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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

" Level: National Data and Regional Totals...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(million","Other(e)","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short...

2

Released: February 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu...

3

,"for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion"...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million" "End Use","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons...

4

Cu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... EAM/FS setfl, Mendelev_Cu2_2012.eam.fs, This file was provided by Mikhail Mendelev (Ames Laboratory) and posted with his permission on 25 Jul ...

2013-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

5

FT Solutions LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FT Solutions LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name FT Solutions LLC Place South Jordan, Utah Zip 84095 Product JV between Headwaters Technology Innovation Group and Rentech to focus...

6

expbook.bbl - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... {\\small \\tt http://developer.apple.com/hardware/ve/acgresearch.html}}, 2003. ..... the Modern Computer, Game theory, Nuclear Deterrence, and Much More}.

7

FT Duplication Coordinates Reproductive and Vegetative Growth  

SciTech Connect

Annual plants grow vegetatively at early developmental stages and then transition to the reproductive stage, followed by senescence in the same year. In contrast, after successive years of vegetative growth at early ages, woody perennial shoot meristems begin repeated transitions between vegetative and reproductive growth at sexual maturity. However, it is unknown how these repeated transitions occur without a developmental conflict between vegetative and reproductive growth. We report that functionally diverged paralogs FLOWERING LOCUS T1 (FT1) and FLOWERING LOCUS T2 (FT2), products of whole-genome duplication and homologs of Arabidopsis thaliana gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), coordinate the repeated cycles of vegetative and reproductive growth in woody perennial poplar (Populus spp.). Our manipulative physiological and genetic experiments coupled with field studies, expression profiling, and network analysis reveal that reproductive onset is determined by FT1 in response to winter temperatures, whereas vegetative growth and inhibition of bud set are promoted by FT2 in response to warm temperatures and long days in the growing season. The basis for functional differentiation between FT1 and FT2 appears to be expression pattern shifts, changes in proteins, and divergence in gene regulatory networks. Thus, temporal separation of reproductive onset and vegetative growth into different seasons via FT1 and FT2 provides seasonality and demonstrates the evolution of a complex perennial adaptive trait after genome duplication.

Hsu, Chuan-Yu [Mississippi State University (MSU); Adams, Joshua P. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Kim, Hyejin [Mississippi State University (MSU); No, Kyoungok [Mississippi State University (MSU); Ma, Caiping [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Strauss, Steven [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Drnevich, Jenny [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Wickett, Norman [Pennsylvania State University; Vandervelde, Lindsay [Mississippi State University (MSU); Ellis, Jeffrey D. [Mississippi State University (MSU); Rice, Brandon [Mississippi State University (MSU); Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Brunner, Amy M. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Page, Grier P. [RTI International; Carlson, John E. [Pennsylvania State University; DePamphilis, Claude [Pennsylvania State University; Luthe, Dawn S. [Pennsylvania State University; Yuceer, Cetin [Mississippi State University (MSU)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Released: March 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" 3 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.3;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal" " "," ",,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS"," ","for Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million" "Code(a)","End Use","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons

9

2-ft Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-ft Flume Facility 2-ft Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 2-ft Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 61.0 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

10

Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron-catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Moessbauer spectroscopy investigations were carried out on 14 iron-based catalysts during the period under review. The catalyst 100Fe/4.4Si/0.71K (all atomic ratios) was subjected to activation first in syngas and subsequently in CO gas atmosphere. Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis was carried out on the above catalyst. Another catalyst 100Fe/4.4Si/2.6Cu/0.71K (all atomic ratios) activated in syngas and subjected to FT synthesis was also studied to understand the effect of added Cu on the phase distribution and its effect on the FT activity. The following trends were observed: (1) activation of the catalyst in syngas, H{sub 2}/CO, lead to the formation of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and no carbides were formed, the FT activity was found to be low at 9--12% (H{sub 2}+CO) conversion; (2) activation of the catalyst in CO for 22hrs lead to the formation of 33% of {chi}-carbide and the FT activity was found to be high at 88% maximum; (3) addition of copper to the catalyst has improved the FT activity for those catalysts pretreated in syngas at elevated pressures.

Huffman, G.P.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

FT-IR photoacoustic spectroscopy investigation of oxidized wool  

SciTech Connect

The Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectra (FT-IR/PAS) of wool, shrink-resist treated wool and corona discharge oxidized wool are reported. Products of the oxidation of wool by dichloroisocyanuric acid are discussed. The FT-IR/PAS results indicate the formation of a sulphinic acid residue during the wool treatment.

McKenna, W.P.; Gale, D.J.; Rivett, D.E.; Eyring, E.M.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ft Bidwell Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Ft Bidwell Sector Geothermal energy Type Space Heating Location Ft. Bidwell, California Coordinates Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

13

U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado October 7, 2013 - 10:01am Addthis Photo of High-Bay Aviation Maintenance Facility at Butts Army Airfield Fort Carson U.S. Army Base is located south of Colorado Springs, Colorado. It was the first Federal facility to install a "solar wall"-a solar ventilation air preheating system. The solar wall heats Ft. Carson's new high-bay aviation maintenance facility at Butts Army Airfield by pre-warming air as much as 54°F and supplying the heated air to the building's central heating system. This collector system is especially advantageous for buildings that require large volumes of heated air. The system cost $140,000 to design, build, and install. The unglazed collector consists of 7,800 ft.² of sheet metal dotted with tiny holes. It

14

Spherically symmetric static spacetimes in vacuum f(T) gravity  

SciTech Connect

We show that Schwarzschild geometry remains as a vacuum solution for those four-dimensional f(T) gravitational theories behaving as ultraviolet deformations of general relativity. In the gentler context of three-dimensional gravity, we also find that the infrared-deformed f(T) gravities, like the ones used to describe the late cosmic speed up of the Universe, have as the circularly symmetric vacuum solution a Deser-de Sitter or a Banados, Teitelboim and Zanelli-like spacetime with an effective cosmological constant depending on the infrared scale present in the function f(T).

Ferraro, Rafael [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pabellon I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fiorini, Franco [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio, Casilla de Correo 67, Sucursal 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

16

Released: March 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.5;" 5 Relative Standard Errors for Table 5.5;" " Unit: Percents." " "," ",," ","Distillate"," "," ","Coal"," " " ",,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" " "," ","Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)"," " " ","Total","Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","Other(e)" "End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu

17

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

18

" Row: End Uses;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: End Uses;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,"Net Demand","Residual","and","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" ,"for Electricity(a)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million" "End Use","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)"

19

"Table A32. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region," " Census Division, Industry Group, and Selected Industries, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " "," ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(d)","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)","Factors"

20

" Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,"Distillate",,,"Coal" ,,,,,"Fuel Oil",,,"(excluding Coal" ,,,"Net","Residual","and","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coke and Breeze)" "NAICS",,"Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Diesel Fuel(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","End Use","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

" Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Net",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)",,"LPG and","Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Electricity(b)",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion",,"NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million kWh)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

22

Released: June 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" 6 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.6;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","NGL(d)","(million","(million","Other(e)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

23

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1, 2006;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 4.1, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ",,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

24

Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.1, 2006;" 1 Relative Standard Errors for Table 3.1, 2006;" " Unit: Percents." " "," "," ",," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",,,,,,,,"Coke" " "," "," ","Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(d)","LPG and","Coal","and Breeze"," " "NAICS"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","NGL(e)","(million","(million","Other(f)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)","(million kWh)","(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)","(million bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

25

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Physical Units or Btu." ,,,,,,,,,,,"Coke" ,,,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural Gas(c)",,"LPG and",,"Coal","and Breeze" "NAICS",,"Total",,"Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion",,"NGL(d)",,"(million","(million","Other(e)" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(trillion Btu)",,"(million bbl)","(million bbl)","cu ft)",,"(million bbl)",,"short tons)","short tons)","(trillion Btu)"

26

"Table A33. Total Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division,"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources by Census Region, Census Division," " and Economic Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" " (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units)" ,,,,,"Natural",,,"Coke" " ","Total","Electricity","Residual","Distillate","Gas(c)"," ","Coal","and Breeze","Other(d)","RSE" " ","(trillion","(million","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","(billion","LPG","(1000 ","(1000","(trillion","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","Btu)","kWh)","(1000 bbl)","(1000 bbl)","cu ft)","(1000 bbl)","short tons)","short tons)","Btu)","Factors"

27

Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock 2-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The 2-Foot Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel is a vertical plane, closed recirculating, variable-speed, variable-pressure, open jet test section, closed jet test section, and semi-rectangular test section. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 17 Recirculating Yes

28

1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-ft Wave Flume Facility -ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.5 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

29

10-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 10-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 3.0 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

30

Langley 16-Ft. Transonic Tunnel Pressure Sensitive Paint System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the NASA Langley 16-Ft. Transonic Tunnel Pressure Sensitive Paint (PSP) System and presents results of a test conducted June 22-23, 2000 in the tunnel to validate the PSP system. The PSP system provides global surface pressure measurements ...

Sprinkle Danny R.; Obara Clifford J.; Amer Tahani R.; Leighty Bradley D.; Carmine Michael T.; Burkett Cecil G.; Sealey Bradley S.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-ft Wave Flume Facility 5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 1.5 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

32

Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Carderock 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel Overseeing Organization United States Naval Surface Warfare Center Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Tunnel Beam(m) 0.7 Depth(m) 0.7 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The 3-ft Variable Pressure Cavitation Water Tunnel is a vertical plane, closed recirculating with resorber, variable-speed, variable-pressure, two interchangeable circular test sections. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 25.8 Recirculating Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None

33

11-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ft Wave Flume Facility ft Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 77.4 Beam(m) 3.4 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities Yes Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None

34

3-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-ft Wave Flume Facility 3-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.9 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

35

Technology development for iron F-T catalysts. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this work were twofold. The first objective was to design and construct a pilot plant for preparing precipitated iron oxide F-T precursors and demonstrate that the rate of production from this plant is equivalent to 100 lbs/day of dried metal oxide. Secondly, these precipitates were to be used to prepare catalysts capable of achieving 88% CO + H{sub 2} conversion with {le} 5 mole percent selectivity to methane + ethane.

Frame, R.R.; Gala, H.B.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Resolving Mismatches in Energy Decision Making  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 USA phone: 630-252-5629 email: cirillor Not Foreseen Increased Demand Caused Natural Gas Prices to Rise 9 0 2 4 6 8 Natural Gas Price (US$/ 1000 cu ft Demand and CO2 Emissions 10 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1980 1990 2000 2010 Gasoline Consumption (106 bbl

Kemner, Ken

37

Can $f(T)$ gravity theories mimic $?$CDM cosmic history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently the teleparallel Lagrangian density described by the torsion scalar T has been extended to a function of T. The $f(T)$ modified teleparallel gravity has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy to explain the late time acceleration of the universe. In order to reconstruct the function $f(T)$ by demanding a background $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology we assume that, (i) the background cosmic history provided by the flat $\\Lambda$CDM (the radiation ere with $\\omega_{eff}=1/3$, matter and de Sitter eras with $\\omega_{eff}=0$ and $\\omega_{eff}=-1$, respectively) (ii) the radiation dominate in the radiation era with $\\Omega_{0r}=1$ and the matter dominate during the matter phases when $\\Omega_{0m}=1$. We find the cosmological dynamical system which can obey the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmic history. In each era, we find a critical lines that, the radiation dominated and the matter dominated are one points of them in the radiation and matter phases, respectively. Also, we drive the cosmologically viability condition for these models. We investigate the stability condition with respect to the homogeneous scalar perturbations in each era and we obtain the stability conditions for the fixed points in each eras. Finally, we reconstruct the function $f(T)$ which mimics cosmic expansion history.

M. R. Setare; N. Mohammadipour

2013-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

38

Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Army - Ft. U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: U.S. Army - Ft. Carson, Colorado on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment Renewable Energy Federal Requirements Renewable Resources & Technologies Project Planning & Implementation Project Assistance

39

ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECCENTRIC ECLIPSING BINARY STAR FT ORIONIS  

SciTech Connect

Accurate absolute properties are determined for the first time for the 3.15 day period eccentric eclipsing binary star FT Ori based on new absolute photometry, five differential light curves, and a radial velocity curve. The stars appear to be normal for their spectral types, A0 + A2. The orbit is highly eccentric (e = 0.409) and shows apsidal motion with a period of 536 years. The absolute properties and the degree of central mass concentration of the stars are consistent with current theoretical models at an age of 190 Myr.

Sabby, Jeffrey A. [Physics Department, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL 62025 (United States); Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg [Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Ibanoglu, Cafer [Astronomy and Space Sciences Department, Science Faculty, Ege University, 35100 Boronova, Izmir (Turkey); Claret, Antonio, E-mail: jsabby@siue.edu, E-mail: clacy@uark.edu, E-mail: cafer.ibanoglu@ege.edu.tr, E-mail: claret@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Apdo. Postal 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

40

HydraNet-FT: network support for dependable servors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis proposes an infrastructure to dynamically replicate services across an internetwork and have them provide a single fault tolerant service access point to clients. For service replication, it relies on previous work for network support for large-scale service scaling within the HydraNet effort. The current work develops a means to combine service replication with TCP communication service to provide fault-tolerant services in a fully client-transparent fashion. The HydraNet-FT infrastructure consists of two components: host servers and redirecting. Host servers are hosts that are specially equipped to act as servers for replicated and fault-tolerant services. The location of the host servers is known to the redirecting, specially equipped routers that detect requests for replicated services and direct the requests to them. Host servers allow one-to-many message delivery from the client to servers and many-to-one message delivery from the servers to the clients. They also provide a low-latency failure estimator to determine server unavailability due to failure or congestion. A management protocol allows to dynamically install or remove service replica and reconfigure the system in case of failure or prolonged congestion of a server in the system. The thesis studies the results obtained by implementing the infrastructure on an experimental testbed. Throughput results indicate that the amount of overhead imposed by using the HydraNet-FT scheme is not unreasonably high.

Shenoy, Gurudatt

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

6-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Flume Facility Wave Flume Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name 6-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 105.2 Beam(m) 1.8 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.4 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system

42

Feasibility study for aquaculture and space heating, Ft. Bidwell, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Expansion of the aquaculture facilities and geothermal space heating at Ft. Bidwell, California were investigated. The lack of cold water is the limiting factor for aquaculture expansion and is also a problem for the town domestic water supply. A new cold water well approximately 1200 feet deep would provide for the aquaculture expansion and additional domestic water. A 2900 foot test well can be completed to provide additional hot water at approximately 200/sup 0/F and an estimated artesian flow of 500 gpm. If these wells are completed, the aquaculture facility could be expanded to produce 6000 two pound catfish per month on a continuous basis and provide space heating of at least 20 homes. The design provided allows for heating 11 homes initially with possible future expansion. 9 figs.

Culver, G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Retrofit the 74,000 sq. ft Illinois National Guard State Headquarter...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the 74,000 sq. ft Illinois National Guard State Headquarter's building's aging boilerchiller equipment with a geothermal system Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation,...

44

Low-cost CuInSe[sub 2] submodule development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aim of this project is development and demonstration of processing steps necessary for fabrication of high efficiency CuInSe[sub 2] solar cells and sub-modules by the two-stage technique (also called the selenization method.) During this period, we have optimized the processing parameters of this method and demonstrated CuInSe[sub 2]/CdS/ZnO devices with a 1[endash]4 cm[sup 2] area and up to 12.4% active area efficiency. We have also developed a novel approach for the preparation of Cu/In precursors that improved the stoichiometric and morphological uniformity in these films. We have developed processing steps and tooling for handling up to 1 ft[sup 2] size substrates and as a result of these efforts demonstrated our first monolithically integrated sub-module of 1 ft[sup 2] area. 16 figs, 1 tab, 15 refs.

Basol, B.M.; Kapur, V.K.; Halani, A.; Leidholm, C. (International Solar Electric Technology, Inglewood, CA (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

CU | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CU CU Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Casual Use Determination of NEPA Adequacy Categorical Exclusion Environmental Assessment Environmental Impact Statements Print PDF NEPA-Related Analysis: Casual Use (CU) General Document Collections (26) Documents Regulatory Roadmap Type of NEPA environmental analysis placeholder. This query has been included to allow you to use the black arrows in the table header cells to sort the table data. Document # Serial Number Applicant Lead Agency District Office Field Office Development Phase(s) Techniques NVN-084629 CU, CU Vulcan Energy BLM Nevada State Office BLM Winnemucca District Office BLM Humboldt River Field Office BLM BLM NVN-084630 CU Vulcan Energy BLM Nevada State Office BLM Winnemucca District Office BLM Humboldt River Field Office BLM

46

D0 Silicon Upgrade: Calculating Mass Flow Rates at Sub-Sonic Conditions Trhough Venturis (FT-4052-H & FT-4053-H) and an Orifice Plate (F)-2019-H)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this engineering note is to explain the method involved in calculating the mass flow rates through venturis and orifice plates at sub-sonic conditions. In particular, the mass flow rate calculations are required for two FLOW-DYNE venturi flow meters, serial no. 35821 and no. 35822, and an orifice plate flow meter, serial no. 35823. The two venturis, FT-4052-H and FT-4053-H, are located in the D-Zero VLPC valve box at the refrigerator and the orifice plate, FO-2019-H, is on the high pressure helium supply line in the assembly building.

Zaczek, Mauiusz; /Fermilab

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cu-Fe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ternary Fe-Cu-Ni many-body potential to model reactor pressure vessel ... alloy, This file was provided by Giovanni Bonny (Nuclear Materials Science ...

2013-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

48

Cu-Ni  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ternary Fe-Cu-Ni many-body potential to model reactor pressure vessel ... alloy, This file was provided by Giovanni Bonny (Nuclear Materials Science ...

2013-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

FT-IR spectroscopy technology, market evolution and future strategies of Bruker Optics Inc.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the technology and market evolution of FT-IR spectroscopy over its nearly forty year history to aid in determining future product design and marketing strategies for an industry-leading firm, Bruker ...

Higdon, Thomas (Thomas Charles)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Nonnative Lizards Nile Monitor 4 to 6 ft. Brown/yellow body bands; forked black/blue tongue; long sharp claws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constrictor 6 to 9 ft. Tan oval spots; reddish-brown tail Green Anaconda 13 to 15 ft. Green body; large, round, dark spots; eye stripes Yellow Anaconda 6 to 9 ft. Yellow body; large, dark spots; five dark stripes

Mazzotti, Frank

51

Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron-catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

University of Kentucky has been developing Fischer-Tropsch catalysts which are active at a low H{sub 2}/CO ratio. It is of interest to find out any relationships that may exist between the iron phases that are produced during activation and FT synthesis and the activity of the catalysts. Moessbauer spectroscopy investigations were carried out on 16 iron-based catalysts during the period under review. Moessbauer measurements on two of the samples were also carried out at 13.5 K. The composition of one set of the catalysts studied consists of 100Fe/3.6Si/0.71K (all atomic % relative to Fe). Activation was carried out in syngas at a low pressure of 1 atm to investigate the effect of low pressure activation as compared to high pressure activation. The composition of a second set of catalysts consisted of 100Fe/3.6Si/2.6Cu/0.71K (all atomic % relative to Fe) and activation was carried out in syngas at a relatively high pressure of 12 atm. The composition of a third set of catalysts consisted of 100Fe/4.4Si/2.6Cu/1.0K (all atomic % relative to Fe) and activation was carried out in H{sub 2} at 1 atm. In all the cases the temperature was kept at 270 C and space velocity at 3.3nL/hr-g(Fe) for 24hrs. Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis was carried out at 13 atm at 270 C, 3.4nL/hr-g(Fe) syngas/g-Fe/hrs.

Huffman, G.P.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process 773,574 10 9 2,709 10 19 Process Heating

53

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18 39 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 12,979 7 3 2,074 3 26 Conventional Boiler Use 12,979 3 1 712 1 3 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 3 1,362 2 23 Direct Uses-Total Process 675,152 4 9 2,549 7 13 Process Heating

54

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

55

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 0 10 1 814 * 19 Direct Uses-Total Process

56

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,124 73,551 4 3 618 1 7 * 45 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 316 15,536 * * 115 * 5 0 28 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,801 * * 51 * 4 0 8 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 67 974 1 * 17 * 1 * 4 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 168 9,721

57

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2006 Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 3 0 * 2 * 0 * * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 3 0 * 2 * 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 0 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 * 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food * 0 0 0 * 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Product * 0 * * 0 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

58

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

59

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 15,658 835,382 40 22 5,357 21 46 5,820 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 12,109 21 4 2,059 2 25 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 12,109 11 3 1,245 2 6 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

60

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 166 End-Use Categories (trillion Btu) kWh) (1000 bbl) (1000 bbl) cu ft) (1000 bbl) tons) (trillion Btu) Total (million Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel (billion LPG (1000 short Other Net Distillate Natural and Electricity Residual Fuel Oil and Gas Breeze) a b c Coal (excluding Coal Coke d RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: NF 0.5 1.3 1.4 0.8 1.2 1.2 NF TOTAL INPUTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,515 778,335 70,111 26,107 5,962 25,949 54,143 5,828 2.7 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

table5.1_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Row Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: 0.3 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 NF TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 832,257 33 24 5,641 26 53 6,006 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 3,540 20 6

62

Table 2.1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) (billion NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 10 * * 4 Q 0 0 2 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 6 0 * 1 Q 0 0 2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 * * 1 * 0 0 * 3115 Dairy Products Q 0 * * * 0 0 * 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing

63

table2.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; 1 Nonfuel (Feedstock) Use of Combustible Energy, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.2 1.1 0.7 1.2 311 Food 8 * * 7 0 0 * * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 0 * 31131 Sugar * 0 * * 0 0 * * 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning * * * 0 0 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 1 * * * 0 0 0 1 3121 Beverages * * * 0 0 0 0 *

64

Table 1.1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; 1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,162 75,407 2 4 567 2 8 * 96 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 355 16,479 * * 119 Q 6 0 47 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 215 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 26 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing

65

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

66

Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Next MECS will be conducted in 2010 Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 977,338 40 22 5,357 21 46 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 24,584 21 4 2,059 2 25 Conventional Boiler Use 24,584 11 3

67

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

68

table5.3_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; 3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Net Demand Fuel Oil Coal for Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE NAICS Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Row Code(a) End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) Factors Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES RSE Column Factors: NF 1 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 966,231 33 24 5,641 26 53 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 6,714 20 6 2,105 2 35 5.3 Conventional Boiler Use

69

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2006; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources Unit: Physical Units or Btu Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 618 1 7 * 107 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 317 15,464 * * 115 * 5 0 30 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,746 * * 51 * 4 0 9 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 82 968 1 * 17 * 1 * 20 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 169 9,708 * * 123 * * 0 4 3115 Dairy Product

70

Dilaton Dark Energy Model in f(R), f(T) and Horava-Lifshitz Gravities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, we have considered dilaton dark energy model in Weyl-scaled induced gravitational theory in presence of barotropic fluid. It is to be noted that the dilaton field behaves as a quintessence. Here we have discussed the role of dilaton dark energy in modified gravity theories namely, f(R); f(T) and Horava-Lifshitz gravities and analyzed the behaviour of the dilaton field and the corresponding potential in respect to these modified gravity theories instead of Einstein's gravity. In f(R) and f(T) gravities, we have considered some particular forms of f(R) and f(T) and we have shown that the potentials always increase with the dilaton fields. But in Horava-Lifshitz gravity, it has been seen that the potential always decreases as dilation field increases.

Khatua, Piyali Bagchi; Debnath, Ujjal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Reconstruction of f(T) gravity from the Holographic dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among different candidates to play the role of Dark Energy (DE), modified gravity has emerged as offering a possible unification of Dark Matter (DM) and DE. The purpose of this work is to develop a reconstruction scheme for the modified gravity with $f(T)$ action using holographic energy density. In the framework of the said modified gravity we have considered the equation of state of the Holographic DE (HDE) density. Subsequently we have developed a reconstruction scheme for modified gravity with $f(T)$ action. Finally we have obtained a modified gravity action consistent with the HDE scenario.

Chattopadhyay, Surajit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Reconstruction of f(T) gravity from the Holographic dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among different candidates to play the role of Dark Energy (DE), modified gravity has emerged as offering a possible unification of Dark Matter (DM) and DE. The purpose of this work is to develop a reconstruction scheme for the modified gravity with $f(T)$ action using holographic energy density. In the framework of the said modified gravity we have considered the equation of state of the Holographic DE (HDE) density. Subsequently we have developed a reconstruction scheme for modified gravity with $f(T)$ action. Finally we have obtained a modified gravity action consistent with the HDE scenario.

Surajit Chattopadhyay; Antonio Pasqua

2012-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

73

Ultra-clean Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Fuels Production and Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the DOE-NETL Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) Production and Demonstration Program was to produce and evaluate F-T fuel derived from domestic natural gas. The project had two primary phases: (1) fuel production of ultra-clean diesel transportation fuels from domestic fossil resources; and (2) demonstration and performance testing of these fuels in engines. The project also included a well-to-wheels economic analysis and a feasibility study of small-footprint F-T plants (SFPs) for remote locations such as rural Alaska. During the fuel production phase, ICRC partnered and cost-shared with Syntroleum Corporation to complete the mechanical design, construction, and operation of a modular SFP that converts natural gas, via F-T and hydro-processing reactions, into hydrogensaturated diesel fuel. Construction of the Tulsa, Oklahoma plant started in August 2002 and culminated in the production of over 100,000 gallons of F-T diesel fuel (S-2) through 2004, specifically for this project. That fuel formed the basis of extensive demonstrations and evaluations that followed. The ultra-clean F-T fuels produced had virtually no sulfur (less than 1 ppm) and were of the highest quality in terms of ignition quality, saturation content, backend volatility, etc. Lubricity concerns were investigated to verify that commercially available lubricity additive treatment would be adequate to protect fuel injection system components. In the fuel demonstration and testing phase, two separate bus fleets were utilized. The Washington DC Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) and Denali National Park bus fleets were used because they represented nearly opposite ends of several spectra, including: climate, topography, engine load factor, mean distance between stops, and composition of normally used conventional diesel fuel. Fuel evaluations in addition to bus fleet demonstrations included: bus fleet emission measurements; F-T fuel cold weather performance; controlled engine dynamometer lab evaluation; cold-start test-cell evaluations; overall feasibility, economics, and efficiency of SFP fuel production; and an economic analysis. Two unexpected issues that arose during the project were further studied and resolved: variations in NOx emissions were accounted for and fuel-injection nozzle fouling issues were traced to the non-combustible (ash) content of the engine oil, not the F-T fuel. The F-T fuel domestically produced and evaluated in this effort appears to be a good replacement candidate for petroleum-based transportation fuels. However, in order for domestic F-T fuels to become a viable cost-comparable alternative to petroleum fuels, the F-T fuels will need to be produced from abundant U.S. domestic resources such as coal and biomass, rather than stranded natural gas.

Stephen P. Bergin

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

The distinctions between $?$CDM and $f(T)$ gravity according Noether symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Noether's theory offers us a useful tool to research the conserved quantities and symmetries of the modified gravity theories, among which the $f(T)$ theory, a generally modified teleparallel gravity, has been proposed to account for the dark energy phenomena. By the Noether symmetry approach, we investigate the power-law, exponential and polynomial forms of $f(T)$ theories. All forms of $f(T)$ concerned in this work possess the time translational symmetry, which is related with energy condition or Hamilton constraint. In addition, we find out that the performances of the power-law and exponential forms are not pleasing. It is rational adding a linear term $T$ to $T^n$ as the most efficient amendment to resemble the teleparallel gravity or General Relativity on small scales, ie., the scale of the solar system. The corresponding Noether symmetry indicates that only time translational symmetry remains. Through numerically calculations and observational data-sets constraining, the optimal form $\\alpha T + \\beta T^{-1}$ is obtained, whose cosmological solution resembles the standard $\\Lambda$CDM best with lightly reduced cosmic age which can be alleviated by introducing another $T^m$ term. More important is that we find the significant differences between $\\Lambda$CDM and $f(T)$ gravity. The $\\Lambda$CDM model has also two additional symmetries and corresponding positive conserved quantities, except the two negative conserved quantities.

Han Dong; Jiaxin Wang; Xinhe Meng

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

75

Low-cost CuInSe{sub 2} submodule development. Final subcontract report, 9 July 1990--31 January 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aim of this project is development and demonstration of processing steps necessary for fabrication of high efficiency CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells and sub-modules by the two-stage technique (also called the selenization method.) During this period, we have optimized the processing parameters of this method and demonstrated CuInSe{sub 2}/CdS/ZnO devices with a 1{endash}4 cm{sup 2} area and up to 12.4% active area efficiency. We have also developed a novel approach for the preparation of Cu/In precursors that improved the stoichiometric and morphological uniformity in these films. We have developed processing steps and tooling for handling up to 1 ft{sup 2} size substrates and as a result of these efforts demonstrated our first monolithically integrated sub-module of 1 ft{sup 2} area. 16 figs, 1 tab, 15 refs.

Basol, B.M.; Kapur, V.K.; Halani, A.; Leidholm, C. [International Solar Electric Technology, Inglewood, CA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Shape selective catalysts for F-T chemistry. Interim report : January 2001 - December 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is carrying out a research program to create, prepare, and evaluate catalysts to promote Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) chemistry, specifically the reaction of hydrogen with carbon monoxide to form long-chain hydrocarbons. In addition to F-T catalysts needing high activity, it is desirable that they have high selectivity and stability with respect to both mechanical strength and aging properties. In this project, selectivity is directed toward the production of diesel fraction components and avoiding excess yields of both light hydrocarbons and heavy waxes. Shape-selective catalysts have the potential to both limit the formation of long-chain products and yet retain the active metal sites in a protected ''cage.'' This cage also restricts their loss by attrition during use in slurry-bed reactors. Experimentation has included evaluation of samples of (1) iron-based F-T catalysts prepared at Argonne National Laboratory, (2) iron-based F-T catalysts prepared by B.H. Davis of the Center of Applied Energy Research (CAER), (3) the Davis catalyst that were sized by differential gravity separation, and (4) the Davis catalyst onto which inorganic or catalytic ''shells'' were deposited. The ANL-prepared samples had a wide range of particle size and were irregular in shape. A sizeable portion of the samples provided by Davis were spherical, because they had been prepared by spray-drying. To compare the catalytic activities of the samples, we used a micro-scale fixed-bed reactor system for F-T runs of low conversion to avoid thermal and mass transfer effects. In summary, the highest activity was that of the original Davis catalyst; additional research must be carried out to generate more permeable surface cages. A number of approaches that have been published for other applications will be tested.

Cronauer, D. C.

2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

77

Million Cu. Feet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2010 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table 29. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas - Alaska, 2006-2010 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year................................................... 231 239 261 261 269 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells .............................................. 193,654 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 From Oil Wells ................................................ 3,012,097 3,313,666 3,265,401

78

A new clustering approach and its application to BBL placement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new approach for clustering applied to Building Block placement is presented. Unlike traditional approaches, which only consider local factors such as connectivity and shape matching of blocks in a cluster, our approach (called the GAC method) not ...

M. Y. Yu; X. L. Hong; Y. E. Lien; Z. Z. Ma; J. G. Bo; W. J. Zhuang

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Variability of biomass chemical composition and rapid analysis using FT-NIR techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quick method for analyzing the chemical composition of renewable energy biomass feedstock was developed by using Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate analysis. The study presents the broad-based model hypothesis that a single FT-NIR predictive model can be developed to analyze multiple types of biomass feedstock. The two most important biomass feedstocks corn stover and switchgrass were evaluated for the variability in their concentrations of the following components: glucan, xylan, galactan, arabinan, mannan, lignin, and ash. A hypothesis test was developed based upon these two species. Both cross-validation and independent validation results showed that the broad-based model developed is promising for future chemical prediction of both biomass species; in addition, the results also showed the method's prediction potential for wheat straw.

Liu, Lu [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ye, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Womac, A.R. [University of Tennessee; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Requirements for boom lift operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft while operating a boom lift  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fall Protection Requirements for Boom Lift Fall Protection Requirements for Boom Lift 2010 Requirements for boom lift operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft while operating a boom lift. While operating a JLG Aerial lift. LBNL best practices requirements for boom lift Operations is to tether an adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft while operating a boom lift. January 14, 2009 OSHA Letter # 20070823-7896 - Whether a manufacturer stipulated minimum anchor point elevation of 18½ feet precludes the use of a shock absorbing lanyard in an aerial lift. (See attached Letter) An adjustable 6' lanyard to 3ft will keep the operator from protected from being ejected out of the lift. If a non-adjustable 6ft lanyard is used for fall restraint it is required that fall distance from the anchor point must be at a height not under

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81

RiPed_By_ILookImager*p* #e?**??i /ft*rp-A,dST?L ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RiPed_By_ILookImager*p*?#e?**??i /ft*rp-A,dST?L*6?ɢ??O? 42^*a ? ????l*ex?fA7???*?4TE?u\\??X ...

2005-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

82

Improved prediction of biomass composition for switchgrass using reproducing kernel methods with wavelet compressed FT-NIR spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fourier transform near-infrared (FT-NIR) technique is an effective approach to predict chemical properties and can be applied to online monitoring in bio-energy industry. High dimensionality and collinearity of the FT-NIR spectral data makes it difficult ... Keywords: Fourier transform near-infrared spectra, Kernel partial least squares regression, Kernel ridge regression, Reproducing kernel Hilbert space, Vertical energy thresholding technique, Wavelet transform

Jong I. Park; Lu Liu; X. Philip Ye; Myong K. Jeong; Young-Seon Jeong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

On the Gravitational Energy-Momentum Vector in f(T) Theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is devoted to analyze the energy of the Universe in the context of f(T) theories. Such theories are the analogous counterpart of the well known f(R) theories that, however, uses torsion instead of curvature. We obtain a general expression for the gravitational energy-momentum vector in this framework. Using the hypothesis of the isotropy of spacetime, we find the energy of the Universe and compare it with the energy obtained in the realm of teleparallelism equivalent to general relativity (TEGR).

Ulhoa, S C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of iron-catalysts used in Fischer-Tropsch (FT) processes. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Texas A and M University has been developing Fischer-Tropsch catalysts which are active at a low H{sub 2}/CO ratio of 0.67. It is of interest to find out any relationships that may exist between the iron phases that are produced during activation and FT synthesis and the activity of the catalysts. Moessbauer spectroscopy investigations were carried out on 13 iron-based catalysts during the period under review. The catalysts were taken from fixed bed reactors at the end of the tests. All the catalysts were mixed with glass beads. The glass beads were removed to a large extent by a hand held magnet. For each run, samples were taken from both top and bottom of the reactor to find out whether there are any differences between the two samples taken from different regions of the reactor. The catalysts with 24 parts of SiO{sub 2} were reduced with H{sub 2} at 250C for 24h, and the catalysts with 16 parts of SiO{sub 2} were reduced with H{sub 2} at 240C for 2h. All the test were carried out at 250C, 200 psig, 2.0nL(syngas)/g-cat/h with H{sub 2}/CO feed ratio of 0.67. The compositions of the catalysts studied are given in a table. Three catalysts consisted of Ca in addition to Cu and K.

Huffman, G.P.; Rao, K.R.P.M.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Can $f(T)$ gravity theories mimic $\\Lambda$CDM cosmic history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently the teleparallel Lagrangian density described by the torsion scalar T has been extended to a function of T. The $f(T)$ modified teleparallel gravity has been proposed as the natural gravitational alternative for dark energy to explain the late time acceleration of the universe. In order to reconstruct the function $f(T)$ by demanding a background $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology we assume that, (i) the background cosmic history provided by the flat $\\Lambda$CDM (the radiation ere with $\\omega_{eff}=1/3$, matter and de Sitter eras with $\\omega_{eff}=0$ and $\\omega_{eff}=-1$, respectively) (ii) the radiation dominate in the radiation era with $\\Omega_{0r}=1$ and the matter dominate during the matter phases when $\\Omega_{0m}=1$. We find the cosmological dynamical system which can obey the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmic history. In each era, we find a critical lines that, the radiation dominated and the matter dominated are one points of them in the radiation and matter phases, respectively. Also, we drive the cosmologically...

Setare, M R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

The influence of dietary Cu and diabetes on tissue sup 67 Cu retention kinetics in rats  

SciTech Connect

Compared to controls, diabetes results in higher plasma, liver and kidney Cu concentrations. Since alterations in Cu metabolism may be associated with diabetic pathology, the authors investigated how Cu metabolism is affected by diabetes and dietary Cu intake. Nondiabetic and STZ diabetic rats were fed Cu suppl. or Cu def. diets for 5 wks. Rats were intubated with 28 {mu}Ci {sup 67}Cu and killed after 8, 16, 24, 32, 64, or 128 h. There were marked effects of both diet and diabetes on {sup 67}Cu metabolism. Independent of diabetes, deficient rats had a higher % of retained {sup 67}Cu, in liver, plasma, RBC, muscle, spleen, brain, lung, uterus, and intestine than adequate Cu rats. Independent of dietary Cu, diabetic rats had a lower % of retained {sup 67}Cu in liver, plasma, RBC, muscle, spleen, lung, bone, pancreas, skin, uterus and heart than controls. Differential effects were noted for kidney; adequate Cu diabetic rats had a higher % of retained {sup 67}Cu than all other groups. Marked effects of both diet and diabetes were evident when tissue Cu turnover was examined. Compared to Cu suppl. rats, Cu def. rats had a slower turnover of {sup 67}Cu, in liver, plasma, intestine, pancreas, eye, brain, muscle, spleen, lung and heart. Diabetic rats had a slower turnover of {sup 67}Cu than nondiabetic rats in liver, plasma, intestine, pancreas, eye, kidney, RBC and uterus. The data imply that a focus on Cu metabolism with regard to cellular Cu trafficking and pathology may be warranted.

Uriu-Hare, J.Y.; Rucker, R.B.; Keen, C.L. (Univ. of California, Davis (United States))

1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

87

I CLASSiFtCArlON CHANiED FAIJC-ABC-286  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Y ~L.ho-I . Y ~L.ho-I . I CLASSiFtCArlON CHANiED FAIJC-ABC-286 : This dooumetlt consists 0.f 3 pages E end p. t' &ures. No. a of &copies. a Seriee A. 7 Novembar 6, 1944 Subject: Visit to Fansteel Netallurgical Corporaticn, North Chicago, Novembar 4, 1944 - AwAlabilityof~lnmbium!kkl Chapin, Simmons end I discussed witb~. C. N. B&e (ResearchDirector) . end LIr. F.L.Hunter (Chief&ineer, TanteInmDivision) availability, purity, and @co of columbiwn,metel. columbium metal is of particular interest to the Project because tuballoy-columbium alloys containing about 4$ or more of columbium are remarkably corrosion resistant. An 'order has &ready been &.ced for 30 lbs. of columbium metal, end it is cerW that large qutnititicsof them&al willbeneededin order that

88

Behaviour of interacting Ricci dark energy in logarithmic f(T) gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present work we have considered a modified gravity dubbed as "logarithmic $f(T)$ gravity" and investigated the behavior of Ricci dark energy interacting with pressureless dark matter. We have chosen the interaction term in the form $Q\\propto H\\delta\\rho_{m}$ and investigated the behavior of the Hubble parameter $H$ as a function of the redshift $z$. For this reconstructed $H$ we have investigated the behavior of the density of the Ricci dark energy $\\rho_{RDE}$ and density contribution due to torsion $\\rho_{T}$. All of the said cosmological parameters are seen to have increasing behavior from higher to lower redshifts for all values of $c^{2}$ pertaining to the Ricci dark energy. Subsequently, we observed the equation of state parameter $w_{RDE}$ in this situation. The equation of state parameter is found to behave like phantom for all choices of $c^{2}$ in the Ricci dark energy.

Rahul Ghosh; Surajit Chattopadhyay

2012-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

89

Electrodeposited NiCo/Cu Superlattices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NiCo/Cu superlattices were electrodeposited on polycrystalline Cu substrates from a single electrolyte under potentiostatic control. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed that NiCo/Cu superlattices have the same crystal structure and texture as in their substrates. The films exhibited giant magnetoresistance (GMR) or anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR), depending on the Cu layer thicknesses.

Safak, M.; Alper, M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Literature, University of Uludag, Goeruekle, Bursa (Turkey)

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

90

Rolling Thunder -- Integration of the Solo 161 Stirling engine with the CPG-460 solar concentrator at Ft. Huachuca  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Rolling Thunder is a dish/Stirling demonstration project at Ft. Huachuca, a US Army fort in southeastern Arizona (Huachuca means rolling thunder in Apache). It has been supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a cooperative program between the Department of Defense (DoD) and the Department of Energy (DOE). As part of a 1992 SERDP project, Cummins Power Generation, Inc. (CPG) installed a CPG 7 kW(c) dish/Stirling system at the Joint Interoperability Test Command (JITC) in Ft. Huachuca, Arizona. The primary objective of the SERDP Dish/Stirling for DoD Applications project was to demonstrate a CPG 7-kW(c) dish/Stirling system at a military facility. Unfortunately, Cummins Engine Company decided to divest its solar operations. As a direct result of Ft. Huachuca`s interest in the Cummins dish/Stirling technology, Sandia explored the possibility of installing a SOLO 161 Stirling power conversion unit (PCU) on the Ft. Huachuca CPG-460. In January 1997, a decision was made to retrofit a SOLO 161 Stirling engine on the CPG-460 at Ft. Huachuca. Project Rolling Thunder. The SOLO 161 Demonstration at Ft. Huachuca has been a challenge. Although, the SOLO 161 PCU has operated nearly flawlessly and the CPG-460 has been, for the most part, a solid and reliable component, integration of the SOLO PCU with the CPG-460 has required significant attention. In this paper, the integration issues and technical approaches of project Rolling Thunder are presented. Lessons of the project are also discussed.

Diver, R.B.; Moss, T.A.; Goldberg, V.; Thomas, G.; Beaudet, A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The effect of dietary Cu and diabetes on indices of Cu nutriture in the rat  

SciTech Connect

The uptake-retention of 67Cu is affected by dietary Cu and diabetes. Consequently, the functional activities of select enzymes and tissue Cu status were assessed. STZ-diabetic and control rats were fed Cu suppl. or def. diets. Rats were gavaged with 28 {mu}Ci 67Cu, and killed 8, 16, 24, 32, 64, or 128 h later. Diabetic rats were hyperphagic, hyperglycemic and hypoinsulinemic; with no effect of diet. Plasma ceruloplasmin activity (Cp) was lower in Cu def. rats; diabetic rats tended to have higher Cp than controls. Cu def. rats had low Cu levels in liver, kidney and plasma. Cu suppl. diabetic rats had higher liver and kidney Cu compared to Cu def. diabetic rats. Gel chromatography of liver showed that with time, there was a transfer of 67Cu from low to higher MW ligands. In nondiabetic rats, more 67Cu was associated with the higher MW ligands. The converse was observed for diabetic rats. There was no effect of diabetes on liver 67Cu localization. Diabetic rats had higher metallothionein (MT) concentrations in liver and kidney compared to controls Cu deficiency lowered MT values in both diabetic and control rats. CuZn SOD Cu activity was lowered with Cu def. and diabetes, while Mn SOD activity was similar among groups. Plasma lipid peroxide levels were lower in diabetic rats than controls. The results show that Cu metabolism is affected in diabetes, and the changes are functionally significant.

Rucker, R.B.; Uriu-Hare, J.Y.; Tinker, D.; Keen, C.L. (Univ. of California, Davis (United States))

1991-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

92

A Novel 9.4 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer with Improved Sensitivity, Mass Resolution, and Mass Range, for Petroleum Heavy Crude Oil Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Novel 9.4 Tesla FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer with Improved Sensitivity, Mass Resolution, and Mass advances in instrument speed and sensitivity. We have redesigned our custom built 9 4 tesla FT ICR New 9 = 800 000 [C32H55S1+H]+ [C35H51+H]+ We have redesigned our custom-built 9.4 tesla FT-ICR mass

Weston, Ken

93

Driving Force of EM-Induced Cu Dissolution in Cu-Sn Compound  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both forces would simultaneously result in Cu dissolution fluxes from the Cu-Sn ... Method of Selective Electroplating having Strong Adhesion and Exceptional...

94

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H{sub 2}/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low (< 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

Singleton, A.H.

1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate the influence of various promoters, additives, and supports on minimizing the methane selectivity and increasing the water-gas shift (WGS) activity of cobalt (Co) Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to identify and demonstrate a catalyst preparation procedure that will be scaled up for the reproducible synthesis of commercial quantities of supported Co catalysts with desired activity, selectivity, and lifetime for use in F-T synthesis in three-phase slurry bubble column reactors. Accomplishments for this quarter are: Four new catalysts were formulated and prepared during this period under both subtasks 1.2 and 1.3 and five more catalysts were prepared by Calsicat; The characterization of all the catalysts in order to determine their physical properties (BET surface area, pore volume, pore size diameter, particle size distribution), as well as the cobalt reducibility, extent of reduction, and dispersion) was continued; Seven new catalysts have been tested for their F-T synthesis performance; An investigation of the effect of pre-treatment (i.e. calcination in static air versus flowing air, direct reduction without prior calcination) of a selected number of catalysts upon their performance for F-T synthesis was continued during this period.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

96

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column reactor. Cobalt-based catalysts have long been known as being active for F-T synthesis. They typically possess greater activity than iron-based catalysts, historically the predominant catalyst being used commercially for the conversion of syngas based on coal, but possess two disadvantages that somewhat lessen its value: (1) cobalt tends to make more methane than iron does, and (2) cobalt is less versatile with low H2/CO ratio syngas due to its lack of water-gas shift activity. Therefore, the major objectives of this work are (1) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with low ( < 5 %) methane selectivity, (2) to develop a cobalt-based F-T catalyst with water-gas shift activity, and (3) to combine both these improvements into one catalyst. It will be demonstrated that these catalysts have the desired activity, selectivity, and life, and can be made reproducibly. Following this experimental work, a design and a cost estimate will be prepared for a plant to produce sufficient quantities of catalyst for scale-up studies.

Singleton, A.H.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

97

Non-OPEC oil supply continues to grow  

SciTech Connect

Global reserves of crude oil remain at 1 trillion bbl, according to OGJ`s annual survey of producing countries. Significant gains are in Brazil, Colombia, Congo, Egypt, Libya, Nigeria, Oman, and Papua New Guinea. Decreases were reported by Indonesia, Norway, the U.K., Iran, Canada, Mexico, and the US. Natural gas reserves slipped to 4.9 quadrillion cu ft. The major production trend is a lasting surge from outside of OPEC. This year`s Worldwide Production report begins with a detailed analysis of this crucial development by an international authority. This article discusses the OECD outlook by region and the turnaround in production in the former Soviet Union.

Knapp, D.H. [International Energy Agency, Paris (France)

1995-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

98

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this Project is to investigate the influence of various promoters, additives, and supports on minimizing the methane selectivity and increasing the water-gas shift (WGS) activity of cobalt (Co) Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalysts. The ultimate goal of this investigation is to identify and demonstrate a catalyst preparation Procedure that will be scaled up for the reproducible synthesis of commercial quantities of supported CO catalysts with desired activity, sleectivity, and lifetime for use in F-T synthesis in three-phase slurry bubble column reactors. Seven new catalysts were formulated and prepared during this period under both subtasks 1.2 and 1.3. Two more catalysts were prepared by Calsicat. The characterization of all the catalysts in order to determine their physical properties (BET surface area, pore volume, pore size diameter, particle size distribution), as well as the cobalt reducibility, extent of reduction, and dispersion) was continued. Fixed-bed reactor testing of the catalysts was continued. Six new catalysts were tested for their F-T synthesis performance. An investigation of the effect of pretreatment in various atmospheres (calcination in air or nitrogen prior to reduction in hydrogen, direct reduction without prior calcination, and reductiono)ddation-reduction (ROR)) of a selected number of catalysts upon their performance for F-T synthesis was continued during this period. Under subtask 2.2 during this reporting period a total of 11 runs were made in the two slurry bubble column reactors with eleven catalysts, including five on alumina, two from Calsicat, one WGS blend, and three on silica support. Four high CO conversion runs were made. Data were compiled to compare the CO conversions and product selectivities of the-methane reduction catalysts.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

99

Effective Dark Energy Models and Dark Energy Models with Bounce in frames of $F(T)$ Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Various cosmological models in frames of $F(T)$ gravity are considered. The general scheme of constructing effective dark energy models with various evolution is presented. It is showed that these models in principle are compatible with $\\Lambda$CDM model. The dynamics of universe governed by $F(T)$ gravity can mimics $\\Lambda$CDM evolution in past but declines from it in a future. We also construct some dark energy models with the "real" (non-effective) equation-of-state parameter $w$ such that $w\\leq-1$. It is showed that in $F(T)$ gravity the Universe filled phantom field not necessarily ends its existence in singularity. There are two possible mechanisms permitting the final singularity. Firstly due to the nonlinear dependence between energy density and $H^{2}$ ($H$ is the Hubble parameter) the universe can expands not so fast as in the general relativity and in fact Little Rip regime take place instead Big Rip. We also considered the models with possible bounce in future. In these models the universe expansion can mimics the dynamics with future singularity but due to bounce in future universe begin contracts.

Artyom V. Astashenok

2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

100

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 12, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The investigation of the effect of certain promoters (Fe, Pd, and Ru) on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis was continued during this reporting period. All catalysts were tested first at 220{degrees}C, then at higher temperatures from 240 to 280{degrees}C, while monitoring their deactivation. The choice of these promoters was based on their intrinsic ability to enhance the hydrogenation reactions while slowing down the Boudouard reaction under the conditions used in F-T synthesis. Olefin hydrogenation and CO dissociation reactions were used individually to investigate further the nature of the deactivation process of these catalyst during F-T synthesis. Hydrogenation of isobutene (IB) was carried out in the presence of CO between 120 and 180{degrees}C and atmospheric pressure. CO dissociation activities of the catalysts were measured using a pulse technique at 2.5 atm and at temperatures between 180 and 280{degrees}C with intermittent H{sub 2} bracketing at 350{degrees}C. Promotion with high loadings of Fe or Pd resulted in catalysts with relatively lower activity and higher methane selectivity. The deactivation process and rate for catalysts containing Pd or Fe were similar to those of the non-promoted or Ru-promoted alumina-supported Co catalysts tested previously. The only exception was Co.068 with 1% Pd which had adequate activity and selectivity as well as lower deactivation rate at the various temperatures tested.

Singleton, A.H.

1996-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

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101

IJ.fI.CU  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IJ.fI.CU IJ.fI.CU . u.s. DEPARTUEN T OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAG EM EN T CENTER NEPA DETE:Rl.VIINATION R[ClPIENT:Fl~County-Seminole Page I of2 STATE: FL PROJECf TITLE: Seminole County , Fl EECBG Program: County Facility and Utility Operation Improvements; Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy Development; Ugrade Land Development Code: Grant Administration; Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy Enhancement Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number CID Number DE-FOA-0000013 DE-EE0000798.Q01 a Based on my nview of the information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Officer (authorized under DOE Order 451.IA), I have made the following determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER:

102

cu | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

02 02 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142229502 Varnish cache server cu Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing

103

Monaco: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2008 EIA Natural Gas Reserves Unavailable Cubic Meters (cu m) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Oil Reserves Unavailable Barrels (bbl) NA 2010 CIA World Factbook Energy Maps featuring...

104

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & ApplicationChapter 14 Application of FT-NIR for Rapid Determination of the Trans Fatty Acid Composition in Fats and Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application Chapter 14 Application of FT-NIR for Rapid Determination of the Trans Fatty Acid Composition in Fats and Oils Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books

105

Observation of the scattering of a CO/sub 2/ laser beam by small-scale plasma waves in the FT-2 tokamak  

SciTech Connect

Scattering of a laser beam by fluctuations with a scale of 0.7-5mm in the frequency range 3-15 MHz in the FT-2 tokamak is observed. (AIP)

Askinazi, L.G.; Budnikov, V.N.; Bulanin, V.V.; Esipov, L.A.; Korneev, D.O.; Sakharov, I.E.; Stepanov, A.Y.; Ushakov, S.N.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Effects of fluoride residue on Cu agglomeration in Cu/low-k interconnects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated the effects of fluoride residue on the thermal stability of a Cu/barrier metal (BM)/porous low-k film (kKeywords: Barrier metal, Cu agglomeration, Fluoride residue, Low-k, Oxidation, Penetration, Porous

Y. Kobayashi; S. Ozaki; Y. Iba; Y. Nakata; T. Nakamura

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Reconstruction of f(T) and f(R) gravity according to (m,n)-type holographic dark energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by earlier works on reconstruction of modified gravity models with dark energy components, we extend them by considering a newly proposed model of (m, n)- type of holographic dark energy for two models of modified gravity, f(R) and f(T) theories, where R and T represent Ricci scalar and torsion scalar respectively. Specifically we reconstruct the two later gravity models and discuss their viability and cosmography. The obtained gravity models are ghost free, compatible with local solar system tests and describe effective positive gravitational constant.

Farooq, M Umar; Momeni, Davood; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project`s goal is the development of a commercially viable, cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalyst for use in a slurry bubble column (SBC) reactor. During the seventh quarter, significant progress in several areas has enabled us to make a number of important conclusions. Preliminary catalyst preparation of 3 batches of a Ru-promoted 20% Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} has confirmed the similarity in catalysts prepared by Energy International and by Calsicat using the same procedure. This similarity was evident in both fixed and SBC reactor studies. All TiO{sub 2}-supported Co catalysts have been found to have poor F-T properties in both the fixed-bed and SBC reactors. These catalysts had been prepared following exactly the procedures given in the Exxon patents. One of the main problems in using TiO{sub 2} as a support is the fact that it has low surface area for supporting a 20 wt % Co catalyst. Another problem is that it does not seem to be robust enough for use in a SBC reactor. Ru promotion of Co/SiO{sub 2} does not have as dramatic an effect on catalyst activity as seen for Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. However, it does play a major role in maintaining higher activity (factor of 2 in the SBCR) when K is added to Co/Sr/SiO{sub 2}. Zr has been clearly shown by us to significantly enhance the F-T activity of Co/SiO{sub 2}. Such promotion is a basis for many of the Shell cobalt F-T patents. Latest results indicate that Zr also improves the activity of Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, although the methane selectivity is also slightly elevated. Finally, for our design of a ``benchmark`` Co F- T catalyst, research has now shown using both fixed-bed and SBC reactors that 0.3 wt % K is the optimum amount to use with Ru- promoted 20 wt % Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This amount of K greatly improves higher hydrocarbon selectivity without causing an unacceptable loss of activity.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources and Shipments;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) Gas(e) NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 1 1.2 1.8 1 1.6 0.8 0.9 1.2 0.4 311 Food 1,123 67,521 2 3 567 1 8 * 89 0 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 6,851 * * 59 * 5 0 11 0 31131 Sugar 112 725 * * 22 * 2 * 46 0 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,960 * * 35 * 0 0 1 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 105 7,639 * * 45 * 1 0 11 0 3121 Beverages 85 6,426 * * 41 * * 0 10 0 3122 Tobacco 20 1,213 * * 4 * * 0 1 0 313 Textile Mills 207 25,271 1 * 73 * 1 0 15 0 314

110

table5.5_02  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Row End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1 1 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 0 0 TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 16,273 832,257 33 24 5,641 26 53 6,006 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 3,540 20 6 2,105 2 35 -- 5.3 Conventional Boiler Use -- 2,496 12 4 1,271 2 11 -- 5.6

111

table5.7_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Net Demand Fuel Oil Coal for Residual and Natural LPG and (excluding Coal RSE Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Row End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) (million short tons) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.3 2.4 1.1 1.4 1 0 TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 966,231 33 24 5,641 26 53 3.4 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 6,714 20 6 2,105 2 35 5.3 Conventional Boiler Use 3,199 12 4 1,271 2 11 5.6 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process 3,515 8 2

112

table7.6_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; 6 Quantity of Purchased Energy Sources, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(b) Gas(c) NGL(d) (million (million Other(e) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.9 0.9 1.2 1.5 0.9 1.5 0.8 0.6 1.1 311 Food 1,082 W 2 3 566 1 9 * 40 8.2 311221 Wet Corn Milling 220 W * * 59 * 6 0 9 1.1 31131 Sugar 71 733 * * 22 * 2 * 3 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,987 * * 35 * 0 0 1 12.6

113

Originally Released: July 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Shipments Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(e) LPG and Coal Breeze of Energy Sources NAICS Total(b) Electricity(c) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(d) (billion NGL(f) (million (million Other(g) Produced Onsite(h) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,186 73,440 4 3 620 1 7 * 105 * 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 318 15,464 * * 117 * 5 0 29 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling 179 6,746 * * 51 * 4 0 9 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 82 968 1 * 17 * 1 * 20 0 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Food 169 9,708 * * 123 * * 0 4 0 3115 Dairy Product 121 10,079 * * 80 * * 0 1 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 226 17,545 1 1 141 * 0 0 12 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 107

114

table4.1_02.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural LPG and Coal and Breeze RSE NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Gas(d) NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Row Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) (billion cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: 0.8 0.8 1.1 1.6 0.9 1.8 0.7 0.7 1.2 311 Food 1,079 68,230 2 3 560 1 8 * 50 8 311221 Wet Corn Milling 217 7,098 * * 59 * 5 0 11 1.1 31131 Sugar 74 733 * * 22 * 2 * 8 1 311421 Fruit and Vegetable Canning 47 1,987 * * 35 * 0

115

Accelerating Fatigue Testing for Cu Ribbon Interconnects (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes fatigue experiments and discusses dynamic mechanical loading for Cu ribbon interconnects.

Bosco, N.; Silverman, T.; Wohlgemuth , J.; Kurtz, S.; Inoue, M.; Sakurai, K.; Shioda, T.; Zenkoh, H.; Miyashita, M.; Tadanori, T.; Suzuki, S.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Local Structure of CuIn3Se5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a detailed EXAFS study of the Cu-K, In-K, and Se-K edges CuIn3Se5 are reported. The Cu and In first nearest neighbor local structures were found to be almost identical to those in CuInSe2.

Chang, C. H.; Wei, S. H.; Leyarovska, N.; Johnson, J. W.; Zhang, S. B.; Stanbery, B. J.; Anderson, T. J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

ANALYSIS OF THE CALIFORNIA ENERGY INDUSTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uranium mines, oil wells, refineries, and oil and gas TheHi BTU (80Xl0 9 ft 3/yr) Refinery (2XI05 bbl/day) Oil importmIne (4.4Xl05 ST/yr ore) Refinery (2Xl05 bbl/day) Oil import

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

-Interface effects on the magnetic moment of Co and Cu in CoCu granular alloys  

SciTech Connect

We report on x-ray magnetic circular dichroism experiments performed on Co{sub 5}Cu{sub 95} annealed granular alloys with giant magnetoresistance. Results on the Co-L{sub 2,3} edge evidence a direct correlation between the Co orbital and spin magnetic moment and the Co clusters interfacial roughness. On the other hand, we have found dichroism on the Cu-L{sub 2,3} edge, revealing an induced magnetic polarization of the Cu interfacial atoms. The magnetic moment of the Cu atoms is mainly of spin character and is ferromagnetically coupled with the Co magnetic moment.

Garcia Prieto, A.; Fdez-Gubieda, M.L.; Chaboy, J.; Laguna-Marco, M.A.; Muro, T.; Nakamura, T. [Departamento de Electricidad y Electronica, Universidad del Pais Vasco (UPV/EHU), Apartado 644, 48080 Bilbao (Spain); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragon, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); CITIMAC, Universidad de Cantabria, Avenida de los Castros s/n, 39005 Santander (Spain); Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Detailed chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes found in conventional and F-T diesel fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed chemical kinetic models are needed to simulate the combustion of current and future transportation fuels. These models should represent the various chemical classes in these fuels. Conventional diesel fuels are composed of n-alkanes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes and aromatics (Farrell et al. 2007). For future fuels, there is a renewed interest in Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) processes which can be used to synthesize diesel and other transportation fuels from biomass, coal and natural gas. F-T diesel fuels are expected to be similar to F-T jet fuels which are commonly comprised of iso-alkanes with some n-alkanes (Smith and Bruno, 2008). Thus, n-alkanes and iso-alkanes are common chemical classes in these conventional and future fuels. This paper reports on the development of chemical kinetic models of large n-alkanes and iso-alkanes to represent these chemical classes in conventional and future fuels. Two large iso-alkanes are 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, which is a primary reference fuel for diesel, and isooctane, a primary reference fuel for gasoline. Other iso-alkanes are branched alkanes with a single methyl side chain, typical of most F-T fuels. The chemical kinetic models are then used to predict the effect of these fuel components on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Mehl, M

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

ALOFT-FT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to aid in the planning process for the intentional burning of crude oils spills on ... Smoke Plume Trajectory From In Situ Burning of Crude Oil in Alaska ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

BP License - FT Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1600 1800 2000 Illinois Basin Coal Qatar LNG Alaska Natural Gas Wyoming Natural Gas Kentucky SNG with geologic storage lb s C O 2e / M W h ...

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

122

Microsoft Word - Vapor Phase Elemental Sulfur Tech Brief DRAFT bbl 08-24.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AT A GLANCE AT A GLANCE  eliminates excavation expense  applicable to large or small sites  straightforward deployment  uses heat to distribute sulfur throughout a soil  mercury reacts with sulfur to form immobile and insoluble minerals  patent applied for TechBrief Vapor Phase Elemental Sulfur Amendment for Sequestering Mercury in Contaminated Soil Scientists at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have identified a method of targeting mercury in contaminated soil zone by use of sulfur vapor heated gas. Background Mercury contamination in soil is a common problem in the environment. The most common treatment is excavation - a method that works well for small sites where the

123

Vapor Phase Elemental Sulfur Tech Brief DRAFT bbl 08-24  

saturated heated gas into access wells to distribute the gas throughout the site. Solid ... need to inject liquid/fluids). ...

124

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

125

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

126

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

127

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

128

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

129

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

130

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

131

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

132

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

133

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

134

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

135

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

136

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

137

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

138

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

139

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

140

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

142

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

143

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

144

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

145

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

146

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

147

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

148

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

149

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

150

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

151

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

152

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

153

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

154

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

155

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

156

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

157

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

158

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

159

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

160

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Big synthetic fuels plant exploits design options  

SciTech Connect

ANG Coal Gasification Co., the lead partner among five companies that are participating in the Great Plains Coal Gasification Project is planning to build a 2 million gal/yr methanol plant at the Beulah, North Dakota, Great Plains site. The methanol will be used to scrub sulfur oxides from 50 billion cu ft/yr of SNG. ANG has applied to the Department of Energy for a $2.6 million grant to explore new technology to convert methanol to gasoline. ANG is also considering the recovery of carbon dioxide from the plant for sale to stimulate oil well production. The almost 75 billion cu ft/yr of carbon dioxide the plant will yield could simulate the production of up to 9 billion bbl/yr of otherwise unrecoverable oil. Before reaching a decision on carbon dioxide recovery, the company must study the feasibility of pipeline transport of carbon dioxide to oilfields in North Dakota and Montana, and the feasibility of removing the 40 Btu/1000 cu ft of hydrocarbons in the carbon dioxide as auxiliary boiler fuel.

Not Available

1980-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

162

Atomistic Predictions of Age Hardening in Al-Cu Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Scale Deformation Mechanisms of Amorphous Polyethylene under Tensile Loading Atomistic Predictions of Age Hardening in Al-Cu Alloys.

163

OPERATIONS AND PERFORMANCE OF RHIC AS A CU-CU COLLIDER.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 5th year of RHIC operations, started in November 2004 and expected to last till June 2005, consists of a physics run with Cu-Cu collisions at 100 GeV/u followed by one with polarized protons (pp) at 100 GeV [l]. We will address here the overall performance of the RHIC complex used for the first time as a Cu-Cu collider, and compare it with previous operational experience with Au, PP and asymmetric d-Au collisions. We will also discuss operational improvements, such as a {beta}* squeeze to 85cm in the high luminosity interaction regions from the design value of 1m, system improvements, machine performance and limitations, and address reliability and uptime issues.

PILAT, R.; AHRENS, L.; BAI, M.; BARTON, D.S.; ET AL.

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

164

Physical Inventory Listing NRC 742cu  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NRC FORM 742CU (MM-YYYY) MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70,72, 74, 75, 150, Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91 EXPIRES: MMDDYYYY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF...

165

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

Table N8.3. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

y(c)","Total","Utility(b)","Local Utility(c)","Row" "Code(a)","Subsector and Industry","(kWh)","(kWh)","(kWh)","(1000 cu ft)","(1000 cu ft)","(1000 cu ft)","(million...

167

Economics and analysis of the miscible CO/sub 2/ injection project, Granny's Creek field, West Virginia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of carbon dioxide (CO/sub 2/) in a tertiary oil recovery pilot in the Granny's Creek field, West Virginia, was started in 1976. At first the CO/sub 2/ was injected into the Pocono Big Injun sand at four wells at the corners of an approximately square area of 6.7 acres. The CO/sub 2/ was injected as a liquid, and the pilot portion of the reservoir was maintained at or above miscible pressure. Production was taken from a well inside the square pilot area and from eight wells outside the area. The test began with injection of water to increase reservoir pressure to more than the miscibility pressure. Injection started with CO/sub 2/ alone, then alternate slugs of CO/sub 2/ and water, then CO/sub 2/, alone, and finally water alone was injected. The additional oil recovery was 8,681 bbl for an injection total of 19.76 million lb of CO/sub 2/ for a ratio of 19,626 cu ft per bbl. A second or minipilot in which the injection was in the lower or C zone of the Big Injun sand resulted in 2,007.9 bbl of additional oil through September 1980 from the injection of 4.24 million lb of CO/sub 2/ for a ratio of 18,192 cu ft per bbl. The CO/sub 2/ spread quickly across the southern 350 acres of the field and confinement was not attained. The sales price of the oil after royalty and taxes is probably about equal to the most optimistic cost of the CO/sub 2/ per barrel of additional oil at the present time and far less than a more reasonable cost for the CO/sub 2/. Production of additional oil in each case decreased sharply after injection of CO/sub 2/ was stopped so there appeared to be no benefits over an extended period of time from the injection of CO/sub 2/.

Smith, R.V.; Watts, R.J.; Burtch, F.W.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

169

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

170

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

171

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

172

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

173

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

174

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

175

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

176

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

177

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

178

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

179

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

180

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

182

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

183

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

184

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

185

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

186

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

187

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

188

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

189

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

190

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

191

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

192

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

193

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

194

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

195

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

196

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

197

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

198

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

199

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

200

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Synthesis of Cu Nanowires with Polycarbonate Template  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Copper nanowires were fabricated into arrays of pores on ion-track etched polycarbonate membrane, using electrodeposition technique. We coated Au thin film layer on one side of membrane in order to have electrical contact. X-ray diffraction analysis shows that the Au layer has a strong (111) texture. The pores which have cylindrical shape with 6 micron length and 30 nm diameter were filled by copper atoms, fabricating Cu nanowires. Energy Disperse Spectrometry (EDS) indicated the picks of copper which filled the pores of substrate. The morphology and structure of Cu nanowires were characterized by SEM, TEM and XRD, respectively. The results show that although all the nanowires do not have uniform diameter, but all of them are continuous along the length.

Naderi, N.; Hashim, M. R. [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

203

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

204

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

205

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

206

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

207

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

208

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

209

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

210

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

211

Direct observation of surface ethyl to ethane interconversion upon C2H4 hydrogenation over Pt/Al2O3 catalyst by time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In-Situ Spectroscopy of Catalysts; Weckhuysen, B.M. , Ed. ;Hydrogenation over Pt/Al 2 O 3 Catalyst by Time-Resolved FT-over alumina-supported Pt catalyst were recorded at 25 ms

Wasylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Electrical Characterization of Cu Composition Effects in CdS/CdTe Thin-Film Solar Cells with a ZnTe:Cu Back Contact: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study the effects of Cu composition on the CdTe/ZnTe:Cu back contact and the bulk CdTe. For the back contact, its potential barrier decreases with Cu concentration while its saturation current density increases. For the bulk CdTe, the hole density increases with Cu concentration. We identify a Cu-related deep level at {approx}0.55 eV whose concentration is significant when the Cu concentration is high. The device performance, which initially increases with Cu concentration then decreases, reflects the interplay between the positive influences and negative influences (increasing deep levels in CdTe) of Cu.

Li, J. V.; Duenow, J. N.; Kuciauskas, D.; Kanevce, A.; Dhere, R. G.; Young, M. R.; Levi, D. H.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Final quarterly technical progress report No. 11, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary results on the effect of reaction temperature on the performance of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis obtained during the last quarter confirmed that Co catalysts were very sensitive to temperature and deactivated significantly at temperatures above 240{degree}C both in the fixed bed and the slurry bubble column reactors. Following this preliminary investigation, a series of tests were carried out during this period in order to elucidate the nature of this deactivation process as well as determine possible means of preventing it. In order to elucidate the nature of this deactivation process, the catalysts which had undergone significant deactivation after high temperature (280{degree}C) reaction in either the fixed bed reactor or the slurry bubble column reactor were regenerated and retested in the fixed bed reactor. In both cases the catalysts recovered completely their initial activity. In addition, reactions at very high H{sub 2}CO ratios and high temperatures showed very little deactivation, suggesting that the deactivation of the Co catalysts during F-T synthesis at high temperatures was mainly due carbon formation via the Boudouard reaction. Due to the unreactive nature of this carbon, it could only be removed by calcination. A second series of experiments was carried out to investigate the effect of certain promoters (Zr, La, Cr, and Re) as well as the effect of another support such as silica on the deactivation characteristics of Co catalysts during F-T synthesis at high temperature. The results suggest that the deactivation process and rate for most of these catalysts are similar to those of the alumina-supported catalysts tested previously (Co.005 and Co-053), and that none of the promoters helps to slow down the rate of carbon formation at high temperatures above 240{degree}C.

Singleton, A.H.

1995-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

214

U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ... City Gate : $ 3.88 /thousand cu ft $ 4.88 /thousand cu ft Oct-13 find more: Residential : ...

215

Effective Suppression of Electromigration-Induced Cu Dissolution by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main failure modes are void formation and fast Cu dissolution, leading to a ... Method of Selective Electroplating having Strong Adhesion and Exceptional...

216

Thermochemical Simulation of Cu-Ni Smelting Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a second example, an advanced on-line thermochemical simulation of Xstrata Nickel's Sudbury NiCu sulphide smelting plant will be presented. The on-line...

217

Evaluation of Microstructure and Mechanical Behavior of Cu Based ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Jonathan Nguyen, Troy Topping, Hidemi Kato, Yizhang Zhou, Enrique Lavernia. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Jonathan Nguyen. Abstract Scope, Cu-Zr...

218

Atomic Cu/Nb Interface Structures Characterized by Transmission ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To understand the interface effect on mechanical behavior, atomic Cu/Nb interface structures were studied by (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ...

219

Development of a Diffusion Mobility Database for Cu-In-Se  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... ? (Cu) 0.545 (Cu,In) 0.122 (In) 0.333 ?3 stoichiometric phases: ? (Cu ... In in Se In in In Page 21. Modeling of Stoichiometric Intermetallic Phases ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

220

Field development will cost $1 billion  

SciTech Connect

The development of the Belridge property 40 miles west of Bakersfield in the San Joaquin Valley is not only one of the biggest production developments of this decade in California but also is one of the msot challenging. It will call on advanced expertise and, ultimately, on techniques that are still in the research stage. The program calls for drilling at least 3000 wells and reworking another 2200 wells. In excess of $100 million is being committed in 1980 alone. Since acquiring the property, Shell has increased the estimate of proved developed and undeveloped reserves to approximately 598 million bbl of hydrocarbon liquids and 364 billion cu ft of natural gas. The higher estimates mirror the company's confidence in its capability to recover a larger amount of the in-place oil and gas than previously expected.

Rintoul, B.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Longueur de diffusion des porteurs minoritaires et structure de jonction des diodes Cu/Cu2O (*)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

short circuit current and with the shift from cell to cell of the peak in the photovoltaic spectral cells are not sui- table for an efficient photovoltaic solar energy conversion. Revue Phys. Appl. 15, the photovoltaic spectrum and the electron beam induced current (EBIC) methods. In the two last cases, Cu/Cu2O

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

222

Photoelectrochemistry, Electronic Structure, and Bandgap Sizes of Semiconducting Cu(I)-Niobates and Cu(I)-Tantalates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Semiconducting metal-oxides have remained of intense research interest owing to their potential for achieving efficient solar-driven photocatalytic reactions in aqueous solutions that occur as a result of their bandgap excitation. The photocatalytic reduction of water or carbon dioxide to generate hydrogen or hydrocarbon fuels, respectively, can be driven on p-type (photocathodic) electrodes with suitable band energies. However, metal-oxide semiconductors are typically difficult to dope as p-type with a high mobility of carriers. The supported research led to the discovery of new p-type Cu(I)-niobate and Cu(I)-tantalate film electrodes that can be prepared on FTO glass. New high-purity flux syntheses and the full structural determination of several Cu(I)-containing niobates and tantalates have been completed, as well as new investigations of their optical and photoelectrochemical properties and electronic structures via density-functional theory calculations. For example, CuNbO3, Cu5Ta11O30 and CuNb3O8 were prepared in high purity and their structures were characterized by both single-crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. These two classes of Cu(I)-containing compounds exhibit optical bandgap sizes ranging from ~1.3 eV to ~2.6 eV. Photoelectrochemical measurements of these compounds show strong photon-driven cathodic currents that confirm the p-type semiconductor behavior of CuNbO3, CuNb3O8, and Cu5Ta11O30. Incident-photon-to-current efficiencies are measured that approach greater than ~1%. Electronic-structure calculations based on density functional theory reveal the visible-light absorption stems from a nearly-direct bandgap transition involving a copper-to-niobium or tantalum (d10 to d0) charge-transfer excitations.

Maggard, Paul A.

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

223

Manipulating Stress in Cu/low-k Dielectric Nanocomposites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of x-rays with organic dielectric materials, which alters their mechanical properties, affects values of stress generated within encapsulated Cu structures. In particular, the evolution of stress within submicron Cu interconnect structures encapsulated by an organosilicate glass can be investigated in situ using synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction. The overall geometry of the composite, along with the amount of irradiation, dictates the change in stress of the Cu features. A quantitative comparison of these findings to mechanical modeling results reveals two modes of modification within the dielectric film: a densification that changes the effective eigenstrain followed by an increase in elastic modulus.

C Murray; P Besser; E Ryan; J Jordan-Sweet

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

224

Study of semantic features of dimensional adjective Cu 'thick' in mandarin chinese  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cu 'thick' is an adjective which is used to describe an object's spatial dimension of thickness. Cu 'thick' used to describe cylindrical objects shares the same sense in essence with Cu 'thick' used to describe granular objects, ... Keywords: Cu 'thick', dimensional adjective, semantic features

Ying Wu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Switching a magnetic vortex by interlayer coupling in epitaxially grown Co/Cu/Py/Cu(001) trilayer disks  

SciTech Connect

Epitaxial Py/Cu/Co/Cu(001) trilayers were patterned into micron sized disks and imaged using element-specific photoemission electron microscopy. By varying the Cu spacer layer thickness, we study how the coupling between the two magnetic layers influences the formation of magnetic vortex states. We find that while the Py and Co disks form magnetic vortex domains when the interlayer coupling is ferromagnetic, the magnetic vortex domains of the Py and Co disks break into anti-parallel aligned multidomains when the interlayer coupling is antiferromagnetic. We explain this result in terms of magnetic flux closure between the Py and Co layers for the antiferromagnetic coupling case.

Wu, J.; Carlton, D.; Oelker, E.; Park, J. S.; Jin, E.; Arenholz, E.; Scholl, A.; Hwang, C.; Bokor, J.; Qiu, Z Q

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

226

Explosive joints in Nb--Ti/Cu composite superconductors  

SciTech Connect

Explosive welding techniques have been applied to the joining of a Nb-Ti/ Cu composite conductor. Details of the process are given together with mechanical and electrical evaluations of the resulting joints. (auth)

Cornish, D.N.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Pattee, H.E.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Positive giant magnetoresistance in ferrimagnetic/Cu/ferrimagnetic films  

SciTech Connect

Spin valves composed of ferrimagnetic/Cu/ferrimagnetic layers were fabricated with the magnetization perpendicular to the film planes. By changing the composition of ferrimagnetic layers, both negative and positive giant magnetoresistance (GMR) can be observed in ferrimagnetic spin valves. For samples consisting of both transition-metal (TM-) rich TbFeCo and GdFeCo, negative GMR values were obtained. Due to the high resistivity of amorphous ferrimagnetic films, the shunting effect of Cu led to relatively small MR ratio. The negative MR effect was 1% for 1.7 nm Cu. For spin valves consisting of rare-earth (RE-)rich TbFeCo and TM-rich GdFeCo, positive GMR values were observed. A thin layer of Co was inserted between RE-rich TbFeCo and Cu to manipulate the sign of GMR. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

Lai, Chih-Huang; Lin, Chao-Cheng; Chen, B. M.; Shieh, Han-Ping D.; Chang, Ching-Ray

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Charge Effects on the Cu Pyramidal Nanoparticle and It's ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the chemical reaction, the different adsorption trend and sites are found in ... on the Cu Pyramidal Nanoparticle and It's Application as a CO2 Conversion Catalyst ... Performance Evaluation, Technical and Environmental Aspects of Biomass...

229

Experimental measurements of electron scattering parameters in Cu narrow lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future generations of integrated circuits will require interconnects with metallic lines at dimensions below 50nm. When Cu is used, the electron mean free path becomes similar to the characteristic dimensions of the structure of the metallic line (grain ...

S. Matrejean; R. Gers; T. Mourier; A. Toffoli; G. Passemard

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Enhanced Radiation Tolerance in Sputtered Cu/V Multilayers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High energy particle (neutron, proton and He ions) irradiation to materials typically leads to deteriorating properties, including void swelling, blistering, embrittlement, fracture and exfoliation of surfaces. This dissertation examines size dependent radiation damage in nanostructured metallic multilayers synthesized by the magnetron sputtering technique at room temperature. It reveals the roles of interface in achieving enhanced radiation tolerance in metallic materials. The microstructure and mechanical properties of as-deposited Cu/V multilayer films are systemically investigated, providing the basis for studying radiation damage mechanisms. Sputter-deposited Cu/V multilayers are subjected to helium (He) ion irradiation at room temperature with a peak dose of 6 displacements per atom (dpa). The average helium bubble density and lattice expansion induced by radiation decrease significantly with decreasing h, where h is individual layer thickness. The magnitude of radiation hardening decreases with decreasing h, and becomes negligible when h is 2.5 nm or less. The interactions between interfaces and radiation induced point defects and the evolution of microstructurs and mechanical behavior are discussed. This study indicates that nearly immiscible Cu/V interfaces spaced a few nm apart can effectively reduce the concentration of radiation induced point defects. Dose dependent radiation damage at room temperature in these Cu/V multilayers is systematically investigated with a peak dose in the range of 1-12 dpa. Peak bubble density increases with increasing dose, but it is much lower in Cu/V 2.5 nm multilayers than that in Cu/V 50 nm specimens. A similar radiation hardening trend is observed in multilayers irradiated at different fluences. Radiation hardening increases with dose and seems to reach saturation at a peak dose of 6 dpa. Negligible hardening for fine ( h less than/equal to 2.5 nm) multilayers is observed at all dose levels. Thermal stability of Cu/V multilayers is revealed by in situ annealing inside a transmission electron microscope. During isothermal annealing at 600 degrees C grain boundary grooving occurs across layer interfaces in Cu/V 50 nm specimens, whereas Cu/V 5 nm multilayers appear rather stable. Annealing of Cu/V multilayers at 400 degrees C leads to hardening of multilayers, whereas softening occurs in Cu/V multilayers annealed at 600 degrees C. The evolution of mechanical properties during annealing is correlated to the degradation of the layer interface and the consequent reduction of interface resistance to the transmission of single dislocation.

Fu, Engang

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Diffusion bonding of commercially pure Ni using Cu interlayer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concentration dependence of diffusivity in a multi-component diffusion system makes it complicated to predict the concentration profiles of diffusing species. This so called chemical diffusivity can be expressed as a function of thermodynamic and kinetic data. DICTRA software can calculate the concentration profiles using appropriate mobility and thermodynamic data. It can also optimize the diffusivity data using experimental diffusivity data. Then the optimized diffusivity data is stored as mobility data which is a linear function of temperature. In this work, diffusion bonding of commercially pure Ni using Cu interlayers is reported. The mobility parameters of Ni-Cu alloy binary systems were optimized using DICTRA/Thermocalc software from the available self-, tracer and chemical diffusion coefficients. The optimized mobility parameters were used to simulate concentration profiles of Ni-Cu diffusion joints using DICTRA/Thermocalc software. The calculated and experimental concentration profiles agreed well at 1100 Degree-Sign C. Agreement between the simulated and experimental profiles was less good at 1050 Degree-Sign C due to the grain boundary contribution to the overall diffusion. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The concentration profiles of Cu in Ni-Cu diffusion joints are modeled. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interdiffusion coefficients in Ni-Cu system are optimized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optimized interdiffusion coefficients are expressed as mobility parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulated profiles are comparable with experimental profiles.

Rahman, A.H.M.E., E-mail: a.rahman@my.und.edu; Cavalli, M.N.

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Model of Fe Nanostripes on Cu(111)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetization as a function of temperature calculated with Monte Carlo techniques is compared to experimental results of Fe stripes grown on vicinal Cu(111) surfaces. The stripes are step decorations grown with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), are 1-2 monolayers thick, and display perpendicular magnetization. The atomic parameters are determined from fully relativistic electronic structure calculations. The moments are found to be 2.57 {micro}{sub B}, with some variation due to film thickness, and uniaxial anisotropy of 40 {micro}Ry/atom for Fe atoms facing vacuum. The Heisenberg model extended to include crystalline anisotropy as well as dipole-dipole interactions is considered for two different values of the exchange constant: J = 20 and 2 meV. Under a large applied field (4000 G), the calculated saturation magnetization falls slowly from 507 emu/cm{sup 3} with an increase in temperature until it falls rapidly around 600 K, after which a more modest falloff with an increase in temperature is observed. For larger J the rapid change occurs for higher temperatures. The importance of disorder in the height and width of the stripes is investigated by generating stripe geometries with a model that incorporates nucleation and growth of Fe particles at step edges under the constraint of constant deposition from MBE. The primary effect of disorder in the stripes is to reduce the saturated magnetization at lower temperatures.

Brown, G. [Florida State University; Lee, H. K. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Schulthess, Thomas C [ORNL; Ujfalussy, Balazs [ORNL; Stocks, George Malcolm [ORNL; Butler, William H [ORNL; Landau, David P [ORNL; Pierce, John Philip [ORNL; Shen, Jian [ORNL; Kirschner, Jurgen M [ORNL

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Dynamics of Propane in Silica Mesopores Formed upon PropyleneHydrogenation over Pt Nanoparticles by Time-Resolved FT-IRSpectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Propylene hydrogenation over Pt nanoparticles supported onmesoporous silica type SBA-15 was monitored by time-resolved FT-IRspectroscopy at 23 ms resolution using short propylene gas pulses thatjoined a continuous flow of hydrogen in N2 (1 atm total pressure).Experiments were conducted in the temperature range 323-413 K. Propanewas formed within 100 milliseconds or faster. The CH stretching regionrevealed distinct bands for propane molecules emerging inside thenanoscale channels of the silica support. Spectral analysis gave thedistribution of the propane product between support and surrounding gasphase as function of time. Kinetic analysis showed that the escape ofpropane molecules from the channels occurred within hundreds ofmilliseconds (3.1 + 0.4 s-1 at 383 K). A steady state distribution ofpropane between gas phase and mesoporous support is established as theproduct is swept from the catalyst zone by the continuous flow ofhydrogen co-reactant. This is the first direct spectroscopic observationof emerging products of heterogeneous catalysis on nanoporous supportsunder reaction conditions.

Waslylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Implementation plan for the demonstration of a 50,000 ft/sup 2/ solar hot water system for the textile industry. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analysis of textile processes was conducted to determine their applicability to integration into a 50,000 ft/sup 2/ collector field and into a waste heat recovery system. Various processes in a typical carpet finishing plant, a typical cotton/cotton blend finishing plant, and a typical 100% synthetic fabric pressurized beck finishing plant are analyzed. The flat-plate, evacuated tube, and parabolic concentrator are discussed and evaluated. Evaluations of direct heat exchange, closed cycle enhanced recovery, and open cycle enhanced heat recovery techniques as applied to textile processes are presented. Conceptual designs are discussed that use a solar array to produce hot water and use standard boilers to produce process steam and to augment the hot water output when insolation values are insufficient to meet process demands. Conceptual designs and cost estimates are presented for: process water systems with evacuated tube solar collectors; process water system with concentrating-tracking solar collectors; feedwater system with concentrating-tracking solar collectors; templifier and direct exchange waste heat recovery system; direct heat recovery systems; integrated system using enhanced heat recovery and concentrating-tracking solar collectors; integrated system using direct heat recovery and concentrating-tracking solar collectors; integrated system using direct heat recovery, evacuated tube solar collectors and concentrating-tracking solar collectors; and integrated system using enhanced heat recovery, evacuated tube collectors, and concentrating-tracking source collectors. An economic evaluation of the systems is presented using the rate of return method. Results and recommendations are summarized. (MCW)

Hester, J.C.; Beasley, D.E.; Rogers, W.A. Jr.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Low-lying isomeric levels in 75Cu  

SciTech Connect

Isomeric low-lying states were identified and investigated in the 75Cu nucleus. Two states at 61.8(5)- and 128.3(7)-keV excitation energies with half-lives of 370(40)- and 170(15)-ns were assigned as 75m1Cu and 75m2Cu, respectively. The measured half-lives combined with the recent spin assignment of the ground state allow one to deduce tentatively spin and parity of the two isomers and the dominant multipolarities of the isomeric transitions with respect to the systematics of the Cu isotopes. Shell-model calculations using an up-to-date effective interaction reproduce the evolution of the 1/2 , 3/2 , and 5/2 states for the neutron-rich odd-mass Cu isotopes when filling the g9/2. The results indicate a significant change in the nuclear structure in this region, where a single-particle 5/2 state coexists with more and more collective 3/2 and 1/2 levels at low excitation energies.

Daugas, J. M. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL); Faul, T. [CEA, France; Grawe, H. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany; Pfutzner, M. [University of Warsaw; Grzywacz, R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lewitowicz, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL); Achouri, N. L. [CNRS/IN2P3, Caen, France; Angelique, J. C. [CNRS/IN2P3, Caen, France; Baiborodin, D. [Nuclear Physic Institute, Czech Republic; Bentida, R. [Universite de Lyon, France; Beraud, R. [Universite de Lyon, France; Borcea, C. [IFIN, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania; Bingham, C. R. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Catford, W. [University of Surrey, UK; Emsallem, A. [Universite de Lyon, France; De France, G. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL); Grzywacz, K. L. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Lemmon, R. [Daresbury Laboratory, UK; Lopez Jimenez, M. J. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL); de Oliveira Santos, F. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL); Regan, P. H. [University of Surrey, UK; Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr [ORNL; Sauvestre, J. E. [CEA, France; Sawicka, M. [University of Warsaw; Stanoiu, M. [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL); Sieja, K. [Technische Universitat Darmstadt, Germany; Nowacki, F. [Institut Pluridisciplinaire Hubert Curien, Strasbourg, France

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Low-lying isomeric levels in {sup 75}Cu  

SciTech Connect

Isomeric low-lying states were identified and investigated in the {sup 75}Cu nucleus. Two states at 61.8(5)- and 128.3(7)-keV excitation energies with half-lives of 370(40)- and 170(15)-ns were assigned as {sup 75m1}Cu and {sup 75m2}Cu, respectively. The measured half-lives combined with the recent spin assignment of the ground state allow one to deduce tentatively spin and parity of the two isomers and the dominant multipolarities of the isomeric transitions with respect to the systematics of the Cu isotopes. Shell-model calculations using an up-to-date effective interaction reproduce the evolution of the 1/2{sup -}, 3/2{sup -}, and 5/2{sup -} states for the neutron-rich odd-mass Cu isotopes when filling the nug{sub 9/2}. The results indicate a significant change in the nuclear structure in this region, where a single-particle 5/2{sup -} state coexists with more and more collective 3/2{sup -} and 1/2{sup -} levels at low excitation energies.

Daugas, J. M.; Faul, T.; Sauvestre, J. E. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon cedex (France); Grawe, H. [GSI-Hemholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, D-64220 Darmstadt (Germany); Pfuetzner, M.; Sawicka, M. [IEP, Warsaw University, 00681 Warsaw, PL-00681 Hoza 69 (Poland); Grzywacz, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Lewitowicz, M.; France, G. de; Lopez Jimenez, M. J.; Oliveira Santos, F. de [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, BP 55027, F-14076 Caen cedex 5 (France); Achouri, N. L.; Angelique, J. C. [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire ENSICAEN, CNRS-IN2P3 UMR 6534 et Universite de Caen, F-14050 Caen cedex (France); Baiborodin, D. [Nuclear Physic Institute, CZ-25068 Rez (Czech Republic); Bentida, R.; Beraud, R.; Emsallem, A. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, CNRS/IN2P3, Universite Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Borcea, C. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, P.O. Box MG6, Bucharest-Margule (Romania); Bingham, C. R.; Grzywacz, K. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Novel route to synthesize CuO nanoplatelets  

SciTech Connect

A new synthesis route to obtain high-purity cupric oxide, CuO, using the hydrothermal reaction of copper sulfide and a NaOH solution in an oxygen atmosphere has been developed. The synthesized products showed nanoplatelet-like morphologies with rectangular cross-sections and dimensions at the nanometric scale. Variations in the oxygen partial pressure and synthesis temperature produced changes in size and shape, being found that the proliferation of nanoplatelet structures occurred at 200 deg. C and 30 bar. - Graphical abstract: Transmission electron microscopy image of a CuO nanoplatelet. The inset is an electron diffraction pattern of this twined CuO nanoplatelet exhibiting a monoclinic crystal structure.

Zarate, R.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile)], E-mail: rzarate@ucn.cl; Hevia, F. [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Fuentes, S. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Catolica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Fuenzalida, V.M. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Av. Blanco Encalada 2008, Santiago (Chile); Zuniga, A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Universidad de Chile, Beauchef 850, Santiago (Chile)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Copper Coordination in Cu-SSZ-13 and Cu-SSZ-16 Investigated by Variable-Temperature XRD  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) are a major atmospheric pollutant produced through the combustion of fossil fuels in internal combustion engines. Copper-exchanged zeolites are promising as selective catalytic reduction catalysts for the direct conversion of NO into N{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, and recent reports have shown the enhanced performance of Cu-CHA catalysts over other zeolite frameworks in the NO decomposition of exhaust gas streams. In the present study, Rietveld refinement of variable-temperature XRD synchrotron data obtained for Cu-SSZ-13 and Cu-SSZ-16 is used to investigate the location of copper cations in the zeolite pores and the effect of temperature on these sites and on framework stability. The XRD patterns show that the thermal stability of SSZ-13 is increased significantly when copper is exchanged into the framework compared with the acid form of the zeolite, H-SSZ-13. Cu-SSZ-13 is also more thermally stable than Cu-SSZ-16. From the refined diffraction patterns, the atomic positions of atoms, copper locations and occupancies, and thermal displacement parameters were determined as a function of temperature for both zeolites. Copper is found in the cages coordinated to three oxygen atoms of the six-membered rings.

Fickel, D.; Lobo, R

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Technology development for cobalt F-T catalysts. Topical report No.3, Zirconia promotion of Fischer-Tropsch cobalt catalysts: Behavior in fixed-bed and slurry bubble column reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of cobalt-based F-T catalysts supported on alumina and silica were prepared with different loadings of Zr and different sequences of impregnation of Co and Zr. All catalysts were extensively characterized by different methods. The catalysts were evaluated in terms of their activity and selectivity both in fixed bed and slurry bubble column reactors. Addition of ZrO{sub 2} to both Co/SiO{sub 2} and Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts resulted in at least a twofold increase in the catalyst activity for F-T synthesis in the fixed bed reactor. In the slurry bubble column reactor, a similar promotion effect was observed for the SiO{sub 2}-supported catalysts, while the addition of Zr to a cobalt/alumina catalyst had a less significant effect.

Oukaci, R.; Marcelin, G.; Goodwin, J.G. Jr. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering

1995-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

240

Incorporation of Cu Acceptors in ZnO Nanocrystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Doping of semiconductor nanocrystals is an important problem in nanomaterials research. Using infrared (IR) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we have observed Cu acceptor dopants that were intentionally introduced into ZnO nanocrystals. The incorporation of Cu2+ dopants increased as the diameter of the nanocrystals was increased from ~3 to 5 nm. Etching the nanocrystals with acetic acid revealed a core-shell structure, where a 2-nm lightly doped core is surrounded by a heavily doped shell. These observations are consistent with the trapped dopant model, in which dopant atoms stick to the surface of the core and are overgrown by the nanocrystal material.

Oo, W.M.H.; Mccluskey, Matthew D.; Huso, Jesse; Morrison, J.; Bergman, Leah; Engelhard, Mark H.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.

2010-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Pb-free Sn-Ag-Cu ternary eutectic solder  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Pb-free solder includes a ternary eutectic composition consisting essentially of about 93.6 weight % Sn-about 4.7 weight % Ag-about 1.7 weight % Cu having a eutectic melting temperature of about 217.degree. C. and variants of the ternary composition wherein the relative concentrations of Sn, Ag, and Cu deviate from the ternary eutectic composition to provide a controlled melting temperature range (liquid-solid "mushy" zone) relative to the eutectic melting temperature (e.g. up to 15.degree. C. above the eutectic melting temperature).

Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA); Yost, Frederick G. (Cedar Crest, NM); Smith, John F. (Ames, IA); Miller, Chad M. (Ames, IA); Terpstra, Robert L. (Ames, IA)

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

242

Technical barriers and development of Cu wirebonding in nanoelectronics device packaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bondpad cratering, Cu ball bond interface corrosion, IMD (intermetal dielectric) cracking, and uncontrolled post-wirebond staging are the key technical barriers in Cu wire development. This paper discusses the UHAST (unbiased HAST) reliability performance ...

C. L. Gan; E. K. Ng; B. L. Chan; U. Hashim; F. C. Classe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Establish Electromigration-induced Failure Map for Flip-chip Sn/Cu ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we will talk about two kinds of EM-induced failures would occur in a flip-chip Cu/Sn/Cu solder joint under EM test first. Then, we calculated the...

244

Elucidating efficiency losses in cuprous oxide (Cu?O) photovoltaics and identifying strategies for efficiency improvement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I fabricated and characterized a series of thin-film cuprous oxide (Cu?O) photovoltaic devices. I constructed several different device designs, using sputtered and electrochemically deposited Cu?O. ...

Brandt, Riley Eric

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Dilute magnetic semiconductor Cu2FeSnS4 nanocrystals with a novel zincblende structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diluted magnetic semiconductor Cu2FeSnS4 nanocrystals with a novel zincblende structure have been successfully synthesized by a hot-injection approach. Cu+, Fe2+, and Sn4+ ions occupy the same position in the ...

Xiaolu Liang; Xianhua Wei; Daocheng Pan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Substrate effect on the electronic structures of CuPc/graphene interfaces  

SciTech Connect

The interfacial electronic structures of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) deposited on a single-layer graphene (SLG) film prepared on Cu and SiO{sub 2} substrates (SLG/Cu and SLG/SiO{sub 2}) were investigated using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. The ionization energy of CuPc on SLG/Cu and SLG/SiO{sub 2} substrate is, respectively, 5.62 eV and 4.97 eV. The energy level alignments at the two interfaces were estimated. The results revealed that the height of the electron (hole) injection barriers are 1.20 (1.10) and 1.38 (0.92) eV at CuPc/SLG/Cu and CuPc/SLG/SiO{sub 2} interfaces, respectively.

Wu Qihui; Hong Guo; Ng, T. W.; Lee, S. T. [Center of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF) and Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

247

Kinetics and Equilibrium Studies of the Biosorption of Cu(II)by Algae in the Presence of Natural Organic Matter.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cu2+ and its compounds are serious environmental pollutants, and thus, the form and aqueous behavior of Cu2+ needs to be understood in order to effectively (more)

Wang, Qiong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

NIST, CU to Build Instrument to Help Search for Earth-like ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST, CU to Build Instrument to Help Search for Earth-like Planets. For Immediate Release: November 3, 2009. ...

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

249

High strength-high conductivity Cu-Fe composites produced by powder compaction/mechanical reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate mixture of Cu and Fe is compacted and mechanically reduced to form an ''in-situ'' Cu-Fe composite having high strength and high conductivity. Compaction and mechanical reduction of the particulate mixture are carried out at a temperature and time at temperature selected to avoid dissolution of Fe into the Cu matrix particulates to a harmful extent that substantially degrades the conductivity of the Cu-Fe composite. 5 figures.

Verhoeven, J.D.; Spitzig, W.A.; Gibson, E.D.; Anderson, I.E.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

High strength-high conductivity Cu--Fe composites produced by powder compaction/mechanical reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate mixture of Cu and Fe is compacted and mechanically reduced to form an "in-situ" Cu-Fe composite having high strength and high conductivity. Compaction and mechanical reduction of the particulate mixture are carried out at a temperature and time at temperature selected to avoid dissolution of Fe into the Cu matrix particulates to a harmful extent that substantially degrades the conductivity of the Cu-Fe composite.

Verhoeven, John D. (Ames, IA); Spitzig, William A. (Ames, IA); Gibson, Edwin D. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Iver E. (Ames, IA)

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

251

Magneto-optical Kerr effect studies of Cu2O/nickel heterostructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cuprous oxide (Cu"2O) is a diamagnetic p-type semiconductor material, considered to be highly attractive for the rapidly emerging field of oxide electronics. In this work Cu"2O layers with various thicknesses were produced by atomic layer deposition ... Keywords: ALD, Cu2O, MOKE, Nickel, Spintronics

Georgeta Salvan, Peter Robaschik, Michael Fronk, Steve MLler, Thomas Waechtler, Stefan E. Schulz, Robert Mothes, Heinrich Lang, Christian Schubert, Senoy Thomas, Manfred Albrecht, Dietrich R. T. Zahn

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Kinetic Controls on Cu and Pb Sorption by Ferrihydrite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nd ed.; Cambridge University Press: New York, 1993. (51) Sparks, D. L. Kinetics of Soil Chemical Processes; Academic Press: New York, 1989. (52) Espenson, J. H. Chemical Kinetics and Reaction Mechanisms, 2Kinetic Controls on Cu and Pb Sorption by Ferrihydrite A N D R E A S C . S C H E I N O

Sparks, Donald L.

253

Electroplating of Cu(Ag) thin films for interconnect applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electromigration effects in interconnect metallizations cause a need for materials with superior resistance against electromigration failure but with adequate electrical properties. In principle, Cu(Ag) alloys are potential candidates to become an interconnect ... Keywords: Copper-silver alloy thin film, Electrochemical deposition, Interconnect material

S. Strehle; S. Menzel; J. W. Bartha; K. Wetzig

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Low-lying levels in Cu-57 and the rp process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The level scheme of Cu-57 is investigated via the H-1(Ni-58,Cu-57-gamma)2n reaction by using the recoil mass spectrometer MARS at the Texas AandM Cyclotron Institute. Three low-lying excited states are observed in Cu-57 at 1028 +/- 4, 1106 +/- 4, and 2398 +/- 10 keV. The results are compared with well known excited states of the mirror nucleus Ni-57. Th, measured excited states of Cu-57 allow recalculation of the astrophysical reaction rate for the stellar radiative proton capture reaction Ni-56(p,gamma)Cu-57.

Zhou, XG; Dejbakhsh, H.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Jiang, J.; Trache, L.; Tribble, Robert E.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Thermochemical and kinetic aspects of the sulfurization of Cu-Sb and Cu-Bi thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CuSbS{sub 2} and Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3} are being investigated as part of a search for new absorber materials for photovoltaic devices. Thin films of these chalcogenides were produced by conversion of stacked and co-electroplated metal precursor layers in the presence of elemental sulfur vapour. Ex-situ XRD and SEM/EDS analyses of the processed samples were employed to study the reaction sequence with the aim of achieving compact layer morphologies. A new 'Time-Temperature-Reaction' (TTR) diagram and modified Pilling-Bedworth coefficients have been introduced for the description and interpretation of the reaction kinetics. For equal processing times, the minimum temperature required for CuSbS{sub 2} to appear is substantially lower than for Cu{sub 3}BiS{sub 3}, suggesting that interdiffusion across the interfaces between the binary sulfides is a key step in the formation of the ternary compounds. The effects of the heating rate and sulfur partial pressure on the phase evolution as well as the potential losses of Sb and Bi during the processes have been investigated experimentally and the results related to the equilibrium pressure diagrams obtained via thermochemical computation. - Graphical Abstract: Example of 3D plot showing the equilibrium pressure surfaces of species potentially escaping from chalcogenide films as a function of temperature and sulfur partial pressure. Bi{sub (g)}, Bi{sub 2(g)}, and BiS{sub (g)} are the gaseous species in equilibrium with solid Bi{sub 2}S{sub 3(s)} considered in this specific example. The pressure threshold plane corresponds to the pressure limit above which the elemental losses from 1 {mu}m thick films exceeds 10% of the original content per cm{sup 2} area of film and dm{sup 3} capacity of sulfurization furnace under static atmosphere conditions. The sulfurization temperature/sulfur partial pressure boundaries required to minimise the elemental losses below a given value can be easily read from the 2D projection of the intersection curves into the T-p{sub S2} plane. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Sulfurization of Sb-Cu and Bi-Cu metal precursors for thin film PV applications. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Kinetics shows the rate determining step to be the interdiffusion of binary sulfides. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Phase evolution is consistent with Pilling-Bedworth coefficients of Cu, Sb and Bi. Black-Right-Pointing-Triangle Elemental losses can be minimised via the use of equilibrium pressure diagrams.

Colombara, Diego, E-mail: dc326@bath.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Peter, Laurence M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Rogers, Keith D.; Hutchings, Kyle [Centre for Materials Science and Engineering, Cranfield University, Shrivenham, SN6 8LA (United Kingdom)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

Effect of Ni on Cu precipitation kinetics in \\alpha-Fe by AKMC study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The kinetics of coherent Cu rich precipitation in Fe-Cu and Fe-Cu-Ni alloys during thermal ageing have been modeled by Atomic Kinetic Monte Carlo method (AKMC). The AKMC is parameterized by existing ab-inito data to treat vacancy mediated diffusion which is depend on local atomic environment. A nonlinear semi-empirical time adjusting method is proposed to rescaled the MC time. The combined AKMC and time adjusting method give good agreement with experiments and other simulations, including advancement factor and the Cu cluster mobility. Simulations of ternary alloys reveal Ni has a temporal delay effect on Cu precipitation. This effect is caused by the decreasing diffusion coefficient of Cu clusters. And the reduction effect of diffusion coefficient weakens with cluster size. The simulations can be used to explain the experimental phenomenon that higher cluster number density formed during coasening stage in Fe-Cu-Ni alloys than corresponding binary alloy, which is related to cluster mobility.

Wang, Yi; Liu, Xiang Bing; Wang, Rong Shan; Wang, Jing Tao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Utility of reactively sputtered CuN{sub x} films in spintronics devices  

SciTech Connect

We have studied nitrified copper (CuN{sub x}) thin films grown by reactive sputtering in the context of spintronic devices. The Ar-to-N{sub 2} flow ratio enables tunability of the electrical resistivity and surface roughness of the CuN{sub x} films, with the former increasing to nearly 20 times that of Cu, and the latter reduced to the atomic scale. Incorporating this into a Ta/CuN{sub x}/Ta seed stack for spin valves improves the current-in-plane (CIP) magnetoresistance; maximum magnetoresistance results with CuN{sub x} seed layer and Cu interlayer. Finally, finite element modeling results are presented that suggest the use of CuN{sub x} in nanocontact spin torque oscillators can enhance current densities by limiting the current spread through the device. This may positively impact threshold currents, power requirements, and device reliability.

Fang Yeyu [Physics Department, Goeteborg University, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); Persson, J. [Physics Department, Goeteborg University, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); NanOsc AB, Electrum 205, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Zha, C. [Materials Physics Department, Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Willman, J.; Miller, Casey W. [Department of Physics, Center for Integrated Functional Materials, University of South Florida, 4202 East Fowler Avenue, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Aakerman, Johan [Physics Department, Goeteborg University, 412 96 Goeteborg (Sweden); NanOsc AB, Electrum 205, 164 40 Kista (Sweden); Materials Physics Department, Royal Institute of Technology, Electrum 229, 164 40 Kista (Sweden)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Comparative Study of the Defect Point Physics and Luminescence of the Kesterites Cu2ZnSnS4 and Cu2ZnSnSe4 and Chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)Se2: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this contribution, we present a comparative study of the luminescence of the kesterites Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) and Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) and their related chalcopyrite Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGSe). Luminescence spectroscopy suggests that the electronic properties of Zn-rich, Cu-poor kesterites (both CZTS and CZTSe) and Cu-poor CIGSe are dictated by fluctuations of the electrostatic and chemical potentials. The large redshift in the luminescence of grain boundaries in CIGSe, associated with the formation of a neutral barrier is clearly observed in CZTSe, and, to some extent, in CZTS. Kesterites can therefore replicate the fundamental electronic properties of CIGSe.

Romero, M. J.; Repins, I.; Teeter, G.; Contreras, M.; Al-Jassim, M.; Noufi, R.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Hydrolysis of CuCl{sub 2} in the Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production : experimental studies using a spray reactor with an ultrasonic atomizer.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cu-Cl thermochemical cycle is being developed as a hydrogen production method. Prior proof-of-concept experimental work has shown that the chemistry is viable while preliminary modeling has shown that the efficiency and cost of hydrogen production have the potential to meet DOE's targets. However, the mechanisms of CuCl{sub 2} hydrolysis, an important step in the Cu-Cl cycle, are not fully understood. Although the stoichiometry of the hydrolysis reaction, 2CuCl{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O {leftrightarrow} Cu{sub 2}OCl{sub 2} + 2HCl, indicates a necessary steam-to-CuCl{sub 2} molar ratio of 0.5, a ratio as high as 23 has been typically required to obtain near 100% conversion of the CuCl{sub 2} to the desired products at atmospheric pressure. It is highly desirable to conduct this reaction with less excess steam to improve the process efficiency. Per Le Chatelier's Principle and according to the available equilibrium-based model, the needed amount of steam can be decreased by conducting the hydrolysis reaction at a reduced pressure. In the present work, the experimental setup was modified to allow CuCl{sub 2} hydrolysis in the pressure range of 0.4-1 atm. Chemical and XRD analyses of the product compositions revealed the optimal steam-to-CuCl{sub 2} molar ratio to be 20-23 at 1 atm pressure. The experiments at 0.4 atm and 0.7 atm showed that it is possible to lower the steam-to-CuCl{sub 2} molar ratio to 15, while still obtaining good yields of the desired products. An important effect of running the reaction at reduced pressure is the significant decrease of CuCl concentration in the solid products, which was not predicted by prior modeling. Possible explanations based on kinetics and residence times are suggested.

Ferrandon, M. S.; Lewis, M. A.; Alvarez, F.; Shafirovich, E.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division; Univ. of Texas at El Paso

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The origins of ordering in CuPt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The alloy CuPt is one of the few that order into a L1{sub 1} crystal structure, i.e. planes of copper and planes of planes of planes of platinum perpendicular to the direction. For disordered CuPt, the calculated Warren-Cowley short-range order parameter indicates an instability to concentration fluctuations with a wave-vector of ({1/2}, {1/2}, {1/2}), consistent with L1{sub 1} ordering. We show that this rare tendency is due to this ordering vector arising from the large joint density of states associated with L point and X point van-Hove singularities which lie near the Fermi energy.

Clark, J.F.; Pinski, F.J. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Sterne, P.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Johnson, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Staunton, J.B. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Ginatempo, B. [Messina Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Teorica

1993-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The origins of ordering in CuPt  

SciTech Connect

The alloy CuPt is one of the few that order into a L1{sub 1} crystal structure, i.e. planes of copper and planes of planes of planes of platinum perpendicular to the < 111 > direction. For disordered CuPt, the calculated Warren-Cowley short-range order parameter indicates an instability to concentration fluctuations with a wave-vector of ({1/2}, {1/2}, {1/2}), consistent with L1{sub 1} ordering. We show that this rare tendency is due to this ordering vector arising from the large joint density of states associated with L point and X point van-Hove singularities which lie near the Fermi energy.

Clark, J.F.; Pinski, F.J. [Cincinnati Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Sterne, P.A. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Johnson, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Staunton, J.B. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Ginatempo, B. [Messina Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Teorica

1993-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

262

CuC1 thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell for producing copper having a dense graphite anode electrode and a dense graphite cathode electrode disposed in a CuCl solution. An anion exchange membrane made of poly(ethylene vinyl alcohol) and polyethylenimine cross-linked with a cross-linking agent selected from the group consisting of acetone, formaldehyde, glyoxal, glutaraldehyde, and mixtures thereof is disposed between the two electrodes.

Fan, Qinbai (Chicago, IL); Liu, Renxuan (Chicago, IL)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

263

Novel approaches to low temperature transient liquid phase bonding in the In-Sn/Cu and In-Sn-Bi/Cu systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fluxless low temperature transient liquid phase (LTTLP) bonding process was studied as a method of producing Cu/Cu joints below 125C and 75C using interlayer alloys from the In-Sn and In-Sn-Bi systems. Using thermodynamic ...

Fischer, David S., Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Charged and strange hadron elliptic flow in Cu+Cu collisions at [sqrt]sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of an elliptic flow, v2, analysis of Cu+Cu collisions recorded with the solenoidal tracker detector (STAR) at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at ?sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV. Elliptic flow as a ...

Surrow, Bernd

265

Directed and elliptic flow of charged particles in Cu + Cu collisions at ?[superscript s][subscript NN]=22.4 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports results for directed flow v[subscript 1] and elliptic flow v[subscript 2] of charged particles in Cu + Cu collisions at ?[superscript s][subscript NN]=22.4 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. The ...

Balewski, Jan T.

266

Effects of Cu Diffusion from ZnTe:Cu/Ti Contacts on Carrier Lifetime of CdS/CdTe Thin Film Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study the performance of CdS/CdTe thin film PV devices processed with a ZnTe:Cu/Ti contact to investigate how carrier lifetime in the CdTe layer is affected by Cu diffusion from the contact.

Gessert, T. A.; Metzger, W. K.; Asher, S. E.; Young, M. R.; Johnston, S.; Dhere, R. G.; Duda, A.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Phase equilibria of the Ba-Sm-Y-Cu-O system for coated conductor applications  

SciTech Connect

The complex phase relationships near the BaO-poor region of the quaternary Ba-Sm-Y-Cu-O oxide system prepared in pure air (p{sub O{sub 2}}=22 kPa, 950 {sup o}C) and in 0.1% O{sub 2} (p{sub O{sub 2}}=100 Pa, 810 {sup o}C) have been determined. This investigation also included the subsolidus compatibilities in ten subsystems (Ba-Sm-Y-O, Ba-Sm-Cu-O, Ba-Y-Cu-O, Sm-Y-Cu-O, Ba-Sm-O, Ba-Y-O, Ba-Cu-O, Sm-Y-O, Sm-Cu-O, and Y-Cu-O), and the homogeneity range of five solid solutions (Ba(Sm{sub x}Y{sub 2-x})CuO{sub 5}, (Sm,Y){sub 2}O{sub 3}, (Sm,Y){sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, (Y,Sm){sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 5}, and Ba(Sm,Y){sub 2}O{sub 4}). The single phase range of the superconductor solid solution, (Ba{sub 2-x}Sm{sub x})(Sm{sub 1-y}Y{sub y})Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+z}, and the phase compatibilities in its vicinity, which are particularly important for processing, are described in detail. The phase equilibrium data of the Ba-Sm-Y-Cu-O system will enable the improvement of the intrinsic superconducting properties of second-generation wires, and facilitate the flux-pinning process. -- Graphical Abstract: Phase diagram overview of the Ba-Sm-Y-Cu-O system in the BaO-poor region prepared in p{sub O2}=22 kPa, 950 {sup o}C. Display Omitted

Liu, G. [Ceramics Division, Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Wong-Ng, W., E-mail: Winnie.wong-ng@nist.go [Ceramics Division, Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Yang, Z. [Ceramics Division, Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Kaduk, J.A. [Poly Crystallography Inc., Naperville, IL 60540 (United States); Cook, L.P. [Ceramics Division, Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); PhazePro Technologies LLC, Hustontown, PA 17229 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Stripe-to-bubble transition of magnetic domains at the spin reorientation of (Fe/Ni)/Cu/Ni/Cu(001)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Magnetic domain evolution at the spin reorientation transition (SRT) of (Fe/Ni)/Cu/Ni/Cu(001) is investigated using photoemission electron microscopy. While the (Fe/Ni) layer exhibits the SRT, the interlayer coupling of the perpendicularly magnetized Ni layer to the (Fe/Ni) layer serves as a virtual perpendicular magnetic field exerted on the (Fe/Ni) layer. We find that the perpendicular virtual magnetic field breaks the up-down symmetry of the (Fe/Ni) stripe domains to induce a net magnetization in the normal direction of the film. Moreover, as the virtual magnetic field increases to exceed a critical field, the stripe domain phase evolves into a bubble domain phase. Although the critical field depends on the Fe film thickness, we show that the area fraction of the minority domain exhibits a universal value that determines the stripe-to-bubble phase transition.

Wu, J.; Choi, J.; Won, C.; Wu, Y. Z.; Scholl, A.; Doran, A.; Hwang, Chanyong; Qiu, Z.

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

269

In Vitro Assessment of the In Vivo Stability of Cu-64 Radiopharmaceuticals  

SciTech Connect

Research Plans: The successful development of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals depends upon retention of the Cu-64 atom in the radiopharmaceutical. To date, the focus has been on the development of chelators that better retain Cu-64, but there has been no effort to develop an effective method by which improved retention may be measured. In the absence of a suitable analytical method, the stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals is estimated indirectly, with decreased liver uptake suggesting higher in vivo complex stability. But this approach is inadequate for radiopharmaceuticals, such as radiolabeled antibodies, that are expected to accumulate in the liver even when there is no free Cu-64 present. The absence of such a method has also hampered efforts to systematically evaluate the chemical factors that may give rise to improved retention. The objective of this project is to develop and validate such a method. Accomplishments: The two primary accomplishments of this project will be 1) the development and validation of a method to measure the stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals and 2) the determination of the chemical factors that define the in vivo stability of Cu 64 radiopharmaceuticals. Because Cu(II) is extremely labile, the in vivo stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals is not primarily determined by the amount of ?¢????free?¢??? Cu that is present at any given time or by the thermodynamic stability constants, but rather by the rate at which Cu is lost from the complex, the dissociation rate constant, kd. The dissociation rate constants of the Cu-64 complexes from a series of bifunctional chelators (BFCs) will be measured using Free Ion Selective Radiotracer Extraction (FISRE), a technique originally developed to measure bioavailable Cu in environmental samples. FISRE will also be applied to the determination of the kd?¢????s of a series of reference Cu-64 complexes to determine the chemical factors that define the in vivo stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals. Potential Benefits: The FISRE method that will be used in this project, once validated, will provide researchers with a core technology by which the stability of Cu 64 radiopharmaceuticals can be accurately measured. In the short-term, we expect to produce extensive data regarding the stability of Cu-64 complexes of ligands of radiopharmaceutical interest, primarily those that are most commonly used as BFCs (e.g., DOTA, TETA). These data will provide a quantitative basis for deciding which ligands may be best suited for use as BFCs, data that is not currently available. In the intermediate term, we expect that these results will facilitate the development of new Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals by providing a quantitative approach to assessing the stability of Cu-64 chelates. This innovative methodology will enable investigators to quantitatively compare the ability of different BFCs to retain Cu-64 in vivo. The benefits of this approach will be best seen in the development of Cu-64-labeled monoclonal antibodies where the accumulation of antibodies in the liver obviates liver uptake as an effective surrogate measure of Cu-64 lability. In the longer-term, we anticipate an improvement in the way in which various diseases (especially cancer) are detected, diagnosed, staged, and treated. This method will also enable researchers to distinguish differences in biodistribution that may arise from differences in charge, lipophilicity, etc. from those that may arise from loss of Cu-64 from the chelator. Last, this novel quantitative tool will allow investigators to evaluate the chemical factors that determine the in vivo stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals?¢????laying the groundwork for the future development of more effective Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals. Once the feasibility of this method is established, it can also be used to evaluate the stability of other metalloradiopharmaceuticals including those based on Ga-68, a

Packard, Alan B.

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Trapping of Implanted He at Cu/Nb Interfaces Measured by Neutron Reflectometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In single crystalline metals, He is insoluble and precipitates into bubbles. In contrast, Cu-Nb multilayers show no evidence of bubble formation below a critical concentration. The conclusions of this paper are: (1) He is trapped at Cu/Nb , Cu/Mo interfaces; (2) He is trapped interstitially; (3) The interface swells {approx} 10 times; and (4) The layered structure retains despite the swell of interfaces.

Wang, Peng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhernenkov, Mikhail [Applications Scientist at Nanometrics; Kashinath, Abishek [MIT; Demkowicz, Michael [MIT; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Majewski, Jaroslaw [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

Method of fabricating high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin films for solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing a slightly Cu-poor thin film of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} comprises depositing a first layer of (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} followed by depositing just enough Cu+(Se,S) or Cu{sub x} (Se,S) to produce the desired slightly Cu-poor material. In a variation, most, but not all, (about 90 to 99%) of the (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} is deposited first, followed by deposition of all the Cu+(Se,S) or Cu{sub x} (Se,S) to go near stoichiometric, possibly or even preferably slightly Cu-rich, and then in turn followed by deposition of the remainder (about 1 to 10%) of the (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} to end with a slightly Cu-poor composition. In yet another variation, a small portion (about 1 to 10%) of the (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} is first deposited as a seed layer, followed by deposition of all of the Cu+(Se,S) or Cu{sub x} (Se,S) to make a very Cu-rich mixture, and then followed deposition of the remainder of the (In,Ga){sub x} (Se,S){sub y} to go slightly Cu-poor in the final Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2} thin film. 5 figs.

Noufi, R.; Gabor, A.M.; Tuttle, J.R.; Tennant, A.L.; Contreras, M.A.; Albin, D.S.; Carapella, J.J.

1995-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Method of fabricating high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)(SeS).sub.2 thin films for solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing a slightly Cu-poor thin film of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S).sub.2 comprises depositing a first layer of (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y followed by depositing just enough Cu+(Se,S) or Cu.sub.x (Se,S) to produce the desired slightly Cu-poor material. In a variation, most, but not all, (about 90 to 99%) of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y is deposited first, followed by deposition of all the Cu+(Se,S) or Cu.sub.x (Se,S) to go near stoichiometric, possibly or even preferably slightly Cu-rich, and then in turn followed by deposition of the remainder (about 1 to 10%) of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y to end with a slightly Cu-poor composition. In yet another variation, a small portion (about 1 to 10%) of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y is first deposited as a seed layer, followed by deposition of all of the Cu+(Se,S) or Cu.sub.x (Se,S) to make a very Cu-rich mixture, and then followed deposition of the remainder of the (In,Ga).sub.x (Se,S).sub.y to go slightly Cu-poor in the final Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S).sub.2 thin film.

Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CO); Gabor, Andrew M. (Boulder, CO); Tuttle, John R. (Denver, CO); Tennant, Andrew L. (Denver, CO); Contreras, Miguel A. (Golden, CO); Albin, David S. (Denver, CO); Carapella, Jeffrey J. (Evergreen, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Phase Diagram of CuCrO2 in a Magnetic Field  

SciTech Connect

The magnetic phase diagram of CuCrO2 is constructed as a function of magnetic field and anisotropy using a trial spin state built from harmonics of a fundamental ordering wavevector. Whereas the multiferroic phase of CuCrO2 is a modified spin spiral with a 3-sublattice (SL) period, the phase diagram also contains 1-SL, 2-SL, 4-SL, and 5-SL collinear states which may be accessi- ble in the nonstoichiometric compound CuCrO2+ . For small anisotropy, CuCrO2 is predicted to undergo a transition between two modified spiral states with an intervening 3-SL collinear phase.

Fishman, Randy Scott [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

F-8: Modeling of Mn-Ni-Si-Cu Precipitation in Reactor Pressure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, F-8: Modeling of Mn-Ni-Si-Cu Precipitation in Reactor .... Steels 316 and Comparison with the Rate Theory Model of a Multicomponent System.

275

Thermodynamic Modeling of the Mg-Cu-Ni Ternary System using ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, COM 2011. Symposium, LIGHT METALS. Presentation Title, Thermodynamic Modeling of the Mg-Cu-Ni Ternary System using the...

276

Fatigue Resistance of Al-Cu-Li and Comparison with 7xxx ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied the fatigue resistance of alloys 2050 (AlCuLi alloy belonging to the AIRWARETM family) and 7050. Crack initiation and propagation have been...

277

Effective suppression of Sn-58Bi/Cu interfacial reactions with minor ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-Site Speaker (Planned), Trong Lan Nguyen. Abstract Scope, Overgrowth of the ?-Cu6Sn5 layer between Sn-58 wt.%Bi (Sn-58Bi)...

278

Infrared Radiation Properties of CuO-ZnO-Based Sintered Material ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Infrared Radiation Properties of CuO-ZnO-Based Sintered Material Prepared for Energy-Saving Coating. Author(s), Chao Lian, Wei Wei, Hao...

279

Interface Role in the Shock Response of Cu/Nb Metallic Multilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Non-equilibrium MD simulations of the shock loading of Cu/Nb multilayers containing exclusively one interface structure or the other confirm the key role which...

280

Effect of Solder Bump Heights on Cu Dissolution Rate in Pb-Free ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Effect of Solder Bump Heights on Cu Dissolution Rate in Pb- Free ... Effect of Zn Content on the Electrification-Fusion and Failure Behaviors of ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fabrication and Characterization of Polycrystalline CuInSe 2 Thin ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Thin Film Structures for Energy Efficient Systems. Presentation Title, Fabrication and Characterization of Polycrystalline CuInSe2 Thin Film by...

282

Oxygen chemisorption on Cu(19 19 1) studied by spot profile analysis low-energy electron diffraction  

SciTech Connect

Cu(110) and the vicinal Cu(19 19 1) surfaces were characterized by recording maps of the reciprocal space by means of spot profile analysis low-energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED). For both surfaces, kinematic simulations were performed to get insight into the main features of the experimental data. Furthermore, it is shown that chemisorption of oxygen and subsequent annealing lead to the formation of a Cu-CuO stripe phase and induce faceting of the Cu(19 19 1) surface. The evolution from the clean Cu(19 19 1) surface to the coexistence of the (110) and (111) facets with increasing oxygen exposure was characterized by SPA-LEED.

Brandstetter, T.; Draxler, M.; Hohage, M.; Zeppenfeld, P. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Johannes Kepler Universitaet Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Microstructural Characterisation of Giant Magnetoresistive Co/Cu Multilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antiferromagnetically-coupled Co/Cu multilayers prepared by magnetron sputtering exhibit pronounced giant magnetoresistance (GMR) effect at room temperature. Using both diffraction and imaging techniques, we studied the in-plane and out-of-plane crystallographic and layering microstructural features of these multilayers. Dominant characteristic features associated with the multilayers, such as lateral and vertical columnar grain orientations as well as layer undulations and regularity, were identified. By deliberately introducing microstructural changes to the materials system using buffer layer and heat treatment, detailed microstructural analysis have provided an insight into the dependence of GMR on microstructures of the multilayers.

Kok, K. Y.; Ng, I. K. [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

284

Cu isotope fractionation during bornite dissolution: An in situ X-ray diffraction analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low-temperature ore deposits exhibit a large variation in {delta}{sup 65}Cu ({approx}12{per_thousand}), and this range has been attributed, in part, to isotope fractionation during weathering reactions of primary minerals such as chalcocite and chalcopyrite. Here, we examine the fractionation of Cu isotopes during dissolution of another important Cu ore mineral, bornite, using a novel approach that combines time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) and isotope analysis of reaction products. During the initial stages of bornite oxidative dissolution by ferric sulfate ( 20 mol% Cu was leached from the solid, the difference between the Cu isotope composition of the aqueous and mineral phases approached zero, with {Delta}{sub aq - min}{sup 0} values ranging from - 0.21 {+-} 0.61{per_thousand} to 0.92 {+-} 0.25{per_thousand}. XRD analysis allowed us to correlate changes in the atomic structure of bornite with the apparent isotope fractionation as the dissolution reaction progressed. These data revealed that the greatest degree of apparent fractionation is accompanied by a steep contraction in the unit-cell volume, which we identified as a transition from stoichiometric to non-stoichiometric bornite. We propose that the initially high {Delta}{sub aq - min} values result from isotopically heavy Cu ({sup 65}Cu) concentrating within Cu{sup 2+} during dissolution. The decrease in the apparent isotope fractionation as the reaction progresses occurs from the distillation of isotopically heavy Cu ({sup 65}Cu) during dissolution or kinetic isotope effects associated with the depletion of Cu from the surfaces of bornite particles.

Wall, Andrew J.; Mathur, Ryan; Post, Jeffrey E.; Heaney, Peter J. (Juniata); (Smithsonian); (Penn)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

285

Incoherent twin boundary migration induced by ion irradiation in Cu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grain boundaries can act as sinks for radiation-induced point defects. The sink capability is dependent on the atomic structures and varies with the type of point defects. Using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, we observed that {Sigma}3{l_brace}112{r_brace} incoherent twin boundary (ITB) in Cu films migrates under Cu{sup 3+} ion irradiation. Using atomistic modeling, we found that {Sigma}3{l_brace}112{r_brace} ITB has the preferred sites for adsorbing interstitials and the preferential diffusion channels along the Shockley partial dislocations. Coupling with the high mobility of grain boundary Shockley dislocations within {Sigma}3{l_brace}112{r_brace} ITB, we infer that {Sigma}3{l_brace}112{r_brace} ITB migrates through the collective glide of grain boundary Shockley dislocations, driven by a concurrent reduction in the density of radiation-induced defects, which is demonstrated by the distribution of nearby radiation-induced defects.

Li, N.; Misra, A. [Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Materials Physics and Applications Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Wang, J.; Wang, Y. Q. [Materials Science and Technology Division, MST-8, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Serruys, Y. [CEA, DEN, Service de Recherches de Metallurgie Physique, Laboratoire JANNUS, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Nastasi, M. [Nebraska Center for Energy Sciences Research, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588 (United States)

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

$J/?$ production at low $p_T$ in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}$ = 200 GeV at STAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The $J/\\psi$ $p_T$ spectrum and nuclear modification factor ($R_{\\textit{AA}}$) are reported for $p_T < 5$ GeV/c and $|y|<1$ from 0-60% central Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} =200$ GeV at STAR. A significant suppression of $p_T$-integrated $J/\\psi$ production is observed in central Au+Au events, with less suppression observed in Cu+Cu. The $p_T$ dependence of the $R_{\\textit{AA}}$ is observed to increase at a higher $p_T$ region. The data are compared with the previously published RHIC results. Comparing with model calculations, it is found that the invariant yields at low $p_T$ are significantly above hydrodynamic flow predictions but are consistent with models that include color screening and regeneration.

STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; A. Banerjee; Z. Barnovska; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Caldern de la Barca Snchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; D. Grosnick; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; Zhang; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

287

Chemical Rearrangement under Hydrothermal Conditions: Formation of Polymeric Chains (CuX)2(dpiz) and (CuX)3(dpiz) (X ) Cl, Br; dpiz ) Dipyrido[1,2-a:2,3-d]imidazole) and Crystal Structures of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to their excellent redox catalytic abilities.10 In this Communication, we report the synthesisL acid digestion bombs at 170 °C afforded orange crystals of 1 [(CuCl)2(C10H7N3)] (I) and 1 [(CuBr)3(C crystallographically independent copper sites in this common motif. Cu(1), the Cu atom in the tetrahedral site

Li, Jing

288

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6{Delta}-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 and 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor attempted in July, 2006, to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Application of surfactant in the length of the horizontal hole, and acid over the fracture zone at 10,236 was also planned. This attempt was not successful in that the clean out tools became stuck and had to be abandoned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6.-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently investigating the costs and operational viability of re-entering the well and conducting an FMI (fracture detection) log and/or an acid stimulation. No final decision or detailed plans have been made regarding these potential interventions at this time.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were drilled and lined through the problematic shale member without major stability problems. The top of the targeted Monterey was thought to be seen at the expected TVD of 10,000 ft where the 7-in. liner was set at a 60{sup o} hole angle. Significant oil and gas shows suggested the fractured interval anticipated at the heel location had been penetrated. A total of 2572 ft of 6 1/8-in. near-horizontal interval was placed in the shale section, extending planned well length by approximately 470 ft. Very little hydrocarbon in-flow was observed from fractures along the productive interval. This may be a result of the well trajectory falling underneath the Monterey fractured zone. Hydrocarbon observations, cuttings analysis and gamma-ray response indicated additional fractured intervals were accessed along the last {+-}900 ft of well length. The well was completed with a 2 7/8-in. tubing string set in a production packer in preparation for flow and swab tests to be conducted later by a service rig. The planned well time was estimated as 39 days and overall cost as $2.4 million. The actual results are 66 days at a total cost of $3.4 million. Well productivity responses during subsequent flow and swabbing tests were negative. The well failed to inflow and only minor amounts (a few barrels) of light oil were recovered. The lack of production may suggest that actual sustainable reservoir pressure is far less than anticipated. Temblor is currently planning to re-enter and clean out the well and run an Array Induction log (primarily for resistivity and correlation purposes), and an FMI log (for fracture detection). Depending on the results of these logs, an acidizing or re-drill program will be planned.

George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

291

Microstructure and Mechanical Property of Cu-40%Zn-0.5%Cr Alloy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yield stress of extruded P/M Cu-40Zn-0.5Cr brass alloy at 773 K was 514.6 MPa, high value of 54.7% of the conventional P/M Cu60-Zn40 brass alloy at same...

292

Modeling of Thermodynamic Properties and Phase Equilibria for the Cu-Mg Binary System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mg2-Cb (oF48) are computed using the Vienna Ab-initio Simulation Package (VASP). The Gibbs free energy and Amorphous Al-Cu-Zr and Al-Cu-Ni-Zr Alloys, Thermochim. Acta, 1999, 339, p 1-9 Section I: Basic and Applied

Chen, Long-Qing

293

Ultrasonochemical-assisted synthesis of CuO nanorods with high hydrogen storage ability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uniform CuO nanorods with different size have been synthesized in a water-alcohol solution through a fast and facile ultrasound irradiation assistant route. Especially, the as-prepared CuO nanorods have shown a strong size-induced enhancement of electrochemical ...

Gang Xiao; Peng Gao; Longqiang Wang; Yujin Chen; Ying Wang; Guoli Zhang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Microstructure and electrical mechanism of Sn-xAg-Cu PV-ribbon for solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microstructure, fusion current, and series resistance of photovoltaic (PV) ribbon containing SAC105 and SAC305 alloys are investigated. After reflow, the interfacial microstructures of solder/Cu and solder/Ag were observed and an electrical current ... Keywords: Electrical properties, Photovoltaic ribbon, Sn-Ag-Cu

Kuan-Jen Chen, Fei-Yi Hung, Truan-Sheng Lui, Li-Hui Chen, Dai-Wen Qiu, Ta-Lung Chou

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Development of a Low Cost Insulated Foil Substrate for Cu(InGaSe)2 Photovoltaics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project validated the use of stainless steel flexible substrate coated with silicone-based resin dielectric, developed by Dow Corning Corporation, for Cu(InGa)Se2 based photovoltaics. The projects driving force was the high performance of Cu(InGa)Se2 based photovoltaics coupled with potential cost reduction that could be achieved with dielectric coated SS web substrate.

ERTEN ESER

2012-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

296

A room temperature CuO nanowire sensor for organic volatile gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CuO nanowires have been synthesised by the thermal method in 100% oxygen ambient at 600C. Gas sensing property has been examined by measuring the resistance change of the materials to 1% of butane gas and 1% of ethanol vapour separately under the ... Keywords: copper oxide (CuO) nanowires, room temperature gas sensor and organic volatile gas

C. F. Dee; T. Y. Tiong; M. M. Salleh; M. M. Yahya; B. Y. Majlis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Glass Forming Ability in Pr-(Cu, Ni)-Al Alloys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glass forming ability (GFA) in the Pr-rich Pr-(Cu, Ni)-Al alloys at or near the eutectic points was systematically studied. It was found that the GFA in the pseudo-ternary alloys of Pr-(Cu, Ni)-Al is higher than that of ...

Zhang, Yong

298

Applications of Cu@C nanoparticles in new dye-sensitized solar cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To enhance the efficiency of a newly developing dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), the Cu@C (Cu size = 7 and 20 nm) core-shell nanoparticles-dispersed molten salt-conjugated electrolyte has been studied. Experimentally, the efficiencies (?) of the ...

Chang-Yu Liao; H. Paul Wang; F.-L. Chen; C.-H. Huang; Y. Fukushima

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Alkali compounds catalyzed low temperature methanol synthesis over Cu-based catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel mixed catalyst system containing alkali compounds over Cu/MgO-Na catalyst was developed to synthesize methanol from syngas via ethyl formate in a slurry reactor. The results exhibited that among the used alkali formates (HCOOM, M=Li, Na, Cs, ... Keywords: CuMgO-Na/HCOONa/catalysis system, low temperature methanol synthesis, slurry phase

Baoshan Hu

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Estudo das propriedades termomecnicas da liga cu 78,3% - al 9,8% mn 11,9%.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The alloys Cu 78,3% - Al 9,8% - Mn 11,9 and 77.5% Cu - Al 9.8% - Mn 11,9% -% Nb 0.5 - 0.3% Ni (more)

Rafael Evaristo Calute

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Magnetic ordering of Nd in (Nd,Ce) sub 2 CuO sub 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron-diffraction techniques have been used to study the magnetic ordering of the Nd ions in semiconducting Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4} and superconducting Nd{sub 1.85}Ce{sub 0.15}CuO{sub 4}. For the Ce-doped system a sharp transition to long-range antiferromagnetic order occurs at {ital T}{sub {ital N}}{approx}1.2 K, with a simple magnetic unit cell which is double the chemical unit cell along the {ital a} and {ital b} directions. The same magnetic structure is observed in the parent system Nd{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, in which the Cu spins are also ordered magnetically, but strong coupling between the Nd and Cu sublattices is indicated.

Lynn, J.W.; Sumarlin, I.W.; Skanthakumar, S.; Li, W. (Center for Superconductivity Research, Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (US) National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (USA)); Shelton, R.N.; Peng, J.L. (Department of Physics, University of California-Davis, Davis, California 95616 (USA)); Fisk, Z. (MS K764, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (USA)); Cheong, S. (MS K764, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (USA) Department of Physics, University of California-Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Enhanced quality thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 for semiconductor device applications by vapor-phase recrystallization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Enhanced quality thin films of Cu.sub.w (In,Ga.sub.y)Se.sub.z for semiconductor device applications are fabricated by initially forming a Cu-rich, phase-separated compound mixture comprising Cu(In,Ga):Cu.sub.x Se on a substrate to form a large-grain precursor and then converting the excess Cu.sub.x Se to Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 by exposing it to an activity of In and/or Ga, either in vapor In and/or Ga form or in solid (In,Ga).sub.y Se.sub.z. Alternatively, the conversion can be made by sequential deposition of In and/or Ga and Se onto the phase-separated precursor. The conversion process is preferably performed in the temperature range of about 300.degree.-600.degree. C., where the Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2 remains solid, while the excess Cu.sub.x Se is in a liquid flux. The characteristic of the resulting Cu.sub.w (In,Ga).sub.y Se.sub.z can be controlled by the temperature. Higher temperatures, such as 500.degree.-600.degree. C., result in a nearly stoichiometric Cu(In,Ga)Se.sub.2, whereas lower temperatures, such as 300.degree.-400.degree. C., result in a more Cu-poor compound, such as the Cu.sub.z (In,Ga).sub.4 Se.sub.7 phase.

Tuttle, John R. (Denver, CO); Contreras, Miguel A. (Golden, CO); Noufi, Rommel (Golden, CO); Albin, David S. (Denver, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Three 3D hybrid networks based on octamolybdates and different Cu{sup I}/Cu{sup II}-bis(triazole) motifs  

SciTech Connect

Three 3D compounds based on octamolybdate clusters and various Cu{sup I}/Cu{sup II}-bis(triazole) motifs, [Cu{sup I}{sub 2}btb][{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sub 0.5} (1), [Cu{sup I}{sub 2}btpe][{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sub 0.5} (2), and [Cu{sup II}(btpe){sub 2}][{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sub 0.5} (3) [btb=1,4-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)butane, btpe=1,5-bis(1,2,4-triazol-1-yl)pentane], were isolated via tuning flexible ligand spacer length and metal coordination preferences. In 1, the copper(I)-btb motif is a one-dimensional (1D) chain which is further linked by hexadentate {beta}-[Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} clusters via coordinating to Cu{sup I} cations giving a 3D structure. In 2, the copper(I)-btpe motif exhibits a 'stairs'-like [Cu{sup I}{sub 2}btpe]{sup 2+} sheet, and the tetradentate {beta}-[Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} clusters interact with two neighboring [Cu{sup I}{sub 2}btpe]{sup 2+} sheets constructing a 3D framework. In 3, the copper(II)-btpe motif possesses a novel (2D{yields}3D) interdigitated structure, which is further connected by the tetradentate {beta}-[Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} clusters forming a 3D framework. The thermal stability and luminescent properties of 1-3 are investigated in the solid state. -- Graphical abstract: Three 3D compounds based on {beta}-[Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} clusters with different Cu{sup I}/Cu{sup II}-bis(triazole) motifs were synthesized by regularly tuning flexible ligand spacer length and metal coordination preferences. Display Omitted

Zhang, Chun-Jing [Key Laboratory of Polyoxometalates Science of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Pang, Hai-Jun [College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Harbin University of Science and Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Tang, Qun; Wang, Hui-Yuan [Key Laboratory of Polyoxometalates Science of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China); Chen, Ya-Guang, E-mail: chenyg146@nenu.edu.c [Key Laboratory of Polyoxometalates Science of Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Northeast Normal University, Changchun 130024 (China)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Effect of Cu contamination on recombination of O atoms on a plasma-oxidized silicon surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the dual damascene microelectronics integration scheme during the last stage of plasma etching of dielectrics down to underlying Cu layers, Cu is sputtered onto the reactor walls and is believed to cause a drift in etching rates. For photoresist etching in an O{sub 2}-containing plasma, a drop in etching rate suggests that Cu could cause a decrease in the O-atom concentration in the plasma, due perhaps to an increase in the O recombination rate on the chamber walls. We therefore studied the effects of traces of Cu on O recombination on an oxygen plasma-conditioned surface, using the spinning wall technique. With this method, a cylindrical substrate, here coated in situ with sputter-deposited Si and then oxidized in an O{sub 2} plasma, is rotated past skimmers, allowing the surface to be periodically exposed to the plasma and an Auger electron spectrometer with a pressure gauge in a differentially pumped chamber. Between plasma exposures, the sample could also be dosed with Cu from an evaporation source in a differentially pumped chamber. With no Cu on the surface, a pressure rise was observed in the Auger chamber, due to desorption of recombined O{sub 2}. These measurements were used to derive a Langmuir-Hinshelwood recombination coefficient of gamma{sub O}=0.043 for the steady-state oxidized Si, Cu-free surface. The surface was then coated with a small fraction of a monolayer (roughly approx0.002 monolayers of Cu with a dose of approx1.4x10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} and an assumed sticking coefficient of 0.3) and gamma{sub O} was found to increase to 0.069. Further dosing with Cu did not produce any further increases in gamma{sub O}. The initial low gamma{sub O} value could not be recovered by coating the surface with sputter Si, apparently due to rapid outdiffusion of Cu through Si at room temperature. Cu catalyzed recombination of O is ascribed to a redox cycling between Cu{sup +} and Cu{sup 2+} oxidation states.

Guha, Joydeep; Khare, Rohit; Stafford, Luc; Donnelly, Vincent M. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States); Sirard, Stephen; Hudson, Eric A. [Lam Research Corporation, Fremont, California 94538 (United States)

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Effects of laser irradiation on the morphology of Cu(110)  

SciTech Connect

The effects of pulsed laser irradiation on the morphology of the Cu(110) surface were investigated by means of reflectance difference spectroscopy (RDS) and spot profile analysis low-energy electron diffraction (SPA-LEED). The laser light induces surface defects (adatoms and islands) as well as subsurface dislocation lines. The high surface mobility leads to efficient annealing of the surface defects even at room temperature, whereas the subsurface dislocation lines persist up to temperatures T>800 K. SPA-LEED profiles of the (00) diffraction spot from the laser irradiated surface suggest an anisotropic distribution of the subsurface line defects related to the geometry of the fcc easy glide system, which is corroborated by STM measurements. Comparative experiments using conventional Ar ion bombardment point out the distinctiveness of the morphological changes induced by laser irradiation.

Brandstetter, T.; Draxler, M.; Hohage, M.; Zeppenfeld, P.; Stehrer, T.; Heitz, J.; Georgiev, N.; Martinotti, D.; Ernst, H.-J. [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Johannes Kepler Universitaet Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Institut fuer Angewandte Physik, Johannes Kepler Universitaet Linz, A-4040 Linz (Austria); CEA Saclay, DSM/Drecam/SPCSI, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

Photoionization spectroscopy of ionic metal dimers: LiCu and LiAg  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electronic spectra are reported for the heteronuclear metal dimers LiCu and LiAg, with resonant one-color two-photon ionization (R2PI). The dimers are produced in a pulsed supersonic molecular beam by laser vaporization of either a copper or silver rod coated with a thin film of vacuum deposited lithium metal. A total of twelve excited electronic states for LiCu and seven for LiAg are observed. Analysis of the vibrational progressions yields ground and excited state vibrational frequencies and dissociation energies for both LiCu and LiAg. In addition, selected vibronic bands are rotationally resolved. This data, together with that obtained by Morse and co-workers for LiCu [J. Chem. Phys. (to be published)], gives bond lengths for LiCu and LiAg (r{sub 0}{sup {double_prime}}=2.26 and 2.41 {Angstrom}, respectively). The bond lengths for LiCu and LiAg are significantly shorter than expected by comparison to the homonuclear diatomics Li{sub 2} and Cu{sub 2} or Ag{sub 2}. Dissociation energies in the heteronuclear dimers are also much greater than the mean of the corresponding homonuclear dimer values. These trends indicate that ionic character plays a leading role in the ground-state bonding. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Brock, L.R.; Knight, A.M.; Reddic, J.E.; Pilgrim, J.S.; Duncan, M.A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Phase stabilization and characterization of nanocrystalline Fe-doped Cu{sub 2}O  

SciTech Connect

Oxide-based ferromagnetic semiconductors are currently being explored for spin-based electronics (Spintronics) applications. Specimens of 1 and 2% Fe-doped Cu{sub 2}O were prepared by varying the parameters of chemical co-precipitation technique. XRD analysis confirmed the cubic structure of Cu{sub 2}O. Single-phase structure was obtained for the 1% Fe-doped Cu{sub 2}O, whereas for the 2% Fe-doped Cu{sub 2}O material, secondary phases were present (either CuO or Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}). The morphology and composition were characterized by SEM and EDAX. Measurements made by vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) indicated paramagnetic behavior at 300 K and diamagnetic behavior at 77 K for the 1% Fe-doped Cu{sub 2}O. Diffuse reflectance (DRS) measurements indicated that a red shift in the band gap of Cu{sub 2}O occurs on doping with Fe.

Joseph, D. Paul; David, T. Premkumar; Raja, S. Philip [Materials Science Centre, Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai-600 025 (India); Venkateswaran, C. [Materials Science Centre, Department of Nuclear Physics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai-600 025 (India)], E-mail: cvunom@hotmail.com

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

Microstructure and Corrosion Behavior of the Cu-Pd-X Ternary Alloys for Hydrogen Separation Membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CuPd alloys are among the most promising candidate materials for hydrogen separation membranes and membrane reactor applications due to their high hydrogen permeability and better sulfur resistance. In order to reduce the Pd content and, therefore, the cost of the membrane materials, efforts have been initiated to develop CuPdM ternary alloys having a bcc structure. The advantages of having Pd as a hydrogen separation membrane are: (1) high hydrogen selectivity; and (2) high hydrogen permeability. The disadvantages are: (1) high cost; (2) hydrogen embrittlement ({alpha} {yields} {beta} Pd hydride); and (3) sulfur poisoning. Experiments (XRD, SEM/EDS) verified that Mg, Al, La, Y and Ti are promising alloying elements to expand the B2 phase region in Cu-Pd binary system. HT-XRD showed that the B2 to FCC transition temperatures for Cu-Pd-X (X = Mg, Al, La, Y and Ti) are higher than that of Cu-Pd binary alloys. While the Cu-50Pd alloy had the highest corrosion resistance to the H2S containing syngas, the Cu-Pd-Mg alloy had a comparable resistance.

O.N. Dogan; M.C. Gao; B.H. Howard

2012-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

309

Cu-Ga-Se Thin Films Prepared by a Combination of Electrodeposition and Evaporation Techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cu-Ga-Se thin films were prepared using a combination of electrodeposition and evaporation techniques. A Cu-Se/Mo/glass precursor thin film was first prepared by galvanostatic electrodeposition. On top of this film three different thicknesses of Ga were deposited by evaporation. The Cu-Ga-Se thin films were formed by annealing the Ga/Cu-Se/Mo/glass thin film configuration in a tubular chamber with Se powder, at different temperatures. Thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), photocurrent spectroscopy (PS), inductively coupled plasma (ICP) analysis, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The detailed analysis from X-ray reveals that after annealing at 550 C the CuGaSe{sub 2} phase is formed when the thickness of Ga is 0.25 {mu}m, however at 0.5 {mu}m and 1.0 {mu}m Ga the formation of CuGa{sub 3}Se{sub 5} and CuGa{sub 5}Se{sub 8} phases is observed respectively. Band gap values were obtained using photocurrent spectroscopy.

Fernandez, A. M.; Turner, J. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Characterization and device performance of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers is of interest in that Ag-chalcopyrites exhibit both wider bandgaps and lower melting points than their Cu counterparts. (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 absorber layers were deposited over the composition range 0 < Ag/(Ag+Cu) < 1 and 0.3 < Ga/(In+Ga) < 1.0 using a variety of elemental co-evaporation processes. Films were found to be singlephase over the entire composition range, in contrast to prior studies. Devices with Ga content 0.3 < Ga/(In+Ga) <0.5 tolerated Ag incorporation up to Ag/(Ag+Cu) = 0.5 without appreciable performance loss. Ag-containing films with Ga/(In+Ga) = 0.8 showed improved device characteristics over Cu-only control samples, in particular a 30-40% increase in short-circuit current. An absorber layer with composition Ag/(Ag+Cu) = 0.75 and Ga/(In+Ga) = 0.8 yielded a device with VOC = 890 mV, JSC = 20.5mA/cm2, fill factor = 71.3%, and ? = 13.0%.

Hanket, Gregory; Boyle, Jonathan H.; Shafarman, William N.

2009-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

311

NQR-NMR studies of higher alcohol synthesis Cu-Co catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have investigated a series of Cu/Co catalysts supported on Titanium Dioxide. This study has sought to examine and compare the nature and effect of the supports Chromia and Titania (Cr[sub 2]O[sub 3], and TiO[sub 2]) on the magnetic character of the Cu-Co-Cr and Cu-Co-TiO[sub 2] catalysts. The magnetization results for Cu/Co, Cu/Co/Cr, Cu/Co/TiO[sub 2] system are presented along with the magnetization data for the unsupported Cu/Co catalysts and data for supported catalysts. Pure cobalt metal has a magnetic moment of 161 emu/g. The measured emu values and the corresponding reduction percentages are given for the various catalysts investigated. The vibration sample magnetometer determines S[sub s], the saturation magnetization, emu per gram of the composite sample. The magnetization values reported are emu per gram of cobalt in the composite. As such the data normally reflects the proportion of cobalt metal that is reduced to metallic form. However, if electronic exchanges occur between cobalt and other elements in the system, the magnetic moment itself differs from the assumed value of 161 emu/g Co then the emu value observed will be the resultant due to the electronic charge density modifications in Co as well as reduction to metallic state. Our earlier NMR studies reveal such electronic structural modifications occur for Cobalt in Cu-Co and Co-TiO[sub 2] systems. The magnetization data in column 3 for Cu-Co-TiO[sub 2] systems unambiguously shows such electron exchanges do occur between cobalt and titania.

Murty, A.N.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Crystal structure and magnetic properties of NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl  

SciTech Connect

A new copper(II) oxide phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], has been synthesized by flux synthesis. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data show that the title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic system, space group P2{sub 1}/c (No. 14), with lattice parameters a=8.392(2) A, b=6.3960(10) A, c=16.670(2) A, {beta}=109.470(10) Degree-Sign , V=843.6(3) A{sup 3}, Z=4. The crystal structure is characterized by a complex chain of copper-centered polyhedra running along [0 1 0] which are connected by phosphate tetrahedra. The resulting three-dimensional polyhedra framework exhibits channels filled by additional copper and sodium atoms. Field and temperature dependent measurements of the specific heat and the magnetic susceptibility reveal low-dimensional magnetic behavior. The compound starts to decompose at 700 K under release of oxygen and evaporation of Cu{sup I}Cl as shown by simultaneous thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry. - Graphical abstract: The crystal structure of the new copper(II) phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], exhibits linear chains of copper tetrahedra which show low-dimensional magnetic behavior proven by specific heat and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new copper(II) oxide phosphate chloride, NaCu{sup II}[(Cu{sup II}{sub 3}O)(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}Cl], has been synthesized by flux synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure comprises chains of Cu{sub 4}O tetrahedra. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low-dimensional behavior has been proven by magnetic and specific heat measurements. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer On heating, Cu{sup I}Cl and oxygen are released shown by simultaneous thermogravimetry and mass spectrometry.

Jin Tengteng [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-Functional Inorganic Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dingxi Rd. 1295, Shanghai 200050 (China); Liu Wei [Institute of Science and Engineering of Materials, Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China); Chen Shuang; Prots, Yurii; Schnelle, Walter [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Zhao Jingtai [Key Laboratory of Transparent Opto-Functional Inorganic Materials, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dingxi Rd. 1295, Shanghai 200050 (China); Kniep, Ruediger [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Hoffmann, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.hoffmann@cpfs.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemische Physik fester Stoffe, Noethnitzer Str. 40, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

The shape memory capability and life of Cu-Al-Be-X alloys  

SciTech Connect

The shape memory capacity and the shape memory life of three alloys of the Cu-11.6Al-0.4Be-X type have been investigated using the strain angle restoration method and compared with the alloy Cu-25Zn-4Al. The alloys were subjected to various normalizing and normalizing plus aging treatments, and all were found to possess excellent shape memory properties. The alloy Cu-11.6Al-0.4Be-0.2Cr demonstrated the best shape memory capacity and life.

Dong, Y.Y.; Dar, K.Z. (Gansu Mechanical Engineering Academy, Lanzhou (China)); Wang, T.M. (Lanzhou Univ. (China)); Zin, S.J. (Lanzhou High Pressure Valve Co. (China))

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Mixed-sputter deposition of Ni-Ti-Cu shape memory films  

SciTech Connect

Ni-Ti-Cu shape memory films were mixed-sputter deposited from separate nickel, titanium, and copper targets, providing increased compositional flexibility. Shape memory characteristics, examined for films with 7 at. % Cu and 41--51 at. % Tl, were determined with temperature controlled substrate curvature measurements, and microstructure was studied with transmission electron microscopy. The Ni-Ti-Cu films were found to have shape memory properties comparable to bulk materials, with transformation temperatures between 20 and 62{degree}C, a 10--13{degree}C hysteresis, and up to 330 MPa recoverable stress.

Krulevitch, P.; Ramsey, P.B.; Makowiecki, D.M.; Lee, A.P.; Northrup, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Johnson, G.C. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Investigations of CuInSe sub 2 thin films and contacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research into electrical contacts for copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) polycrystalline thin films used for solar cell applications. Molybdenum contacts have historically been the most promising for heterojunction solar cells. This program studied contact stability by investigating thermally induced bilayer reactions between molybdenum and copper, indium, and selenium. Because selenization is widely used to fabricate CuInSe{sub 2} thin films for photovoltaic cells, a second part of the program investigated how the morphologies, phases, and reactions of pre-selenization Cu-In structures are affected by the deposition process and heat treatments. 7 refs., 6 figs.

Nicolet, M.A. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Giant Magnetoresistance In Ni/Cu Multilayers Fabricated By Electron-Beam Evaporation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron beam evaporation technique has been used to deposit the multilayers of Ni-Cu, represented by Si[BL{sub t}/[Ni(t{sub FM})/Cu(t{sub NM})]xn] where Si is used as a substrate and BL is buffer layer, n is the number of bilayers, t, t{sub FM} and t{sub NM} are thicknesses of buffer layer, ferromagnetic (Ni) and nonmagnetic (Cu) layers, respectively. We characterize the multilayers using M-H curves, magnetoresistance measurement (at room temperature)

Vikram, V.; Rahman, Md. Rizwanur; Katiyar, Monica [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh, 208016 (India)

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

317

Investigation of thermal, mechanical and magnetic behaviors of the Cu-11%Al alloy with Ag and Mn additions  

SciTech Connect

The investigation of thermal, mechanical and magnetic behaviors of the Cu-11%Al, Cu-11%Al-3%Ag, Cu-11%Al-10%Mn and Cu-11%Al-10%Mn-3%Ag alloys was made using microhardness measurements, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy and magnetic moment change with applied field measurement. The results indicated that the Mn addition changes the phase stability range, the microhardness values and makes undetectable the eutectoid reaction in annealed Cu-11%Al and Cu-11%Al-3%Ag alloys while the presence of Ag does not modify the phase transformation sequence neither microhardness values of the annealed Cu-11%Al and Cu-11%Al-10%Mn alloys, but it increases the magnetic moment of this latter at about 2.7 times and decreases the rates of eutectoid and peritectoid reactions of the former. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The microstructure of Cu-Al alloy is modified in the Ag presence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ({alpha} + {gamma}) phase is stabilized down to room temperature when Ag is added to Cu-Al alloy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ag-rich phase modifies the magnetic characteristics of Cu-Al-Mn alloy.

Silva, R.A.G., E-mail: galdino.ricardo@gmail.com [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra-UNIFESP, Diadema-SP (Brazil)] [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra-UNIFESP, Diadema-SP (Brazil); Paganotti, A.; Gama, S. [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra-UNIFESP, Diadema-SP (Brazil)] [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas e da Terra-UNIFESP, Diadema-SP (Brazil); Adorno, A.T.; Carvalho, T.M.; Santos, C.M.A. [Instituto de Quimica - UNESP, Araraquara-SP (Brazil)] [Instituto de Quimica - UNESP, Araraquara-SP (Brazil)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Effects of Cu, Mg, and Sr Additions on the Mechanical Properties ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increase in Cu/Mg levels has a detrimental effect on drill life. The Mg-free alloy displays the lowest cutting force and moment, producing the highest number of...

319

Effects of Cu-Bearing Flux on Sn-3.5Ag Soldering with Electroless Ni ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The content of the Cu compound in a flux varies from 0 wt. ... Electromigration Behavior of Sn-In Lead-Free Solder Alloy Under High Current Stress ... Phase-

320

Quantificao da deformao residual em uma liga CuAlBe superelstica.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Este trabalho apresenta um estudo relativo transformao martenstica induzida por tenso temperatura ambiente e a 57C em uma liga Cu 11,8% Al 0,6% (more)

Fbio Jos Carvalho Frana

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Relative Humidity Sensing Properties Of Cu{sub 2}O Doped ZnO Nanocomposite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we report application of Cu{sub 2}O doped ZnO composite prepared by solid state reaction route as humidity sensor. Pellet samples of ZnO-Cu{sub 2}O nanocrystalline powders with 2, 5 and 10 weight% of Cu{sub 2}O in ZnO have been prepared. Pellets have been annealed at temperatures of 200-500 deg. C and exposed to humidity. It is observed that as relative humidity increases, resistance of the pellet decreases for the humidity from 10% to 90%. Sample with 5% of Cu{sub 2}O doped in ZnO and annealed at 500 deg. C shows best results with sensitivity of 1.50 M{omega}/%RH. In this case the hysteresis is low and the reproducibility high, making it the suitable candidate for humidity sensing.

Pandey, N. K.; Tiwari, K.; Tripathi, A.; Roy, A.; Rai, A.; Awasthi, P. [Sensors and Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, University Of Lucknow, U.P., Pin-226007 (India)

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

322

Electrochemical Behaviour of a 2024 Al-Cu-Mg Alloy of Various ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... alloy tempers at solution pH 12 showed distinct active-passive phenomenon. ... E43: Behavior of Intermetallic Compound in Al-Si-Cu Alloy with Cooling Rate...

323

Microstructure Formation in Ti3SiC2-Cu Composites Produced by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under low-energy milling, (3-5) vol.%Ti3SiC2Cu composite particles of platelet morphology formed, which could be easily SPS-ed to 92-95% relative density.

324

Synchrotron SAXS of Reverted Al-4wt.%Cu during In Situ Artificial ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cu, which is a more stable than the as-quenched condition, was artificially aged in situ while probing with SAXS configured at beam-line X27C at NSLS. Results...

325

Some Uptake Studies of Metal Ions and the Formation of Cu?0 Particles in Wool.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research programme is concerned with the uptake studies of Cu2+, Zn2+ and Mn2+ at different conditions, by merino wool fibres and also uptake studies (more)

Samarasinghe, Ishira

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Interfacial Reconstruction and Superconductivity in YBa2Cu3O7-x ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Interfacial Reconstruction and Superconductivity in YBa2Cu3O7-x and Pr0.68Ca0.32MnO3 Superlattices. Author(s), Jonas Norpoth, Dong Su,...

327

Pb-free Sn-Ag-Cu ternary eutectic solder - Energy ...  

A Pb-free solder includes a ternary eutectic composition consisting essentially of about 93.6 weight % Sn-about 4.7 weight % Ag-about 1.7 weight % Cu ...

328

Effects of mechanical properties on the reliability of Cu/low-k metallization systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cu and low-dielectric-constant (k) metallization schemes are critical for improved performance of integrated circuits. However, low elastic moduli, a characteristic of the low-k materials, lead to significant reliability ...

Wei, Frank L. (Frank Lili), 1977-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Method of synthesizing and growing copper-indium-diselenide (CuInSe.sub.2) crystals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for preparing CuInSe.sub.2 crystals includes melting a sufficient quantity of B.sub.2 O.sub.3 along with stoichiometric quantities of Cu, In, and Se in a crucible in a high pressure atmosphere of inert gas to encapsulate the CuInSe.sub.2 melt and confine the Se to the crucible. Additional Se in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 percent over the stoichiometric quantity is preferred to make up for small amounts of Se lost in the process. The crystal is grown by inserting a seed crystal through the B.sub.2 O.sub.3 encapsulate into contact with the CuInSe.sub.2 melt and withdrawing the seed upwardly to grow the crystal thereon from the melt.

Ciszek, Theodore F. (Evergreen, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Nuclear modification factors of phi mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has performed systematic measurements of phi meson production in the K+K- decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV. Results are presented on the phi invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor R_AA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R_dA for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1phi exhibits a suppression relative to expectations from binary scaled p+p results. The amount of suppression is smaller than that of the neutral pion and the eta meson in the intermediate p_T range (2--5 GeV/c); whereas at higher p_T the phi, pi^0, and eta show similar suppression. The baryon (protons and anti-protons) excess observed in central Au+Au collisions at intermediate p_T is not observed for the phi meson despite the similar mass of the proton and the phi. This suggests that the excess is linked to the number of constituent quarks rather than the hadron mass. The difference gradually disappears with decreasing centrality and for peripheral collisions the R_AA values for both particles are consistent with binary scaling. Cu+Cu collisions show the same yield and suppression as Au+Au collisions for the same number of N_part. The R_dA of phi shows no evidence for cold nuclear effects within uncertainties.

PHENIX Collaboration; A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; A. Al-Jamel; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; L. Aphecetche; Y. Aramaki; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; F. Bauer; C. Baumann; A. Bazilevsky; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; J. H. Bhom; A. A. Bickley; M. T. Bjorndal; D. S. Blau; J. G. Boissevain; J. S. Bok; H. Borel; N. Borggren; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. S. Brown; D. Bucher; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; J. M. Burward-Hoy; S. Butsyk; S. Campbell; A. Caringi; N. Cassano; J. -S. Chai; B. S. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; C. -H. Chen; S. Chernichenko; J. Chiba; C. Y. Chi; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; C. R. Cleven; Y. Cobigo; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; Z. Conesa del Valle; M. Connors; P. Constantin; M. Csanad; T. Csorgo; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; K. Das; A. Datta; G. David; M. K. Dayananda; M. B. Deaton; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; M. Donadelli; L. D Orazio; J. L. Drachenberg; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; V. Dzhordzhadze; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; B. Espagnon; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; B. Fadem; D. E. Fields; M. Finger Jr.; M. Finger; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; B. Forestier; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; S. -Y. Fung; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; I. Garishvili; F. Gastineau; M. Germain; A. Glenn; H. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; G. Grim; M. Grosse Perdekamp; T. Gunji; H. -A. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; M. N. Hagiwara; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; J. Hanks; R. Han; H. Harada; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; M. Harvey; E. Haslum; K. Hasuko; R. Hayano; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; J. M. Heuser; X. He; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; M. Holmes; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; D. Hornback; S. Huang; M. G. Hur; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; H. Iinuma; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanischev; Y. Iwanaga; B. V. Jacak; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; B. M. Johnson; T. Jones; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; M. Kaneta; J. H. Kang; H. Kanou; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; T. Kawagishi; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; S. Kelly; T. Kempel; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; A. Kim; B. I. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. J. Kim; E. Kim; Y. -J. Kim; Y. -S. Kim; E. Kinney; A. Kiss; E. Kistenev; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotchetkov; D. Kotov; A. Kozlov; A. Kral; A. Kravitz; P. J. Kroon; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; A. Lebedev; Y. Le Bornec; S. Leckey; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; M. K. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; P. Lichtenwalner; P. Liebing; H. Lim; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liska; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; X. Li; X. H. Li; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; L. Masek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. C. McCain; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; N. Means; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; A. C. Mignerey; P. Mikes; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; G. C. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; A. K. Mohanty; H. J. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; J. M. Moss; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; T. Murakami; J. Murata; S. Nagamiya; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; S. Nam; J. Newby; M. Nguyen; M. Nihashi; B. E. Norman; R. Nouicer; A. S. Nyanin; J. Nystrand; C. Oakley; E. O'Brien; S. X. Oda; C. A. Ogilvie; H. Ohnishi; I. D. Ojha; K. Okada; M. Oka; O. O. Omiwade; Y. Onuki; A. Oskarsson; I. Otterlund; M. Ouchida; K. Ozawa; R. Pak; D. Pal; A. P. T. Palounek; V. Pantuev; V. Papavassiliou; I. H. Park; J. Park; S. K. Park; W. J. Park; S. F. Pate; H. Pei; J. -C. Peng; H. Pereira; V. Peresedov; D. Yu. Peressounko; R. Petti; C. Pinkenburg; R. P. Pisani; M. Proissl; M. L. Purschke; A. K. Purwar; H. Qu; J. Rak; A. Rakotozafindrabe; I. Ravinovich; K. F. Read; S. Rembeczki; M. Reuter

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

Thin-film polycrystalline n-ZnO/p-CuO heterojunction  

SciTech Connect

Results of X-ray diffraction and spectral-optical studies of n-ZnO and p-CuO films deposited by gas-discharge sputtering with subsequent annealing are presented. It is shown that, despite the difference in the crystal systems, the polycrystallinity of n-ZnO and p-CuO films enables fabrication of a heterojunction from this pair of materials.

Lisitski, O. L.; Kumekov, M. E.; Kumekov, S. E. [Satpaev Kazakh National Technical University (Kazakhstan)], E-mail: skumekov@mail.ru; Terukov, E. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physicotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

Solidification of hypereutectic Al-38 wt pct Cu alloy in microgravity and in unit gravity  

SciTech Connect

Solidification in microgravity aboard the space shuttle Endeavour resulted in a dramatic change in the morphology of the primary Al{sub 2}Cu phase compared to ground-based solidification in unit gravity. An Al-38 wt pct Cu ingot directionally solidified at a rate of 0.015 mm/s with a temperature gradient of 1.69 K/mm exhibited large, well-formed dendrites of primary Al{sub 2}Cu phase. Ingots solidified under similar conditions in unit gravity contained primary Al{sub 2}Cu phase with smooth, faceted surfaces. The primary Al{sub 2}Cu phase spacing in the microgravity ingot was much greater than that in the unit gravity ingot, 670 {micro}m compared to 171 {micro}m. It is suggested that thermosolutal mixing in the unit gravity ingot reduces the buildup of an Al-rich layer at the solid/liquid interface, which increases the stability of the interface resulting in smooth, faceted particles of Al{sub 2}Cu phase. It is also suggested that the large difference in primary phase spacings is due mostly to the difference in morphology rather than changes in parameters that might influence dendrite ripening mechanisms. The presence or absence of gravity had no effect on the interlamellar spacing of the inter-Al{sub 2}Cu phase eutectic. The ingot solidified in microgravity exhibited almost no longitudinal macrosegregation, in agreement with the theory of inverse segregation in the absence of thermosolutal convection. The ingot solidified in unit gravity exhibited considerable longitudinal macrosegregation, with the chilled end having about 6 wt pct more Cu than the average composition. It is not clear whether the segregation results from thermosolutal convection during solidification or from sedimentation during melting.

Yu, H.; Tandon, K.N.; Cahoon, J.R. [Univ. of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Doping Cu{sub 2}O in Electrolyte Solution: Dopant Incorporation, Atomic Structures and Electrical Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have pursued a number of research activities between April 2010 and April 2011: ? A detailed study on n-type doping in Cu2O by Br; ? An analysis of natural resource limitations to terawatt-scale solar cells; ? Attempt to achieve a 1.4-eV direct band gap in Ni sulfides (NiSx); ? First-principles studies of doping in Cu2O and electronic structures of NiSx.

Tao, Meng; Zhang, Qiming

2013-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

334

Solar Total Energy System, Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume III. Appendix. [1. 72 MW thermal and 383. 6 kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the appendix to the Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design report on ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2). The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia, and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. Under this contract Stearns-Roger developed a conceptual design, which was site specific, containing the following major elements: System Requirements Analysis, Site Description, System Conceptual Design, Conceptual Test and Operating Plans, Development Plans, Procurement and Management Plans for Subsequent Phases, and Cost Estimates. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. Drawings, tables, and data sheets are included on hourly temperatures, displacement, utility rates, power conversion system, seasonal design load summary, average collector temperature optimization study, system operating temperature optimization study, power conversion system seasonal performance, thermal storage/fluid loop, system integration, and cost estimates. (WHK)

None,

1977-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

335

AlCu alloy films prepared by the thermal diffusion technique  

SciTech Connect

100-nm thick films of Al{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x} alloys were prepared on glass substrates by thermal diffusion technique. The Cu atomic concentration was varied from 10% to 90%. Alloys were prepared at different temperatures into a vacuum oven with Argon atmosphere. Two thermal processes were used: i) heating the film at 400 deg. C in a single step, and ii) heating the films in sequential steps at 100, 200, 300 and 400 deg. C. Morphology, electrical resistivity, and crystalline orientation of the alloys were studied. The electrical resistivity and surface roughness of the alloys were found to depend strongly on the atomic composition and the diffusion temperature. However, we did not find differences between samples prepared under the two thermal processes. Alloys prepared with x = 0.6 and x = 0.1-0.3 as Cu at concentration exhibited values on electrical resistivity and surface roughness lower than pure Al. Different phases of the Al{sub 1} {sub -} {sub x}Cu{sub x} films were observed as a function of Cu concentration showing a good agreement with the AlCu phase diagram.

Oliva, A.I., E-mail: oliva@mda.cinvestav.mx [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Km. 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso, CP 97310, Merida Yucatan (Mexico); Corona, J.E.; Sosa, V. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Unidad Merida, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Km. 6 Antigua Carretera a Progreso, CP 97310, Merida Yucatan (Mexico)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

Co layer fragmentation effect on magnetoresistive and structural properties of nanogranular Co/Cu multilayers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We deposited nanogranular Co/Cu multilayers made of thin fragmented Co layers separated by thicker Cu layers to study how the structure and the microstructure of magnetic nanogranular samples change as the average particle size is reduced and how these changes affect the giant magnetoresistive response of the samples. Indeed, thanks to the vertical periodicity of the structure, namely, to the fact that Co/Cu interfaces display an ordered stacking and are not randomly distributed within the samples as in conventional granular materials, their self-correlation and cross correlation can be investigated. In this way, the characteristic length scale of the Co/Cu interfacial roughness that is strictly related to the giant magnetoresistive response of the samples and the universality class of the growth mechanism that affects the systems structure can be both accessed. The Co/Cu nanogranular multilayers were characterized using different x-ray techniques, from specular reflectivity, which allows to probe the multilayer development in the vertical direction, to grazing incidence small angle diffuse scattering, which provides information on the self-correlation and cross correlation of the Co/Cu interfaces. Furthermore, diffraction measurements indicate that the degree of structural disorder increases by decreasing the thickness of the Co layers. Magnetoresistive and magnetization measurements are as well presented and discussed with the results of the structural characterization.

Spizzo, F.; Ronconi, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica and CNISM, Polo Scientifico e Tecnologico, Universita degli Studi di Ferrara, via Saragat, 1 I-44100 Ferrara (Italy); Ferrero, C.; Mazuelas, A.; Metzger, T. H. [ESRF, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Albertini, F.; Casoli, F.; Nasi, L. [IMEM-CNR, Parco Area delle Scienze, 37/A I-43100 Parma (Italy)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Spray Deposition of High Quality CuInSe2 and CdTe Films: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of different ink and deposition approaches have been used for the deposition of CuInSe2 (CIS), Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS), and CdTe films. For CIS and CIGS, soluble precursors containing Cu, In, and Ga have been developed and used in two ways to produce CIS films. In the first, In-containing precursor films were sprayed on Mo-coated glass substrates and converted by rapid thermal processing (RTP) to In2Se3. Then a Cu-containing film was sprayed down on top of the In2Se3 and the stacked films were again thermally processed to give CIS. In the second approach, the Cu-, In-, and Ga-containing inks were combined in the proper ratio to produce a mixed Cu-In-Ga ink that was sprayed on substrates and thermally processed to give CIGS films directly. For CdTe deposition, ink consisting of CdTe nanoparticles dispersed in methanol was prepared and used to spray precursor films. Annealing these precursor films in the presence of CdCl2 produced large-grained CdTe films. The films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Optimized spray and processing conditions are crucial to obtain dense, crystalline films.

Curtis, C. J.; van Hest, M.; Miedaner, A.; Leisch, J.; Hersh, P.; Nekuda, J.; Ginley, D. S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10.sup.3 K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x).sub.a Cu.sub.b (Ni.sub.1-y Co.sub.y).sub.c wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y.cndot.c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b.

Lin, Xianghong (Pasadena, CA); Peker, Atakan (Pasadena, CA); Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Novel Approaches to Wide Bandgap CuInSe2 Based Absorbers  

SciTech Connect

This project targeted the development of high performance wide bandgap solar cells based on thin film alloys of CuInSe2 to relax constraints on module design and enable tandem solar cell structures. This addressed goals of the Solar Energy Technologies Program for Next Generation PV to develop technology needed for higher thin film module efficiency as a means to reduce costs. Specific objectives of the research project were: 1) to develop the processes and materials required to improve the performance of wide bandgap thin film solar cells based on alloys of CuInSe2, and 2) to provide the fundamental science and engineering basis for the material, electronic, and device properties required to effectively apply these processes and materials to commercial manufacture. CuInSe2-based photovoltaics have established the highest efficiencies of the thin film materials at both the cell and module scales and are actively being scaled up to commercialization. In the highest efficiency cells and modules, the optical bandgap, a function of the CuInSe2-based alloy composition, is relatively low compared to the optimum match to the solar spectrum. Wider bandgap alloys of CuInSe2 produce higher cell voltages which can improve module performance and enable the development of tandem solar cells to boost the overall efficiency. A focus for the project was alloying with silver to form (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 pentenary thin films deposited by elemental co-evaporation which gives the broadest range of control of composition and material properties. This alloy has a lower melting temperature than Ag-free, Cu-based chalcopyrite compounds, which may enable films to be formed with lower defect densities and the (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 films give improved material properties and better device performance with increasing bandgap. A comprehensive characterization of optical, structural, and electronic properties of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 was completed over the complete compositional range 0 ? Ga/(In+Ga) ? 1 and 0 ? Ag/(Ag+Cu) ? 1. Evidence of improved material quality includes reduced sub-bandgap optical absorption, sharper bandtails, and increased grain size with Ag addition. The Ag alloying was shown to increase the range of bandgaps over which solar cells can be fabricated without any drop-off in performance. With bandgap greater than 1.6 eV, in the range needed for tandem solar cells, (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 gave higher efficiency than other CuInSe2-based alloys. Using a simple single-stage co-evaporation process, a solar cell with 17.6% efficiency using a film with bandgap = 1.3 eV was achieved, demonstrating the viability of (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 for high efficiency devices. With a three-stage co-evaporation process for (AgCu)(InGa)Se2 deposition a device with efficiency = 13.0 % and VOC = 890 mV with JSC = 20.5 mA/cm2, FF = 71.3% was achieved. This surpasses the performance of other wide bandgap CuInSe2-based solar cells. Detailed characterization of the electronic properties of the materials and devices including the application of advanced admittance-based easements was completed.

William N. Shafarman

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

340

14MIB*ft* * * Kyoto Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline 1 Kinetic chemotaxis model 2 Goals and first results 3 Work in progress and future applications direction randomly, biased by chemical signal #12;Analysis on kinetic chemotaxis models using a functionalAnalysis on kinetic chemotaxis models using a functional analytic approach Analysis on kinetic

Sparks, Donald L.

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341

ALOFT-FT: Frequently Asked Questions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NISTIR 5958 Smoke Plume Trajectory From In Situ Burning of Crude Oil in Alaska: Field Experiments and Modeling of Complex Terrain. ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Nuclear threaths from terrorist : -ft or fiction?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Summary After the terrorist attack on 9/11 on New York City and the Pentagon, it could seen to be an increase of speculation in the (more)

Kristine, Rakkenes

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

~'ftEMISTRY PftOIDNOIDO~  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rights reserved SSDI I0 I0-6030( 95 )04223-7 environment such as "electric energy per order" [8 photo efficiencies [ 10]. Vogler and coworkers [ 11] recommended the usage of formal rate constants

Sauvé, Geneviève

344

UK FT PDU Facility Draft EA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2S 2S Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment for University of Kentucky Small-Scale Pilot Plant for the Gasification of Coal and Coal-Biomass Blends and Conversion of Derived Syngas to Liquid Fuels via Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis Lexington, KY December 2013 Prepared for: Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory This page intentionally left blank. Draft Supplemental Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1642S Fischer-Tropsch Process Development Unit December 2013 Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) proposes, through a cooperative agreement with the University of Kentucky (UK) Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), to partially fund the completion of the design, construction, and operation of a small-scale pilot plant for research related to the gasification of coal

345

Charged and strange hadron elliptic flow in Cu+Cu collisions at sqrt sNN = 62.4 and 200 GeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of an elliptic flow, v{sub 2}, analysis of Cu+Cu collisions recorded with the STAR detector at RHIC at {radical}s{sub NN} = 62.4 and 200 GeV. Elliptic flow as a function of transverse momentum, v{sub 2}(p{sub T}), is reported for different collision centralities for charged hadrons h{sup {+-}}, and strangeness containing hadrons K{sub S}{sup 0}, {Lambda}, {Xi}, {phi} in the midrapidity region |{eta}| system-size dependence of elliptic flow, we present a detailed comparison with previously published results from Au+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. We observe that v{sub 2}(p{sub T}) of strange hadrons has similar scaling properties as were first observed in Au+Au collisions, i.e.: (i) at low transverse momenta, p{sub T} energy, m{sub T} - m, and (ii) at intermediate p{sub T}, 2 system size, number of participants N{sub part}. This indicates that the ideal hydrodynamic limit is not reached in Cu+Cu collisions, presumably because the assumption of thermalization is not attained.

STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

346

Nuclear modification factors of phi mesons in d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) has performed systematic measurements of phi meson production in the K+K- decay channel at midrapidity in p+p, d+Au, Cu+Cu and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(S_NN)=200 GeV. Results are presented on the phi invariant yield and the nuclear modification factor R_AA for Au+Au and Cu+Cu, and R_dA for d+Au collisions, studied as a function of transverse momentum (1phi exhibits a suppression relative to expectations from binary scaled p+p results. The amount of suppression is smaller than that of the neutral pion and the eta meson in the intermediate p_T range (2--5 GeV/c); whereas at higher p_T the phi, pi^0, and eta show similar suppression. The baryon (protons and anti-protons) excess observed in central Au+Au collisions at intermediate p_T is not observed for the phi meson despite the similar mass of the proton and the phi. This suggests that the excess is lin...

Adare, A; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Al-Bataineh, H; Alexander, J; Al-Jamel, A; Angerami, A; Aoki, K; Aphecetche, L; Aramaki, Y; Armendariz, R; Aronson, S H; Asai, J; Atomssa, E T; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, B; Babintsev, V; Bai, M; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Basye, A T; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bauer, F; Baumann, C; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Belmont, R; Bennett, R; Berdnikov, A; Berdnikov, Y; Bhom, J H; Bickley, A A; Bjorndal, M T; Blau, D S; Boissevain, J G; Bok, J S; Borel, H; Borggren, N; Boyle, K; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Campbell, S; Caringi, A; Cassano, N; Chai, J -S; Chang, B S; Charvet, J -L; Chen, C -H; Chernichenko, S; Chiba, J; Chi, C Y; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J B; Choudhury, R K; Christiansen, P; Chujo, T; Chung, P; Churyn, A; Chvala, O; Cianciolo, V; Citron, Z; Cleven, C R; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Comets, M P; del Valle, Z Conesa; Connors, M; Constantin, P; Csanad, M; Csorgo, T; Dahms, T; Dairaku, S; Danchev, I; Das, K; Datta, A; David, G; Dayananda, M K; Deaton, M B; Dehmelt, K; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; d'Enterria, D; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dharmawardane, K V; Dietzsch, O; Dion, A; Donadelli, M; Orazio, L D; Drachenberg, J L; Drapier, O; Drees, A; Drees, K A; Dubey, A K; Durham, J M; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Dzhordzhadze, V; Edwards, S; Efremenko, Y V; Egdemir, J; Ellinghaus, F; Emam, W S; Engelmore, T; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Espagnon, B; Esumi, S; Eyser, K O; Fadem, B; Fields, D E; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Forestier, B; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fujiwara, K; Fukao, Y; Fung, S -Y; Fusayasu, T; Gadrat, S; Garishvili, I; Gastineau, F; Germain, M; Glenn, A; Gong, H; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; de Cassagnac, R Granier; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Grim, G; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Gunji, T; Gustafsson, H -A; Hachiya, T; Henni, A Hadj; Haegemann, C; Haggerty, J S; Hagiwara, M N; Hahn, K I; Hamagaki, H; Hamblen, J; Hanks, J; Han, R; Harada, H; Hartouni, E P; Haruna, K; Harvey, M; Haslum, E; Hasuko, K; Hayano, R; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Hester, T; Heuser, J M; He, X; Hiejima, H; Hill, J C; Hobbs, R; Hohlmann, M; Holmes, M; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Horaguchi, T; Hornback, D; Huang, S; Hur, M G; Ichihara, T; Ichimiya, R; Iinuma, H; Ikeda, Y; Imai, K; Inaba, M; Inoue, Y; Isenhower, D; Isenhower, L; Ishihara, M; Isobe, T; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Ivanischev, D; Iwanaga, Y; Jacak, B V; Jia, J; Jiang, X; Jin, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Jones, T; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Jumper, D S; Kajihara, F; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kamin, J; Kaneta, M; Kang, J H; Kanou, H; Kapustinsky, J; Karatsu, K; Kasai, M; Kawagishi, T; Kawall, D; Kawashima, M; Kazantsev, A V; Kelly, S; Kempel, T; Khanzadeev, A; Kijima, K M; Kikuchi, J; Kim, A; Kim, B I; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, E J; Kim, E; Kim, Y -J; Kim, Y -S; Kinney, E; Kiss, A; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klay, J; Klein-Boesing, C; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Komkov, B; Konno, M; Koster, J; Kotchetkov, D; Kotov, D; Kozlov, A; Kral, A; Kravitz, A; Kroon, P J; Kubart, J; Kunde, G J; Kurihara, N; Kurita, K; Kurosawa, M; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lai, Y S; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Le Bornec, Y; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, J; Lee, K B; Lee, K S; Lee, M K; Lee, T; Leitch, M J; Leite, M A L; Lenzi, B; Lichtenwalner, P; Liebing, P; Lim, H; Levy, L A Linden; Liska, T; Litvinenko, A; Liu, H; Liu, M X; Li, X; Li, X H; Love, B; Lynch, D; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Malik, M D; Manko, V I; Mannel, E; Mao, Y; Masek, L; Masui, H; Matathias, F; McCain, M C; McCumber, M; McGaughey, P L; Means, N; Meredith, B; Miake, Y; Mibe, T; Mignerey, A C; Mikes, P; Miki, K; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, G C; Mishra, M; Mitchell, J T; Mitrovski, M; Mohanty, A K; Moon, H J; Morino, Y; Morreale, A; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Moukhanova, T V; Mukhopadhyay, D; Murakami, T; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagata, Y; Nagle, J L; Naglis, M; Nagy, M I; Nakagawa, I; Nakamiya, Y; Nakamura, K R; Nakamura, T; Nakano, K; Nam, S; Newby, J; Nguyen, M; Nihashi, M; Norman, B E; Nouicer, R; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; Oakley, C; O'Brien, E; Oda, S X; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Oka, M; Omiwade, O O; Onuki, Y; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Ouchida, M; Ozawa, K; Pak, R; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, I H; Park, J; Park, S K; Park, W J; Pate, S F; Pei, H; Peng, J -C; Pereira, H; Peresedov, V; Peressounko, D Yu; Petti, R; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Proissl, M; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Qu, H; Rak, J; Rakotozafindrabe, A; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Rembeczki, S; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Richardson, E; Roach, D; Roche, G; Rolnick, S D; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosen, C A; Rosendahl, S S E; Rosnet, P; Rukoyatkin, P; Ruzicka, P; Rykov, V L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Modeling Cu Migration in CdTe Solar Cells Under Device-Processing and Long-Term Stability Conditions (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An impurity migration model for systems with material interfaces is applied to Cu migration in CdTe solar cells. In the model, diffusion fluxes are calculated from the Cu chemical potential gradient. Inputs to the model include Cu diffusivities, solubilities, and segregation enthalpies in CdTe, CdS and contact materials. The model yields transient and equilibrium Cu distributions in CdTe devices during device processing and under field-deployed conditions. Preliminary results for Cu migration in CdTe PV devices using available diffusivity and solubility data from the literature show that Cu segregates in the CdS, a phenomenon that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing and/or stress conditions.

Teeter, G.; Asher, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Modeling Cu Migration in CdTe Solar Cells Under Device-Processing and Long-Term Stability Conditions: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An impurity migration model for systems with material interfaces is applied to Cu migration in CdTe solar cells. In the model, diffusion fluxes are calculated from the Cu chemical potential gradient. Inputs to the model include Cu diffusivities, solubilities, and segregation enthalpies in CdTe, CdS and contact materials. The model yields transient and equilibrium Cu distributions in CdTe devices during device processing and under field-deployed conditions. Preliminary results for Cu migration in CdTe photovoltaic devices using available diffusivity and solubility data from the literature show that Cu segregates in the CdS, a phenomenon that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing and/or stress conditions.

Teeter, G.; Asher, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Metallic glass alloys of Zr, Ti, Cu and Ni  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

At least quaternary alloys form metallic glass upon cooling below the glass transition temperature at a rate less than 10{sup 3} K/s. Such alloys comprise titanium from 19 to 41 atomic percent, an early transition metal (ETM) from 4 to 21 atomic percent and copper plus a late transition metal (LTM) from 49 to 64 atomic percent. The ETM comprises zirconium and/or hafnium. The LTM comprises cobalt and/or nickel. The composition is further constrained such that the product of the copper plus LTM times the atomic proportion of LTM relative to the copper is from 2 to 14. The atomic percentage of ETM is less than 10 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as high as 41, and may be as large as 21 when the atomic percentage of titanium is as low as 24. Furthermore, when the total of copper and LTM are low, the amount of LTM present must be further limited. Another group of glass forming alloys has the formula (ETM{sub 1{minus}x}Ti{sub x}){sub a} Cu{sub b} (Ni{sub 1{minus}y}Co{sub y}){sub c} wherein x is from 0.1 to 0.3, y{center_dot}c is from 0 to 18, a is from 47 to 67, b is from 8 to 42, and c is from 4 to 37. This definition of the alloys has additional constraints on the range of copper content, b. 2 figs.

Lin, X.; Peker, A.; Johnson, W.L.

1997-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

350

Synthesis of Silica Supported AuCu Nanoparticle Catalysts and the Effects of Pretreatment Conditions for the CO Oxidation Reaction  

SciTech Connect

Supported gold nanoparticles have generated an immense interest in the field of catalysis due to their extremely high reactivity and selectivity. Recently, alloy nanoparticles of gold have received a lot of attention due to their enhanced catalytic properties. Here we report the synthesis of silica supported AuCu nanoparticles through the conversion of supported Au nanoparticles in a solution of Cu(C{sub 2}H{sub 3}O{sub 2}){sub 2} at 300 C. The AuCu alloy structure was confirmed through powder XRD (which indicated a weakly ordered alloy phase), XANES, and EXAFS. It was also shown that heating the AuCu/SiO{sub 2} in an O{sub 2} atmosphere segregated the catalyst into a Au-CuO{sub x} heterostructure between 150 C to 240 C. Heating the catalyst in H{sub 2} at 300 C reduced the CuO{sub x} back to Cu{sup 0} to reform the AuCu alloy phase. It was found that the AuCu/SiO{sub 2} catalysts were inactive for CO oxidation. However, various pretreatment conditions were required to form a highly active and stable Au-CuO{sub x}/SiO{sub 2} catalyst to achieve 100% CO conversion below room-temperature. This is explained by the in situ FTIR result, which shows that CO molecules can be chemisorbed and activated only on the Au-CuOx/SiO{sub 2} catalyst but not on the AuCu/SiO{sub 2} catalyst.

J Bauer; D Mullins; M Li; Z Wu; E Payzant; S Overbury; S Dai

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

351

Geopressured-geothermal test of the EDNA Delcambre No. 1 well, Tigre Lagoon Field, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: analysis of water an dissolved natural gas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Edna Delcambre et al. No. 1 gas well, shut-in since June 1975, was made available for the project. Two geopressured sand-bed aquifers were tested: sand No. 3 at a depth of 12,900 feet and sand No. 1 at a depth of 12,600 feet. Each aquifer was subjected to flow tests which lasted approximately three weeks in each case. Water samples were obtained during flow testing of the two geopressured aquifers. The water contained 11.3 to 13.3% dissolved solids. Several radioactive species were measured. Radium-226 was found to be approximately 10 times more concentrated than the average amount observed in surface waters. No appreciable amount of heavy metals was detected. Recombination studies at bottom-hole conditions indicate the solubility of natural gas per barrel of water to be about 24 SCF. The methane content was 93 to 95%, and the gas had a heating value in the range of 1020 to 1070 Btu/cu.ft. During the flow tests, the gas/water ratio at the well-head was observed to be 45 to 88 SCF/Bbl water produced. (MHR)

Hankins, B.E.; Karkalits, O.C.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Natural-gas liquids  

SciTech Connect

Casinghead gasoline or natural gasoline, now more suitably known as natural-gas liquids (NGL), was a nuisance when first found, but was developed into a major and profitable commodity. This part of the petroleum industry began at about the turn of the century, and more than 60 yr later the petroleum industry recovers approx. one million bbl of natural-gas liquids a day from 30 billion cu ft of natural gas processed in more than 600 gasoline plants. Although casinghead gasoline first was used for automobile fuel, natural-gas liquids now are used for fuel, industrial solvents, aviation blending stock, synthetic rubber, and many other petrochemical uses. Production from the individual plants is shipped by tank car, tank truck, pipeline, and tankers all over the world. Most of the natural-gas liquids come from wet natural gas which contains a considerable quantity of vapor, ranging from 0.5 to 6 gal/Mcf, and some particularly rich gases contain even more which can be liquefied. Nonassociated gas is generally clean, with a comparatively small quantity of gasoline, 0.1 to 0.5 gas/Mcf. The natural-gas liquids branch of the industry is build around the condensation of vapors in natural gas. Natural-gas liquids are processed either by the compression method or by adsorption processes.

Blackstock, W.B.; McCullough, G.W.; McCutchan, R.C.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Normal-state Hall effect in YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3[minus][ital x  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have measured the normal-state Hall effect on single crystals of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3[minus][ital x

Lan, M.D.; Liu, J.Z.; Jia, Y.X.; Zhang, L.; Shelton, R.N. (Department of Physics, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Synthesis and Electrochemical Characterization of M2Mn3O8 (M=Ca,Cu) Compounds and Derivatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

M{sub 2}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 8} (M=Ca{sup 2+}, Cu{sup 2+}) compounds were synthesized and characterized in lithium cells. The M{sup 2+} cations, which reside in the van der Waal's gaps between adjacent sheets of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 8}{sup 4-}, may be replaced chemically (by ion-exchange) or electrochemically with Li. More than 7 Li{sup +}/Cu{sub 2}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 8} may be inserted electrochemically, with concomitant reduction of Cu{sup 2+} to Cu metal, but less Li can be inserted into Ca{sub 2}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 8}. In the case of Cu{sup 2+}, this process is partially reversible when the cell is charged above 3.5 V vs. Li, but intercalation of Cu{sup +} rather than Cu{sup 2+} and Li{sup +}/Cu{sup +} exchange occurs during the subsequent discharge. If the cell potential is kept below 3.4 V, the Li in excess of 4Li{sup +}/Cu{sub 2}Mn{sub 3}O{sub 8} can be cycled reversibly. The unusual mobility of +2 cations in a layered structure has important implications both for the design of cathodes for Li batteries and for new systems that could be based on M{sup 2+} intercalation compounds.

Park, Yong Joon; Doeff, Marca M.

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

355

Ab initio cluster studies of La sub 2 CuO sub 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we examine the properties of small cluster models of La{sub 2}CuO{sub 4}. In Section 2, the Madelung/Pauli background potential used to imbed the primary cluster and the basis sets used to expand the cluster wavefunction are discussed. Section 3 presents the results of calculations on CuO{sub 6} in which the optical absorption and the photoemission spectrum are examined. The calculation on CuO{sub 6} and our earlier work on larger clusters suggest that a single-band Pariser-Parr-Pople (PPP) model be developed. Therefore, in Section 4 the PPP model and extensions which relax the zero-differential-overlap (ZDO) approximation upon which it is based are reviewed. Calculations on the states of Cu{sub 2}O{sub 7} necessary to parameterize the PPP model are presented in Section 5 and compared with analogous calculations for Cu{sub 2}O{sub 11}. Section 6 discusses the problems associated with the direct ab initio determination of the anti-ferromagnetic exchange interaction, examines the magnitudes of the occupation-dependent hopping and direct exchange interactions which arise when the ZDO approximation is relaxed, and provides estimates of the uncertainties in the parameters due to electron correlation and polarization effects not recoverable with the present basis sets and finite clusters. A comparison of the parameters with those extracted from constrained LDF theory concludes Section 6. Finally, Section 7 summarizes the conclusions of this research.

Martin, R.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Geometrical Characterization of Adenine And Guanine on Cu(110) By NEXAFS, XPS, And DFT Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adsorption of purine DNA bases (guanine and adenine) on Cu(1 1 0) was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS), and density-functional theory (DFT) calculation. At coverages near 0.2 monolayers, Angular-resolved NEXAFS analysis revealed that adenine adsorbates lie almost flat and that guanine adsorbates are tilted up on the surface with the purine ring parallel to the atom rows of Cu(1 1 0). Referring to the previous studies on pyrimidine DNA bases [M. Furukawa, H. Fujisawa, S. Katano, H. Ogasawara, Y. Kim, T. Komeda, A. Nilsson, M. Kawai, Surf. Sci. 532-535 (2003) 261], the isomerization of DNA bases on Cu(1 1 0) was found to play an important role in the adsorption geometry. Guanine, thymine and cytosine adsorption have an amine-type nitrogen next to a carbonyl group, which is dehydrogenated into imine nitrogen on Cu(1 1 0). These bases are bonded by the inherent portion of - NH-CO - altered by conversion into enolic form and dehydrogenation. Adenine contains no CO group and is bonded to Cu(1 1 0) by participation of the inherent amine parts, resulting in nearly flatly-lying position.

Furukawa, M.; Yamada, T.; /Wako, RIKEN; Katano, S.; /tohoku U.; Kawai, M.; /Wako, RIKEN /Tokyo U.; Ogasawara, H.; /SLAC, SSRL; Nilsson, A.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stockholm U.

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

357

Investigation of solar cells based on Cu/sub 2/O. Progress report, June 1, 1980-November 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress was made in three areas: microstructure of Cu/sub 2/O substrates; correlation of Cu/sub 2/O microstructure with Cu/Cu/sub 2/O cell properties; and in fabrication of Tl/Cu/sub 2/O Schottky barriers. Characterization of Cu/sub 2/O substrates with IMMA indicates that Cl is uniformly distributed through grains, Mg precipitates at grain boundaries and Na and Fe precipitates occur throughout the material. It is clear that the presence of Cl results in lower p-type resistivities. Previous photoresponse scans established that grain boundaries are not significantly active concerning minority carrier recombination. I-V analyses of Cu/Cu/sub 2/O cells indicate that leakage current components are a result of distributed effects, and not a grain boundary mechanism. It is not yet clear whether the distributed effects are strictly a surface effect, or a result of bulk defects such as Na and Fe precipitates. Tl/Cu/sub 2/O Schottky barrier studies are progressing well. This device structure is being used as a means of determining if a significant built-in voltage can be achieved with a Cu/sub 2/O cell. Problems were encountered concerning deposition of thin Tl films. The films tend to agglomerate. Substrates will be cooled to counter the apparent lateral diffusion. V/sub oc/ values greater than 0.6 volts were obtained with thick film Tl/Cu/sub 2/O cells, however. These results suggest an improved built-in potential was achieved.

Olsen, L. C.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Stable n-CuInSe/sub 2/iodide-iodine photoelectrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a photoelectrochemical solar cell, stable output and solar efficiency in excess of 10% are achieved with a photoanode of n-CuInSe/sub 2/ electrode material and an iodine/iodide redox couple used in a liquid electrolyte. The photoanode is prepared by treating the electrode material by chemical etching, for example in Br/sub 2//MeOH; heating the etched electrode material in air or oxygen; depositing a surface film coating of indium on the electrode material after the initial heating; and thereafter again heating the electrode material in air or oxygen to oxidize the indium. The electrolyte is treated by the addition of Cu/sup +/ or Cu/sup 2 +/ salts and in In/sup 3 +/ salts.

Cahen, D.; Chen, Y.W.

1984-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

359

Stable N-CuInSe.sub.2 /iodide-iodine photoelectrochemical cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a photoelectrochemical solar cell, stable output and solar efficiency in excess of 10% are achieved with a photoanode of n-CuInSe.sub.2 electrode material and an iodine/iodide redox couple used in a liquid electrolyte. The photoanode is prepared by treating the electrode material by chemical etching, for example in Br.sub.2 /MeOH; heating the etched electrode material in air or oxygen; depositing a surface film coating of indium on the electrode material after the initial heating; and thereafter again heating the electrode material in air or oxygen to oxidize the indium. The electrolyte is treated by the addition of Cu.sup.+ or Cu.sup.2+ salts and In.sup.3+ salts.

Cahen, David (Rehovot, IL); Chen, Yih W. (Lakewood, CO)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Cu-Pd Hydrogen Separation Membranes with Reduced Palladium Content and Improved Performance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cu-Pd Hydrogen Separation Membranes with Reduced Cu-Pd Hydrogen Separation Membranes with Reduced Palladium Content and Improved Performance Opportunity This patent-pending technology, "Cu-Pd Hydrogen Separation Membranes with Reduced Palladium Content and Improved Performance," consists of copper-palladium alloy compositions for hydrogen separation membranes that use less palladium and have a potential increase in hydrogen permeability and resistance to sulfur degradation compared to currently available copper-palladium membranes. This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview NETL is working to help produce and deliver hydrogen from fossil fuels including coal in commercially applicable and environmentally

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361

INTERFACE DISORDER CONTROLLED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY YBa2Cu3O7 / SrTiO3 SUPERLATTICES  

SciTech Connect

We report on the coherent growth of ultrathin YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) layers on SrTiO3 (STO) in YBCO/STO superlattices. The termination plane of the STO is TiO2 and the CuO chains are missing at the interface. Disorder (steps) at the STO interface cause alterations of the stacking sequence of the intra-cell YBCO atomic layers. Stacking faults give rise to antiphase boundaries which break the continuity of the CuO2 planes and depress superconductivity. We show that superconductivity is directly controlled by interface disorder outlining the importance of pair breaking and localization by disorder in ultrathin layers.

Garcia-Barriocanal, Javier [Universidad Complutense, Spain; Rivera-Calzada, Alberto [Universidad Complutense, Spain; Sefrioui, Z. [Universidad Complutense, Spain; Arias, D [Universidad Complutense, Spain; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Leon, C. [Universidad Complutense, Spain; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL; Santamaria, J. [Universidad Complutense, Spain

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Optical and quantum efficiency analysis of (Ag,Cu)(In,Ga)Se2 absorber layers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

(Ag,Cu)(In,Ga)Se2 thin films have been deposited by elemental co-evaporation over a wide range of compositions and their optical properties characterized by transmission and reflection measurements and by relative shift analysis of quantum efficiency device measurements. The optical bandgaps were determined by performing linear fits of (?h?)2 vs. h?, and the quantum efficiency bandgaps were determined by relative shift analysis of device curves with fixed Ga/(In+Ga) composition, but varying Ag/(Cu+Ag) composition. The determined experimental optical bandgap ranges of the Ga/(In+Ga) = 0.31, 0.52, and 0.82 groups, with Ag/(Cu+Ag) ranging from 0 to 1, were 1.19-1.45 eV, 1.32-1.56 eV, and 1.52-1.76 eV, respectively. The optical bowing parameter of the different Ga/(In+Ga) groups was also determined.

Boyle, Jonathan; Hanket, Gregory; Shafarman, William

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

363

Photoresponses of a Photovoltaic Cell Prepared by CuSCN Electrodepositing C60 on Mesoporous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The photovoltaic responses of a solid-state photovoltaic cell with structure TiO2/C60/CuSCN/, by electro-depositing C60 onto glass substrates comprised of nanocrystalline TiO2 films and subsequently chemically depositing CuSCN on to the above C60 film, were investigated. The device delivered a short-circuit photocurrent of 225 A cm ?2 with an open circuit voltage of 350 mV under an irradiance of 260 Wm ?2. The charge transferring mechanism is described as the formation of a C60 anion from the excited C60 molecule by donating a hole to CuCNS and then, injecting the electron from the C60 anions into the conduction band of TiO2. PACS numbers: 72.80.Rj, 73.50.Pz, 71.20.Tx I.

G. K. R. Senadeera; V. P. S. Perera

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Junction Formation in CuInSe{sub 2} Based Thin Film Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nature of the interface between CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) and the chemical bath deposited CdS layer has been investigated. We show that heat-treating the absorbers in Cd- or Zn-containing solutions in the presence of ammonium hydroxide sets up a chemical reaction which facilitates an extraction of Cu from the lattice and an in-diffusion of Cd. The characteristics of devices made in this manner suggest that the reaction generates a thin, n-doped region in the absorber. It is quite possible that the CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} device is a buried, shallow junction with a CdS window layer, rather than a heterojunction. We have used these ideas to develop methods for fabricating devices without CdS or Cd. A 14.2% efficiency ZnO/CIGS device was obtained through aqueous treatment in Zn solutions.

Ramanathan, K.; Wiesner, H.; Asher, S.; Bhattacharya, R. N.; Keane, J.; Contreras, M.; Noufi, R.

1998-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

365

Cu2Sb thin film electrodes prepared by pulsed laser deposition f or lithium batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin films of Cu2Sb, prepared on stainless steel and copper substrates with a pulsed laser deposition technique at room temperature, have been evaluated as electrodes in lithium cells. The electrodes operate by a lithium insertion/copper extrusion reaction mechanism, the reversibility of which is superior when copper substrates are used, particularly when electrochemical cycling is restricted to the voltage range 0.65-1.4 V vs. Li/Li+. The superior performance of Cu2Sb films on copper is attributed to the more active participation of the extruded copper in the functioning of the electrode. The continual and extensive extrusion of copper on cycling the cells leads to the isolation of Li3Sb particles and a consequent formation of Sb. Improved cycling stability of both types of electrodes was obtained when cells were cycled between 0.65 and 1.4 V. A low-capacity lithium-ion cell with Cu2Sb and LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 electrodes, laminated from powders, shows excellent cycling stability over the voltage range 3.15 - 2.2 V, the potential difference corresponding to approximately 0.65-1.4 V for the Cu2Sb electrode vs. Li/Li+. Chemical self-discharge of lithiated Cu2Sb electrodes by reaction with the electrolyte was severe when cells were allowed to relax on open circuit after reaching a lower voltage limit of 0.1 V. The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer formed on Cu2Sb electrodes after cells had been cycled between 1.4 and 0.65 V vs. Li/Li+ was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy; the SEI layer contributes to the large irreversible capacity loss on the initial cycle of these cells. The data contribute to a better understanding of the electrochemical behavior of intermetallic electrodes in rechargeable lithium batteries.

Song, Seung-Wan; Reade, Ronald P.; Cairns, Elton J.; Vaughey, Jack T.; Thackeray, Michael M.; Striebel, Kathryn A.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Preparation and investigation of the quaternary alloy CuTaInSe{sub 3}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycrystalline samples of the quaternary alloy CuTaInSe{sub 3} were prepared by the usual melt and anneal technique. The analysis of the diffraction pattern indicates a single phase which indexes as a tetragonal chalcopyrite-like structure with lattice parameters a = 5.7837 {+-} 0.0002 A; c = 11.6208 {+-} 0.0007 A and V = 389 {+-} 1 A{sup 3}. Differential thermal analysis shows that the melting transition of CuTaInSe{sub 3} is incongruent with large liquid + solids regions.

Grima-Gallardo, P. [Centro de Estudios en Semiconductores (CES), Dpto. Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, La Hechicera, Merida (Venezuela)], E-mail: peg@ula.ve; Munoz, M.; Duran, S. [Centro de Estudios en Semiconductores (CES), Dpto. Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, La Hechicera, Merida (Venezuela); Delgado, G.E. [Laboratorio de Cristalografia, Dpto. Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101 (Venezuela); Quintero, M.; Ruiz, J. [Centro de Estudios en Semiconductores (CES), Dpto. Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, La Hechicera, Merida (Venezuela)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

367

XPS and AES Studies of Cu/CdTe(111)-B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Copper is frequently used as a p-type dopant to improve the performance of back contacts in CdTe thin-film solar cells. In this study, surface-analysis techniques are used to probe fundamental interactions between Cu and the CdTe(111)-B surface. The results presented here were facilitated by the newly constructed surface-analysis cluster tool in the Measurements and Characterization Division at NREL; they reveal a host of fundamental phenomena that occur in the Cu/CdTe system.

Teeter, G.; Gessert, T. A.; Asher, S. E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Method of producing superconducting fibers of YBA2CU30X  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fibers of YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x have been produce by pendant drop melt extraction. This technique involves the end of a rod of YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x melted with a hydrogen-oxygen torch, followed by lowering onto the edge of a spinning wheel. The fibers are up to 10 cm in length with the usual lateral dimensions, ranging from 20 .mu.m to 125 .mu.m. The fibers require a heat treatment to make them superconducting.

Schwartzkopf, Louis A. (Mankato, MN); Ostenson, Jerome E. (Ames, IA); Finnemore, Douglas K. (Ames, IA)

1990-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

369

New Thin Film CuGaSe2/Cu(In,Ga)Se2 Bifacial, Tandem Solar Cell with Both Junctions Formed Simultaneously  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin films of CuGaSe2 and Cu(In,Ga)Se2 were evaporated by the 3-stage process onto opposite sides of a single piece of soda-lime glass, coated bifacially with an n+/-TCO. Junctions were formed simultaneously with each of the p-type absorbers by depositing thin films of n-CdS via chemical bath deposition (CBD) at 60C. The resulting four-terminal device is a non-mechanically stacked, two-junction tandem. The unique growth sequence protects the temperature-sensitive p/n junctions. The initial device (h= 3.7%, Voc= 1.1 V[AM1.5]) suffered from low quantum efficiencies. Initial results are also presented from experiments with variations in growth sequence and back reflectors.

Young, D. L.; Abu-Shama, J.; Noufi, R.; Li, X.; Keane, J.; Gessert, T. A.; Ward, J. S.; Contreas, M.; Symko-Davies, M.; Coutts, T. J.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

THE PERFORMANCE OF THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS EMPLOYING PHOTOVOLTAIC Cu22014x Te-CdTe HETEROJUNCTIONS (1)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

195 THE PERFORMANCE OF THIN FILM SOLAR CELLS EMPLOYING PHOTOVOLTAIC Cu22014x Te This paper is a short status report on the continuing development of Cu22014xTe-CdTe thin film solar cells thin film work. The most pressing current need is to determine how to extend cell life, particularly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

371

The properties of sprayed nanostructured P-type CuI films for dye-sensitized solar cells application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In our experiments, we provide a new approach for depositing CuI (inorganic compound) thin films using the mister atomizer technique. The CuI solution was sprayed into fine droplets using argon as a carrier gas at different solution concentrations. The ...

M. N. Amalina; N. A. Rasheid; M. Rusop

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Modeling of the performance of carbon nanotube bundle, cu/low-k and optical on-chip global interconnects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we have quantified and compared the performance of carbon nanotube (CNT) and optical interconnects with the existing technology of Cu/low-K interconnects for future high-performance ICs. We present these comparisons not only in terms of ... Keywords: Cu, Global interconnects, bandwidth density, carbon nanotube, latency, optics, power

Hoyeol Cho; Kyung-Hoae Koo; Pawan Kapur; Krishna C. Saraswat

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

In situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopic Investigation of the Electrochemical Conversion Reactions of CuF2-MoO3 Nanocomposite  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have used X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Cu K-edge to investigate the electrochemical conversion reaction of 20 nm size 85 wt% CuF{sub 2}-15 wt% MoO{sub 3} nanocomposite under in situ conditions. The nanocomposite was prepared by high energy milling. Upon discharge, the lithiation reaction with the nanocomposite resulted in the formation of nanophase metallic Cu, which is consistent with the conversion of CuF{sub 2} into Cu and LiF. Based on XANES and Fourier transforms of EXAFS spectra, we show that the discharge process proceeded via the formation of highly dispersed Cu particles. Based on the coordination number of the first shell of Cu, the average size of the Cu particles was estimated to be in the 1-3 nm range in the fully discharged state.

A Mansour; F Badway; W Yoon; K Chung; G Amatucci

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Crystallization mechanisms and recording characteristics of Si/CuSi bilayer for write-once blu-ray disc  

SciTech Connect

The crystallization mechanisms of Si/CuSi bilayer and its recording characteristics for write-once blu-ray disc (BD-R) were investigated. It was found that Cu{sub 3}Si phase appeared during the room temperature sputtered deposition. Then, the Si atoms in CuSi layer segregated and crystallized to cubic Si in Cu{sub 3}Si nucleation sites as the film was annealed at 270 deg. C. After heating to 500 deg. C, the grains size of cubic Si phase grew and the hexagonal Si phase was observed. The dynamic tests show that the Si/CuSi bilayer has great feasibility for 1-4x BD-R with the bottom jitter values below 6.5%.

Ou, Sin-Liang; Kuo, Po-Cheng; Tsai, Tsung-Lin [Departmant of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Sheng-Chi [Department of Materials Engineering and Center for Thin Film Technologies and Applications, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taipei 243, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Chin-Yen; Chang, Han-Feng [CMC Magnetics Corporation, Taoyuan 333, Taiwan (China); Lee, Chao-Te; Chiang, Donyau [Instrument Technology Research Center, National Applied Research Laboratories, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

375

Reactive magnetron sputtering of Cu{sub 2}O: Dependence on oxygen pressure and interface formation with indium tin oxide  

SciTech Connect

Thin films of copper oxides were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering and structural, morphological, chemical, and electronic properties were analyzed using x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, in situ photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrical resistance measurements. The deposition conditions for preparation of Cu(I)-oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) are identified. In addition, the interface formation between Cu{sub 2}O and Sn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (ITO) was studied by stepwise deposition of Cu{sub 2}O onto ITO and vice versa. A type II (staggered) band alignment with a valence band offset {Delta}E{sub VB} 2.1-2.6 eV depending on interface preparation is observed. The band alignment explains the nonrectifying behavior of p-Cu{sub 2}O/n-ITO junctions, which have been investigated for thin film solar cells.

Deuermeier, Jonas; Gassmann, Juergen; Broetz, Joachim; Klein, Andreas [Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Fachbereich Material- und Geowissenschaften, Petersenstrasse 32, D-64287 (Germany)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Investigation of solar cells based on Cu/sub 2/O. Quarterly progress report, May 1-July 31, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Efforts during this quarter have involved a detailed study of photocurrent from Cu/Cu/sub 2/O Schottky barriers, development of a MBE system, and studies of reactively sputtered ZnO films. Optical constants were determined for Cu films as a function of film thickness and utilized to determine optimum AR coating thicknesses to maximize the photocurrent from Cu/Cu/sub 2/O cells. Using results of these analyses, an AM1 photocurrent of 7.4 mA/cm/sup 2/ has been obtained. Fabrication and purchasing of parts for a three-source MBE system has progressed well. Conductive and transparent ZnO films were deposited by reactively sputtering zinc. Films exhibiting a sheet resistance in the range of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 5/ ..cap omega../cm/sup 2/ have been deposited on quartz.

Olsen, L.C.

1979-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

377

Formation of ZnTe:Cu/Ti Contacts at High Temperature for CdS/CdTe Devices (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conclusions of this report are that Cu diffusion from a ZnTe:Cu contact causes good and bad things. The good (Cu in CdS < low 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3})--increase in CdTe N{sub A}-N{sub D} that leads to V{sub oc} and FF improvement. The bad (Cu in CdS > low 10{sup 18} cm{sup -3})--(1) possibly decreased of shunt resistance (?); (2) depletion width in CdTe can become too narrow for optimum current collection at J{sub MPP}; (3) donor reduction in CdS (significant FF loss in LIV); and (4) excessive Cu diffusion into CdS readily observed by red-light bias QE.

Gessert, T. A.; Asher, S.; Johnston, S.; Duda, A.; Young, M. R.; Moriarty, T.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Effect of the Keggin anions on assembly of Cu{sup I}-bis(tetrazole) thioether complexes containing multinuclear Cu{sup I}-cluster  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to investigate the effect of polyoxometalate (POM) on the assembly of transition metal-bis(tetrazole) thioether complexes, three new complexes based on different Keggin anions and multinuclear Cu{sup I}-cluster [Cu{sup I}{sub 12}(bmtr){sub 9}(HSiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}){sub 4}] (1), [Cu{sup I}{sub 3}(bmtr){sub 3}(PM{sub 12}O{sub 40})] (M=W for 2; Mo for 3) (bmtr=1,3-bis(1-methyl-5-mercapto-1,2,3,4-tetrazole)propane), have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by routine physical methods and single crystal X-ray diffraction. In compound 1, two kinds of nanometer-scale tetranuclear subunits linked by [SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 4-} polyanions assemble a (3, 4)-connected three-dimensional (3D) self-penetrating framework. Compounds 2 and 3 are isostructural, exhibiting a 1D chain with [PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 3-}/[PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}]{sup 3-} polyanions and trinuclear clusters arranging alternately. The distinct structural differences between these POM-based Cu{sup I}-bmtr complexes of 1 and 2/3 maybe rest on the contrast of Keggin-type polyoxometalate with different central heteroatoms, which have been discussed in detail. In addition, the electrochemical properties of the title complexes have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three new complexes based on different Keggin anions and multinuclear Cu{sup I}-cluster have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The Keggin polyanions with different central heteroatoms play a key role. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The flexible bis(tetrazole)-based thioether ligand with some advantages have been used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effect of Keggin anions with different central heteroatoms has been discussed in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electrochemical behaviors and electrocatalysis property have been investigated.

Wang Xiuli, E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Gao Qiang; Tian Aixiang; Hu Hailiang; Liu Guocheng [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Importance of Low-Angle Grain Boundaries in YBa2Cu3O7-? Coated Conductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

behaviour of single grain boundaries in YBa2Cu3O7?? with an emphasis on those with misorientation angles less than 10 degrees. This cutoff is chosen following the work of Redwing and Heinig [65, 7] who showed, with some variation with magnetic field...

Durrell, John H; Rutter, Noel Anthony

380

Preparation of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductors from oxide-glass precursors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconductor and precursor therefor from oxide mixtures of Ca, Sr, Bi and Cu. Glass precursors quenched to elevated temperatures result in glass free of crystalline precipitates having enhanced mechanical properties. Superconductors are formed from the glass precursors by heating in the presence of oxygen to a temperature below the melting point of the glass.

Hinks, David G. (Lemont, IL); Capone, II, Donald W. (Northbridge, MA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Accelerated lifetime estimation of thermosonic Cu ball bonds on Al metallization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study a fast mechanical shear fatigue test technique for the quality assessment of thermosonic ball bonded interconnects was developed to estimate their lifetime behavior. The micro-interconnects were subjected to cyclic shear stress using a ... Keywords: Cu/Al Ball bond, Fatigue, Fracture mechanics, Lifetime, Microelectronic interconnects

A. Lassnig, W. Trasischker, G. Khatibi, B. Weiss, M. Nelhiebel, R. Pelzer

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Louisiana oyster CuLtCh ProjeCt General Project DescriPtion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

secondary production. estiMateD cost The estimated cost to implement the Louisiana Oyster Cultch Project is $15,582,600. (Estimated costs for some of the projects were updated from those provided in the DERPLouisiana oyster CuLtCh ProjeCt General Project DescriPtion The Louisiana Oyster Cultch Project

383

Combustion synthesis of calcium phosphate bioceramic powders A. Cu neyt Tas *,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion synthesis of calcium phosphate bioceramic powders A. Cu? neyt Tas *,1 Department)2; Combustion synthesis; Hydroxyapatite 1. Introduction Calcium hydroxyapatite (HA: Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2), the major), instead of water, as the precipitation medium. Self-propagating combustion synthesis (SPCS

Tas, A. Cuneyt

384

Drift tube soft-landing for the production and characterization of materials: Applied to Cu clusters  

SciTech Connect

We have recently developed a soft-landing (SL) instrument that is capable of depositing ions onto substrates for preparative and developmental research of new materials using a laser ablation source. This instrument was designed with a custom drift tube and a split-ring ion optic for the isolation of selected ions. The drift tube allows for the separation and thermalization of ions formed after laser ablation through collisions with an inert bath gas. These collisions allow the ions to be landed at energies below 1 eV onto substrates. The split-ring ion optic is capable of directing ions toward the detector or a landing substrate for selected components. Experiments will be shown ablating Cu using an Nd:YAG (1064 and 532 nm) for cluster formation and landing onto a muscovite (mica) surface. The laser ablation of Cu in 8 Torr of He gas gives a spectrum that contains multiple peaks corresponding to Cu{sub n}, Cu{sub n}O{sub m} clusters, and their corresponding isomers. Atomic force microscopy and drift tube measurements were performed to characterize the performance characteristics of the instrument.

Davila, Stephen J.; Birdwell, David O.; Verbeck, Guido F. [Department of Chemistry, University of North Texas, Denton, Texas 76201 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Evaluation of a Modified Scheme for Shallow Convection: Implementation of CuP and Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new treatment for shallow clouds has been introduced into the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF). The new scheme, called the cumulus potential (CuP) scheme, replaces the ad hoc trigger function used in the KainFritsch cumulus ...

Larry K. Berg; William I. Gustafson Jr.; Evgueni I. Kassianov; Liping Deng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Possible Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrothermally Aged Cu/Beta Zeolite Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The hydrothermal stability of Cu/beta NH3 SCR catalysts are explored here. In particular, this paper focuses on the interesting ability of this catalyst to maintain and even enhance high-temperature performance for the "standard" SCR reaction after modest (900 C, 2 hours) hydrothermal aging. Characterization of the fresh and aged catalysts was performed with an aim to identify possible catalytic phases responsible for the enhanced high temperature performance. XRD, TEM and 27Al NMR all showed that the hydrothermally aging conditions used here resulted in almost complete loss of the beta zeolite structure between 1 and 2 hours aging. While the 27Al NMR spectra of 2 and 10 hour hydrothermally-aged catalysts showed significant loss of a peak associated with tetrahedrally-coordinated Al species, no new spectral features were evident. Two model catalysts, suggested by these characterization data as possible mimics of the catalytic phase formed during hydrothermal aging of Cu/beta, were prepared and tested for their performance in the "standard" SCR and NH3 oxidation reactions. The similarity in their reactivity compared to the 2 hour hydrothermally-aged Cu/beta catalyst suggests possible routes for preparing multi-component catalysts that may have wider temperature windows for optimum performance than those provided by current Cu/zeolite catalysts.

Peden, Charles HF; Kwak, Ja Hun; Burton, Sarah D.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Lee, Jong H.; Jen, H. W.; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Cheng, Yisun; Lambert, Christine

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

CU-CAS-97-09 CENTER FOR AEROSPACE STRUCTURES THE CONSTRUCTION OF FREE-FREE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CU-CAS-97-09 CENTER FOR AEROSPACE STRUCTURES THE CONSTRUCTION OF FREE-FREE FLEXIBILITY MATRICES OF ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO CAMPUS BOX 429 BOULDER, COLORADO 80309 #12;The Construction of Free-Free­418, of that journal) #12;The Construction of Free-Free Flexibility Matrices as Generalized Stiffness Inverses C. A

Felippa, Carlos A.

388

Analysis of electromigration induced early failures in Cu interconnects for 45nm node  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bi-directional current stressing was used for monitoring electromigration (EM) lifetime evolution in 45nm node interconnects. Experimental results show that an initial bimodal distribution of lifetimes can be modified into a more robust mono-modal distribution. ... Keywords: Bi-directional current, Cu interconnects, Electromigration, FEM modeling

L. Arnaud; F. Cacho; L. Doyen; F. Terrier; D. Galpin; C. Monget

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

E1: Phase Diagram Study of Au-Al-Cu at 500C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A18: Effect of Local Alendronate Delivery on In Vivo Osteogenesis From PCL ... A7: On-the-fly System Design for High Precision/Ultra Fast/Wide Area Fabrication .... C19: Dissolution Behavior of Cu Under Bump Metallization in Ball Grid Array ... High Volume and Fast Turnaround Automated Inline TEM Sample Preparation.

390

Comparative Toxicity of Nanoparticulate CuO and ZnO to Soil Bacterial Communities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing industrial application of metal oxide Engineered Nano-Particles (ENPs) is likely to increase their environmental release to soils. While the potential of metal oxide ENPs as environmental toxicants has been shown, lack of suitable control treatments have compromised the power of many previous assessments. We evaluated the ecotoxicity of ENP (nano) forms of Zn and Cu oxides in two different soils by measuring their ability to inhibit bacterial growth. We could show a direct acute toxicity of nano-CuO acting on soil bacteria while the macroparticulate (bulk) form of CuO was not toxic. In comparison, CuSO4 was more toxic than either oxide form. Unlike Cu, all forms of Zn were toxic to soil bacteria, and the bulk-ZnO was more toxic than the nano-ZnO. The ZnSO4 addition was not consistently more toxic than the oxide forms. Consistently, we found a tight link between the dissolved concentration of metal in solution and the inhibition of bacterial growth. The inconsistent toxicological response between soils could be explained by different resulting concentrations of metals in soil solution. Our findings suggested that the principal mechanism of toxicity was dissolution of metal oxides and sulphates into a metal ion form known to be highly toxic to bacteria, and not a direct effect of nano-sized particles acting on bacteria. We propose that integrated efforts toward directly assessing bioavailable metal concentrations are more valuable than spending resources to reassess ecotoxicology of ENPs separately from

Johannes Rousk; Kathrin Ackermann; Simon F. Curling; Davey L. Jones

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Synthesis, crystal and electronic structure, and physical properties of the new lanthanum copper telluride La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5}Te{sub 7}  

SciTech Connect

The new lanthanum copper telluride La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5-x}Te{sub 7} has been obtained by annealing the elements at 1073 K. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies revealed that the title compound crystallizes in a new structure type, space group Pnma (no. 62) with lattice dimensions of a=8.2326(3) A, b=25.9466(9) A, c=7.3402(3) A, V=1567.9(1) A{sup 3}, Z=4 for La{sub 3}Cu{sub 4.86(4)}Te{sub 7}. The structure of La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5-x}Te{sub 7} is remarkably complex. The Cu and Te atoms build up a three-dimensional covalent network. The coordination polyhedra include trigonal LaTe{sub 6} prisms, capped trigonal LaTe{sub 7} prisms, CuTe{sub 4} tetrahedra, and CuTe{sub 3} pyramids. All Cu sites exhibit deficiencies of various extents. Electrical property measurements on a sintered pellet of La{sub 3}Cu{sub 4.86}Te{sub 7} indicate that it is a p-type semiconductor in accordance with the electronic structure calculations. -- Graphical abstract: Oligomeric unit comprising interconnected CuTe{sub 3} pyramids and CuTe{sub 4} tetrahedra. Display Omitted Research highlights: {yields} La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5-x}Te{sub 7} adopts a new structure type. {yields} All Cu sites exhibit deficiencies of various extents. {yields} The coordination polyhedra include trigonal LaTe{sub 6} prisms, capped trigonal LaTe{sub 7} prisms, CuTe{sub 4} tetrahedra and CuTe{sub 3} pyramids. {yields} La{sub 3}Cu{sub 5-x}Te{sub 7} is a p-type semiconductor.

Zelinska, Mariya; Assoud, Abdeljalil [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada); Kleinke, Holger, E-mail: kleinke@uwaterloo.c [Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada N2L 3G1 (Canada)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

FT-ICR Z-- FT-ICR Mass Spectroscopy of Precursor Clusters of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"ü,Á,½,±,? ,?·CNX^S"O,ª·G"}OEø?,?,æ,è"ñ·í,?`·,-·i,ñ,?,¢,é ,?·l,¦,ç,ê,é·DFig.2(c),Í Ni/Co/C ,ð

Maruyama, Shigeo

393

FT-ICR ,,,NX^[,Z-- FT-ICR Mass Spectroscopy of Atomic Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S?,-·ÝOEv,?,?,Á,?,¢,é·D--¼`¤,?^·[{·ªZq|" v(300l/s),?,æ,Á,?·C"w^³3·~10-10 Torr ,?·,·^DFig

Maruyama, Shigeo

394

Nanopattering in CeOx/Cu(111): A New Type of Surface Reconstruction and Enhancement of Catalytic Activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our results indicate that small amounts of an oxide deposited on a stable metal surface can trigger a massive surface reconstruction under reaction conditions. In low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) experiments, no reconstruction of Cu(111) is observed after chemisorbing oxygen or after reducing O/Cu(111) in a CO atmosphere. On the other hand, LEEM images taken in situ during the reduction of CeO{sub 2}/CuO{sub 1-x}/Cu(111) show a complex nonuniform transformation of the surface morphology. Ceria particles act as nucleation sites for the growth of copper microterraces once CuO{sub 1-x} is reduced. Can this reconstructed surface be used to enhance the catalytic activity of inverse oxide/metal catalysts? Indeed, CeO{sub x} on reconstructed Cu(111) is an extremely active catalyst for the water-gas shift process (CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}), with the Cu microterraces providing very efficient sites for the dissociation of water and subsequent reaction with CO.

Rodriguez J. A.; Senanayake, S.D.; Sadowski, J.; Evans, J.; Kundu, S.; Agnoli, S.; Yang, F.; Stacchiola, D.; Flege, J.I.; Hrbek, J.

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

395

Method for preparation of textured YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x superconductor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relate to textured YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x (Y-123) superconductors and a process of preparing them by directional recrystallization of compacts fabricated from quenched YBCO powders at temperatures about 100.degree. C. below the peritectic temperature to provide a superconductor where more than 75% of the YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x phase is obtained without any Y.sub.2 BaCuO.sub.5 .

Selvamanickam, Venkat (Guilderland, NY); Goyal, Amit (Knoxville, TN); Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Devitrification kinetics and phase selection mechanisms in Cu-Zr metallic glasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metallic glasses have been a promising class of materials since their discovery in the 1960s. Indeed, remarkable chemical, mechanical and physical properties have attracted considerable attention, and several excellent reviews are available. Moreover, the special group of glass forming alloys known as the bulk metallic glasses (BMG) become amorphous solids even at relatively low cooling rates, allowing them to be cast in large cross sections, opening the scope of potential applications to include bulk forms and net shape structural applications. Recent studies have been reported for new bulk metallic glasses produced with lower cooling rates, from 0.1 to several hundred K/s. Some of the application products of BMGs include sporting goods, high performance springs and medical devices. Several rapid solidification techniques, including melt-spinning, atomization and surface melting have been developed to produce amorphous alloys. The aim of all these methods is to solidify the liquid phase rapidly enough to suppress the nucleation and growth of crystalline phases. Furthermore, the production of amorphous/crystalline composite (ACC) materials by partial crystallization of amorphous precursor has recently given rise to materials that provide better mechanical and magnetic properties than the monolithic amorphous or crystalline alloys. In addition, these advances illustrate the broad untapped potential of using the glassy state as an intermediate stage in the processing of new materials and nanostructures. These advances underlie the necessity of investigations on prediction and control of phase stability and microstructural dynamics during both solidification and devitrification processes. This research presented in this dissertation is mainly focused on Cu-Zr and Cu-Zr-Al alloy systems. The Cu-Zr binary system has high glass forming ability in a wide compositional range (35-70 at.% Cu). Thereby, Cu-Zr based alloys have attracted much attention according to fundamental research on the behaviors of glass forming alloys. Further motivation arising from the application of this system as a basis for many BMGs and ACC materials; the Cu-Zr system warrants this attention and offers great potential for the development of new materials. However, the prediction and control of microstructural evolution during devitrification remains challenging because of the complex devitrification behavior of the Cu-Zr binary alloy which is arising from the competition of metastable and stable phases and diversity of crystal structures. This dissertation details a systematic fundamental investigation into the mechanisms and kinetics of the various crystallization transformation processes involved in the overall devitrification response of Cu-Zr and Cu-Zr-Al glasses. Various isothermal and nonisothermal treatments are employed, and the structural response is characterized using bulk X-ray and thermal analysis methods as well as nanoscale microscopic analysis methods, revealing structural and chemical details down to the atomic-scale. By carefully combining techniques such as differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), in-situ synchrotron high energy X-ray diffraction (HEXRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to quantify the characterization transformations, this research has uncovered numerous details concerning the atomistic mechanisms of crystallization and has provided much new understanding related to the dominant phases, the overall reaction sequences, and the rate-controlling mechanisms. As such this work represents a substantial step forward in understanding these transformations and provides a clear framework for further progress toward ultimate application of controlled devitrification processing for the production of new materials with remarkable properties.

Kalay, Ilkay

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Feasibility Study of Economics and Performance of Solar Photovoltaics at the Ft. Hood Military Base Outside Killeen, Texas. A Study Prepared in Partnership with the Environmental Protection Agency for the RE-Powering America's Land Initiative: Siting Renewable Energy on Potentially Contaminated Land and Mine Sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in accordance with the RE-Powering America's Land initiative through the Region 6 contract, selected Ft. Hood Army Base in Killeen, Texas, for a feasibility study of renewable energy production. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provided technical assistance for this project. The purpose of this study is to assess the site for possible photovoltaic (PV) system installations and estimate the cost, performance, and site impacts of different PV options. In addition, the report recommends financing options that could assist in the implementation of a PV system at the site.

Geiger, J.; Lisell, L.; Mosey, G.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Syntheses, crystal structures, and characterization of two new Tl{sup +}-Cu{sup 2+}-Te{sup 6+} oxides: Tl{sub 4}CuTeO{sub 6} and Tl{sub 6}CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10}  

SciTech Connect

Crystals and polycrystalline powders of two new oxide materials, Tl{sub 4}CuTeO{sub 6} and Tl{sub 6}CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10}, have been synthesized by hydrothermal and solid-state methods. The materials were structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Tl{sub 4}CuTeO{sub 6} and Tl{sub 6}CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10} exhibit one dimensional anionic slabs of [CuTeO{sub 6}]{sup 4-} and [CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10}]{sup 6-}, respectively. Common to both slabs is the occurrence of Cu{sup 2+}O{sub 4} distorted squares and Te{sup 6+}O{sub 6} octahedra. The slabs are separated by Tl{sup +} cations. For Tl{sub 4}CuTeO{sub 6}, magnetic measurements indicate a maximum at {approx}8 K in the temperature dependence of the susceptibility. Low temperature neutron diffraction data confirm no long-range magnetic ordering occurs and the susceptibility was adequately accounted for by fits to a Heisenberg alternating chain model. For Tl{sub 6}CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10} on the other hand, magnetic measurements revealed paramagnetism with no evidence of long-range magnetic ordering. Infrared, UV-vis spectra, thermogravimetric, and differential thermal analyses are also reported. Crystal data: Tl{sub 4}CuTeO{sub 6}, Triclinic, space group P-1 (No. 2), a=5.8629(8) A, b=8.7848(11) A, c=9.2572(12) A, {alpha}=66.0460(10), {beta}=74.2010(10), {gamma}=79.254(2), V=417.70(9) A{sup 3}, and Z=2; Tl{sub 6}CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10}, orthorhombic, space group Pnma (No. 62), a=10.8628(6) A, b=11.4962(7) A, c=10.7238(6) A, V=1339.20(13) A{sup 3}, and Z=4. - Graphical Abstract: Two new oxide materials, Tl{sub 4}CuTeO{sub 6} and Tl{sub 6}CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10}, have been synthesized and characterized. The materials exhibit one dimensional crystal structures consisting of CuO{sub 4} and TeO{sub 6} polyhedra. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two New Tl-Te-Cu-oxides have been synthesized and structurally characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For Tl{sub 4}CuTeO{sub 6}, magnetic measurements indicate a maximum at {approx}8 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low temperature neutron diffraction data confirm no long-range magnetic ordering. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For Tl{sub 6}CuTe{sub 2}O{sub 10} magnetic measurements revealed no long-range magnetic ordering.

Yeon, Jeongho; Kim, Sang-Hwan [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, 136 Fleming Building, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, 136 Fleming Building, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States); Green, Mark A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 20742-2115 and NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standard and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6103 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 20742-2115 and NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standard and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6103 (United States); Bhatti, Kanwal Preet; Leighton, C. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0132 (United States)] [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0132 (United States); Shiv Halasyamani, P., E-mail: psh@uh.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, 136 Fleming Building, Houston, TX 77204-5003 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Cosponsored by CU's Renewable and Sustainable Energy Initiative and the CIRES Center for Science and Technology Policy Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cosponsored by CU's Renewable and Sustainable Energy Initiative and the CIRES Center for Science, policy and analysis, and has extensive eld experience in Latin American, southeast Asia and China

Colorado at Boulder, University of

400

Low energy positron diffraction from Cu(111): Importance of surface loss processes at large angles of incidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Intensities of positrons specularly diffracted from Cu(111) were measured at the Brandeis positron beam facility and analyzed in the energy range 8eV40{degree}. 30 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Lessor, D.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Duke, C.B. (Xerox Corp., Webster, NY (USA). Webster Research Center); Lippel, P.H.; Brandes, G.R.; Canter, K.F.; Horsky, T.N. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA). Dept. of Physics)

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A three-dimensional Macroporous Cu/SnO2 composite anode sheet prepared via a novel method  

SciTech Connect

Macroporous Cu/SnO2 composite anode sheets were prepared by a novel method which is based on slurry blending, tape casting, sintering, and reducing of metal oxides. Such composite Cu/SnO2 anode sheets have no conducting carbons and binders, and show improved discharge capacity and cycle life than the SnO2 electrode from conventional tape-casting method on Cu foil. This methodology produces limited wastes and is also adaptable to many other materials. It is easy for industrial scale production. With the optimization of particle size of the metal oxide, pore size, pore volume and other factors, this kind of macroporous Cu/SnO2 composite anode sheets could give significantly improved capacity and cycle life.

Xu, Wu; Canfield, Nathan L.; Wang, Deyu; Xiao, Jie; Nie, Zimin; Zhang, Jiguang

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Effect of bonding and aging temperatures on bond strengths of Cu with 75Sn25In solders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present study, the interaction between thin film Cu and non-eutectic Sn-In is studied. The effects of the bonding and aging temperature on microstructure, IMC formation and also shear strength are investigated by ...

Thompson, Carl V.

403

Millimeter size single crystals of superconducting YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of growing large, up to 1 mm size single crystals of superconducting YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub x], wherein x equals from 6.5 to 7.2 is disclosed.

Damento, M.A.; Gschneidner, K.A. Jr.

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

404

Spectroscopic Cathodoluminescence Studies of the ZnTe:Cu Contact Process for CdS/CdTe Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the spectroscopic cathodoluminescence (CL), electron-beam induced current (EBIC), and capacitance-Voltage (C-V) measurements are used to study the formation of CdS/CdTe devices processed using ion-beam milling and a ZnTe:Cu/Ti contact. Results show heating in vacuum at {approx}360 C and ion-beam milling lead to observable changes in the CL emission from the CdCl2-treated CdTe surface. Changes in the CL spectrum are also observed as ZnTe:Cu layer thickness increases. These changes are correlated to published studies of defect levels and shown to be due, possibly, to an n-type region existing between the ZnTe:Cu contact interface and the p-CdTe layers. This n-type region is eliminated once a sufficiently thick ZnTe:Cu layer is produced.

Gessert, T. A.; Romero, M. J.; Johnston, S.; Keyes, B.; Dippo, P.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hardness variation and cyclic crystalline-amorphous phase transformation in CuZr alloy during ball milling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hardness and percent crystallinity of Cu33Zr67 powder samples are measured through several cycles of a cyclic phase transformation during ball milling. Each are found to cycle with a period of approximately 320 minutes. ...

Schoen, David Taylor

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The rotational spectrum of CuCCH(1+): A Fourier transform microwave discharge assisted laser ablation spectroscopy and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

spectra were analyzed with an effective Hamiltonian, and rotational, electric quadrupole Cu and D reagents have widespread usage in or- ganic chemistry.1 These compounds have many desirable synthetic

Ziurys, Lucy M.

407

89Y NMR probe of Zn induced local magnetism in YBa2(Cu1?yZny ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

a large T-dependent contribution to the 89Y NMR linewidth is evidenced and is ... YBCO6+x samples and 27Al NMR data taken on Al3+ substituted on the Cu...

408

Millimeter size single crystals of superconducting YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub .  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of growing large, up to 1 mm size single crystals of superconducting YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.x, wherein x equals from 6.5 to 7.2.

Damento, Michael A. (Ames, IA); Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA)

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

409

Adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of methanol decomposition on Cu(100)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo method was used to calculate the dynamics of methanol decomposition on Cu(100) at room temperature over a time scale of minutes. Mechanisms of reaction were found using min-mode following saddle point searches based upon forces and energies from density functional theory. Rates of reaction were calculated with harmonic transition state theory. The dynamics followed a pathway from CH3-OH, CH3-O, CH2-O, CH-O and finally C-O. Our calculations confirm that methanol decomposition starts with breaking the O-H bond followed by breaking C-H bonds in the dehydrogenated intermediates until CO is produced. The bridge site on the Cu(100) surface is the active site for scissoring chemical bonds. Reaction intermediates are mobile on the surface which allows them to find this active reaction site. This study illustrates how the adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo method can model the dynamics of surface chemistry from first principles.

Xu, Lijun; Mei, Donghai; Henkelman, Graeme A.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Local structural and compositional determination via electron scattering: Heterogeneous Cu(001)-Pd surface alloy  

SciTech Connect

We have measured the structure and chemical composition of ultrathin Pd films on Cu(001) using low-energy electron microscopy. We determine their local stoichiometry and structure, with 8.5 nm lateral spatial resolution, by quantitatively analyzing the scattered electron intensity and comparing it to dynamical scattering calculations, as in a conventional low-energy electron diffraction (LEED)-IV analysis. The average t-matrix approximation is used to calculate the total atomic scattering matrices for this random substitutional alloy. As in the traditional LEED analysis, the structural and compositional parameters are determined by comparing the computed diffraction intensity of a trial structure to that measured in experiment. Monte Carlo simulations show how the spatial and compositional inhomogeneity can be used to understand the energetics of Cu-Pd bonding.

Sun, J.; Pohl, K. [Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 03824 (United States); Hannon, J. B. [IBM Research Division, T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States); Kellogg, G. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Inhomogeneous magnetism in the doped kagome lattice of LaCuO2.66  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hole-doped kagome lattice of Cu2+ ions in LaCuO2.66 was investigated by nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR), electron spin resonance (ESR), electrical resistivity, bulk magnetization and specific heat measurements. For temperatures above 180 K, the spin and charge properties show an activated behavior suggestive of a narrow-gap semiconductor. At lower temperatures, the results indicate an insulating ground state which may or may not be charge ordered. While the frustrated spins in remaining patches of the original kagome lattice might not be directly detected here, the observation of coexisting non-magnetic sites, free spins and frozen moments reveals an intrinsically inhomogeneous magnetism. Numerical simulations of a 1/3-diluted kagome lattice rationalize this magnetic state in terms of a heterogeneous distribution of cluster sizes and morphologies near the site-percolation threshold.

Julien, M.-H. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Intenses; Simonet, V [Institut Neel, CNRS-UJF; Canals, B. [Institut Neel, CNRS-UJF; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL; Bordet, Pierre [Laboratoire of Cristallographie, Grenoble; Darie, Celine [Laboratoire of Cristallographie, Grenoble

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Cu2Sb thin films as anode for Na-ion batteries  

SciTech Connect

Cu2Sb thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering are evaluated as an anode material for Na-ion batteries. The starting material is composed of nanocrystallites with the desired tetragonal P4/nmm structure. The study of the reaction mechanism reveals the formation of an amorphous/nanocrystalline phase of composition close to Na3Sb as the final reaction product. The solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) material is mostly composed of carbonates (Na2CO3, NaCO3R). The Cu2Sb anode possesses moderate capacity retention with a reversible storage capacity (250 mAh/g) close to the theoretical value (323 mAh/g), an average reaction potential of around 0.55 V vs. Na/Na+, and a high rate performance (10 C-rate).

Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Allcorn, Eric [University of Texas, Austin; Manthiram, Arumugam [University of Texas, Austin; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Multivariate Curve Resolution Analysis for Interpretation of Dynamic Cu K-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Spectra for a Cu Doped V2O5 Lithium Battery  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vanadium pentoxide materials prepared through sol-gel processes act as excellent intercalation hosts for lithium as well as polyvalent cations. A chemometric approach has been applied to study the X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) evolution during in situ scanning of the Cu{sub 0.1}V{sub 2}O{sub 5} xerogel/Li ions battery. Among the more common techniques, the fixed size windows evolving factor analysis (FSWEFA) permits the number of species involved in the experiment to be determined and the range of existence of each of them. This result, combined with the constraints of the invariance of the total concentration and non-negativity of both concentrations and spectra, enabled us to obtain the spectra of the pure components using a multivariate curve resolution refined by an alternate least squares fitting procedure. This allowed the normalized concentration profile to be understood. This data treatment evidenced the occurrence, for the first time, of three species during the battery charging. This fact finds confirmation by comparison of the pure spectra with the experimental ones. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis confirms the occurrence of three different chemical environments of Cu during battery charging.

Conti, P.; Zamponi, S; Giorgetti, M; Berrettoni, M; Smyrl, W

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Current Understanding of Cu-Exchanged Chabazite Molecular Sieves for Use as Commercial Diesel Engine DeNOx Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia using metal-exchanged molecular sieves with a chabazite (CHA) structure has recently been commercialized on diesel vehicles. One of the commercialized catalysts, i.e., Cu-SSZ-13, has received much attention for both practical and fundamental studies. For the latter, the particularly well-defined structure of this zeolite is allowing long-standing issues of the catalytically active site for SCR in metal-exchanged zeolites to be addressed. In this review, recent progress is summarized with a focus on two areas. First, the technical significance of Cu-SSZ-13 as compared to other Cu-ion exchanged zeolites (e.g., Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta) is highlighted. Specifically, the much enhanced hydrothermal stability for Cu-SSZ-13 compared to other zeolite catalysts is addressed via performance measurements and catalyst characterization using several techniques. The enhanced stability of Cu-SSZ-13 is rationalized in terms of the unique small pore structure of this zeolite catalyst. Second, the fundamentals of the catalytically active center; i.e., the chemical nature and locations within the SSZ-13 framework are presented with an emphasis on understanding structure-function relationships. For the SCR reaction, traditional kinetic studies are complicated by intra-particle diffusion limitations. However, a major side reaction, nonselective ammonia oxidation by oxygen, does not suffer from mass-transfer limitations at relatively low temperatures due to significantly lower reaction rates. This allows structure-function relationships that are rather well understood in terms of Cu ion locations and redox properties. Finally, some aspects of the SCR reaction mechanism are addressed on the basis of in-situ spectroscopic studies.

Gao, Feng; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

2013-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

415

Pressure-driven orbital reorientations and coordination-sphere reconstructions in [CuF2(H2O)2(pyz)  

SciTech Connect

Successive reorientations of the Jahn-Teller axes associated with the Cu{sup II} ions accompany a series of pronounced structural transitions in the title compound, as is shown by X-ray crystallography and high-frequency EPR measurements. The second transition forces a dimerization involving two thirds of the Cu{sup II} sites due to ejection of one of the water molecules from the coordination sphere

Prescimone, A.; Morien, C.; Allan, D.; Schlueter, J.; Tozer, S.; Manson, J. L.; Parsons, S.; Brechin, E. K.; Hill, S. (Materials Science Division); (EaStCHEM School of Chem.); (Florida State Univ.); (Harwell Sci. Innovation Campus); (Eastern Washington Univ.)

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

416

Stability of Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O Superconducting Thin Films  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report the stability of TlBa{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 7} (Tl-1212) and Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (T1-2212) thin films and by inference, the stability of TlBa{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 9} (Tl-1223) and Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10} (Tl-2223) thin films, under a variety of conditions. In general, we observe that the stability behavior of the single Tl-O layer materials (Tl-1212 and Tl-1223)are similar and the double Tl-O layer materials (Tl-2212 and Tl-2223) are similar. All films are stable with repeated thermal cycling to cryogenic temperatures. Films are also stable in acetone and methanol. Moisture degrades film quality rapidly, especially in the form of vapor. Tl-1212 is more sensitive to vapor than Tl-2212. These materials are stable to high temperatures in either N{sub 2}, similar to vacuum for the cuprates, and O{sub 2} ambients. While total degradation of properties (superconducting and structural) occur at the same temperatures for all phases, 600 C in N{sub 2} and 700 C in O{sub 2}, the onset of degradation occurs at somewhat lower temperatures for Tl-1212 than for Tl-2212 films. In all cases, sample degradation is associated with Tl depletion from the films.

Siegal, M.P.; Overmyer, D.L.; Venturini, E.L.; Padilla, R.R.; Provencio, P.N.

1999-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

417

Incorporation of sulfur, chlorine, and carbon into electroplated Cu thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microstructure of electroplated Cu thin films and the contamination with incorporated additives were investigated in dependence on the galvanostatic deposition parameters and thermal treatment. Sulfur, chlorine, and carbon were analysed as impurities ... Keywords: 61.72.Ss, 66.30.Jt, 68.35.Dv, 68.43.Mn, 81.15.Pq, 82.45.Vp, 85.40.Ls, Additive incorporation, Additive surface adsorption, Copper, Electrochemical deposition, Impurities

M. Stangl; J. Acker; S. Oswald; M. Uhlemann; T. Gemming; S. Baunack; K. Wetzig

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Production of {sup 64}Cu and other radionuclides using a charged-particle accelerator  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclides are produced according to the present invention at commercially significant yields and at specific activities which are suitable for use in radiodiagnostic agents such as PET imaging agents and radiotherapeutic agents and/or compositions. In the method and system of the present invention, a solid target having an isotopically enriched target layer electroplated on an inert substrate is positioned in a specially designed target holder and irradiated with a charged-particle beam. The beam is preferably generated using an accelerator such as a biomedical cyclotron at energies ranging from about 5 MeV to about 25 MeV. The target is preferably directly irradiated, without an intervening attenuating foil, and with the charged particle beam impinging an area which substantially matches the target area. The irradiated target is remotely and automatically transferred from the target holder, preferably without transferring any target holder subassemblies, to a conveyance system which is preferably a pneumatic or hydraulic conveyance system, and then further transferred to an automated separation system. The system is effective for processing a single target or a plurality of targets. After separation, the unreacted target material can be recycled for preparation of other targets. In a preferred application of the invention, a biomedical cyclotron has been used to produce over 500 mCi of {sup 64}Cu having a specific activity of over 300 mCi/{mu}g Cu according to the reaction {sup 64}Ni(p,n){sup 64}Cu. These results indicate that accelerator-produced {sup 64}Cu is suitable for radiopharmaceutical diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

Welch, M.J.; McCarthy, D.W.; Shefer, R.E.; Klinkowstein, R.E.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

419

Microstructure control of Al-Cu films for improved electromigration resistance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the forming of Al-Cu conductive thin films with reduced electromigration failures is useful, for example, in the metallization of integrated circuits. An improved formation process includes the heat treatment or annealing of the thin film conductor at a temperature within the range of from 200 C to 300 C for a time period between 10 minutes and 24 hours under a reducing atmosphere such as 15% H[sub 2] in N[sub 2] by volume. Al-Cu thin films annealed in the single phase region of a phase diagram, to temperatures between 200 C and 300 C have [theta]-phase Al[sub 2] Cu precipitates at the grain boundaries continuously become enriched in copper, due, it is theorized, to the formation of a thin coating of [theta]-phase precipitate at the grain boundary. Electromigration behavior of the aluminum is, thus, improved because the [theta]-phase precipitates with copper hinder aluminum diffusion along the grain boundaries. Electromigration, then, occurs mainly within the aluminum grains, a much slower process. 5 figures.

Frear, D.R.; Michael, J.R.; Romig, A.D. Jr.

1994-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

420

Microstructure control of Al-Cu films for improved electromigration resistance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the forming of Al-Cu conductive thin films with reduced electromigration failures is useful, for example, in the metallization of integrated circuits. An improved formation process includes the heat treatment or annealing of the thin film conductor at a temperature within the range of from 200.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. for a time period between 10 minutes and 24 hours under a reducing atmosphere such as 15% H.sub.2 in N.sub.2 by volume. Al-Cu thin films annealed in the single phase region of a phase diagram, to temperatures between 200.degree. C. and 300.degree. C. have .theta.-phase Al.sub.2 Cu precipitates at the grain boundaries continuously become enriched in copper, due, it is theorized, to the formation of a thin coating of .theta.-phase precipitate at the grain boundary. Electromigration behavior of the aluminum is, thus, improved because the .theta.-phase precipitates with copper hinder aluminum diffusion along the grain boundaries. Electromigration, then, occurs mainly within the aluminum grains, a much slower process.

Frear, Darrel R. (Albuquerque, NM); Michael, Joseph R. (Albuquerque, NM); Romig, Jr., Alton D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

LARGE SCALE PRODUCTION, PURIFICATION, AND 65CU SOLID STATE NMR OF AZURIN  

SciTech Connect

This paper details a way to produce azurin with an effi ciency over 10 times greater than previously described and demonstrates the fi rst solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of 65Cu(I) in a metalloprotein. A synthetic gene for azurin based upon the DNA sequence from Pseudomonas aeruginosa including the periplasmic targeting sequence was subcloned into a T7 overexpression vector to create the plasmid pGS-azurin, which was transformed into BL21 (DE3) competent cells. The leader sequence on the expressed protein causes it to be exported to the periplasmic space of Escherichia coli. Bacteria grown in a fermentation unit were induced to overexpress the azurin, which was subsequently purifi ed through an endosmotic shock procedure followed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). 1,500 mg of azurin were purifi ed per liter of culture. 65Cu(II) was added to apo-azurin and then reduced. The 65Cu metal cofactor in azurin was observed with solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to determine any structural variations that accompanied copper reduction. This is the fi rst solid state NMR spectra of a copper(I) metalloprotein. Analysis of the NMR spectra is being used to complement hypotheses set forth by x-ray diffraction and computational calculations of electron transfer mechanisms in azurin.

Gao, A.; Heck, R.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Modulated structure of [beta]-brass CuZn compressed to 90 GPa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cu-Zn is a classic example of an alloy system displaying a sequence of phases along an alloy composition, called Hume-Rothery phases. The crystal structure of these phases is determined by valence electron concentration (that is the average number of valence electrons per atom), and the lowering of the electronic energy is considered the key factor for the structure stabilization. Using powder x-ray diffraction, we study the {beta}-phase of an equiatomic CuZn alloy in its body-centered cubic (bcc) phase in the pressure range up to 90 GPa and find a transformation to a modulated trigonal structure at around 40 GPa. We analyze the structural distortion of bcc CuZn by looking at the configuration of the Brillouin zone of the bcc and the trigonal structures and their interaction with the Fermi surface. We demonstrate that the stabilization of the complex high-pressure structure can be explained with the Hume-Rothery effect.

Degtyareva, Olga; Degtyareva, Valentina F. (Edinburgh); (CIW)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

423

Stability of hume rothery phases in Cu?Zn alloys at pressures up to 50 GPa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The crystal structure of the {gamma}-brass phase Cu{sub 5}Zn{sub 8} is confirmed with single-crystal X-ray diffraction and a charge-coupled device (CCD) detector to be cubic with 52 atoms in the unit cell, space group I{bar 4}3m, and the refined atomic positions are in good agreement with previously reported data. The structural behavior of {alpha}-(fcc), {beta}-brass (cI52) phases of the Cu-Zn alloy system has been studied under pressure using diamond anvil cells and powder X-ray diffraction with synchrotron radiation. The appearance of additional peaks in the diffraction patterns of {alpha}- and {beta}-phases indicates the beginning of transitions to new phases at 17 and 37 GPa, respectively. The complex cubic {gamma}-brass phase (52 atoms in the unit cell, space group I{bar 4}3m) is observed to be stable up to at least 50 GPa. The bulk modulus K 0 was determined as 140(4) GPa for {alpha}-, 139(5) for {beta}-, and 121(2) for {gamma}-phase assuming K 0 = 4. The structural stability of brass phases of the Cu-Zn system under pressure is discussed in terms of the Hume-Rothery mechanism.

Degtyareva, V.F.; Sakharov, M.K.; Novokhatskaya, N.I.; Degtyareva, O.; Dera, P.; Mao, H.-K.; Hemley, R.J. (Edinburgh); (Russ. Acad. Sci.); (CIW)

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

424

110K Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor oxide and method for making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconductor consisting of a sufficiently pure phase of the oxides of Bi, Sr, Ca, and Cu to exhibit a resistive zero near 110K resulting from the process of forming a mixture of Bi.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrCO.sub.3, CaCO.sub.3 and CuO into aparticulate compact wherein the atom ratios are Bi.sub.2, Sr.sub.1.2-2.2, Ca.sub.1.8-2.4, Cu.sub.3. Thereafter, heating the particulate compact rapidly in the presence of oxygen to an elevated temperature near the melting point of the oxides to form a sintered compact, and then maintaining the sintered compact at the elevated temperature for a prolonged period of time. The sintered compact is cooled and reground. Thereafter, the reground particulate material is compacted and heated in the presence of oxygen to an elevated temperature near the melting point of the oxide and maintained at the elevated temperature for a time sufficient to provide a sufficiently pure phase to exhibit a resistive zero near 110K.

Veal, Boyd W. (Downers Grove, IL); Downey, John W. (Joliet, IL); Lam, Daniel J. (Orland Park, IL); Paulikas, Arvydas P. (Downers Grove, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

110K Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconductor oxide and method for making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconductor is disclosed consisting of a sufficiently pure phase of the oxides of Bi, Sr, Ca, and Cu to exhibit a resistive zero near 110K resulting from the process of forming a mixture of Bi[sub 2]O[sub 3], SrCO[sub 3], CaCO[sub 3] and CuO into a particulate compact wherein the atom ratios are Bi[sub 2], Sr[sub 1.2-2.2], Ca[sub 1.8-2.4], Cu[sub 3]. Thereafter, heating the particulate compact rapidly in the presence of oxygen to an elevated temperature near the melting point of the oxides to form a sintered compact, and then maintaining the sintered compact at the elevated temperature for a prolonged period of time. The sintered compact is cooled and reground. Thereafter, the reground particulate material is compacted and heated in the presence of oxygen to an elevated temperature near the melting point of the oxide and maintained at the elevated temperature for a time sufficient to provide a sufficiently pure phase to exhibit a resistive zero near 110K. 7 figs.

Veal, B.W.; Downey, J.W.; Lam, D.J.; Paulikas, A.P.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

426

The surface chemistry of Cu in the presence of CO2 and H2O  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The chemical nature of copper and copper oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) surfaces in the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O at room temperature was investigated using ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The studies reveal that in the presence of 0.1 torr CO{sub 2} several species form on the initially clean Cu, including carbonate CO{sub 3}{sup 2}, CO{sub 2}{sup {delta}-} and C{sup 0}, while no modifications occur on an oxidized surface. The addition of 0.1 ML Zn to the Cu results in the complete conversion of CO{sub 2}{sup {delta}-} to carbonate. In a mixture of 0.1 torr H{sub 2}O and 0.1 torr CO{sub 2}, new species are formed, including hydroxyl, formate and methoxy, with H{sub 2}O providing the hydrogen needed for the formation of hydrogenated species.

Deng, Xingyi; Verdaguer, Albert; Herranz, Tirma; Weis, Christoph; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

427

Duplex Oxide Formation during Transient Oxidation of Cu-5%Ni(001) Investigated by In situ UHV-TEM and XPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The transient oxidation stage of a model metal alloy thin film was characterized with in situ ultra-high vacuum (UHV) transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and analytic high-resolution TEM. We observed the formations of nanosized NiO and Cu{sub 2}O islands when Cu-5a5%Ni(100) was exposed to oxygen partial pressure, pO{sub 2} = 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr and various temperatures in situ. At 350 C epitaxial Cu{sub 2}O islands formed initially and then NiO islands appeared on the surface of the Cu{sub 2}O island, whereas at 750 C NiO appeared first. XPS and TEM was used to reveal a sequential formation of NiO and then Cu{sub 2}O islands at 550 C. The temperature-dependant oxide selection may be due to an increase of the diffusivity of Ni in Cu with increasing temperature.

Yang, J.C.; Starr, D.; Kang, Y.; Luo, L.; Tong, X.; Zhou, G.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

428

On the Sn loss from thin films of the material system Cu-Zn-Sn-S in high vacuum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the Sn loss from thin films of the material system Cu-Zn-Sn-S and the subsystems Cu-Sn-S and Sn-S in high vacuum is investigated. A combination of in situ x-ray diffractometry and x-ray fluorescence (XRF) at a synchrotron light source allowed identifying phases, which tend to decompose and evaporate a Sn-containing compound. On the basis of the XRF results a quantification of the Sn loss from the films during annealing experiments is presented. It can be shown that the evaporation rate from the different phases decreases according to the order SnS{yields}Cu{sub 2}SnS{sub 3}{yields}Cu{sub 4}SnS{sub 4}{yields}Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4}. The phase SnS is assigned as the evaporating compound. The influence of an additional inert gas component on the Sn loss and on the formation of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} thin films is discussed.

Weber, A.; Mainz, R.; Schock, H. W. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Glienicker Str. 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

An In-Situ XAS Study of the Structural Changes in a CuO-CeO2/Al2O3 Catalyst during Total Oxidation of Propane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A CuOx-CeOx/Al2O3 catalyst was studied with in-situ transmission Cu K XAS for the total oxidation of propane as model reaction for the catalytic elimination of volatile organic compounds. The local Cu structure was determined for the catalyst as such, after pre-oxidation and after reduction with propane. The catalyst as such has a local CuO structure. No structural effect was observed upon heating in He up to 600 deg. C or after pre-oxidation at 150 deg. C. A full reduction of the Cu2+ towards metallic Cu0 occurred, when propane was fed to the catalyst. The change in local Cu structure during propane reduction was followed with a time resolution of 1 min. The {chi}(k) scans appeared as linear combinations of start and end spectra, CuO and Cu structure, respectively. However, careful examination of the XANES edge spectra indicates the presence of a small amount of additional Cu1+ species.

Silversmith, Geert; Poelman, Hilde; Poelman, Dirk; Gryse, Roger de [Ghent University, Department of Solid State Sciences, Krijgslaan 281 S1, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Olea, Maria; Balcaen, Veerle; Heynderickx, Philippe; Marin, Guy B. [Ghent University, Laboratorium voor Petrochemische Techniek, Krijgslaan 281 S5, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

430

Structure and Magnetic Properties of Cu3Ni2SbO6 and Cu3Co2SbO6 Delafossites with Honeycomb Lattices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The crystal structures of two Delafossites, Cu3Ni2SbO6 and Cu3Co2SbO6, are determined by high resolution synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction. The Ni and Co are ordered with respect to Sb in the layer of edge sharing octahedra, forming magnetic layers with honeycomb geometry. High-resolution electron microscopy confirms ordering, and selected-area electron diffraction patterns identify examples of the stacking polytypes. Low temperature synthetic treatments result in disordered stacking of the layers, but heating just below their melting points results in nearly fully ordered stacking variants. The major variant in both cases is a monoclinic distortion of a 6-layer Delafossite polytype, but a significant amount of a 2-layer polytype is also present for the Ni case. The antiferromagnetic ordering with transitions, at 22.3 and 18.5 K for Ni and Co variants, respectively, is investigated by temperature and field dependent magnetization, as well as specific heat. The sharp magnetic transitions support the presence of well developed 2:1 ordering of the Co:Sb or Ni:Sb ions in the honeycomb layers. Neutron diffraction measurements at 4 K are used to determine the magnetic structures. For both the Ni and Co phases, the propagation vector is k = [100], and can be described as alternating ferromagnetic chains in the metal-oxide plane giving an overall antiferromagntic zigzag alignment. While orientation of the magnetic moments of the Co is along the b-axis, the Ni moments are in the ac plane, approximately parallel to the stacking direction. Bulk magnetization properties are discussed in terms of their magnetic structures.

Roudebush, J. H. [Princeton University; Andersen, N. [Technical University of Denmark; Ramlau, R. [Max Planck Institute for the Chemical Physics of Solids; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL; Toft-Petersen, R. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin; Norby, P. [Technical University of Denmark; Schneider, R. [Laboratory for Electron Microscopy, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology; Hay, J. N. [Princeton University; Cava, R J [Princeton University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

HAPL Meeting, Madison Wisconsin Oct 22 -23, 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;21 The Vision...A plentiful, safe, clean energy source A 100 ton (4200 Cu ft) COAL hopper runs a 1 GWe Power Plant for 10 min #12;22 The Vision...A plentiful, safe, clean energy source A 100 ton (4200 Cu ft) COAL for 7 years #12;23 The Vision...A plentiful, safe, clean energy source A 100 ton (4200 Cu ft) COAL

432

Optical an Thermodynamic Properties of the High-Temperature Superconductor HgBa{2}CuO{4+delta}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In- and out-of-plane optical spectra and specific heat measurements for the single layer cuprate superconductor HgBa{sub 2}CuO{sub 4+{delta}} (Hg-1201) at optimal doping (T{sub c} = 97 K) are presented. Both the in-plane and out-of-plane superfluid density agree well with a recently proposed scaling relation {rho}{sub s} {proportional_to} {sigma}{sub dc} T{sub c}. It is shown that there is a superconductivity induced increase of the in-plane low frequency spectral weight which follows the trend found in underdoped and optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+{delta}} (Bi-2212) and optimally doped Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10+{delta}} (Bi-2223). We observe an increase of optical spectral weight which corresponds to a change in kinetic energy {Delta}W {approx} 0.5 meV/Cu which is more than enough to explain the condensation energy. The specific heat anomaly is 10 times smaller than in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+{delta}} (YBCO) and 3 times smaller than in Bi-2212. The shape of the anomaly is similar to the one observed in YBCO showing that the superconducting transition is governed by thermal fluctuations.

van Heumen,E.; Lortz, R.; Kuzmenko, A.; Carbone, F.; van der Marel, D.; Zhao, G. Yu, Y. Cho,, X.; Barisic, M. Greven,, N.; Homes, C.; Dordevic, S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Formation of ZnTe:Cu/Ti Contacts at High Temperature for CdS/CdTe Devices: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We study the performance of CdS/CdTe thin-film devices contacted with ZnTe:Cu/Ti of various thickness at a higher-than-optimum temperature of {approx}360 C. At this temperature, optimum device performance requires the same thickness of ZnTe:Cu as for similar contacts formed at a lower temperature of 320 C. C-V analysis indicates that a ZnTe:Cu layer thickness of {approx}< 0.5 mu m does not yield the degree of CdTe net acceptor concentration necessary to reduce space charge width to its optimum value for n-p device operation. The thickest ZnTe:Cu layer investigated (1 mu m) yields the highest CdTe net acceptor concentration, lowest value of Jo, and highest Voc. However, performance is limited for this device by poor fill factor. We suggest poor fill factor is due to Cu-related acceptors compensating donors in CdS.

Gessert, T. A.; Asher, S.; Johnston, S.; Duda, A.; Young, M. R.; Moriarty, T.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A Theoretical Study of Methanol Synthesis from CO(2) Hydrogenation on Metal-doped Cu(111) Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Density functional theory (DFT) calculations and Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations were employed to investigate the methanol synthesis reaction from CO{sub 2} hydrogenation (CO{sub 2} + 3H{sub 2} {yields} CH{sub 3}OH + H{sub 2}O) on metal-doped Cu(111) surfaces. Both the formate pathway and the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction followed by a CO hydrogenation pathway (RWGS + CO-Hydro) were considered in the study. Our calculations showed that the overall methanol yield increased in the sequence: Au/Cu(111) Hydro pathway is much faster than that via the formate pathway. Further kinetic analysis revealed that the methanol yield on Cu(111) was controlled by three factors: the dioxomethylene hydrogenation barrier, the CO binding energy, and the CO hydrogenation barrier. Accordingly, two possible descriptors are identified which can be used to describe the catalytic activity of Cu-based catalysts toward methanol synthesis. One is the activation barrier of dioxomethylene hydrogenation, and the other is the CO binding energy. An ideal Cu-based catalyst for the methanol synthesis via CO{sub 2} hydrogenation should be able to hydrogenate dioxomethylene easily and bond CO moderately, being strong enough to favor the desired CO hydrogenation rather than CO desorption but weak enough to prevent CO poisoning. In this way, the methanol production via both the formate and the RWGS + CO-Hydro pathways can be facilitated.

Liu P.; Yang, Y.; White, M.G.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

435

Tilt grain boundaries in YBa sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7-x thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grain boundaries in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} superconductor thin films grown on (001) MgO by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM). It was found that the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} thin films were highly textured with the c axes, or (001) orientation, nearly parallel between grains and perpendicular to the MgO substrate. A majority of the grain boundaries are low-angle boundaries with a tilt angle, {theta}, less than 15{degree}. The low-angle boundaries appear to be strongly faceted on an atomic scale in such a way that the boundary planes tend to be parallel to the (100), (010), or (110) lattice planes in one of the adjacent grains. Almost all of the lattice planes, except for a number of distorted regions along the boundaries, are continuous across the boundaries from one grain to another, accommodating the misorientation with a slight bending of the lattice planes. The small-angle boundaries are shown to consist of arrays of dislocations. A domain structure, formed by the interchange of a and b axes has been observed in large grains. The domain boundaries are strongly faceted with the (100) and (010) lattice planes parallel to the boundaries. These observations on the atomic structure of boundaries, are used to discuss the effect of grain boundaries on superconductor properties in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} thin films. 15 refs., 9 figs.

Gao, Y.; Bai, G.; Chang, H.L.M.; Merkle, K.L.; Lam, D.J.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Virginia State Energy Profile  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The States two nuclear power plants provided 38 percent of the net electricity generation ... Storage : 8,111 million cu ft ... energy demand is distributed fairly ...

437

Ni spin switching induced by magnetic frustration in FeMn/Ni/Cu(001)  

SciTech Connect

Epitaxially grown FeMn/Ni/Cu(001) films are investigated by Photoemission Electron Microscopy and Magneto-Optic Kerr Effect. We find that as the FeMn overlayer changes from paramagnetic to antiferromagnetic state, it could switch the ferromagnetic Ni spin direction from out-of-plane to in-plane direction of the film. This phenomenon reveals a new mechanism of creating magnetic anisotropy and is attributed to the out-of-plane spin frustration at the FeMn-Ni interface.

Wu, J.; Choi, J.; Scholl, A.; Doran, A.; Arenholz, E.; Hwang, Chanyong; Qiu, Z. Q.

2009-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

438

A thermogravimetric study of oxygen diffusion in YBa2Cu3O7-d  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the experiments carried out by Kirkendall. The setup used for these experiments consisted of an ?-brass/copper couple with the interface between both allows marked by Mo wires (Fig. 2.4). + + + + + + + + + jZn jCu Fig. 2.4 Kirkendall effect It was observed... that after annealing the sample the markers had shifted to the side closer to the ?-brass end showing that the zinc atoms diffuse out of the alloy faster Chapter 2 Theory of diffusion 27 than the copper atoms diffuse in. This can be explained in terms...

Vazquez-Navarro, Maria Dolores

439

Effects of lithium additions on processing of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O superconducting tapes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium additions to the high-temperature superconductor Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x} (2212) increased superconducting transition temperatures and improved resistance to effects of magnetic fields. In addition, these additions lowered the melting point of 2212 and increased reaction kinetics. Ag-clad tapes fabricated from 2212 with and without Li exhibited profound differences. For heating to temperatures less than or equal to 840{degrees}C, grain growth and sintering were much more substantial in the tapes containing Li.

Goretta, K.C.; Li, Y.F.; Poeppel, R.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wu, S.; Guo, J. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Schwartz, J. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

ScanningTunneling Luminescence of Grain Boundaries in Cu(In,Ga)Se2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the Laboratory, photon emission in semiconductors has been mapped in the nanoscale using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). In this Solar Program Review Meeting, we report on the latest results obtained in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films by this adapted STM. Scanning tunneling luminescence (STL) spectroscopy suggests that photons are emitted near the surface of CIGS. STL is excited either by (1) diffusion of tunneling electrons and subsequent recombination with available holes in CIGS or (2) impact ionization by hot electrons. Which process becomes predominant depends on the voltage applied to the STM tip. Photon mapping shows electronically active, extended defects near the surface of CIGS thin films.

Romero, M. J.; Jiang, C.-S.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Noufi, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bbl cu ft" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Research on polycrystalline thin film submodules based on CuInSe sub 2 materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes progress during the first year of a three-year research program to develop 12%-efficient CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) submodules with area greater than 900 cm{sup 2}. To meet this objective, the program was divided into five tasks: (1) windows, contacts, substrates; (2) absorber material; (3) device structure; (4) submodule design and encapsulation; and (5) process optimization. In the first year of the program, work was concentrated on the first three tasks with an objective to demonstrate a 9%-efficient CIS solar cell. 7 refs.

Catalano, A.; Arya, R.; Carr, L.; Fieselmann, B.; Lommasson, T.; Podlesny, R.; Russell, L.; Skibo, S.; Rothwarf, A.; Birkmire, R. (Solarex Corp., Newtown, PA (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Oxygen Reordering Near Room temperature in YBa2Cu3O6+x: A Thermodynamic Model  

SciTech Connect

We propose a thermodynamic model to explain an unusual phase transformation occurring near room temperature in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} that greatly affects properties of the superconductor. Based on our model, the material's thermodynamic response functions, specific heat, thermal-expansion coefficient, and elastic compliances are deduced at the critical temperature of the phase transformation. We discuss the change of critical temperature with stress, and analyze the anomaly of specific heat in critical temperature of the phase transformation.

Meng, Q.; Welch, D.; Zhu, Y.

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

443

Superior pinning properties in nano-engineered YBa2Cu3O7-?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the key factor in commercial applications of high temperature supercon- ductors. This thesis demonstrates an easy and inexpensive bottom-up technique to produce self assembled nanorods, segmented nanorods as well as nanoparticles in YBa2Cu3O7?? thin films... is still missing, in particular the superelectron condensation mechanism is still unknown. In the last few years other two non-cuprate materials were discovered to be superconductive and deserve a mention for the interest that the scientific commu- nity has...

Ercolano, Giorgio

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

444

Operation features of a longitudinal-capacitive-discharge-pumped CuBr laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The frequency and energy characteristics of a capacitive-discharge-pumped CuBr laser are investigated. Processes proceeding in the discharge circuit of lasers pumped in this way, in particular, pumped without an external storage capacitor are analysed. It is shown that, depending on the pumping circuit, laser levels are excited either during the charge current flow or during the discharge of electrode capacitances. The differences in the influence of the active HBr addition on the characteristics of the discharge and lasing compared to the case of a usual repetitively pulsed high-current discharge with internal electrodes are established. (lasers)

Gubarev, F A; Shiyanov, D V [V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Evtushenko, Gennadii S [Tomsk Polytechnical University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Sukhanov, V B

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Role of polycrystallinity in CdTe and CuInSe[sub 2] photovoltaic cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The limiting role of polycrystallinity in thin-film solar calls has been reduced somewhat during the past year, and efficiencies of both CdTe and CuInSe[sub 2] cells are approaching 15%. Quantitative separation of loss mechanisms shows that individual losses, with the exception of forward recombination current, can be made comparable to their single crystal counterparts. One general manifestation of the extraneous trapping states in that the voltage of all polycrystalline thin-film cells drifts upward by 10--50 mV following the onset of illumination.

Sites, J.R. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Investigation of solar cells based on Cu/sub 2/O. Final progress report May 1, 1979 to April 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Investigations conducted over a 12-month period concerning Cu/sub 2/O as a material for low-cost solar cells are reported. Emphasis was placed on (1) Cu/sub 2/O substrate fabrication and characterization; (2) studies of Cu/sub 2/O cell photocurrent; (3) Cu/sub 2/O solar cell studies. Large grain polycrystalline Cu/sub 2/O substrates were fabricated by first oxidizing copper discs at 1050/sup 0/C, and then polishing both sides to obtain 20 mil thick wafers. Optical constants were measured with ellipsometry and investigations of material microstructure were conducted. Photocurrent studies have included measurements of the internal photoresponse of Cu-Cu/sub 2/O Schottky barriers, and computer aided analyses to optimize the structure of such cells in order to achieve maximum photocurrent. As a result, a photocurrent of 8.52 mA/cm/sup 2/ has been demonstrated with a SiO(900 A)/Cu(90 A)/Cu/sub 2/O cell structure. Solar cell studies have concentrated on Cu-Cu/sub 2/O MIS structures. Improved Cu/sub 2/O surface preparation procedures were developed. Depth concentration profiles taken with Auger spectroscopy indicate that the copper-to-oxygen atomic ratio is essentially two, after one or two monolayers are removed. An AM1 efficiency of 1.76% was obtained with a Cu-Cu/sub 2/O cell. I-V analyses indicate that two current mechanisms are involved. A low voltage current component was identified as a thermally activated tunneling process, while a higher voltage mechanism is explained by a MIS model. The interfacial region is possibly a CuBr layer. The high voltage current component is characterized by n approx. = 1.15 and J/sub o/ approx. = 2 x 10/sup -9/ A/cm/sup 2/. Efforts are underway to eliminate the tunneling component and improve cell I-V characteristics by optimizing the MIS structure.

Olsen, L.C.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

447

Monte-Carlo and Variational Calculations of the Magnetic Phase Diagram of CuFeO2  

SciTech Connect

Monte-Carlo and variational calculations are used to revise the phase diagram of the magnetically- frustrated material CuFeO2. For fields 50 T < H < 65 T, a new spin flop phase is predicted between a canted three-sublattice phase and the conventional conical spin-flop phase. This phase has wavevector Q (0.8 , 0.43 ) and is commensurate in the x direction but incommensurate in the y direction. A canted five-sublattice phase is predicted between the multiferroic phase and either a collinear five-sublattice phase for pure CuFeO2 or a canted three-sublattice phase for Al- or Ga-doped CuFeO2.

Fishman, Randy Scott [ORNL; Brown, Gregory [Florida State University; Haraldsen, Jason T [ORNL; Haraldsen, Jason T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

15.4% CuIn1-XGaXSe2-Based Photovoltaic Cells from Solution-Based Precursor Films  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have fabricated 15.4%- and 12.4%-efficient CuIn1-XGaXSe2 (CIGS)-based photovoltaic devices from solution-based electrodeposition (ED) and electroless-deposition (EL) precursors. As-deposited precursors are Cu-rich CIGS. Additional In, Ga, and Se are added to the ED and EL precursor films by physical vapor deposition (PVD) to adjust the final film composition to CuIn1-XGaXSe2. The ED and EL device parameters are compared with those of a recent world record, an 18.8%-efficient PVD device. The tools used for comparison are current voltage, capacitance voltage, and spectral response characteristics.

Bhattacharya, R. N.; Batchelor, W.; Contreras, M. A.; Noufi, R. N. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Hiltner, J. F.; Sites, J. R. (Department of Physics, Colorado State University)

1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

449

Photoconductivity and luminescence of CuInSe{sub 2} single crystals at a high level of optical excitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The luminance-current and spectral characteristics of photoluminescence of the CuInSe{sub 2} single crystals are studied. The superlinear portion of the excitation-intensity dependence of photoconductivity at low excitation intensities in compensated p-CuInSe{sub 2} crystals is explained on the basis of a recombination model. The emission band that peaked at 0.98 eV in the n-CuInSe{sub 2} photoluminescence spectrum corresponds to radiative recombination of electrons at the donor level with a depth of 0.04 eV. The maximum in the band intensity corresponds to the energy gap between the trap level and the valence band.

Guseinov, A. G.; Salmanov, V. M.; Mamedov, R. M. [Baku State University (Azerbaijan)], E-mail: rovshan63@rambler.ru

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Copper (Cu)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 12   Thermodynamic properties of copper...0.244 0.360 1.174 0.117 11 1.14 3.446 0.313 0.456 1.57 0.144 12 1.47 4.752 0.395 0.570 2.09 0.175 13 1.87 6.405 0.493 0.703 3.51 0.209 14 2.34 8.513 0.607 0.858 2.72 0.250 15 2.89 11.11 0.741 1.039 4.45 0.297 16 3.54 14.32 0.895 1.245 5.59 0.349 17 4.30 18.22 1.072 1.481 6.96 0.409 18 5.16 22.94...

451

Non-H[sub 2]Se, ultra-thin CIS devices. [CuInSe[sub 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work done during Phase I of a 3-phase, cost- shared contract. Objective of the subcontract is to demonstrate 12% total-area efficiency copper indium diselenide (CIS) solar cells and 50-W CIS modules average at least 8 W/ft[sup 2] in the third year. At the end of Phase I, EPV delivered to NREL a 1.1 cm[sup 2] CIS cell with an active area efficiency of 10.5%. the corresponding total-area efficiency is 7.9%.

Delahoy, A.E.; Britt, J.; Kiss, Z. (Energy Photovoltaics, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Factors Affecting the Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking Resistance of an AL-Zn-Mg-(Cu) Alloy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Precipitation hardenable Al-Zn-Mg alloys are susceptible to hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC) when exposed to aqueous environments. In Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys, overaged tempers are used to increase HEAC resistance at the expense of strength but overaging has little benefit in low copper alloys. However, the mechanism or mechanisms by which overaging imparts HEAC resistance is poorly understood. The present research investigated hydrogen uptake, diffusion, and crack growth rate in 90% relative humidity (RH) air for both a commercial copper bearing Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy (AA 7050) and a low copper variant of this alloy in order to better understand the factors which affect HEAC resistance. Experimental methods used to evaluate hydrogen concentrations local to a surface and near a crack tip include nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), focused ion beam, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (FIB/SIMS) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS). Results show that overaging the copper bearing alloys both inhibits hydrogen ingress from oxide covered surfaces and decreases the apparent hydrogen diffusion rates in the metal.

G.A. Young; J.R. Scully

2002-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

453

Novel thin-film CuInSe sub 2 fabrication  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research in Rapid Thermal Processing (RTP), a process that allows the formation of CuInSe{sub 2} without the use of H{sub 2}Se. RTP is a well-established method of rapidly achieving temperatures necessary to melt and recrystallize materials such as Si and and silicides. RTP processes can rapidly and uniformly heat large surface areas to hundreds of degrees Celsius. RTP is the most promising method of rapid recrystallization studied to date, being readily scalable from the research to the production level. The approach to the experiment was divided into two sections: (1) fabricating the precursor film and (2) processing the precursor film. The objective of the first phase of the work was to fabricate the thin films by RTP, then fully characterize them, to demonstrate the viability of the process as a method by which to make device-quality CuInSe{sub 2}. The second phase was to demonstrate that material made by this method could be used to make an active photovoltaic device. 24 refs.

Mooney, G.D.; Hermann, A.M. (Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Manufacturing technology development for CuInGaSe sub 2 solar cell modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report describes research performed by Boeing Aerospace and Electronics under the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology project. We anticipate that implementing advanced semiconductor device fabrication techniques to the production of large-area CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} (CIGS)/Cd{sub 1-y}Zn{sub y}S/ZnO monolithically integrated thin-film solar cell modules will enable 15% median efficiencies to be achieved in high-volume manufacturing. We do not believe that CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) can achieve this efficiency in production without sufficient gallium to significantly increase the band gap, thereby matching it better to the solar spectrum (i.e., x{ge}0.2). Competing techniques for CIS film formation have not been successfully extended to CIGS devices with such high band gaps. The SERI-confirmed intrinsic stability of CIS-based photovoltaics renders them far superior to a-Si:H-based devices, making a 30-year module lifetime feasible. The minimal amounts of cadmium used in the structure we propose, compared to CdTe-based devices, makes them environmentally safer and more acceptable to both consumers and relevant regulatory agencies. Large-area integrated thin-film CIGS modules are the product most likely to supplant silicon modules by the end of this decade and enable the cost improvements which will lead to rapid market expansion.

Stanbery, B.J. (Boeing Aerospace and Electronics Co., Seattle, WA (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Room temperature ferromagnetism in Mn, Ni and Co ions doped Cu{sub 2}O nanorods  

SciTech Connect

Here we report the synthesis and characterization of Cu{sub 2}O nanorods doped with Mn, Ni and Co transition metal ions and the study of their magnetic properties. Synthesis of the nanorods was carried out by the modified polyol method. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns clearly showed them to be polycrystalline single phase material. They exhibited ferromagnetic behavior at room temperature, however no such behavior was observed for the reference undoped sample, which indicated that unintentionally introduced magnetic impurities were not responsible for the observed phenomenon. Ferromagnetic behavior was found to be dependent on the dopant concentration and increased consistently with its increment in the material. The total magnetic moments contribution was calculated for the dopant concentration and was found to be insignificant to account for the observed ferromagnetism, therefore it was suggested that ferromagnetism could have conjured up from the induced magnetic moment in the defects created as cation vacancies in the material. The presence of the defects was supported by the room temperature photoluminescence study which showed that intensity of the peaks was dependent on the dopant concentration and increased consistently with it. There was strong correlation between the magnitude of the photoluminescence peak and the observed ferromagnetic property in the doped samples. -- Graphical Abstract: Room temperature ferromagnetism was observed in the Cu{sub 2}O nanorods doped with Mn, Ni and Co ions. The origin seems to be the defects of cation vacancies created by the dopant ions. Display Omitted

Ahmed, Asar [Department of Chemistry, SL-214, Southern Lab, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh (India); Gajbhiye, Namdeo S., E-mail: nsg@iitk.ac.i [Department of Chemistry, SL-214, Southern Lab, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, Uttar Pradesh (India)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Thermal Durability of Cu-CHA NH3-SCR Catalysts for Diesel NOx Reduction  

SciTech Connect

Multiple catalytic functions (NOx conversion, NO and NH3 oxidation, NH3 storage) of a commercial Cu-zeolite urea/NH3-SCR catalyst were assessed in a laboratory fixed-bed flow reactor system after differing degrees of hydrothermal aging. Catalysts were characterized by using x-ray diffraction (XRD), 27Al solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) / energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy to develop an understanding of the degradation mechanisms during catalyst aging. The catalytic reaction measurements of laboratory-aged catalysts were performed, which allows us to obtain a universal curve for predicting the degree of catalyst performance deterioration as a function of time at each aging temperature. Results show that as the aging temperature becomes higher, the zeolite structure collapses in a shorter period of time after an induction period. The decrease in SCR performance was explained by zeolite structure destruction and/or Cu agglomeration, as detected by XRD/27Al NMR and by TEM/EDX, respectively. Destruction of the zeolite structure and agglomeration of the active phase also results in a decrease in the NO/NH3 oxidation activity and the NH3 storage capacity of the catalyst. Selected laboratory aging conditions (16 h at 800oC) compare well with a 135,000 mile vehicle-aged catalyst for both performance and characterization criteria.

Schmieg, Steven J.; Oh, Se H.; Kim, Chang H.; Brown, David B.; Lee, Jong H.; Peden, Charles HF; Kim, Do Heui

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

457

Development of a Manufacturing Process for High-Precision Cu EOS Targets  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the development of a manufacturing process and the production of Cu EOS targets. The development of a manufacturing process for these targets required a great deal of research, because the specifications for the targets required a level of precision an order of magnitude beyond Target Fabrication's capabilities at the time. Strict limitations on the dimensions of the components and the interfaces between them required research efforts to develop bonding and deposition processes consistent with a manufacturing plan with a dimensional precision on the order of 0.1 {micro}m. Several months into this effort, the specifications for the targets were relaxed slightly as a result of discussions between the Target Fabrication Group and the physicists. The level of precision required for these targets remained an order of magnitude beyond previous capabilities, but the changes made it possible to manufacture targets to the specifications. The development efforts and manufacturing processes described in this document successfully produced a complete Cu EOS target that satisfied all of the fabrication and metrology specifications.

Bono, M J; Castro, C; Hibbard, R L

2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

458

Optical and electron transport properties of reactively sputtered Cu/sub x/S  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin films of Cu/sub x/S were deposited on glass slides by sputtering Cu i