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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

FT Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FT Solutions LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: FT Solutions LLC Place: South Jordan, Utah Zip: 84095 Product: JV between Headwaters Technology Innovation Group and Rentech to...

2

Released: March 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million" "Code(a)","End Use","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons

3

Sandia National Laboratories: SWiFT Operations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Operations SWiFT Operations wind-turbines The DOESNL SWiFT facility has three research-scale variable-speed variable-pitch modified wind turbines with full power conversion and an...

4

UK FT PDU Facility Draft EA  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Process Development Unit Facility February 2014 The facility is sized as a small-scale pilot CBTL plant that would produce research quantities of FT liquid fuels at...

5

Cosmological perturbations in f(T) gravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the cosmological perturbations in f(T) gravity. Examining the pure gravitational perturbations in the scalar sector using a diagonal vierbein, we extract the corresponding dispersion relation, which provides a constraint on the f(T) Ansaetze that lead to a theory free of instabilities. Additionally, upon inclusion of the matter perturbations, we derive the fully perturbed equations of motion, and we study the growth of matter overdensities. We show that f(T) gravity with f(T) constant coincides with General Relativity, both at the background as well as at the first-order perturbation level. Applying our formalism to the power-law model we find that on large subhorizon scales (O(100 Mpc) or larger), the evolution of matter overdensity will differ from {Lambda}CDM cosmology. Finally, examining the linear perturbations of the vector and tensor sectors, we find that (for the standard choice of vierbein) f(T) gravity is free of massive gravitons.

Chen, Shih-Hung; Dent, James B. [Department of Physics and School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1404 (United States); Dutta, Sourish [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Saridakis, Emmanuel N. [College of Mathematics and Physics, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Chongqing 400065 (China)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

6

RICOH FT MODELS PRODUCT ASU STOCK # FT 3013/3213/3513/3713 TONER TYPE 320 CP502006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RICOH FT MODELS PRODUCT ASU STOCK # FT 3013/3213/3513/3713 TONER TYPE 320 CP502006 DEVELOPER TYPE 310 CP502027 FT 3113/3313 TONER TYPE 310 CP502005 DEVELOPER TYPE 310 CP502027 FT 3320 TONER TYPE 3300 CP502025 DEVELOPER TYPE 3300 CP502026 FT 4415/4418/4421/4220/4222/4215 TONER TYPE 410 CP502028

Rhoads, James

7

Kerr geometry in f(T) gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Null tetrads are shown to be a valuable tool in teleparallel theories of modified gravity. We use them to prove that Kerr geometry remains a solution for a wide family of f(T) theories of gravity.

Cecilia Bejarano; Rafael Ferraro; María José Guzmán

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

2-ft Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-ft Flume Facility 2-ft Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 2-ft Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 61.0 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

9

Table S1. Fuel Properties. JP-8 Blend-1 FT-1 Blend-2 FT-2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

58 45 51 H Content (% mass) 13.6 14.5 15.5 14.3 15.1 Heat of Combust. (MJ/kg) 43.3 43.8 44.4 43.8 441 Table S1. Fuel Properties. JP-8 Blend-1 FT-1 Blend-2 FT-2 Feedstock Petroleum Petroleum & Natural Gas Natural Gas Petroleum & Coal Coal Sulfur (ppm by mass) 1148 699 19 658 22 Alkanes (% vol.) 50

Meskhidze, Nicholas

10

U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado Photo of High-Bay Aviation Maintenance Facility at Butts Army Airfield Fort Carson U.S. Army Base is located south of...

11

Natural Disaster Survey Report Ft. Smith and Van Buren, Arkansas,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and conversations with volunteer amateur radio operators, members of the print and broadcast media in Ft. Smith to the U.S. Congress, to local government officials in Ft. Smith and Van Buren, and to the media on May 21Natural Disaster Survey Report Ft. Smith and Van Buren, Arkansas, Tornado of April 21, 1996 U

12

U.S. Army- Ft. Carson, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fort Carson U.S. Army Base is located south of Colorado Springs, Colorado. It was the first Federal facility to install a "solar wall"—a solar ventilation air preheating system. The solar wall heats Ft. Carson's new high-bay aviation maintenance facility at Butts Army Airfield by pre-warming air as much as 54°F and supplying the heated air to the building's central heating system. This collector system is especially advantageous for buildings that require large volumes of heated air.

13

"Table A32. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(d)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

14

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

15

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million kWh)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

16

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" 6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

17

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1, 2006;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

18

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

19

Released: March 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)" "End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu

20

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million" "End Use","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)"

22

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.1, 2006;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.1, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

23

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)",,"LPG and",,"Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion",,"NGL(d)",,"(million","(million","Other(e)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)",,"short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

24

"Table A33. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," " and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000 ","(1000","(trillion","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","Btu)","Factors"

25

Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Imaging. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Abstract: Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power...

26

New Cryogenic Apparatus for FT-IR Spectroscopic Studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cryogenic Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, being an effective technique in improving the spectral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, is utilized in our group....

Kang, Ning; Xu, Yizhuang; Ferraro, J R; Li, Weihong; Weng, Shifu; Xu, Duanfu; Wu, Jinguang; Soloway, R D; Xu, Guangxian

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A Low-Cost Reflectance FT-IR Microscope  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) microscope combines microscopy with infrared (IR) spectroscopic molecular characterization. IR microspectroscopy presents a...

Jansen, J A J; Van Der Maas, J H; Posthuma De Boer, A

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ft Bidwell Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ft. Bidwell, California Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

29

U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado October 7, 2013 - 10:01am Addthis Photo of High-Bay Aviation Maintenance Facility at Butts Army Airfield Fort Carson U.S. Army Base is located south of Colorado Springs, Colorado. It was the first Federal facility to install a "solar wall"-a solar ventilation air preheating system. The solar wall heats Ft. Carson's new high-bay aviation maintenance facility at Butts Army Airfield by pre-warming air as much as 54°F and supplying the heated air to the building's central heating system. This collector system is especially advantageous for buildings that require large volumes of heated air. The system cost $140,000 to design, build, and install. The unglazed collector consists of 7,800 ft.² of sheet metal dotted with tiny holes. It

30

Spherically symmetric static spacetimes in vacuum f(T) gravity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that Schwarzschild geometry remains as a vacuum solution for those four-dimensional f(T) gravitational theories behaving as ultraviolet deformations of general relativity. In the gentler context of three-dimensional gravity, we also find that the infrared-deformed f(T) gravities, like the ones used to describe the late cosmic speed up of the Universe, have as the circularly symmetric vacuum solution a Deser-de Sitter or a Banados, Teitelboim and Zanelli-like spacetime with an effective cosmological constant depending on the infrared scale present in the function f(T).

Ferraro, Rafael [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fiorini, Franco [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Application of Printed Circuit Board Technology to FT-ICR MS...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to FT-ICR MS Analyzer Cell Construction and Prototyping. Abstract: Although Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICRMS) remains themass spectrometry...

32

Advanced Mass Calibration and Visualization for FT-ICR Mass Spectromet...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging. Abstract: Mass spectrometry imaging by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) yields hundreds of unique peaks, many of which...

33

FT-ICR MS optimization for the analysis of intact proteins. ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FT-ICR MS optimization for the analysis of intact proteins. Abstract: Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS) remains the technique of...

34

0.6 cu. ft. (17 litre) capacity microwave 700 watts of cooking power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Installation/yearly maintenance not included. Danby ENERGY STAR Mini Fridge (DCR88WDD) Danby Microwave (DMW608W

Lotze, Heike K.

35

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A computer search of both the open and the patent literature was conducted in order to ascertain the current state of cobalt-based catalyst technology for F-T synthesis. Two series of literature searches were conducted, one dealing specifically with cobalt catalysts for F-T synthesis and the other focusing on the preparation and/or characterization of supported cobalt catalysts including those not used for F-T synthesis. An initial screening of the literature was carried out by examining the 942 abstracts obtained from these searches. The main objective of this initial screening was the selection of the most pertinent publications for this work. out of the 230 patent references obtained from the computer search, about 90 were found to be directly related the preparation of cobalt catalysts and their use in FT synthesis. Copies of patents (78 patents) not available within the group have been ordered but not yet received. Based on a preliminary analysis,of the abstracts of the most pertinent patents a distribution among the various patent assignees is given in Table 1. As can be seen in Table 1, most of the patents for Co FT catalysts have been assigned to very few companies, the first four, i.e. Exxon, Shell, Gulf, and Statoil representing the most relevant ones. This preliminary analysis of the patent literature permitted a selection of a number of benchmark catalysts the formulations of which will be based on the patents of these four companies.

Not Available

1993-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

36

1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-ft Wave Flume Facility -ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.5 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

37

10-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 10-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 3.0 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

38

Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The 2-Foot Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel is a vertical plane, closed recirculating, variable-speed, variable-pressure, open jet test section, closed jet test section, and semi-rectangular test section. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 17 Recirculating Yes

39

Stratigraphic Units at Ft. Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stratigraphic Units at Ft. Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge Mrs. Flynn's Earth Science Class this formation are wind-blown volcanic ash. The climate may have been more arid than during the time Hills (continued) These were deposited by the wind. The climate was similar to the present day climate

Frank, Tracy D.

40

11-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 77.4 Beam(m) 3.4 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

3-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-ft Wave Flume Facility 3-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.9 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

42

5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-ft Wave Flume Facility 5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 1.5 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

43

Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Beam(m) 0.7 Depth(m) 0.7 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel is a vertical plane, closed recirculating with resorber, variable-speed, variable-pressure, two interchangeable circular test sections. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 25.8 Recirculating Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None

44

Technology development for iron F-T catalysts. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this work were twofold. The first objective was to design and construct a pilot plant for preparing precipitated iron oxide F-T precursors and demonstrate that the rate of production from this plant is equivalent to 100 lbs/day of dried metal oxide. Secondly, these precipitates were to be used to prepare catalysts capable of achieving 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion with {le} 5 mole percent selectivity to methane + ethane.

Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

U.S. Army - Ft. U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies Project Planning & Implementation Project Assistance

46

Mass Spectrometer: FT-ICR, 6T (Ion Surface Collisions) | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mass Spectrometer: FT-ICR, 6T (Ion Surface Collisions) The 6-Tesla High-Field Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FT-ICR MS), is a unique instrument...

47

Generalized second law of thermodynamics in f(T) gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the validity of the generalized second law (GSL) of gravitational thermodynamics in the framework of f(T) modified teleparallel gravity. We consider a spatially flat FRW universe containing only the pressureless matter. The boundary of the universe is assumed to be enclosed by the Hubble horizon. For two viable f(T) models containing $f(T)=T+\\mu_1{(-T)}^n$ and $f(T)=T-\\mu_2 T(1-e^{\\beta\\frac{T_0}{T}})$, we first calculate the effective equation of state and deceleration parameters. Then, we investigate the null and strong energy conditions and conclude that a sudden future singularity appears in both models. Furthermore, using a cosmographic analysis we check the viability of two models. Finally, we examine the validity of the GSL and find that for both models it is satisfied from the early times to the present epoch. But in the future, the GSL is violated for the special ranges of the torsion scalar T.

K. Karami; A. Abdolmaleki

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

48

CuO–PAA hybrid films: Chemical synthesis and supercapacitor behavior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the synthesis of CuO–Poly (acrylic) acid (PAA) hybrid thin films by a cost-effective spin coating technique for supercapacitor application. Coated films were annealed at 300, 400 and 500 °C, to study the annealing effect on the supercapacitor behavior. Further films were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform-Raman spectroscopy (FT-Raman) and Fourier transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) techniques. Energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) shows the formation of amorphous blend of CuO and Cu2O phases at 300 °C. Further, films annealed at 400 and 500 °C exhibit polycrystalline phase pure CuO with monoclinic structure. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs show the transition of island-like structure to CuO crystals surrounded by PAA grafted composite ring with increase in annealing temperature. The possible growth mechanism of PAA and CuO bonding is discussed. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) is employed to calculate the specific capacitance (Csp) in 1 M H2SO4 electrolyte. It is observed that the Csp increases from 41 to136 F g?1 with increase in annealing temperature.

J.S. Shaikh; R.C. Pawar; A.V. Moholkar; J.H. Kim; P.S. Patil

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

CU | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CU CU Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Casual Use Determination of NEPA Adequacy Categorical Exclusion Environmental Assessment Environmental Impact Statements Print PDF NEPA-Related Analysis: Casual Use (CU) General Document Collections (26) Documents Regulatory Roadmap Type of NEPA environmental analysis placeholder. This query has been included to allow you to use the black arrows in the table header cells to sort the table data. Document # Serial Number Applicant Lead Agency District Office Field Office Development Phase(s) Techniques NVN-084629 CU, CU Vulcan Energy BLM Nevada State Office BLM Winnemucca District Office BLM Humboldt River Field Office BLM BLM NVN-084630 CU Vulcan Energy BLM Nevada State Office BLM Winnemucca District Office BLM Humboldt River Field Office BLM

50

6-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Flume Facility Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 6-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 105.2 Beam(m) 1.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

51

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 3 0 * 2 * 0 * * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3 0 * 2 * 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 * 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

52

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

53

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

54

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 166 End-Use Categories (trillion Btu) kWh) (1000 bbl) (1000 bbl) cu ft) (1000 bbl) tons) (trillion Btu) Total (million Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel (billion LPG (1000 short Other Net Distillate Natural and Electricity Residual Fuel Oil and Gas Breeze) a b c Coal (excluding Coal Coke d RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: NF 0.5 1.3 1.4 0.8 1.2 1.2 NF TOTAL INPUTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,515 778,335 70,111 26,107 5,962 25,949 54,143 5,828 2.7 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --

55

table5.1_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Row Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: 0.3 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 NF TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 832,257 33 24 5,641 26 53 6,006 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 3,540 20 6

56

Table 2.1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 10 * * 4 Q 0 0 2 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6 0 * 1 Q 0 0 2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 * * 1 * 0 0 * 3115 Dairy Products Q 0 * * * 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

57

table2.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.2 1.1 0.7 1.2 311 Food 8 * * 7 0 0 * * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar * 0 * * 0 0 * * 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning * * * 0 0 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1 * * * 0 0 0 1 3121 Beverages * * * 0 0 0 0 *

58

Table 1.1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; 1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,162 75,407 2 4 567 2 8 * 96 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 355 16,479 * * 119 Q 6 0 47 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 215 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 26 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

59

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

60

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

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61

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18 39 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 12,979 7 3 2,074 3 26 Conventional Boiler Use 12,979 3 1 712 1 3 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 3 1,362 2 23 Direct Uses-Total Process 675,152 4 9 2,549 7 13 Process Heating

62

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

63

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

64

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,124 73,551 4 3 618 1 7 * 45 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 316 15,536 * * 115 * 5 0 28 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,801 * * 51 * 4 0 8 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 67 974 1 * 17 * 1 * 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 168 9,721

65

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

66

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

67

table5.3_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Net Demand Fuel Oil Coal for Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Row Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: NF 1 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 966,231 33 24 5,641 26 53 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 6,714 20 6 2,105 2 35 5.3 Conventional Boiler Use

68

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 618 1 7 * 107 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 317 15,464 * * 115 * 5 0 30 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,746 * * 51 * 4 0 9 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 82 968 1 * 17 * 1 * 20 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 169 9,708 * * 123 * * 0 4 3115 Dairy Product

69

Sandia National Laboratories: New Facility Tool at SWiFT Makes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Updated New Facility Tool at SWiFT Makes Rotor Work More Efficient On January 22, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, SWIFT,...

70

SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers....

71

SESAM FT-IR: A Comparison of the R&D Workhorse to Standard Emission Benches  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Data for a number of regulated emissions and ethanol using the SESAM FT-IR compare favorably with standard emissions analyzers.

72

Mass of Cu-57  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the extension of these systematics to higher Z. If the 3 =57 nuclei have true single particle low-lying states, the Cu beta decay rates determine the 2p3/2 +2p3/2 and 2p 3/2 ~2p ~ &2 Gamow-Teller matrix elements, providing a measure of Gamow... with A ~ 56 (Ref. 3) and possibly for the time evolu- tion of cosmic x-ray bursts. Cu has been observed in the Cu~ Ni+e++v, and Ni( Li, He} Cu reactions. The former study found the Cu mass excess to be ?47.34(13) MeV and deter- mined its beta decay...

Gagliardi, Carl A.; Semon, D. R.; Tribble, Robert E.; Vanausdeln, L. A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Supercapacitor behavior of CuO–PAA hybrid films: Effect of PAA concentration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Cu–poly(acrylic) acid (PAA) thin films were deposited at room temperature by a simple and cost effective polymer assisted deposition (PAD) method. The solution containing Cu salt and PAA was spin coated to yield the thin films with desired properties. The Cu–PAA films were annealed at 400 °C in ambient air for 4 h to obtain CuO–PAA phase. The effect of PAA concentration on the film properties is studied and characterized by employing various techniques. The structural and surface morphological studies are carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and FT-Raman spectroscopy are employed to investigate the hybrid film formation. Wetting behavior is studied by measuring the contact angle of water on the film surface. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) studies were carried out to investigate the specific capacitance of CuO–PAA films in aqueous 1 M H2SO4 electrolyte. Hybrid films deposited with 2 mM PAA exhibits highest specific capacitance of 65 F g?1.

J.S. Shaikh; R.C. Pawar; N.L. Tarwal; D.S. Patil; P.S. Patil

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Author's personal copy Unexpected new phase detected in FT30 type reverse osmosis membranes using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Unexpected new phase detected in FT30 type reverse osmosis membranes using Available online 13 July 2011 Keywords: Reverse osmosis membranes X-ray microscopy Poly phenylene diamine a b s t r a c t FT30 type thin film composite membranes used for reverse osmosis water purification

Hitchcock, Adam P.

75

CdTe-Cu(OH){sub 2} nanocomposite: Aqueous synthesis and characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CdTe-Cu(OH){sub 2} nanocomposites were synthesized in aqueous solution by a seed-mediated growth approach. The effect of refluxing time and the concentration of Cu{sup 2+} on the preparation of these samples were measured using UV-visible absorption and photoluminescence analysis. The emission peak of the synthesized nanocomposites (CdTe-Cu(OH){sub 2}) was shifted from 605 (CdTe seed) to 621 nm. The size of CdTe nanoparticles were averaged about 3.22 nm, and the CdTe-Cu(OH){sub 2} nanocomposites were averaged as 5.19 nm. The synthesized CdTe-Cu(OH){sub 2} nanocomposite were characterized with XRD, EDAX, TEM, FT-IR, EPR, and thermal analysis (TG/DTG curves). The results indicate that as-prepared nanoparticles with core/shell structure exhibit interesting optical properties. -- Graphical Abstract: Schematic of aqueous synthesis route for CdTe-Cu(OH){sub 2} nanocomposite and The Stokes shift of CdTe nanocrystals and CdTe-Cu(OH){sub 2} Nanocomposites, (CdTe: emission at 605 nm, CdTe-Cu(OH){sub 2}: emission at 621 nm). Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} CdTe-Cu(OH){sub 2} nanocomposites were synthesized by a seed-mediated growth approach. {yields} The synthetic procedure is simple, and can be easily scaled up. {yields} The effect of refluxing time on the preparation of these samples was measured. {yields} The Cu(OH){sub 2} shell thickness was controlled by the amount of Cu in the solution. {yields} TEM images demonstrated homogeneous size distribution for these nanocomposites.

Abd El-sadek, M.S., E-mail: el_sadek_99@yahoo.co [Nanomaterial Laboratory, Physics Department, Faculty of Science, South Valley University, Qena 83523 (Egypt); Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University Chennai, Chennai 600025 (India); Moorthy Babu, S. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University Chennai, Chennai 600025 (India)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

76

NOx Emissions of Alternative Diesel Fuels:? A Comparative Analysis of Biodiesel and FT Diesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study explores the diesel injection and combustion processes in an effort to better understand the differences in NOx emissions between biodiesel, Fischer?Tropsch (FT) diesel, and their blends with a conventional diesel fuel. Emissions studies were ...

James P. Szybist; Stephen R. Kirby; André L. Boehman

2005-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

77

Wall effects in improved confinement modes in the FT-2 tokamak  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An analysis is made of the transition to improved confinement (H-mode) observed in lower hybrid heating experiments in the FT-2 tokamak. Particular attention is paid to processes taking ... data are compared with...

V. N. Budnikov; V. V. D’yachenko; L. A. Esipov; E. R. Its…

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

DE-AT26-99FT40267 | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mechanical Testing of Gas HydrateSediment Samples DE-AT26-99FT40267 Project Goal Develop understanding of the mechanical characteristics of hydrate-containing sediments....

79

FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Catalytic Reforming of Biomass Raw Fuel Gas to Syngas for FT Liquid Fuels Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gasification of biomass to obtain a syngas provides a competitive means for clean FT (Fischer-Tropsch) liquid fuels from renewable resources. The feasibility of the process depends on the upgrading of raw ...

Tiejun Wang; Chenguang Wang; Qi Zhang…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

FT-ICR studies of metal-carbon binary clusters for formation mechanism of endohedral fullerene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ion Mass [amu] C60 + Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arb.units) LaC44 + LaC50 + LaC60 + Figure 2FT-ICR studies of metal-carbon binary clusters for formation mechanism of endohedral fullerene-wall carbon nanotube), i.e. La, Y, Sc, Gd, Ce, Ca, and Ni-Y. An example of FT-ICR mass spectra is shown

Maruyama, Shigeo

82

FTIR and FT-PL spectroscopic analysis of TPV materials and devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopic techniques are useful in determining properties of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) materials and devices. The III-V TPV absorber materials have energy bandgaps that can be optimized for conversion of the near-infrared radiation emitted by thermal sources in the 1000{degree}{endash}1200&hthinsp;{degree}C temperature range. The bandgaps of these materials can be measured at room temperature using FT-photoluminescence spectroscopy, which can be done with a modified FT-Raman spectrophotometer operating in the near-infrared spectral region. The intensities and bandwidths of the FT-PL spectra also provide information on the extent of non-radiative recombination and the compositional uniformity of the materials. To achieve adequate operating efficiencies, TPV converters must return sub-bandgap radiation to the thermal source. The percent reflectance of the device in the mid-infrared spectral region is therefore an important operating parameter that can be accurately measured using FT-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy with total reflectance optical accessories. In this paper, we discuss applications of these techniques to TPV materials and devices, and variations on these approaches, such as scanning micro-FT-PL spectroscopy, that enable microanalysis of TPV device structures at the 1{endash}100-{mu}m scale. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Webb, J.D.; Gedvilas, L.M.; Olson, M.R.; Wu, X.; Duda, A.; Wanlass, M.W.; Jones, K.M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Million Cu. Feet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2010 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table 29. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Alaska, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year................................................... 231 239 261 261 269 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 193,654 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 From Oil Wells ................................................ 3,012,097 3,313,666 3,265,401

84

Epitaxial Graphene on Cu(111)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Epitaxial Graphene on Cu(111) ... The growth of graphene on single crystal Cu(111) has been achieved by thermal decomposition of ethylene in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber for the first time. ... The structural and electronic properties of graphene on Cu(111) have been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. ...

Li Gao; Jeffrey R. Guest; Nathan P. Guisinger

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

85

Geodesic Deviation Equation in GR equivalent theory of $f(T)$ gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we show that it is possible to study the GR equivalent notion of geodesic deviation in $f(T)$ gravity, in spite of the fact that in teleparallel gravity there is no notion of geodesics, and the torsion is responsible for the appearance of gravitational interaction. In this regard, we obtain the GR equivalent of $f(T)$ gravity whose equations are in the modified gravity form such as $f(R)$ gravity. Then, we obtain the GDE within the context of this modified gravity. In this way, the obtained geodesic deviation equation will correspond to the $f(T)$ gravity. Eventually, we extend the calculations to obtain the modification of Matting relation.

Darabi, F; Atazadeh, K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Geodesic Deviation Equation in GR equivalent theory of $f(T)$ gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we show that it is possible to study the GR equivalent notion of geodesic deviation in $f(T)$ gravity, in spite of the fact that in teleparallel gravity there is no notion of geodesics, and the torsion is responsible for the appearance of gravitational interaction. In this regard, we obtain the GR equivalent of $f(T)$ gravity whose equations are in the modified gravity form such as $f(R)$ gravity. Then, we obtain the GDE within the context of this modified gravity. In this way, the obtained geodesic deviation equation will correspond to the $f(T)$ gravity. Eventually, we extend the calculations to obtain the modification of Matting relation.

F. Darabi; M. Mousavi; K. Atazadeh

2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer lab evaluation; cold-start test-cell evaluations; overall feasibility, economics, and efficiency of SFP fuel production; and an economic analysis. Two unexpected issues that arose during the project were further studied and resolved: variations in NOx emissions were accounted for and fuel-injection nozzle fouling issues were traced to the non-combustible (ash) content of the engine oil, not the F-T fuel. The F-T fuel domestically produced and evaluated in this effort appears to be a good replacement candidate for petroleum-based transportation fuels. However, in order for domestic F-T fuels to become a viable cost-comparable alternative to petroleum fuels, the F-T fuels will need to be produced from abundant U.S. domestic resources such as coal and biomass, rather than stranded natural gas.

Stephen P. Bergin

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

88

If*|lg1JEDIlls ,,ft-o-aS.2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

»-H a3UW ·3USi «c« «"22"5"35» If*|lg1JEDIlls pV) 232 *2*& yuo = OW O5oc ,,ft-o-aS.2 F.O-a-- o :§>£ £1 2 (genetic code) Eukaryotes Sexual populations Animals, plants, fungi (cell differentiation) Colonies (non

89

Chemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

45 48 51 54 57 60 Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arbitrary) (a) as injected (b) SWIFTed (c) NO 1sChemical Reaction of Metal-Carbon Binary Cluster Anions by FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer S. Maruyama, M- fullerene and single walled carbon nanotubes are investigated through experimental studies of interaction

Maruyama, Shigeo

90

FT-ICR ,,,Carbon Clusters and Metal/Carbon Binary Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

60 70 80 720 760 800 Ion Mass [amu] ScC60 + C64 + Number of Carbon Atoms Intensity(arb.units) ScC60FT-ICR ,�,æ,éCarbon Clusters and Metal/Carbon Binary Clusters ·>Í­ì·³"¹1 ·C Masamichi Kohno1 , Tetsuya

Maruyama, Shigeo

91

Integration of microfluidics and FT-IR microscopy for label-free study of enzyme kinetics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this article we report on the integration of microfluidics with FT-IR microscopy for the label-free study of enzyme kinetics. The IR compatible microfluidic chip was fabricated by standard photolithography processes using a photopatternable PDMS and infrared transparent materials (Si and CaF2). Chip characterization was performed with an imaging focal plane array (FPA) detector. The enzymatic oxidation of glucose catalyzed by glucose oxidase, which served as a model system, was monitored on-chip in real time in a label-free manner using FT-IR microscopy. The reference FT-IR measurements were carried out using the attenuated total reflection (ATR) accessory. Michaelis–Menten parameters for glucose-oxidase were estimated from the spectral measurements both on-chip and off-chip. The proposed microfluidic approach for enzyme reaction monitoring serves as a novel strategy for FT-IR microscopy allowing for minimal reaction volumes, measurement automation and flexibility in terms of spatial, spectral and temporal data acquisition and offers new opportunities in kinetics studies of various bio(chemical) reactions.

Evgeny Polshin; Bert Verbruggen; Daan Witters; Bert Sels; Dirk De Vos; Bart Nicolaď; Jeroen Lammertyn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Nonlinear Electrodynamics in $f(T)$ Gravity and Generalized Second Law of Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we study the nonlinear electrodynamics in the framework of $f(T)$ gravity for FRW universe along with dust matter, magnetic and torsion contributions. We evaluate the equation of state and deceleration parameters to explore the accelerated expansion of the universe. The validity of generalized second law of thermodynamics for Hubble and event horizons is also investigated in this scenario. For this purpose, we assume pole-like and power-law forms of scale factor and construct $f(T)$ models. The graphical behavior of the cosmological parameters versus smaller values of redshift $z$ represent the accelerated expansion of the universe. It turns out that the generalized second law of thermodynamics holds for all values of $z$ with event horizon for power-law scale factor whereas it holds in a specific range of $z$ with Hubble horizon for power-law and both horizons in pole-like scale factors.

Sharif, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nonlinear Electrodynamics in $f(T)$ Gravity and Generalized Second Law of Thermodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we study the nonlinear electrodynamics in the framework of $f(T)$ gravity for FRW universe along with dust matter, magnetic and torsion contributions. We evaluate the equation of state and deceleration parameters to explore the accelerated expansion of the universe. The validity of generalized second law of thermodynamics for Hubble and event horizons is also investigated in this scenario. For this purpose, we assume pole-like and power-law forms of scale factor and construct $f(T)$ models. The graphical behavior of the cosmological parameters versus smaller values of redshift $z$ represent the accelerated expansion of the universe. It turns out that the generalized second law of thermodynamics holds for all values of $z$ with event horizon for power-law scale factor whereas it holds in a specific range of $z$ with Hubble horizon for power-law and both horizons in pole-like scale factors.

M. Sharif; Shamaila Rani

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

94

Technical and economic comparison of steam-injected versus combined- cycle retrofits on FT-4 engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study discusses the findings of a conceptual site-specific investigation of the technical and economic aspects of converting the TPM FT4 simple cycle combustion turbines into either the steam injected gas turbine (SIGT) cycle or the combined cycle (CC). It describes the selection of the best retrofit alternatives through the evaluation and data analysis of a large number of sites and units at two utilities. Conceptual designs are performed on the best retrofit alternatives. Flow diagrams and general arrangement drawings are developed for various configurations utilizing drum type and once-through type multipressure heat recovery steam generators. Auxiliary power consumption and capital cost estimates are presented together with an economic evaluation and comparison of the retrofit alternatives. While the investigation is performed utilizing the FT4 combustion turbines, the steps presented in the report may be used as a guide for investigating the conversion of other gas turbines to either cycle at any utility site.

Silaghy, F.J. (Burns and Roe, Inc., Oradell, NJ (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Trapped-ion cell with improved DC potential harmonicity for FT-ICR MS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The trapped-ion cell is a key component critical for optimal performance in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry (MS). We have upgraded our 12 Tesla FT-ICR instrument with a new open cylindrical cell that includes four additional cylindrical segments that serve as compensation electrodes. The DC potential on the additional segments can be set to specific pre-calculated values to suppress DC trapping field anharmonicity, in an effort to improve coherence of the ion cyclotron motion and minimize deviations from the calibration function of the ideal cell. Alternatively, the compensation potentials can be set equal to potentials of adjacent cell electrodes, which creates a DC potential distribution equivalent to that of a regular open cylindrical cell. The initial experimental characterization of both the compensated and open cell configurations was performed using ESI direct infusion of a peptide mixture. Operating the compensated cell at increased post-excitation radii resulted in improved mass measurement accuracy together with increased signal intensity, while the regular configuration exhibited peak splitting and reduced signal life time under these operating conditions. The observed improvement of the compensated cell performance was consistent with the expected behavior due to the improved DC potential harmonicity. These results confirm that the trapping DC potential harmonicity is significant for optimizing FT-ICR MS performance.

Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Robinson, Errol W.; Wu, Si; Kang, Hyuk; Lourette, Natacha M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Final technical report. In-situ FT-IR monitoring of a black liquor recovery boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project developed and tested advanced Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) instruments for process monitoring of black liquor recovery boilers. The state-of-the-art FT-IR instruments successfully operated in the harsh environment of a black liquor recovery boiler and provided a wealth of real-time process information. Concentrations of multiple gas species were simultaneously monitored in-situ across the combustion flow of the boiler and extractively at the stack. Sensitivity to changes of particulate fume and carryover levels in the process flow were also demonstrated. Boiler set-up and operation is a complex balance of conditions that influence the chemical and physical processes in the combustion flow. Operating parameters include black liquor flow rate, liquor temperature, nozzle pressure, primary air, secondary air, tertiary air, boiler excess oxygen and others. The in-process information provided by the FT-IR monitors can be used as a boiler control tool since species indicative of combustion efficiency (carbon monoxide, methane) and pollutant emissions (sulfur dioxide, hydrochloric acid and fume) were monitored in real-time and observed to fluctuate as operating conditions were varied. A high priority need of the U.S. industrial boiler market is improved measurement and control technology. The sensor technology demonstrated in this project is applicable to the need of industry.

James Markham; Joseph Cosgrove; David Marran; Jorge Neira; Chad Nelson; Peter Solomon

1999-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Microwave-assisted synthesis and photovoltaic measurements of CuInS{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared by using metal–organic precursors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? CuInS{sub 2} nanoparticles were prepared using complexes via a microwave-assisted method. ? The effect of preparation parameters on the morphology of CuInS{sub 2} was investigated. ? The as-deposited CdS/CuInS{sub 2} films were used for the photovoltaic measurements. -- Abstract: In this work, CuInS{sub 2} (CIS) nanoparticles have been synthesized with the aid of (1,8-diamino-3,6-dioxaoctan)copper(II) sulfate ([Cu(DADO)]SO{sub 4}) and bis(propylenediamine)copper(II) sulfate ([Cu(pn){sub 2}]SO{sub 4}) complexes as copper precursor in the presence of microwave irradiation. Besides, L-cystine, InCl{sub 3}, and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) were applied as sulfur source, indium precursor, and capping agent, respectively. To investigate the effect of preparation parameters like microwave power and irradiation time on the morphology and particle size of CuInS{sub 2}, the experiment was carried out at different conditions. The as-synthesized CuInS{sub 2} nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, FT-IR, PL, SEM, TEM, and EDS. The XRD results showed that pure tetragonal CuInS{sub 2} could be only obtained after annealing at 400 °C for 2 h. The SEM images indicated that with decreasing the microwave power and irradiation time, particle size of CuInS{sub 2} nanoparticles decreased. To fabricate a solar cell, CdS film was directly deposited on top of the CIS film prepared by Doctor's blade method through chemical bath deposition. The as-deposited CdS/CuInS{sub 2} films were used for the photovoltaic measurements.

Hosseinpour-Mashkani, S. Mostafa [Center for Nanoscience and Technology, IST, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Hyderabad – 500 085, Andhra Pradesh (India)] [Center for Nanoscience and Technology, IST, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Hyderabad – 500 085, Andhra Pradesh (India); Mohandes, Fatemeh [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of) [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317-51167, Islamic Republic of Iran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Venkateswara-Rao, K. [Center for Nanoscience and Technology, IST, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Hyderabad – 500 085, Andhra Pradesh (India)] [Center for Nanoscience and Technology, IST, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University Hyderabad, Hyderabad – 500 085, Andhra Pradesh (India)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Requirements for boom lift operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft while operating a boom lift  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fall Protection Requirements for Boom Lift Fall Protection Requirements for Boom Lift 2010 Requirements for boom lift operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft while operating a boom lift. While operating a JLG Aerial lift. LBNL best practices requirements for boom lift Operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft while operating a boom lift. January 14, 2009 OSHA Letter # 20070823-7896 - Whether a manufacturer stipulated minimum anchor point elevation of 18½ feet precludes the use of a shock absorbing lanyard in an aerial lift. (See attached Letter) An adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft will keep the operator from protected from being ejected out of the lift. If a non-adjustable 6ft lanyard is used for fall restraint it is required that fall distance from the anchor point must be at a height not under

99

Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) Microspectroscopic Census of Single Starch Granules for Octenyl Succinate Ester Modification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy was used to investigate reaction homogeneity of octenyl succinic anhydride modification on waxy maize starch and detect uniformity of blends of modified and native starches. For the first time, the ...

Yanjie Bai; Yong-Cheng Shi; David L. Wetzel

2009-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

100

Characterization of the surface properties of xylan by FT-Raman spectroscopy and wicking technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using FT-Raman spectroscopy, column wicking technique and the equations of Washburn as well as van Oss et al., the surface properties of xylan, the main component in hemicelluloses, has been characterized and estimated. Raman spectrum showed that xylan has been structured by acetyl group and methyl-bonded glucurono group. Obtained results show that the surface free energy of xylan is higher in comparison with literature reported values for cellulose because the former has a larger Lifshitz–van der Waals component than the latter. However, xylan has been found to have very smaller polarity and orientation data than that of cellulose.

Qing Shen; Lei Zhong; Jian-Feng Hu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Characterization of Irradiated Starches by Using FT-Raman and FTIR Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Degradation of starch polymers resulting in decreased viscosity and increased water solubility, and increased acidity with increasing radiation doses are potential changes observed in irradiated starches. ... FT-Raman spectra were obtained using a Nicolet 870 spectrometer with the Raman module 32B (Madison, WI) and Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with a maximum power of 2 W. The system was equipped with an InGaAs (Indium?Gallium Arsenide) detector, XT-KBr beam-splitter with 180° reflective optics, and a fully motorized sample position adjustment feature. ...

Ramazan Kizil; Joseph Irudayaraj; Koushik Seetharaman

2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

102

Weak-Field Spherically Symmetric Solutions in $f(T)$ gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study weak-field solutions having spherical symmetry in $f(T)$ gravity; to this end, we solve the field equations for a non diagonal tetrad, starting from Lagrangian in the form $f(T)=T+\\alpha T^{n}$, where $\\alpha$ is a small constant, parameterizing the departure of the theory from GR. We show that the classical spherically symmetric solutions of GR, i.e. the Schwarzschild and Schwarzschild-de Sitter solutions, are perturbed by terms in the form $\\propto r^{2-2n}$ and discuss the impact of these perturbations in observational tests.

Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Epitaxial graphene on Cu(111).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growth of graphene on single crystal Cu(111) has been achieved by thermal decomposition of ethylene in an ultrahigh vacuum chamber for the first time. The structural and electronic properties of graphene on Cu(111) have been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The nucleation of monolayer islands and two predominant domain orientations have been observed, which lead to the formation of numerous domain boundaries with increasing coverage. These results reveal that reducing the density of domain boundaries is one challenge of growing high-quality graphene on copper.

Gao, L.; Guest, J. R.; Guisinger, N. P. (Center for Nanoscale Materials)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

The optimization of the production of ??Cu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. N. Kundu and M. L. Pool in 1950 and 1951. Based on these two investigations, C. M. Lederer, J. M. Hollander and I. Perlman have stated that the principal means of production of this isotope are through the Ni(a, p)s Cu, Zn(n, p) Cu and the Cu... the existence of the contaminating reaction ''Ni(a, p) 'Cu. This reaction becomes important in elemental or low enrichment sam- (~) ples. From Table 3 it was noted that another contam- inant isotope was ''Cu which has a half-life of S. l m and decays to 6...

Gauny, Ronnie Dean

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

I CLASSiFtCArlON CHANiED FAIJC-ABC-286  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Y ~L.ho-I . Y ~L.ho-I . I CLASSiFtCArlON CHANiED FAIJC-ABC-286 : This dooumetlt consists 0.f 3 pages E end p. t' &ures. No. a of &copies. a Seriee A. 7 Novembar 6, 1944 Subject: Visit to Fansteel Netallurgical Corporaticn, North Chicago, Novembar 4, 1944 - AwAlabilityof~lnmbium!kkl Chapin, Simmons end I discussed witb~. C. N. B&e (ResearchDirector) . end LIr. F.L.Hunter (Chief&ineer, TanteInmDivision) availability, purity, and @co of columbiwn,metel. columbium metal is of particular interest to the Project because tuballoy-columbium alloys containing about 4$ or more of columbium are remarkably corrosion resistant. An 'order has &ready been &.ced for 30 lbs. of columbium metal, end it is cerW that large qutnititicsof them&al willbeneededin order that

106

FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A. [Spectra-Tech, Inc., Shelton, CT (United States); Williams, G.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Rolling Thunder -- Integration of the Solo 161 Stirling engine with the CPG-460 solar concentrator at Ft. Huachuca  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Rolling Thunder is a dish/Stirling demonstration project at Ft. Huachuca, a US Army fort in southeastern Arizona (Huachuca means rolling thunder in Apache). It has been supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a cooperative program between the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy (DOE). As part of a 1992 SERDP project, Cummins Power Generation, Inc. (CPG) installed a CPG 7 kW(c) dish/Stirling system at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC) in Ft. Huachuca, Arizona. The primary objective of the SERDP Dish/Stirling for DoD Applications project was to demonstrate a CPG 7-kW(c) dish/Stirling system at a military facility. Unfortunately, Cummins Engine Company decided to divest its solar operations. As a direct result of Ft. Huachuca`s interest in the Cummins dish/Stirling technology, Sandia explored the possibility of installing a SOLO 161 Stirling power conversion unit (PCU) on the Ft. Huachuca CPG-460. In January 1997, a decision was made to retrofit a SOLO 161 Stirling engine on the CPG-460 at Ft. Huachuca. Project Rolling Thunder. The SOLO 161 Demonstration at Ft. Huachuca has been a challenge. Although, the SOLO 161 PCU has operated nearly flawlessly and the CPG-460 has been, for the most part, a solid and reliable component, integration of the SOLO PCU with the CPG-460 has required significant attention. In this paper, the integration issues and technical approaches of project Rolling Thunder are presented. Lessons of the project are also discussed.

Diver, R.B.; Moss, T.A.; Goldberg, V.; Thomas, G.; Beaudet, A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Phase transformations in Cu-Zr multilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of phase transformations is reported for Cu-rich, Cu-Zr multilayer foils synthesized using magnetron sputter deposition and annealed using a differential scanning calorimeter. The foils range in composition from 1.6 to 9.0 at% Zr and consist of alternate layers of polycrystalline Cu and Zr. Differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray analysis and electron microscopy were used to three distinct reactions in the foils: a mixing and an amorphization of the Cu and die Zr, a crystallization on of this amorphous phase to the metastable intermetallic Cu{sub 5l}Zr{sub l4}, and a transformation of the Cu{sub 5l}Zr{sub l4} phase into the equilibrium phase Cu{sub 9}Zr{sub 2}. The as-deposited layering remained stable during the first two reactions and then broke down in the third reaction as large grains of Cu{sub 9}Zr{sub 2} encompassed the smaller Cu grains. Heats of the reactions and activation energies of these reactions are measured and are compared to values reported for bulk samples. The measured heats provide evidence that amorphous Cu-Zr alloys phase separate and that mixing and short range ordering produce 3.5 times more heat than long range ordering produces when Ca and Zr react and form Cu{sub 5l}Zr{sub l4}.

Weihs, T.P.; Barbee, T.W. Jr.; Wall, M.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

cu | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

02 02 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142229502 Varnish cache server cu Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing

110

IJ.fI.CU  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IJ.fI.CU IJ.fI.CU . u.s. DEPARTUEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM EN T CENTER NEPA DETE:Rl.VIINATION R[ClPIENT:Fl~County-Seminole Page I of2 STATE: FL PROJECf TITLE: Seminole County , Fl EECBG Program: County Facility and Utility Operation Improvements; Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy Development; Ugrade Land Development Code: Grant Administration; Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy Enhancement Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0000013 DE-EE0000798.Q01 a Based on my nview of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER:

111

Surface geometry of Cu{531}  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a combined quantitative low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and density-functional theory (DFT) study of the chiral Cu{531} surface. The surface shows large inward relaxations with respect to the bulk interlayer distance of the first two layers and a large expansion of the distance between the fourth and fifth layers. (The latter is the first layer having the same coordination as the Cu atoms in the bulk.) Additional calculations have been performed to study the likelihood of faceting by comparing surface energies of possible facet terminations. No overall significant reduction in energy with respect to planar {531} could be found for any of the tested combinations of facets, which is in agreement with the experimental findings.

G. Jones; M. J. Gladys; J. Ottal; S. J. Jenkins; G. Held

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

112

Flexible Solar-Energy Harvesting System on Plastic with Thin-film LC Oscillators Operating Above ft for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flexible Solar-Energy Harvesting System on Plastic with Thin-film LC Oscillators Operating Above ft- This paper presents an energy-harvesting system consisting of amorphous-silicon (a-Si) solar cells and thin of the energy-harvesting system. The solar module consists of solar cells in series operating at an output

113

Novel Syngas Production Techniques for GTL-FT Synthesis of Gasoline Using Reverse Flow Catalytic Membrane Reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel Syngas Production Techniques for GTL-FT Synthesis of Gasoline Using Reverse Flow Catalytic Membrane Reactors ... Catalytic partial oxidation (CPO, or also CPOX) is different from noncatalytic partial oxidation (POX) in that chemical conversion takes place over a catalyst bed, but it does not use a burner. ...

C. Dillerop; H. van den Berg; A. G. J. van der Ham

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 14, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low ( < 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

Singleton, A.H.

1996-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

115

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995. No. 13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

Singleton, A.H.

1996-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

116

FINLANDFINANCIAL TIMES SPECIAL REPORT | Wednesday May 30 2012 www.ft.com/finland-2012 | twitter.com/ftreports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINLANDFINANCIAL TIMES SPECIAL REPORT | Wednesday May 30 2012 www.ft.com/finland-2012 | twitter." Like Greece, Portugal and Ire- land, Finland is on the geo- graphical periphery of the euro- zone in the past two years. Richer, happier and better educated than the OECD rich nations' club average, Finland

Kaski, Samuel

117

SWiFT Turbines Full Dynamic Characterization Opens Doors for Research in the Dynamics of Coupled Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Research conducted at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility (SWiFT) in Lubbock, Texas, drew a lot of interest from attendees at the International Modal Analysis Conference held in Orlando, Florida, last February. According to a presentation given by DOE's Sandia National Laboratories, a large quantity of unique data was collected during the facility’s construction and characterization tests.

118

Comparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life-Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from Coal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal and Natural Gas Figure S1 shows a graphical description of the life cycle of coal-to-liquids (CTL) and gas-to-liquids (GTL). Figure S1: Life Cycle of Coal-Based and Natural Gas-Based Fischer-Tropsch LiquidComparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life- Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from

Jaramillo, Paulina

119

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate the influence of various promoters, additives, and supports on minimizing the methane selectivity and increasing the water-gas shift (WGS) activity of cobalt (Co) Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to identify and demonstrate a catalyst preparation procedure that will be scaled up for the reproducible synthesis of commercial quantities of supported Co catalysts with desired activity, selectivity, and lifetime for use in F-T synthesis in three-phase slurry bubble column reactors. Accomplishments for this quarter are: Four new catalysts were formulated and prepared during this period under both subtasks 1.2 and 1.3 and five more catalysts were prepared by Calsicat; The characterization of all the catalysts in order to determine their physical properties (BET surface area, pore volume, pore size diameter, particle size distribution), as well as the cobalt reducibility, extent of reduction, and dispersion) was continued; Seven new catalysts have been tested for their F-T synthesis performance; An investigation of the effect of pre-treatment (i.e. calcination in static air versus flowing air, direct reduction without prior calcination) of a selected number of catalysts upon their performance for F-T synthesis was continued during this period.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

120

Steam reforming of methanol on binary CuZnO catalysts: Effects of preparation condition upon precursors, surface structure and catalytic activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Precursors for CuZnO catalysts, with CuZn molar ratios in the range from 1000 to 0100, were prepared by two coprecipitation methods. These methods differ by the addition rate of a mixed Cu(NO3)2Zn(NO3)2 solution to a NaHCO3 solution. Characterisation by powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), FT-IR and UV/VIS spectroscopies indicated that the structure of precursors with CuZn ratios in the range of 3070 to 7030 depends greatly upon the addition rate of the mixed solution. Amorphous copper hydroxycarbonate and sodium zinc carbonate were formed prior to the various precursors such as malachite, aurichalcite and hydrozincite. The uZnO catalysts subsequently formed from the precursors showed the activity for steam reforming of methanol to vary with its composition. Based on the results of temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) with N2O and an infrared spectra of CO chemisorption, the TOF of the reaction is proposed to be associated with the surface of metallic Cu.

Guo-Cheng Shen; Shin-ichiro Fujita; Susumu Matsumoto; Nobutsun Takezawa

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Bifurcation and Global Dynamical Behavior of the $f(T)$ Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Usually, in order to investigate the evolution of a theory, one may find the critical points of the system and then perform perturbations around these critical points to see whether they are stable or not. This local method is very useful when the initial values of the dynamical variables are not far away from the critical points. Essentially, the nonlinear effects are totally neglected in such kind of approach. Therefore, one can not tell whether the dynamical system will evolute to the stable critical points or not when the initial values of the variables do not close enough to these critical points. Furthermore, when there are two or more stable critical points in the system, local analysis can not provide the informations that which one the system will finally evolute to. In this paper, we have further developed the nullcline method to study the bifurcation phenomenon and global dynamical behaviour of the $f(T)$ theory. We overcome the shortcoming of local analysis. And it is very clear to see the evolution of the system under any initial conditions.

Chao-Jun Feng; Xin-Zhou Li; Li-Yan Liu

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

122

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 * 89 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 6,851 * * 59 * 5 0 11 0 31131 Sugar 112 725 * * 22 * 2 * 46 0 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,960 * * 35 * 0 0 1 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 105 7,639 * * 45 * 1 0 11 0 3121 Beverages 85 6,426 * * 41 * * 0 10 0 3122 Tobacco 20 1,213 * * 4 * * 0 1 0 313 Textile Mills 207 25,271 1 * 73 * 1 0 15 0 314

123

table5.5_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Row End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 0 0 TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 832,257 33 24 5,641 26 53 6,006 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 3,540 20 6 2,105 2 35 -- 5.3 Conventional Boiler Use -- 2,496 12 4 1,271 2 11 -- 5.6

124

table5.7_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Net Demand Fuel Oil Coal for Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Row End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.3 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 0 TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 966,231 33 24 5,641 26 53 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 6,714 20 6 2,105 2 35 5.3 Conventional Boiler Use 3,199 12 4 1,271 2 11 5.6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 3,515 8 2

125

table7.6_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 0.9 1.2 1.5 0.9 1.5 0.8 0.6 1.1 311 Food 1,082 W 2 3 566 1 9 * 40 8.2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 220 W * * 59 * 6 0 9 1.1 31131 Sugar 71 733 * * 22 * 2 * 3 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,987 * * 35 * 0 0 1 12.6

126

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 620 1 7 * 105 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 318 15,464 * * 117 * 5 0 29 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,746 * * 51 * 4 0 9 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 82 968 1 * 17 * 1 * 20 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 169 9,708 * * 123 * * 0 4 0 3115 Dairy Product 121 10,079 * * 80 * * 0 1 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 226 17,545 1 1 141 * 0 0 12 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 107

127

table4.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.8 0.8 1.1 1.6 0.9 1.8 0.7 0.7 1.2 311 Food 1,079 68,230 2 3 560 1 8 * 50 8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 7,098 * * 59 * 5 0 11 1.1 31131 Sugar 74 733 * * 22 * 2 * 8 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,987 * * 35 * 0

128

Room-temperature Formation of Hollow Cu2O Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monodisperse Cu and Cu2O nanoparticles (NPs) are synthesized using tetradecylphosphonic acid as a capping agent. Dispersing the NPs in chloroform and hexane at room temperature results in the formation of hollow Cu2O NPs and Cu@Cu2O core/shell NPs, respectively. The monodisperse Cu2O NPs are used to fabricate hybrid solar cells with efficiency of 0.14percent under AM 1.5 and 1 Sun illumination.

Hung, Ling-I; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Yang, Peidong

2010-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

129

Investigation of Sulfur Deactivation on Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of Sulfur Deactivation on CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Investigation of Sulfur Deactivation on CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Investigation of...

130

Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Deactivation Mechanisms of CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application Understanding the Deactivation Mechanisms of CuZeolite SCR Catalysts in Diesel Application To understand...

131

Cu  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

t in t im e wit h b e a m (t a n k h it s > 2 0 0 , ve t o h it s < 6 ) 1 0 va r ia b le Fis h e r d is cr im in a n t in clu d e s : Fr a c t io n o f ligh t o n vs o ff r in g Fr...

132

Generalized second law of thermodynamics in the emergent universe for some viable models of f(T) gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present study is motivated by the study of reference [1], where the generalized second law of thermodynamics has been investigated for a flat FRW universe for two viable models of $f(T)$ gravity. In the present work, we have considered a non-flat universe and accordingly studied the behaviors of equation of state parameter and deceleration parameter. Subsequently, using the first law of thermodynamics we derived the expressions for the time derivative of the total entropy of a universe enveloped by apparent horizon. In the next phase, with the choice of scale factor pertaining to an emergent universe we have investigated the sign of the time derivatives of total entropy for three viable models of $f(T)$ gravity.

Rahul Ghosh; Antonio Pasqua; Surajit Chattopadhyay

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

133

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this Project is to investigate the influence of various promoters, additives, and supports on minimizing the methane selectivity and increasing the water-gas shift (WGS) activity of cobalt (Co) Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to identify and demonstrate a catalyst preparation Procedure that will be scaled up for the reproducible synthesis of commercial quantities of supported CO catalysts with desired activity, sleectivity, and lifetime for use in F-T synthesis in three-phase slurry bubble column reactors. Seven new catalysts were formulated and prepared during this period under both subtasks 1.2 and 1.3. Two more catalysts were prepared by Calsicat. The characterization of all the catalysts in order to determine their physical properties (BET surface area, pore volume, pore size diameter, particle size distribution), as well as the cobalt reducibility, extent of reduction, and dispersion) was continued. Fixed-bed reactor testing of the catalysts was continued. Six new catalysts were tested for their F-T synthesis performance. An investigation of the effect of pretreatment in various atmospheres (calcination in air or nitrogen prior to reduction in hydrogen, direct reduction without prior calcination, and reductiono)ddation-reduction (ROR)) of a selected number of catalysts upon their performance for F-T synthesis was continued during this period. Under subtask 2.2 during this reporting period a total of 11 runs were made in the two slurry bubble column reactors with eleven catalysts, including five on alumina, two from Calsicat, one WGS blend, and three on silica support. Four high CO conversion runs were made. Data were compiled to compare the CO conversions and product selectivities of the-methane reduction catalysts.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

134

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report number 10, January 1--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially-viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. The major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5%) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. The project consists of five major tasks: catalyst development; catalyst testing; catalyst reproducibility tests; catalyst aging tests; and preliminary design and cost estimate for a demonstrate scale catalyst production facility. Technical accomplishments during this reporting period include the following. It appears that the higher activity obtained for the catalysts prepared using an organic solution and reduced directly without prior calcination was the result of higher dispersions obtained under such pretreatment. A Ru-promoted Co catalyst on alumina with 30% Co loading exhibited a 4-fold increase in dispersion and a 2-fold increase in activity in the fixed-bed reactor from that obtained with the non-promoted catalyst. Several reactor runs have again focused on pushing conversion to higher levels. The maximum conversion obtained has been 49.7% with 26g catalyst. Further investigations of the effect of reaction temperature on the performance of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis were started using a low activity catalyst and one of the most active catalysts. The three 1 kg catalyst batches prepared by Calsicat for the reproducibility and aging studies were tested in both the fixed-bed and slurry bubble column reactors under the standard reaction conditions. The effects of adding various promoters to some cobalt catalysts have also been addressed. Results are presented and discussed.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

135

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The investigation of the effect of certain promoters (Fe, Pd, and Ru) on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis was continued during this reporting period. All catalysts were tested first at 220{degrees}C, then at higher temperatures from 240 to 280{degrees}C, while monitoring their deactivation. The choice of these promoters was based on their intrinsic ability to enhance the hydrogenation reactions while slowing down the Boudouard reaction under the conditions used in F-T synthesis. Olefin hydrogenation and CO dissociation reactions were used individually to investigate further the nature of the deactivation process of these catalyst during F-T synthesis. Hydrogenation of isobutene (IB) was carried out in the presence of CO between 120 and 180{degrees}C and atmospheric pressure. CO dissociation activities of the catalysts were measured using a pulse technique at 2.5 atm and at temperatures between 180 and 280{degrees}C with intermittent H{sub 2} bracketing at 350{degrees}C. Promotion with high loadings of Fe or Pd resulted in catalysts with relatively lower activity and higher methane selectivity. The deactivation process and rate for catalysts containing Pd or Fe were similar to those of the non-promoted or Ru-promoted alumina-supported Co catalysts tested previously. The only exception was Co.068 with 1% Pd which had adequate activity and selectivity as well as lower deactivation rate at the various temperatures tested.

Singleton, A.H.

1996-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

136

Accelerating Fatigue Testing for Cu Ribbon Interconnects (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes fatigue experiments and discusses dynamic mechanical loading for Cu ribbon interconnects.

Bosco, N.; Silverman, T.; Wohlgemuth , J.; Kurtz, S.; Inoue, M.; Sakurai, K.; Shioda, T.; Zenkoh, H.; Miyashita, M.; Tadanori, T.; Suzuki, S.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U. Cut it about 2 feet long. Cut a slot 1 inch wide by and 1 foot long along the long axis of the pipe

Navara, Kristen

138

The Application of FT-MIR Spectroscopy for the Evaluation of Energy Value, Fat Content, and Fatty Acid Composition in Selected Organic Oat Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, Fourier transform mid-infrared (FT-MIR) spectroscopy was investigated as a rapid and non-destructive method for the determination of selected quality parameters of oat flakes and cakes. The spec...

Magdalena Reder; Piotr Koczo?; Magdalena Wirkowska…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Microstructures of Si surface layers implanted with Cu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microstructures of Si ion-implanted with Cu have been characterized by TEM after annealing. For 1.2 at.%, the Cu is trapped at planar defects, but for 10 at.%, {eta}-Cu{sub 3}Si forms and Cu diffuses at its equilibrium solubility. These observations allow proper evaluation of the binding energies of Cu to previously formed internal cavities (2.2 eV) and {eta}-Cu{sub 3}Si (1.7 eV). The 10 at.% Cu layer promotes oxidation of Si catalyzed by {eta}-Cu{sub 3}Si. The microstructures also indicate that Si implanted with {approximately}2 at.% Cu reforms epitaxially with embedded defects after 8 hr at 700C, but for {approximately}10 at.% Cu, epitaxy is not recovered after 6 hours at 600C.

Follstaedt, D.M.; Myers, S.M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Decommissioning samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA, solvent refined coal pilot plant: chemical analysis and biological testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results from chemical analyses and limited biological assays of three sets of samples from the Ft. Lewis, WA solvent refined coal (SRC) pilot plant. The samples were collected during the process of decommissioning this facility. Chemical composition was determined for chemical class fractions of the samples by using high-resolution gas chromatography (GC), high-resolution GC/mass spectrometry (MS) and high-resolution MS. Biological activity was measuring using both the histidine reversion microbial mutagenicity assay with Salmonella typhimurium, TA98 and an initiation/promotion mouse-skin tumorigenicity assay. 19 refs., 7 figs., 27 tabs.

Weimer, W.C.; Wright, C.W.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Isotopic effect study in the LHCD and LHH experiments in hydrogen/deuterium plasmas of the FT-2 tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of comparative experimental studies of the efficiency of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and lower hybrid heating (LHH) in the FT-2 tokamak in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas are presented. In the new comparative experimental runs in deuterium/hydrogen plasmas suppression of the LHCD and beginning of the interaction of LH waves with ions is controlled by the plasma density rise. Role of parametric instabilities in CD switch-off is considered. In order to analyze the experimentally observed effect of LHCD the GRILL3D and FRTC codes has been used.

Lashkul, S. I.; Altukhov, A. B.; Gusakov, E. Z.; Dyachenko, V. V.; Esipov, L. A.; Irzak, M. A.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Kouprienko, D. V.; Saveliev, A. N. [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Shatalin, S. V. [St. Petersburg State Polytekhnical University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Stepanov, A. Yu. [A.F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

142

Ferromagnetism in CuO-ZnO multilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the magnetic properties of CuO-ZnO heterostructures to elucidate the origin of the ferromagnetic signature in Cu doped ZnO. The CuO and ZnO layer thickness were varied from 15 to 150 nm and from 70 to 350 nm, respectively. Rutherford backscattering experiments showed no significant diffusion of either Cu in ZnO or Zn in CuO layers. Magnetic measurements indicate ferromagnetism at 300 K, which depends on the CuO particle size, but not on the CuO-ZnO interfacial area. Polarized neutron reflectometry measurements show that the observed magnetization cannot be accounted for solely by spins localized near the CuO-ZnO interface or in the CuO layer.

Sudakar, C.; Padmanabhan, K.; Naik, R.; Lawes, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States); Kirby, B. J. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Kumar, Sanjiv [NCCCM, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, ECIL Post, Hyderabad 500062 (India); Naik, V. M. [Department of Natural Sciences, University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, Michigan 48128 (United States)

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

143

Comparative study of the alloying effect on the initial oxidation of Cu-Au(100) and Cu-Pt(100)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using in situ transmission electron microscopy, we show that the oxidation of the Cu-Au(100) results in the formation of Cu{sub 2}O islands that deeply embed into the Cu-Au substrate while the oxidation of the Cu-Pt(100) leads to the formation of Cu{sub 2}O islands that highly protrude above the Cu-Pt substrate. Their difference is attributed to the different mobilities of Pt and Au in the Cu base alloys for which the sluggish mobility of Pt in Cu results in trapped Pt atoms at the oxide/alloy interface while the faster mobility of Au in Cu leads to enhanced rehomogenization of the alloy composition.

Luo, Langli; Zhou, Guangwen, E-mail: gzhou@binghamton.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Multidisciplinary Program in Materials Science and Engineering, State University of New York, Binghamton, New York 13902 (United States); Kang, Yihong [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States); Yang, Judith C. [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15261 (United States); Su, Dong; Stach, Eric A. [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

144

Economics and analysis of the miscible CO/sub 2/ injection project, Granny's Creek field, West Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) in a tertiary oil recovery pilot in the Granny's Creek field, West Virginia, was started in 1976. At first the CO/sub 2/ was injected into the Pocono Big Injun sand at four wells at the corners of an approximately square area of 6.7 acres. The CO/sub 2/ was injected as a liquid, and the pilot portion of the reservoir was maintained at or above miscible pressure. Production was taken from a well inside the square pilot area and from eight wells outside the area. The test began with injection of water to increase reservoir pressure to more than the miscibility pressure. Injection started with CO/sub 2/ alone, then alternate slugs of CO/sub 2/ and water, then CO/sub 2/, alone, and finally water alone was injected. The additional oil recovery was 8,681 bbl for an injection total of 19.76 million lb of CO/sub 2/ for a ratio of 19,626 cu ft per bbl. A second or minipilot in which the injection was in the lower or C zone of the Big Injun sand resulted in 2,007.9 bbl of additional oil through September 1980 from the injection of 4.24 million lb of CO/sub 2/ for a ratio of 18,192 cu ft per bbl. The CO/sub 2/ spread quickly across the southern 350 acres of the field and confinement was not attained. The sales price of the oil after royalty and taxes is probably about equal to the most optimistic cost of the CO/sub 2/ per barrel of additional oil at the present time and far less than a more reasonable cost for the CO/sub 2/. Production of additional oil in each case decreased sharply after injection of CO/sub 2/ was stopped so there appeared to be no benefits over an extended period of time from the injection of CO/sub 2/.

Smith, R.V.; Watts, R.J.; Burtch, F.W.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

146

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

147

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

148

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

149

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

150

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

151

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

152

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

153

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

154

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

155

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

156

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

157

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

158

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

159

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

160

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

162

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

163

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

164

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

165

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

166

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

167

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

168

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

169

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

170

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

171

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

172

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

173

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

174

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

175

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

176

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

177

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

178

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

179

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

180

Anisotropic electric surface resistance of Cu(110)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electric surface resistance is measured without contacts by grazing incidence of p-polarized infrared (IR) radiation for the adsorbates CO and C2H4, which settle on top of the close packed atomic ridges of Cu(110) in the 1, -1, 0 direction. Surface resistance has only been observed for the IR electric currents in this direction. This can be explained by the assumption that IR induced currents in the 001 direction can only flow in the second and deeper layers of Cu(110). Therefore, in this direction, there is no friction with the adsorbates and hence no surface resistance.

A Otto; P Lilie; P Dumas; C Hirschmugl; M Pilling; G P Williams

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

182

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

183

The Effects of Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR Catalyst  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Examines the effect of hydrothermal aging on the Nox reduction over a commercial Cu-zeolite SCR catalyst.

184

Conceptual design report for the project to install leak detection in FAST-FT-534/548/549  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides conceptual designs and design recommendations for installing secondary containment and leak detection systems for three sumps at the Fluorinel and Storage Facility (FAST), CPP-666. The FAST facility is located at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The three sumps receive various materials from the FAST water treatment process. This project involves sump upgrades to meet appropriate environmental requirements. The steps include: providing sump modifications or designs for the installation of leak chases and/or leakage accumulation, coating the sump concrete with a chemical resistant sealant (except for sump VES-FT-534 which is already lined with stainless steel) to act as secondary containment, lining the sumps with a primary containment system, and providing a means to detect and remove primary containment leakage that may occur.

Galloway, K.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

High Mass Accuracy and High Mass Resolving Power FT-ICR Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry for Biological Tissue Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biological tissue imaging by secondary ion mass spectrometry has seen rapid development with the commercial availability of polyatomic primary ion sources. Endogenous lipids and other small bio-molecules can now be routinely mapped on the micrometer scale. Such experiments are typically performed on time-of-flight mass spectrometers for high sensitivity and high repetition rate imaging. However, such mass analyzers lack the mass resolving power to ensure separation of isobaric ions and the mass accuracy for exact mass elemental formula assignment. We have recently reported a secondary ion mass spectrometer with the combination of a C60 primary ion gun with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FT-ICR MS) for high mass resolving power, high mass measurement accuracy and tandem mass spectrometry capabilities. In this work, high specificity and high sensitivity secondary ion FT-ICR MS was applied to chemical imaging of biological tissue. An entire rat brain tissue was measured with 150 ?m spatial resolution (75 ?m primary ion spot size) with mass resolving power (m/?m50%) of 67,500 (at m/z 750) and root-mean-square measurement accuracy less than two parts-per-million for intact phospholipids, small molecules and fragments. For the first time, ultra-high mass resolving power SIMS has been demonstrated, with m/?m50% > 3,000,000. Higher spatial resolution capabilities of the platform were tested at a spatial resolution of 20 ?m. The results represent order of magnitude improvements in mass resolving power and mass measurement accuracy for SIMS imaging and the promise of the platform for ultra-high mass resolving power and high spatial resolution imaging.

Smith, Donald F.; Kiss, Andras; Leach, Franklin E.; Robinson, Errol W.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Heeren, Ronald M.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Synthesis and thermoelectric properties of Cu excess Cu2ZnSnSe4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Quaternary stannites with an excess of copper were successfully synthesized by reacting the constituent elements and subsequent solid state annealing, followed by densification by hot-pressing. The composition for each specimen was confirmed with a combination of Rietveld refinement and elemental analysis. Their high temperature thermoelectric properties were measured from 300 K to 800 K and compared with that of Cu2ZnSnSe4. The thermal conductivity decreases significantly with increasing Cu content at elevated temperatures due to the crystal structure of this material system. A maximum ZT value of 0.86 was obtained at 800 K for the specimen with the highest Cu content, Cu2.2Zn0.8SnSe4.

Dong, Yongkwan [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF); Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Nolas, G [University of South Florida, Tampa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Cu-Bearing Tourmaline from Paraiba, Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Cu-bearing tourmaline, the octahedrally coordinated Z site is completely occupied by Al, the octahedrally coordinated Y site is occupied primarily by Li and Al, and the nine-coordinate X site is approximately half-occupied by Na.

MacDonald, D.J.

1995-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Adsorption of Cu21 Ions with Poly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transition behavior to external stimuli such as temperature, pH, and ions. Among the most studied hydrogels, the phase transition of pNIPAAm- based copolymers could be controlled to a desired temperature range as wellAdsorption of Cu21 Ions with Poly (N-isopropylacrylamide-co-methacrylic acid) Micro

189

CU-LASP Production Capabilities! Jennifer Methlie  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cu, Titanium and Macor" Equipment includes:! 4-axis CNC mill 40"x20"" 3-axis CNC mill 36"x18"" 2-axis EZ-Trak" 8" Chuck CNC Lathe" Other manual milling and lathe equipment inc Hardinge tool room lathe" 30 ton

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

190

Using Matlab at CUED July 24, 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Matlab at CUED Tim Love July 24, 2006 Abstract This document does not try to describe matlab-beginners to undocumented and/or local features of matlab. Suggestions and contributions for this document are welcomed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 7 User Interface Controls 7 8 Local Utilities 8 1http://www-h.eng.cam.ac.uk/help/tpl/programs/matlab

Talbot, James P.

191

Preparation, optical and non-linear optical power limiting properties of Cu, CuNi nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metallic nanowires show excellent Plasmon absorption which is tunable based on its aspect ratio and alloying nature. We prepared Cu and CuNi metallic nanowires and studied its optical and nonlinear optical behavior. Optical properties of nanowires are theoretically explained using Gans theory. Nonlinear optical behavior is studied using a single beam open aperture z-scan method with the use of 5?ns Nd: YAG laser. Optical limiting is found to arise from two-photon absorption.

Udayabhaskar, R.; Karthikeyan, B., E-mail: bkarthik@nitt.edu [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Tiruchirappalli 620 015 (India); Ollakkan, Muhamed Shafi [Light and Matter Physics Group, Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560 080 (India)] [Light and Matter Physics Group, Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560 080 (India)

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

192

Mechanism of methanol synthesis on Cu(100) and Zn/Cu(100) surfaces: Comparative dipped adcluster model study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mechanism of methanol synthesis from CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2} on Cu(100) and Zn/Cu(100) surfaces was studied using the dipped adcluster model (DAM) combined with ab initio Hartree-Fock (HF) and second-order Moeller-Plesset (MP2) calculations. On clean Cu(100) surface, calculations show that five successive hydrogenations are involved in the hydrogenation of adsorbed CO{sub 2} to methanol, and the intermediates are formate, dioxomethylene, formaldehyde, and methoxy. The rate-limiting step is the hydrogenation of formate to formaldehyde, and the Cu-Cu site is responsible for the reaction on Cu(100). The roles of Zn on Zn/Cu(100) catalyst are to modify the rate-limiting step of the reaction: to lower the activation energies of this step and to stabilize the dioxomethylene intermediate at the Cu-Zn site. The present comparative results indicate that the Cu-Zn site is the active site, which cooperates with the Cu-Cu site to catalyze methanol synthesis on a Cu-based catalyst. Electron transfer from surface to adsorbates is the most important factor in affecting the reactivity of these surface catalysts.

Nakatsuji, Hiroshi; Hu, Zhenming

2000-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

193

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 1, September 25, 1992 to December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5%) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

Not Available

1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

194

Exergy Analysis of a GTL Process Based on Low-Temperature Slurry F-T Reactor Technology with a Cobalt Catalyst  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exergy Analysis of a GTL Process Based on Low-Temperature Slurry F-T Reactor Technology of the initial exergy of the gas is used to convert it into liquid fuel. In the present study, we analyze. Next, we use exergy analysis to establish the impact of catalyst selectivity and of thermal losses

Kjelstrup, Signe

195

A Novel 9.4 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer with Improved Sensitivity, Mass Resolution, and Mass Range, for Petroleum Heavy Crude Oil Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Range, for Petroleum Heavy Crude Oil Analysis Nathan K. Kaiser, John P. Quinn, Greg T. Blakney NHMFL 9.4 T FT- species in petroleum crude oil and its products, extending to "heavy" crudes for unequivocal identification of sulfur-containing components in petroloeum heavy crude oils. Facilities: NHMFL 9

196

PUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S. Department of Agriculture and counties of the state cooperating.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of surface waters, and can lead to changes in species composition within land and water ecosystems. AmmoniaPUTTING KNOWLEDGE TO WORK The University of Georgia and Ft. Valley State College, the U.S to the formation of acid rain, which can damage sensitive ecosystems. In areas where nitrogen is a limiting

Navara, Kristen

197

Synthesis and spectroscopic characterisation of aurichalcite (Zn,Cu2+)5(CO3)2(OH)6; implications for Cu–ZnO catalyst precursors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Cu–ZnO catalyst precursors with variable Cu:Zn ratio, between Zn-rich and Cu-rich compositions have been investigated by a combination of electronic and vibrational spectroscopy. Synthesized catalyst precu...

B. Jagannadha Reddy; Ray Leslie Frost; Ashley Locke

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

199

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

200

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

202

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

203

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

204

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

205

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

206

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

207

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

208

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

209

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

210

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

211

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

212

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

213

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

214

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

215

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

216

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

217

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

218

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

219

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

220

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

222

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

223

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

224

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

225

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

226

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

227

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

228

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

229

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

230

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

231

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

232

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

233

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

234

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

235

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

236

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

237

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

238

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

239

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

240

Electrical Characterization of Cu Composition Effects in CdS/CdTe Thin-Film Solar Cells with a ZnTe:Cu Back Contact: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the effects of Cu composition on the CdTe/ZnTe:Cu back contact and the bulk CdTe. For the back contact, its potential barrier decreases with Cu concentration while its saturation current density increases. For the bulk CdTe, the hole density increases with Cu concentration. We identify a Cu-related deep level at {approx}0.55 eV whose concentration is significant when the Cu concentration is high. The device performance, which initially increases with Cu concentration then decreases, reflects the interplay between the positive influences and negative influences (increasing deep levels in CdTe) of Cu.

Li, J. V.; Duenow, J. N.; Kuciauskas, D.; Kanevce, A.; Dhere, R. G.; Young, M. R.; Levi, D. H.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Effects of Hydrothermal Aging on NH3-SCR reaction over Cu/zeolites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of hydrothermal treatment on model Cu/zeolite catalysts were investigated to better understand the nature of Cu species for the selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} by NH{sub 3}. After hydrothermal aging at 800 C for 16 h, the NO{sub x} reduction performance of Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta were significantly reduced at low temperatures, while that of Cu-SSZ-13 was not affected. When the zeolite framework aluminum species were probed using solid state {sup 27}Al-NMR, significant reduction in the intensities of the tetrahedral aluminum peak was observed for Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta, although no increase in the intensities of the octahedral aluminum peak was observed. When the redox behavior of Cu species was examined using H{sub 2}-TPR, it was found that Cu{sup 2+} could be reduced to Cu{sup +} and to Cu{sup 0} fir Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta catalysts, while Cu{sup 2+} could be reduced to Cu{sup +} only for Cu-SSZ-13. After hydrothermal aging, CuO and Cu-aluminate species were found to form in Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta, while little changes were observed for Cu-SSZ-13.

Kwak, Ja Hun; Tran, Diana N.; Burton, Sarah D.; Szanyi, Janos; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

242

Microsoft Word - Vapor Phase Elemental Sulfur Tech Brief DRAFT bbl 08-24.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AT A GLANCE AT A GLANCE ď‚· eliminates excavation expense ď‚· applicable to large or small sites ď‚· straightforward deployment ď‚· uses heat to distribute sulfur throughout a soil ď‚· mercury reacts with sulfur to form immobile and insoluble minerals ď‚· patent applied for TechBrief Vapor Phase Elemental Sulfur Amendment for Sequestering Mercury in Contaminated Soil Scientists at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have identified a method of targeting mercury in contaminated soil zone by use of sulfur vapor heated gas. Background Mercury contamination in soil is a common problem in the environment. The most common treatment is excavation - a method that works well for small sites where the

243

Charged Particle Multiplicities in Ultra-relativistic Au+Au and Cu+Cu Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The PHOBOS collaboration has carried out a systematic study of charged particle multiplicities in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A unique feature of the PHOBOS detector is its ability to measure charged particles over a very wide angular range from 0.5 to 179.5 deg. corresponding to |eta|<5.4. The general features of the charged particle multiplicity distributions as a function of pseudo-rapidity, collision energy and centrality, as well as system size, are discussed.

B. B. Back

2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

244

Thermopower of Yba2cu3o7-X, Erba2cu3o7-X  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Department, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 11 September 1989; revised manuscript received 25 October 1989) Resistance and absolute thermopower of high-T, oxide superconductors RBa2Cu307 (R=Y,Er) synthesized by a hot... indicates that there is no completely satisfactory theory of elec- trical transport in these superconducting oxides. INTRODUCTION Among the family of high-T, oxide superconductors, having chemical composition RBa2Cu307 ?,where R is a rare-earth metal...

BHATNAGAR, AK; PAN, R.; Naugle, Donald G.; GILBERT, GR; PANDEY, RK.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Understanding ammonia selective catalytic reduction kinetics over Cu-SSZ-13 from motion of the Cu ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cu-SSZ-13 catalysts with three Si/Al ratios, at 6, 12 and 35, are synthesized with solution ion exchange. Catalysts are characterized with surface area/pore volume measurements, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Catalytic properties are examined using NO oxidation, ammonia oxidation, and standard ammonia selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) reactions. By varying Si/Al ratios and Cu loadings, it is possible to synthesize catalysts with one dominant type of isolated Cu2+ ion species. Prior to full dehydration of the zeolite catalyst, hydrated Cu2+ ions are found to be very mobile as judged from EPR. NO oxidation is catalyzed by O-bridged Cu-dimer species that form at relatively high Cu loadings and in the presence of O2. For NH3 oxidation and standard SCR reactions, transient Cu-dimers even form at much lower Cu loadings; and these are proposed to be the active sites for reaction temperatures ? 350 °C. These dimer species can be viewed as in equilibrium with monomeric Cu ion complexes. Between ~250 and 350 °C, these moieties become less stable causing SCR reaction rates to decrease. At temperatures above 350 °C and at low Cu loadings, Cu-dimers completely dissociate to regenerate isolated Cu2+ monomers that then locate at ion-exchange sites of the zeolite lattice. At low Cu loadings, these Cu species are the high-temperature active SCR catalytic centers. At high Cu loadings, on the other hand, both Cu-dimers and monomers are highly active in the high temperature kinetic regime, yet Cu-dimers are less selective in SCR. Brönsted acidity is also very important for SCR reactivity in the high-temperature regime. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

Gao, Feng; Walter, Eric D.; Kollar, Marton; Wang, Yilin; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Completion of the ORNL Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) Level 4 Milestone – Sigma Team – Off-Gas – ORNL – FT-14OR031202, MS# M4FT-14OR0312027, “Support to PNNL Kr-85 Preliminary Optimization Study”, due May 30, 2014  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This letter and attached emails document the completion of the FCR&D Level 4 milestone for the Sigma Team – Off-Gas – ORNL work package (FT-14OR031202), “Support to PNNL Kr-85 Preliminary Optimization Study” (M4FT-14OR0312027), due May 30, 2014. Support to this effort included providing a literature search and providing a significant number of reference documents covering more than 30 years of past work on Kr recovery, recovery system designs, and past cost analyses. In addition, ORNL provided support on several conference calls to establish an analysis approach for the current study and to review progress.

Jubin, Robert T. [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

ft.... "'~l '1~--"", ~:.~..;.,MIT's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

' group before and they were happy in their individual dorms," said Ann Orlando, Harvard Square, said hack a hack attempt gone awry. Class of 2004 Ring Committee member Amal Dorai '04.and several r In the shooting. Hack Attempt Thwarted By Theft Of Paw From MIT Beaver Costume Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

248

J/{psi} Production in {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV Cu+Cu Collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yields for J/{psi} production in Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV have been measured over the rapidity range |y|<2.2 and compared with results in p+p and Au+Au collisions at the same energy. The Cu+Cu data offer greatly improved precision over existing Au+Au data for J/{psi} production in collisions with small to intermediate numbers of participants, in the range where the quark-gluon plasma transition threshold is predicted to lie. Cold nuclear matter estimates based on ad hoc fits to d+Au data describe the Cu+Cu data up to N{sub part}{approx}50, corresponding to a Bjorken energy density of at least 1.5 GeV/fm{sup 3}.

Adare, A.; Bickley, A. A.; Ellinghaus, F.; Glenn, A.; Kinney, E.; Nagle, J. L.; Seele, J.; Wysocki, M. [University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Afanasiev, S.; Isupov, A.; Litvinenko, A.; Malakhov, A.; Peresedov, V.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Zolin, L. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Aidala, C.; Chi, C. Y.; Cole, B. A.; D'Enterria, D.; Jia, J. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 and Nevis Laboratories, Irvington, New York 10533 (United States)] (and others)

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

249

High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Preparation of CuAlO2 and CuCrO2 thin films by sol–gel processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CuAlO2 and CuCrO2 thin films were prepared by sol–gel processing and subsequent thermal treatment in air and inert gas atmosphere. Resistivities of 700 ? cm and 60 ? cm with optical transmissions of 65% and 32% were achieved respectively. The crystallization temperature of 700 °C allows the preparation of CuCrO2 on borosilicate glass. P-type conductivity was verified by Seebeck measurements and a transparent heterostructure including p-CuCrO2 showed rectifying behavior.

Stefan Götzendörfer; Christina Polenzky; Stephan Ulrich; Peer Löbmann

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea Cu/Zeolite...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea CuZeolite SCR Catalysts Non-uniform Aging on Super Duty Diesel Truck Aged Urea CuZeolite SCR Catalysts CuZeolite SCR catalysts...

252

Epitaxial Growth and Microstructure of Cu2O Nanoparticle/thin...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Microstructure of Cu2O Nanoparticlethin Films on SrTiO3(100). Epitaxial Growth and Microstructure of Cu2O Nanoparticlethin Films on SrTiO3(100). Abstract: Cuprous oxide (Cu2O)...

253

Reduction of part-list cuing inhibition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . - . . ~ ~ . ~ 23 Table 3: Total Number Recalled, Reminiscence, and Hypermnesia as a Function of Incubation Interval and List Type in Experiment 2 30 Table 4: Minute-by-Minute Reminiscence as a Function of Incubation Interval and List Type in Experiment 2 33... 2. 55 1. 37 1. 55 10. 47 10. 66 6. 02 0. 19 31 2. 52 3. 05 1. 08 1. 10 10. 77 2. 04 11. 23 2. 02 6. 10 0. 88 0. 47 1. 35 30 Cued Recall Total Test 1 Total retest Reminiscence Hypermnesia 10. 17 12. 42 8. 63 2. 27 30 4. 00 3. 98 1...

Brown, Jeffrey Michael

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Magnetism in Ni-Cu Alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the assumption that in Ni-Cu alloys the spin moment on a Ni atom depends on the local atomic environment, it was possible to find moment values for the various atomic configurations so as to give average moments in reasonable quantitative agreement with the values measured in the ferromagnetic composition range. The local environment is specified by the number of Ni nearest neighbors and the number of Ni second-nearest neighbors. This model allows also a consistent qualitative interpretation of the effect on the average moment of low-temperature annealing treatment and of plastic deformation.

C. G. Robbins; Helmut Claus; Paul A. Beck

1969-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

255

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Thermokinetic investigation of binary Cu/Zn hydroxycarbonates as precursors for Cu/ZnO catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A combination of thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) coupled to mass spectrometry has been applied to study the thermal decomposition of Cu/Zn hydroxycarbonates, which are used as a precursor for the active methanol synthesis catalyst. Original TG and DSC profiles and results of a formal kinetic analysis of the calcination process are compared with transformations occurring in the solid phase, which has been studied by means of in situ XRD. A series of hydroxycarbonate precursors with different Cu/Zn molar ratios (40/60, 70/30, 80/20) were synthesized under conditions reported as optimum for catalytic performance. The samples contain primarily two crystalline phases, aurichalcite (Cu,Zn)5(CO3)2(OH)6 and zincian malachite (Cu,Zn)2CO3(OH)2. At least four formal decomposition stages of CO2 and H2O evolution cause the major mass loss in the TG experiments. The best-fit quality for all the studied samples was obtained for a four-step competitive reaction model. The experimental TG dependences are adequately described by the n-th order equation and 3D Jander diffusion equation. The effects of the gas flow, sample mass, and water transfer conditions on the reaction pathway were studied. The presence of H2O vapor in the reaction feed accelerates the decomposition and dramatically changes the reaction TG profile. The decomposition enthalpy of mixed Cu/Zn (80/20) hydroxycarbonate was determined, and the formation enthalpy of the decomposition intermediate, a carbonate-modified oxide, was calculated to be ?Hf° = ?633.7 ± 5.6 kJ/mol.

Andrey Tarasov; Julia Schumann; Frank Girgsdies; Nygil Thomas; Malte Behrens

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Deactivation Mechanism of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mechanism of CuZeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive Hydrothermal Aging Deactivation Mechanism of CuZeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive Hydrothermal Aging Better control for...

258

LOBPCG for electronic structure calculations Andrew Knyazev, CU-Denver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LOBPCG for electronic structure calculations Andrew Knyazev, CU-Denver 1 Center for Computational;LOBPCG for electronic structure calculations Andrew Knyazev, CU-Denver 2 Center for Computational). Several methods are available in ABINIT/VASP to calculate the electronic ground state: simple Davidson

Knyazev, Andrew

259

Kinetic Controls on Cu and Pb Sorption by Ferrihydrite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinetic Controls on Cu and Pb Sorption by Ferrihydrite A N D R E A S C . S C H E I N O and time, Cu and Pbwereboundtotheferrihydritesurfacebyformationofedge- sharing inner-sphere sorption limiting the slow sorption process. The quantification of diffusion-limited surface sites in soils

Sparks, Donald L.

260

Magnetic order and superconductivity in RBa2Cu3Oz  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mössbauer studies Fe57 in RBa2-yKy(Cu1-xFex)3Oz, with R=Y and Pr, y=0 and 0.5, x=0.01,0.05, and 0.1, and z between 5.9 and 7.1, have been performed. A minority of the iron ions enter the Cu(2) site and reveal its magnetic order. For R=Y, y=0, and x=0.1, TN equals 280 and 415 K for z=6.5 and 6.1, respectively. The magnetic moments lie in the basal plane. In tetragonal, oxygen-rich PrBa2(Cu0.9Fe0.1)3O6.9, TN=325 K; in superconducting YBa2(Cu0.9Fe0.1)3O7.1 there is no magnetic order. In nonsuperconducting YBa1.5K0.5(Cu0.95Fe0.05)3O6.1 two distinctly inequivalent magnetic iron sites are observed, corresponding to iron in the Cu(2) site with different Ba-K neighbors. Moments of iron ions that have three Ba and one K as first-nearest neighbors have a different temperature dependence and TN (TN=450 K) from those with four Ba neighbors, where TN=415 K, showing that the antiferromagnetic exchange in the Cu(2) planes is strongly affected by the replacement of Ba2+ by K+, probably by repelling oxygen from the Cu(2) plane. In superconducting YBa1.5K0.5(Cu0.95Fe0.05)3O6.5 the iron site with TN=450 K remains magnetic. The implications of these findings on the valencies of the Cu ions are discussed.

I. Nowik; M. Kowitt; I. Felner; E. R. Bauminger

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Longueur de diffusion des porteurs minoritaires et structure de jonction des diodes Cu/Cu2O (*)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

short circuit current and with the shift from cell to cell of the peak in the photovoltaic spectral cells are not sui- table for an efficient photovoltaic solar energy conversion. Revue Phys. Appl. 15, the photovoltaic spectrum and the electron beam induced current (EBIC) methods. In the two last cases, Cu/Cu2O

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

262

Development and implementation of a FT-ICR mass spectrometer for the investigation of ion conformations of peptide sequence isomers containing basic amino acid residues by gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium exchange  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gas-phase hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange of protonated di- and tripeptides containing a basic amino acid residue has been studied with a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer. Bimolecular reactions...

Marini, Joseph Thomas

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Photoelectrochemistry, Electronic Structure, and Bandgap Sizes of Semiconducting Cu(I)-Niobates and Cu(I)-Tantalates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Semiconducting metal-oxides have remained of intense research interest owing to their potential for achieving efficient solar-driven photocatalytic reactions in aqueous solutions that occur as a result of their bandgap excitation. The photocatalytic reduction of water or carbon dioxide to generate hydrogen or hydrocarbon fuels, respectively, can be driven on p-type (photocathodic) electrodes with suitable band energies. However, metal-oxide semiconductors are typically difficult to dope as p-type with a high mobility of carriers. The supported research led to the discovery of new p-type Cu(I)-niobate and Cu(I)-tantalate film electrodes that can be prepared on FTO glass. New high-purity flux syntheses and the full structural determination of several Cu(I)-containing niobates and tantalates have been completed, as well as new investigations of their optical and photoelectrochemical properties and electronic structures via density-functional theory calculations. For example, CuNbO3, Cu5Ta11O30 and CuNb3O8 were prepared in high purity and their structures were characterized by both single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. These two classes of Cu(I)-containing compounds exhibit optical bandgap sizes ranging from ~1.3 eV to ~2.6 eV. Photoelectrochemical measurements of these compounds show strong photon-driven cathodic currents that confirm the p-type semiconductor behavior of CuNbO3, CuNb3O8, and Cu5Ta11O30. Incident-photon-to-current efficiencies are measured that approach greater than ~1%. Electronic-structure calculations based on density functional theory reveal the visible-light absorption stems from a nearly-direct bandgap transition involving a copper-to-niobium or tantalum (d10 to d0) charge-transfer excitations.

Maggard, Paul A.

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

264

Cu depletion at the CuInSe2 surface Dongxiang Liaoa)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and its relation to the Cd doping at the CdS/CuInSe2 interface are discussed. ďż˝ 2003 American Institute%. However, there are still unresolved fundamental issues about the interface of the CIGS/CdS junction, whose that there is a large band bending in the p-type CIGS absorber, and its surface the region that contacts the CdS

Rockett, Angus

265

Hydrothermal Liquefaction Oil and Hydrotreated Product from Pine Feedstock Characterized by Heteronuclear Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy and FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) crude oil and hydrotreated product from pine tree farm waste (forest product residual, FPR) have been analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes and high-resolution twodimensional heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. FT-ICR MS resolves thousands of compounds in complex oils and provides unparalleled compositional details for individual molecules for identification of compound class (heteroatom content), type (number of rings plus double bonds to carbon or double bond equivalents (DBE) and carbon number (degree of alkylation). Heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy provides one-bond and multiple-bond correlations between pairs of 1H and 13C chemical shifts that are characteristic of different organic functional groups. Taken together this information provides a picture of the chemical composition of these oils. Pyrolysis crude oil product from pine wood was characterized for comparison. Generally, pyrolysis oil is comprised of a more diverse distribution of heteroatom classes with higher oxygen number relative to HTL oil as shown by both positive- and negative-ion ESI FT-ICR MS. A total of 300 N1, 594 O1 and 267 O2 compounds were observed as products of hydrotreatment. The relative abundance of N1O1, N1O2, N1O3, N2, N2O1, N2O2 and O3 compounds are reduced to different degrees after hydrotreatment and other higher heteroatom containing species (O4-O10, N1O4, N1O5 and N2O3) are completely removed by hydrotreatment.

Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Cort, John R.; Hallen, Richard T.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Schaub, Tanner

2014-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

266

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Final quarterly technical progress report No. 11, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary results on the effect of reaction temperature on the performance of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis obtained during the last quarter confirmed that Co catalysts were very sensitive to temperature and deactivated significantly at temperatures above 240{degree}C both in the fixed bed and the slurry bubble column reactors. Following this preliminary investigation, a series of tests were carried out during this period in order to elucidate the nature of this deactivation process as well as determine possible means of preventing it. In order to elucidate the nature of this deactivation process, the catalysts which had undergone significant deactivation after high temperature (280{degree}C) reaction in either the fixed bed reactor or the slurry bubble column reactor were regenerated and retested in the fixed bed reactor. In both cases the catalysts recovered completely their initial activity. In addition, reactions at very high H{sub 2}CO ratios and high temperatures showed very little deactivation, suggesting that the deactivation of the Co catalysts during F-T synthesis at high temperatures was mainly due carbon formation via the Boudouard reaction. Due to the unreactive nature of this carbon, it could only be removed by calcination. A second series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effect of certain promoters (Zr, La, Cr, and Re) as well as the effect of another support such as silica on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis at high temperature. The results suggest that the deactivation process and rate for most of these catalysts are similar to those of the alumina-supported catalysts tested previously (Co.005 and Co-053), and that none of the promoters helps to slow down the rate of carbon formation at high temperatures above 240{degree}C.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

267

Coupled skyrmion sublattices in Cu2OSeO3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the observation of a skyrmion lattice in the chiral multiferroic insulator Cu2OSeO3 using Cu L3-edge resonant soft x-ray diffraction. We observe the unexpected existence of two distinct skyrmion sub-lattices that arise from inequivalent Cu sites with chemically identical coordination numbers but different magnetically active orbitals . The skyrmion sublattices are rotated with respect to each other implying a long wavelength modulation of the lattice. The modulation vector is controlled with an applied magnetic field, associating this Moir'e-like phase with a continuous phase transition. Our findings will open a new class of science involving manipulation of quantum topological states.

Langner, M.C.; Roy,, S.; Mishra, S. K.; Lee, J. C. T.; Shi,, X. W.; Hossain, M. A.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Seki, S.; Tokura, Y.; Kevan, S. D.; Schoenlein, R. W.

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

268

Investigation of Compositional, Structural, and Dynamical Changes of Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures on a Rat Brain by FT-IR Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An epileptic seizure originating from the activation of a group of neurons at the same time is a sudden onset of symptoms and clinical manifestations caused by an abnormal, excessive, hypersynchronous burst of electrical activity that disrupts brain functions. ... Additionally, we performed deconvolution only in the C–H region covering 3050–2800 cm–1 with 0.7 gamma factor. ... The neural networks (NNs) were first trained using FT-IR spectra of 18 water-soluble proteins whose secondary structures are known from X-ray crystallographic analysis. ...

Sevgi Turker; Gul Ilbay; Mete Severcan; Feride Severcan

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron-catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to carry out a Moessbauer spectroscopy study of Iron-based catalysts to identify iron phases present and correlate with water gas shift and FT activities. A total of 15 catalysts were evaluated so far. Results are presented on the amounts in each catalyst of the following phases: superparamagnetic phase, hematite ({alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}), magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}), Chi-carbide phase ({chi}-Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}), and an epsilon-carbide phase ({var_epsilon}-Fe{sub 2.2}C).

Huffman, G.P.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

270

Crystallization of Zr2PdxCu(1-x) and Zr2NixCu(1-x) Metallic Glass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One interesting aspect of rretallic glasses is the numerous instances of the deviation of the phase selection from the amorphous state to thermodynamically stable phases during the crystallization process. Their devitrification pathways allow us to study the relationship between the original amorphous structure and their crystalline counter parts. Among the various factors of phase selections, size and electronic effects have been most extensively studied. Elucidating the phase selection process of a glassy alloy will be helpful to fill in the puzzle of the changes from disordered to ordered structures. In this thesis, Two model Zr{sub 2}Pd{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} and Zr{sub 2}Ni{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} (x = 0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1) glassy systems were investigated since: (1) All of the samples can be made into a homogenous metallic glass; (2) The atomic radii differ from Pd to Cu is by 11%, while Ni has nearly the identical atomic size compare to Cu. Moreover, Pd and Ni differ by only one valence electron from Cu. Thus, these systems are ideal to test the idea of the effects of electronic structure and size factors; (3) The small number of components in these pseudo binary systems readily lend themselves to theoretical modeling. Using high temperature X-ray diffraction {HTXRD) and thermal analysis, topological, size, electronic, bond and chemical distribution factors on crystallization selections in Zr{sub 2}Pd{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} and Zr{sub 2}Ni{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} metallic glass have been explored. All Zr{sub 2}Pd{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} compositions share the same Cu11b phase with different pathways of meta-stable, icosahedral quasicrystalline phase (i-phase), and C16 phase formations. The quasicrystal phase formation is topologically related to the increasing icosahedral short range order (SRO) with Pd content in Zr{sub 2}Pd{sub x}Cu{sub (1·x)} system. Meta-stable C16 phase is competitive with C11b phase at x = 0.5, which is dominated by electronic structure rather than size effects. Cu-rich and Ni-rich compositions in Zr{sub 2}Ni{sub x}Cu{sub (1-x)} trend to divitrify to C11b or C16 phases respectively. In the proposed pseudo binary phase diagram, the domain of C16, C11b and co-existence phases are mainly related with the topology in the amorphous structure and formation enthalpies of crystalline phases.

Min Xu

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

271

Cu Electrochemical Mechanical Planarization Surface Quality Abhinav Tripathi,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

containing 5-phenyl-1-H-tetrazole. The results show that surface roughness increases following Cu ECMP slurries11 and ECMP electrolytes6 that contain 5-phenyl-1-H-tetrazole PTA at pH 3. Although the ECMP

Suni, Ian Ivar

272

Laser cladding of Co-based hardfacing on Cu substrate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cu substrates were subjected to laser cladding with Triballoy 66 SNF by means of...2 laser, preceded by the deposition of an intermediate ... Si for improving the energy coupling between the laser radiation and t...

G. Dehm; M. Bamberger

273

Autocatalytic water dissociation on Cu(110) at near ambient conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from ultra-high vacuum (UHV) studies 2,3 and theory 4-10 ,present authors under UHV conditions and low temperatures. 2on Cu(110) under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) and low temperature

Andersson, Klas

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

A XANES study of Cu speciation in high-temperature brines using synthetic fluid inclusions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cu K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra were recorded from individual synthetic brine fluid inclusions as a function of temperature up to 500 C. The inclusions serve as sample cells for high-temperature spectroscopic studies of aqueous Cu-Cl speciation. Cu{sup +} and Cu{sup 2+} can both be identified from characteristic pre-edge features. Mixed oxidation states can be deconvoluted using linear combinations of Cu{sup +} and Cu{sup 2+} spectra. This work illustrates how complex Cu XANES spectra can be interpreted successfully. Cu{sup 2+} is the stable oxidation state in solution at room temperature and Cu{sup +} at high temperatures. The change in oxidation state with temperature was completely reversible. Cu{sup +} was found to occur exclusively as the linear species [CuCl{sub 2}]{sup -} in solutions containing KCl with Cu:Cl ratios up to 1:6. In the absence of K{sup +}, there is evidence for higher order coordination of Cu{sup +}, in particular the tetrahedral complex [CuCl{sub 4}]{sup 3-}. The importance of such complexes in natural ore-forming fluids is yet to be determined, but may explain the vapor-phase partitioning of Cu as a Cl complex from a Cl-rich brine.

Berry, Andrew J.; Hack, Alistair C.; Mavrogenes, John A.; Newville, Matthew; Sutton, Stephen R. (UC); (ANU)

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

275

Modified Ni-Cu catalysts for ethanol steam reforming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three Ni-Cu catalysts, having different Cu content, supported on ?-alumina were synthesized by wet co-impregnation method, characterized and tested in the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction. The catalysts were characterized for determination of: total surface area and porosity (N{sub 2} adsorption - desorption using BET and Dollimer Heal methods), Ni surface area (hydrogen chemisorption), crystallinity and Ni crystallites size (X-Ray Diffraction), type of catalytic active centers (Hydrogen Temperature Programmed Reduction). Total surface area and Ni crystallites size are not significantly influenced by the addition of Cu, while Ni surface area is drastically diminished by increasing of Cu concentration. Steam reforming experiments were performed at atmospheric pressure, temperature range 150-350°C, and ethanol - water molar ration of 1 at 30, using Ar as carrier gas. Ethanol conversion and hydrogen production increase by the addition of Cu. At 350°C there is a direct connection between hydrogen production and Cu concentration. Catalysts deactivation in 24h time on stream was studied by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) on used catalysts. Coke deposition was observed at all studied temperatures; at 150°C amorphous carbon was evidenced, while at 350°C crystalline, filamentous carbon is formed.

Dan, M.; Mihet, M.; Almasan, V.; Borodi, G. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Street, 400293, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Street, 400293, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Katona, G.; Muresan, L. [Univ. Babes Bolyai, Fac. Chem. and Chem. Eng.,11 Arany Janos, 400028, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Univ. Babes Bolyai, Fac. Chem. and Chem. Eng.,11 Arany Janos, 400028, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Lazar, M. D., E-mail: diana.lazar@itim-cj.ro [65-103 Donath Street (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

276

Analysis of the structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles generated by fs laser ablation of solid target in liquids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the analysis of structure, configuration, and sizing of Cu and Cu oxide nanoparticles (Nps) produced by femtosecond (fs) laser ablation of solid copper target in liquids. Laser pulse energy ranged between 500 {mu}J and 50 {mu}J. Water and acetone were used to produce the colloidal suspensions. The study was performed through optical extinction spectroscopy using Mie theory to fit the full experimental spectra, considering free and bound electrons size dependent contributions to the metal dielectric function. Raman spectroscopy and AFM technique were also used to characterize the sample. Considering the possible oxidation of copper during the fabrication process, two species (Cu and Cu{sub 2}O) arranged in two structures (bare core or core-shell) and in two configuration types (Cu-Cu{sub 2}O or Cu{sub 2}O-Cu) were considered for the fitting depending on the laser pulse energy and the surrounding media. For water at high energy, it can be observed that a Cu-Cu{sub 2}O configuration fits the experimental spectra of the colloidal suspension, while for decreasing energy and below a certain threshold, a Cu{sub 2}O-Cu configuration needs to be included for the optimum fit. Both species coexist for energies below 170 {mu}J for water. On the other hand, for acetone at high energy, optimum fit of the full spectrum suggests the presence a bimodal Cu-Cu{sub 2}O core-shell Nps distribution while for decreasing energy and below a 70 {mu}J threshold energy value, Cu{sub 2}O-Cu core-shell Nps must be included, together with the former configuration, for the fit of the full spectrum. We discuss possible reasons for the changes in the structural configuration of the core-shell Nps.

Santillan, J. M. J. [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CIOp), (CONICET La Plata - CIC) (Argentina); Videla, F. A.; Schinca, D. C.; Scaffardi, L. B. [Centro de Investigaciones Opticas (CIOp), (CONICET La Plata - CIC) (Argentina); Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Facultad de Ingenieria, UNLP (Argentina); Fernandez van Raap, M. B. [Departamento de Fisica-IFLP, Universidad Nacional de La Plata-CONICET, L. B. Scaffardi: CIOp CC3 (1897) Gonnet, La Plata (Argentina)

2013-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

277

Magnetism and superconductivity in Sr YRu Cu O and magnetism in Ba GdRu Cu O  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report magnetization, surface resistance ( ), and electron spin resonance (ESR) for non-superconducting Ba2GdRu1-uCuuO6, and find that all three magnetic ions (Gd, Ru, and Cu...

H.A. Blackstead; John D. Dow; D.R. Harshman…

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Optical and electrochemical properties of CuInSe2 and CuInS2?CuInSe2 alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fundamental optical transitions in single crystals of CuInS2 x Se2 ? 2 x alloys have been studied by electrolyte electroreflectance (EER) spectroscopy. The band gap of the alloys increases nonlinearly with increasing sulphur content corresponding to a bowing parameter 0.14. The flatband potential derived from the EER spectra is in excellent agreement with differential capacitance measurements and determined as ?0.350 V versus the saturated calomel electrode. CuInS2x Se2?2x liquid junction solar cells are reported that exhibit a long wavelength cutoff in the spectral response matching the EER data.

H. Neff; P. Lange; M. L. Fearheiley; K. J. Bachmann

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Different adsorbate binding mechanisms of hydrocarbons: Theoretical studies for Cu(111)C2H2 and Cu(111)C2H4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Different adsorbate binding mechanisms of hydrocarbons: Theoretical studies for Cu(111)±C2H2 and Cu qualitatively different adsorbate binding mechanisms, depending on the adsorbate and substrate material. Experiments on Cu(111)±C2H2 identify a strongly distorted adsorbate while the adsorption energy is small

280

Magnetic interactions in 3d metal chains on Cu[subscript 2]X/Cu(001) (X = N, O): Comparison with corresponding unsupported chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we present a systematic study of the magnetic interactions within 3d transition-metal chains adsorbed on Cu[subscript 2]N and Cu[subscript 2]O monolayers grown on Cu(001). We are interested in the particular ...

Urdaniz, M. C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Thermoelectric properties of chalcopyrite type CuGaTe{sub 2} and chalcostibite CuSbS{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electronic and transport properties of CuGaTe{sub 2}, a hole-doped ternary copper based chalcopyrite type semiconductor, are studied using calculations within the Density Functional Theory and solving the Boltzmann transport equation within the constant relaxation time approximation. The electronic band structures are calculated by means of the full-potential linear augmented plane wave method, using the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson potential. The calculated band gap of 1.23?eV is in agreement with the experimental value of 1.2?eV. The carrier concentration- and temperature dependent thermoelectric properties of CuGaTe{sub 2} are derived, and a figure of merit of zT?=?1.69 is obtained at 950?K for a hole concentration of 3.7·10{sup 19}?cm{sup ?3}, in agreement with a recent experimental finding of zT?=?1.4, confirming that CuGaTe{sub 2} is a promising material for high temperature thermoelectric applications. The good thermoelectric performance of p-type CuGaTe{sub 2} is associated with anisotropic transport from a combination of heavy and light bands. Also for CuSbS{sub 2} (chalcostibite), a better performance is obtained for p-type than for n-type doping. The variation of the thermopower as a function of temperature and concentration suggests that CuSbS{sub 2} will be a good thermoelectric material at low temperatures, similarly to the isostructural CuBiS{sub 2} compound.

Kumar Gudelli, Vijay; Kanchana, V., E-mail: kanchana@iith.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Hyderabad, Ordnance Factory Estate, Yeddumailaram 502 205, Andhra Pradesh (India); Vaitheeswaran, G. [Advanced Centre of Research in High Energy Materials (ACRHEM), University of Hyderabad, Prof. C. R. Rao Road, Gachibowli, Hyderabad 500 046, Andhra Pradesh (India); Svane, A.; Christensen, N. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

282

Phase-Pure Cu,Zn,Al Hydrotalcite-like Materials as Precursors for Copper rich Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Zincian malachite or rosasite (Cu,Zn)2(CO3)(OH), aurichalcite (Cu,Zn)5(CO3)2(OH)6, and hydrotalcite-like (htl) materials of the general composition ((Cu,Zn)1?xAlx)(OH)2(CO3)x/2·m H2O are the typical hydroxy carbonate precursor phases for such catalysts. ... (5) The relevance of the individual precursor phases for applied Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 or binary Cu/ZnO model catalysts is controversially discussed in the literature and aurichalcite,(6) rosasite,(7) zincian malachite,(1, 8) or a phase mixture of rosasite and hydrotalcite(9) have been suggested as desired precursor phases leading to highly active catalysts. ... (52) It is noted that such carbonate species have also been observed for the binary CuZn precursors zincian malachite and aurichalcite in course of the preparation of Cu/ZnO catalysts. ...

Malte Behrens; Igor Kasatkin; Stefanie Kühl; Gisela Weinberg

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

283

Calculated electronic structure of metastable phases of Cu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic energy band and ground-state properties for the existing body-centered-cubic (bcc) and body-centered-tetragonal (bct) crystals, and the predicted hexagonal-close-packed (hcp) structure of elemental copper have been calculated by using first-principles density-functional linear muffin-tin orbital methods in a unified scheme. Results are presented in the form of the energy-band structure in k space and the total energy as a function of the lattice constant. A recent proposed generalized gradient approximation scheme gives more accurate values than the standard local-density approximation. The calculated band structure of bct-Cu is in good agreement with that measured in photoemission experiments, on Cu films grown epitaxialy on Pd{001} and on Pt{001}. The equilibrium lattice constants given by us are in good agreement with those obtained from experiments on bct-Cu and bcc-Cu films. The possibility of the existence of an artificial structure of hcp-Cu has been discussed.

Yumei Zhou; Wuyan Lai; Jianqing Wang

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Absolute measurements of nitric acid by kilometer pathlength FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and their intercomparison with other measurement methods. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of ambient nitric acid (HNO/sub 3/) and ammonia (NH/sub 3/) concentrations were conducted using a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer interfaced to an open-path, multiple-reflection optical system. These measurements provided benchmark data for gaseous HNO/sub 3/ and NH/sub 3/ during a field study, held at Claremont, California, September 11-19, 1985, which compared current analytical methods for determining nitrogenous species concentrations in the atmosphere. Hourly average concentrations of HNO/sub 3/ and NH/sub 3/ are reported, along with the calculated average concentrations for the sampling periods designated for the majority of the other measurement methods.

Winer, A.M.; Tuazon, E.C.; Biermann, H.W.; Wallington, T.J.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

PMo or PW heteropoly acids supported on MCM-41 silica nanoparticles: Characterisation and FT-IR study of the adsorption of 2-butanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mesoporous silica, prepared in basic conditions, has been loaded (20% weight) with 12-molybdophosphoric (PMo) or 12-tungstophosphoric (PW) acid and calcined at different temperatures ranging between 250 and 550 deg. C. The samples have been characterised by N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption at -196 deg. C, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), UV-visible diffuse reflectance, Raman spectroscopy and temperature programmed reduction (TPR). The acidity and catalytic activity have been, respectively, examined by monitoring the adsorption of pyridine and 2-butanol by FT-IR spectroscopy. The results indicate that PW and PMo acids are highly dispersed on mesoporous silica MCM-41 spherical nanoparticles. While PMo retains its Keggin structure up to 550 deg. C, PW decomposes at this temperature into crystalline WO{sub 3} and phosphorous oxides. In both cases, the morphology, hexagonal symmetry and long-range order observed for the support are preserved with calcination up to 450 deg. C. The Broensted-type acid sites found in all samples, whose surface concentration decreases as the calcination temperature increases, are responsible for the selective formation of cis-butene detected upon adsorption of 2-butanol. The sample containing PW calcined at 450 deg. C also shows selectivity to methyl ethyl ketone. - Graphical abstract: Samples based in MCM-41 nanoparticles loaded with tungstophosphoric and molybdophosphoric acids have been synthesised. The uncalcined solids and that derived upon their calcination in the temperature range 250-550 deg. C have been characterised and evaluated in the decomposition of 2-butanol monitored by FT-IR spectroscopy.

Carriazo, Daniel [GIR-QUESCAT, Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008-Salamanca (Spain); Domingo, Concepcion [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, C.S.I.C., Serrano, 123, 28006-Madrid (Spain); Martin, Cristina [GIR-QUESCAT, Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008-Salamanca (Spain); Rives, Vicente [GIR-QUESCAT, Dpto. de Quimica Inorganica, Universidad de Salamanca, 37008-Salamanca (Spain)], E-mail: vrives@usal.es

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

286

Growth and transport properties of Y-Ba-Cu-O/Pr-Ba-Cu-O superlattices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The pulsed-laser deposition method has been used to fabricate epitaxial, nonsymmetric M(Y) {times} N(Pr) superlattices in which YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (YBCO) layers either M = 1,2,3,4,8, or 16 c-axis unit cells thick are separated by insulating PrBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} (PBCO) layers N unit cells thick (N = 1 to {approximately}32). The zero-resistance superconducting transition temperature, T{sub c0}, initially decreases rapidly with increasing PBCO layer thickness, but then saturates at T{sub c0} {approximately} 19 K, 54 K, 71 K, or 80 K, or structures containing 1-,2-,3-, or 4-cell-thick YBCO layers, respectively. Critical current density measurements carried out on structures with 16- or 32-cell thick YBCO layers show that the magnitude of J{sub c}(H = 0) {approximately} 1-2 MA/cm{sup 2}, as well as the magnetic field dependence and the anisotropy of J{sub c}(H) all are in good agreement with corresponding measurements on thicker, single-layer YBCO films. Thus, there is no evidence of an enhanced J{sub c}(H) due to the multi-layered structure, for the layer thickness investigated to date. The systematic variation of T{sub c0}, as a function of the YBCO and PBCO layer thickness, is discussed in light of other recent experiments and theoretical model calculations. The superlattices' structural and compositional order are characterized using x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy, and details of the pulsed-laser deposition process are reported. 42 refs., 7 figs.

Lowndes, D.H.; Norton, D.P.; Budai, J.D.; Christen, D.K.; Klabunde, C.E.; Warmack, R.J.; Pennycook, S.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Photovolatic effect in CdS-Cu2S heterojunctions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current-voltage characteristic of CdS-Cu2S solar cells is analyzed in terms of the contributing physical effects. In Cu2S it is minority-carrier generation and diffusion, in CdS it is a Schottky barrier layer with sliding boundary conditions, nj(j), and the development of high-field domains which control the current. These domains are responsible for current saturation, but they may also limit the current to a value below the one which can be supplied from Cu2S, hence they present a ceiling for the observed short-circuit current. The given model is in satisfactory agreement with several experimental observations not previously understood.

K. W. Böer

1976-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Three approaches to economical photovoltaics: conformal Cu2S, organic luminescent films, and PbSe nanocrystal superlattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approaches to economical photovoltaics: conformal Cu 2 S,routes to more efficient photovoltaics using conformal Cu 2on grid-parity. Progress in Photovoltaics: Research and

Carbone, Ian Anthony

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The Different Impacts of SO2 and SO3 on Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalysts...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Different Impacts of SO2 and SO3 on CuZeolite SCR Catalysts. The Different Impacts of SO2 and SO3 on CuZeolite SCR Catalysts. Abstract: The different impacts of SO2 and SO3...

290

Sulfur Effect and Performance Recovery of a DOC + CSF + Cu-Zeolite...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Sulfur Effect and Performance Recovery of a DOC + CSF + Cu-Zeolite SCR System Sulfur Effect and Performance Recovery of a DOC + CSF + Cu-Zeolite SCR System effect and performance...

291

Structure-Activity Relationships in NH3-SCR over Cu-SSZ-13 as...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Structure-Activity Relationships in NH3-SCR over Cu-SSZ-13 as Probed by Reaction Kinetics and EPR Studies. Structure-Activity Relationships in NH3-SCR over Cu-SSZ-13 as Probed by...

292

Photovoltaic characteristics of TCNQ-incorporated CuPc-poly(p-phenylene) composite films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Composite films (CuPc–PPP–TCNQ) were produced by simultaneous deposition using copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) as a carrier generation material, poly(p-phenylene) (PPP) as a hole transport material, and tetracyan...

Takayuki Iwase; Yutaka Haga

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Synthesis over Cu from CO/CO2...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Methanol Synthesis over Cu from COCO2H2H2O Mixtures: the Source of C in Methanol and the Role of Water Mechanistic Studies of Methanol Synthesis over Cu from COCO2H2H2O...

294

E-Print Network 3.0 - al-cu-fe quasicrystalline plasma Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

thin films in the Al rich region of the Al-Cu-Fe-Cr quasicrystalline phase field... in UHV of magnetron sputtered Al-Cu-Fe-Cr quasicrystalline thin films. We also confirm the...

295

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloy fracture cu-ni Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

fracture cu-ni Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: alloy fracture cu-ni Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Ris-R-1276(EN) Final Report...

296

Predictive GIS model for potential mapping of Cu, Pb, Zn mineralization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The geologic features indicative of Cu, Pb, Zn mineral deposits in a area are fractures (structure), and host rock sediments. Datasets used include Cu, Pb, Zn deposit points record, geological data, remote sensin...

Tarik B. Benomar Ph. D.; Bian Fuling

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Elucidating efficiency losses in cuprous oxide (Cu?O) photovoltaics and identifying strategies for efficiency improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I fabricated and characterized a series of thin-film cuprous oxide (Cu?O) photovoltaic devices. I constructed several different device designs, using sputtered and electrochemically deposited Cu?O. ...

Brandt, Riley Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Effects of the Calcination and Reduction Conditions on a Cu/ZnO Methanol Synthesis Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The CuO crystallite size of the catalysts obtained from aurichalcite greatly depends on the heating rate of...

Shin-ichiro Fujita; Shuhei Moribe…

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Dehydrogenation of Ethanol Over Cu/ZnO Catalysts Prepared from Various Coprecipitated Precursors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the title reaction, Cu/ZnO catalysts prepared from aurichalcite were more active than those prepared from...2

Shin-ichiro Fujita; Nobuhiro Iwasa; Hiroaki Tani…

300

Possibilities of increasing the efficiency of Si and CuInSe2 solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper proposes a method of increasing the efficiency of Si and CuInSe2 solar cells using the impact ionization and impurity...pZnTe-pSi-nSi and pZnTe-pCuInSe2-n(CuInSe2)1?x (2InAs) ...

M. S. Saidov

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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301

DISSERTATION DEVICE PHYSICS OF Cu(In,Ga)Se2 THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISSERTATION DEVICE PHYSICS OF Cu(In,Ga)Se2 THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS Submitted by Markus Gloeckler PHYSICS OF Cu(In,Ga)Se2 THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS BE ACCEPTED AS FULFILLING IN PART REQUIREMENTS OF Cu(In,Ga)Se2 THIN-FILM SOLAR CELLS Thin-film solar cells have the potential to be an important

Sites, James R.

302

FT-ICR STUDIES OF METAL-CARBON BINARY CLUSTERS, MASAMICHI KOHNO (Eng. Res. Inst., Univ. Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656), SHUHEI INOUE (Dept. Mech. Eng., Univ.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, no pure carbon clusters were observed, whereas pure carbon clusters with almost the same intensity of MCn encapsulated inside. 50 60 70 Number of Carbon Atoms [Cm + ] Intensity(arb.units) (b) La:0.8% (a) Sc:0.8% LaAbstract FT-ICR STUDIES OF METAL-CARBON BINARY CLUSTERS, MASAMICHI KOHNO (Eng. Res. Inst., Univ

Maruyama, Shigeo

303

Conjugate heat transfer in a room with a laminated glazing with CuS or CuS–Cu2?xSe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A numerical study of the heat transfer in a room with a laminated glazing wall with solar control films is presented. The thermal evaluation was performed on three different configurations of the laminated glazing, with films of CuS–Cu2?xSe or CuS using polyvinyl butyral (PVB) and/or polyethylene terephthalate (PET). For a reference case, a single glazing was evaluated. In order to observe the effect of the conjugate heat transfer on the inside environment of the system, thermal efficiency (?t) was defined; this is the ratio between the total heat flux towards the inside environment regarding the incident solar energy on glazing. The results show that the adhesion of two solar control films at laminated glazing presents better values of thermal efficiency for different values of solar radiation (G) and outside temperature (Text). Also, with the aim of applying these results to other contexts, we computed the values obtained for the solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC). The SHGC was determined for the summer conditions stated in ISO 15099 and ASHRAE. The SHGC results were predicted in a range of 0.360 ? SHGC ? 0.499 and 0.504 ? SHGC ? 0.595 for the conditions of ISO 15099 and ASHRAE, respectively.

J. Xamán; I. Zavala-Guillén; J.O. Aguilar; G. Álvarez; C. López-Mata; J. Arce

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Cardiologists from CU testing revolutionary heart-attack treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cardiologists from CU testing revolutionary heart-attack treatment Compiled 4.12.2013 23 of the biologically degradable stent in the treatment of myocardial infarctions (heart-attacks). The results with a metal stent in their heart for the rest of their life; instead, the stent does its work then disappears

Cerveny, Vlastislav

305

Carl Wieman UBC & CU Colorado physics & chem education research group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carl Wieman UBC & CU Colorado physics & chem education research group: W. Adams, K. Perkins, K-- transforming brain Think about and use science like a scientist. What does that mean? How is it accomplished/reflection. Change brain "wiring" *Cambridge Handbook on Expertise and Expert Performance patterns, associations

Southern California, University of

306

Efficient solar energy conversion with CuInS2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... film is displayed in the inset of Fig. 26. The light attenuation for photon energies above the CuInS2 band gap (830 nm) can be estimated by the area under ... the area under the transmittivity curve. Since the total transmission is 25% in this energy range, a correction factor of 4 for efficiency calculation is obtained. This would result ...

H. J. Lewerenz; H. Goslowsky; K.-D. Husemann; S. Fiechter

1986-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

307

0 EC C / I O O C 2001 Conference I ncor porat ing A C0 FT M onday 2 July-T hursday 5 July 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

00 GHz. i s dg nom on- d at 10 M bps using a scH--secded FP-L!) m m a L CFB G W i£ £ i s tech to a hncarly cu - ed fib- B ragg gm£ 1g (L CFB G) [3] . Fig. 1 show s thc exper im ental scu p uscd for ra k spacing. ¢ 1c L CFB G has 12.l 4 nm of spc ¤ - B W from 1544 05 nm to 15562 0 M n ¦ £ 68 % of rm ecum ty

Choi, Woo-Young

308

Water-gas shift reaction over Cu/ZnO and Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts prepared by homogeneous precipitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both binary Cu/ZnO and ternary Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts were prepared by homogeneous precipitation (hp) using urea hydrolysis. The structure and the activity for the water-gas shift reaction of these catalysts were studied compared with those prepared by coprecipitation (cp). The binary precursors contained hydroxycarbonates such as malachite and aurichalcite phases, whereas the ternary precursors were composed of hydrotalcite, malachite and aurichalcite phases depending on the metal composition. After thermal decomposition, both catalysts contained apparently CuO and ZnO as crystalline phase. No phase derived from Al was observed, since the amount of Al was small as 10 at.% in the ternary catalysts. After reduction pretreatment with hydrogen, the catalysts were tested for the shift reaction between 150 and 300 °C. The activity of hp-catalysts was higher than that of cp-catalysts; binary hp-Cu/ZnO showed higher activity than ternary hp-Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts none the less the surface area was larger for the latter than for the former. The activity apparently depended on the surface area of Cu metal formed on the surface of hp-catalysts and a good correlation was observed between the Cu metal particle size and the activation energy of the shift reaction. However, more precise evaluation of the activity based on turn-over frequency strongly suggested the formation of Cu+ species as the active sites at the boundary between Cu metal particles and ZnO particles. Even after the pre-reduction at the high temperature, 250 °C, hp-Cu/ZnO catalyst showed no significant deactivation as well as no detectable sintering of the Cu metal particles during 50 h of the reaction, indicating that the hp-preparation method afforded the Cu catalysts with high sustainability in the shift reaction.

Tetsuya Shishido; Manabu Yamamoto; Dalin Li; Yan Tian; Hiroyuki Morioka; Masahide Honda; Tsuneji Sano; Katsuomi Takehira

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Magnetic dipole moment of 57,59Cu measured by in-gas-cell laser spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-gas-cell laser spectroscopy study of the 57,59,63,65Cu isotopes has been performed for the first time using the 244.164 nm optical transition from the atomic ground state of copper. The nuclear magnetic dipole moments for 57,59,65Cu relative to that of 63Cu have been extracted. The new value for 57Cu of mu(57Cu) = +2.582(7)mu_N is in strong disagreement with the previous literature value but in good agreement with recent theoretical and systematic predictions.

T. E. Cocolios; A. N. Andreyev; B. Bastin; N. Bree; J. Buscher; J. Elseviers; J. Gentens; M. Huyse; Yu. Kudryavtsev; D. Pauwels; T. Sonoda; P. Van den Bergh; P. Van Duppen

2009-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

310

Energy and system size dependence of phi meson production in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the beam-energy and system-size dependence of {phi} meson production (using the hadronic decay mode {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}) by comparing the new results from Cu + Cu collisions and previously reported Au + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV measured in the STAR experiment at RHIC. Data presented are from midrapidity (|y| < 0.5) for 0.4 < p{sub T} < 5 GeV/c. At a given beam energy, the transverse momentum distributions for {phi} mesons are observed to be similar in yield and shape for Cu + Cu and Au + Au colliding systems with similar average numbers of participating nucleons. The {phi} meson yields in nucleus-nucleus collisions, normalized by the average number of participating nucleons, are found to be enhanced relative to those from p + p collisions with a different trend compared to strange baryons. The enhancement for {phi} mesons is observed to be higher at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV compared to 62.4 GeV. These observations for the produced {phi}(s{bar s}) mesons clearly suggest that, at these collision energies, the source of enhancement of strange hadrons is related to the formation of a dense partonic medium in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions and cannot be alone due to canonical suppression of their production in smaller systems.

STAR Coll

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

311

Energy and system size dependence of ?meson production in Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the beam-energy and system-size dependence of \\phi meson production (using the hadronic decay mode \\phi -- K+K-) by comparing the new results from Cu+Cu collisions and previously reported Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV measured in the STAR experiment at RHIC. Data presented are from mid-rapidity (|y|energy, the transverse momentum distributions for \\phi mesons are observed to be similar in yield and shape for Cu+Cu and Au+Au colliding systems with similar average numbers of participating nucleons. The \\phi meson yields in nucleus-nucleus collisions, normalised by the average number of participating nucleons, are found to be enhanced relative to those from p+p collisions with a different trend compared to strange baryons. The enhancement for \\phi mesons is observed to be higher at \\sqrt{s_NN} = 200 GeV compared to 62.4 GeV. These observations for the produced \\phi(s\\bar{s}) mesons clearly suggest that, at these collision energies, the source of enhancement of strange hadrons is related to the formation of a dense partonic medium in high energy nucleus-nucleus collisions and cannot be alone due to canonical suppression of their production in smaller systems.

STAR Collaboration

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

Utility of reactively sputtered CuN{sub x} films in spintronics devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied nitrified copper (CuN{sub x}) thin films grown by reactive sputtering in the context of spintronic devices. The Ar-to-N{sub 2} flow ratio enables tunability of the electrical resistivity and surface roughness of the CuN{sub x} films, with the former increasing to nearly 20 times that of Cu, and the latter reduced to the atomic scale. Incorporating this into a Ta/CuN{sub x}/Ta seed stack for spin valves improves the current-in-plane (CIP) magnetoresistance; maximum magnetoresistance results with CuN{sub x} seed layer and Cu interlayer. Finally, finite element modeling results are presented that suggest the use of CuN{sub x} in nanocontact spin torque oscillators can enhance current densities by limiting the current spread through the device. This may positively impact threshold currents, power requirements, and device reliability.

Fang Yeyu [Physics Department, Goeteborg University, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Persson, J. [Physics Department, Goeteborg University, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); NanOsc AB, Electrum 205, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Zha, C. [Materials Physics Department, Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Willman, J.; Miller, Casey W. [Department of Physics, Center for Integrated Functional Materials, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Avenue, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Aakerman, Johan [Physics Department, Goeteborg University, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); NanOsc AB, Electrum 205, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Materials Physics Department, Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Dynamics of Propane in Silica Mesopores Formed upon PropyleneHydrogenation over Pt Nanoparticles by Time-Resolved FT-IRSpectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Propylene hydrogenation over Pt nanoparticles supported onmesoporous silica type SBA-15 was monitored by time-resolved FT-IRspectroscopy at 23 ms resolution using short propylene gas pulses thatjoined a continuous flow of hydrogen in N2 (1 atm total pressure).Experiments were conducted in the temperature range 323-413 K. Propanewas formed within 100 milliseconds or faster. The CH stretching regionrevealed distinct bands for propane molecules emerging inside thenanoscale channels of the silica support. Spectral analysis gave thedistribution of the propane product between support and surrounding gasphase as function of time. Kinetic analysis showed that the escape ofpropane molecules from the channels occurred within hundreds ofmilliseconds (3.1 + 0.4 s-1 at 383 K). A steady state distribution ofpropane between gas phase and mesoporous support is established as theproduct is swept from the catalyst zone by the continuous flow ofhydrogen co-reactant. This is the first direct spectroscopic observationof emerging products of heterogeneous catalysis on nanoporous supportsunder reaction conditions.

Waslylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

HMA1, a new Cu-ATPase of the chloroplast envelope, is essential for growth under adverse light conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an additional way to the previously characterized chloroplast envelope Cu-ATPase PAA1 to import Cu are PAA1 (4) and very recently PAA2 (5), two P1B-type ATPases. PAA1, localized into the chloroplast envelope, supplies Cu to the chloroplast, whereas PAA2, localized into the thylakoid membrane, delivers Cu to the

315

Comparative Study of the Defect Point Physics and Luminescence of the Kesterites Cu2ZnSnS4 and Cu2ZnSnSe4 and Chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)Se2: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this contribution, we present a comparative study of the luminescence of the kesterites Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) and Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) and their related chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe). Luminescence spectroscopy suggests that the electronic properties of Zn-rich, Cu-poor kesterites (both CZTS and CZTSe) and Cu-poor CIGSe are dictated by fluctuations of the electrostatic and chemical potentials. The large redshift in the luminescence of grain boundaries in CIGSe, associated with the formation of a neutral barrier is clearly observed in CZTSe, and, to some extent, in CZTS. Kesterites can therefore replicate the fundamental electronic properties of CIGSe.

Romero, M. J.; Repins, I.; Teeter, G.; Contreras, M.; Al-Jassim, M.; Noufi, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Cu–ZnO and Cu–ZnO/Al2O3 Catalysts for the Reverse Water-Gas Shift Reaction. The Effect of the Cu/Zn Ratio on Precursor Characteristics and on the Activity of the Derived Catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparison is made between Cu–ZnO and alumina-supported Cu–ZnO as catalysts for the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction. For both types of catalyst the Cu/Zn ratio has been varied between Cu-rich and Zn-ri...

Frank S. Stone; David Waller

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

? + SR studies on Sr2CuO2Cl2, La2CuO4 and Nd2CuO4: 2-d magnetism, local fields and muon sitesSR studies on Sr2CuO2Cl2, La2CuO4 and Nd2CuO4: 2-d magnetism, local fields and muon sites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We compare the temperature dependence of the zero-field muon spin precession frequency observed in Sr2CuO2Cl2 and La2CuO4...below the Néel temperature with a 2-d Heisenberg model with an additional small anisotro...

L. P. Le; G. M. Luke; B. J. Sternlieb; Y. J. Uemura; J. H. Brewer…

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Photodetecting Properties of CuInSe2 Homojunctions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the photovoltaic properties of homojunctions prepared by indium diffusion on p-type CuInSe2 at liquid nitrogen and room temperatures. The CuInSe2 was grown by the Bridgman method. We obtained the photovolatic spectra for both parallel and perpendicular incident lights with respect to the plane of the junciton (both on the p and n sides). The wavelength range was between 1.4 µm and 0.8 µm. We calculated a quantum efficiency of 40% at room temperature. This efficiency remained approximately constant between 1.2 µm and 0.9 µm. We have also measured response times for the junction at 300K. For change of incident light the response time is 1.2?10-6 sec and for change of bias the response time is 4?10-7 sec.

J. González; C. Rincón; A. Redondo; P. Negrete

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Adsorption-induced distortion of F16CuPc on Cu(111) and Ag(111): An x-ray standing wave study A. Gerlach,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

still fragmentary understanding of the complex interaction of aro- matic molecules with metal substrates-substrate interaction on metals organic compounds may undergo structural changes upon adsorption.3,6 In this context we chose to study perflu- orinated copper-phthalocyanine F16CuPc, see Fig. 1 a on Cu 111 and Ag 111 using

Schreiber, Frank

320

Systematic Study of Azimuthal Anisotropy in Cu$+$Cu and Au$+$Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 62.4$ and 200~GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy $v_2$ for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of $v_2$ as a function of transverse momentum $p_T$ and centrality in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200~GeV and 62.4~GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu$+$Cu collisions we observe a decrease in $v_2$ values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4~GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions we find that $v_2$ depends both on eccentricity and the number of participants, $N_{\\rm part}$. We observe that $v_2$ divided by eccentricity ($\\varepsilon$) monotonically increases with $N_{\\rm part}$ and scales as ${N_{\\rm part}^{1/3}}$. The Cu$+$Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled $v_{2}$ data. For identified hadrons, $v_2$ divided by the number of constituent quarks $n_q$ is independent of hadron species as...

Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Al-Jamel, A; Alexander, J; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, Y; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Cianciolo, V; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; Constantin, P; Csanád, M; Csörg?, T; Dahms, T; Das, K; David, G; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Dubey, A K; Durum, A; Dzhordzhadze, V; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Jr., \\,; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -Ĺ; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hamagaki, H; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Iinuma, H; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E; Kim, Y -S; Kinney, E; Kiss, Á; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Král, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Bornec, Y Le; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Li, X; Li, X H; Lim, H; Liška, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mašek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Miake, Y; Mikeš, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Oka, M; Okada, K; Omiwade, O O; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Rykov, V L; Ryu, S S; Sahlmueller, B; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, S; Sakata, H; Samsonov, V; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Seele, J; Seidl, R; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Sharma, D; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shevel, A; Shibata, T -A; Shigaki, K; Shimomura, M; Shohjoh, T; Shoji, K; Sickles, A; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Silvestre, C; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Skutnik, S; Slune?ka, M; Smith, W C; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Suire, C; Sullivan, J P; Sziklai, J; Tabaru, T; Takagi, S; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Taranenko, A; Tarján, P; Thomas, T L; Todoroki, T; Togawa, M; Toia, A; Tojo, J; Tomášek, L; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tram, V-N; Tserruya, I; Tsuchimoto, Y; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Vale, C; Valle, H; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Vértesi, R; Vinogradov, A A; Virius, M; Vrba, V; Vznuzdaev, E; Wagner, M; Walker, D; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; Wessels, J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Effects of Cu Diffusion from ZnTe:Cu/Ti Contacts on Carrier Lifetime of CdS/CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the performance of CdS/CdTe thin film PV devices processed with a ZnTe:Cu/Ti contact to investigate how carrier lifetime in the CdTe layer is affected by Cu diffusion from the contact.

Gessert, T. A.; Metzger, W. K.; Asher, S. E.; Young, M. R.; Johnston, S.; Dhere, R. G.; Duda, A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Multiexciton Solar Cells of CuInSe2 Nanocrystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multiexciton Solar Cells of CuInSe2 Nanocrystals ... nanocrystals; photovoltaics; CIGS; multiple excitons; solar cells; photonic curing ... (4-8) Extraction of more than one electron per absorbed photon as electrical current in devices has also been reported,(9-12) with a few instances of device quantum efficiencies (QEs) exceeding 100%, PbS (internal QE only),(13) PbSe (external QE, EQE)(14) nanocrystal solar cells, and an organic device exhibiting a related process of singlet fission. ...

C. Jackson Stolle; Taylor B. Harvey; Douglas R. Pernik; Jarett I. Hibbert; Jiang Du; Dong Joon Rhee; Vahid A. Akhavan; Richard D. Schaller; Brian A. Korgel

2013-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

323

CuC1 thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell for producing copper having a dense graphite anode electrode and a dense graphite cathode electrode disposed in a CuCl solution. An anion exchange membrane made of poly(ethylene vinyl alcohol) and polyethylenimine cross-linked with a cross-linking agent selected from the group consisting of acetone, formaldehyde, glyoxal, glutaraldehyde, and mixtures thereof is disposed between the two electrodes.

Fan, Qinbai (Chicago, IL); Liu, Renxuan (Chicago, IL)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

324

Precipitation in 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu maraging steels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two maraging steels with the compositions 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu-4Mo (wt%) and 9Ni-12Cr-2Cu and with small additions of Al and Ti were investigated using atom probe field ion microscopy. Tomographic atom probe investigations were performed to clarify the spatial distribution of elements in and close to the precipitates. Materials heat treated at 475 C for 5, 25 min, 1, 2, 4 and 400 h were analyzed. Precipitates in the Mo-rich material were observed already after 5 min of aging, while in the material without MO, precipitation started later. In both materials precipitation begins with the formation of Cu-rich particles which work as nucleation sites for a Ni-rich phase of type Ni{sub 3}(Ti,Al). A Mo-rich phase was detected in the Mo-rich steel after 2 h of aging. The distribution of alloying elements in the precipitates, their role in the precipitation process, and the mechanism of hardening in the two materials are discussed.

Stiller, K.; Haettestrand, M. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physics; Danoix, F. [Univ. de Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Ionique] [Univ. de Rouen, Mont Saint Aignan (France). Lab. de Microscopie Ionique

1998-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

325

Synthesis of BiPbSrCaCuO superconductor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and a precursor composition for preparing a lead-doped bismuth-strontium-calcium-copper oxide superconductor of the formula Bi.sub.a Pb.sub.b Sr.sub.c Ca.sub.d Cu.sub.e O.sub.f wherein a is from about 1.7 to about 1.9, b is from about 0.3 to about 0.45, c is from about 1.6 to about 2.2, d is from about 1.6 to about 2.2, e is from about 2.97 to about 3.2 and f is 10.+-.z by reacting a mixture of Bi.sub.4 Sr.sub.3 Ca.sub.3 Cu.sub.4 O.sub.16.+-.z, an alkaline earth metal cuprate, e.g., Sr.sub.9 Ca.sub.5 Cu.sub.24 O.sub.41, and an alkaline earth metal plumbate, e.g., Ca.sub.2-x Sr.sub.x PbO.sub.4 wherein x is about 0.5, is disclosed.

Hults, William L. (Los Alamos, NM); Kubat-Martin, Kimberly A. (Espanola, NM); Salazar, Kenneth V. (Espanola, NM); Phillips, David S. (Los Alamos, NM); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Synthesis of BiPbSrCaCuO superconductor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process and a precursor composition for preparing a lead-doped bismuth-strontium-calcium-copper oxide superconductor of the formula Bi[sub a]Pb[sub b]Sr[sub c]Ca[sub d]Cu[sub e]O[sub f] wherein a is from about 1.7 to about 1.9, b is from about 0.3 to about 0.45, c is from about 1.6 to about 2.2, d is from about 1.6 to about 2.2, e is from about 2.97 to about 3.2 and f is 10[+-]z by reacting a mixture of Bi[sub 4]Sr[sub 3]Ca[sub 3]Cu[sub 4]O[sub 16[+-]z], an alkaline earth metal cuprate, e.g., Sr[sub 9]Ca[sub 5]Cu[sub 24]O[sub 41], and an alkaline earth metal plumbate, e.g., Ca[sub 2[minus]x]Sr[sub x]PbO[sub 4] wherein x is about 0.5, is disclosed.

Hults, W.L.; Kubat-Martin, K.A.; Salazar, K.V.; Phillips, D.S.; Peterson, D.E.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

327

Determination of Mass Attenuation Coefficients for CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 Semiconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work presents mass attenuation coefficients values of CuInSe2 and CuGaSe2 semiconductor thin films commonly used in photovoltaic devices. The mass attenuation coefficients were measured at different energies from 11.9 to 37.3 keV by using the secondary excitation method. Monochromatic photons were obtained using the Br, Sr, Mo, Cd, Te, Ba and Nd secondary targets. 59.5 keV gamma rays emitted from an annular Am-241 radioactive source were used to excite secondary targets. Characteristic X-rays emitted from secondary target were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 0.16 keV at 5.9 keV. The measured values were compared with theoretical values calculated using WinXCOM program.

Celik, Ahmet; Cevik, Ugur; Baltas, Hasan; Bacaksiz, Emin [Department of Physics, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Karadeniz Technical University, 61080 Trabzon (Turkey)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

328

Systematic Study of Azimuthal Anisotropy in Cu$+$Cu and Au$+$Au Collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} = 62.4$ and 200~GeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied the dependence of azimuthal anisotropy $v_2$ for inclusive and identified charged hadrons in Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions on collision energy, species, and centrality. The values of $v_2$ as a function of transverse momentum $p_T$ and centrality in Au$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$=200~GeV and 62.4~GeV are the same within uncertainties. However, in Cu$+$Cu collisions we observe a decrease in $v_2$ values as the collision energy is reduced from 200 to 62.4~GeV. The decrease is larger in the more peripheral collisions. By examining both Au$+$Au and Cu$+$Cu collisions we find that $v_2$ depends both on eccentricity and the number of participants, $N_{\\rm part}$. We observe that $v_2$ divided by eccentricity ($\\varepsilon$) monotonically increases with $N_{\\rm part}$ and scales as ${N_{\\rm part}^{1/3}}$. The Cu$+$Cu data at 62.4 GeV falls below the other scaled $v_{2}$ data. For identified hadrons, $v_2$ divided by the number of constituent quarks $n_q$ is independent of hadron species as a function of transverse kinetic energy $KE_T=m_T-m$ between $0.1Cu$+$Cu data at 62.4 GeV, of $v_2/(n_q\\cdot\\varepsilon\\cdot N^{1/3}_{\\rm part})$ vs $KE_T/n_q$ for all measured particles.

A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; A. Al-Jamel; J. Alexander; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Bennett; Y. Berdnikov; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; J. G. Boissevain; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; J. -S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; V. Cianciolo; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; K. Das; G. David; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; A. Durum; V. Dzhordzhadze; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S. -Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H. -Ĺ. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; H. Hamagaki; R. Han; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; S. Huang; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; H. Iinuma; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kanou; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; A. Khanzadeev; J. Kikuchi; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; Y. -S. Kim; E. Kinney; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; D. Kotchetkov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; X. Li; X. H. Li; H. Lim; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; M. X. Liu; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; Y. Mao; L. Mašek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; Y. Miake; P. Mikeš; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; B. E. Norman; R. Nouicer; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; M. Oka; K. Okada; O. O. Omiwade; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; J. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter; K. Reygers; V. Riabov; Y. Riabov; G. Roche; A. Romana; M. Rosati; S. S. E. Rosendahl; P. Rosnet; P. Rukoyatkin; V. L. Rykov; S. S. Ryu; B. Sahlmueller; N. Saito; T. Sakaguchi; S. Sakai; H. Sakata; V. Samsonov; H. D. Sato; S. Sato; S. Sawada; J. Seele; R. Seidl; V. Semenov; R. Seto; D. Sharma; T. K. Shea; I. Shein; A. Shevel; T. -A. Shibata; K. Shigaki; M. Shimomura; T. Shohjoh; K. Shoji; A. Sickles; C. L. Silva; D. Silvermyr; C. Silvestre; K. S. Sim; C. P. Singh; V. Singh; S. Skutnik; M. Slune?ka; W. C. Smith; A. Soldatov; R. A. Soltz; W. E. Sondheim; S. P. Sorensen; I. V. Sourikova; F. Staley; P. W. Stankus; E. Stenlund; M. Stepanov; A. Ster; S. P. Stoll; T. Sugitate; C. Suire; J. P. Sullivan; J. Sziklai; T. Tabaru; S. Takagi; E. M. Takagui; A. Taketani; K. H. Tanaka; Y. Tanaka; K. Tanida; M. J. Tannenbaum; A. Taranenko; P. Tarján; T. L. Thomas; T. Todoroki; M. Togawa; A. Toia; J. Tojo; L. Tomášek; H. Torii; R. S. Towell; V-N. Tram; I. Tserruya; Y. Tsuchimoto; S. K. Tuli; H. Tydesjö; N. Tyurin; C. Vale; H. Valle

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

329

Hydrocarbon injection improves condensate recovery in U. S. S. R  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Treating producing zones with hydrocarbon mixtures can increase the flow capacity of wells in which the rate has decreased because of gas-condensate precipitation. When an appropriate mixture is injected in a predetermined amount (volume per meter of producing interval), production can be increased by 10-20%. After treatment, producing rates can be stabilized for a period of several months to 2 years. Wells producing from gas-condensate, depletion-drive reservoirs are considered to be the most suitable for stimulation. These wells can be characterized by: Initial liquid content in the formation (pentane plus high boiling fraction) exceeds 430-520 cu m/cu m of gas (77-93 bbl/MMcf). Formation pressure is in the range of 10-25% of initial pressure. Producing formation thickness is 15-80 m (49-262 ft). For better results in stimulating a well, one should consider the nature of rock characteristics of the reservoir. Preferred formations for stimulations are porous-type reservoirs with permeability not higher than 10{sup {minus}13} sq m (100 md) and not lower than 10{sup {minus}15} sq m (1 md).

Ter-Sarkisov, R. (All-Union Scientific Research, Inst. of Natural Gas, Moscow (SU)); Gritsenko, A. (NPO Soyuzgastechnology, Moscow (SU))

1991-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

330

Control of Y2BaCuO5 particle formation in bulk, single grain Y–Ba–Cu–O  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The trapped field of undoped, bulk, single grain Y–Ba–Cu–O (YBCO) fabricated by top seeded melt growth (TSMG) has been measured to investigate the field generating potential of this material. Bulk samples were prepared from precursor powders that incorporated Y2O3 of particle size 20–50 nm, rather than Y2BaCuO5 (Y-211), which is used more commonly, in order to introduce nano-Y-211 inclusions in the superconducting YBa2Cu3Oy (Y-123) matrix. Relatively small bulk samples of diameter 20 mm processed from this precursor are observed to trap a peak magnetic flux density of nearly 0.8 T at 77 K. This is the first time that such a trapped field of this magnitude has been observed in undoped YBCO (i.e. in the absence of chemical additions). The increase in trapped field is accompanied by an associated enhancement in Jc by up to a factor of five over the applied magnetic field up to 4 T at 77 K compared to standard single grain YBCO fabricated from precursor powders that contain the Y-211 phase.

W K Yeoh; S K Pathak; Y-H Shi; A R Dennis; D A Cardwell; N Hari Babu; K Iida; M Strasik

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Intrinsic surface band bending in Cu{sub 3}N(100) ultrathin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highly homogeneous, ultrathin films of copper nitride (Cu{sub 3}N) have been grown on Fe(001) at room temperature using a Cu evaporator and a radio-frequency plasma source to obtain atomic nitrogen in a UHV environment. Cu{sub 3}N is a semiconductor with the valence band edge at -0.65{+-}0.05 eV below the Fermi Level. The formation of copper nitride can be detected spectroscopically by the shape of the Cu LVV-Auger electron transition, which changes sensibly in shape and position compared to metallic Cu. Cu{sub 3}N grows epitaxially with the substrate forming flat disklike mosaic blocks (001) oriented. Both x-ray core level photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy photoemission experiments have been used to study the electronic structure. A first-principles calculation has been performed and compared with the measured spectra.

Navio, C.; Alvarez, J.; Yndurain, F.; Miranda, R. [Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada e Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales Nicolas Cabrera, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Capitan, M. J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia-CSIC, c/Serrano 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Enhanced performance of high temperature aluminate cementitious materials incorporated with Cu powders for thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Cementitious materials have been extensively developed in thermal energy storage system of solar thermal power. This paper deals with the volume heat capacity, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient, and compressive strength of aluminate cementitious thermal energy storage materials with the addition of metal Cu powders. The specimens were subjected to heat-treatment at 105, 350, and 900 °C, respectively. In the heating process, Cu powders gradually oxidized to Cu2O and CuO, providing a so-called mass compensation mechanism for the composite paste. Meanwhile, it indicates that volume heat capacity and thermal conductivity both increase with increasing Cu powders content and decrease with the rising temperature. The optimum thermal properties were obtained at 15 wt% Cu powders loading. In addition, Calorimetric Test, XRD, TG–DSC, and MIP are performed for characterizing the hydration rates, the phases, the mass/heat evolution, and the pore distribution, respectively.

Huiwen Yuan; Yu Shi; Chunhua Lu; Zhongzi Xu; Yaru Ni; Xianghui Lan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Method of fabricating high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)(SeS).sub.2 thin films for solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for producing a slightly Cu-poor thin film of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S).sub.2 comprises depositing a first layer of (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y followed by depositing just enough Cu+(Se,S) or Cu.sub.x (Se,S) to produce the desired slightly Cu-poor material. In a variation, most, but not all, (about 90 to 99%) of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y is deposited first, followed by deposition of all the Cu+(Se,S) or Cu.sub.x (Se,S) to go near stoichiometric, possibly or even preferably slightly Cu-rich, and then in turn followed by deposition of the remainder (about 1 to 10%) of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y to end with a slightly Cu-poor composition. In yet another variation, a small portion (about 1 to 10%) of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y is first deposited as a seed layer, followed by deposition of all of the Cu+(Se,S) or Cu.sub.x (Se,S) to make a very Cu-rich mixture, and then followed deposition of the remainder of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y to go slightly Cu-poor in the final Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S).sub.2 thin film.

Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CO); Gabor, Andrew M. (Boulder, CO); Tuttle, John R. (Denver, CO); Tennant, Andrew L. (Denver, CO); Contreras, Miguel A. (Golden, CO); Albin, David S. (Denver, CO); Carapella, Jeffrey J. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Cu/Zn-based catalysts improved by adding magnesium for water–gas shift reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ternary Cu/MeO/ZnO (Me: alkaline-earth metal, Mg, Ca, Sr and Ba) catalysts were prepared by homogeneous precipitation (hp) using urea hydrolysis. The structure and the activity for the water–gas shift reaction of these catalysts were studied compared with those of the catalysts prepared by coprecipitation (cp). The highest activity was obtained over hp-Cu/MgO/ZnO among the catalysts tested. The catalyst precursors after the precipitation contained mainly aurichalcite, (Cu,Zn)5(CO3)2(OH)16, while the decomposed products after the calcination contained apparently CuO and ZnO as crystalline phases, since the amount of Mg actually included in the catalyst was less than 1.0 at.%. The Cu metal surface area was larger and the particle size of Cu metal was smaller on the hp-catalysts than those on the cp-catalysts; nonetheless the BET surface area was sometimes larger on the latter than on the former. The addition of ?0.1 at.% of Mg was the most effective, resulting in the highest activity as well as the lowest activation energy. A good correlation was observed between the amount of Cu+ species and the activation energy of the shift reaction, suggesting that MgO significantly enhanced the formation of Cu+ species as the active sites. Even after the pre-reduction at the high temperature, 250 °C, hp-Cu/MgO/ZnO catalyst showed no significant decrease in the activity as well as no detectable sintering in the Cu metal particles during 50 h of the reaction. It was supposed that the shift reaction proceeds by a reduction–oxidation mechanism between Cu0 ? Cu+.

Tetsuya Shishido; Manabu Yamamoto; Ikuo Atake; Dalin Li; Yan Tian; Hiroyuki Morioka; Masahide Honda; Tsuneji Sano; Katsuomi Takehira

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Methanol synthesis from CO2 over Cu/ZnO catalysts prepared from various coprecipitated precursors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various precursors of Cu/ZnO catalysts were prepared by coprecipitation methods. By varying the conditions of coprecipitation, precursors having different structures (aurichalcite, malachite, hydrozincite, or their mixture) were obtained at given Cu/Zn ratios, ranging from 30/70 to 70/30. In a wide range of the Cu/Zn ratios, the catalysts derived from the precursors containing aurichalcite exhibited high performance in the methanol synthesis from CO2.

Shin-ichiro Fujita; Yoshinori Kanamori; Agus Muhamad Satriyo; Nobutsune Takezawa

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

BOSONS IN QUANTUM MAGNETS PURE COMPOUND IPA-CuCl3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BOSONS IN QUANTUM MAGNETS PURE COMPOUND IPA-CuCl3 BOSE GLASS PHASE DISCUSSION #12;Matsubara in the specific heat J 50K J 5K M. Jaime et al., PRL (2004),Bilayer geometry + 3D frustration... #12;PURE IPA ON COUPLINGS J WEAK FERRO J1 #12;PURE IPA-CuCl3 [(CH3)2CHNH3CuCl3] Gap Soft mode E(k)=c*k #12;BEC Order

Paris-Sud 11, Université de

337

Trapping of Implanted He at Cu/Nb Interfaces Measured by Neutron Reflectometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In single crystalline metals, He is insoluble and precipitates into bubbles. In contrast, Cu-Nb multilayers show no evidence of bubble formation below a critical concentration. The conclusions of this paper are: (1) He is trapped at Cu/Nb , Cu/Mo interfaces; (2) He is trapped interstitially; (3) The interface swells {approx} 10 times; and (4) The layered structure retains despite the swell of interfaces.

Wang, Peng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhernenkov, Mikhail [Applications Scientist at Nanometrics; Kashinath, Abishek [MIT; Demkowicz, Michael [MIT; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Majewski, Jaroslaw [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

338

Microscopic structure, discommensurations, and tiling of Si(111)/Cu-‘‘5×5’’  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We derive a detailed, microscopic description of the Si(111)/Cu-‘‘5×5’’ reconstruction. The key to understanding this structure is the x-ray standing-wave determination of the Cu registry with respect to the Si substrate. With Cu basically in H3 and substitutional sites the buckled Si(111) surface bilayer converts to an almost planar, hexagonal Cu2Si layer. The straightened bond angles and the associated increase in the lateral lattice constant give rise to a hexagonal network of discommensurations of period ?5.5aSi. Complete tiling of the surface requires three types of twisted (±3°) domains, two of which are rotationally equivalent.

J. Zegenhagen; E. Fontes; F. Grey; J. R. Patel

1992-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Sulfur Effect and Performance Recovery of a DOC + CSF + Cu-Zeolite...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

October 04, 2011 Sulfur Effect and Performance Recovery of a DOC + CSF + Cu-Zeolite SCR System DEER CONFERENCE 2011 Outline Introduction Zeolite-based SCR behavior -...

340

NMR Studies of Cu/zeolite SCR Catalysts Hydrothermally Aged with...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cuzeolite SCR Catalysts Hydrothermally Aged with Urea. NMR Studies of Cuzeolite SCR Catalysts Hydrothermally Aged with Urea. Abstract: The effects of hydrothermal aging of Cu...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Smectic Vortex Phase in Optimally Doped YBa2Cu3O7 Thin Films...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

can lead to magnetoelectric effects. These are single crystals that incorporate magnetic transition- metal ions such as Cu or Ni in an insulating organic matrix. * Measurements in...

342

Investigation of Chemical Looping Combustion of Coal with CuFe2O4 Oxygen Carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of Chemical Looping Combustion of Coal with CuFe2O4 Oxygen Carrier ... Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research2013 52 (5), 1795-1805 ...

Baowen Wang; Rong Yan; Haibo Zhao; Ying Zheng; Zhaohui Liu; Chuguang Zheng

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

E-Print Network 3.0 - av zn cu Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to promote efficiency of CuZnOAl2O3 catalysts, producing hydrogen with low carbon monoxide levels 13 Source: Mukasyan, Alexander - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular...

344

Deactivation Mechanism of Cu/Zeolite SCR Catalyst Due to Reductive Hydrothermal Aging  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Better control for preventing catalyst deactivation resulted from study of and proposed mechanism for deactivation of Cu/zeolite under rich conditions.

345

Temporal stability of Y Ba Cu O nano Josephson junctions from ion irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

planar high temperature Josephson junctions fabricated usingYBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-? Josephson junctions via nanolithography andsuperconductor Josephson junctions,” J. Vac. Sci. Technol.

Cybart, Shane A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Structure, Magnetism, and Transport of CuCr2Se4 Thin Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the surface. Electronic structure calculations indicatealso present electronic structure calculations for CuCr 2 Sewith the electronic structure calculations. 1. Introduction

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Growth and microstructure of MTG REBa2Cu3O7/RE?2BaCuO5 with heavy rare earth elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

New melt textured REBa2Cu3O7/RE?2BaCuO5 composites, have been obtained by top seeding melt-texturing growth. Two different starting mixtures of \\{REBa2Cu3O7\\} superconducting powders and insulating \\{Y2BaCuO5\\} phase were used. On one hand RE is a natural mixture of heavy rare earth elements (Y, Yb, Lu, Er, Dy, Tm, Ho) extracted from the Brazilian mineral “Xenotime”, and on the other hand, RE is thulium. In both cases melt textured REBa2Cu3O7/RE?2BaCuO5 composites have been obtained where RE and RE? are different mixtures of heavy rare earth/yttrium and Tm/yttrium. The composition analysis shows different areas within the RE?2BaCuO5 as a consequence of an inhomogeneous RE distribution, due to the differential solubility of each rare earth in the high temperature semisolid state. During the crystallization process a profound inversion of the rare earth composition between the superconducting matrix and the insulating precipitates occurs. Yttrium is selectively located in the 123 matrix and RE in the 211 particles. Heavy RE ions can substitute yttrium in MTG REBCO without degradation of the superconducting properties. A model for the crystallization process is proposed.

A.E. Carrillo; P. Rodr??guez Jr.; T. Puig; A. Palau; X. Obradors; H. Zheng; U. Welp; L. Chen; B.W. Veal; H. Claus; G.W. Crabtree

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Effect of thermally stable Cu- and Mg-rich aluminides on the high temperature strength of an AlSi12CuMgNi alloy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The internal architecture of an AlSi12CuMgNi piston alloy, revealed by synchrotron tomography, consists of three dimensional interconnected hybrid networks of Cu-rich aluminides, Mg-rich aluminides and eutectic/primary Si embedded in an ?-Al matrix. The strength at room temperature and at 300°C is studied as a function of solution treatment time at 490°C and compared with results previously reported for an AlSi12Ni alloy. The addition of 1 wt% Cu and 1 wt% Mg to AlSi12CuMgNi increases the room temperature strength by precipitation hardening while the strength at 300°C is similar for both alloys in as-cast condition. The strength of AlSi12CuMgNi decreases with solution treatment time and stabilizes at 4 h solution treatment. The effect of solution treatment time on the strength of the AlSi12CuMgNi alloy is less pronounced than for the AlSi12Ni alloy both at room temperature and at 300°C. - Highlights: • The 3D microstructure of AlSi12CuMgNi is revealed by synchrotron tomography. • An imaging analysis procedure to segment phases with similar contrasts is presented. • 1 wt% Cu and Mg results in the formation of 3D networks of rigid phases. • AlSi12CuMgNi is stronger than AlSi12Ni owing to the stability of the 3D networks.

Asghar, Z., E-mail: zhdasghar@yahoo.com [Materials Division, Directorate of Technology, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Karlsplatz 13/308, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Requena, G. [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Materials Science and Technology, Karlsplatz 13/308, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Zahid, G.H.; Rafi-ud-Din [Materials Division, Directorate of Technology, PINSTECH, P. O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Comparison of bulk R2-zCezCuO4 with superlattice R2-zCezCuO4/SrO/NbO2/SrO/CuO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bulk R2-zCezCuO4 compounds superconduct for trivalent ions R=Pr, Nd, Sm, and Eu, but not for Gd or for Cm (with Th replacing Ce). R2-zCezSr2Cu2NbO10 is a natural superlattice of R2-zCezCuO4 and the layers SrO/NbO2/SrO/CuO2; it exhibits bulk superconductivity for R=Nd, Sm, Eu, and Gd, but not for R=Pr. These differences imply that the superconducting regions in the bulk and in the superlattice must be different, and not both cuprate planes. The primary superconductivity is assigned to interstitial oxygen and Nd-O layers in the bulk and to Sr-O layers in the superlattice.

Howard A. Blackstead and John D. Dow

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Autocatalytic water dissociation on Cu(110) at near ambient conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Autocatalytic dissociation of water on the Cu(110) metal surface is demonstrated based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies carried out in-situ under near ambient conditions of water vapor pressure (1 Torr) and temperature (275-520 K). The autocatalytic reaction is explained as the result of the strong hydrogen-bond in the H{sub 2}O-OH complex of the dissociated final state, which lowers the water dissociation barrier according to the Broensted-Evans-Polanyi relations. A simple chemical bonding picture is presented which predicts autocatalytic water dissociation to be a general phenomenon on metal surfaces.

Mulleregan, Alice; Andersson, Klas; Ketteler, Guido; Bluhm, Hendrik; Yamamoto, Susumu; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Pettersson, Lars G.M.; Salmeron, Miquel; Nilsson, Anders

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

351

Kinetic investigations of NaF: Cu luminescence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The temperature dependence of the lifetime of Cu+ impurity ions in single-crystal sodium fluoride has been analyzed. In order to describe the emission process occurring in this system, we have proposed a three-level model including the ground state and two close excited states in thermal equilibrium. Information is deduced concerning mainly their emission probabilities and their energy differences. A calculation of the mixing of these triplet emitting levels with other excited states is in very good agreement with our experimental results.

B. Moine and C. Pedrini

1984-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Electronic and atomic structure of the Cu/Si(111) quasi-5×5 overlayer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The quasi-5×5 layer formed by annealing a monolayer of Cu on a Si(111) surface has a so-called quasiperiodic structure that differs significantly from both transition-metal silicides and metal-induced reconstructions. We have therefore performed detailed angle-resolved uv photoemission (ARUPS) measurements and ab initio band-structure calculations to investigate the atomic structure of the quasi-5×5 layer and the unique bonding behavior it embodies. ARUPS results are dominated by two Cu 3d peaks separated by 0.7 eV. The intensity variation of these peaks with emission and incidence angles suggests an ordered planar layer, yet there is considerable inhomogeneous broadening. A Si 3p–derived surface state is also observed 1.2 eV below the Fermi level. Two atomic models are considered in light of these results: a widely cited nearly planar CuSi2 model with interstitial Cu atoms and a substitutional CuSi model. In electronic-structure calculations using the pseudofunction method of Kasowski et al., the CuSi model agrees much better than the CuSi2 model with ARUPS in the energy differences between Cu 3d states, in their energies relative to the Fermi level, and in the surface-state behavior. Computed results for the CuSi model also account for features seen in current-voltage relationships in scanning tunneling microscopy, the Cu atom height measured with x-ray standing waves, the observed nonreactivity of the quasi-5×5 surface, and a vibrational mode at 8 meV detected using helium diffraction. The band-structure calculations show that bonding in the ‘‘5×5’’ CuSi layer is different from that of transition-metal silicides. The formation of Si p–Cu d bonding hybrid orbitals appears to be important in making the CuSi structure stable, but the Cu 4s orbitals also play a significant role in hybridizing with Si 3p states. It is possible that the quasi-5×5 layer is a two-dimensional electron phase in which domain boundaries are formed to accommodate a particular [Cu]:[Si] surface stoichiometry different from unity.

D. D. Chambliss and T. N. Rhodin

1990-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Rotating ring-disk electrode studies of Cu-Zn alloy electrodissolution in 1M HCl: Effect of benzotriazole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrodissolution behavior of Cu and Cu-rich Cu-Zn alloys in 1M HCl containing benzotriazole (BTA) was studied using rotating ring-disk electrodes. Cu(I) was the main product of Cu-Zn alloy dissolution with Cu(II) detected only at higher potentials. Electrodissolution of the Cu component was similar to that of copper with an apparent Tafel slope of 60 mV/dec. Cu component dissolution rates exhibited strong mass-transfer effects in the entire potential range studied. A CuCl film formed on the alloy surfaces in the current peak region. In the limiting current region the rates of Cu(I) dissolution from both alloys and copper were essentially equivalent and indicate CuCl{sup {minus}}{sub 2} as the principal diffusing species. Significant selective electrodissolution of Zn was observed in the apparent Tafel region. The formation of a duplex film was indicated in the presence of BTA with a nonporous Cu(I) BTA inner layer and a porous CuCl outer layer.

Costa, S.L.F.A. da; Nobe, K. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering; Agostinho, S.M.L. [Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Fundamental

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Mineral formation from aqueous solution. Part III. The stability of aurichalcite, (Zn,Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6, and rosasite (Cu,Zn)2(CO3)(OH)2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The stabilities of rosasite, (Cu, Zn)2 (CO3)(OH)2, and aurichalcite, (Zn, Cu)5(CO3)2(OH)6, have been determined by solution experiments with computer calculations of aqueous species in equilibrium with the solid ...

Alwan K. Alwan; J. H. Thomas; Peter A. Williams

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Lavinskyite, K(LiCu)Cu6(Si4O11)2(OH)4, isotypic with plancheite, a new mineral from the Wessels mine, Kalahari Manganese Fields, South Africa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the undulating, brucite-like layers consisting of three distinct octahedral sites occupied mainly by Cu

Downs, Robert T.

356

J/psi production at high transverse momenta in p+p and Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt sNN = 200 GeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The STAR collaboration at RHIC presents measurements of J/{psi} {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} at mid-rapidity and high transverse momentum (p{sub T} > 5 GeV/c) in p+p and central Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}sNN = 200 GeV. The inclusive J/{psi} production cross section for Cu+Cu collisions is found to be consistent at high p{sub T} with the binary collision-scaled cross section for p+p collisions, in contrast to previous measurements at lower p{sub T}, where a suppression of J/{psi} production is observed relative to the expectation from binary scaling. Azimuthal correlations of J/{psi} with charged hadrons in p+p collisions provide an estimate of the contribution of B-meson decays to J/{psi} production of 13% {+-} 5%.

STAR Collaboration; Abelev, B. I.

2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

357

Characterization of Cu-ZSM-5 Prepared by Solid-State Ion Exchange of H-ZSM-5 with CuCl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cl occlusion in the zeolite pores. After SSIE, the resulting Cu-ZSM-5 was characterized by XRD, 27 Al MAS NMR and nitriles,15 the desulfurization of diesel fuel,16 and the oxidative carbony- lation of methanol to dimethyl

Bell, Alexis T.

358

Mechanism of the formation of precursors for the Cu/ZnO methanol synthesis catalysts by a coprecipitation method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Precursors of Cu/ZnO catalysts with various Cu/Zn molar ratios were prepared by a coprecipitation method. It was found that amorphous copper hydroxycarbonate and sodium zinc carbonate were intermediates for the f...

Shin-ichiro Fujita; Agus Muhamad Satriyo; Guo Cheng Shen…

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The effect of ZnO in methanol synthesis catalysts on Cu dispersion and the specific activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of ZnO in Cu/ZnO catalysts prepared by the coprecipitation method has been studied using measurements of the surface area of Cu, the specific activity for the methanol synthesis by hydrogenation of CO2

T. Fujitani; J. Nakamura

360

Thermal decomposition of Cu-based hydroxycarbonate catalytic precursors for the low-temperature co-shift reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal decomposition of Cu-Zn-Al hydroxycarbonate precursors to obtain water-gas shift catalysts was studied by employing a variety of experimental techniques. A set of six samples containing 34 wt% of Cu an...

M. J. L. Ginés; C. R. Apesteguía

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Muon-spin spectroscopy of the organometallic spin-1/2 kagome-lattice compound Cu(1,3-benzenedicarboxylate)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using muon-spin resonance, we examine the organometallic hybrid compound Cu(1,3-benzenedicarboxylate) [Cu(1,3-bdc)], which has structurally perfect spin-1/2 copper kagome planes separated by pure organic linkers. This ...

Marcipar, Lital

362

Bi 3 + cluster primary ions in SIMS depth profiling of YBaCuO high-temperature superconductor films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SIMS depth profiling of YBa2Cu3O7 high-temperature superconductor films was performed using a TOF.SIMS-...2Cu3O7 films based on detection of cluster secondary ions.

M. N. Drozdov; Yu. N. Drozdov…

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Ultrasound-assisted synthesis of CuO nanostructures templated by cotton fibers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: ? Flower-like and corn-like CuO nanostructures were synthesized by a simple method. ? Cotton fibers purchased from commercially are used as template. ? The concentration of Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solution is an important parameter. -- Abstract: Flower-like and corn-like CuO nanostructures composed of CuO nanoparticles were successfully synthesized via ultrasound-assisted template method, respectively, by controlling the initial concentration of Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solution. Here, cotton fibers were used as template agent. The products were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), respectively. The results demonstrated that the initial concentration of Cu(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solution was an important parameter for determining whether CuO nanoparticles assembled into flower-like structures or corn-like structures. The mechanism of forming different nanostructures of CuO was discussed.

Zou, Yunling, E-mail: zouyunling1999@126.com [College of Science, Civil Aviation University of China, Tianjin 300300 (China)] [College of Science, Civil Aviation University of China, Tianjin 300300 (China); Li, Yan; Guo, Ying; Zhou, Qingjun; An, Dongmin [College of Science, Civil Aviation University of China, Tianjin 300300 (China)] [College of Science, Civil Aviation University of China, Tianjin 300300 (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

COMMUNICATIONS Cd doping at the CuInSe2 CdS heterojunction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMUNICATIONS Cd doping at the CuInSe2 �CdS heterojunction Dongxiang Liaoa) and Angus Rockett that CIGS could be doped with Cd during chemical bath deposition CBD of CdS.6 However, Cd doping of CIGS October 2002; accepted 7 March 2003 The chemical composition of the CuInSe2 /CdS heterojunction interface

Rockett, Angus

365

Chemical bath deposition of CdS thin films doped with Zn and Cu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Zn- and Cu-doped CdS thin films were deposited onto glass substrates...2 and CuCl2...were incorporated as dopant agents into the conventional CdS chemical bath in order to promote the CdS doping process. The effe...

A I OLIVA; J E CORONA; R PATIŃO; A I OLIVA-AVILÉS

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Kinetic, Mechanistic, and Spectroscopic Studies of the Mo/Cu Containing CO dehydrogenase of Oligotropha carboxidovorans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

et. al. where active site models [Tp iPr MoO(OAr)(?-S)Cu(triazacyclononane) (Tp iPr ) = hydrotris(3-isopropylpyrazol-of CO dehydrogenase: [Tp iPr Mo (V) (O)(OAr)(?-S)Cu (I) (Me

Wilcoxen, Jarett Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Photoelectric properties of In/n-CuIn5Se8 Schottky barriers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have grown homogeneous CuIn5Se8 crystals with n-type conductivity and determined the activation energy for the donor centers. We created In/n-CuIn5Se8 Schottky barriers and obtained the first spectral dependen...

1 I. V. Bodnar’; V. Yu. Rud’; Yu. V. Rud’

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Reduction Kinetics of Cu-Based Oxygen Carriers for Chemical Looping Air Separation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Only Sahir et al. performed a rate analysis from the reported batch fluidized bed CLOU experimental data of Mexican petcoke particles by a CuO/ZrO2 oxygen carrier. ... data of Mexican petcoke particles by a CuO/ZrO2 oxygen carrier. ...

Kun Wang; Qingbo Yu; Qin Qin

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

369

Diffusion of indium and gallium in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diffusion of indium and gallium in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 thin film solar cells O. Lundberga,*, J. Lua , A. Rockettb , M. Edoffa , L. Stolta a A°ngstro¨m Solar Center, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Abstract The diffusion of indium and gallium in polycrystalline thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se2 layers has been

Rockett, Angus

370

Glass Forming Ability in Pr-(Cu, Ni)-Al Alloys  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glass forming ability (GFA) in the Pr-rich Pr-(Cu, Ni)-Al alloys at or near the eutectic points was systematically studied. It was found that the GFA in the pseudo-ternary alloys of Pr-(Cu, Ni)-Al is higher than that of ...

Zhang, Yong

371

Mineral assemblages in sulfide ores; the system Cu-Fe-As-S  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...6a-c) requiresthejoindomeykite-Fe. Infex red joins dom-lo Cu-lo (high temperature) dom-Fe (low temperature) C2U^tSaS^a S StE VtCu-FE-As-S There are noknownmineralscontainingall four elementsasessentialcom- ponents. The only phasesthat...

Hugh McKinstry

372

A DFT Study of Ethanol Adsorption and Dehydrogenation on Cu/Cr2O3 Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, DFT simulation method was used to study the adsorption and dehydrogenation of ethanol on Cu/Cr2O3 catalyst. Firstly, the stable configuration of Cu4 cluster adsorbed on Cr2O3...(001) surface was stu...

Minhua Zhang; Yanping Huang; Ruzhen Li; Guiming Li; Yingzhe Yu

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

E-Print Network 3.0 - aleaciones cu-zn-al estabilidad Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C2, suppl6mentau Journal de Physique 111,Volume 5, f6vrier 1995 Summary: The shape memory alloys which are industrially used are based upon NiTi, CuZnAl and CuAlNi to which...

374

Reduction of CuO and Cu2O with H2: H Embedding and Kinetic Effects in the Formation of Suboxides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OH + H2O),2b,9 the water-gas shift reaction (CO + H2O w CO2 + H2),10 methanol steam reReduction of CuO and Cu2O with H2: H Embedding and Kinetic Effects in the Formation of Suboxides. These results show the importance of kinetic effects for the formation of well-defined suboxides during

Frenkel, Anatoly

375

Deposition and characterization of YBa2Cu3O7 /LaMnO3 / MgO/TiN heterostructures on Cu metal substrates for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-on-cube epitaxy is observed. While the Cu/TiN and TiN/MgO interfaces are rough, the MgO and LaMnO3 layers . Reduced Jc of approximately 1 MA/cm2 on rolled Cu tapes is limited by damage to the tape surface during- ity of the coatings, reliability of these conductors against thermal transients, and limitation

Pennycook, Steve

376

In Situ Characterization of CuFe2O4 and Cu/Fe3O4 Water-Gas Shift Catalysts Michael Estrella,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the performance of the Pt electrode in fuel cell systems. In order to get clean hydrogen for fuel cells and otherIn Situ Characterization of CuFe2O4 and Cu/Fe3O4 Water-Gas Shift Catalysts Michael Estrella, LauraVised Manuscript ReceiVed: June 19, 2009 Mixtures of copper and iron oxides are used as industrial catalysts

Frenkel, Anatoly

377

Unusual Physical and Chemical Properties of Cu in Ce1-xCuxO2 Oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structural and electronic properties of Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2} nano systems prepared by a reverse microemulsion method were characterized with synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional calculations. The Cu atoms embedded in ceria had an oxidation state higher than those of the cations in Cu{sub 2}O or CuO. The lattice of the Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2} systems still adopted a fluorite-type structure, but it was highly distorted with multiple cation-oxygen distances with respect to the single cation-oxygen bond distance seen in pure ceria. The doping of CeO{sub 2} with copper introduced a large strain into the oxide lattice and favored the formation of O vacancies, leading to a Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2-y} stoichiometry for our materials. Cu approached the planar geometry characteristic of Cu(II) oxides, but with a strongly perturbed local order. The chemical activities of the Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2} nanoparticles were tested using the reactions with H2 and O2 as probes. During the reduction in hydrogen, an induction time was observed and became shorter after raising the reaction temperature. The fraction of copper that could be reduced in the Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2} oxides also depended strongly on the reaction temperature. A comparison with data for the reduction of pure copper oxides indicated that the copper embedded in ceria was much more difficult to reduce. The reduction of the Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2} nanoparticles was rather reversible, without the generation of a significant amount of CuO or Cu{sub 2}O phases during reoxidation. This reversible process demonstrates the unusual structural and chemical properties of the Cu-doped ceria materials.

Wang,X.; Rodriguez, J.; Hanson, J.; Gamarra, D.; Martinez-Arias, A.; Fernandez-Garcia, M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Evaluation of photovoltaic materials within the Cu-Sn-S family  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Next-generation thin film solar cell technologies require earth abundant photovoltaic absorber materials. Here we demonstrate an alternative approach to design of such materials, evaluating candidates grouped by constituent elements rather than underlying crystal structures. As an example, we evaluate thermodynamic stability, electrical transport, electronic structure, optical and defect properties of Cu-Sn-S candidates using complementary theory and experiment. We conclude that Cu{sub 2}SnS{sub 3} avoids many issues associated with the properties of Cu{sub 4}SnS{sub 4}, Cu{sub 4}Sn{sub 7}S{sub 16}, and other Cu-Sn-S materials. This example demonstrates how this element-specific approach quickly identifies potential problems with less promising candidates and helps focusing on the more promising solar cell absorbers.

Zawadzki, Pawel; Peng, Haowei; Ginley, David S.; Tumas, W.; Zakutayev, Andriy, E-mail: andriy.zakutayev@nrel.gov; Lany, Stephan, E-mail: stephan.lany@nrel.gov [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Toberer, Eric S. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States) [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Physics Department, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

379

Reactions of Disilane on Cu(111): Direct Observation of Competitive Dissociation, Disproportionation, and Thin Film Growth Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reactions of Disilane on Cu(111): Direct Observation of Competitive Dissociation, Disproportionation, and Thin Film Growth Processes ...

Shrikant P. Lohokare; Benjamin C. Wiegand; Ralph G. Nuzzo

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Location of Cu2+ in CHA zeolite investigated by X-ray diffraction using the Rietveld/maximum entropy method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rietveld/MEM analysis applied to synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data of dehydrated CHA zeolites with catalytically active Cu2+ reveals Cu2+ in both the six- and eight-membered rings in the CHA framework, providing the first complete structural model that accounts for all Cu2+. Density functional theory calculations are used to corroborate the experimental structure and to discuss the Cu2+ coordination in terms of the Al distribution in the framework.

Andersen, C.W.

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fullerene on Nitrogen-Adsorbed Cu(001) Nanopatterned Surfaces: From Preferential Nucleation to Layer-by-Layer Growth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fullerene on Nitrogen-Adsorbed Cu(001) Nanopatterned Surfaces: From Preferential Nucleation, 2008 Nitrogen (N)-adsorbed Cu(001)-c(2 Ă? 2) nanopatterned surfaces are used as templates to guide of growth, C60 molecules preferentially adsorb on the bare Cu regions on a partially N-covered grid surface

382

De novo design and spectroscopic characterization of Cu(II)-binding peptides based upon the blue copper protein plastocyanin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Cu(II) reduction potentials have been measured to be + 62 mV vs. NHE for BCP-A-Cu(II) and -11 mV vs. NHE for BCP-B-Cu(II). The observed redox potentials fit a trend observed for the blue copper proteins, as the axial interactions are increased the reduction...

Daugherty, Roxanne Gail

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Water-gas Shift Reaction on oxide/Cu(111): Rational Catalyst Screening from Density Functional Theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing improved catalysts based on a fundamental understanding of reaction mechanism has become one of the grand challenges in catalysis. A theoretical understanding and screening the metal-oxide composite catalysts for the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction is presented here. Density functional theory was employed to identify the key step for the WGS reaction on the Au, Cu-oxide catalysts, where the calculated reaction energy for water dissociation correlates well with the experimental measured WGS activity. Accordingly, the calculated reaction energy for water dissociation was used as the scaling descriptor to screen the inverse model catalysts, oxide/Cu(111), for the better WGS activity. Our calculations predict that the WGS activity increases in a sequence: Cu(111), ZnO/Cu(111) < TiO{sub 2}/Cu(111), ZrO{sub 2}/Cu(111) < MoO{sub 3}/Cu(111). Our results imply that the high performances of Au, Cu-oxide nanocatalysts in the WGS reaction rely heavily on the direct participation of both oxide and metal sites. The degree that the oxide is reduced by Cu plays an important role in determining the WGS activity of oxide/Cu catalysts. The reducible oxide can be transformed from the fully oxidized form to the reduced form due to the interaction with Cu and, therefore, the transfer of electron density from Cu, which helps in releasing the bottleneck water dissociation and, therefore, facilitating the WGS reaction on copper.

Liu, P.

2010-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

384

SnO2-CuO/graphene nanocomposites for high performance Li-ion battery anodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nanocomposites of SnO2-CuO/graphene are synthesized via a two-step method. ... CuO nanorods are firstly uniformly loaded on the graphene nanosheets, and then SnO2 nanoparticles are coated on CuO nanorods. SnO

Jun Zhao; WanFei Shan; XinBei Xia; Qi Wang…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

CuGeO3 nanowires covered with graphene as anode materials of lithium ion batteries with enhanced  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CuGeO3 nanowires covered with graphene as anode materials of lithium ion batteries with enhanced one-step route was developed to synthesize crystalline CuGeO3 nanowire/graphene composites (CGCs). Crystalline CuGeO3 nanowires were tightly covered and anchored by graphene sheets, forming a layered structure

Lin, Zhiqun

386

Using direct hot-rolling approach to obtain dual-phase weathering steel Cu–P–Cr–Ni–Mo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A weathering steel Cu–P–Cr–Ni–Mo has been ... based on the continuous cooling transformation diagram of weathering steel Cu–P–Cr–Ni–Mo. The results show that the microstructures of DP weathering steels Cu–P–Cr–Ni...

Chunling Zhang; Dayong Cai; Bo Liao; Yunchang Fan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Enhanced quality thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 for semiconductor device applications by vapor-phase recrystallization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Enhanced quality thin films of Cu.sub.w (In,Ga.sub.y)Se.sub.z for semiconductor device applications are fabricated by initially forming a Cu-rich, phase-separated compound mixture comprising Cu(In,Ga):Cu.sub.x Se on a substrate to form a large-grain precursor and then converting the excess Cu.sub.x Se to Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 by exposing it to an activity of In and/or Ga, either in vapor In and/or Ga form or in solid (In,Ga).sub.y Se.sub.z. Alternatively, the conversion can be made by sequential deposition of In and/or Ga and Se onto the phase-separated precursor. The conversion process is preferably performed in the temperature range of about 300.degree.-600.degree. C., where the Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 remains solid, while the excess Cu.sub.x Se is in a liquid flux. The characteristic of the resulting Cu.sub.w (In,Ga).sub.y Se.sub.z can be controlled by the temperature. Higher temperatures, such as 500.degree.-600.degree. C., result in a nearly stoichiometric Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2, whereas lower temperatures, such as 300.degree.-400.degree. C., result in a more Cu-poor compound, such as the Cu.sub.z (In,Ga).sub.4 Se.sub.7 phase.

Tuttle, John R. (Denver, CO); Contreras, Miguel A. (Golden, CO); Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CO); Albin, David S. (Denver, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Enhanced quality thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se[sub 2] for semiconductor device applications by vapor-phase recrystallization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Enhanced quality thin films of Cu[sub w](In,Ga[sub y])Se[sub z] for semiconductor device applications are fabricated by initially forming a Cu-rich, phase-separated compound mixture comprising Cu(In,Ga):Cu[sub x]Se on a substrate to form a large-grain precursor and then converting the excess Cu[sub x]Se to Cu(In,Ga)Se[sub 2] by exposing it to an activity of In and/or Ga, either in vapor In and/or Ga form or in solid (In,Ga)[sub y]Se[sub z]. Alternatively, the conversion can be made by sequential deposition of In and/or Ga and Se onto the phase-separated precursor. The conversion process is preferably performed in the temperature range of about 300--600 C, where the Cu(In,Ga)Se[sub 2] remains solid, while the excess Cu[sub x]Se is in a liquid flux. The characteristic of the resulting Cu[sub w](In,Ga)[sub y]Se[sub z] can be controlled by the temperature. Higher temperatures, such as 500--600 C, result in a nearly stoichiometric Cu(In,Ga)Se[sub 2], whereas lower temperatures, such as 300--400 C, result in a more Cu-poor compound, such as the Cu[sub z](In,Ga)[sub 4]Se[sub 7] phase. 7 figs.

Tuttle, J.R.; Contreras, M.A.; Noufi, R.; Albin, D.S.

1994-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

389

Identified high-pT spectra in Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt sNN=200 GeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report new results on identified (anti)proton and charged pion spectra at large transverse momenta (3 < p{sub T} < 10 GeV/c) from Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV using the STAR detector at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). This study explores the system size dependence of two novel features observed at RHIC with heavy ions: the hadron suppression at high-p{sub T} and the anomalous baryon to meson enhancement at intermediate transverse momenta. Both phenomena could be attributed to the creation of a new form of QCD matter. The results presented here bridge the system size gap between the available pp and Au+Au data, and allow the detailed exploration for the on-set of the novel features. Comparative analysis of all available 200 GeV data indicates that the system size is a major factor determining both the magnitude of the hadron spectra suppression at large transverse momenta and the relative baryon to meson enhancement.

STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

390

Development and performance of Cu-based oxygen carriers for chemical-looping combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has the inherent property of separating the product CO{sub 2} from flue gases. Instead of air, it uses an oxygen carrier, usually in the form of a metal oxide, to provide oxygen for combustion. This paper focuses on the development and performance of a suitable Cu-based oxygen carrier for burning solid fuels using CLC. Carriers were made from CuO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (as a support) in three different ways: mechanical mixing, wet impregnation, and co-precipitation. The reactivity of these solids was assessed by measuring their ability to oxidize CO, when in a hot bed of sand fluidized by a mixture of CO and N{sub 2}. After that, the Cu in the carrier was oxidized back to CuO by fluidizing the hot bed with air. These oxygen carriers were tested over many such cycles of reduction and oxidation. This work confirms that supporting CuO on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} enhances the ability of the resulting particles to withstand mechanical and thermal stresses in a fluidized bed. Also, only co-precipitation produces particles that have a high loading of copper and do not agglomerate at 800-900 C. The performance of co-precipitated particles of CuO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} at oxidizing CO to CO{sub 2} was significantly affected by the pH of the solution in which precipitation occurred: a high pH (9.7) gave particles that reacted completely and rapidly. After 18 cycles, such a co-precipitated carrier with 82.5 wt% CuO yielded all its oxygen when oxidizing CO. X-ray analysis showed that when heated, CuO reacted with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to form CuAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}, which was fully reducible, so CuO experienced no loss in extent of reaction after forming this mixed oxide. An increase in operating temperature from 800 to 900 C led to the CuO providing slightly less oxygen; this was because a little of the CuO decomposed to Cu{sub 2}O between its reduction and oxidation, when the bed was fluidized by pure N{sub 2}. (author)

Chuang, S.Y.; Dennis, J.S.; Hayhurst, A.N.; Scott, S.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 3RA, England (United Kingdom)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Effective MgO surface doping of Cu/Zn/Al oxides as water–gas shift catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trace amounts of MgO were doped on Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalysts with the Cu/Zn/Al molar ratio of 45/45/10 and tested for the water–gas shift (WGS) reaction. A mixture of Zn(Cu)–Al hydrotalcite (HT) and Cu/Zn aurichalcite was prepared by co-precipitation (cp) of the metal nitrates and calcined at 300 °C to form the catalyst precursor. When the precursor was dispersed in an aqueous solution of Mg(II) nitrate, HT was reconstituted by the “memory effect.” During this procedure, the catalyst particle surface was modified by MgO-doping, leading to a high sustainability. Contrarily, cp-Mg/Cu/Zn/Al prepared by Mg2+, Cu2+, Zn2+ and Al3+ co-precipitation as a control exhibited high activity but low sustainability. Mg2+ ions were enriched in the surface layer of m-Mg–Cu/Zn/Al, whereas Mg2+ ions were homogeneously distributed throughout the particles of cp-Mg/Cu/Zn/Al. CuO particles were significantly sintered on the m-catalyst during the dispersion, whereas CuO particles were highly dispersed on the cp-catalyst. However, the m-catalyst was more sustainable against sintering than the cp-catalyst. Judging from TOF, the surface doping of MgO more efficiently enhanced an intrinsic activity of the m-catalyst than the cp-catalyst. Trace amounts of MgO on the catalyst surface were enough to enhance both activity and sustainability of the m-catalyst by accelerating the reduction–oxidation between Cu0 and Cu+ and by suppressing Cu0 (or Cu+) oxidation to Cu2+.

Kazufumi Nishida; Dalin Li; Yingying Zhan; Tetsuya Shishido; Yasunori Oumi; Tsuneji Sano; Katsuomi Takehira

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Diffusion of the Cu monomer and dimer on Ag(111): Molecular dynamics simulations and density functional theory calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present results of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the diffusion of Cu adatom and dimer on Ag(111). We have used potentials generated by the embedded-atom method for the MD simulations and pseudopotentials derived from the projected-augmented-wave method for the DFT calculations. The MD simulations (at three different temperatures: 300, 500, and 700 K) show that the diffusivity has an Arrhenius behavior. The effective energy barriers obtained from the Arrhenius plots are in excellent agreement with those extracted from scanning tunneling microscopy experiments. While the diffusion barrier for Cu monomers on Ag(111) is higher than that reported (both in experiment and theory) for Cu(111), the reverse holds for dimers [which, for Cu(111), has so far only been theoretically assessed]. In comparing our MD result with those for Cu islets on Cu(111), we conclude that the higher barriers for Cu monomers on Ag(111) results from the comparatively large Ag-Ag bond length, whereas for Cu dimers on Ag(111) the diffusivity is taken over and boosted by the competition in optimization of the Cu-Cu dimer bond and the five nearest-neighbor Cu-Ag bonds. Our DFT calculations confirm the relatively large barriers for the Cu monomer on Ag(111)—69 and 75 meV—compared to those on Cu(111) and hint a rationale for them. In the case of the Cu dimer, the relatively long Ag-Ag bond length makes available a diffusion route whose highest relevant energy barrier is only 72 meV and which is not favorable on Cu(111). This process, together with another involving an energy barrier of 83 meV, establishes the possibility of low-barrier intercell diffusion by purely zigzag mechanisms.

Sardar Sikandar Hayat; Marisol Alcántara Ortigoza; Muhammad A. Choudhry; Talat S. Rahman

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

393

High yield Cu-Co CPP GMR multilayer sensors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have fabricated and tested GMR magnetic flux sensors that operate in the CPP mode. This work is a continuation of the ultra-high density magnetic sensor research introduced at INTERMAG 96. We have made two significant modifications to the process sequence. First, contact to the sensor is made through a metal conduit deposited in situ with the multilayers. This deposition replaces electroplating. This configuration ensures a good electrical interface between the top of multilayer stack and the top contact, and a continuous, conductive current path to the sensor. The consequences of this modification are an increase in yield of operational devices to {ge}90% per wafer and a significant reduction of the device resistance to {le}560 milliohms and of the uniformity of the device resistance to {le}3%. Second, the as-deposited multilayer structure has been changed from [Cu 30 {angstrom}/Co 20 {angstrom}]{sub 18} (third peak) to [Cu 20.5 {angstrom}/Co 12 {angstrom}]{sub 30} (second peak) to increase the CPP and CIP responses. The sheet film second peak CIP GMR response is 18% and the sensitivity is 0.08 %/Oe. The sheet film third peak CIP GMR response is 8% and the sensitivity is 0. 05 %/Oe. The second peak CPP GMR response averaged over twenty devices on a four inch silicon substrate is 28% {+-} 6%. The response decreases radially from the substrate center. The average response at the center of the substrate is 33% {+-} 4%. The average second peak CPP sensitivity is 0.09 %/Oe {+-} 0.02 %/Oe. The best second peak CPP response from a single device is 39%. The sensitivity of that device is 0.13 %/Oe. The third peak CPP GMR response is approximately 14 %. The third peak CPP response sensitivity is 0.07 %/Oe. 6 refs., 3 figs.

Spallas, J., Mao, M., Law, B., Grabner, F., Cerjan, C., O`Kane, O.

1997-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Negative permittivity and permeability spectra of Cu/yttrium iron garnet hybrid granular composite materials in the microwave frequency range  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relative complex permittivity and permeability spectra of the coagulated copper and yttrium iron garnet (Cu/YIG) hybrid granular composite materials have been studied in the microwave range. The insulator to metal transition was observed at the percolation threshold of Cu particle content (?{sub Cu}?=?16.0 vol. %) in the electrical conductivity. In the percolation threshold, the low frequency plasmonic state caused by the metallic Cu particle networks was observed. The percolated Cu/YIG granular composites show simultaneous negative permittivity and permeability spectra under external magnetic fields.

Tsutaoka, Takanori, E-mail: tsutaok@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Fukuyama, Koki; Kinoshita, Hideaki [Graduate School of Education, Hiroshima University, 1-1-1, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8524 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Education, Hiroshima University, 1-1-1, Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8524 (Japan); Kasagi, Teruhiro [Tokuyama College of Technology, Gakuendai, Shunan, Yamaguchi 745-8585 (Japan)] [Tokuyama College of Technology, Gakuendai, Shunan, Yamaguchi 745-8585 (Japan); Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Hatakeyama, Kenichi [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Syosha, Himeji 671-2201 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Engineering, University of Hyogo, Syosha, Himeji 671-2201 (Japan)

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

Studies on Cu/CeO{sub 2}: A new NO reduction catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fine particle and large surface area Cu/CeO{sub 2} catalysts of crystallite sizes in the range of 100--200 {angstrom} synthesized by the solution combustion method have been investigated for NO reduction. Five percent Cu/CeO{sub 2} catalyst shows nearly 100% conversion of NO by NH{sub 3} below 300 C, whereas pure ceria and Zr, Y, and Ca doped ceria show 85--95% NO conversion above 600 C. Similarly NO reduction by CO has been observed over 5% Cu/CeO{sub 2} with nearly 100% conversion below 300 C. Hydrocarbon (n-butane) oxidation by NO to CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O has also been demonstrated over this catalyst below 350 C making Cu/CeO{sub 2} a new NO reduction catalyst in the low temperature window of 150--350 C. Kinetics of NO reduction over 5% Cu/CeO{sub 2} have also been investigated. The rate constants are in the range of 1.4 {times} 10{sup 4} to 2.3 {times} 10{sup 4} cm{sup 3}/g s between 170 and 300 C. Cu/CeO{sub 2} catalysts are characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy where Cu{sup 2+} ions are shown to be dispersed on the CeO{sub 2} surface.

Bera, P.; Aruna, S.T.; Patil, K.C.; Hegde, M.S. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India)] [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India)

1999-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of the Cu-Pd-X Ternary Alloys for Hydrogen Separation Membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CuPd alloys are among the most promising candidate materials for hydrogen separation membranes and membrane reactor applications due to their high hydrogen permeability and better sulfur resistance. In order to reduce the Pd content and, therefore, the cost of the membrane materials, efforts have been initiated to develop CuPdM ternary alloys having a bcc structure. The advantages of having Pd as a hydrogen separation membrane are: (1) high hydrogen selectivity; and (2) high hydrogen permeability. The disadvantages are: (1) high cost; (2) hydrogen embrittlement ({alpha} {yields} {beta} Pd hydride); and (3) sulfur poisoning. Experiments (XRD, SEM/EDS) verified that Mg, Al, La, Y and Ti are promising alloying elements to expand the B2 phase region in Cu-Pd binary system. HT-XRD showed that the B2 to FCC transition temperatures for Cu-Pd-X (X = Mg, Al, La, Y and Ti) are higher than that of Cu-Pd binary alloys. While the Cu-50Pd alloy had the highest corrosion resistance to the H2S containing syngas, the Cu-Pd-Mg alloy had a comparable resistance.

O.N. Dogan; M.C. Gao; B.H. Howard

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

397

Unraveling the Active Site in Copper-Ceria Systems for the Water-Gas Shift Reaction: In Situ Characterization of an Inverse Powder CeO2-x/CuO-Cu Catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An inverse powder system composed of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles dispersed over a CuO-Cu matrix is proposed as a novel catalyst for the water-gas shift reaction. This inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst exhibits a higher activity than standard Cu/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. In situ synchrotron characterization techniques were employed to follow the structural changes of CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu under reaction conditions. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments showed the transformation of CuO to metallic Cu via a Cu{sub 2}O intermediate. Short-order structural changes were followed by pair distribution function analysis and corroborated the results obtained by diffraction. Moreover, X-ray absorption spectroscopy also revealed oxidation state changes from Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup 0} and the partial reduction of CeO{sub x} nanoparticles. The activity data obtained by mass spectrometry revealed that hydrogen production starts once the copper has been fully reduced. The strong interaction of ceria and copper boosted the catalytic performance of the sample. The inverse catalyst was active at low temperatures, stable to several reaction runs and to redox cycles. These characteristics are highly valuable for mobile fuel cell applications. The active phases of the inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst are partially reduced ceria nanoparticles strongly interacting with metallic copper. The nature and structure of the ceria nanoparticles are of critical importance because they are involved in processes related to water dissociation over the catalyst surface.

Barrio, L.; Estrella, M; Zhou, G; Wen, W; Hanson, J; Hungria, A; Hornes, A; Fernandez-Garcia, M; Martinez-Arias, A; Rodriguez, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Unraveling the Active Site in Copper-ceria Systems for the Water Gas Shift Reaction: In-situ Characterization of an Inverse Powder CeO2-x/CuO-Cu Catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An inverse powder system composed of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles dispersed over a CuO-Cu matrix is proposed as a novel catalyst for the water-gas shift reaction. This inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst exhibits a higher activity than standard Cu/CeO{sub 2} catalysts. In situ synchrotron characterization techniques were employed to follow the structural changes of CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu under reaction conditions. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments showed the transformation of CuO to metallic Cu via a Cu{sub 2}O intermediate. Short-order structural changes were followed by pair distribution function analysis and corroborated the results obtained by diffraction. Moreover, X-ray absorption spectroscopy also revealed oxidation state changes from Cu{sup 2+} to Cu{sup 0} and the partial reduction of CeOx nanoparticles. The activity data obtained by mass spectrometry revealed that hydrogen production starts once the copper has been fully reduced. The strong interaction of ceria and copper boosted the catalytic performance of the sample. The inverse catalyst was active at low temperatures, stable to several reaction runs and to redox cycles. These characteristics are highly valuable for mobile fuel cell applications. The active phases of the inverse CeO{sub 2}/CuO-Cu catalyst are partially reduced ceria nanoparticles strongly interacting with metallic copper. The nature and structure of the ceria nanoparticles are of critical importance because they are involved in processes related to water dissociation over the catalyst surface.

Rodriguez, J.A.; Barrio, L.; Estrella, M.; Zhou, G.; Wen, W.; Hanson, J.C.; Hungría, A.B.; Hornés, A.; Fernández-García, M.; Arturo Martínez-Arias, A.

2010-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

399

Morphological and Structural Changes During the Reduction and Reoxidation of CuO/CeO(2) and Ce(1-x)Cu(x)O(2) Nanocatalysts: In-situ Studies with Environmental TEM, XRD and XAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have studied the structural, morphological, and electronic properties of CuO/CeO{sub 2} and Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2} nanocatalysts during reduction/oxidation cycles using H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} as chemical probes. Time-resolved in situ characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as well as aberration-corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM). We have found that both types of nanocatalysts reduce to a Cu/CeO{sub 2} biphase system with significant oxygen vacancies in CeO{sub 2}. Important variations are seen in the Cu particle size and metal dispersion depending on the initial state of the copper oxide-ceria systems. During subsequent in situ oxygen annealing, the Cu precipitated from the CuO/CeO{sub 2} system reoxidized to form CuO through a Cu{sub 2}O intermediate phase as expected. However, the Cu precipitated from the Ce{sub 0.8}Cu{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} solid solution behaved rather differently under oxidizing conditions, and neither oxidized to form CuO nor fully returned to a bulk Ce{sub 0.8}Cu{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} phase in solid solution. We found that {approx} 50% of the Cu returned to a Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2} solid solution, while the remainder was observed by in situ ETEM to form an amorphous copper oxide phase with a Cu oxidation state similar to Ce{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 2}, but with a local bonding environment similar to CuO. The behavior of the reduced Ce{sub 0.8}Cu{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} reflects strong interactions between Cu and the ceria matrix and illustrates the advantages of working with solid solutions of mixed oxides.

Rodriguez, J.A.; Ciston, J.; Si, R.; Hanson, J.C.; Martínez-Arias, A.; Fernandez-García, M.; Zhu, Y.

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

400

Synthesis, structure and properties of new chain cuprates, Na{sub 3}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Na{sub 8}Cu{sub 5}O{sub 10}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Na{sub 3}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 4} and Na{sub 8}Cu{sub 5}O{sub 10} were prepared via the azide/nitrate route from stoichiometric mixtures of the precursors CuO, NaN{sub 3} and NaNO{sub 3}. Single crystals have been grown by subsequent annealing of the as prepared powders at 500 deg. C for 2000h in silver crucibles, which were sealed in glass ampoules under dried Ar. According to the X-ray analysis of the crystal structures (Na{sub 3}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 4}: P2{sub 1}/n, Z=4, a=5.7046(2), b=11.0591(4), c=8.0261(3)A, {beta}=108.389(1){sup o}, 2516 independent reflections, R{sub 1}(all)=0.0813, wR{sub 2} (all)=0.1223; Na{sub 8}Cu{sub 5}O{sub 10}: Cm, Z=2, a=8.228(1), b=13.929(2), c=5.707(1)A, {beta}=111.718(2){sup o}, 2949 independent reflections, R{sub 1}(all)=0.0349, wR{sub 2} (all)=0.0850), the main feature of both crystal structures are CuO{sub 2} chains built up from planar, edge-sharing CuO{sub 4} squares. From the analysis of the Cu-O bond lengths, the valence states of either +2 or +3 can be unambiguously assigned to each copper atom. In Na{sub 3}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 4} these ions alternate in the chains, in Na{sub 8}Cu{sub 5}O{sub 10} the periodically repeated part consists of five atoms according to Cu{sup II}-Cu{sup II}-Cu{sup III}-Cu{sup II}-Cu{sup III}. The magnetic susceptibilities show the dominance of antiferromagnetic interactions. At high temperatures the compounds exhibit Curie-Weiss behaviour (Na{sub 3}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 4}: {mu}=1.7{mu}{sub B}, {theta}=-160K, Na{sub 8}Cu{sub 5}O{sub 10}: {mu}=1.8{mu}{sub B}, {theta}=-58K, magnetic moments per divalent copper ion). Antiferromagmetic ordering is observed to occur in these compounds below 13K (Na{sub 3}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and 24K (Na{sub 8}Cu{sub 5}O{sub 10})

Sofin, Mikhail [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstr. 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Peters, Eva-Maria [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstr. 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Jansen, Martin [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstr. 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)]. E-mail: jansen@fkf.mpg.de

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Investigation of thermal, mechanical and magnetic behaviors of the Cu-11%Al alloy with Ag and Mn additions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The investigation of thermal, mechanical and magnetic behaviors of the Cu-11%Al, Cu-11%Al-3%Ag, Cu-11%Al-10%Mn and Cu-11%Al-10%Mn-3%Ag alloys was made using microhardness measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy and magnetic moment change with applied field measurement. The results indicated that the Mn addition changes the phase stability range, the microhardness values and makes undetectable the eutectoid reaction in annealed Cu-11%Al and Cu-11%Al-3%Ag alloys while the presence of Ag does not modify the phase transformation sequence neither microhardness values of the annealed Cu-11%Al and Cu-11%Al-10%Mn alloys, but it increases the magnetic moment of this latter at about 2.7 times and decreases the rates of eutectoid and peritectoid reactions of the former. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The microstructure of Cu-Al alloy is modified in the Ag presence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ({alpha} + {gamma}) phase is stabilized down to room temperature when Ag is added to Cu-Al alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-rich phase modifies the magnetic characteristics of Cu-Al-Mn alloy.

Silva, R.A.G., E-mail: galdino.ricardo@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra-UNIFESP, Diadema-SP (Brazil)] [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra-UNIFESP, Diadema-SP (Brazil); Paganotti, A.; Gama, S. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra-UNIFESP, Diadema-SP (Brazil)] [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra-UNIFESP, Diadema-SP (Brazil); Adorno, A.T.; Carvalho, T.M.; Santos, C.M.A. [Instituto de Quimica - UNESP, Araraquara-SP (Brazil)] [Instituto de Quimica - UNESP, Araraquara-SP (Brazil)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

402

Polycrystalline oxides formation during transient oxidation of (001) Cu-Ni binary alloys studied by in situ TEM and XRD.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nucleation and growth of Cu{sub 2}O and NiO islands due to oxidation of Cu{sub x}Ni{sub 1-x} (001) films were monitored, at various temperatures, by in situ ultra-high vacuum (UHV) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD). In remarkable contrast to our previous observations of Cu and Cu-Au oxidation, irregular-shaped polycrystalline oxide islands formed with respect to the Cu-Ni alloy film, and an unusual second oxide nucleation stage was noted. In situ XRD experiments revealed that NiO formed first epitaxially, then other orientations appeared, and finally polycrystalline Cu{sub 2}O developed as the oxidation pressure was increased. The segregation of Ni and Cu towards or away, respectively, from the alloy surface during oxidation could disrupt the surface and cause polycrystalline oxide formation.

Yang, J. C.; Li, Z. Q.; Sun, L.; Zhou, G. W.; Eastman, J. A.; Fong, D. D.; Fuoss, P. H.; Baldo, P. M.; Rehn, L. E.; Thompson, L. J.; Materials Science Division; Univ.of Pittsburgh; State Univ. of New York at Binghamton

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

The structural and mechanical properties of a Cu??Zr??(at. %) alloy processed by High-Velocity-Injection (HVI)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) cooling rate, (3) defects and/or defect structure, (4) density and, (5) purity. The samples investigated in this research will be a copper- zirconium alloy of composition Cu Zr (at. ?) . This alloy was chosen because it is a member of a group...+Zr, C E6 8220C 4~0. 2 a~Zr, Cu 3200 2800 u 2600 ur 2400 g O 2200 ~ 2000 ~ i800 ~ l 600 i 100'C piZrCu3 965'C 935'C 895 C )I Sar I I g 47 92PC ~ 'C 1 400 Zr, cu $ ZrCu R O ZrCu~+Cu l200 lO 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 l00 WEIGHT...

Hays, Charles C.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

404

Anisotropic empty electron-band states at the pseudo-5×5 Si(111)/Cu interface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The partial (s-d) density of empty states at the Cu site in the pseudo-5×5 Si(111)/Cu interface has been investigated by polarization-dependent x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Cu L2,3 edges. The absorption spectra are strongly dichroic showing a metallic edge in the interface plane and a quasigap in the perpendicular direction. The two-dimensional nature of the electron-band states at the pseudo-5×5 interface layer is therefore directly probed.

Massimo Sancrotti; Maurizio Sacchi; Oumar Sakho; Giorgio Rossi

1991-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Alloy Catalyst in a Reactive Environment: The Example of Ag-Cu Particles for Ethylene Epoxidation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Combining first-principles calculations and in situ photoelectron spectroscopy, we show how the composition and structure of the surface of an alloy catalyst is affected by the temperature and pressure of the reagents. The Ag-Cu alloy, recently proposed as an improved catalyst for ethylene epoxidation, forms a thin Cu-O surface oxide, while a Ag-Cu surface alloy is found not to be stable. Several possible surface structures are identified, among which the catalyst surface is likely to dynamically evolve under reaction conditions.

Simone Piccinin; Spiros Zafeiratos; Catherine Stampfl; Thomas W. Hansen; Michael Hävecker; Detre Teschner; Valerii I. Bukhtiyarov; Frank Girgsdies; Axel Knop-Gericke; Robert Schlögl; Matthias Scheffler

2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

406

Microstructural variations in Cu/Nb and Al/Nb nanometallic multilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Miscible (Al/Nb) and immiscible (Cu/Nb) nanometallic multilayer systems were characterized by means of transmission electron microscopy techniques, primarily by automated crystallographic orientation mapping, which allows for the resolution of crystal structures and orientations at the nanoscale. By using this technique, distinctive Nb orientations in relation to the crystallographic state of the Al and Cu layer structures can be observed. Specifically, the Al and Cu layers were found to consist of amorphous, semi-amorphous, and crystalline regions, which affect the overall multilayer microstructure.

Polyakov, M. N.; Hodge, A. M. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)] [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Courtois-Manara, E.; Wang, D.; Kuebel, C. [Institute of Nanotechnology and Karlsruhe NanoMicro Facility, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute of Nanotechnology and Karlsruhe NanoMicro Facility, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Chakravadhanula, K. [Institute of Nanotechnology and Karlsruhe NanoMicro Facility, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany) [Institute of Nanotechnology and Karlsruhe NanoMicro Facility, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Helmholtz Institute Ulm, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

407

Adsorption and chemical reaction of Cu(hfac)(vtms) on Young Su Chung, Hyoo Suk Lee, Yoon Sup Lee, Sehun Kim *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Adsorption and chemical reaction of Cu(hfac)(vtms) on Cu(1 1 1) Young Su Chung, Hyoo Suk Lee, Yoon the adsorption and reaction of Cu(hfac) (vtms) (hexaÂŻuoroacetylacetonate, hfac; vinyl tri- methyl silane, vtms between adsorbed Cu(hfac) molecules were observed to occur between 240 and 400 K. The adsorption geo

Kim, Sehun

408

A Theoretical Study of Methanol Synthesis from CO(2) Hydrogenation on Metal-doped Cu(111) Surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations were employed to investigate the methanol synthesis reaction from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation (CO{sub 2} + 3H{sub 2} {yields} CH{sub 3}OH + H{sub 2}O) on metal-doped Cu(111) surfaces. Both the formate pathway and the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction followed by a CO hydrogenation pathway (RWGS + CO-Hydro) were considered in the study. Our calculations showed that the overall methanol yield increased in the sequence: Au/Cu(111) < Cu(111) < Pd/Cu(111) < Rh/Cu(111) < Pt/Cu(111) < Ni/Cu(111). On Au/Cu(111) and Cu(111), the formate pathway dominates the methanol production. Doping Au does not help the methanol synthesis on Cu(111). Pd, Rh, Pt, and Ni are able to promote the methanol production on Cu(111), where the conversion via the RWGS + CO-Hydro pathway is much faster than that via the formate pathway. Further kinetic analysis revealed that the methanol yield on Cu(111) was controlled by three factors: the dioxomethylene hydrogenation barrier, the CO binding energy, and the CO hydrogenation barrier. Accordingly, two possible descriptors are identified which can be used to describe the catalytic activity of Cu-based catalysts toward methanol synthesis. One is the activation barrier of dioxomethylene hydrogenation, and the other is the CO binding energy. An ideal Cu-based catalyst for the methanol synthesis via CO{sub 2} hydrogenation should be able to hydrogenate dioxomethylene easily and bond CO moderately, being strong enough to favor the desired CO hydrogenation rather than CO desorption but weak enough to prevent CO poisoning. In this way, the methanol production via both the formate and the RWGS + CO-Hydro pathways can be facilitated.

Liu P.; Yang, Y.; White, M.G.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

409

Local Cu and Br environments and their relationship to superconductivity restoration in brominated YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

{sup 63,65}Cu nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) and Br {ital k}-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) have been used to study the local structures in well-characterized samples of deoxygenated and brominated YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub y}(YBCO). NQR shows that after bromination of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6.1} at 260thinsp{degree}C, oxygen has repopulated the chain sites. From XAFS, it is concluded that Br does not enter the YBCO lattice, but rather precipitates out as small nanoscale particles of BaBr{sub 2}. These results provide clear evidence of the role of Br in reoxygenating the YBCO structure and an explanation for the partial restoration of superconductivity in the YBCO system. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

Potrepka, D.M.; Fenner, D.B.; Balasubramanian, M.; Hines, W.A.; Budnick, J.I. [Department of Physics and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Institute of Materials Science, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269 (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Nanoscale Materials for Thin Film Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells show the highest efficiencies of all thin film technologies. Nano-particulate precursor materials could have the potential to lead this technology to...

Ahlswede, Erik

411

Synthesis of colloidal CuInSe2 nanoparticles by electrical spark discharge in liquid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work presents a low-cost, non-vacuum, and facile process for fabrication of CuInSe2 (CIS) nanoparticles using electrical discharge treatment of mixture of copper, indium, and selenium powders between two tu...

Mehdi Mardanian; Alena A. Nevar; Michael Nedel’ko…

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A polarizer chip based on CMOS Cu-interconnect for optical telecommunications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The construction by CMOS Cu-interconnect fabrication technology of an optical chip that performs the function of linear polarization is described. The chip consists of three rows of...

Ko, Cheng-Hao; Lee, Kuei-Jen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Microstructure and Strengthening Mechanisms of Highly Textured Cu/Ni Multilayers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I planned to fabricate Cu/Ni metallic multilayers with equal layer thicknesses on different substrates by using magnetic sputtering technique. My objective was to characterize the texture, structure and hardness, in order to study...

Liu, Yue

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

414

Zn3P2 and Cu2O substrates for solar energy conversion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Zinc phosphide (Zn3P2) and cuprous oxide (Cu2O) are promising and earth-abundant alternatives to traditional thin film photovoltaics materials such as CIGS, CdTe, and a-Si. We… (more)

Kimball, Gregory Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Vibrational, giant dielectric and AC conductivity properties of agglomerated CuO nanostructures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report frequency, temperature dependent dielectric response and AC conductivity of nanocrystalline CuO. These nanoparticles were prepared using sol–gel technique. Prepared particles were made as a pellet us...

K. R. Deepthi; T. Pandiyarajan…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Effect of Cu doping on Hole Mobility in CdTe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High quality CdTe thin films grown by laser deposition technique and heavily doped with Cu have recently been reported to have resistivity and hole mobility comparable to those of bulk single crystals. To explain the experimental results we have calculated the effect of Cu on the band structure and phonon spectrum of CdTe using the density functional theory (DFT) and the linearized augmented plane wave (LAPW) method. We found that the introduction of a high density of Cu can lead to a reduction in the hole-LO phonon scattering. In addition, Cu doping can remove Cd vacancies in CdTe and thereby enhance the hole mobility in CdTe.

Ma Zhixun; Mao, Samuel S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Liu Lei; Yu, Peter Y. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

417

Evaluation of Quasicrystal Al-Cu-Fe Alloys for Tribological Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research investigated the tribological performance of a composite material, formed from an ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) matrix and quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders. An evaluation was conducted for the microstructure...

Nabelsi, Nezar

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

418

Investigation of Cu(II)/2',3'-isopropylidene adenosine complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UV spectrum and polarographic behavior of Cu(II)/IpA complex was investigated, in an aqueous solution of Cu(II)/IpA complex, in Britton Robinson buffer solution at a pH from 5.0 to 8.0. At a low concentration of Cu(II)/IpA complex, maximum absorbance was shown to be 532 nm. Only one polarographic wave was found dependent on a two electron reduction. The composition ratio of the complex was obtained by both UV spectrum and polarography, it was found that the ratio of Cu(II) to IpA was 1:2. The polarography was shown by a two-electron reduction wave.

Hatano, A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional cu layer Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

(2009), doi:10.1016j.electacta.2008.12.037 Summary: additives on film properties and formation rates were also examined. Cu reduction kinetics decreased... the properties of...

420

Modellversuche zu Grenzflächenreaktionen an n-CuInSe2 im UHV  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For a detailed understanding of the formation conditions of a heterojunction observed at the n-CuInSe2...-polyiodide electrolyte contact, model experiments in the UHV were performed: Adsorption of H2O and Cl2 on ...

M. Sander; H. J. Lewerenz; W. Jaegermann…

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

E-Print Network 3.0 - al cu sn Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Uniwersytet Jagiellonski Collection: Physics 6 Defect physics of the kesterite thin-film solar cell absorber Cu2ZnSnS4 Shiyou Chen,1,2 Summary: Defect physics of the...

422

Temporal stability of Y Ba Cu O nano Josephson junctions from ion irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stability of Y-Ba-Cu-O nano Josephson junctions from ionion irradiation through a nano-scale implant mask fabricateda two-dimensional array,” Nano Letters, 9, pp. 3581-3585, [

Cybart, Shane A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Structure, Magnetism, and Transport of CuCr2Se4 Thin Films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure, Magnetism, and Transport of CuCr 2 Se 4 Thindichroism shows that the magnetism persists to the surfacesuch as the nature of magnetism at surfaces and interfaces.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A Comparison of Melt Processes to Prepare YBaCuO with High J c  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are several melt processes which promise high J c ...in bulk YBaCuO. A comparison of various melt processes such as MTG and MPMG was performed in this stud...

M. Murakami; A. Kondoh; H. Fujimoto; K. Takamuku…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Electronic properties and morphology of Cu-phthalocyanine—C{sub 60} composite mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phthalocyanines in combination with C{sub 60} are benchmark materials for organic solar cells. Here, we have studied the morphology and electronic properties of co-deposited mixtures (blends) of these materials forming a bulk heterojunction as a function of the concentration of the two constituents. For a concentration of 1:1 of Cu-Phthalocyanine (CuPc):C{sub 60}, a phase separation into about 100?nm size domains is observed, which results in electronic properties similar to layered systems. For low C{sub 60} concentrations (10:1 CuPc:C{sub 60}), the morphology, as indicated by Low-Energy Electron Microscopy images, suggests a growth mode characterized by (amorphous) domains of CuPC, whereby the domain boundaries are decorated with C{sub 60}. Despite of these markedly different growth modes, the electronic properties of the heterojunction films are essentially unchanged.

Roth, Friedrich [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science/DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Lupulescu, Cosmin [Institute of Optics and Atomic Physics, TU Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Arion, Tiberiu [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science/DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Institut für Experimentalphysik, Universität Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Darlatt, Erik; Gottwald, Alexander [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Abbestraße 2-12, D-10587 Berlin (Germany); Eberhardt, Wolfgang [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science/DESY, Notkestraße 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Institute of Optics and Atomic Physics, TU Berlin, Straße des 17. Juni 135, D-10623 Berlin (Germany)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

426

Rusting Evolution of MnCuP Weathering Steel Submitted to Simulated Industrial Atmospheric Corrosion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The rusting evolution of MnCuP weathering steel in a simulated industrial atmosphere as a...?-FeOOH. During the second corrosion stage, a compact and protective inner rust layer forms with a higher relative abund...

Long Hao; Sixun Zhang; Junhua Dong; Wei Ke

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

The adsorption of water on Cu2O and Al2O3 thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Cu 2 O collected in UHV. (22) Diebold, U. Surf. Sci. Rep.studies in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) and at low temperaturesO 1s spectrum recorded in UHV (a single peak due to Al 2 O

Deng, Xingyi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Single Source Electron Beam Evaporation of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O Thin Films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A modified electron beam evaporation technique for the deposition of BiSrCaCuO thin films has been developed. In contrast to the conventional hearthed electron beam crucible the design in the present study use...

M. Ghanashyam Krishna; G. K. Muralidhar…

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Comparison of CsBr and KBr coated Cu photocathodes: Effects of...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Comparison of CsBr and KBr coated Cu photocathodes: Effects of laser irradiation and work function changes. Abstract: Thin films (7 nm layers) of CsBr and KBr were deposited...

430

Resistance Reduction Induced by Small Electric Current in CoCu Porous Films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resistance Reduction Induced by Small Electric Current in CoCu Porous Films ... The investigation of electrics discovered that resistance reduction could be induced by a small electric current in these ferromagnetic porous films. ...

Zhigang Li; Weiping Cai; Peisheng Liu; Qintao Li; Liangjian Zou

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

431

ELEMENTARY DIFFUSION PROCESSES IN AL-CU-ZN ALLOYS: AN AB INITIO STUDY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ELEMENTARY DIFFUSION PROCESSES IN AL-CU-ZN ALLOYS: AN AB INITIO STUDY S. GRABOWSKI AND P. ENTEL of alloys such as mechanical strength and toughness, creep and corrosion resistance are essentially

Entel, P.

432

Development of Cu(2)ZnSn(S,Se)(4) based solar cells.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Thin film solar cell technologies are rapidly developing, and chalcopyrite (Cu(In,Ga)Se2) based devices have demonstrated the highest power conversion efficiencies on the laboratory scale. However,… (more)

Fairbrother, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Photocatalytic performance of TiO2 thin films connected with Cu micro-grid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aiming at reducing the recombination of photo-induced carriers in semiconductor photocatalytic process, we prepared TiO2...thin film with its surface modified by a connected Cu micro-grid via a microsphere lithog...

HaiLing Zhu; JunYing Zhang; TianMin Wang…

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Characterization of Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic powders produced by water atomization and powder heat treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic shows its importance in industrial applications, the Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic-containing powders, produced by a powder processing route with a high production rate, were characterized. The route consisted of water atomization of an alloy melt (Cu–61 wt.% Sn) and subsequent heat treatment of the water-atomized powders. Characterization of the water-atomized powders and their heated forms was conducted by using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Fine water-atomized powder microstructures consisted of primary hexagonal ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} dendrites coexisting with interdendritic ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} + ?-Sn eutectic. Solidification of fine melt droplets was governed by surface nucleation and growth of the primary hexagonal ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} dendrites followed by ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} + ?-Sn eutectic solidification of the remnant liquid. In coarse melt droplets, nucleation and growth of primary ?-Cu{sub 3}Sn dendrites were followed by peritectic reaction (?-Cu{sub 3}Sn + liquid ? ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5}) or direct crystallization of ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} phase from the undercooled melt. Finally, the ?-Cu{sub 6.25}Sn{sub 5} + ?-Sn eutectic solidification of the remnant liquid occurred. Heating of the water-atomized powders at different temperatures resulted in microstructural homogenization. The water-atomized powders with mixed phases were transformed to powders with single monoclinic ?-Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} phase. - Highlights: • The Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic powder production route was proposed. • Single phase Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} powders could be by water atomization and heating. • Water-atomized Cu–Sn powders contained mixed Cu–Sn phases. • Solidification and heat treatment of water-atomized Cu–Sn powders are explained.

Tongsri, Ruangdaj, E-mail: ruangdt@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Yotkaew, Thanyaporn, E-mail: thanyy@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Krataitong, Rungtip, E-mail: rungtipk@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Wila, Pongsak, E-mail: pongsakw@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Sir-on, Autcharaporn, E-mail: autchars@mtec.or.th [Materials Characterization Research Unit (MCRU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Muthitamongkol, Pennapa, E-mail: pennapm@mtec.or.th [Materials Characterization Research Unit (MCRU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand); Tosangthum, Nattaya, E-mail: nattayt@mtec.or.th [Powder Metallurgy Research and Development Unit (PM-RDU), National Metal and Materials Technology Center, 114 Paholyothin, Klong 1, Klong Luang, Pathum Thani 12120 (Thailand)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Examination of the cu/si(111) 5×5 structure by scanning tunneling microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The incommensurate 5×5 Cu/Si(111) structure has been examined by scanning tunneling microscopy. Images show that the surface structure is not well described as a hexagonal copper layer modulated at the Si(111) periodicity. Rather, the surface breaks up into 5×5 subunits which pack at spacings varying from 5 to 7 lattice constants, implying that substrate-adsorbate interactions dominate lateral interactions within the Cu adlayer.

R. J. Wilson; S. Chiang; F. Salvan

1988-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Understanding of catalytic behaviors of TiO2/CuOx catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aiming to reveal the catalysis at the metal-oxide and oxide-oxide interfaces,1,2 the water-gas shift reaction (WGS, CO + H2O and #61664; CO2 + H2) and CO oxidation (2CO + O2 and #61664; 2CO2) at the interface of the Cu(111) and Cu2O(111) supported TiO2 clusters were studied based on DFT calculations

Kim H. Y.; Liu, P.

2013-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

437

DISSERTATION Role of the Cu-O Defect in CdTe Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF THE CU-O DEFECT COMPLEX IN CDTE SOLAR CELLS Thin-film CdTe is one of the leading materials used the defects present in thin-film CdTe deposited for solar cells. One key defect seen in the thin-film CdDISSERTATION Role of the Cu-O Defect in CdTe Solar Cells Submitted by Caroline R. Corwine

Sites, James R.

438

Theoretical Survey of the Potential Energy Surface of Ethylenediamine + Cu+ Reactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Theoretical Survey of the Potential Energy Surface of Ethylenediamine + Cu+ Reactions ... The structures of the different local minima (species 4?17) and transition states located in the PES will not be discussed in detail, but they will be schematized in the energy profiles of Figures 2?7 and are given as Supporting Information together with their corresponding total energies. ... The dark blue circle denotes N atoms, green circles C atoms and light blue circles Cu atom. ...

Manuel Alcamí; Alberto Luna; Otilia Mó; Manuel Yáńez; Jeanine Tortajada

2004-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

439

Pion Interferometry in Au+Au and Cu+Cu Collisions at sqrt sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a systematic analysis of two-pion interferometry in Au+Au collisions at {radical}sNN = 62.4 GeV and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV using the STAR detector at RHIC. The multiplicity and transverse momentum dependences of the extracted correlation lengths (radii) are studied. The scaling with charged particle multiplicity of the apparent system volume at final interaction is studied for the RHIC energy domain. The multiplicity scaling of the measured correlation radii is found to be independent of colliding system and collision energy.

STAR Collaboration; Abelev, B.I.

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

440

Effect of arc discharge on wear rate of Cu-impregnated carbon strip in unlubricated sliding against Cu trolley under electric current  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The wear of contact strip on the pantograph of electric railway vehicle is mainly governed by arc discharge occurring simultaneously with contact break between strip and trolley wire. Sliding wear tests were carried out under electric current for the combination of Cu-impregnated baked carbon strip and Cu trolley at a sliding speed of 100 km/h. Voltage drop and current were measured at a frequency of 48 kHz and electric power, total time duration and accumulated energy of discharge were evaluated for each test strip. Plot of wear rate of strip against arc discharge energy shows a proportional relationship between them.

Shunichi Kubo; Koji Kato

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Influence of preparation methods and Zr and Y promoters on Cu/ZnO catalysts used for methanol steam reforming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Binary Cu/ZnO catalysts were prepared using three different methods (coprecipitation, sequential precipitation and homogeneous precipitation) and tested in a methanol steam reforming reaction. Zirconium and yttrium were tested as promoters, and their effects were evaluated in the same reaction. The studied preparation methods influenced the surface area of the Cu-based catalysts and consequently their catalytic activity; however, we verified that surface area was not the only factor influencing activity. Different structural changes in the aurichalcite precursor resulted from the different preparation methods used, and these differences were also observed in the reduced catalysts. An expansion of the Cu lattice with an increase in microstrain were identified and attributed to the formation of a Cu–Zn alloy. Based on the correlation found between these structural changes and the catalytic activity, the Cu–Zn alloy was proposed as active site. We concluded that the preparation methods used influenced Cu dispersion and overall catalyst structure, and Cu–Zn alloy formation resulted from the incorporation of Zn atoms into the Cu lattice. This influence was more pronounced in the catalysts prepared by homogeneous precipitation and coprecipitation. The yttrium promoter did not provide textural or structural advantages. In contrast, the incorporation of Zr promoted both greater Cu dispersion and structural changes in the Cu lattice.

S.G. Sanches; J. Huertas Flores; R.R. de Avillez; M.I. Pais da Silva

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Preparation of Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for a micro methanol reformer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst suitable for low-temperature methanol reforming is proposed. The catalyst achieved by optimization of the temperature and pH of preparation and the addition of boehmite has superior catalytic activity to commercial catalysts. The catalytic activity is found to depend on the Cu surface area, which is related to the amount of Cu dispersed within ZnO. Dispersion of Cu is promoted by precipitation at low temperature, which results in the formation of small crystallites of the precursor. Enlarged BET surface area by the addition of boehmite as the third component derives high catalytic activity. Under optimized pH, it is predicted that the excess of Cu species existing as amorphous-like malachite in the precursor, in addition to aurichalcite, facilitates the dispersion of Cu. The proposed catalyst system can achieve methanol reforming at temperatures 20–25 °C lower than conventional catalysts, representing an improved source of H2 for small proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems.

Yoshihiro Kawamura; Kazuto Yamamoto; Naotsugu Ogura; Takashi Katsumata; Akira Igarashi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

The Different Impacts of SO2 and SO3 on Cu/zeolite SCR Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The different impacts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} on Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts were investigated by SCR performance tests and multiple characterization techniques including temperature programmed desorption (TPD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results indicate that a larger amount of highly dispersed CuSO{sub 4} formed in the zeolite catalysts (Z-CuSO{sub 4}) upon SO{sub 3} poisoning, explaining the much more significant deactivation of the Cu/zeolite catalysts that were exposed to SO{sub 3} compared to poisoning by SO{sub 2}. This paper provides the first demonstration that active sites of Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts involved in the storage and removal of sulfur can react with SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} in very different ways. In particular, the significant differences in the extent of sulfur uptake account for the considerably different impacts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} poisoning on the performance of Cu/zeolite SCR catalysts.

Cheng, Y.; Lambert, C; Kim, D; Kwak, J; Cho, S; Peden, C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Solvent-dependent luminescent Cu(I) framework based on 5-(4-pyridyl)tetrazole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new Cu(IOTA) coordination compound, Cu{sub 4}(L){sub 4}.2EtOH (1), has been obtained from the solvothermal reaction of CuBr, HL (L=5-(4-pyridyl) tetrazole), EtOH and NH{sub 3}.H{sub 2}O. The structure determination reveals that 1 has a 2D network, where each Cu(I) atom adopts a trigonal coordination mode. The 2D networks stacked in an ABAB sequence through the pi-pi interaction to form a 3D supramolecular framework, giving a 1D channel along the b-axis. The TGA and powder XRD measurements reveal that the framework is stable after removal of the guest molecules. Gas (N{sub 2}) adsorption measurement was carried out for the framework. Framework 1 shows II sorption profile with N{sub 2}, which indicates that N{sub 2} molecules cannot diffuse into the micropore and only surface adsorption occurs. The photoluminescent research shows that compound 1 displays an interesting solvent-dependent luminescence. - Abstract: A new Cu(I) compound, Cu{sub 4}(L){sub 4}.2EtOH (1) (L=5-(4-pyridyl) tetrazole), was synthesized under solvothermal method, which displays an interesting solvent-dependent luminescence. Display Omitted

Wang Fei; Yu Rongmin; Zhang Qisheng; Zhao Zhenguo; Wu Xiaoyuan; Xie Yiming; Qin Li; Chen Shanci [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 35002 (China); Lu Canzhong, E-mail: czlu@fjirsm.ac.c [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 35002 (China)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

CuO nanostructures: Synthesis, characterization, growth mechanisms, fundamental properties, and applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Nanoscale metal oxide materials have been attracting much attention because of their unique size- and dimensionality-dependent physical and chemical properties as well as promising applications as key components in micro/nanoscale devices. Cupric oxide (CuO) nanostructures are of particular interest because of their interesting properties and promising applications in batteries, supercapacitors, solar cells, gas sensors, bio sensors, nanofluid, catalysis, photodetectors, energetic materials, field emissions, superhydrophobic surfaces, and removal of arsenic and organic pollutants from waste water. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent synthetic methods along with associated synthesis mechanisms, characterization, fundamental properties, and promising applications of CuO nanostructures. The review begins with a description of the most common synthetic strategies, characterization, and associated synthesis mechanisms of CuO nanostructures. Then, it introduces the fundamental properties of CuO nanostructures, and the potential of these nanostructures as building blocks for future micro/nanoscale devices is discussed. Recent developments in the applications of various CuO nanostructures are also reviewed. Finally, several perspectives in terms of future research on CuO nanostructures are highlighted.

Qiaobao Zhang; Kaili Zhang; Daguo Xu; Guangcheng Yang; Hui Huang; Fude Nie; Chenmin Liu; Shihe Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Spray Deposition of High Quality CuInSe2 and CdTe Films: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of different ink and deposition approaches have been used for the deposition of CuInSe2 (CIS), Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), and CdTe films. For CIS and CIGS, soluble precursors containing Cu, In, and Ga have been developed and used in two ways to produce CIS films. In the first, In-containing precursor films were sprayed on Mo-coated glass substrates and converted by rapid thermal processing (RTP) to In2Se3. Then a Cu-containing film was sprayed down on top of the In2Se3 and the stacked films were again thermally processed to give CIS. In the second approach, the Cu-, In-, and Ga-containing inks were combined in the proper ratio to produce a mixed Cu-In-Ga ink that was sprayed on substrates and thermally processed to give CIGS films directly. For CdTe deposition, ink consisting of CdTe nanoparticles dispersed in methanol was prepared and used to spray precursor films. Annealing these precursor films in the presence of CdCl2 produced large-grained CdTe films. The films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Optimized spray and processing conditions are crucial to obtain dense, crystalline films.

Curtis, C. J.; van Hest, M.; Miedaner, A.; Leisch, J.; Hersh, P.; Nekuda, J.; Ginley, D. S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Enhanced thermoelectric performance in Cd doped CuInTe{sub 2} compounds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CuIn{sub 1?x}Cd{sub x}Te{sub 2} materials (x?=?0, 0.02, 0.05, and 0.1) are prepared using melting-annealing method and the highly densified bulk samples are obtained through Spark Plasma Sintering. The X-ray diffraction data confirm that nearly pure chalcopyrite structures are obtained in all the samples. Due to the substitution of Cd at In sites, the carrier concentration is greatly increased, leading to much enhanced electrical conductivity and power factor. The single parabolic band model is used to describe the electrical transport properties of CuInTe{sub 2} and the low temperature Hall mobility is also modeled. By combing theoretical model and experiment data, the optimum carrier concentration in CuInTe{sub 2} is proposed to explain the greatly enhanced power factors in the Cd doped CuInTe{sub 2}. In addition, the thermal conductivity is reduced by extra phonon scattering due to the atomic mass and radius fluctuations between Cd and In atoms. The maximum zTs are observed in CuIn{sub 0.98}Cd{sub 0.02}Te{sub 2} and CuIn{sub 0.9}Cd{sub 0.1}Te{sub 2} samples, which are improved by over 100% at room temperature and around 20% at 600?K.

Cheng, N. [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, R. [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Bai, S. [CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Shi, X., E-mail: xshi@mail.sic.ac.cn; Chen, L. [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); CAS Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1295 Dingxi Road, Shanghai 200050 (China)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

448

Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.a Cu.sub.b (Ni.sub.1-y Co.sub.y).sub.c wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y.cndot.c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b.

Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Peker, Atakan (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

450

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

451

USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Modeling Cu Migration in CdTe Solar Cells Under Device-Processing and Long-Term Stability Conditions: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An impurity migration model for systems with material interfaces is applied to Cu migration in CdTe solar cells. In the model, diffusion fluxes are calculated from the Cu chemical potential gradient. Inputs to the model include Cu diffusivities, solubilities, and segregation enthalpies in CdTe, CdS and contact materials. The model yields transient and equilibrium Cu distributions in CdTe devices during device processing and under field-deployed conditions. Preliminary results for Cu migration in CdTe photovoltaic devices using available diffusivity and solubility data from the literature show that Cu segregates in the CdS, a phenomenon that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing and/or stress conditions.

Teeter, G.; Asher, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Modeling Cu Migration in CdTe Solar Cells Under Device-Processing and Long-Term Stability Conditions (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An impurity migration model for systems with material interfaces is applied to Cu migration in CdTe solar cells. In the model, diffusion fluxes are calculated from the Cu chemical potential gradient. Inputs to the model include Cu diffusivities, solubilities, and segregation enthalpies in CdTe, CdS and contact materials. The model yields transient and equilibrium Cu distributions in CdTe devices during device processing and under field-deployed conditions. Preliminary results for Cu migration in CdTe PV devices using available diffusivity and solubility data from the literature show that Cu segregates in the CdS, a phenomenon that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing and/or stress conditions.

Teeter, G.; Asher, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Correlation between \\{Y2BaCuO5\\} (211) phase and superconducting magnetic properties in Ag-doped melt textured growth (MTG) YBa2Cu3O7?x superconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Samples of YBa2Cu3O7?x with different amount of Ag addition were prepared by the melt textured growth (MTG) process. The hysteresis and irreversible behaviour have been examined. It is found that the critical current density Jc is reduced and the irreversibility line is degenerated by doping Ag into YBa2Cu3O7?x. The microstructure analyses reveal that the volume fraction of \\{Y2BaCuO5\\} (211 Phase) decreases with increasing Ag concentration. This indicates that Ag doping can not intrinsically improve the Jc of YBa2Cu3O7?x superconductors.

J.A. Xia; H.T. Ren; Y. Zhao; C. Andrikidis; H.K. Liu; S.X. Dou

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Measurement of electrons from heavy-flavor decays from $p$+$p$, $d$+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions in the PHENIX experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charm and bottom quarks are formed predominantly by gluon fusion in the initial hard scatterings at RHIC, making them good probes of the full medium evolution. Previous measurements at RHIC have shown large suppression and azimuthal anisotropy of open heavy-flavor hadrons in Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200~{\\rm GeV}$. Explaining the simultaneously large suppression and flow of heavy quarks has been challenging. To further understand the heavy-flavor transport in the hot and dense medium, it is imperative to also measure cold nuclear matter effects which affect the initial distribution of heavy quarks as well as the system size dependence of the final state suppression. In this talk, new measurements by the PHENIX collaboration of electrons from heavy-flavor decays in $p$+$p$, $d$+Au, and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200~{\\rm GeV}$ are presented. In particular, a surprising enhancement of intermediate transverse momentum heavy-flavor decay leptons in $d$+Au at mid and backward rapidity are also seen in mid-central Cu+Cu collisions. This enhancement is much larger than the expectation from anti-shadowing of the parton distributions and is theoretically unexplained.

Sanghoon Lim

2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

456

Dynamic Cu/Zn Interaction in SiO2 Supported Methanol Synthesis Catalysts Unraveled by in Situ XAFS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fujitani et al.(15) already observed that formation of an intimately mixed Cu/Zn/carbonate aurichalcite phase during the preparation stage enhanced the creation of a Cu–Zn alloy, which they identified as the main active site in methanol synthesis after calcination and reduction. ... method through a precursor of aurichalcite is ascribed to both improvements in the Cu surface area and the specific activity. ...

Didier Grandjean; Vladimir Pelipenko; Erdni D. Batyrev; Johannes C. van den Heuvel; Alexander A. Khassin; Tamara. M. Yurieva; Bert M. Weckhuysen

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

457

DISSERTATION IMPACT OF SECONDARY BARRIERS ON CuIn1-xGaxSe2 SOLAR-CELL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impact of Secondary Barriers on CuIn1-xGaxSe2 Solar-Cell Operation Thin-film solar cells based on CuInSe2 of thin-film solar-cell tandems. Since the bottom cells are exposed to practically only "red" photonsDISSERTATION IMPACT OF SECONDARY BARRIERS ON CuIn1-xGaxSe2 SOLAR-CELL OPERATION Submitted by Alexei

Sites, James R.

458

The Roles of Cu Impurity States in CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells Ken K. Chin1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Roles of Cu Impurity States in CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells Ken K. Chin1 , T.A. Gessert2 of Cu impurity inclusion in CdTe thin film solar cells, such as degradation caused by Cu diffusion , and Su-Huai Wei2 1 Department of Physics and Apollo CdTe Solar Energy Research Center, NJIT, Newark, NJ

459

Plastic deformation in Al (Cu) interconnects stressed by electromigration and studied by synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plastic deformation in Al (Cu) interconnects stressed bygrain orientation [7], study plastic deformation [12-15] andThis aspect of EM-induced plastic deformation in grains

Chen, Kai; Advanced Light Source; UCLA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Electroslag surfacing of steel shafting with Ni alloy 625 and 70Cu-30Ni strip  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive study of electroslag surfacing (ESS) of steel with Ni Alloy 625 and 70Cu-30Ni strip electrodes was conducted to establish the feasibility of replacing forged bearing sleeves on propulsion shafting with integral weld surfacing. The base material was MIL-S-23284, Class 1 steel in the form of 41--66 cm (16--26 in.) diameter shafting and 76 mm (3 in.) thick flat plate. All ESS was carried out at a heat input level of approximately 5.9kJ/mm (150 kJ/in.) using 30 x 0.5 mm (1.2 x 0.02 in.) strip electrodes. Assessments of mechanical properties and microstructure of Ni Alloy 625 surfacing and 70Cu-30Ni surfacing were conducted to establish the structure-property relationships in these complex alloy systems. In addition, a solidification cracking test was developed to determine the relative cracking susceptibilities of these strip surfacing alloys. Although the Ni Alloy 625 surfacing contained small islands of interdendritic MC type carbides and Laves phase, the mechanical properties of this surfacing were satisfactory. The 70Cu-30Ni surfacing required a buttering layer of 30Cu-70Ni or pure Ni to prevent solidification cracking. The inherent ductility-dip sensitivity of 70Cu-30Ni surfacing was overcome by the development of a suitable ESS procedure.

Devletian, J.H.; Gao, Y.P.; Wood, W.E. [Oregon Graduate Inst. of Science and Technology, Portland, OR (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

CuAl{sub 2} revisited: Composition, crystal structure, chemical bonding, compressibility and Raman spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The structure of CuAl{sub 2} is usually described as a framework of base condensed tetragonal antiprisms [CuAl{sub 8/4}]. The appropriate symmetry governed periodic nodal surface (PNS) divides the space of the structure into two labyrinths. All atoms are located in one labyrinth, whereas the second labyrinth seems to be 'empty'. The bonding of the CuAl{sub 2} structure was analyzed by the electron localization function (ELF), crystal orbital Hamiltonian population (COHP) analysis and Raman spectroscopy. From the ELF representation it is seen, that the 'empty' labyrinth is in fact the place of important covalent interactions. ELF, COHP in combination with high-pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy show that the CuAl{sub 2} structure is described best as a network built of interpenetrating graphite-like nets of three-bonded aluminum atoms with the copper atoms inside the tetragonal-antiprismatic cavities. - Graphical abstract: Atomic interactions in the crystal structure of the intermetallic compound CuAl{sub 2}: Three-bonded aluminum atoms form interpenetrating graphite-like nets. The copper atoms are located in the channels of aluminum network by means of three-center bonds. The bonding model is in agreement with the result of polarized Raman spectroscopy and high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction.

Grin, Yuri [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)]. E-mail: grin@cpfs.mpg.de; Wagner, Frank R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Armbruester, Marc [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Kohout, Miroslav [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Leithe-Jasper, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Schwarz, Ulrich [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Strasse 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Wedig, Ulrich [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Georg von Schnering, Hans [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstr. 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Ab initio cluster studies of La sub 2 CuO sub 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we examine the properties of small cluster models of La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. In Section 2, the Madelung/Pauli background potential used to imbed the primary cluster and the basis sets used to expand the cluster wavefunction are discussed. Section 3 presents the results of calculations on CuO{sub 6} in which the optical absorption and the photoemission spectrum are examined. The calculation on CuO{sub 6} and our earlier work on larger clusters suggest that a single-band Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) model be developed. Therefore, in Section 4 the PPP model and extensions which relax the zero-differential-overlap (ZDO) approximation upon which it is based are reviewed. Calculations on the states of Cu{sub 2}O{sub 7} necessary to parameterize the PPP model are presented in Section 5 and compared with analogous calculations for Cu{sub 2}O{sub 11}. Section 6 discusses the problems associated with the direct ab initio determination of the anti-ferromagnetic exchange interaction, examines the magnitudes of the occupation-dependent hopping and direct exchange interactions which arise when the ZDO approximation is relaxed, and provides estimates of the uncertainties in the parameters due to electron correlation and polarization effects not recoverable with the present basis sets and finite clusters. A comparison of the parameters with those extracted from constrained LDF theory concludes Section 6. Finally, Section 7 summarizes the conclusions of this research.

Martin, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Structure and Bonding of Tungsten Oxide Clusters on Nanostructured Cu-O Surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

(WO3)3 gas-phase clusters generated via vacuum sublimation are deposited under UHV and low temperature (5 K) conditions on a Cu(110) 'stripe' phase consisting of alternating Cu-O (2x1) and clean Cu regions. STM imaging shows that the clusters adsorb as intact units on both substrates, and the suggested adsorption geometries are confirmed by density-functional (DF) simulations. On the clean surface the overall distortion is minor and we are able to image the nodal structure of an individual molecular orbital in the STM at low bias, whereas on the Cu-O surface both the clusters and the substrate are significantly distorted, due to the strong oxygen affinity of W atoms. On both surfaces cluster and Cu electronic states are appreciably mixed, and electron charge is donated by the surface to the cluster. The experimentally STS-determined DOS signature of the adsorption complex consists in two peaks across the Fermi energy and is well reproduced by the DF calculations.

Wagner, Margareta; Surnev, Svetlozar; Ramsey, Michael; Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Negreiros, Fabio R.; Fortunelli, Alessandro; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Netzer, Falko P.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Density functional study of CaN mono and bilayer on Cu(001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Density functional - pseudopotential calculations are performed to provide first-principles insights into magnetic behaviour of bulk CaN and CaN monolayers on Cu(001) in the rock-salt (RS) and zinc-blende (ZB) structures. Our results indicate that both RS- and ZB-CaN exhibit half-metallic ferromagnetism originated from the incomplete 2p shell of the nitrogen ion. In contrast to the bulk CaN, the CaN monolayers on Cu(001) generally favor ZB structure. We argue that the more stable ZB-CaN thin films on Cu(001) are nonmagnetic, because of strong Cu-N bonding at the interface, while the less stable Ca terminated ZB-CaN thin films exhibit half-metallic ferromagnetism. The transition path between the high energy ferromagnetic and the stable nonmagnetic configurations of the ZB-CaN monolayer on Cu(001) are studied by using the nudged elastic band method. We observe a two stages transition and an activation barrier of about 1.18 eV in the minimum energy path of this transition.

Zahedifar, Maedeh; Hashemifar, S. Javad, E-mail: hashemifar@cc.iut.ac.ir; Akbarzadeh, Hadi [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

465

Microstructural and magnetic characterizations of CoFeCu electrodeposited in self-assembled mesoporous silicon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Self-assembled mesoporous silicon with quasi-regular pore arrangements has been fabricated by the electrochemical anodization process in hydrofluoric acid solution. CoFeCu was electrodeposited in this structure from a bath containing sodium acetate as a complexing agent with a pH value of 5. The effect of current density on the morphology, the structure and the magnetic properties of CoFeCu deposit was studied by SEM, EDS, DRX and VSM. It has been shown that the morphology and structure of samples were strongly influenced by the current density and etching duration. The micrographs show the vertical and branched nanowires and also a discontinuous growth of wires. Further, the growth of a thick layer from the grain boundaries of released CoFeCu wires is produced. The magnetic hysteresis loops demonstrate that the CoFeCu nanowires exhibit easy magnetic axis perpendicular to the PS channels axis when the current density varied from 3 to 10 mA/cm2. Nevertheless, they reveal a no magnetic anisotropy of CoFeCu nanostructures deposited only in the outside of porous silicon, probably due to the vanishing the shape anisotropy.

G. Fortas; N. Haine; S. Sam; N. Gabouze; A. Saifi; S. Ouir; H. Menari

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Critical current density of Y-Ba-Cu oxide superconductor prepared by a diffusion process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The formation of the YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-y/ layer has been investigated by a diffusion process as a basic research for high-T/sub c/ superconductor fabrication. The starting materials were Y/sub 2/BaCuO/sub 5/ and barium cuprate, unlike the ordinary sintering technique. A dense layer of YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-y/ was formed on Y/sub 2/BaCuO/sub 5/ substrate, and the starting barium cuprate layer was fully converted to the superconducting oxide. X-ray diffractometry revealed that the layer consisted of an orthorhombic crystal structure. The reacted specimens showed good superconductivity. A zero resistance of 91.5K and the critical current density of 1900A/cm/sup 2/ (77K, OT) were achieved in the layer. Preparation conditions and superconducting properties, particularly, Jc characteristics are investigated. The diffusion phenomena to form the YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub 7-y/ phase by this diffusion process are also discussed.

Sadakata, N.; Sugimoto, M.; Kohno, O.; Tachikawa, K.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Application Of Ti-Based Self-Formation Barrier Layers To Cu Dual-Damascene Interconnects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cu interconnects have been used extensively in ULSI devices. However, large resistance-capacitance delay and poor device reliability have been critical issues as the device feature size has reduced to nanometer scale. In order to achieve low resistance and high reliability of Cu interconnects, we have applied a thin Ti-based self-formed barrier (SFB) using Cu(Ti) alloy seed to 45nm-node dual damascene interconnects and evaluated its performance. The line resistance and via resistance decreased significantly, compared with those of conventional Ta/TaN barriers. The stress migration performance was also drastically improved using the SFB process. A performance of time dependent dielectric breakdown revealed superior endurance. These results suggest that the Ti-based SFB process is one of the most promising candidates for advanced Cu interconnects. TEM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy observations for characterization of the Ti-based SFB structure were also performed. The Ti-based SFB consisted of mainly amorphous Ti oxides. Amorphous or crystalline Ti compounds such as TiC, TiN, and TiSi formed beneath Cu alloy films, and the formation varied with dielectric.

Ito, Kazuhiro; Kohama, Kazuyuki [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Ohmori, Kazuyuki; Mori, Kenichi; Maekawa, Kazuyoshi; Asai, Koyu [Process Technology Div., Renesas Electronics Corporation, Hitachinaka, Ibaraki 312-8504 (Japan); Murakami, Masanori [The Ritsumeikan Trust, Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8520 (Japan)

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

468

A bifunctional adsorbent with high surface area and cation exchange property for synergistic removal of tetracycline and Cu2+  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel bifunctional adsorbent with high surface area and cation exchange character (HAR-2) was prepared via copolymerization and hydrolysis reactions for the coremoval of tetracycline and Cu2+. HAR-2 possessed large specific surface area of 394 m2/g and high weak cation exchange capacity of 1.06 meq/g. The adsorption kinetics of TC or Cu2+ fitted both pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second order equations in single-substrate solution, whereas the adsorption kinetics were better described by pseudo-second order model in binary solutions. The adsorption of TC was an exothermic process, while the Cu2+ adsorption process was endothermic. The adsorption isotherms of TC and Cu2+ fitted the Langmuir model, suggesting a monolayer adsorption process. The adsorbed amount of TC was pronouncedly enhanced in the presence of Cu2+ due to the formation of tertiary surface complex HAR–Cu2+–TC. Likewise, the adsorption of Cu2+ was significantly improved by forming HAR–TC–Cu2+ complex in the presence of TC. The uptake of Cu2+ increased as pH increased, while the adsorbed amount of TC increased as pH rose from 2 to 3 but decreased when pH was further elevated from 3 to 6. The presence of NaCl exerted no significant influence on the adsorption of TC and negatively affected the adsorption of Cu2+. HAR-2 exhibited high stability over 5 repeated uses, only losing 6.3% and 18.4% of the initial adsorption capacity for TC and Cu2+, respectively.

Yan Ma; Qing Zhou; Sicong Zhou; Wei Wang; Jing Jin; Jiawen Xie; Aimin Li; Chendong Shuang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

07/14/2005 03:15 PMEBSCOhost Page 1 of 9https://sslvpn.pitt.edu/DeliveryPrintSave.asp,DanaInfo=weblinks2.ep...a&ev=CA&fd=&fi=aph_4562569_AN&del_submit=Print&est=&ft=on&ff=s&df=2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.pitt.edu/DeliveryPrintSave.asp,DanaInfo=weblinks2.ep...a&ev=CA&fd=&fi=aph_4562569_AN&del_submit=Print&est=&ft=on&ff=s&df=2 11 page://sslvpn.pitt.edu/DeliveryPrintSave.asp,DanaInfo=weblinks2.ep...a&ev=CA&fd=&fi=aph_4562569_AN

Spirtes, Peter

470

Neutron Scattering Studies on Magnetism and Phonon in the Electron-doped Nd2-xCexCuO4 and Pr1-xLaCexCuO4.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We present comprehensive neutron scattering studies on the electron-doped superconductors Nd2-xCexCuO4 and Pr1-xLaCexCuO4 to understand how magnetic properties and phonon are related to superconductivity. For… (more)

Kang, Hye Jung

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Thermoelectric properties of chalcopyrite type CuGaTe2 and chalcostibite CuSbS2 Vijay Kumar Gudelli, V. Kanchana, G. Vaitheeswaran, A. Svane, and N. E. Christensen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of zT ÂĽ 1.4, confirming that CuGaTe2 is a promising material for high temperature thermoelectric and concentration suggests that CuSbS2 will be a good thermoelectric material at low temperatures, similarly Thermoelectric (TE) materials with potential applica- tions within power generation and refrigeration have repre

Svane, Axel Torstein

472

Microstructural evolutions in converting epitaxial Tl2Ba2CaCu2Ox thin films to epitaxial HgBa2CaCu2O6+delta thin films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting HgBa2CaCu2O6+delta (Hg-1212) thin films were obtained from Tl2Ba2CaCu2Ox (Tl-2212) precursor films using a cation-exchange process. In this process, Tl cations on the precursor lattice were thermally excited ...

Wu, Judy; Siegal, M. P.; Xie, Y. Y.; Aytug, T.; Fang, L.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Cu-Pd Hydrogen Separation Membranes with Reduced Palladium Content and Improved Performance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cu-Pd Hydrogen Separation Membranes with Reduced Cu-Pd Hydrogen Separation Membranes with Reduced Palladium Content and Improved Performance Opportunity This patent-pending technology, "Cu-Pd Hydrogen Separation Membranes with Reduced Palladium Content and Improved Performance," consists of copper-palladium alloy compositions for hydrogen separation membranes that use less palladium and have a potential increase in hydrogen permeability and resistance to sulfur degradation compared to currently available copper-palladium membranes. This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview NETL is working to help produce and deliver hydrogen from fossil fuels including coal in commercially applicable and environmentally

474

Stable n-CuInSe/sub 2/iodide-iodine photoelectrochemical cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a photoelectrochemical solar cell, stable output and solar efficiency in excess of 10% are achieved with a photoanode of n-CuInSe/sub 2/ electrode material and an iodine/iodide redox couple used in a liquid electrolyte. The photoanode is prepared by treating the electrode material by chemical etching, for example in Br/sub 2//MeOH; heating the etched electrode material in air or oxygen; depositing a surface film coating of indium on the electrode material after the initial heating; and thereafter again heating the electrode material in air or oxygen to oxidize the indium. The electrolyte is treated by the addition of Cu/sup +/ or Cu/sup 2 +/ salts and in In/sup 3 +/ salts.

Cahen, D.; Chen, Y.W.

1984-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

475

Iodide retention by cinnabar (HgS) and chalcocite (Cu{sub 2}S)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sorption of iodide (I{sup {minus}}) on cinnabar (HgS) and chalcocite (Cu{sub 2}S) was examined as a function of pH at 25{degrees}C in a series of batch experiments. Calculated distribution ratios (K{sub d}) far exceed those reported for other minerals; maximal K{sub d}`s of 1375 cc/g (Cu{sub 2}S) and 3080 c/g (HgS) were observed between pH 4-5, but wre substantial at all pH`s measured (4 < pH < 10). Iodide sorption apparently occurs by the formation of an insoluble surface solid solution with exposed Hg and Cu sites. Surface solid solution formation is favored at low pH due to the lessened electrostatic repulsion of the iodide ion by the sulfide surfaces.

Anderson, H.L.; Balsley, S.D.; Brady, P.V.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Synthesis of CuInSe2 nanopowders by microwave assisted solvothermal method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CuInSe2 (CISe) nanopowders were synthesised using the innovative microwave assisted solvothermal method. We studied the impact of the synthesis temperature as well as the precursor composition on the morphological, compositional, and structural properties of the nanopowders. We have found that for the synthesis of stoichiometric CISe particulates with chalcopyrite phase structure, temperatures equal to 230°C and In concentration in excess in the reaction solution with respect to Cu are required. At lower temperatures (200°C) and In excess, the presence of binary phases such as CuxSe and In2Se3 is clearly detected indicating a inadequate In incorporation. At intermediate temperatures (215°C), CISe is mainly formed but preferentially with the Cu-Au polytype structure. The method presented here may be very interesting for the possible mass production of CISe nanopowders due to the facile temperature control, the fast reaction process, and the easy scalability.

F.A. Pulgarin-Agudelo; M. Placidi; A. Fairbrother; X. Fontané; V. Izquierdo Roca; P.J. Sebastian; F. Ramos; B. Pina; A. Pérez-Rodríguez; E. Saucedo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

IPA-CuCl3: a S=1/2 Ladder with Ferromagnetic Rungs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The spin gap material IPA-CuCl{sub 3} has been extensively studied as a ferromagnetic-antiferromagnetic bond-alternating S = 1/2 chain. This description of the system was derived from structural considerations and bulk measurements. New inelastic neutron scattering experiments reveal a totally different picture: IPA-CuCl{sub 3} consists of weakly coupled spin ladders with antiferromagnetic legs and ferromagnetic rungs. The ladders run perpendicular to the originally supposed bond-alternating chain direction. The ferromagnetic rungs make this system equivalent to a Haldane S = 1 antiferromagnet. With a gap energy of 1.17(1) meV, a zone-boundary energy of 4.1(1) meV, and almost no magnetic anisotropy, IPA-CuCl{sub 3} may be the best Haldane-gap material yet, in terms of suitability for neutron scattering studies in high magnetic fields.

Masuda, Takatsugu [ORNL] [ORNL; Zheludev, Andrey I [ORNL] [ORNL; Manaka, H. [Kagoshima University, Kagoshima JAPAN] [Kagoshima University, Kagoshima JAPAN; Chung, J.-H. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)] [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Stable N-CuInSe.sub.2 /iodide-iodine photoelectrochemical cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a photoelectrochemical solar cell, stable output and solar efficiency in excess of 10% are achieved with a photoanode of n-CuInSe.sub.2 electrode material and an iodine/iodide redox couple used in a liquid electrolyte. The photoanode is prepared by treating the electrode material by chemical etching, for example in Br.sub.2 /MeOH; heating the etched electrode material in air or oxygen; depositing a surface film coating of indium on the electrode material after the initial heating; and thereafter again heating the electrode material in air or oxygen to oxidize the indium. The electrolyte is treated by the addition of Cu.sup.+ or Cu.sup.2+ salts and In.sup.3+ salts.

Cahen, David (Rehovot, IL); Chen, Yih W. (Lakewood, CO)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Temperature sensitivity of Cu K(alpha) imaging efficiency using a spherical Bragg reflecting crystal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vulcan laser facility at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory was used to study the interaction of a 75 J 10 ps, high intensity laser beam with low-mass solid, Cu targets. Two instruments were fielded as diagnostics of the Cu K-shell emission from the targets: A single photon counting CCD spectrometer provided the absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield and a spherically bent Bragg crystal recorded 2D monochromatic images with a spatial resolution of 10 {micro}m. Due to the shifting and broadening of the K{sub {alpha}} spectral lines with increasing temperature, there is a temperature dependence of the crystal collection efficiency. This provides a temperature diagnostic when cross calibrated against a single hit CCD spectrometer, and it affects measurements of the spatial pattern of electron transport. The experimental data showing changing collection efficiency are presented. The results are discussed in light of modeling of the temperature-dependent spectrum of Cu K-shell emission.

Akli, K U; Key, M H; Chung, H K; Hansen, S B; Freeman, R R; Chen, M H; Gregori, G; Hatchett, S; Hey, D; Izumi, N; King, J A; Kuba, J; Norreys, P; Mackinnon, A J; Murphy, C D; Snavely, R; Stepehens, R; Stoeckel, C; Theobald, W; Zhang, B

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

480

Electronic structure of La2CuO4 and YBa2Cu3O6: A local-spin-density approximation with on-site Coulomb-U correlation calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electron-electron correlation has been considered by using the local-spin-density approximation (LSDA) with on-site Coulomb interaction in the first-principles discrete variational cluster method. Based on the correction to LSDA, we have carried out self-consistent electronic-structure calculations for the strongly correlated electronic systems of La2CuO4 and YBa2Cu3O6. In contrast to LSDA, the LSDA+U calculations reveal the experimentally observed antiferromagnetic and insulating ground state. The energy gap for these compounds is of a charge-transfer character, and the values of the energy gap and Cu magnetic moment are in good agreement with experiments. The orbital character of the states near the Fermi level in La2CuO4 and YBa2Cu3O6 is discussed and a comparison with experiments is made.

Pan Wei and Zheng Qing Qi

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Vortex-lattice activation energy deduced from irreversibility lines for (PrBa2Cu3-xGaxO7)M/(YBa2Cu3O7)N superlattices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The activation energy of the vortex structure in high anisotropic (PrBa2Cu3-xGaxO7)M/(YBa2Cu3O7)N superlattices with a layer thickness of the superconductor in the range 1.2–4.8 nm and with no Josephson coupling between the YBa2Cu3O7 elementary layers has been deduced from irreversibility lines Tirr(H). The activation energy is proportional to the thickness of the elementary YBa2Cu3O7 layer and to the logarithm of the field H, whereas it follows a TAFF behavior for a YBa2Cu3O7 single film. The origin of the activation energy is discussed in light of recent theories on vortex dynamic. The anisotropies deduced from both Tirr(H) and the Kosterlitz-Thouless analysis of the resistive transition are found to be strongly correlated.

D. Ravelosona, J. P. Contour, and N. Bontemps

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Synthesis and catalytic performance of graphene modified CuO-ZnO-Al2O3 for CO2 hydrogenation to methanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CuO-ZnO-Al2O3 and graphene nanosheet (GNS) were synthesized by coprecipitation route and reduction of exfoliated graphite oxides method, respectively. GNS modified CuO-ZnO-Al2O3 nanocomposites were synthesized ...

Zheng-juan Liu, Xing-jiang Tang, Shan Xu, Xiao-lai Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

A comparative study on shock compression of nanocrystalline Al and Cu: Shock profiles and microscopic views of plasticity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shock compressions of nanocrystalline (nc) metals Al and Cu with the same grain size and texture are studied by using molecular dynamics simulations. Results have revealed that the shock front of both Al and Cu can be divided into three stages: elastic, grain-boundary-mediated, and dislocation-mediated plastic deformation. The transition planes among these three stages are proven to be non-planar by two-dimensional shock response analysis, including local stress, shear, temperature, and atom configuration. The difference between shocked Al and Cu is that the rise rate of the elastic stage of Cu is slightly higher than that of Al, and that the shock-front width of Al is wider than Cu at the same loading conditions. For the plastic stage, the dislocation density of shocked Al is lower than Cu, and the contribution of grain-boundary-mediated plasticity to shock front and strain for nc Al is more pronounced than for nc Cu. These results are explained through intrinsic material properties and atomistic analysis of the plastic process. In the case of the shocked Al sample, partial dislocations, perfect dislocations, and twins are observed, but few evidence of perfect dislocations and twins are observed in the shocked Cu.

Ma, Wen; Hou, Yong [Department of Physics, College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)] [Department of Physics, College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Zhu, Wenjun [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-111, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, CAEP, P.O. Box 919-111, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

484

Stereochemistry and structural phase transition of Cu(II) complexes containing orthophosphate ions and pyridine/picoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Copper complexes of the type Cu(L)4(H2PO4)2 designated as complex (I), and Cu(L)4 HPO4 designated as complex (II), (whereL = pyridine (py) or ?-picoline (pic)) have been synthesised, characterised by chemical ana...

M. S. Sastry; M. D. Sastry

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Hole transport and doping states in epitaxial CuIn1 xGaxSe2 David J. Schroeder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interest in renewable energy sources such as photovoltaic devices. CuIn1 xGaxSe2 CIGS /CdS hetero- junctionHole transport and doping states in epitaxial CuIn1 xGaxSe2 David J. Schroeder Motorola

Rockett, Angus

486

Optical transitions and multiphonon Raman scattering of Cu doped ZnO and MgZnO ceramics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Cu ion, Cu doped ZnO is a p-type semiconductor.13 Additionally, ferromagnetic behavior due were then dried and cold pressed at up to 3 tons for approximately 30 min, followed by annealing at a temperature of 10 K using a Bomem DA8 Fourier transform IR spectrometer and InSb detector. The micro

McCluskey, Matthew

487

THE PERFORMANCE OF THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS EMPLOYING PHOTOVOLTAIC Cu22014x Te-CdTe HETEROJUNCTIONS (1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

195 THE PERFORMANCE OF THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS EMPLOYING PHOTOVOLTAIC Cu22014x Te This paper is a short status report on the continuing development of Cu22014xTe-CdTe thin film solar cells Company has had a conti- nuous effort on thin film solar cells for the past four and a half years

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

488

Heterogeneous deposition of Cu2O nanoparticles on TiO2 nanotube array films in organic solvent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel method for decoration of anodic TiO2 nanotube array films (NAFs) with Cu2O nanoparticles has been reported. The method is based on the reduction of Cu(II) in a mixture of ethylene glycol and N, N-dimethylformamide at 120°C ...

Xinwen Huang; Zongjian Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Correlation between corrosion performance and surface wettability in ZrTiCuNiBe bulk metallic glasses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Correlation between corrosion performance and surface wettability in ZrTiCuNiBe bulk metallic June 2010 The corrosion properties of two Zr-based bulk metallic glass, Zr41Ti14Cu12Ni10Be23 LM1 and Zr potential, LM1b showed superior corrosion resistance to LM1. Under identical sample preparation and testing

Zheng, Yufeng

490

Effect of thin Mo2C layer on thermal stability of Si/SiO2/Ti/Cu system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of introducing a thin Mo2C (30 nm) layer between Ti and Cu on the thermal stability of Si/SiO2/Ti/Cu system was studied using four-point probe (FPP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersi...

C. C. Tripathi; Mukesh Kumar; Dinesh Kumar

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Influence of oxygen on the interfacial stability of Cu on Co,,0001... thin films Hongmei Wen,1 Matthew Neurock,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Influence of oxygen on the interfacial stability of Cu on Co,,0001... thin films Hongmei Wen,1 of oxygen, which can impact the quality of film and its properties. Previously we found that oxygen to examine the effects of surface atomic oxygen on the stability of the Cu 111 /Co 0001 interface

Wadley, Haydn