (5.0 tesla, single pole) Energy range 5-17 keV (1% max flux) Monochromator Double flat crystal, Si(111) Measured flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 2.5 x 1011 at 11 keV Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7,000 Divergence (max at sample) 3.0 (h) x 0.35 (v) mrad Endstations Minihutch Detectors 3 x 3

  12. Anomalous energy transport across topological insulator superconductor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2013-04-15 OSTI Identifier: 1102080 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 87; ...

  13. Anomalous response of stratified fluid to forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingel, L. Kh.

    2006-01-15

    The time-independent disturbances induced by nonuniformly distributed surface shear stress in a binary fluid (salt water) are analyzed in the linear approximation. It is shown that correct treatment of two scalar fields (stratified background temperature and salinity distributions) may lead to counterintuitive qualitative predictions even if the thermal and salt diffusivities are equal. In particular, when stable salinity stratification is imposed on stable temperature stratification, both the amplitude and depth of the disturbance may substantially increase rather than decrease (contrary to intuitive expectations). A previously unknown mechanism of convective instability is revealed for a stable density-stratified binary fluid.

  14. Broken Scale Invariance and Anomalous Dimensions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Wilson, K. G.

    1970-05-01

    Mack and Kastrup have proposed that broken scale invariance is a symmetry of strong interactions. There is evidence from the Thirring model and perturbation theory that the dimensions of fields defined by scale transformations will be changed by the interaction from their canonical values. We review these ideas and their consequences for strong interactions.

  15. Anomalous liquid scintillation counting of chromium-51

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charig, A.; Blake-Haskins, J.; Eigen, E.

    1985-12-01

    Unusual behavior of chromium-51 in liquid scintillation cocktail is described. Rapidly declining count rate is attributed to first-order binding of chromate to glass vials.

  16. Footprinting Technique Gives ALS Users New Insights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    formation. The ALS XFP experts at Beamline 5.3.1. From left: Research Scientist Sayan Gupta, Beamline 5.3.1 Scientist Rich Celestre, and BCSB Head Corie Ralston. XFP, a powerful...

  17. Combined search for anomalous pseudoscalar HVV couplings in VH...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... with a definition of the coordinate system used and the relevant kinematic ... background samples to assess the system- atic uncertainty related to event ...

  18. The mystery of milk: SAXS, anomalous SAXS, and resonant soft...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Bridget Ingham, Callaghan Innovation (Wellington, New Zealand) Program Description Most of the dietary calcium in milk is contained...

  19. Anomalous electronic structure and magnetoresistance in TaAs2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Luo, Yongkang; McDonald, R. D.; Rosa, P. F. S.; Scott, B.; Wakeham, N.; Ghimire, N. J.; Bauer, E. D.; Thompson, J. D.; Ronning, F.

    2016-06-07

    We report that the change in resistance of a material in a magnetic field reflects its electronic state. In metals with weakly- or non-interacting electrons, the resistance typically increases upon the application of a magnetic field. In contrast, negative magnetoresistance may appear under some circumstances, e.g., in metals with anisotropic Fermi surfaces or with spin-disorder scattering and semimetals with Dirac or Weyl electronic structures. Here we show that the non-magnetic semimetal TaAs2 possesses a very large negative magnetoresistance, with an unknown scattering mechanism. In conclusion, density functional calculations find that TaAs2 is a new topological semimetal [Z2 invariant (0;111)] withoutmore » Dirac dispersion, demonstrating that a negative magnetoresistance in non-magnetic semimetals cannot be attributed uniquely to the Adler-Bell-Jackiw chiral anomaly of bulk Dirac/Weyl fermions.« less

  20. Neutron diffraction study and anomalous negative thermal expansion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    does not result in the emergence of superconductivity or any other new ground state. ... results suggest that the absence of superconductivity in these materials could be related ...

  1. Anomalous transient uplift observed at the Lop Nor, China nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My Library Send to Email Send to Email Email address: Content: Close Send Cite: MLA Format Close Cite: ...

  2. Edge State Induced Andreev Oscillation in Quantum Anomalous Hall...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Close Cite: Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for ...

  3. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher: American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text ...

  4. Engineering quantum anomalous/valley Hall states in graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2011-11-15 OSTI Identifier: 1101181 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 84; ...

  5. Anomalous grain growth in the surface region of a nanocrystalline...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC05-76RL01830 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, 85(21):Article No. ...

  6. Understanding the dramatic role of anomalous dispersion on the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: SPIE International Symposium on Optics and ... FREE ELECTRON LASERS; INTERFEROMETERS; OPTICS; PHOTONS; PLASMA; PROBES; REFRACTIVE ...

  7. Anomalous transient uplift observed at the Lop Nor, China nuclear...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Save Share this Record Citation Formats MLA APA Chicago Bibtex Export Metadata Endnote Excel CSV XML Save to My ...

  8. Anomalous response of superconducting titanium nitride resonators to terahertz radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bueno, J. Baselmans, J. J. A; Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Zheng, G.; Visser, P. J. de; Klapwijk, T. M.; Driessen, E. F. C.; Doyle, S.

    2014-11-10

    We present an experimental study of kinetic inductance detectors (KIDs) fabricated of atomic layer deposited TiN films and characterized at radiation frequencies of 350 GHz. The responsivity to radiation is measured and found to increase with the increase in radiation powers, opposite to what is expected from theory and observed for hybrid niobium titanium nitride/aluminium (NbTiN/Al) and all-aluminium (all-Al) KIDs. The noise is found to be independent of the level of the radiation power. The noise equivalent power improves with higher radiation powers, also opposite to what is observed and well understood for hybrid NbTiN/Al and all-Al KIDs. We suggest that an inhomogeneous state of these disordered superconductors should be used to explain these observations.

  9. Anomalous Density Properties and Ion Solvation in Liquid Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to a number of fields, ranging from biologybiochemistry to energy storage and electrochemistry. Several key properties of water, are crucial for understanding and predicting...

  10. Structure solution with weak anomalous data (Technical Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Sponsoring Org: NIH Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological ...

  11. Anomalous dielectric relaxation of water confined in graphite oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Ji; Tian, Yuchen; Gu, Min; Tang, Tong B.

    2015-09-28

    Nonmonotonic thermal dependence of dielectric relaxation of water has been observed in hydrated graphite oxide (GO). Graphite oxide prepared via Hummers method then imbued with specific water contents were characterized, with {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, ambient- and variable-temperature X-ray diffractometries, as well as thermogravimetric analysis. Pressed pellets provided with either conducting or blocking electrodes yielded dielectric loss, which was shown to originate from dielectric relaxation of the confined water. Three relaxation processes were observed in impedance spectroscopy. Our previous work has identified two different types of water in GO, namely, intercalated water and water in inter-grain voids. P{sub 1} expresses the reorientation of water confined inside inter-grain voids, and P{sub 2}, the rotation of intercalated water molecules confined in interlayers. The present work reveals a new process P{sub 3}, which also relates to intercalated water. It slows down with temperature, and this apparent anomaly is explained by the decrease in water content and consequent narrowing of interlayer spacing in graphite oxide, as confirmed by characterization techniques. The present study should contribute to our understanding of surface water dynamics.

  12. Origin of anomalous Xe-H in nanodiamond stardust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kratz, K. L.; Farouqi, K.; Hallmann, O.; Pfeiffer, B.; Ott, U.

    2014-05-09

    Still today, the nucleosynthesis origin of Xe-H in presolar nanodiamonds is far from understood. Historically possible explanations were proposed by a secondary neutron-burst process occurring in the He- or C/O-shells of a type-II supernova (SN-II), which are, however, not fully convincing in terms of modern nucleosynthesis conditions. Therefore, we have investigated Xe isotopic abundance features that may be diagnostic for different versions of a classical, primary r-process in high-entropy-wind (HEW) ejecta of core-collapse SN-II. We report here on parameter tests for non-standard r-process variants, by varying electron abundances (Y{sub e}), ranges of entropies (S) and expansion velocities (V{sub exp}) with their correlated neutron-freezeout times (?(freeze)) and temperatures (T{sub 9}(freeze)). From this study, we conclude that a best fi to the measured Xe-H abundance ratios {sup i}Xe/{sup 136}Xe can be obtained with the high-S main component of a cold r-process variant.

  13. Impact of anomalous dispersion on the interferometer measurements...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We validate the average-atom code against the more detailed OPAL code for carbon and aluminum plasmas. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other sources will be ...

  14. Anomalous Zeeman response of the coexisting superconducting and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Date: 2011-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 1099678 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 83; Journal...

  15. Anomalous compression behavior of germanium during phase transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Xiaozhi; Tan, Dayong; Ren, Xiangting; Yang, Wenge E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn; He, Duanwei E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2015-04-27

    In this article, we present the abnormal compression and plastic behavior of germanium during the pressure-induced cubic diamond to β-tin structure transition. Between 8.6 GPa and 13.8 GPa, in which pressure range both phases are co-existing, first softening and followed by hardening for both phases were observed via synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. These unusual behaviors can be interpreted as the volume misfit between different phases. Following Eshelby, the strain energy density reaches the maximum in the middle of the transition zone, where the switch happens from softening to hardening. Insight into these mechanical properties during phase transformation is relevant for the understanding of plasticity and compressibility of crystal materials when different phases coexist during a phase transition.

  16. Top quark anomalous couplings at the International Linear Collider...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2011-08-17 OSTI Identifier: 1100572 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 84; ...

  17. Anomalous dimensions of the double parton fragmentation functions...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publication Date: 2013-04-23 OSTI Identifier: 1102128 Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Physical Review D Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 87; ...

  18. Anomalous softening of yield strength in tantalum at high pressures...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with previous results obtained by the pressure gradient method and shock wave experiments. ... National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, ...

  19. Anomalous distribution of microearthquakes in the Newberry Geothermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 63; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2016-06-26 20:29:56; Journal ID: ISSN 0375-6505 Publisher: Elsevier ...

  20. Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to a precision of approximately 1% for each of two choices of beam polarization. ... INTERMEDIATE BOSONS; LINEAR COLLIDERS; POLARIZATION; PROBES; QUARKS; SILICON; SIMULATION; ...

  1. Anomalous Dimensions and Non-Gaussianity (Journal Article) |...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ... Authors: Green, Daniel ; Lewandowski, Matthew ; Senatore, Leonardo ; Silverstein, Eva ; ...

  2. Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text Accepted...

  3. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text Accepted...

  4. Combined search for anomalous pseudoscalar HVV couplings in VH...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bosons V ( W or Z) in a sample of proton-proton collision events corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.9 fb-1 at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV is presented. ...

  5. Testing of the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (x D eff ) resulted in a wide variation in Q ext values, posing a challenging test of theory. Using a photon-tunneling factor around 0.6, the mean difference between...

  6. Anomalous transport theory for the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry, P.W.; Hegna, C.C; Sovinec, C.R.

    1996-09-01

    Physically motivated transport models with predictive capabilities and significance beyond the reversed field pinch (RFP) are presented. It is shown that the ambipolar constrained electron heat loss observed in MST can be quantitatively modeled by taking account of the clumping in parallel streaming electrons and the resultant self-consistent interaction with collective modes; that the discrete dynamo process is a relaxation oscillation whose dependence on the tearing instability and profile relaxation physics leads to amplitude and period scaling predictions consistent with experiment; that the Lundquist number scaling in relaxed plasmas driven by magnetic turbulence has a weak S{sup {minus}1/4} scaling; and that radial E{times}B shear flow can lead to large reductions in the edge particle flux with little change in the heat flux, as observed in the RFP and tokamak. 24 refs.

  7. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Dolan, K.W.; Perkins, D.E.

    1995-08-22

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation is disclosed. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features. 1 fig.

  8. Emissivity corrected infrared method for imaging anomalous structural heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, Nancy K.; Durbin, Philip F.; Dolan, Kenneth W.; Perkins, Dwight E.

    1995-01-01

    A method for detecting flaws in structures using dual band infrared radiation. Heat is applied to the structure being evaluated. The structure is scanned for two different wavelengths and data obtained in the form of images. Images are used to remove clutter to form a corrected image. The existence and nature of a flaw is determined by investigating a variety of features.

  9. 24th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference. Book of abstracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    This report contains abstracts on topics in the following areas: parametric instabilities; hohlraum physics; laser plasma physics with short pulses; and rayleigh-taylor instability and hydrodynamics.

  10. Anomalously large isotope effect in the glass transition of water

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gainaru, Catalin; Agapov, Alexander L.; Fuentes-Landete, Violeta; Amann-Winkel, Katrin; Nelson, Helge; Köster, Karsten W.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Novikov, Vladimir N.; Richert, Ranko; Böhmer, Roland; et al

    2014-11-24

    Here we present the discovery of an unusually large isotope effect in the structural relaxation and the glass transition temperature Tg of water. Dielectric relaxation spectroscopy of low-density as well as of vapor deposited amorphous water reveal Tg differences of 10±2K between H2O and D2O, sharply contrasting with other hydrogen bonded liquids for which H/D exchange increases Tg by typically less than 1K. We show that the large isotope effect and the unusual variation of relaxation times in water at low temperatures can be explained in terms of quantum effects. Thus, our findings shed new light on water's peculiar low-temperaturemore » dynamics and the possible role of quantum effects in its structural relaxation, and possibly in dynamics of other low molecular weight liquids.« less

  11. Center for Inverse Design Highlight: Anomalous Surface Conductivity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    O 3 ) films grown by pulsed laser deposition. This desirable, but unexpected, effect produces conductivities at the surface comparable to intentionally doped commercial materials. ...

  12. Demonstration of anomalous heat from the cold fusion effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storms, E.

    1995-12-01

    Heat production by an unexpected process is the most challenging aspect of the {open_quotes}cold fusion{close_quotes} phenomenon to accept. Many studies have been done in ways that invite criticism and easy rejection. A few recent studies have attempted to eliminate obvious errors and, thereby, reduce the ease of rejection. In addition, several of these studies have revealed important variables related to improving reproducibility. This paper will describe heat measurements done at the Los Alamos National Laboratory using a closed, pressurized, stirred calorimeter having two independent methods of calibration. Results using several batches of palladium are discussed in terms of those characteristics that lead to reproducibility using the electrolytic loading technique.

  13. Top Quark Anomalous Couplings at the International Linear Collider...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This process probes the elementary couplings of the top quark to the photon, the Z and the W bosons at a level of precision that is difficult to achieve at hadron colliders. ...

  14. Search for anomalous production of events with a high energy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The level of excess observed in Run I, 16 events with an expectation of 7.6 +- 0.7 ... Language: English Subject: 72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; FERMILAB ...

  15. Anomalous negative electrocaloric effect in a relaxor/normal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Electrical Engineering and Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State ... Type: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Applied Physics Letters ...

  16. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; et al

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitudemore » in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.« less

  17. High-intensity double-pulse X-ray free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinelli, A.; Ratner, D.; Lutman, A. A.; Turner, J.; Welch, J.; Decker, F. J.; Loos, H.; Behrens, C.; Gilevich, S.; Miahnahri, A. A.; Vetter, S.; Maxwell, T. J.; Ding, Y.; Coffee, R.; Wakatsuki, S.; Huang, Z.

    2015-03-06

    The X-ray free-electron laser has opened a new era for photon science, improving the X-ray brightness by ten orders of magnitude over previously available sources. Similar to an optical laser, the spectral and temporal structure of the radiation pulses can be tailored to the specific needs of many experiments by accurately manipulating the lasing medium, that is, the electron beam. Here we report the generation of mJ-level two-colour hard X-ray pulses of few femtoseconds duration with an XFEL driven by twin electron bunches at the Linac Coherent Light Source. This performance represents an improvement of over an order of magnitude in peak power over state-of-the-art two-colour XFELs. The unprecedented intensity and temporal coherence of this new two-colour X-ray free-electron laser enable an entirely new set of scientific applications, ranging from X-ray pump/X-ray probe experiments to the imaging of complex biological samples with multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion.

  18. Anomalous Transport in Sketched Nanostructures at the LaAlO3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher: American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text ...

  19. Berry phase mechanism of the anomalous Hall effect in a disordered...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    interactions and ferromagnetic order and is a potentially useful probe of electron spin polarization, especially in nanoscale systems where direct measurement is not feasible. ...

  20. Direct evidence of anomalous interfacial magnetization in metamagnetic Pd doped FeRh thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bennett, S. P.; Ambaye, H.; Lee, H.; LeClair, P.; Mankey, G. J.; Lauter, V.

    2015-03-16

    Palladium doped iron rhodium is a magnetic material of significant interest for it’s close to room temperature magnetostructural phase transition from antiferromagnetic (AF) to ferromagnetic (FM) ordering. Here we report on the peculiarities of the magnetization distribution in thin films of FeRh(Pd) probed by Polarized Neutron Reflectometry. Remarkably, we’ve found thin interfacial regions with strong magnetization that have unique thermomagnetic properties as compared to the rest of the system. These regions exist at the top and bottom interfaces of the films while the central regions behave similarly to the bulk with a clear AF-FM order transition. Further we explore themore » impact of an additional Pt interlayer introduced in the middle of the FeRh(Pd) film and reveal that it serves to replicate the strong interfacial magnetization found at the top and bottom interfaces. In conclusion, these results are of great value both in understanding the fundamental physics of such an order transition, and in considering FeRh(Pd) for magnetic media and spintronics applications.« less

  1. Molecular ferroelectric contributions to anomalous hysteresis in hybrid perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, Jarvist M.; Butler, Keith T.; Walsh, Aron

    2014-08-01

    We report a model describing the molecular orientation disorder in CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub 3}, solving a classical Hamiltonian parametrised with electronic structure calculations, with the nature of the motions informed by ab initio molecular dynamics. We investigate the temperature and static electric field dependence of the equilibrium ferroelectric (molecular) domain structure and resulting polarisability. A rich domain structure of twinned molecular dipoles is observed, strongly varying as a function of temperature and applied electric field. We propose that the internal electrical fields associated with microscopic polarisation domains contribute to hysteretic anomalies in the current-voltage response of hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells due to variations in electron-hole recombination in the bulk.

  2. Quantum anomalous Hall effect in single-layer and bilayer graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    B Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 83; Journal Issue: 15; Journal ID: ISSN 1098-0121 Publisher: American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of...

  3. A Numerical Investigation into the Anomalous Slight NOx Increase when Burning Biodiesel: A New (Old) Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ban-Weiss, G A; Chen, J Y; Buchholz, B A; Dibble, R W

    2007-01-30

    Biodiesel is a notable alternative to petroleum derived diesel fuel because it comes from natural domestic sources and thus reduces dependence on diminishing petroleum fuel from foreign sources, it likely lowers lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions, and it lowers an engine's emission of most pollutants as compared to petroleum derived diesel. However, the use of biodiesel often slightly increases a diesel engine's emission of smog forming nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) relative to petroleum diesel. In this paper, previously proposed theories for this slight NOx increase are reviewed, including theories based on biodiesel's cetane number, which leads to differing amounts of charge preheating, and theories based on the fuel's bulk modulus, which affects injection timing. This paper proposes an additional theory for the slight NO{sub x} increase of biodiesel. Biodiesel typically contains more double bonded molecules than petroleum derived diesel. These double bonded molecules have a slightly higher adiabatic flame temperature, which leads to the increase in NOx production for biodiesel. Our theory was verified using numerical simulations to show a NOx increase, due to the double bonded molecules, that is consistent with observation. Further, the details of these numerical simulations show that NOx is predominantly due to the Zeldovich mechanism.

  4. Anomalous QCD contribution to the Debye screening in an external field via holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorsky, A.; Kopnin, P. N.; Krikun, A.

    2011-03-15

    In this paper we discuss the QCD contribution to the Abelian Debye and magnetic screening masses in a deconfined QCD plasma at finite temperature in the presence of an external magnetic field B. We use a holographic AdS/QCD setup in an AdS Schwarzschild black hole background and show that the electric screening mass has a form similar to the one-loop result in QED. Moreover, we calculate the corrections due to the magnetic field to all orders of B and demonstrate that in the case when the magnetic field is large the Debye mass grows linearly with B, while the magnetic screening mass vanishes. The whole effect of the magnetic field turns out to stem from the Chern-Simons action. We also discuss the zero temperature case in the chiral perturbation theory.

  5. Anomalous Electron Transport Due to Multiple High Frequency Beam Ion Driven Alfven Eigenmode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorelenkov, N. N.; Stutman, D.; Tritz, K.; Boozer, A.; Delgardo-Aparicio, L.; Fredrickson, E.; Kaye, S.; White, R.

    2010-07-13

    We report on the simulations of recently observed correlations of the core electron transport with the sub-thermal ion cyclotron frequency instabilities in low aspect ratio plasmas of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In order to model the electron transport of the guiding center code ORBIT is employed. A spectrum of test functions of multiple core localized Global shear Alfven Eigenmode (GAE) instabilities based on a previously developed theory and experimental observations is used to examine the electron transport properties. The simulations exhibit thermal electron transport induced by electron drift orbit stochasticity in the presence of multiple core localized GAE.

  6. Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-Doped High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Chen, Yulin ; Iyo, Akira ; Yang, Wanli ; Zhou, Xingjiang ; Lu, Donghui ; Eisaki, Hiroshi ; Devereaux, Thomas P. ; Hussain, Zahid ; Shen, Z.-X. ; Stanford U., Phys. Dept. ...

  7. Anomalous magnetic structure and spin dynamics in magnetoelectric LiFePO4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toft-Petersen, Rasmus; Reehuis, Manfred; Jensen, Thomas B. S.; Andersen, Niels H.; Li, Jiying; Le, Manh Duc; Laver, Mark; Niedermayer, Christof; Klemke, Bastian; Lefmann, Kim; Vaknin, David

    2015-07-06

    We report significant details of the magnetic structure and spin dynamics of LiFePO4 obtained by single-crystal neutron scattering. Our results confirm a previously reported collinear rotation of the spins away from the principal b axis, and they determine that the rotation is toward the a axis. In addition, we find a significant spin-canting component along c. Furthermore, the possible causes of these components are discussed, and their significance for the magnetoelectric effect is analyzed. Inelastic neutron scattering along the three principal directions reveals a highly anisotropic hard plane consistent with earlier susceptibility measurements. While using a spin Hamiltonian, we show that the spin dimensionality is intermediate between XY- and Ising-like, with an easy b axis and a hard c axis. As a result, it is shown that both next-nearest neighbor exchange couplings in the bc plane are in competition with the strongest nearest neighbor coupling.

  8. Measuring anomalous couplings in H→WW* decays at the International...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Publisher: American Physical Society Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Free Publicly Accessible Full Text ...

  9. Anomalous magnetic structure and spin dynamics in magnetoelectric LiFePO4

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Toft-Petersen, Rasmus; Reehuis, Manfred; Jensen, Thomas B. S.; Andersen, Niels H.; Li, Jiying; Le, Manh Duc; Laver, Mark; Niedermayer, Christof; Klemke, Bastian; Lefmann, Kim; et al

    2015-07-06

    We report significant details of the magnetic structure and spin dynamics of LiFePO4 obtained by single-crystal neutron scattering. Our results confirm a previously reported collinear rotation of the spins away from the principal b axis, and they determine that the rotation is toward the a axis. In addition, we find a significant spin-canting component along c. Furthermore, the possible causes of these components are discussed, and their significance for the magnetoelectric effect is analyzed. Inelastic neutron scattering along the three principal directions reveals a highly anisotropic hard plane consistent with earlier susceptibility measurements. While using a spin Hamiltonian, we showmore » that the spin dimensionality is intermediate between XY- and Ising-like, with an easy b axis and a hard c axis. As a result, it is shown that both next-nearest neighbor exchange couplings in the bc plane are in competition with the strongest nearest neighbor coupling.« less

  10. Anomalous Dynamical Line Shapes in a Quantum Magnet at Finite Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennant D. A.; James A.; Lake, B.; Essler, F.H.L.; Notbohm, S.; Mikeska, H.-J.; Fielden, J.; Kogerler,, P.; Canfield, P.C.; Telling, M.T.F.

    2012-01-04

    The effect of thermal fluctuations on the dynamics of a gapped quantum magnet is studied using inelastic neutron scattering on copper nitrate, a model material for the spin-1/2, one-dimensional (1D) bond alternating Heisenberg chain. A large, highly deuterated, single-crystal sample of copper nitrate is produced using a solution growth method and measurements are made using the high-resolution backscattering spectrometer OSIRIS at the ISIS Facility. Theoretical calculations and numerical analysis are combined to interpret the physical origin of the thermal effects observed in the magnetic spectra. The primary observations are (1) a thermally induced central peak due to intraband scattering, which is similar to Villain scattering familiar from soliton systems in 1D, and (2) the one-magnon quasiparticle pole is seen to develop with temperature into an asymmetric continuum of scattering. We relate this asymmetric line broadening to a thermal strongly correlated state caused by hard-core constraints and quasiparticle interactions. These findings are a counter example to recent assertions of the universality of line broadening in 1D systems and are applicable to a broad range of quantum systems.

  11. Evidence for an anomalous quantum state of protons in nanoconfined water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reiter, George F; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Paddison, Stephen J; Platzman, P. M.; Moravsky, Alexander P.; Adams, Mark A.; Mayers, Dr. Jerry

    2012-01-01

    Deep inelastic neutron scattering provides a means of directly and accurately measuring the momentum distribution of protons in water, which is determined primarily by the proton ground-state wave function.We find that in water confined on scales of 20 A, this wave function responds to the details of the confinement, corresponds to a strongly anharmonic local potential, shows evidence in some cases of coherent delocalization in double wells, and involves changes in zero-point kinetic energy of the protons from 40 to +120 meV difference from that of bulk water at room temperature. This behavior appears to be a generic feature of nanoscale confinement. It is exhibited here in 16 A inner diameter carbon nanotubes, two different hydrated proton exchange membranes (PEMs), Nafion 1120 and Dow 858, and has been seen earlier in xerogel and 14 A diameter carbon nanotubes. The proton conductivity in the PEM samples correlates with the degree of coherent delocalization of the proton.

  12. Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-DopedHigh...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    mechanism:the van Hove singularity and the antiferromagnetic (pia, pia)scattering. ... Subject: 75; FERMI LEVEL; HIGH-TC SUPERCONDUCTORS; SCATTERING; SHAPE; SINGULARITY; ...

  13. Efficiency enhancement of anomalous-Doppler electron cyclotron masers with tapered magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Chao-Ran; Hou, Zhi-Ling; Kong, Ling-Bao E-mail: pkliu@pku.edu.cn; Liu, Pu-Kun E-mail: pkliu@pku.edu.cn; Du, Chao-Hai; Jin, Hai-Bo

    2014-02-15

    The efficiency of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) is usually low, thus limiting the practical applications. Here, a method of tapered magnetic field is introduced for the efficiency enhancement of the slow-wave ECM. The numerical calculations show that the tapered magnetic-field method can enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM significantly. The effect of beam electron velocity spread on the efficiency has also been studied. Although the velocity spread reduces the efficiency, a great enhancement of efficiency can still be obtained by the tapered magnetic field method.

  14. Anomalous Fermi-Surface Dependent Pairing in a Self-Doped High...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; FERMI LEVEL; HIGH-TC SUPERCONDUCTORS; VALENCE; BARIUM OXIDES; CALCIUM OXIDES; COPPER OXIDES; BARIUM FLUORIDES; CALCIUM FLUORIDES; COPPER FLUORIDES; ...

  15. Ba-filled Ni–Sb–Sn based skutterudites with anomalously high lattice thermal conductivity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paschinger, W.; Rogl, Gerda; Grytsiv, A.; Michor, H.; Heinrich, P. R.; Mueller, H.; Puchegger, S.; Klobes, B.; Hermann, Raphael P.; Reinecker, M.; et al

    2016-06-21

    Here, in this study, novel filled skutterudites BayNi4Sb12-xSnx (ymax = 0.93) have been prepared by arc melting followed by annealing at 250, 350 and 450°C up to 30 days in vacuum-sealed quartz vials. Extension of the homogeneity region, solidus temperatures and structural investigations were performed for the skutterudite phase in the ternary Ni–Sn–Sb and in the quaternary Ba–Ni–Sb–Sn systems. Phase equilibria in the Ni–Sn–Sb system at 450°C were established by means of Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray Powder Diffraction (XPD). With rather small cages Ni4(Sb,Sn)12, the Ba–Ni–Sn–Sb skutterudite system is perfectly suited to study the influence of filler atomsmore » on the phonon thermal conductivity. Single-phase samples with the composition Ni4Sb8.2Sn3.8, Ba0.42Ni4Sb8.2Sn3.8 and Ba0.92Ni4Sb6.7Sn5.3 were used to measure their physical properties, i.e. temperature dependent electrical resistivity, Seebeck coefficient and thermal conductivity. The resistivity data demonstrate a crossover from metallic to semiconducting behaviour. The corresponding gap width was extracted from the maxima in the Seebeck coefficient data as a function of temperature. Single crystal X-ray structure analyses at 100, 200 and 300 K revealed the thermal expansion coefficients as well as Einstein and Debye temperatures for Ba0.73Ni4Sb8.1Sn3.9 and Ba0.95Ni4Sb6.1Sn5.9. These data were in accordance with the Debye temperatures obtained from the specific heat (4.4 K < T < 140 K) and Mössbauer spectroscopy (10 K < T < 290 K). Rather small atom displacement parameters for the Ba filler atoms indicate a severe reduction in the “rattling behaviour” consistent with the high levels of lattice thermal conductivity. The elastic moduli, collected from Resonant Ultrasonic Spectroscopy ranged from 100 GPa for Ni4Sb8.2Sn3.8 to 116 GPa for Ba0.92Ni4Sb6.7Sn5.3. The thermal expansion coefficients were 11.8 × 10-6 K-1 for Ni4Sb8.2Sn3.8 and 13.8 × 10-6 K-1 for Ba0.92Ni4Sb6.7Sn5.3. The room temperature Vickers hardness values vary within the range from 2.6 GPa to 4.7 GPa. Lastly, severe plastic deformation via high-pressure torsion was used to introduce nanostructuring; however, the physical properties before and after HPT showed no significant effect on the materials thermoelectric behaviour.« less

  16. Crossover of two power laws in the anomalous diffusion of a two lipid membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakalis, Evangelos E-mail: francesco.zerbetto@unibo.it; Höfinger, Siegfried; Zerbetto, Francesco E-mail: francesco.zerbetto@unibo.it; Venturini, Alessandro

    2015-06-07

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a bi-layer membrane made by the same number of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-glycero-3-phospho-ethanolamine and palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylserine lipids reveal sub-diffusional motion, which presents a crossover between two different power laws. Fractional Brownian motion is the stochastic mechanism that governs the motion in both regimes. The location of the crossover point is justified with simple geometrical arguments and is due to the activation of the mechanism of circumrotation of lipids about each other.

  17. tan{beta}-enhanced supersymmetric corrections to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchetti, Schedar; Mertens, Susanne; Nierste, Ulrich; Stoeckinger, Dominik

    2009-01-01

    We report on a two-loop supersymmetric contribution to the magnetic moment (g-2){sub {mu}} of the muon which is enhanced by two powers of tan{beta}. This contribution arises from a shift in the relation between the muon mass and Yukawa coupling and can increase the supersymmetric contribution to (g-2){sub {mu}} sizably. As a result, if the currently observed 3{sigma} deviation between the experimental and SM theory value of (g-2){sub {mu}} is analyzed within the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), the derived constraints on the parameter space are modified significantly: If (g-2){sub {mu}} is used to determine tan{beta} as a function of the other MSSM parameters, our corrections decrease tan{beta} by roughly 10% for tan{beta}=50.

  18. Pulsed laser-induced oxygen deficiency at TiO{sub 2} surface: Anomalous structure and electrical transport properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, Tomohiko; Tsuchiya, Tetsuo; Kumagai, Toshiya

    2009-09-15

    We have studied pulsed laser-induced oxygen deficiencies at rutile TiO{sub 2} surfaces. The crystal surface was successfully reduced by excimer laser irradiation, and an oxygen-deficient TiO{sub 2-{delta}} layer with 160 nm thickness was formed by means of ArF laser irradiation at 140 mJ/cm{sup 2} for 2000 pulses. The TiO{sub 2-{delta}} layer fundamentally maintained a rutile structure, though this structure was distorted by many stacking faults caused by the large oxygen deficiency. The electrical resistivity of the obtained TiO{sub 2-{delta}} layer exhibited unconventional metallic behavior with hysteresis. A metal-insulator transition occurred at 42 K, and the electrical resistivity exceeded 10{sup 4} OMEGA cm below 42 K. This metal-insulator transition could be caused by bipolaronic ordering derived from Ti-Ti pairings that formed along the stacking faults. The constant magnetization behavior observed below 42 K is consistent with the bipolaronic scenario that has been observed previously for Ti{sub 4}O{sub 7}. These peculiar electrical properties are strongly linked to the oxygen-deficient crystal structure, which contains many stacking faults formed by instantaneous heating during excimer laser irradiation. - Graphical abstract: A pulsed laser-irradiated TiO{sub 2-{delta}} substrate showed an unconventional metallic phase, with hysteresis over a wide range of temperatures and a metal-insulator transition at 42 K.

  19. Anomalous mid-twentieth century atmospheric circulation change over the South Atlantic compared to the last 6000 years

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Turney, Chris S. M.; Jones, Richard T.; Lister, David; Jones, Phil; Williams, Alan N.; Hogg, Alan; Thomas, Zoe A.; Compo, Gilbert P.; Yin, Xungang; Fogwill, Christopher J.; et al

    2016-06-09

    Determining the timing and impact of anthropogenic climate change in data-sparse regions is a considerable challenge. Arguably, nowhere is this more difficult than the Antarctic Peninsula and the subantarctic South Atlantic where observational records are relatively short but where high rates of warming have been experienced since records began. Here we interrogate recently developed monthly-resolved observational datasets from the Falkland Islands and South Georgia, and extend the records back using climate-sensitive peat growth over the past 6000 years. Investigating the subantarctic climate data with ERA-Interim and Twentieth Century Reanalysis, we find that a stepped increase in precipitation across the 1940smore » is related to a change in synoptic atmospheric circulation: a westward migration of quasi-permanent positive pressure anomalies in the South Atlantic has brought the subantarctic islands under the increased influence of meridional airflow associated with the Amundsen Sea Low. Analysis of three comprehensively multi-dated (using 14C and 137Cs) peat sequences across the two islands demonstrates unprecedented growth rates since the mid-twentieth century relative to the last 6000 years. Comparison to observational and reconstructed sea surface temperatures suggests this change is linked to a warming tropical Pacific Ocean. Lastly, our results imply 'modern' South Atlantic atmospheric circulation has not been under this configuration for millennia.« less

  20. Anomalous magneto-elastic and charge doping effects in thallium-doped BaFe2As2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sefat, Athena S.; Li, Li; Cao, Huibo B.; McGuire, Michael A.; Sales, Brian; Custelcean, Radu; Parker, David S.

    2016-02-12

    Within the BaFe2As2 crystal lattice, we partially substitute thallium for barium and report the effects of interlayer coupling in Ba1-xTlxFe2As2 crystals. We demonstrate the unusual effects of magneto-elastic coupling and charge doping in this iron-arsenide material, whereby Néel temperature rises with small x, and then falls with additional x. Specifically, we find that Néel and structural transitions in BaFe2As2 (TN = Ts = 133 K) increase for x = 0.05 (TN = 138 K, Ts = 140 K) from magnetization, heat capacity, resistivity, and neutron diffraction measurements. Evidence from single crystal X-ray diffraction and first principles calculations attributes the stronger magnetism in x = 0.05 to magneto-elastic coupling related to the shorter intraplanar Fe-Fe bondmore » distance. With further thallium substitution, the transition temperatures decrease for x = 0.09 (TN = Ts = 131 K), and this is due to charge doping. Finally, we illustrate that small changes related to 3d transition-metal state can have profound effects on magnetism.« less

  1. Role of channel coupling and deuteron-exchange mechanisms in anomalous alpha-particle scattering on {sup 6}Li

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakuta, S. B.; Artemov, S.V.; Burtebaev, N.; Kerimkulov, Zh.; Novatsky, B. G.; Stepanov, D.N.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2009-12-15

    A unified description of existing experimental data on alpha-particle scattering by {sup 6}Li over the broad energy range from 18 to 166 MeV was obtained with allowance for channel-coupling effects and mechanisms involving the exchange of a deuteron cluster. Angular distributions were analyzed on the basis of the optical model and the coupled reaction channels method. It was shown that the inclusion of channel coupling and the contributions from one- and two-step exchangemechanismsmakes it possible to describe special features of the behavior of differential cross sections for both elastic and inelastic scattering in a full energy range. Optimum values found for the parameters of optical potentials agree with the parameters of the global potential proposed previously for nuclei in the mass region A > 12.

  2. MO-G-BRF-07: Anomalously Fast Diffusion of Carbon Nanotubes Carriers in 3D Tissue Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y; Bahng, J; Kotov, N

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: We aim to investigate and understand diffusion process of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and other nanoscale particles in tissue and organs. Methods: In this research, we utilized a 3D model tissue of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)cultured in inverted colloidal crystal (ICC) scaffolds to compare the diffusivity of CNTs with small molecules such as Rhodamine and FITC in vitro, and further investigated the transportation of CNTs with and without targeting ligand, TGFβ1. The real-time permeation profiles of CNTs in HCC tissue model with high temporal and spatial resolution was demonstrated by using standard confocal microscopy. Quantitative analysis of the diffusion process in 3D was carried out using luminescence intensity in a series of Z-stack images obtained for different time points of the diffusion process after initial addition of CNTs or small molecules to the cell culture and the image data was analyzed by software ImageJ and Mathematica. Results: CNTs display diffusion rate in model tissues substantially faster than small molecules of the similar charge such as FITC, and the diffusion rate of CNTs are significantly enhanced with targeting ligand, TGFβ1. Conclusion: In terms of the advantages of in-vitro model, we were able to have access to measuring the rate of CNT penetration at designed conditions with variable parameters. And the findings by using this model, changed our understanding about advantages of CNTs as nanoscale drug carriers and provides design principles for making new drug carriers for both treatment and diagnostics. Additionally the fast diffusion opens the discussion of the best possible drug carriers to reach deep parts of cancerous tissues, which is often a prerequisite for successful cancer treatment. This work was supported by the Center for Photonic and Multiscale Nanomaterials funded by National Science Foundation Materials Research Science and Engineering Center program DMR 1120923. The work was also partially supported by NSF grant ECS-0601345; EFRI-BSBA 0938019; CBET 0933384; CBET 0932823; CBET 1036672, AFOSR MURI 444286-P061716 and NIH 1R21CA121841-01A2.

  3. Phonon self-energy and origin of anomalous neutron scattering spectra in SnTe and PbTe thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Chen [ORNL] [ORNL; Ma, Jie [ORNL] [ORNL; May, Andrew F [ORNL] [ORNL; Cao, Huibo [ORNL] [ORNL; Christianson, Andrew D [ORNL] [ORNL; Ehlers, Georg [ORNL] [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL] [ORNL; Sales, Brian C [ORNL] [ORNL; Delaire, Olivier A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The anharmonic lattice dynamics of rock-salt thermoelectric compounds SnTe and PbTe are investigated with inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and first-principles calculations. The experiments show that, surprisingly, although SnTe is closer to the ferroelectric instability, phonon spectra in PbTe exhibit a more anharmonic character. This behavior is reproduced in first-principles calculations of the temperature-dependent phonon self-energy. Our simulations reveal how the nesting of phonon dispersions induces prominent features in the self-energy, which account for the measured INS spectra and their temperature dependence. We establish that the phase-space for three-phonon scattering processes, rather than just the proximity to the lattice instability, is the mechanism determining the complex spectrum of the transverse-optical ferroelectric mode.

  4. Erratum: Search for Anomalous $$t\\bar{t}$$ Production in the Highly-Boosted All-Hadronic Final State

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-28

    A search is presented for a massive particle, generically referred to as a Z', decaying into a t t-bar pair. The search focuses on Z' resonances that are sufficiently massive to produce highly Lorentz-boosted top quarks, which yield collimated decay products that are partially or fully merged into single jets. The analysis uses new methods to analyze jet substructure, providing suppression of the non-top multijet backgrounds. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Upper limits in the range of 1more » pb are set on the product of the production cross section and branching fraction for a topcolor Z' modeled for several widths, as well as for a Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gluon. In addition, the results constrain any enhancement in t t-bar production beyond expectations of the standard model for t t-bar invariant masses larger than 1 TeV.« less

  5. Erratum: Search for Anomalous $t\\bar{t}$ Production in the Highly-Boosted All-Hadronic Final State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-28

    A search is presented for a massive particle, generically referred to as a Z', decaying into a t t-bar pair. The search focuses on Z' resonances that are sufficiently massive to produce highly Lorentz-boosted top quarks, which yield collimated decay products that are partially or fully merged into single jets. The analysis uses new methods to analyze jet substructure, providing suppression of the non-top multijet backgrounds. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Upper limits in the range of 1 pb are set on the product of the production cross section and branching fraction for a topcolor Z' modeled for several widths, as well as for a Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gluon. In addition, the results constrain any enhancement in t t-bar production beyond expectations of the standard model for t t-bar invariant masses larger than 1 TeV.

  6. Anomalous dynamics of aqueous solutions of di-propylene glycol methylether confined in MCM-41 by quasielastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swenson, Jan Elamin, Khalid; Chen, Guo; Lohstroh, Wiebke; Sakai, Victoria Garcia

    2014-12-07

    The molecular dynamics of solutions of di-propylene glycol methylether (2PGME) and H{sub 2}O (or D{sub 2}O) confined in 28 Å pores of MCM-41 have been studied by quasielastic neutron scattering and differential scanning calorimetry over the concentration range 0–90 wt.% water. This system is of particular interest due to its pronounced non-monotonic concentration dependent dynamics of 2PGME in the corresponding bulk system, showing the important role of hydrogen bonding for the dynamics. In this study we have elucidated how this non-monotonic concentration dependence is affected by the confined geometry. The results show that this behaviour is maintained in the confinement, but the slowest diffusive dynamics of 2PGME is now observed at a considerably higher water concentration; at 75 wt.% water in MCM-41 compared to 30 wt.% water in the corresponding bulk system. This difference can be explained by an improper mixing of the two confined liquids. The results suggest that water up to a concentration of about 20 wt.% is used to hydrate the hydrophilic hydroxyl surface groups of the silica pores, and that it is only at higher water contents the water becomes partly mixed with 2PGME. Hence, due to this partial micro-phase separation of the two liquids larger, and thereby slower relaxing, structural entities of hydrogen bonded water and 2PGME molecules can only be formed at higher water contents than in the bulk system. However, the Q-dependence is unchanged with confinement, showing that the nature of the molecular motions is preserved. Thus, there is no indication of localization of the dynamics at length scales of less than 20 Å. The dynamics of both water and 2PGME is strongly dominated by translational diffusion at a temperature of 280 K.

  7. Drifting localization of ionization runaway: Unraveling the nature of anomalous transport in high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ni, Pavel; Rauch, Albert

    2011-12-04

    The plasma over the magnetrons erosion racetrack is not azimuthally uniform but concentrated in distinct dense plasma zones which move in the {vector E}{vector B} direction with about 10% of the electrons {vector E}{vector B}/B{sup 2} drift velocity. The plasma zones are investigated with a gated camera working in concert with a streak camera for Al, Nb, Cu, and W targets in Ar or Kr background gas. It is found that each plasma zone has a high density edge which is the origin of a plasma-generating electron jet leaving the target zone. Each region of strong azimuthal density gradient generates an azimuthal electric field which promotes the escape of magnetized electrons and the formation of electron jets and plasma flares. The phenomena are proposed to be caused by an ionization instability where each dense plasma zone exhibits a high stopping power for drifting high energy electrons, thereby enhancing itself.

  8. Theoretical Framework for Anomalous Heat Without High-Energy Particles from Deuteron Fusion in Deuterium-Transition Metal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott R. Chubb; Talbot A. Chubb

    2000-11-12

    In cold fusion, two conflicting intuitive pictures have caused confusion. A local picture, involving particle-particle interaction, has been dominant for most physicists. However, we suggest that a second, nonlocal, 'counter-intuitive' picture is more appropriate because it places greater emphasis on the behavior of matter distributions and their interaction with the associated environment. This picture is relevant in solids because when charged particles possess large DeBroglie wavelengths, they frequently interact coherently, in a wavelike fashion, in which momentum is conserved globally but not locally. These wavelike effects can become important in periodically ordered solids since they may lead to large momentum transfer from an isolated location to many locations at once. The local picture fails to incorporate these kinds of effects. How hydrogen (H) nuclei can become delocalized is illustrated by anomalies in the diffusivity and vibrational behavior of H in transition metals. Also, it is well-known that in many-body systems, discontinuities in the local momentum (wave function cusps) can explain how near-perfect overlap between charged particles can occur at close separation (which may explain how the Coulomb barrier can be circumvented). We explore implications of these effects on cold fusion.

  9. An anomalous extinction law in the Cep OB3b young cluster: Evidence for dust processing during gas dispersal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Thomas S.; Prchlik, Jakub J.; Megeath, S. Thomas; Gutermuth, Robert A.; Pipher, Judith L.; Naylor, Tim; Jeffries, R. D.

    2014-05-10

    We determine the extinction law through Cep OB3b, a young cluster of 3000 stars undergoing gas dispersal. The extinction is measured toward 76 background K giants identified with MMT/Hectospec spectra. Color excess ratios were determined toward each of the giants using V and R photometry from the literature, g, r, i, and z photometry from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and J, H, and K{sub s} photometry from the Two Micron All Sky Survey. These color excess ratios were then used to construct the extinction law through the dusty material associated with Cep OB3b. The extinction law through Cep OB3b is intermediate between the R{sub V} = 3.1 and R{sub V} = 5 laws commonly used for the diffuse atomic interstellar medium and dense molecular clouds, respectively. The dependence of the extinction law on line-of-sight A{sub V} is investigated and we find the extinction law becomes shallower for regions with A{sub V} > 2.5 mag. We speculate that the intermediate dust law results from dust processing during the dispersal of the molecular cloud by the cluster.

  10. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v)

  11. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v)

  12. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0

  13. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.1 Beamline 5.0.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:32 Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving

  14. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v)

  15. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole

  16. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline 5.0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm

  17. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole

  18. Link Alpha B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    b A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Filter by alpha... A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Back-Up Dependent (Child & Elder) Care Program Backups for Computers Backups for PC and Mac (self-service using Carbonite) Badge Office BASE (Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects) BELLA (Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator) Benefits Berkeley Center for Structural Biology(BCSB) Berkeley Lab 75th Anniversary Site Berkeley Lab Energy and Environmental Research Blog Berkeley Lab

  19. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v)

  20. Beamline 5.0.1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12.7 keV (fixed) Monochromator Si(220) Asymmetric cut single crystal Measured flux 1.50 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole collimator Resolving power (E/ΔE) ~10,000 Divergence at sample 3.0 (h) x 0.4 (v)

  1. Beamline 5.0.3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0.3 Print Berkeley Center for Structural Biology (BCSB) Monochromatic protein crystallography Scientific discipline: Structural biology GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for Structural Biology Beamlines (2-month cycle) Source characteristics 11.4-cm-period wiggler (W11) Energy range 12,700 eV(fixed) Monochromator Asymmetric cut single crystal Si(220) Measured flux 2.4 x 1011 photons/s at 400-mA ring current, with 1.5-mrad divergence and 100-µm pinhole

  2. Search for anomalous production of events with three or more leptons in pp collisions at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.; et al.,

    2014-08-01

    A search for physics beyond the standard model in events with at least three leptons is presented. The data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 inverse femtobarns of proton-proton collisions with center-of-mass energy sqrt(s) = 8 TeV, was collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC during 2012. The data are divided into exclusive categories based on the number of leptons and their flavor, the presence or absence of an opposite-sign, same-flavor lepton pair (OSSF), the invariant mass of the OSSF pair, the presence or absence of a tagged bottom-quark jet, the number of identified hadronically decaying tau leptons, and the magnitude of the missing transverse energy and of the scalar sum of jet transverse momenta. The numbers of observed events are found to be consistent with the expected numbers from standard model processes, and limits are placed on new-physics scenarios that yield multilepton final states. In particular, scenarios that predict Higgs boson production in the context of supersymmetric decay chains are examined. We also place a 95% confidence level upper limit of 1.3% on the branching fraction for the decay of a top quark to a charm quark and a Higgs boson (t to c H), which translates to a bound on the left- and right-handed top-charm flavor-violating Higgs Yukawa couplings, lambda[H, tc] and lambda[H, ct], respectively, of sqrt(abs(lambda[H, tc])^2 + abs(lambda[H, ct])^2) < 0.21.

  3. Anomalous reduction of the switching voltage of Bi-doped Ge{sub 0.5}Se{sub 0.5} ovonic threshold switching devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Juhee; Ahn, Hyung-Woo; Shin, Sang-yeol; Cheong, Byung-ki; Lee, Suyoun

    2014-04-14

    Switching devices based on Ovonic Threshold Switching (OTS) have been considered as a solution to overcoming limitations of Si-based electronic devices, but the reduction of switching voltage is a major challenge. Here, we investigated the effect of Bi-doping in Ge{sub 0.5}Se{sub 0.5} thin films on their thermal, optical, electrical properties, as well as on the characteristics of OTS devices. As Bi increased, it was found that both of the optical energy gap (E{sub g}{sup opt}) and the depth of trap states decreased resulting in a drastic reduction of the threshold voltage (V{sub th}) by over 50%. In addition, E{sub g}{sup opt} was found to be about three times of the conduction activation energy for each composition. These results are explained in terms of the Mott delocalization effect by doping Bi.

  4. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous HVV couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.,

    2014-11-14

    The study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the $\\mathrm{H} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{Z} \\mathrm{Z}$, $\\mathrm{Z}\\gamma^*$, $\\gamma^*\\gamma^* \\rightarrow 4\\ell$, $\\mathrm{H} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{W} \\mathrm{W} \\rightarrow \\ell\

  5. Communication: Localized molecular orbital analysis of the effect of electron correlation on the anomalous isotope effect in the NMR spin-spin coupling constant in methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarycz, M. Natalia C. Provasi, Patricio F.; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2014-10-21

    We discuss the effect of electron correlation on the unexpected differential sensitivity (UDS) in the {sup 1}J(CH) coupling constant of CH{sub 4} using a decomposition into contributions from localized molecular orbitals and compare with the {sup 1}J(NH) coupling constant in NH{sub 3}. In particular, we discuss the well known fact that uncorrelated coupled Hartree-Fock (CHF) calculations are not able to reproduce the UDS in methane. For this purpose we have implemented for the first time a localized molecular orbital analysis for the second order polarization propagator approximation with coupled cluster singles and doubles amplitudesSOPPA(CCSD) in the DALTON program. Comparing the changes in the localized orbital contributions at the correlated SOPPA and SOPPA(CCSD) levels and at the uncorrelated CHF level, we find that the latter overestimates the effect of stretching the bond between the coupled atoms on the contribution to the coupling from the localized bonding orbital between these atoms. This disturbs the subtle balance between the molecular orbital contributions, which lead to the UDS in methane.

  6. Constraints on the spin-parity and anomalous HVV couplings of the Higgs boson in proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-07-13

    The study of the spin-parity and tensor structure of the interactions of the recently discovered Higgs boson is performed using the $\\mathrm{H} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{Z} \\mathrm{Z}$, $\\mathrm{Z}\\gamma^*$, $\\gamma^*\\gamma^* \\rightarrow 4\\ell$, $\\mathrm{H} \\rightarrow \\mathrm{W} \\mathrm{W} \\rightarrow \\ell\

  7. Reply to "Comment on papers by K. Shanahan that propose to explain anomalous heat generated by cold fusion", E. Storms, Thermochim. Acta (2005)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shanahan, Kirk

    2005-09-21

    Dr. E. Storms has published a Letter [1] in which he argues that in a sequence of recent papers [2-5], the apparent excess heat signal claimed by Dr. Shanahan to arise from a calibration constant shift is actually true excess heat. In particular he proposes that the mechanisms proposed that foster the proposed calibration constant shifts [3,5] cannot occur as postulated for several reasons. As well, he proposes Shanahan has ignored the extant data proving this. Because this Letter may lend unwarranted support to acceptance of cold fusion claims, these erroneous arguments used by Storms need to be answered.

  8. Anomalous change in dielectric constant of CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} under violet-to-ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masingboon, C.; Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kasetsart University, Chalermphrakiat Sakon Nakhon Province Campus, Sakon Nakhon 47000 ; Eknapakul, T.; Suwanwong, S.; Buaphet, P.; Nakajima, H.; Mo, S.-K.; Thongbai, P.; King, P. D. C.; Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 ; Maensiri, S.; Meevasana, W.; Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Bangkok 10400; NANOTEC-SUT Center of Excellence on Advanced Functional Nanomaterials, Suranaree University of Technology, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000

    2013-05-20

    The influence of light illumination on the dielectric constant of CaCu{sub 3}Ti{sub 4}O{sub 12} (CCTO) polycrystals is studied in this work. When exposed to 405-nm laser light, a reversible enhancement in the room temperature capacitance as high as 22% was observed, suggesting application of light-sensitive capacitance devices. To uncover the microscopic mechanisms mediating this change, we performed electronic structure measurements, using photoemission spectroscopy, and measured the electrical conductivity of the CCTO samples under different conditions of light exposure and oxygen partial pressure. Together, these results suggest that the large capacitance enhancement is driven by oxygen vacancies induced by the irradiation.

  9. SASSI Subtraction Method Effects at Various DOE projects

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Building, Vertical Roof Response CJCAssociates 21 Lessons Learned Subtraction can lead to anomalous response Anomalous response occurs at and above the natural...

  10. Structure-Curie temperature relationships in BaTiO 3 -based ferroelect...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ferroelectric perovskites: Anomalous behavior of ( Ba , Cd ) TiO 3 from DFT, ... ferroelectric perovskites: Anomalous behavior of ( Ba , Cd ) TiO 3 from DFT, ...

  11. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microscopic theory of quantum anomalous Hall effect in graphene Qiao, Zhenhua ; Jiang, Hua ... Scattering universality classes of side jump in the anomalous Hall effect Yang, Shengyuan ...

  12. Semiconductor laser with multiple lasing wavelengths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Arthur J.; Choquette, Kent D.; Chow, Weng W.

    2003-07-29

    A new class of multi-terminal vertical-cavity semiconductor laser components has been developed. These multi-terminal laser components can be switched, either electrically or optically, between distinct lasing wavelengths, or can be made to lase simultaneously at multiple wavelengths.

  13. Modification of solid state CdZnTe (CZT) radiation detectors with high sensitivity or high resolution operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Washington, II, Aaron L; Duff, Martine C; Teague, Lucile C; Burger, Arnold; Groza, Michael

    2014-11-11

    An apparatus and process is provided to illustrate the manipulation of the internal electric field of CZT using multiple wavelength light illumination on the crystal surface at RT. The control of the internal electric field is shown through the polarization in the IR transmission image under illumination as a result of the Pockels effect.

  14. Microsoft Word - 10103378 DVP

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .........6 Data Assessment Summary ......Attachment 1-Assessment of Anomalous Data Potential Outliers Report Attachment ...

  15. A double crystal monochromator using tangentially bend crystals in combination with toroidal mirror focusing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Jun, Thompson,A.C.; Padmore,H.A.

    2000-02-24

    In collaboration with the Chemistry Department at the University of California at Berkeley, the ALS is building a beamline for structural determination in materials chemistry. The system will be used for single crystal x-ray diffraction on crystals that are too small or disordered for examination on laboratory systems, and typically will be used for crystals in the 5 - 20 micron regime. As some of the materials being designed are of the size of small proteins, phasing using direct methods is problematic, and so use of multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion techniques will be employed in many cases. The production of new compounds has been revolutionized in recent years with the development of combinatorial synthesis techniques, and a major b2048 to further advances in this field is access to rapid measurement of structural parameters. The specification of the beamline follows from these points. It must have a small focal spot to match closely the size of the crystals, high resolution for MAD techniques, and a high flux in the small focus. The strategy for satisfying these constraints is to us a system which is compact and which uses the minimum number of components. This is done in this case by using a pseudo channel cut crystal monochromator with tangentially bent crystals, in combination with a 1:1 focusing toroidal mirror. The toroidal mirror at 1:1 magnification has only very small aberrations, and from a 220 (h) by 25 (v) [micro] m FWHM source, an image of 220 by 45 [micro]m FWHM should be produced for a 3 mrad horizontal aperture for a full vertical aperture. This has already been achieved on an existing beamline. The crystal monochromator uses tangentially bent crystals in a concave - convex configuration to achieve matching of Bragg angles to the divergent source, while maintaining zero focusing power. A useful feature of this arrangement is that while there is an optimum crystal curvature for each energy that gives the expected Darwin width limited

  16. Final Technical Report for SBIR entitled Four-Dimensional Finite-Orbit-Width Fokker-Planck Code with Sources, for Neoclassical/Anomalous Transport Simulation of Ion and Electron Distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu. V.

    2013-12-03

    Within the US Department of Energy/Office of Fusion Energy magnetic fusion research program, there is an important whole-plasma-modeling need for a radio-frequency/neutral-beam-injection (RF/NBI) transport-oriented finite-difference Fokker-Planck (FP) code with combined capabilities for 4D (2R2V) geometry near the fusion plasma periphery, and computationally less demanding 3D (1R2V) bounce-averaged capabilities for plasma in the core of fusion devices. Demonstration of proof-of-principle achievement of this goal has been carried out in research carried out under Phase I of the SBIR award. Two DOE-sponsored codes, the CQL3D bounce-average Fokker-Planck code in which CompX has specialized, and the COGENT 4D, plasma edge-oriented Fokker-Planck code which has been constructed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory scientists, where coupled. Coupling was achieved by using CQL3D calculated velocity distributions including an energetic tail resulting from NBI, as boundary conditions for the COGENT code over the two-dimensional velocity space on a spatial interface (flux) surface at a given radius near the plasma periphery. The finite-orbit-width fast ions from the CQL3D distributions penetrated into the peripheral plasma modeled by the COGENT code. This combined code demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed 3D/4D code. By combining these codes, the greatest computational efficiency is achieved subject to present modeling needs in toroidally symmetric magnetic fusion devices. The more efficient 3D code can be used in its regions of applicability, coupled to the more computationally demanding 4D code in higher collisionality edge plasma regions where that extended capability is necessary for accurate representation of the plasma. More efficient code leads to greater use and utility of the model. An ancillary aim of the project is to make the combined 3D/4D code user friendly. Achievement of full-coupling of these two Fokker-Planck codes will advance computational modeling of plasma devices important to the USDOE magnetic fusion energy program, in particular the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics, San Diego, the NSTX spherical tokamak at Princeton, New Jersey, and the MST reversed-field-pinch Madison, Wisconsin. The validation studies of the code against the experiments will improve understanding of physics important for magnetic fusion, and will increase our design capabilities for achieving the goals of the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) project in which the US is a participant and which seeks to demonstrate at least a factor of five in fusion power production divided by input power.

  17. Eu3Ir2In15: A mixed-valent and vacancy-filled variant of the Sc5Co4Si10 structure type with anomalous magnetic properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sarkar, Sumanta; Jana, Rajkumar; Siva, Ramesh; Banerjee, Swastika; Pati, Swapan K.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Peter, Sebastian C.

    2015-10-27

    Here, a new compound, Eu3Ir2In15 has been synthesized using indium as an active metal flux. The compound crystallizes in tetragonal P4/mbm space group with lattice parameters, a = 14.8580(4) Å, b = 14.8580(4) Å, c = 4.3901(2) Å. It was further characterized by SEM-EDX studies. The temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility suggests that Eu in this compound is exclusively in divalent state. The effective magnetic moment (μeff) of this compound is 7.35 μB/Eu ion with paramagnetic Curie temperature (θp) of -28 K suggesting antiferromagnetic interaction. The mixed valent nature of Eu observed in magnetic measurements was confirmed by XANES measurements. Themore » compound undergoes demagnetization at a low magnetic field (10 Oe), which is quite unusual for Eu based intermetallic compounds. Temperature dependent resistivity studies reveal that the compound is metallic in nature. A comparative study was made between Eu3Ir2In15 and hypothetical vacancy variant Eu5Ir4In10 which also crystallizes in the same crystal structure However our computational studies along with control experiments suggest that the latter is thermodynamically less feasible compared to the former and hence we proposed that it is highly unlikely that a RE5T4X10 would exist with X as a group 13 elements.« less

  18. Anomalous magnetic configuration of Mn{sub 2}NiAl ribbon and the role of hybridization in the martensitic transformation of Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 50−x}Al{sub x} ribbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, R. B.; Zhao, D. W.; Li, G. K.; Ma, L. E-mail: houdenglu@mail.hebtu.edu.cn; Zhen, C. M.; Hou, D. L. E-mail: houdenglu@mail.hebtu.edu.cn; Wang, W. H.; Liu, E. K.; Chen, J. L.; Wu, G. H.

    2014-12-08

    The magnetic configuration of Mn{sub 2}NiAl ribbon has been investigated. In contrast to Ni{sub 2}MnAl, the compound Mn{sub 2}NiAl with considerable disorder does exhibit ferromagnetism and, due to exchange interaction competition, both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic moment orientations can coexist between nearest neighbor Mn atoms. This is unexpected in Heusler alloys. Regarding the mechanism of the martensitic transformation in Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 50−x}Al{sub x}, it is found that increasing the Al content results in an unusual change in the lattice constant, a decrease of the transformation entropy change, and enhancement of the calculated electron localization. These results indicate that the p-d covalent hybridization between Mn (or Ni) and Al atoms gradually increases at the expense of the d-d hybridization between Ni and Mn atoms. This leads to an increased stability of the austenite phase and a decrease of the martensitic transformation temperature. For 11 ≤ x ≤ 14, Mn{sub 50}Ni{sub 50−x}Al{sub x} ferromagnetic shape memory alloys are obtained.

  19. Influence of Ga content on the structure and anomalous Hall effect of Fe{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x} thin films on GaSb(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anh Tuan, Duong; Shin, Yooleemi; Viet Cuong, Tran; Cho, Sunglae; Phan, The-Long

    2014-05-07

    The Fe{sub 1−x}Ga{sub x} thin films (x = 0.4, 0.5) have been grown on GaSb(100) substrate using molecular beam epitaxy. An epitaxial film with bcc α-Fe crystal structure (A2) is observed in Fe{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4} film, while an impure Fe{sub 3}Ga phase with DO{sub 3} structure is appeared in Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5} film. The saturated magnetizations at room temperature are observed to be 570 emu/cm{sup 3} and 180 emu/cm{sup 3} and the coercivities to be 170 and 364 Oe for Fe{sub 0.6}Ga{sub 0.4} and Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}, respectively. A hysteresis trend in Hall resistance vs. magnetic field is observed for Fe{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5} film. However, there is a weak hysteresis noticed in Fe{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6} thin film.

  20. Search for anomalous couplings in the W tb vertex from the measurement of double differential angular decay rates of single top quarks produced in the t-channel with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2016-04-05

    The electroweak production and subsequent decay of single top quarks is determined by the properties of the Wtb vertex. This vertex can be described by the complex parameters of an effective Lagrangian. An analysis of angular distributions of the decay products of single top quarks produced in the t -channel constrains these parameters simultaneously. The analysis described in this paper uses 4.6 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at √s=7 TeV collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Two parameters are measured simultaneously in this analysis. The fraction f 1 of decays containing transversely polarised W bosons is measured tomore » be 0.37 ± 0.07 (stat.⊕syst.). The phase δ - between amplitudes for transversely and longitudinally polarised W bosons recoiling against left-handed b-quarks is measured to be -0.014π ± 0.036π (stat.⊕syst.). The correlation in the measurement of these parameters is 0.15. These values result in two-dimensional limits at the 95% confidence level on the ratio of the complex coupling parameters g R and V L, yielding Re[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.36, 0.10] and Im[g R /V L] ϵ [-0.17, 0.23] with a correlation of 0.11. We find the results are in good agreement with the predictions of the Standard Model.« less

  1. A Meaurement of the W+- production cross section in p anti-p collisions at sqroot(s)=1.96 TeV in the DiLepton channel and limits on anomalous WWZ/gamma couplings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGivern, Dustin; /University Coll. London

    2005-12-01

    Measurements of the production cross section of W{sup +}W{sup -} pairs in p{bar p} collisions at 1.96 TeV and limits on trilinear gauge boson coupling (TGC) parameters are presented. The data were recorded with the CDF experiment at Tevatron during the 2001 and 2002 data taking periods in which a total integrated luminosity of 184 pb{sup -1} was collected. The data sample was filtered for events with two leptonic w boson decays where the charged leptons can be either electrons or muons. 17 events are observed against an expected background of 5.0{sub -0.8}{sup +2.2} events. The resulting cross-section is found to be {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) = 14.5{sub -5.1}{sup +5.8}(stat){sub -3.0}{sup +1.8}(syst) {+-} 0.9(lum) pb and agrees well with the Standard Model expectation. Limits on the TGC parameters {Delta}{kappa} and {lambda} are set under both the equal coupling scheme, that assumes the W boson couples identically to the Z and {gamma}, and the HISZ coupling scheme, that requires the couplings to respect SU(2){sub L} x &(1){sub Y} gauge symmetry. In both cases this is achieved by using a likelihood fit to the lepton-P{sub T} distribution of the 17 candidate events. The resulting limits are found to be: -0.4 < {Delta}{kappa} < +0.6({lambda} = 0); -0.3 < {lambda} < +0.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) for the EQUAL couplings and -0.7 < {Delta}{kappa} < +0.9 ({lambda} = 0); -0.4 < {lambda} < +0.4 ({Delta}{kappa} = 0) for the HISZ couplings.

  2. Resolving Material-Specific Structures within Fe[subscript 3...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    2Osubscript 3 Core|Shell Nanoparticles Using Anomalous Small-Angle X-ray ... 2Osubscript 3 Core|Shell Nanoparticles Using Anomalous Small-Angle X-ray ...

  3. Apparatus and method for measuring fluorescence intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buican, Tudor N.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus and method for measuring intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes. A source of multiple-wavelength electromagnetic radiation is passed through a first interferometer modulated at a first frequency, the output thereof being directed into a sample to be investigated. The light emitted from the sample as a result of the interaction thereof with the excitation radiation is directed into a second interferometer modulated at a second frequency, and the output detected and analyzed. In this manner excitation, emission, and lifetime information may be obtained for a multiplicity of fluorochomes in the sample.

  4. Apparatus and method for measuring fluorescence intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buican, T.N.

    1993-05-04

    Apparatus and method is described for measuring intensities at a plurality of wavelengths and lifetimes. A source of multiple-wavelength electromagnetic radiation is passed through a first interferometer modulated at a first frequency, the output thereof being directed into a sample to be investigated. The light emitted from the sample as a result of the interaction thereof with the excitation radiation is directed into a second interferometer modulated at a second frequency, and the output detected and analyzed. In this manner excitation, emission, and lifetime information may be obtained for a multiplicity of fluorochromes in the sample.

  5. Eu3Ir2In15: A mixed-valent and vacancy-filled variant of the Sc5Co4Si10 structure type with anomalous magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarkar, Sumanta; Jana, Rajkumar; Siva, Ramesh; Banerjee, Swastika; Pati, Swapan K.; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Peter, Sebastian C.

    2015-10-27

    Here, a new compound, Eu3Ir2In15 has been synthesized using indium as an active metal flux. The compound crystallizes in tetragonal P4/mbm space group with lattice parameters, a = 14.8580(4) Å, b = 14.8580(4) Å, c = 4.3901(2) Å. It was further characterized by SEM-EDX studies. The temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility suggests that Eu in this compound is exclusively in divalent state. The effective magnetic moment (μeff) of this compound is 7.35 μB/Eu ion with paramagnetic Curie temperature (θp) of -28 K suggesting antiferromagnetic interaction. The mixed valent nature of Eu observed in magnetic measurements was confirmed by XANES measurements. The compound undergoes demagnetization at a low magnetic field (10 Oe), which is quite unusual for Eu based intermetallic compounds. Temperature dependent resistivity studies reveal that the compound is metallic in nature. A comparative study was made between Eu3Ir2In15 and hypothetical vacancy variant Eu5Ir4In10 which also crystallizes in the same crystal structure However our computational studies along with control experiments suggest that the latter is thermodynamically less feasible compared to the former and hence we proposed that it is highly unlikely that a RE5T4X10 would exist with X as a group 13 elements.

  6. Geothermometry At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    have been commonly used in Hawaii for identifying geothermal potential (i.e. silica concentration and chloride to magnesium ion ratios) were anomalous in the groundwater of this...

  7. Beamlines Directory | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BSL23 level Coherent x-ray scattering Detector testing Differential phase contrast Diffraction anomalous fine structure Diffuse x-ray scattering Energy dispersive x-ray...

  8. Beamline

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beamline Scientific Applications SAXSWAXS Solution Scattering Fiber diffraction Anomalous SAXS Source characteristics Bending Magnet Port 6A Electron Beam energy 1.3 GeV Dipole...

  9. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological ... Organometallic Framework Liu, Zheng ; Wang, ... for growing transition-metal dichalcogenide (TMD) ...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    It leads to a new phase diagram that replaces the Doniach picture, describes the emergent anomalous scaling behavior of the heavy electron (Kondo) liquid measured below the lattice ...

  11. A predictive standard model for heavy electron systems (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    It leads to a new phase diagram that replaces the Doniach picture, describes the emergent anomalous scaling behavior of the heavy electron (Kondo) liquid measured below the lattice ...

  12. Evaluation of Techniques to Detect Significant Network Performance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    persistent network problems using anomalous variations analysis in real end-to-end Internet performance measurements. We also provide methods andor guidance for how to set the...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... for the muon anomalous magnetic moment Porter, Frank C. The BABAR collaboration has an ... CP Violation and the Determination of the CKM Matrix Porter, Frank ; Caltech Full Text ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Efficient merging of data from multiple samples for determination of anomalous substructure Akey, David L. ; Terwilliger, Thomas C. ; Smith, Janet L. ; LANL) March 2016 , IUCr ...

  15. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Hung, Hsiang-Hsuan (1) Sheng, D. N. (1) Save Results Excel (limit 2000) CSV (limit 5000) ... ; Ryu, Shinsei Full Text Available April 2013 , American Physical Society Anomalous ...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Because of the similarity with 2D continuum Landau levels, these topologically nontrivial ... anomalous quantum Hall states and fractional topological insulators in real materials. ...

  17. De novo protein crystal structure determination from X-ray free-electron laser data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Barends, Thomas, R.M.

    2013-11-25

    Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) data of microcrystals of a lysozyme gadolinium derivative. The data was used to demonstrate de-novo phasing by single anomalous dispersion.

  18. Application Of Remote Sensing To Geothermal Prospecting | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    << signatures a are also presented. Multiband photography in the visible and near infra-red was used to delineate anomalous spectral reflectance associated with hydrothermal...

  19. Autonomous global sky monitoring with real-time robotic follow...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    anomalous behavior, selecting targets for detailed investigation, and making real-time anomaly detection to enable rapid recognition and a swift response to transients as...

  20. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    recognizing anomalous behavior, selecting targets for detailed investigation, and making real-time anomaly detection to enable rapid recognition and a swift response to...

  1. Method for non-referential defect characterization using fractal encoding and active contours

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gleason, Shaun S.; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed

    2007-05-15

    A method for identification of anomalous structures, such as defects, includes the steps of providing a digital image and applying fractal encoding to identify a location of at least one anomalous portion of the image. The method does not require a reference image to identify the location of the anomalous portion. The method can further include the step of initializing an active contour based on the location information obtained from the fractal encoding step and deforming an active contour to enhance the boundary delineation of the anomalous portion.

  2. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    bragg reflection (1) burgers vector (1) copper oxides (1) crystal growth (1) cuprates ... Anomalous expansion of the copper-apical-oxygen distance in superconducting cuprate ...

  3. Efficient merging of data from multiple samples for determination...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Efficient merging of data from multiple samples for determination of anomalous substructure Authors: Akey, David L. ; Terwilliger, Thomas C. ; Smith, Janet L. 1 ; LANL) ...

  4. Two-fluid description of wave-particle interactions in strong...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Two-fluid description of wave-particle interactions in strong Buneman turbulence To understand the nature of anomalous resistivity in magnetic reconnection, we investigate ...

  5. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... July 2015 Anomalous plasma transport and induced electric field in a stochastic magnetic field structure Kubota, Tetsuyuki ; Itoh, Sanae-I. ; Toda, Shinichiro ; Yamaguchi, Hiroki ...

  6. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Coso Geothermal Area (1983...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploration Basis To study anomalous shear wave attenuation in the shallow crust Notes V s and V p wave amplitudes were measured from vertical component seismograms of...

  7. Experimental Station 14-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Single wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) Main Scientific Disciplines Structural Molecular Biology Beam Line Specifications Source Bending Magnet Source Bending magnet, side...

  8. Searching for new physics at CDF (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We report on model-independent studies for anomalous production of ellgamma + X, ellgammabEsub T and gammagamma + Esub T, Standard Model tbar tgamma production. ...

  9. Nearly Flatbands with Nontrivial Topology (Journal Article) ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nontrivial nearly flatbands may lead to the realization of fractional anomalous quantum Hall states and fractional topological insulators in real materials. Among the models we...

  10. Direct Measurement of the Neutral Weak Dipole Moments of the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ... We present direct measurements of the neutral weak anomalous magnetic dipole moment, asub ...

  11. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Graphene electrodynamics in the presence of the extrinsic spin Hall effect Huang, Chunli ; ... Anomalous spin precession and spin Hall effect in semiconductor quantum wells Bi, Xintao ; ...

  12. Controlling Graphene's Electronic Structure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    It exhibits high conductivity and an anomalous quantum Hall effect (a phenomenon exhibited by certain semiconductor devices at low temperatures and high magnetic fields). Among its ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in 2D Organic Topological Insulators Wang, Z. F. ; Liu, Zheng ; Liu, Feng Full Text Available May 2013 , American Physical Society Structural and ...

  14. Discovery of Weyl Semimetals May Lead to Novel Future Spintronic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    effects, negative magnetoresistance, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, novel quantum oscillations in magneto-transport, and quantum interference in tunnelling spectroscopy. ...

  15. Evidence for a Crustal Heat Source for Low-Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is anomalously high due to significant concentrations ofradioactive elements U, Th and K. High heat production in granitesmay be responsiblehfor local elevation of the...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... of Space and Defense Power Systems NNSA Kansas City ... NY (United States) Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments - ... Influence of an anomalous dimension effect on thermal ...

  17. Free-Space optical interconnects for cable-less readout in particle physics detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chramowicz, John; Kwan, Simon; Moretti, Tony; Sugg, Alan; Prosser, Alan; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Particle physics detectors utilize readout data links requiring a complicated network of copper wires or optical fibers. These links are both massive and costly. Upgrades to such detectors may require additional bandwidth to be provisioned with limited space available to route new cables or fibers. In contrast, free-space optical interconnects will offer cable-less readout, thereby resulting in significant reductions of material and labor. A collaborative effort between Fermilab and Vega Wave Systems is pursuing the development of a unique free-space optical link design that utilizes the transparency of silicon at wavelengths including 1310 nm and multiple wavelengths used in standard telecommunications applications such as coarse wavelength division multiplexing (CWDM). The first step in the pursuit of that design is a proof that the concept may be viable. To that end, experiments have been performed to characterize the bit error rate performance of a prototype link over a free-space optical path and through doped silicon at multi-gigabit rates. These experiments have demonstrated that operation within acceptable bit error rates is possible using single and multiple wavelength transmission arrangements.

  18. Polarization-independent optical wavelength filter for channel dropping applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deri, Robert J.; Patterson, Frank

    1996-01-01

    The polarization dependence of optical wavelength filters is eliminated by using waveguide directional couplers. Material birefringence is used to compensate for the waveguide (electromagnetic) birefringence which is the original cause of the polarization dependence. Material birefringence is introduced in a controllable fashion by replacing bulk waveguide layers by finely layered composites, such as multiple quantum wells using III-V semiconductor materials. The filter has use in wavelength-division-multiplexed fiber optic communication systems. This filter has broad application for wavelength-tunable receivers in fiber optic communication links, which may be used for telecommunications, optical computer interconnect links, or fiber optic sensor systems. Since multiple-wavelength systems are increasingly being used for all of these applications, the filter is useable whenever a rapidly tunable, wavelength-filtering receiver is required.

  19. Infrared light sources with semimetal electron injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kurtz, Steven R.; Biefeld, Robert M.; Allerman, Andrew A.

    1999-01-01

    An infrared light source is disclosed that comprises a layered semiconductor active region having a semimetal region and at least one quantum-well layer. The semimetal region, formed at an interface between a GaAsSb or GalnSb layer and an InAsSb layer, provides electrons and holes to the quantum-well layer to generate infrared light at a predetermined wavelength in the range of 2-6 .mu.m. Embodiments of the invention can be formed as electrically-activated light-emitting diodes (LEDs) or lasers, and as optically-pumped lasers. Since the active region is unipolar, multiple active regions can be stacked to form a broadband or multiple-wavelength infrared light source.

  20. Gemini Planet Imager Spectroscopy of the HR 8799 Planets c and d

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingraham, Patrick; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Marois, Christian; Macintosh, Bruce; Barman, Travis; Bauman, Brian; Burrows, Adam; Chilcote, Jeffrey K.; De Rosa, Robert J.; Dillon, Daren; Doyon, René; Dunn, Jennifer; Erikson, Darren; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Gavel, Donald; Goodsell, Stephen J.; Graham, James R.; Hartung, Markus; Hibon, Pascale; Kalas, Paul G.; Konopacky, Quinn; Larkin, James A.; Marchis, Franck; McBride, James; Millar-Blanchaer, Max; Morzinski, Katie M.; Norton, Andrew; Oppenheimer, Rebecca; Palmer, Dave W.; Patience, Jenny; Perrin, Marshall D.; Poyneer, Lisa A.; Pueyo, Laurent; Rantakyrö, Fredrik; Sadakuni, Naru; Saddlemyer, Leslie; Savransky, Dmitry; Soummer, Rémi; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Song, Inseok; Thomas, Sandrine; Kent Wallace, J.; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J.; Wolff, Schuyler G.

    2014-09-30

    During the first-light run of the Gemini Planet Imager we obtained K-band spectra of exoplanets HR 8799 c and d. Analysis of the spectra indicates that planet d may be warmer than planet c. Comparisons to recent patchy cloud models and previously obtained observations over multiple wavelengths confirm that thick clouds combined with horizontal variation in the cloud cover generally reproduce the planets’ spectral energy distributions.When combined with the 3 to 4μm photometric data points, the observations provide strong constraints on the atmospheric methane content for both planets. Lastly, the data also provide further evidence that future modeling efforts must include cloud opacity, possibly including cloud holes, disequilibrium chemistry, and super-solar metallicity.

  1. Gemini Planet Imager Spectroscopy of the HR 8799 Planets c and d

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ingraham, Patrick; Marley, Mark S.; Saumon, Didier; Marois, Christian; Macintosh, Bruce; Barman, Travis; Bauman, Brian; Burrows, Adam; Chilcote, Jeffrey K.; De Rosa, Robert J.; et al

    2014-09-30

    During the first-light run of the Gemini Planet Imager we obtained K-band spectra of exoplanets HR 8799 c and d. Analysis of the spectra indicates that planet d may be warmer than planet c. Comparisons to recent patchy cloud models and previously obtained observations over multiple wavelengths confirm that thick clouds combined with horizontal variation in the cloud cover generally reproduce the planets’ spectral energy distributions.When combined with the 3 to 4μm photometric data points, the observations provide strong constraints on the atmospheric methane content for both planets. Lastly, the data also provide further evidence that future modeling efforts mustmore » include cloud opacity, possibly including cloud holes, disequilibrium chemistry, and super-solar metallicity.« less

  2. Polarization-independent optical wavelength filter for channel dropping applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deri, R.J.; Patterson, F.

    1996-05-07

    The polarization dependence of optical wavelength filters is eliminated by using waveguide directional couplers. Material birefringence is used to compensate for the waveguide (electromagnetic) birefringence which is the original cause of the polarization dependence. Material birefringence is introduced in a controllable fashion by replacing bulk waveguide layers by finely layered composites, such as multiple quantum wells using III-V semiconductor materials. The filter has use in wavelength-division multiplexed fiber optic communication systems. This filter has broad application for wavelength-tunable receivers in fiber optic communication links, which may be used for telecommunications, optical computer interconnect links, or fiber optic sensor systems. Since multiple-wavelength systems are increasingly being used for all of these applications, the filter is useable whenever a rapidly tunable, wavelength-filtering receiver is required. 14 figs.

  3. Optical steam quality measurement system and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, James R.; Partin, Judy K.

    2006-04-25

    An optical measurement system is presented that offers precision on-line monitoring of the quality of steam. Multiple wavelengths of radiant energy are passed through the steam from an emitter to a detector. By comparing the amount of radiant energy absorbed by the flow of steam for each wavelength, a highly accurate measurement of the steam quality can be determined on a continuous basis in real-time. In an embodiment of the present invention, the emitter, comprises three separate radiant energy sources for transmitting specific wavelengths of radiant energy through the steam. In a further embodiment, the wavelengths of radiant energy are combined into a single beam of radiant energy for transmission through the steam using time or wavelength division multiplexing. In yet a further embodiment, the single beam of radiant energy is transmitted using specialized optical elements.

  4. ALSNews Vol. 363

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p.m. Friday. The ring status can be seen in real time at http:www-als.lbl.govindex.phpbeamlinesbeam-status.html. newslinks ALS in the News Anomalous Light-Like Behavior...

  5. Heat capacity, magnetic susceptibility, and electric resistivity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The Neel temperature of CePdSn is anomalously large compared with that expected on the basis of de Gennes scaling from the ital Tsub ital N of 14.5 K of isostructural GdPdSn, ...

  6. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of high b-value anomalies withmagma reservoirs is confirmed. References M. Wyss, F. Klein, K. Nagamine, S. Wiemer (2001) Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea...

  7. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Have feedback or suggestions for a way to improve these results? Anomalous Coulomb Drag in Electron-Hole Bilayers due to the Formation of Excitons Efimkin, Dmitry K. ; Galitski, ...

  8. Elevated carbon dioxide flux at the Dixie Valley geothermal field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    site near the Stillwater Fault to 0.1 t dayy1 from a 0.01-km2 location of steaming ground on the valley floor. Anomalous CO2 flux is positively correlated with shallow...

  9. An Integrated Geophysical Study Of The Geothermal Field Of Tule...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    bounds characterizing axisymmetric bodies from a set of gravity data. Bounds on the density contrast as a function of depth to the top and thickness of the anomalous source are...

  10. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Mitchell, D.L., A.J. Baran, W.P. Arnott, C. Schmitt, 2006: Testing and comparing the anomalous diffraction approximation. J. Atmos. Sci., 63, 2948-2962. Comparison of MADA and T-matrix with measured Qext. Regions without data were contaminated by water vapor or

  11. Producing a Radioactive Source in a Deuterated Palladium Electrode Under Direct-Current Glow Discharge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Hiroshi; Uchiyama, Kazuyoshi; Kawata, Nobuhiko; Kurisawa, Yoshiyuki; Nakamura, Mitsuru

    2001-03-15

    Anomalous gamma emission was rarely observed during direct-current glow discharge in {approx}3 Torrs of deuterium gas using a deuterated palladium foil cathode. Autoradiography after the discharge experiment showed that isotopes with low- and high-energy radiation components were produced before or during the discharge. The palladium foil after the anomalous gamma-ray emission was analyzed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy, which revealed a considerable increase in the content of iron and copper on the surface.

  12. Magnetic measurements on ??CS{sub 2}U{sub 4}O{sub 12}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanrar, Buddhadev Misra, N. L.; Sastry, P. U.; Dube, V.; Ravikumar, G.

    2014-04-24

    Magnetic and XRD measurements on ??CS{sub 2}U{sub 4}O{sub 12} having uranium in mixed valent states of U (V) and U (VI) have been made. The study reveals that the compound undergoes an antiferromagnetic transition below 25K and an anomalous magnetic behavior was seen around 75K. This anomalous behavior indicates towards a structural phase transition. However, the low temperature XRD could not confirm this observation.

  13. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anomalous Radiative Absorption and Unbounded Cascade Models of Cloud Fields Schertzer, D., and Larchevêque, M., Université P.&M. Curie, Paris, France; Lovejoy, S., McGill University; Naud, C., Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London Ninth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting One of the most achieving results of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program could well have been the empirical finding of the anomalous radiative absorption of the atmosphere. We

  14. Ion Thermal Decoupling and Species Separation in Shock-Driven Implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kagan, G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sio, H.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P.; Bellei, C.; Wilks, S.; Delettrez, J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2015-01-14

    Anomalous reduction of the fusion yields by 50% and anomalous scaling of the burn-averaged ion temperatures with the ion-species fraction has been observed for the first time in DHe3-filled shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions. Two ion kinetic mechanisms are used to explain the anomalous observations: thermal decoupling of the D and He3 populations and diffusive species separation. The observed insensitivity of ion temperature to a varying deuterium fraction is shown to be a signature of ion thermal decoupling in shock-heated plasmas. The burn-averaged deuterium fraction calculated from the experimental data demonstrates a reduction in the average core deuterium density, as predicted by simulations that use a diffusion model. Accounting for each of these effects in simulations reproduces the observed yield trends.

  15. Ion Thermal Decoupling and Species Separation in Shock-Driven Implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kagan, G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sio, H.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; et al

    2015-01-14

    Anomalous reduction of the fusion yields by 50% and anomalous scaling of the burn-averaged ion temperatures with the ion-species fraction has been observed for the first time in DHe3-filled shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions. Two ion kinetic mechanisms are used to explain the anomalous observations: thermal decoupling of the D and He3 populations and diffusive species separation. The observed insensitivity of ion temperature to a varying deuterium fraction is shown to be a signature of ion thermal decoupling in shock-heated plasmas. The burn-averaged deuterium fraction calculated from the experimental data demonstrates a reduction in the average core deuterium density, asmore » predicted by simulations that use a diffusion model. Accounting for each of these effects in simulations reproduces the observed yield trends.« less

  16. Theoretical analysis of the self-frequency shift near zero-dispersion points: Soliton spectral tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsoy, Eduard N.; Sterke, C. Martijn de

    2007-10-15

    Soliton dynamics under the action of higher-order dispersion and the Raman effect is analyzed. Though we consider a wide variety of parameters, a particularly interesting phenomenon occurs when the presence of cubic and quartic dispersion results in two regions of anomalous group velocity dispersion (GVD) separated by a region of normal dispersion. In this case a sharp switching of the soliton frequency from one anomalous GVD region to the other may exist. During such a transformation, the center of the soliton spectrum passes through the normal GVD region. We show that this switching occurs due to the phase matching between the soliton and the resonance frequency in the two anomalous GVD regions.

  17. Infrared singularities of scattering amplitudes in perturbative QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becher, Thomas; Neubert, Matthias

    2013-11-01

    An exact formula is derived for the infrared singularities of dimensionally regularized scattering amplitudes in massless QCD with an arbitrary number of legs, valid at any number of loops. It is based on the conjecture that the anomalous-dimension matrix of n-jet operators in soft-collinear effective theory contains only a single non-trivial color structure, whose coefficient is the cusp anomalous dimension of Wilson loops with light-like segments. Its color-diagonal part is characterized by two anomalous dimensions, which are extracted to three-loop order from known perturbative results for the quark and gluon form factors. This allows us to predict the three-loop coefficients of all 1/epsilon^k poles for an arbitrary n-parton scattering amplitudes, generalizing existing two-loop results.

  18. Single field inflation in supergravity with a U(1) gauge symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heurtier, L.; Khalil, S.; Moursy, A.

    2015-10-19

    A single field inflation based on a supergravity model with a shift symmetry and U(1) extension of the MSSM is analyzed. We show that one of the real components of the two U(1) charged scalar fields plays the role of inflaton with an effective scalar potential similar to the “new chaotic inflation” scenario. Both non-anomalous and anomalous (with Fayet-Iliopoulos term) U(1) are studied. We show that the non-anomalous U(1) scenario is consistent with data of the cosmic microwave background and recent astrophysical measurements. A possible kinetic mixing between U(1) and U(1){sub B−L} is considered in order to allow for natural decay channels of the inflaton, leading to a reheating epoch. Upper limits on the reheating temperature thus turn out to favour an intermediate (∼O(10{sup 13}) GeV) scale B−L symmetry breaking.

  19. Ion Thermal Decoupling and Species Separation in Shock-Driven Implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kagan, G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sio, H.; Frenje, J. A,; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P.; Bellei, C.; Wilks, S.; Delettrez, J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nikroo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Anomalous reduction of the fusion yields by 50% and anomalous scaling of the burn-averaged ion temperatures with the ion-species fraction has been observed for the first time in DHe3-filled shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions. Two ion kinetic mechanisms are used to explain the anomalous observations: thermal decoupling of the D and He3 populations and diffusive species separation. The observed insensitivity of ion temperature to a varying deuterium fraction is shown to be a signature of ion thermal decoupling in shock-heated plasmas. The burn-averaged deuterium fraction calculated from the experimental data demonstrates a reduction in the average core deuterium density, as predicted by simulations that use a diffusion model. Accounting for each of these effects in simulations reproduces the observed yield trends.

  20. Giant phonon anomaly associated with superconducting fluctuations in the pseudogap phase of cuprates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Ye-Hua; Konik, Robert M.; Rice, T. M.; Zhang, Fu-Chun

    2016-01-20

    The pseudogap in underdoped cuprates leads to significant changes in the electronic structure, and was later found to be accompanied by anomalous fluctuations of superconductivity and certain lattice phonons. Here we propose that the Fermi surface breakup due to the pseudogap, leads to a breakup of the pairing order into two weakly coupled sub-band amplitudes, and a concomitant low energy Leggett mode due to phase fluctuations between them. This increases the temperature range of superconducting fluctuations containing an overdamped Leggett mode. In this range inter-sub-band phonons show strong damping due to resonant scattering into an intermediate state with a pairmore » of overdamped Leggett modes. In the ordered state, the Leggett mode develops a finite energy, changing the anomalous phonon damping into an anomaly in the dispersion. Finally, this proposal explains the intrinsic connection between the anomalous pseudogap phase, enhanced superconducting fluctuations and giant anomalies in the phonon spectra.« less

  1. Kinetic modeling of divertor heat load fluxes in the Alcator C-Mod and DIII-D tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pankin, A. Y.; Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Park, G. Y.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S.; Brunner, D.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B.; Terry, J. L.; Groebner, R. J.

    2015-09-15

    The guiding-center kinetic neoclassical transport code, XGC0 [Chang et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2649 (2004)], is used to compute the heat fluxes and the heat-load width in the outer divertor plates of Alcator C-Mod and DIII-D tokamaks. The dependence of the width of heat-load fluxes on neoclassical effects, neutral collisions, and anomalous transport is investigated using the XGC0 code. The XGC0 code includes realistic X-point geometry, a neutral source model, the effects of collisions, and a diffusion model for anomalous transport. It is observed that the width of the XGC0 neoclassical heat-load is approximately inversely proportional to the total plasma current I{sub p.} The scaling of the width of the divertor heat-load with plasma current is examined for an Alcator C-Mod discharge and four DIII-D discharges. The scaling of the divertor heat-load width with plasma current is found to be weaker in the Alcator C-Mod discharge compared to scaling found in the DIII-D discharges. The effect of neutral collisions on the 1/I{sub p} scaling of heat-load width is shown not to be significant. Although inclusion of poloidally uniform anomalous transport results in a deviation from the 1/I{sub p} scaling, the inclusion of the anomalous transport that is driven by ballooning-type instabilities results in recovering the neoclassical 1/I{sub p} scaling. The Bohm or gyro-Bohm scalings of anomalous transport do not strongly affect the dependence of the heat-load width on plasma current. The inclusion of anomalous transport, in general, results in widening the width of neoclassical divertor heat-load and enhances the neoclassical heat-load fluxes on the divertor plates. Understanding heat transport in the tokamak scrape-off layer plasmas is important for strengthening the basis for predicting divertor conditions in ITER.

  2. Nonlinear ELM simulations based on a nonideal peeling–ballooning model using the BOUT++ code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, X. Q.; Dudson, B. D.; Snyder, P. B.; Umansky, M. V.; Wilson, H. R.; Casper, T.

    2011-09-23

    A minimum set of equations based on the peeling–ballooning (P–B) model with nonideal physics effects (diamagnetic drift, E × B drift, resistivity and anomalous electron viscosity) is found to simulate pedestal collapse when using the BOUT++ simulation code, developed in part from the original fluid edge code BOUT. Linear simulations of P–B modes find good agreement in growth rate and mode structure with ELITE calculations. The influence of the E × B drift, diamagnetic drift, resistivity, anomalous electron viscosity, ion viscosity and parallel thermal diffusivity on P–B modes is being studied; we find that (1) the diamagnetic drift and E × B drift stabilize the P–B mode in a manner consistent with theoretical expectations; (2) resistivity destabilizes the P–B mode, leading to resistive P–B mode; (3) anomalous electron and parallel ion viscosities destabilize the P–B mode, leading to a viscous P–B mode; (4) perpendicular ion viscosity and parallel thermal diffusivity stabilize the P–B mode. With addition of the anomalous electron viscosity under the assumption that the anomalous kinematic electron viscosity is comparable to the anomalous electron perpendicular thermal diffusivity, or the Prandtl number is close to unity, it is found from nonlinear simulations using a realistic high Lundquist number that the pedestal collapse is limited to the edge region and the ELM size is about 5–10% of the pedestal stored energy. Furthermore, this is consistent with many observations of large ELMs. The estimated island size is consistent with the size of fast pedestal pressure collapse. In the stable α-zones of ideal P–B modes, nonlinear simulations of viscous ballooning modes or current-diffusive ballooning mode (CDBM) for ITER H-mode scenarios are presented.

  3. Exotic physics: search for new physics leading to high mass tau pairs with ppbar collisions at 1.96 tev using cdf ii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta, D.; The CDF Collaboration

    2005-06-14

    We present the results of a search for anomalous resonant production of tau lepton pairs with large invariant mass, the first such search using the CDF II Detector in Run II of the Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Such anomalous production could arise from various new physics processes. In a data sample corresponding to 195 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity we predict 2.8 {+-} 0.5 events from Standard Model background processes and observe 4. We use this result to set limits on the production of heavy scalar and vector particles decaying to tau lepton pairs.

  4. Analysis of the published calorimetric evidence for electrochemical fusion of deuterium in palladium. Technical report. [Cold fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miskelly, G.M.; Heben, M.J.; Kumar, A.; Penner, R.M.; Sailor, M.J.

    1989-11-10

    Estimates are given of the raw data that are the basis for the claims of excess power production by the electrochemical charging of palladium in deuterium oxide (D2O). Calorimetric results are also presented that show no anomalous power production in either 0.1 M LiOD/D2O or 0.1 M LiOH/H2O (LiOH is lithium hydroxide). Several possible sources of error in open-system calorimetry are discussed that can confound interpretation of temperature changes in terms of anomalous power production.

  5. Analysis of the published calorimetric evidence for electrochemical fusion of deuterium in palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miskelly, G.M.; Heben, M.J.; Kumar, A.; Penner, R.M.; Sailor, M.J.; Lewis, N.S. )

    1989-11-10

    Estimates are given of the raw data that are the basis for the claims of excess power production by the electrochemical charging of palladium in deuterium oxide (D{sub 2}O). Calorimetric results are also presented that show no anomalous power production in either 0.1M LiOD/D{sub 2}O or 0.1M LiOH/H{sub 2}O (LiOH is lithium hydroxide). Several possible sources of error in open-system calorimetry are discussed that can confound interpretation of temperature changes in terms of anomalous power production. 13 refs., 3 figs., 2 tab.

  6. Partial depletion region collapse and its impact on transient capacitance measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lips, K.; Unold, T.; Xu, Y.; Crandall, R.S.

    1996-12-31

    The authors investigate capacitance transients under various experimental conditions on a number of different amorphous silicon Schottky barrier device structures. The samples differ mainly in their back contact configuration, which is non-ohmic for one type of sample and ohmic for the second type of samples. Anomalous transients can be observed for all samples regardless of the back contact if the depletion region is only partially collapsed by partial voltage pulsing. The authors find that samples without an ohmic back contact show a slowly rising capacitance during the filling pulse. These samples show anomalous capacitance transients for short filling pulses.

  7. Subtleties of capacitance transients in amorphous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, R.S.; Lips, K.

    1996-12-31

    Using junction capacitance methods, the authors describe the effect of contacts on charge emission transients in n-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon. The results demonstrate some of the difficulties encountered in observing and interpreting anomalous temperature independent emission transients (slow relaxation). In this paper, the authors present additional data and reconcile the absence of anomalous emission transients in some cases with a discussion of the dynamics of depletion width filling. The authors show that the transient capacitance response of Schottky structure is not only related to the contact configuration but is connected to the rate of charge injection into the depletion region.

  8. Quantum effects in the dynamics of deeply supercooled water

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agapov, Alexander L.; Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Novikov, Vladimir N.; Richert, Ranko; Sokolov, Alexei P

    2015-02-26

    In spite of its simple chemical structure, water remains one of the most puzzling liquids with many anomalies at low temperatures. Combining neutron scattering and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy, we show that quantum fluctuations are not negligible in deeply supercooled water. Our dielectric measurements reveal the anomalously weak temperature dependence of structural relaxation in vapor-deposited water close to the glass transition temperature Tg~136K. We demonstrate that this anomalous behavior can be explained well by quantum effects. In conclusion, these results have significant implications for our understanding of water dynamics.

  9. Manipulating effective spin orbit coupling based on proximity effect in magnetic bilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y. Q.; Sun, N. Y.; Che, W. R.; Zhang, J. W.; Shan, R.; Li, X. L.; Zhu, Z. G. Su, G.

    2015-08-24

    A proximity effect of spin orbit coupling (SOC) is proposed in nonmagnetic metal/ferromagnet (NM/FM) bilayers by extending the Crépieux-Bruno (CB) theory. We demonstrate that over 1000% enhancement of the SOC strength can be realized based on this effect (Pt/FM bilayers) and it brings greatly enhanced anomalous Hall effect and anomalous Nernst effect. This work could help maximize the performance of magnetic transport property for the spintronics device using NM/FM as the key structure.

  10. Photoplethysmography beyond perfusion and oxygenation monitoring: Pulse wave analysis for hepatic graft monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akl, Tony; Wilson, Mark A.; Ericson, Milton Nance; Cote, Gerard L.

    2014-01-01

    Photoplethysmography is a widely used technique in monitoring perfusion and blood oxygen saturation by using the amplitude of the pulsatile signal on one or multiple wavelengths. However, the pulsatile signal carries in its waveform a substantial amount of information about the mechanical properties of the tissue and vasculature under investigation that is still yet to be utilized to its full potential. In this work, we present the feasibility of pulse wave analysis for the application of monitoring hepatic implants and diagnosing graft complications. In particular, we show the possibility of computing the slope of the pulse during the diastole phase to assess the location of vascular complications when they take place. This hypothesis was tested in a series of in vitro experiments using a PDMS based phantom mimicking the optical and mechanical properties of the portal vein. The emptying time of the vessel increased from 305 ms to 515 ms when an occlusion was induced downstream from the phantom. However, in the case of upstream occlusions, the emptying time remained constant. In both cases, a decrease in the amplitude of the pulse was recorded indicating the drop in flow levels. In addition, we show that quantifying the emptying time of the vasculature under investigation can be used to assess its compliance. The emptying time decreased from 305 ms for phantoms with compliance of 15 KPa to 195 ms for phantoms with compliance of 100 KPa. These compliance levels mimic those seen for normal and fibrotic hepatic tissue respectively.

  11. Systematic wavelength selection for improved multivariate spectral analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Edward V.; Robinson, Mark R.; Haaland, David M.

    1995-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for determining in a biological material one or more unknown values of at least one known characteristic (e.g. the concentration of an analyte such as glucose in blood or the concentration of one or more blood gas parameters) with a model based on a set of samples with known values of the known characteristics and a multivariate algorithm using several wavelength subsets. The method includes selecting multiple wavelength subsets, from the electromagnetic spectral region appropriate for determining the known characteristic, for use by an algorithm wherein the selection of wavelength subsets improves the model's fitness of the determination for the unknown values of the known characteristic. The selection process utilizes multivariate search methods that select both predictive and synergistic wavelengths within the range of wavelengths utilized. The fitness of the wavelength subsets is determined by the fitness function F=.function.(cost, performance). The method includes the steps of: (1) using one or more applications of a genetic algorithm to produce one or more count spectra, with multiple count spectra then combined to produce a combined count spectrum; (2) smoothing the count spectrum; (3) selecting a threshold count from a count spectrum to select these wavelength subsets which optimize the fitness function; and (4) eliminating a portion of the selected wavelength subsets. The determination of the unknown values can be made: (1) noninvasively and in vivo; (2) invasively and in vivo; or (3) in vitro.

  12. Distributed low-mass star formation in the IRDC G34.43+00.24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, Jonathan B.; Arce, Hctor G.; Offner, Stella; Kassis, Marc; Sanhueza, Patricio; Jackson, James M.; Finn, Susanna C.; Sakai, Takeshi; Sakai, Nami; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Guzmn, Andrs E.; Rathborne, Jill M.

    2014-08-20

    We have used deep near-infrared observations with adaptive optics to discover a distributed population of low-mass protostars within the filamentary Infrared Dark Cloud G34.43+00.24. We use maps of dust emission at multiple wavelengths to determine the column density structure of the cloud. In combination with an empirically verified model of the magnitude distribution of background stars, this column density map allows us to reliably determine overdensities of red sources that are due to embedded protostars in the cloud. We also identify protostars through their extended emission in the K band, which comes from excited H{sub 2} in protostellar outflows or reflection nebulosity. We find a population of distributed low-mass protostars, suggesting that low-mass protostars may form earlier than, or contemporaneously with, high-mass protostars in such a filament. The low-mass protostellar population may also produce the narrow line-width SiO emission observed in some clouds without high-mass protostars. Finally, we use a molecular line map of the cloud to determine the virial parameter per unit length along the filament and find that the highest mass protostars form in the most bound portion of the filament, as suggested by theoretical models.

  13. TEMPEST Simulations of the Plasma Transport in a Single-Null Tokamak Geometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    X. Q. Xu; Bodi, K.; Cohen, R. H.; Krasheninnikov, S.; Rognlien, T. D.

    2010-05-28

    We present edge kinetic ion transport simulations of tokamak plasmas in magnetic divertor geometry using the fully nonlinear (full-f) continuum code TEMPEST. Besides neoclassical transport, a term for divergence of anomalous kinetic radial flux is added to mock up the effect of turbulent transport. In order to study the relative roles of neoclassical and anomalous transport, TEMPEST simulations were carried out for plasma transport and flow dynamics in a single-null tokamak geometry, including the pedestal region that extends across the separatrix into the scrape-off layer and private flux region. In a series of TEMPEST simulations were conducted to investigate themore » transition of midplane pedestal heat flux and flow from the neoclassical to the turbulent limit and the transition of divertor heat flux and flow from the kinetic to the fluid regime via an anomalous transport scan and a density scan. The TEMPEST simulation results demonstrate that turbulent transport (as modelled by large diffusion) plays a similar role to collisional decorrelation of particle orbits and that the large turbulent transport (large diffusion) leads to an apparent Maxwellianization of the particle distribution. Moreover, we show the transition of parallel heat flux and flow at the entrance to the divertor plates from the fluid to the kinetic regime. For an absorbing divertor plate boundary condition, a non-half-Maxwellian is found due to the balance between upstream radial anomalous transport and energetic ion endloss.« less

  14. Detector signal correction method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, Robert M.; Duran, Andrew J.; Kudman, Irwin

    1995-07-11

    Corrective factors are applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factors may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects.

  15. Anode Sheath Switching in a Carbon Nanotube Arc Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abe Fetterman, Yevgeny Raitses, and Michael Keidar

    2008-04-08

    The anode ablation rate is investigated as a function of anode diameter for a carbon nanotube arc plasma. It is found that anomalously high ablation occurs for small anode diameters. This result is explained by the formation of a positive anode sheath. The increased ablation rate due to this positive anode sheath could imply greater production rate for carbon nanotubes.

  16. The search for extended air showers at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahl, D.; Chau, J.; Galindo, F.; Huaman, A.; Solano, C. J.

    2009-04-30

    This paper presents the status of the project to detect extended air showers at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory. We report on detected anomalous signals and present a toy model to estimate at what altitudes we might expect to see air shower signals. According to this model, a significant number of high altitude horizontal air showers could be observed by radar techniques.

  17. FY2014 Parameters for Helions and Gold Ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, C. J.

    2014-08-15

    The nominal parameters for helions (helion is the bound state of two protons and one neutron, the nucleus of a helium-3 atom) and gold ions in Booster, AGS, and RHIC are given for the FY2014 running period. The parameters are found using various formulas to derive mass, helion anomalous g-factor, kinetic parameters, RF parameters, ring parameters, etc..

  18. New physics searches with photons in CDF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sungwon Lee

    2004-05-24

    A brief review of searches for physics beyond the Standard Model with photons using the CDF detector at the Tevatron is given here. These include searches for supersymmetry, extra dimensions, excited electrons and W/Z+{gamma} production, as well as anomalous photon production. Recent results from CDF Run II experiment are presented, but some results from Run I are also reviewed.

  19. SSRL HEADLINES Nov 2002

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 November, 2002 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of This Issue: Science Highlight - Towards the Chemically Specific Structure of Amorphous Materials: Anomalous X-ray Scattering from a Molybdenum-Germanium Alloy U.S. Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham Visits SLAC Critical Decision 1 Approval Moves LCLS Project Forward SLAC-DESY MOU Amped Up and Ready to Go! Organizational Changes in Macromolecular Crystallography Group User Research

  20. Using analytic continuation for the hadronic vacuum polarization computation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Xu; Hashimoto, Shoji; Hotzel, Grit; Jansen, Karl; Petschlies, Marcus; Renner Dru B

    2014-11-01

    We present two examples of applications of the analytic continuation method for computing the hadronic vacuum polarization function in space- and time-like momentum regions. These examples are the Adler function and the leading order hadronic contribution to the muon anomalous magnetic moment. We comment on the feasibility of the analytic continuation method and provide an outlook for possible further applications.

  1. Investigation of ELM [edge localized mode] Dynamics with the Resonant Magnetic Perturbation Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pankin, Alexei Y.; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2011-07-19

    Topics covered are: anomalous transport and E x B flow shear effects in the H-mode pedestal; RMP (resonant magnetic perturbation) effects in NSTX discharges; development of a scaling of H-mode pedestal in tokamak plasmas with type I ELMs (edge localized modes); and divertor heat load studies.

  2. METHANE IN THE ATMOSPHERE OF THE TRANSITING HOT NEPTUNE GJ436B?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, J.-P.; Batista, V.; Tinetti, G.; Kipping, D. M.; Barber, R. J.; Tennyson, J.; Waldmann, I.; Miller, S.; Fossey, S. J.; Aylward, A.; Ribas, I.; Cho, J. Y.-K.; Polichtchouk, I.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Griffith, C. A.; Carey, S.; Mousis, O.

    2011-04-10

    We present an analysis of seven primary transit observations of the hot Neptune GJ436b at 3.6, 4.5, and 8 {mu}m obtained with the Infrared Array Camera on the Spitzer Space Telescope. After correcting for systematic effects, we fitted the light curves using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique. Combining these new data with the EPOXI, Hubble Space Telescope, and ground-based V, I, H, and K{sub s} published observations, the range 0.5-10 {mu}m can be covered. Due to the low level of activity of GJ436, the effect of starspots on the combination of transits at different epochs is negligible at the accuracy of the data set. Representative climate models were calculated by using a three-dimensional, pseudospectral general circulation model with idealized thermal forcing. Simulated transit spectra of GJ436b were generated using line-by-line radiative transfer models including the opacities of the molecular species expected to be present in such a planetary atmosphere. A new, ab-initio-calculated, line list for hot ammonia has been used for the first time. The photometric data observed at multiple wavelengths can be interpreted with methane being the dominant absorption after molecular hydrogen, possibly with minor contributions from ammonia, water, and other molecules. No clear evidence of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide is found from transit photometry. We discuss this result in the light of a recent paper where photochemical disequilibrium is hypothesized to interpret secondary transit photometric data. We show that the emission photometric data are not incompatible with the presence of abundant methane, but further spectroscopic data are desirable to confirm this scenario.

  3. SU-E-T-20: A Novel Hybrid CBCT, Bioluminescence and Fluorescence Tomography System for Preclinical Radiation Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, B; Eslami, S; Iordachita, I; Yang, Y; Patterson, M; Wong, J; Wang, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A novel standalone bioluminescence and fluorescence tomography (BLT and FT) system equipped with high resolution CBCT has been built in our group. In this work, we present the system calibration method and validate our system in both phantom and in vivo environment. Methods: The CBCT is acquired by rotating the animal stage while keeping the x-ray source and detector panel static. The optical signal is reflected by the 3-mirror system to a multispectral filter set and then delivered to the CCD camera with f/1.4 lens mounted. Nine fibers passing through the stage and in contact with the mouse skin serve as the light sources for diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and FT. The anatomical information and optical properties acquired from the CBCT and DOT, respectively, are used as the priori information to improve the BLT/FT reconstruction accuracy. Flat field correction for the optical system was acquired at multiple wavelengths. A home-built phantom is used to register the optical and CBCT coordinates. An absolute calibration relating the CCD photon counts rate to the light fluence rate emitted at animal surface was developed to quantify the bioluminescence power or fluorophore concentration. Results: An optical inhomogeneous phantom with 2 light sources (3mm separation) imbedded is used to test the system. The optical signal is mapped onto the mesh generated from CBCT for optical reconstruction. Our preliminary results show that the center of mass can be reconstructed within 2.8mm accuracy. A live mouse with the light source imbedded is also used to validate our system. Liver or lung metastatic luminescence tumor model will be used for further testing. Conclusion: This hybrid system transforms preclinical research to a level that even sub-palpable volume of cells can be imaged rapidly and non-invasively, which largely extends the scope of radiobiological research. The research is supported by the NCI grant R01CA158100-01.

  4. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RADIO AND X-RAY MODELING AND DATA ANALYSIS SOFTWARE: REVEALING FLARE COMPLEXITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nita, Gelu M.; Fleishman, Gregory D.; Gary, Dale E.; Kuznetsov, Alexey A.; Kontar, Eduard P.

    2015-02-01

    Many problems in solar physics require analysis of imaging data obtained in multiple wavelength domains with differing spatial resolution in a framework supplied by advanced three-dimensional (3D) physical models. To facilitate this goal, we have undertaken a major enhancement of our IDL-based simulation tools developed earlier for modeling microwave and X-ray emission. The enhanced software architecture allows the user to (1) import photospheric magnetic field maps and perform magnetic field extrapolations to generate 3D magnetic field models; (2) investigate the magnetic topology by interactively creating field lines and associated flux tubes; (3) populate the flux tubes with user-defined nonuniform thermal plasma and anisotropic, nonuniform, nonthermal electron distributions; (4) investigate the spatial and spectral properties of radio and X-ray emission calculated from the model; and (5) compare the model-derived images and spectra with observational data. The package integrates shared-object libraries containing fast gyrosynchrotron emission codes, IDL-based soft and hard X-ray codes, and potential and linear force-free field extrapolation routines. The package accepts user-defined radiation and magnetic field extrapolation plug-ins. We use this tool to analyze a relatively simple single-loop flare and use the model to constrain the magnetic 3D structure and spatial distribution of the fast electrons inside this loop. We iteratively compute multi-frequency microwave and multi-energy X-ray images from realistic magnetic flux tubes obtained from pre-flare extrapolations, and compare them with imaging data obtained by SDO, NoRH, and RHESSI. We use this event to illustrate the tool's use for the general interpretation of solar flares to address disparate problems in solar physics.

  5. Impact of biomass burning aerosol on the monsoon circulation transition over Amazonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Fu, Rong; Yu, Hongbin; Qian, Yun; Dickinson, Robert; Silva Dias, Maria Assuncao F.; da Silva Dias, Pedro L.; Fernandes, Katia

    2009-05-30

    Ensemble simulations of a regional climate model (RegCM3) forced by aerosol radiative forcing suggest that biomass burning aerosols can work against the seasonal monsoon circulation transition, thus re-enforce the dry season rainfall pattern for Southern Amazonia. Strongly absorbing smoke aerosols warm and stabilize the lower troposphere within the smoke center in southern Amazonia (where aerosol optical depth > 0.3). These changes increase the surface pressure in the smoke center, weaken the southward surface pressure gradient between northern and southern Amazonia, and consequently induce an anomalous moisture divergence in the smoke center and an anomalous convergence occurs in northwestern Amazonia (5S-5N, 60W-40 70W). The increased atmospheric thermodynamic stability, surface pressure, and divergent flow in Southern Amazonia may inhibit synoptic cyclonic activities propagated from extratropical South America, and re-enforce winter-like synoptic cyclonic activities and rainfall in southeastern Brazil, Paraguay and northeastern Argentina.

  6. High speed measurements of neutral beam turn-on and impact of beam modulation on measurements of ion density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grierson, B. A. Grisham, L.; Burrell, K. H.; Crowley, B.; Scoville, J. T.

    2014-10-15

    Modulation of neutral beams on tokamaks is performed routinely, enabling background rejection for active spectroscopic diagnostics, and control of injected power and torque. We find that there exists an anomalous initial transient in the beam neutrals delivered to the tokamak that is not accounted for by the accelerator voltage and power supply current. Measurements of the charge-exchange and beam photoemission on the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] at high speed (200 ?s) reveal that the energy of the beam neutrals is constant, but the density of beam neutrals displays dramatic variation in the first 23 ms following beam turn-on. The impact of this beam density variation on inferred ion densities and impurity transport is presented, with suggested means to correct for the anomalous transient.

  7. Raman scattering as a tool for the evaluation of strain in GaN/AlN quantum dots: The effect of capping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cros, A.; Cantarero, A.; Garro, N.; Coraux, J.; Daudin, B.

    2007-10-15

    The strain state of GaN/AlN quantum dots grown on 6H-SiC has been investigated as a function of AlN capping thickness by three different techniques. On the one hand, resonant Raman scattering allowed the detection of the A{sub 1}(LO) quasiconfined mode. It was found that its frequency increases with AlN deposition, while its linewidth did not evolve significantly. Available experiments of multiwavelength anomalous diffraction and diffraction anomalous fine structure on the same samples provided the determination of the wurtzite lattice parameters a and c of the quantum dots. A very good agreement is found between resonant Raman scattering and x-ray measurements, especially concerning the in-plane strain state. The results demonstrate the adequacy of Raman scattering, in combination with the deformation potential and biaxial approximations, to determine quantitatively values of strain in GaN quantum dot layers.

  8. System and method for the detection of anomalies in an image

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Lakshman; Swaminarayan, Sriram

    2013-09-03

    Preferred aspects of the present invention can include receiving a digital image at a processor; segmenting the digital image into a hierarchy of feature layers comprising one or more fine-scale features defining a foreground object embedded in one or more coarser-scale features defining a background to the one or more fine-scale features in the segmentation hierarchy; detecting a first fine-scale foreground feature as an anomaly with respect to a first background feature within which it is embedded; and constructing an anomalous feature layer by synthesizing spatially contiguous anomalous fine-scale features. Additional preferred aspects of the present invention can include detecting non-pervasive changes between sets of images in response at least in part to one or more difference images between the sets of images.

  9. Enhanced densification under shock compression in porous silicon

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lane, J. Matthew; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Vogler, Tracy

    2014-10-27

    Under shock compression, most porous materials exhibit lower densities for a given pressure than that of a full-dense sample of the same material. However, some porous materials exhibit an anomalous, or enhanced, densification under shock compression. The mechanism driving this behavior was not completely determined. We present evidence from atomistic simulation that pure silicon belongs to this anomalous class of materials and demonstrate the associated mechanisms responsible for the effect in porous silicon. Atomistic response indicates that local shear strain in the neighborhood of collapsing pores catalyzes a local solid-solid phase transformation even when bulk pressures are below the thermodynamicmore » phase transformation pressure. This metastable, local, and partial, solid-solid phase transformation, which accounts for the enhanced densification in silicon, is driven by the local stress state near the void, not equilibrium thermodynamics. This mechanism may also explain the phenomenon in other covalently bonded materials.« less

  10. Situ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-06-16

    Rapidly discovering novel and sophisticated cyber attacks and providing situation aware-ness to analysts are unsolved problems in cyber security. We have developed a platform that scores events in real-time based on probabilistic models to define how typical an event is. This anomaly detection approach is based on unsupervised, probabilistic modeling of data at multiple scales. Scoring events based on multiple scales allows the system to 1) score anomalousness at different levels to detect important events that would otherwise be hidden, and 2) explain to users why an event is anomalous, not just that it is. The system was designed to address several challenges: 1) scaling to very high volume, heterogeneous, streaming data, and 2) minimizing the time from observation to discovery to understanding. The prototype has the real-time framework for pushing scored events to a web-based visualization.

  11. Enhanced densification under shock compression in porous silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, J. Matthew; Thompson, Aidan Patrick; Vogler, Tracy

    2014-10-27

    Under shock compression, most porous materials exhibit lower densities for a given pressure than that of a full-dense sample of the same material. However, some porous materials exhibit an anomalous, or enhanced, densification under shock compression. The mechanism driving this behavior was not completely determined. We present evidence from atomistic simulation that pure silicon belongs to this anomalous class of materials and demonstrate the associated mechanisms responsible for the effect in porous silicon. Atomistic response indicates that local shear strain in the neighborhood of collapsing pores catalyzes a local solid-solid phase transformation even when bulk pressures are below the thermodynamic phase transformation pressure. This metastable, local, and partial, solid-solid phase transformation, which accounts for the enhanced densification in silicon, is driven by the local stress state near the void, not equilibrium thermodynamics. This mechanism may also explain the phenomenon in other covalently bonded materials.

  12. Situ

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-06-16

    Rapidly discovering novel and sophisticated cyber attacks and providing situation aware-ness to analysts are unsolved problems in cyber security. We have developed a platform that scores events in real-time based on probabilistic models to define how typical an event is. This anomaly detection approach is based on unsupervised, probabilistic modeling of data at multiple scales. Scoring events based on multiple scales allows the system to 1) score anomalousness at different levels to detect important eventsmore » that would otherwise be hidden, and 2) explain to users why an event is anomalous, not just that it is. The system was designed to address several challenges: 1) scaling to very high volume, heterogeneous, streaming data, and 2) minimizing the time from observation to discovery to understanding. The prototype has the real-time framework for pushing scored events to a web-based visualization.« less

  13. Observation of meshlike traces on nuclear emulsions during cold fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsumoto, Takaaki )

    1993-01-01

    Cold fusion products from the electrolysis of heavy water have been directly measured by using a thin palladium foil. Several anomalous traces have been clearly recorded on nuclear emulsions. Some traces have meshlike structures, which are classified into two types: (a) ones associated with ring traces that are caused by the gravity decay of quad-neutrons and (b) ones with no ring traces. The mechanisms that form these meshlike traces are discussed in terms of the Nattoh model. It is inferred that multiple-neutron nuclei such as quad-neutrons, covered by itonic mesh and iton beads, are born during cold fusion. Furthermore, other anomalous traces suggest the production of a new heavy particle during gravity decay. 14 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Measurement of the $WZ$ Cross Section and Triple Gauge Couplings in $p \\bar p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2012-02-01

    This Letter describes the current most precise measurement of the WZ production cross section as well as limits on anomalous WWZ couplings at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV in proton-antiproton collisions. The WZ candidates are reconstructed from decays containing three charged leptons and missing energy from a neutrino, where the charged leptons are either electrons or muons. Using data collected by the CDF II detector (7.1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity), 64 candidate events are observed with the expected background contributing 8 {+-} 1 events. The measured total cross section {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WZ) = 3.93{sub -0.53}{sup +0.60}(stat){sub -0.46}{sup +0.59}(syst) pb is in good agreement with the standard model prediction of 3.50 {+-} 0.21. The same sample is used to set limits on anomalous WWZ couplings.

  15. Experimental Station 7-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Beamline 7-1 is a wiggler side-station beamline dedicated for monochromatic, high-throughput, high-resolution macromolecular crystallography. It is SAD and MAD capable and can be run in a full remote access mode. It is equipped with an ADSC Q315R CCD detector. For aditional information about the experimental capabilities, see http://smb.slac.stanford.edu/index.shtml. Status Open Supported Techniques Macromolecular Crystallography Multi wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) Single wavelength

  16. Deconfinement to quark matter in neutron stars - The influence of strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dexheimer, V.; Negreiros, R.; Schramm, S.; Hempel, M.

    2013-03-25

    We use an extended version of the hadronic SU(3) non-linear realization of the sigma model that also includes quarks to study hybrid stars. Within this approach, the degrees of freedom change naturally as the temperature/density increases. Different prescriptions of charge neutrality, local and global, are tested and the influence of strong magnetic fields and the anomalous magnetic moment on the particle population is discussed.

  17. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Minimal Shortwave Anomalous Absorption Found over ACRF Sites Download a printable PDF Submitter: Dong, X., University of Arizona Minnis, P., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Dong, X, BA Wielicki, B Xi, Y Hu, GG Mace, S Benson, F Rose, S Kato, T Charlock, and P Minnis. 2008. "Using observations of deep convective systems to constrain atmospheric column absorption of solar radiation in the optically

  18. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantifying the Magnitude of Anomalous Solar Absorption Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Spurred by a series of articles published in 1995 claiming solar absorption in cloudy atmospheres far exceeded model predictions, Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program researchers at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma

  19. Tuning Pore Size to Enhance the Capacitance of Supercapacitors | U.S. DOE

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Office of Science (SC) Tuning Pore Size to Enhance the Capacitance of Supercapacitors Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights Highlight Archives News & Events Publications History Contact BES Home 04.27.12 Tuning Pore Size to Enhance the Capacitance of Supercapacitors Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Scientific Achievement Simulations of nanoporous super-capacitors confirm and help to understand the anomalous increase in

  20. Detector signal correction method and system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, R.M.; Duran, A.J.; Kudman, I.

    1995-07-11

    Corrective factors are applied so as to remove anomalous features from the signal generated by a photoconductive detector, and to thereby render the output signal highly linear with respect to the energy of incident, time-varying radiation. The corrective factors may be applied through the use of either digital electronic data processing means or analog circuitry, or through a combination of those effects. 5 figs.