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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Strategic petroleum reserve (SPR) geological site characterization report, Bayou Choctaw Salt Dome. Sections I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report comprises two sections: Bayou Choctaw cavern stability issues, and geological site characterization of Bayou Choctaw. (DLC)

Hogan, R.G. (ed.)

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Three dimensional simulation for bayou choctaw strategic petroleum reserve (SPR).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three dimensional finite element analyses were performed to evaluate the structural integrity of the caverns located at the Bayou Choctaw (BC) site which is considered a candidate for expansion. Fifteen active and nine abandoned caverns exist at BC, with a total cavern volume of some 164 MMB. A 3D model allowing control of each cavern individually was constructed because the location and depth of caverns and the date of excavation are irregular. The total cavern volume has practical interest, as this void space affects total creep closure in the BC salt mass. Operations including both cavern workover, where wellhead pressures are temporarily reduced to atmospheric, and cavern enlargement due to leaching during oil drawdowns that use water to displace the oil from the caverns, were modeled to account for as many as the five future oil drawdowns in the six SPR caverns. The impacts on cavern stability, underground creep closure, surface subsidence, infrastructure, and well integrity were quantified.

Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon; Lee, Moo Yul

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Features of Bayou Choctaw SPR caverns and internal structure of the salt dome.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intent of this study is to examine the internal structure of the Bayou Choctaw salt dome utilizing the information obtained from graphical representations of sonar survey data of the internal cavern surfaces. Many of the Bayou Choctaw caverns have been abandoned. Some existing caverns were purchased by the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) program and have rather convoluted histories and complex cavern geometries. In fact, these caverns are typically poorly documented and are not particularly constructive to this study. Only two Bayou Choctaw caverns, 101 and 102, which were constructed using well-controlled solutioning methods, are well documented. One of these was constructed by the SPR for their use while the other was constructed and traded for another existing cavern. Consequently, compared to the SPR caverns of the West Hackberry and Big Hill domes, it is more difficult to obtain a general impression of the stratigraphy of the dome. Indeed, caverns of Bayou Choctaw show features significantly different than those encountered in the other two SPR facilities. In the number of abandoned caverns, and some of those existing caverns purchased by the SPR, extremely irregular solutioning has occurred. The two SPR constructed caverns suggest that some sections of the caverns may have undergone very regular solutioning to form uniform cylindrical shapes. Although it is not usually productive to speculate, some suggestions that point to the behavior of the Bayou Choctaw dome are examined. Also the primary differences in the Bayou Choctaw dome and the other SPR domes are noted.

Munson, Darrell E.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Allegations of diversion and substitution of crude oil. Bayou Choctaw Storage Site, Strategic Petroleum Reserve  

SciTech Connect

Investigation did not substantiate allegations that crude oil destined for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage site at Bayou Choctaw was diverted to private use and some other material substituted in its place. However, recommendations are made for handling intermediate transport and storage systems for crude oil to tighten security aspects. (PSB)

Not Available

1984-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Threat of a sinkhole: A reevaluation of Cavern 4, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cavern Lake at Bayou Choctaw salt dome resulted from the failure of Cavern 7 in 1954. Uncontrolled solutioning of this cavern through the thin caprock had set the stage for overburden to collapse into the cavern below. A similar situation developed with nearby Cavern 4, but with less dissolutioning of the caprock. Because pressure loss was already a problem and because another 800 ft diameter lake would have endangered surface operations, solutioning of Cavern 4 was stopped and the cavern abandoned in 1957 in order to protect the already-small site. In 1978 the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) acquired a number of caverns at Bayou Choctaw, including Cavern 4, and the possible repeat of the Cavern 7 failure and formation of another lake thus became an issue. The cavern dimensions were re-sonared in 1980 for comparison with 1963 and 1977 surveys. Annual surface leveling between 1982--1992 showed less subsidence occurring than the site average, and a cavern monitoring system, installed in 1984, has revealed no anomalous motion. Repeat sonar surveys in 1992 showed very little, if any, change occurred since 1980 although a small amount of uncertainty exists as a result of changing sonar techniques. We conclude that significant additional solutioning or erosion of the caprock has not occurred and that there is no increased threat to SPR operations.

Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Linn, J.K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Expansion analyses of strategic petroleum reserve in Bayou Choctaw : revised locations.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a series of three-dimensional simulations for the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve. The U.S. Department of Energy plans to leach two new caverns and convert one of the existing caverns within the Bayou Choctaw salt dome to expand its petroleum reserve storage capacity. An existing finite element mesh from previous analyses is modified by changing the locations of two caverns. The structural integrity of the three expansion caverns and the interaction between all the caverns in the dome are investigated. The impacts of the expansion on underground creep closure, surface subsidence, infrastructure, and well integrity are quantified. Two scenarios were used for the duration and timing of workover conditions where wellhead pressures are temporarily reduced to atmospheric pressure. The three expansion caverns are predicted to be structurally stable against tensile failure for both scenarios. Dilatant failure is not expected within the vicinity of the expansion caverns. Damage to surface structures is not predicted and there is not a marked increase in surface strains due to the presence of the three expansion caverns. The wells into the caverns should not undergo yield. The results show that from a structural viewpoint, the locations of the two newly proposed expansion caverns are acceptable, and all three expansion caverns can be safely constructed and operated.

Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report revises and updates the geologic site characterization report that was published in 1980. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major east-west trending shear zone, not mapped in the 1980 report. Excessive gas influx in Caverns 18 and 20 may be associated with this shear zone. Subsidence values at Bayou Choctaw are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging only about 10 mm/yr but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values often approximate measurement accuracy. Periodic, temporary flooding is a continuing concern because of the low site elevation (less than 10 ft), and this may intensify as future subsidence lowers the surface even further. Cavern 4 was re-sonared in 1992 and the profiles suggest that significant change has not occurred since 1980, thereby reducing the uncertainty of possible overburden collapse -- as occurred at Cavern 7 in 1954. Other potential integrity issues persist, such as the proximity of Cavern 20 to the dome edge, and the narrow web separating Caverns 15 and 17. Injection wells have been used for the disposal of brine but have been only marginally effective thus far; recompletions into more permeable lower Pleistocene gravels may be a practical way of increasing injection capacity and brinefield efficiency. Cavern storage space is limited on this already crowded dome, but 15 MMBBL could be gained by enlarging Cavern 19 and by constructing a new cavern beneath and slightly north of abandoned Cavern 13. Environmental issues center on the low site elevation: the backswamp environment combined with the potential for periodic flooding create conditions that will require continuing surveillance.

Neal, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Magorian, T.R. [Magorian (Thomas R.), Amherst, NY (United States); Byrne, K.O.; Denzler, S. [Acres International Corp., Amherst, NY (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

needed to replace the timber piles and cross beams which support aboveground steel pipelines at Bayou Choctaw. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003594.pdf More Documents &...

9

Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek Watershed Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

Biological monitoring of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, which border the Paducah Site, has been conducted since 1987. Biological monitoring was conducted by University of Kentucky from 1987 to 1991 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 through March 1999. In March 1998, renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permits were issued to the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Enrichment Corporation. The renewed DOE permit requires that a watershed monitoring program be developed for the Paducah Site within 90 days of the effective date of the renewed permit. This plan outlines the sampling and analysis that will be conducted for the watershed monitoring program. The objectives of the watershed monitoring are to (1) determine whether discharges from the Paducah Site and the Solid Waste Management Units (SWMUs) associated with the Paducah Site are adversely affecting instream fauna, (2) assess the ecological health of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks, (3) assess the degree to which abatement actions ecologically benefit Big Bayou Creek and Little Bayou Creek, (4) provide guidance for remediation, (5) provide an evaluation of changes in potential human health concerns, and (6) provide data which could be used to assess the impact of inadvertent spills or fish kill. According to the cleanup will result in these watersheds [Big Bayou and Little Bayou creeks] achieving compliance with the applicable water quality criteria.

Kszos, L.A.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon; Smith, J.G.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

New Choctaw Nation Recycling Center Posts Quick Results | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Choctaw Nation Recycling Center Posts Quick Results New Choctaw Nation Recycling Center Posts Quick Results New Choctaw Nation Recycling Center Posts Quick Results March 8, 2011 - 5:08pm Addthis Albert Bond Project Officer, Golden Field Office What does this mean for me? The Choctaw Nation used approximately $800,000 in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funding to build a state-of-the-art recycling center and improve stewardship of the land and environment. "If you build it, they will come" ...to recycle. That line from the 1989 film Field of Dreams is as good a way as any to describe how the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma's new regional recycling center is being received. The Choctaw Nation used approximately $800,000 in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funding to build a state-of-the-art recycling

11

New Choctaw Nation Recycling Center Posts Quick Results | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Choctaw Nation Recycling Center Posts Quick Results Choctaw Nation Recycling Center Posts Quick Results New Choctaw Nation Recycling Center Posts Quick Results March 8, 2011 - 5:08pm Addthis Albert Bond Project Officer, Golden Field Office What does this mean for me? The Choctaw Nation used approximately $800,000 in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funding to build a state-of-the-art recycling center and improve stewardship of the land and environment. "If you build it, they will come" ...to recycle. That line from the 1989 film Field of Dreams is as good a way as any to describe how the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma's new regional recycling center is being received. The Choctaw Nation used approximately $800,000 in Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant funding to build a state-of-the-art recycling

12

Choctaw, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Choctaw, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Choctaw, Oklahoma: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.4975625°, -97.2689212° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.4975625,"lon":-97.2689212,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

13

Choctaw Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Coop Inc Electric Coop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Place Oklahoma Utility Id 3527 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location SPP Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png 100 Watt HPS, Metered Lighting 100 Watt HPS, Unmetered Lighting 1000 Watt HPS, Metered Lighting 1000 Watt HPS, Unmetered Lighting 175 Watt MV ,Metered Lighting 175 Watt MV ,Unmetered Lighting 250 Watt HPS, Metered Lighting 250 Watt HPS, Unmetered Lighting 400 Watt HPS ,Metered Lighting 400 Watt HPS ,Unmetered Lighting 400 Watt MV,Metered Lighting

14

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 25430 of 31,917 results. 21 - 25430 of 31,917 results. Download CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Bayou Choctaw Timber Pile Pipe Supports CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003594-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003596: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bayou Choctaw Site Building Upgrades, Phases II and III CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003596-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003481: Categorical Exclusion Determination California - City - Compton

15

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.3 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 24, 2010 August 24, 2010 CX-003596: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bayou Choctaw Site Building Upgrades, Phases II and III CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office August 24, 2010 CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Bayou Choctaw Timber Pile Pipe Supports CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office August 24, 2010 CX-003571: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 84 Gas Alarm Installation CX(s) Applied: A12, B1.3, B2.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2010

16

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 8240 of 26,764 results. 31 - 8240 of 26,764 results. Download CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Bayou Choctaw Timber Pile Pipe Supports CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003594-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003596: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bayou Choctaw Site Building Upgrades, Phases II and III CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003596-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002830: Categorical Exclusion Determination Repairs to Men?s Bathroom in West Hackberry Building 302

17

Choctaw County, Mississippi: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Choctaw County, Mississippi: Energy Resources Choctaw County, Mississippi: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.3914427°, -89.2847251° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.3914427,"lon":-89.2847251,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

CX-005372: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

72: Categorical Exclusion Determination 72: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005372: Categorical Exclusion Determination Repair Bayou Choctaw Timber Pipe Supports CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/22/2011 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Subcontractor shall provide all materials, tools, equipment, pile driving hammers, mobile lifting equipment, rigging, transportation, labor, and supervision required to repair or replace the timber pipe supports and cross beams which support the aboveground steel pipelines at the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-005372.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004170: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003596

19

Bayou Cogeneration Plant- A Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bayou Cogeneration Plant is a prime example of the high fuel efficiency and consequent energy savings an industrial company can realize from cogeneration. A joint venture of Big Three Industries, Inc., and General Electric Company, this $100 million power plant became operational late last year and produces approximately 1.4 million lb/hr of process steam and 300 MW of electricity. As the turnkey supplier, General Electric was responsible for the entire project from cycle engineering through start up and is currently operating and maintaining the plant. This paper describes the factors which led Big Three Industries to build a cogeneration power plant and the route selected for project implementation. Also included is a brief profile of project implementation, highlighting the responsibilities of the turnkey supplier and specific steps taken to compress the project into a 20-month schedule, resulting in significant cost savings and enabling Big Three to realize cogeneration benefits as early as possible.

Bray, M. E.; Mellor, R.; Bollinger, J. M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Microseismic monitoring of Chocolate Bayou, Texas: the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 geopressured/geothermal energy test well program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Brazoria seismic network, instrumentation, design, and specifications are described. The data analysis procedures are presented. Seismicity is described in relation to the Pleasant Bayou production history. Seismicity originating near the chemical plant east of the geopressured/geothermal well is discussed. (MHR)

Mauk, F.J.; Kimball, B.; Davis, R.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bayou Latenache Bayou Latenache < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.6395,"lon":-90.2536,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Testing of the Pleasant Bayou Well through October 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pleasant Bayou location was inactive from 1983 until the cleanout of the production and disposal wells in 1986. The surface facilities were rehabilitated and after shakedown of the system, additional repair of wellhead valves, and injection of an inhibitor pill, continuous long-term production was started in 1988. Over two years of production subsequent to that are reviewed here, including: production data, brine sampling and analysis, hydrocarbon sampling and analysis, solids sampling and analysis, scale control and corrosion monitoring and control.

Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Mosca, V.L.; Anhaiser, J.L.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Brazoria County Re-Leveling Pleasant Bayou Geopressured Well Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose is to conduct first order leveling surveys as part of an ongoing environmental monitoring program for geopressured-geothermal test wells. The scope is to Conduct First Order, Class I, leveling to monitor subsidence of previously installed and leveled bench marks, established by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS) and Vernon F. Meyer and Associates, Inc., in the area of the Pleasant Bayou geopressured test well. All leveling surveys to conform to NGS standards and specifications.

None

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

DIY TIMBER DECKS CHECKLIST POINTS TO CONSIDER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIY TIMBER DECKS CHECKLIST POINTS TO CONSIDER · Local council regulations. · Special regulations and materials you will be using. #12;DIY TIMBER DECKS CHECKLIST LOCATION · Direction of sun. · Best views. #12;DIY TIMBER DECKS CHECKLIST CONSTRUCTION 1. THEBASICSARE: · Stumps/posts or brackets set

Peters, Richard

25

Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station  

SciTech Connect

A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

Lyles Brad,McCurdy Greg,Chapman Jenny,Miller Julianne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Geopressurized/geothermal project, Pleasant Bayou well no. 2, Brazoria County, Texas: Workover summary, February 15, 1986-April 3, 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workover of the Pleasant Bayou well No. 2 to clear debris from the well and replace leaking 5.5'' production tubing is described. (ACR)

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.3 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 22, 2011 February 22, 2011 CX-005372: Categorical Exclusion Determination Repair Bayou Choctaw Timber Pipe Supports CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/22/2011 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office February 22, 2011 CX-005371: Categorical Exclusion Determination West Hackberry Off-Site Services Contract, 2011-2013 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/22/2011 Location(s): West Hackberry, Texas Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office February 22, 2011 CX-005370: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean and Inspect West Hackberry (WHT-14) Brine Tank CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/22/2011 Location(s): West Hackberry, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office February 22, 2011 CX-005369: Categorical Exclusion Determination

28

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.3 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 24, 2010 August 24, 2010 CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Bayou Choctaw Timber Pile Pipe Supports CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office August 24, 2010 CX-003571: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 84 Gas Alarm Installation CX(s) Applied: A12, B1.3, B2.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory August 23, 2010 CX-004031: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy and Motor Upgrades for Sewer and Water Pumps CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.2, B1.3, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 08/23/2010 Location(s): Amherst, Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

29

Extracting Cultural Information from Ship Timber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is rooted in one general question: what can the wood from ships reveal about the people and cultures who built them? Shipwrecks are only the last chapter of a complex story, and while the last fifty years of nautical archaeology have managed to rewrite a number of these chapters, much of the information unrelated to a ships final voyage remains a mystery. However, portions of that mystery can be exposed by an examination of the timbers. An approach for the cultural investigation of ship timbers is presented and attempts are made to establish the most reliable information possible from the largely unheralded treasures of underwater excavations: timbers. By introducing the written record, iconographic record, and the social, economic, and political factors to the archaeological record a more complete analysis of the cultural implications of ship and boat timbers is possible. I test the effectiveness of the approach in three varied casestudies to demonstrate its limits and usefulness: ancient Egypts Middle Kingdom, the Mediterranean under Athenian influence, and Portugal and the Iberian Peninsula during the Discoveries. The results of these studies demonstrate how ship timbers can be studied in order to better understand the people who built the vessels.

Creasman, Pearce

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Timber Road II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Jump to: navigation, search Name Timber Road II Facility Timber Road II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind Energy Developer Horizon Wind Energy Energy Purchaser American Electric Power Location Near Payne OH Coordinates 41.023524°, -84.717185° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.023524,"lon":-84.717185,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

31

Global Timber Market and Forestry Data Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Timber Market and Forestry Data Project Global Timber Market and Forestry Data Project Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Timber Market and Forestry Data Project Agency/Company /Organization: Ohio State University Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Market analysis, Resource assessment Resource Type: Dataset Website: aede.osu.edu/people/sohngen.1/forests/GTM/index.htm Global Timber Market and Forestry Data Project Screenshot References: Global Timber Market and Forestry Data Project[1] About "This website provides data on global forest resources and timber markets. The purpose of this data is to help modelers advance understanding about the important role that forests play in the global ecosystem and the effects that markets have on these resources. The data can be used by

32

CX-006606: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

utilities, labor and supervision required to pressure wash, power tool clean, andor blasting, and painting of the RPX spools at Bayou Choctaw. Government will have fire water...

33

Big Timber, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Congressional Districts by Places. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBigTimber,Montana&oldid227781" Categories: Places Stubs Cities What links here Related...

34

UNECE TIMBER COMMITTEE Market Discussions, 3-4 October 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's discussions · TC Market Statement · Market press release · Information to joint TC and European ForestryUNECE TIMBER COMMITTEE Market Discussions, 3-4 October 2006 Photo: NTC Photo: Stora Enso Photo: Stora Enso UNECE Timber Committee Market Discussions Theme: "China's influence on forest products

35

Numerical analysis of sheathing boards influence on racking resistance of timber-frame walls  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a numerical analysis of sheathing boards influence on racking resistance of timber-frame walls coated with single sheathing boards fastened to a timber frame. Worldwide, the walls are usually broadly used as main bearing capacity ... Keywords: Fibre-plaster boards, Numerical analysis, OSB, Racking resistance, Timber structures, Timber-framed walls

M. Premrov; P. Dobrila

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Preliminary reservoir and subsidence simulations for the Austin Bayou geopressured geothermal prospect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the last several years, the University of Texas at Austin (UTA) has analyzed the geopressured tertiary sandstones along the Texas Gulf Coast with the objective of locating prospective reservoirs from which geothermal energy could be recovered. Of the ''geothermal fairways'' (areas with thick sandstone bodies and estimated temperatures in excess of 300 F), the Brazoria fairway appears most promising and the Austin Bayou Prospect has been developed within this fairway. A test well (DOE 1 Martin Ranch) is currently being drilled in this area. Pending the availability of actual well test data, estimated reservoir properties have been employed in numerical simulations to study the effects of variations in reservoir properties on the projected long-term behavior of the Austin Bayou Prospect. The simulations assess the sensitivity of the reservoir behavior to variations is estimated sandstone/shale distribution, shale compressibility, and vertical shale permeability. Further, hypothetical properties for the stress-deformation behavior of the rock formations were employed in a very preliminary study of the potential ground surface displacements that might accompany fluid production.

Garg, S.K.; Riney, T.D.; Brownell, D.H., Jr.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram, GCO-DOE, Pleasant Bayou No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared to assess the environmental implications of the Department of Energy's proposal to drill, complete, and test one geopressure well located in Brazoria County on a 2 hectares (five acre) test site 64 km (40 mi) south of Houston, Abstract 107, Perry and Austin Survey, Brazoria County, TX. The test well is herein referred to as GCO-DOE Pleasant Bayou No. 1. A maximum of four disposal wells will be located within .8 km (1/2 mi) of the proposed well. The DOE and the University of Texas Center for Energy Studies propose to operate the test facility for three years to evaluate the geopressure potential of the subsurface. Tests to be conducted include flow rates, fluid composition, temperature, gas content, geologic characteristics, and the land subsidence potential for subsequent production.

none

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Visual kerogen and vitrinite reflectance analyses of the Pleasant Bayou No. 1 Well, Brazoria Co. , Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on the visual kerogen analyses, the Pleasant Bayou No. 1 Well can be subdivided into six zones and nine sub zones. The stratigraphic section ranges from immature at 2,894 feet to marginally mature at 16,500 feet. From 2,894 to 5,360 feet the organic matter suite is primarily an amorphous spore-pollen assemblage with secondary amounts of vitrinite. Below 6,080 feet the kerogenaceous debris is generally of a vitrinite, plant tissue, spore-pollen mixture with very little amorphous debris. Loss-of-circulation material, indicating drilling problems, is particularly abundant in cutting samples from 9,740 to 10,820 feet. There is a significant jump in the thermal maturation index, T.A.I., at the T-3 seismic horizon between 11,180 and 11,600 feet. As a result of the overall thermal immaturity and due to only fairquality organic matter, one can expect noncommercial accumulations of biogenic methane and/or wet gas.

Not Available

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Pleasant Bayou geopressured/geothermal testing project, Brazoria County, Texas. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase II-B production testing of the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well began September 22, 1982. The test plan was designed to evaluate the capabilities of the geopressured-geothermal reservoir during an extended flow period. Tests were conducted to determine reservoir areal extent; aquifer fluid properties; fluid property change with production; information on reservoir production drive mechanism; long-term scale and corrosion control methods; and disposal well operations. Operatinal aspects of geopressured-geothermal production were also evaluated. The test was discontinued prematurely in May 1983 because of a production tubing failure. Most of the production tubing was recovered from the well and cause of the failure was determined. Plans for recompletion of the well were prepared. However, the well was not recompleted because of funding constraints and/or program rescheduling. In March 1984, the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) directed that the site be placed in a standby-secured condition. In August 1984, the site was secured. Routine site maintenance and security was provided during the secured period.

Ortego, P.K.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Modified hysteretic damping model applied to Timoshenko timber beams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study deals with prediction of material damping in Timoshenko beams. Complex elastic moduli and complex stiffness are defined to derive an analytical model that predicts the hysteretic system damping for the whole structure. The prediction ... Keywords: Bending damping, Complex stiffness, Hysteretic damping, Shear damping, Timber structure, Timoshenko beam

Nathalie Labonnote, Anders RNnquist, Kjell Arne Malo

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

HEAT THAT GROWS ON TREES Short description of timber energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEAT THAT GROWS ON TREES 6 Short description of timber energy · Along with hydro-electric power, wood is Switzerland's most important energy source. · Wood is CO2-neutral: in sustainably managed, a balance is maintained between growth and combustion). · Wood energy represents a welcome potential use

42

Cross-Laminated Timber Panels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laminated Timber Panels Laminated Timber Panels Jump to: navigation, search TODO: add page breaks/images Cross-Laminated Timer Panels are formed using planed "lamellas" (planed boards from 1" thick x 5"-7" wide) laid and glued using formaldehyde-free, food-grade glue in a vacuum press in alternate layers, at 90 degrees to each other, creating panels that are from 3 to 11 layers thick. These panels form a robust, structurally strong building system that outperforms anything currently available in the USA. Quality control is optimized with the pre-fabrication of the structural panels in an atmospherically controlled facility using computer controlled cutting equipment. State-of-the-art computer aided design programming is transferred directly to the manufacturing process. More information can

43

A Theoretical Structural Impairment Detection System for Timber Railway Bridges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to develop a theoretical Structural Impairment Detection System (SIDS) for timber railway bridges. Due to fatigue, the timber stringers in timber railway bridges develop shear cracks. These shear cracks lead to higher bridge deflections, higher stresses in the stringers and rail, and shorter fatigue life of the system. A SIDS is proposed which links wheel path accelerations obtained from traversing freight cars to the condition of the bridge. In order to develop the SIDS, two models of timber railway bridges with various levels of structural impairment were developed. The first model was a quasi-static model developed from classical beam theory and implemented in MATLAB. The second model was a dynamic, finite element model created in LS-DYNA. Traversing axle loads were imposed on the models. The results obtained from the model were the wheel paths the axles take as they traverse the bridge. The paths were expressed as vertical displacements as a function of position on the bridge. Wheel path accelerations were obtained by numerically differentiating the vertical displacements. The accelerations were then used to train neural networks to have an input of an acceleration vector and an output of a bridge condition vector. The neural networks were trained on results from both models under three train speeds: 40 mph, 30 mph, and 20 mph. The networks were able to determine the correct bridge condition 90% of the time when the train speed was 40 mph and 70% of the time when the train speed was 30 mph. The networks were not successful in determining bridge condition when the train speed was 20 mph.

Orsak, John

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

INITIAL RESPONSE OF INVASIVE EXOTIC PLANT SPECIES TO TIMBER HARVESTING IN SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY FORESTS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The responses of invasive exotic plant species (IES) to silvicultural treatments one growing season after timber harvesting were examined in the Cumberland Plateau region of (more)

Devine, Kevin Patrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

U.S. Timber Production, Trade, Consumption, and Price Statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is part of an annual series that presents current and historical information on the production, trade, consumption, and prices of timber products in the United States. The report focuses on national statistics, but includes some data for individual States and regions and for Canada. The data were collected from industry trade associations and government agencies. They are intended for use by forest land managers, forest industries, trade associations, forestry schools, renewable resource organizations, libraries, organizations, individuals in the major timber producing and consuming countries of the world, and the general public. A major use of the data presented here is tracking technological change over time. One of the major technology shifts occurring in the wood-using industry is the substitution of oriented strandboard (OSB) for plywood in the structural panel sector, as well as a shift in plywood production from the west to the south United States. Some data show these shifts. United States production of structural panels totaled 29.4 billion ft in 1999. Production of OSB increased from less than 3 billion ft in 1985 to 11.6 billion ft in 1999. Plywood production was 20.1 billion ft in 1985 before falling to 17.8 billion ft in 1999. The decline in plywood production reflects the continued increase in the OSB share of the traditional plywood market Keywords: production, consumption, import, export April 2001 Howard, James. L. 2001. U.S. timber production, trade consumption, and price statistics 1965 to 1999. Res. Pap. FPL-RP-595. Madison, WI: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Forest Products Laboratory. 90 p. A limited number of free copies of this publication are available to the public from the Forest Products Laboratory, One Gifford Pi...

James Howard United; United States; Forest Service; Price Statistics; James L. Howard

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Brazil closes down illegal timber operation, seizes wood Rhett A. Butler, mongabay.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brazil closes down illegal timber operation, seizes wood Rhett A. Butler, mongabay.com April 11 efforts. Deforestation Figures for Brazil, 1978-2005 Brazil's environmental regulations require landowners Newsletter Languages SUPPORT Help support mongabay.com when you buy from Brazil closes down illegal timber

47

CX-006250: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Blast and Paint Bayou Choctaw Brine Pump Pad and Associate PipingCX(s) Applied: B1.3Date: 06/20/2011Location(s): Iberville Parish, LouisianaOffice(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

48

CX-010715: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CX-010715: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Bayou Choctaw 500 KVA Power Transformer CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07092013 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic...

49

CX-009713: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Replace Bayou Choctaw Warehouse Firewater Piping CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/26/2012 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office

50

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 17960 of 28,905 results. 51 - 17960 of 28,905 results. Download CX-003138: Categorical Exclusion Determination Big Hill Buildings 802 and 812 Door Repairs CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/20/2010 Location(s): Big Hill, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003138-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003137: Categorical Exclusion Determination Repairs to West Hackberry Building 301 Roof CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/12/2010 Location(s): West Hackberry, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003137-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003594: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Bayou Choctaw Timber Pile Pipe Supports

51

Title: Hidden economies, future options: trade in non-timber forest products in eastern Indonesia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Hidden economies, future options: trade in non-timber forest products in eastern Indonesia Tenggara (ENT), eastern Indonesia. The study was the outcome of an ACIAR scoping study undertaken through

52

UNECE TIMBER COMMITTEE Sixty-first session, 7-10 October 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Hakan Ekström, President, Wood Resources International, USA #12;UNECE TIMBER COMMITTEE Sixty removals of roundwood in the UNECE region were close to record levels in 2002. · Slightly stronger demand

53

EU, CHINA AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGE IN AFRICA A case study from timber industry in Gabon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 EU, CHINA AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGE IN AFRICA A case study from timber industry: .....................................................................................................................................................2 Part I: The EU, China and the external environmental dimension....................................................................3 1.1 China as a competitor normative power in the environmental sector

54

A view from the top: US enrichment Corp. 's William H. Timbers, Jr  

SciTech Connect

Nick Timbers took over as the first Transition Manager of the US Enrichment Corporation upon its founding last July 1st. Although USEC is not involved in negotiating the HEU deal, the fledgling company will be in charge of actually buying and selling the resulting LEU. Whenever the deal is finally signed. After the politics and haggling are over, it will be up to Nick Timbers to make the deal work on the global uranium market. The view from USEC is resolute. No matter what shape the final HEU deal takes, Nick Timbers promises that USEC will remain a competitive supplier of enrichment services. Timbers pledges that any extra costs associated with the HEU deal will not be passed on to customers. He took time out from his recent busy schedule to share his thoughts on HEU and its aftermath.

Giltenan, E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain  

SciTech Connect

Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

Ernest A. Mancini

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

Ernest A. Mancini

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Pipeline corridors through wetlands - impacts on plant communities: Bayou Grand Cane, De Soto Parish, Louisiana. Topical report, August 1991--July 1993  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipeline on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and night of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted over the period of August 12-13, 1991, at the Bayou Grand Cane crossing in De Soto Parish, Louisiana, where a pipeline constructed three years prior to the survey crosses the bayou through mature bottomland hardwoods. The sit was not seeded or fertilized after construction activities. At the time of sampling, a dense herb stratum (composed of mostly native species) covered the 20-m-wide ROW, except within drainage channels. As a result of the creation of the ROW, new habitat was created, plant diversity increased, and forest habitat became fragmented. The ROW must be maintained at an early stage of succession to allow access to the pipeline however, impacts to the wetland were minimized by decreasing the width of the ROW to 20 m and recreating the drainage channels across the ROW. The canopy trees on the ROW`s edge shaded part of the ROW, which helped to minimize the effects of the ROW.

Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Hayes, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Van Dyke, G.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Trinity Christian College, Palos Heights, IL (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns  

SciTech Connect

A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

Gary D. Kronrad

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

59

Forests Campaign 2007 How the illegal timber coming into China? Case of Merbau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This logging decimates the forest: one study showed that to reach one merbau tree, an additional 45 trees were the illegal timber coming into China? Case of Merbau Manufactured for consumption in China... ...and manufacturing sector has on the world's remaining merbau, as well as many other species, is enormous. #12

60

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1979. Annual report, Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to monitor baseline air and water quality, subsidence, microseismic activity, and noise in the vicinity of Brazoria County geopressured geothermal test wells, Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2, has been underway since March 1978. The initial report on environmental baseline monitoring at the test well contained descriptions of baseline air and water quality, a noise survey, an inventory of microseismic activity, and a discussion of the installation of a liquid tilt meter (Gustavson, 1979). The following report continues the description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, includes an inventory of microseismic activity during 1979 with interpretations of the origin of the events, and discusses the installation and monitoring of a liquid tilt meter at the test well site. In addition, a brief description of flooding at the test site is presented.

Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Final report for the geothermal well site restoration and plug and abandonment of wells: DOE Pleasant Bayou test site, Brazoria County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For a variety of reasons, thousands of oil and gas wells have been abandoned in the Gulf Coast Region of the United States. Many of these wells penetrated geopressured zones whose resource potential for power generation was undervalued or ignored. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program was chartered to improve geothermal technology to the point where electricity could be commercially produced from a substantial number of geopressured resource sites. This research program focused on relatively narrow technical issues that are unique to geopressured resources such as the ability to predict reservoir production capacity based on preliminary flow tests. Three well sites were selected for the research program. These are the Willis Hulin and Gladys McCall sites in Louisiana, and the Pleasant Bayou site in Texas. The final phase of this research project consists of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and site restoration.

Rinehart, Ben N.; Seigel, Ben H.

1994-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

62

Sulfur in the Timbers of Henry VIII's Warship Mary Rose: Synchrotrons  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur in the Timbers of Henry Sulfur in the Timbers of Henry VIII's Warship Mary Rose: Synchrotrons Illuminate Conservation Concerns Magnus Sandström,1 Farideh Jalilehvand,2 Emiliana Damian,1 Yvonne Fors,1 Ulrik Gelius,3 Mark Jones,4 and Murielle Salomé5 1Structural Chemistry, Stockholm University, Sweden 2Department of Chemistry, University of Calgary, Alberta, Canada 3Department of Physics, Uppsala University, Sweden 4The Mary Rose Trust, HM Naval Base, Portsmouth, UK 5European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble, France Figure 1.The starboard side of the Mary Rose (about ½ of the hull, ~280 tons oak timbers) is since 1994 being sprayed with an aqueous solution of PEG 200. Figure 2. Sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum of Mary Rose oak core surface (0-3 mm). Standard spectra used for model fitting: 1 (solution), 1' (solid) disulfides R-SS-R (cystine with peaks at 2472.7 and 2474.4 eV); 45%; 2: Thiols R-SH (cysteine, 2473.6 eV) 23%; 3: Elemental sulfur (S8 in xylene 2473.0 eV) 10%; 4: Sulfoxide R(SO)R' (methionine sulfoxide, 2476.4 eV) 5%; 5: Sulfonate R-SO3- (methyl sulfonate, 2481.2 eV) 10%; 6: Sulfate SO42- (sodium sulfate, 2482.6 eV) 7%.

63

CX-007813: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

813: Categorical Exclusion Determination 813: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007813: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bayou Choctaw Building 401 Air Handling Unit-3 Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.4 Date: 02/01/2012 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, materials, equipment and supervision required to replace the Bayou Choctaw Building 401 Air Handling Unit (AHU-3) and its associated air cooled condensing unit at the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve site for the existing Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) unit. Microsoft Word - BC-MM-815 NEPA.docx More Documents & Publications CX-008347: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003596: Categorical Exclusion Determination

64

CX-004170: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

170: Categorical Exclusion Determination 170: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004170: Categorical Exclusion Determination Refurbish Bayou Choctaw Static Mixer Government Furnished Equipment CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/17/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Subcontractor shall provide all supervision, transportation, labor, materials, and equipment to pickup, refurbish, install new baffles, and deliver an axial flow type mixer for crude oil service to the Bayou Choctaw Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. Government will furnish the old static mixer complete with flanges. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004170.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-007510: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006247: Categorical Exclusion Determination

65

CX-003596: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

596: Categorical Exclusion Determination 596: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003596: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bayou Choctaw Site Building Upgrades, Phases II and III CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/24/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, materials, equipment, and supervision required to perform various building upgrades at Bayou Choctaw (BC) Buildings 401, 402, 403, 408, 415, and 416 (Phase II) and BC Buildings 401, 402, 413, and 414 (Phase III). Subcontractor shall evaluate and implement Green Building Design where applicable. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-003596.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-007813: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006247: Categorical Exclusion Determination

66

Market Enhancement for Small Diameter Timber in Florida Final Project Report to Florida Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services-Division of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass into electricity, industrial steam energy and fuel ethanol. A barrier to private sector investment .................................................................................................................... 7 Biomass Energy Uses................. 39 Small Diameter Timber for Fuel or Energy

Florida, University of

67

Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research; project: hazardous materials in aquatic environments; subproject: biomarkers and risk assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established in 1989 as the umbrella organization to coordinate environmental research at both universities. CBR projects funded by the DOE under the Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments grant are defining the following: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants through wetlands environments, (2) the actual and potential impact of contaminants on ecological systems and health, (3) the mechanisms and new technologies through which these impacts might be remediated, and (4) new programs aimed at educating and training environmental workers of the future. The subproject described in this report, `Biomarkers and Risk Assessment in Bayou Trepagnier, LN`, is particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s Environmental Restoration and Waste Management program aimed at solving problems related to hazard monitoring and clean-up prioritization at sites with aquatic pollution problems in the DOE complex.

Ide, C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Microbial methane formation from hard coal and timber in an abandoned coal mine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 7% of the global annual methane emissions originate from coal mining. Also, mine gas has come into focus of the power industry and is being used increasingly for heat and power production. In many coal deposits worldwide, stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic signatures of methane indicate a mixed thermogenic and biogenic origin. In this study, we have measured in an abandoned coal mine methane fluxes and isotopic signatures of methane and carbon dioxide, and collected samples for microbiological and phylogenetic investigations. Mine timber and hard coal showed an in-situ production of methane with isotopic signatures similar to those of the methane in the mine atmosphere. Enrichment cultures amended with mine timber or hard coal as sole carbon sources formed methane over a period of nine months. Predominantly, acetoclastic methanogenesis was stimulated in enrichments containing acetate or hydrogen/carbon dioxide. Molecular techniques revealed that the archaeal community in enrichment cultures and unamended samples was dominated by members of the Methanosarcinales. The combined geochemical and microbiological investigations identify microbial methanogenesis as a recent source of methane in abandoned coal mines.

Kruger, M.; Beckmann, S.; Engelen, B.; Thielemann, T.; Cramer, B.; Schippers, A.; Cypionka, H. [Federal Institute for Geoscience and Natural Resources BGR, Hannover (Germany)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

TREE-RING DATING OF OLD-GROWTH LONGLEAF PINE (PINUS PALUSTRIS MILL.) LOGS FROM AN EXPOSED TIMBER CRIB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as a timber crib dam. Inspection revealed these logs to be old-growth longleaf pines, which are now rare and Grashot 1976; Stahle 1979; Bortolot et al. 2001; Mann 2002; Grissino-Mayer and van de Gevel 2007), infer to help date other historical structures and prehistoric archaeological sites (Stahle 1979) and create

Grissino-Mayer, Henri D.

70

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B1.23 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 3, 2012 May 3, 2012 CX-008345: Categorical Exclusion Determination Remove Abandoned Bayou Choctaw Timber Bridge Over North/South Canal CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 05/03/2012 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office April 24, 2012 CX-008179: Categorical Exclusion Determination Building 09-056 Demolition CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 04/24/2012 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Pantex Site Office April 20, 2012 CX-008339: Categorical Exclusion Determination Prototype Staff Building 114 CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.16, B1.23 Date: 04/20/2012 Location(s): New York Offices(s): Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program April 20, 2012 CX-008338: Categorical Exclusion Determination Security Upgrades Major Construction Project CX(s) Applied: B1.11, B1.15, B1.16, B1.23, B2.2

71

Premium Fuel Production From Mining and Timber Waste Using Advanced Separation and Pelletizing Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Commonwealth of Kentucky is one of the leading states in the production of both coal and timber. As a result of mining and processing coal, an estimated 3 million tons of fine coal are disposed annually to waste-slurry impoundments with an additional 500 million tons stored at a number of disposal sites around the state due to past practices. Likewise, the Kentucky timber industry discards nearly 35,000 tons of sawdust on the production site due to unfavorable economics of transporting the material to industrial boilers for use as a fuel. With an average heating value of 6,700 Btu/lb, the monetary value of the energy disposed in the form of sawdust is approximately $490,000 annually. Since the two industries are typically in close proximity, one promising avenue is to selectively recover and dewater the fine-coal particles and then briquette them with sawdust to produce a high-value fuel. The benefits are i) a premium fuel product that is low in moisture and can be handled, transported, and utilized in existing infrastructure, thereby avoiding significant additional capital investment and ii) a reduction in the amount of fine-waste material produced by the two industries that must now be disposed at a significant financial and environmental price. As such, the goal of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of producing a premium fuel with a heating value greater than 10,000 Btu/lb from waste materials generated by the coal and timber industries. Laboratory and pilot-scale testing of the briquetting process indicated that the goal was successfully achieved. Low-ash briquettes containing 5% to 10% sawdust were produced with energy values that were well in excess of 12,000 Btu/lb. A major economic hurdle associated with commercially briquetting coal is binder cost. Approximately fifty binder formulations, both with and without lime, were subjected to an extensive laboratory evaluation to assess their relative technical and economical effectiveness as binding agents for the briquetting of 90% coal and 10% sawdust blends. Guar gum, wheat starch, and a multi-component formulation were identified as most cost-effective for the production of briquettes targeted for the pulverized-coal market with costs being around $8 per ton of the coal-sawdust blend. REAX/lime and a second multi-component formulation were identified as the most cost-effective for the production of briquettes targeted for the stoker-coal market. Various sources of sawdust generated from different wood types were also investigated to determine their chemical properties and to evaluate their relative performance when briquetted with clean coal to form a premium fuel. The highest heating values, approaching 7,000 Btu/lb, were obtained from oak. Sawdusts from higher-density, red oak, white oak, hickory, and beech trees provided higher quality briquettes relative to their lower-density counterparts. In addition to sawdust type, a number of other parameters were evaluated to characterize their impact on briquette properties. The parameters that exhibited the greatest impact on briquette performance were binder concentration; sawdust concentration and particle size; cure temperature; and ash content. Parameters that had the least impact on briquette properties, at least over the ranges studied, were moisture content, briquetting force, and briquetting dwell time. The continuous production of briquettes from a blend of coal and sawdust was evaluated using a 200 lbs/hr Komarek Model B-100 briquetter. The heating values of briquettes produced by the unit exceeded the goal of the project by a large margin. A significant observation was the role of feed moisture on the stability of the mass flow rate through the briquetter and on briquette strength. Excessive feed moisture levels caused inconsistent or stoppage of material flow through the feed hopper and resulted in the production of variable-quality briquettes. Obviously, the limit on feed moisture content has a significant impact on the economics of coal-sawdust briquetting since it will ultimately dictate dew

Honaker, R. Q.; Taulbee, D.; Parekh, B. K.; Tao, D.

2005-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

72

Predicted Effects of Prescribed Burning and Timber Management on Forest Recovery and Sustainability at Fort Benning, Georgia  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to use a simple compartment model of soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics to predict forest recovery on degraded soils and forest sustainability, following recovery, under different regimes of prescribed fire and timber management. This report describes the model and a model-based analysis of the effect of prescribed burning and forest thinning or clearcutting on stand recovery and sustainability at Fort Benning, GA. I developed the model using Stella{reg_sign} Research Software (High Performance Systems, Inc., Hanover, NH) and parameterized the model using data from field studies at Fort Benning, literature sources, and parameter fitting. The model included (1) a tree biomass submodel that predicted aboveground and belowground tree biomass, (2) a litter production submodel that predicted the dynamics of herbaceous aboveground and belowground biomass, (3) a soil C and N submodel that predicted soil C and N stocks (to a 30 cm soil depth) and net soil N mineralization, and (4) an excess N submodel that calculated the difference between predicted plant N demands and soil N supplies. There was a modeled feedback from potential excess N (PEN) to tree growth such that forest growth was limited under conditions of N deficiency. Two experiments were performed for the model-based analysis. In the first experiment, forest recovery from barren soils was predicted for 100 years with or without prescribed burning and with or without timber management by thinning or clearcutting. In the second experiment, simulations began with 100 years of predicted forest growth in the absence of fire or harvesting, and sustainability was predicted for a further 100 years either with or without prescribed burning and with or without forest management. Four performance variables (aboveground tree biomass, soil C stocks, soil N stocks, and PEN) were used to evaluate the predicted effects of timber harvesting and prescribed burning on forest recovery and sustainability. Predictions of forest recovery and sustainability were directly affected by how prescribed fire affected PEN. Prescribed fire impacted soil N supplies by lowering predicted soil C and N stocks which reduced the soil N pool that contributed to the predicted annual flux of net soil N mineralization. On soils with inherently high N availability, increasing the fire frequency in combination with stand thinning or clearcutting had little effect on predictions of forest recovery and sustainability. However, experiments with the model indicated that combined effects of stand thinning (or clearcutting) and frequent prescribed burning could have adverse effects on forest recovery and sustainability when N availability was just at the point of limiting forest growth. Model predictions indicated that prescribed burning with a 3-year return interval would decrease soil C and N stocks but not adversely affect forest recovery from barren soils or sustainability following ecosystem recovery. On soils with inherently low N availability, prescribed burning with a 2-year return interval depressed predicted soil C and N stocks to the point where soil N deficiencies prevented forest recovery as well as forest sustainability following recovery.

Garten, C.T.,JR.

2004-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

73

CX-006247: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Categorical Exclusion Determination 7: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006247: Categorical Exclusion Determination Relocation of Bayou Choctaw Helipad CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/13/2011 Location(s): Iberville Parish, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Subcontractor shall furnish all labor, tools, equipment, materials, consumables, services, transportation, storage, and supervision required to perform the relocation of the helipad at Bayou Choctaw. Tasks include surface preparation; construction of reinforced concrete landing surface, asphaltic paved safety zone and access road; seeding outside slopes and exposed surfaces; installation of helipad perimeter lighting; painting of perimeter markings; construction of concrete foundation for windsock; installation of windsock; and painting closure markings at existing

74

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

01 - 1810 of 29,416 results. 01 - 1810 of 29,416 results. Download CX-004170: Categorical Exclusion Determination Refurbish Bayou Choctaw Static Mixer Government Furnished Equipment CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 09/17/2010 Location(s): Bayou Choctaw, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004170-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-002301: Categorical Exclusion Determination Facility Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning System Conversion to Ground Source Heat Pump (Phase 1 Modification) CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 05/12/2010 Location(s): Montana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002301-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2009

75

CX-007510: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10: Categorical Exclusion Determination 10: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007510: Categorical Exclusion Determination Record of Categorical Exclusion for Tear Down, Inspect and Repair Bayou Choctaw Brine Filters at BDW Pad 1 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/29/2011 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Subcontractor shall provide all supervision, transportation, labor, materials and equipment required to pickup, inspect, refurbish, install new closures, blast and paint, and deliver three filter pod vessels for brine disposal service at Bayou Choctaw. The existing filter pods will be disconnected from piping by OM personnel. Site personnel and equipment will be available for loading/unloading the filter pods onto the subcontractor's transport vehicle during pickup and delivery.

76

Well test analysis and reservoir modeling of geopressured-geothermal systems (includes topical reports on analyses for: Pleasant Bayou Well No. 2, Gladys McCall Well No.1). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Automated inversion of pressure transient data from the Pleasant Bayou and Gladys McCall geopressured test wells has allowed the resolution of several outstanding questions concerning the two reservoirs. The added accuracy of the interpretation of the various data sets from each well provides convincing evidence that the formation response of each of the reservoirs behaved in an essentially linear fashion throughout its multi-year depletion/recovery test history. The only exception was in the immediate vicinity of the sandface; the skin factor in each of the wells varies during the course of its test history (see Appendices for detailed discussions of the variations and the likely causes of the variations for each well). (a) The six bottomhole pressure transient tests of Pleasant Bayou Well No.2 over a twelve year period (1980-1992) yield estimates for the permeability-thickness product that are in excellent agreement (kh = 3.665 D-m). Inversion of the 45-day buildup portion of the 1980 RLT yields an estimate of X{sub a} = 869 m as the distance from the well to the nearest boundary. The inversion of the data from the other five tests, of much shorter duration, yield estimates in the range X{sub a} = 427-503 m. The RLT estimate would normally be given much more credence. The failure, repair and resetting of the gauge after the first ten days of the start of the buildup test, however, may have affected the RLT data. Calculations are employed to estimate bottomhole pressures from surface recordings subsequent to removal of the bottomhole gauge following the 1992 70-hr buildup test. These estimated values were combined with the 70-hr data to form the 111-day (from September 12, 1992 through January 1, 1993) LTT buildup test data set. The LTT data were inverted to yield an estimate of X{sub a} = 452 m. Since this is in agreement with the range of estimates from the five short-term bottomhole test, we believe the range X{sub a} = 427-503 m to represent the best estimate for the distance from the well to the nearest boundary. The simulation model presented in Appendix B used L1 = 990 m (Figure 3 in Appendix B) as the distance from the test well to the nearest boundary. The simulation model could probably be improved using a smaller value for L1. The actual location of the boundary to the south of the well is not known from the available geological information. (b) The five bottomhole pressure transient tests of Gladys McCall Well No.2 over an eight-year period (1983-1991) yield estimates for the permeability-thickness product that differ significantly from each other. The differences, however, can be explained by the partial plugging of the near-well formation during an aborted attempt to inject a scale-inhibitor pill in May 1985, followed by subsequent scouring out the pill precipitates by the flowing fluid during the May 1985-August 1987 production testing. The partial plugging of the near-well formation in conjunction with a known shale stringer that prevents vertical communication in sand 8 (Figure 2 in Appendix A) would reduce the apparent value of kh to about sixty percent of the original RLT value of 13.44 D-m. Inversion of the 79-hr (1985) and 92-hr (1986) buildup tests yield kh estimates of 7.69 and 8.86 D-m, respectively. Inversions of the valid MRT (1987) and FDT (1991) pressure transient data yield estimates very near the original RLT value. The reinterpretation of the MRT data represents a correction of our earlier conclusion (in Appendix A); we now believe that the data from the first and second gauges employed during the MRT are incompatible. Data from the first (''old'') gauge during the drawdown portion of the MRT could not be adequately corrected for the observed drift in the recorded data. Only the second (''new'') gauge data are considered reliable and inversion of the buildup data it recorded yields the estimate for kh that is in agreement with estimates obtained from inversion of the RLT and FDT pressure transient data.

Riney, T.D.; Owusu, L.A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Pleasant Bayou Operations Brazoria County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project will demonstrate the Hybrid Cycle Concept for electricity generation using geopressured-geothermal resources. The test is scheduled to be a minimum of one year, which may be extended. The majority of the equipment came from the DOE facility at East Mesa, CA. The hybrid cycle has been designed for 10,800 BPD brine and 220,000 SCFD of gas. The power output will be about one megawatt, which will be sold to Houston Lighting and Power Company. An important research objective is to determine the size and ultimate production capability of the geopressured-geothermal reservoir. The long-term deliverability of these type reservoirs is a significant factor in determining the ultimate economic capability of these systems.

Eaton, B.A.; Featherston, C.R.; Meahl, T.E.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

78

Choctaw County, Oklahoma: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

95.5197394° 95.5197394° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9851472,"lon":-95.5197394,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

79

Choctaw County, Alabama: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

461183° 461183° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.0716631,"lon":-88.2461183,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

80

Bayou Vista, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vista, Texas: Energy Resources Vista, Texas: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 29.3263467°, -94.9385339° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.3263467,"lon":-94.9385339,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

EIS-0385: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

85: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental 85: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0385: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Environmental Protection Agency Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statements: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Expansion, Site Selection of Five New Sites: Chacahoula and Clovelly, in Lafourche Parish, LA; Burinsburg, Claiborne County, MS; Richton, Perry County, MS; and Stratton Ridge, Brazoria County, TX and Existing Site Bayou Choctaw, Iberville Parish, LA, West Hackberry, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, LA; and Big Hill, Jefferson County, TX DOE/EIS-0385, Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve

82

Microsoft Word - MS-OM-1005 NEPA.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MS-OM-1005 MS-OM-1005 Title: FY 2012 Annual Site Subsidence Surveys Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, supervision, materials, equipment, transportation, and services necessary to perform a subsidence survey of the Bayou Choctaw, Big Hill, Bryan Mound and West Hackberry SPR sites. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following: (1) The proposed action fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix A or B of Subpart D;

83

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 21670 of 26,764 results. 61 - 21670 of 26,764 results. Article Women @ Energy: Robin Goldstone "I am surrounded by smart people from all disciplines: physicists, engineers, mathematicians and computer scientists all working together to solve some of the world's most challenging technical problems. It is exhilarating and rewarding." Read more from Robin on her profile here. http://energy.gov/diversity/articles/women-energy-robin-goldstone Download CX-009713: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Bayou Choctaw Warehouse Firewater Piping CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/26/2012 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-009713-categorical-exclusion-determination Article 2013 Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month Resources and

84

EIS-0385: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0385: EPA Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Environmental Protection Agency Notice of Availability of Draft Environmental Impact Statements: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Expansion, Site Selection of Five New Sites: Chacahoula and Clovelly, in Lafourche Parish, LA; Burinsburg, Claiborne County, MS; Richton, Perry County, MS; and Stratton Ridge, Brazoria County, TX and Existing Site Bayou Choctaw, Iberville Parish, LA, West Hackberry, Cameron and Calcasieu Parishes, LA; and Big Hill, Jefferson County, TX DOE/EIS-0385, Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve

85

Microsoft Word - BC-MM-815 NEPA.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15 15 Title: BC Building 401 AHU-3 HVAC Replacement Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, tools, materials, equipment and supervision required to replace the BC Building 401 Air Handling Unit (AHU-3) and its associated air cooled condensing unit at the Bayou Choctaw SPR site for the existing Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning (HVAC) unit. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following:

86

Energy Department Announces Emergency Oil Loan In Response to Hurricane  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Oil Loan In Response to Emergency Oil Loan In Response to Hurricane Isaac-Related Request Energy Department Announces Emergency Oil Loan In Response to Hurricane Isaac-Related Request August 31, 2012 - 11:17am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON, DC - Following a request yesterday from Marathon Petroleum Company, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced today that the Energy Department has agreed to lend 1 million barrels of sweet crude oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve's (SPR) Bayou Choctaw site in Louisiana to address the short term impact on the company's refining capacity caused by Hurricane Isaac, which is resulting in limited crude oil shortages. The loan, which is distinct from a release from the SPR, will be provided to Marathon Petroleum Company under short-term contractual agreements.

87

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 21830 of 26,764 results. 21 - 21830 of 26,764 results. Download CX-007509: Categorical Exclusion Determination Record of Categorical Exclusion for Use of RW Surge Line to Big Hill Anhydrite Pond for Raw Water Intake Structure Recycle CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/28/2011 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007509-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-007510: Categorical Exclusion Determination Record of Categorical Exclusion for Tear Down, Inspect and Repair Bayou Choctaw Brine Filters at BDW Pad 1 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/29/2011 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-007510-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-007511: Categorical Exclusion Determination

88

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21 - 17830 of 26,764 results. 21 - 17830 of 26,764 results. Download CX-006540: Categorical Exclusion Determination Wells Fargo Property Structure Removal CX(s) Applied: B1.23 Date: 08/16/2011 Location(s): Golden, Colorado Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006540-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000194: Categorical Exclusion Determination Ohio City Cincinnati CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B5.1 Date: 11/18/2009 Location(s): Cincinnati, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000194-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006606: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recoat RPX Spools at Bayou Choctaw CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/08/2011

89

DOE Takes Next Steps to Expand Strategic Petroleum Reserve to One Billion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Takes Next Steps to Expand Strategic Petroleum Reserve to One DOE Takes Next Steps to Expand Strategic Petroleum Reserve to One Billion Barrels DOE Takes Next Steps to Expand Strategic Petroleum Reserve to One Billion Barrels December 8, 2006 - 9:34am Addthis Richton, Mississippi is Preferred New Site for Reserve WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced that DOE has identified the salt domes at Richton, in Mississippi, as the preferred alternative to lead the expansion of the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to one billion barrels. This site selection adds to the SPR's geographic diversity. In addition to Richton, DOE also proposes to expand capacity at three existing SPR sites: Big Hill in Texas, and Bayou Choctaw and West Hackberry in Louisiana. Selection of sites is the first step in the process to achieve expansion.

90

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. BC-10-077A  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7A 7A Title: Refurbish BC Static Mixer GFE Description: Subcontractor shall provide all supervision, transportation, labor, materials, and equipment to pickup, refurbish, install new baffles, and deliver an axial flow type mixer for crude oil service to the Bayou Choctaw SPR site. Government will furnish the old static mixer complete with flanges. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following:

91

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2, 2012 2, 2012 CX-007998: Categorical Exclusion Determination Integration of Stoltze Land and Lumber Biomass Generation CX(s) Applied: B1.7 Date: 02/02/2012 Location(s): Montana Offices(s): Bonneville Power Administration February 1, 2012 CX-007813: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bayou Choctaw Building 401 Air Handling Unit-3 Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning Replacement CX(s) Applied: B1.4 Date: 02/01/2012 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office February 1, 2012 CX-007952: Categorical Exclusion Determination Esperanza Roof Replacement CX(s) Applied: A1, B2.1, B5.1 Date: 02/01/2012 Location(s): Pennsylvania Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory February 1, 2012 CX-007951: Categorical Exclusion Determination Puget Sound Clean Cities Petroleum Reduction Project

92

EIS-0385: Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings EIS-0385: Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve DOE has prepared an environmental impact statement (EIS) (DOE/EIS-0385), DOE has decided to develop a new 160 MMB SPR storage facility at Richton (Mississippi), expand the storage capacity at the existing Bayou Choctaw (Louisiana) SPR facility by 33 MMB, expand the storage capacity at the existing Big Hill (Texas) SPR facility by 80 MMB, and fill the Reserve to 1 billion barrels of oil as authorized by Congress.(72 FR 7964) Record of Decision and Floodplain Statement of Findings: Site Selection for the Expansion of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, EIS-0385 (February 2007)

93

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 20, 2011 June 20, 2011 CX-006251: Categorical Exclusion Determination Big Hill Heat Exchanger Isolation Valves - Install CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/20/2011 Location(s): Jefferson County, Texas Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office June 20, 2011 CX-006250: Categorical Exclusion Determination Blast and Paint Bayou Choctaw Brine Pump Pad and Associate Piping CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/20/2011 Location(s): Iberville Parish, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office June 20, 2011 CX-006249: Categorical Exclusion Determination Blast and Paint West Hackberry Heat Exchanger Headers and Overhead Rack Piping CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/20/2011 Location(s): Cameron Parish, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office June 20, 2011

94

Microsoft Word - SPR Site Subsidence Surveys 2013-2017.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subsidence Surveys, 2013-2017 Subsidence Surveys, 2013-2017 Description: Subcontractor shall provide all labor, supervision, materials, equipment, transportation, and services necessary to perform a subsidence survey of the Bayou Choctaw, Big Hill, Bryan Mound and West Hackberry SPR sites. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following: (1) The proposed action fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix A or B of Subpart D;

95

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

81 - 7890 of 29,416 results. 81 - 7890 of 29,416 results. Download CX-005895: Categorical Exclusion Determination Relocation of Bayou Choctaw Entry Portal Building CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/05/2011 Location(s): Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005895-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003117: Categorical Exclusion Determination Columbia University - Biofuels from Carbon Dioxide using Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria in a Reverse Microbial Fuel Cell CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): New York Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003117-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003075: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pellion Technologies, Inc. - Research and Development on Rechargeable

96

DOE Takes Next Steps to Expand Strategic Petroleum Reserve to One Billion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Expand Strategic Petroleum Reserve to One to Expand Strategic Petroleum Reserve to One Billion Barrels DOE Takes Next Steps to Expand Strategic Petroleum Reserve to One Billion Barrels December 8, 2006 - 9:34am Addthis Richton, Mississippi is Preferred New Site for Reserve WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced that DOE has identified the salt domes at Richton, in Mississippi, as the preferred alternative to lead the expansion of the U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) to one billion barrels. This site selection adds to the SPR's geographic diversity. In addition to Richton, DOE also proposes to expand capacity at three existing SPR sites: Big Hill in Texas, and Bayou Choctaw and West Hackberry in Louisiana. Selection of sites is the first step in the process to achieve expansion.

97

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Louisiana | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 23, 2011 August 23, 2011 CX-006542: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant - State of Louisiana Saint James Parish CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 08/23/2011 Location(s): Saint James Parish, Louisiana Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office August 8, 2011 CX-006606: Categorical Exclusion Determination Recoat RPX Spools at Bayou Choctaw CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/08/2011 Location(s): Baton Rouge, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office July 29, 2011 CX-006271: Categorical Exclusion Determination American Recovery and Reinvestment Act State Energy Program - Known Geothermal Resource Area at Linerboard and Newsprint Mill CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/29/2011

98

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

91 - 21700 of 26,764 results. 91 - 21700 of 26,764 results. Video Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps http://energy.gov/eere/videos/energy-101-geothermal-heat-pumps Download CX-010715: Categorical Exclusion Determination Replace Bayou Choctaw 500 KVA Power Transformer CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 07/09/2013 Location(s): Louisiana Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-010715-categorical-exclusion-determination Article Saving Energy as a Renter this Fall Use these tips to save some energy-and money-in your rented apartment this fall. http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/saving-energy-renter-fall Contributor Andre H. Sayles Andre H. Sayles, Ph.D., joined the Department of Energy as the Principal Deputy Director of the Office of Economic Impact and Diversity in September

99

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 8220 of 26,764 results. 11 - 8220 of 26,764 results. Download CX-000870: Categorical Exclusion Determination West Hackberry Air Conditioning/Heating Repairs CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/05/2010 Location(s): West Hackberry, Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000870-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005895: Categorical Exclusion Determination Relocation of Bayou Choctaw Entry Portal Building CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 05/05/2011 Location(s): Louisiana Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005895-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005897: Categorical Exclusion Determination Bryan Mound Upgrade Wood to Steel Lighting Poles

100

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 9320 of 28,560 results. 11 - 9320 of 28,560 results. Download CX-006247: Categorical Exclusion Determination Relocation of Bayou Choctaw Helipad CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 06/13/2011 Location(s): Iberville Parish, Louisiana Office(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006247-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000873: Categorical Exclusion Determination Clean, Inspect, and Repair BMT-27 CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/11/2010 Location(s): Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000873-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-000871: Categorical Exclusion Determination West Hackberry Annual Pressure Safety Valve Testing CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 02/05/2010 Location(s): West Hackberry, Louisiana

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Timber Products Equipment Services MarketPlace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The 400-acre tract already includes a biomass power plant that Ainsworth used to generate its own power on local job development and "thoughtful use of the region's resources," according to Mark Doctor, a member are interested in using a portion of the facility for some form of biomass. Other potential tenants could include

102

Thermal discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant outfalls: Impacts on stream temperatures and fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks  

SciTech Connect

The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the US Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7 C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

Roy, W.K.; Ryon, M.G.; Hinzman, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computer Science and Mathematics Div.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Thermal Discharges from Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Outfalls: Impacts on Stream Temperatures and Fauna of Little Bayou and Big Bayou Creeks  

SciTech Connect

The development of a biological monitoring plan for the receiving streams of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) began in the late 1980s, because of an Agreed Order (AO) issued in September 1987 by the Kentucky Division of Water (KDOW). Five years later, in September 1992, more stringent effluent limitations were imposed upon the PGDP operations when the KDOW reissued Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit No. KY 0004049. This action prompted the US Department of Energy (DOE) to request a stay of certain limits contained in the permit. An AO is being negotiated between KDOW, the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), and DOE that will require that several studies be conducted, including this stream temperature evaluation study, in an effort to establish permit limitations. All issues associated with this AO have been resolved, and the AO is currently being signed by all parties involved. The proposed effluent temperature limit is 89 F (31.7C) as a mean monthly temperature. In the interim, temperatures are not to exceed 95 F (35 C) as a monthly mean or 100 F (37.8 C) as a daily maximum. This study includes detailed monitoring of instream temperatures, benthic macroinvertebrate communities, fish communities, and a laboratory study of thermal tolerances.

Roy, W.K.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

UN/ECE TIMBER COMMITTEEUN/ECE TIMBER COMMITTEE Geneva, Oct. 2003Geneva, Oct. 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategic re-orientation : to cover also the local demand of emerging markets e.g. eastern European transcontinental / transregional furniture trade flows : from Asia to the USA and Europe from Europe to the USA of the Asian furniture industries has a direct impact in the USA and in Europe, mainly in the lower-cost range

105

First order leveling: Pleasant Bayou geothermal test site, Brazoria County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

First order leveling to be conducted as part of an environmental monitoring program for a geopressured test well was reported. 39.43 kilometers of first order levels were run to NGS specifications. Twelve Class B type bench marks were set to NGS specifications. The adjusted elevation of bench mark C-1209 was used as a starting elevation and is based on a supplementary adjustment of April 6, 1979 by NGS. The closure for the loop around the well site is -0.65 millimeters. The distance around the loop is 1.29 kilometers, the allowable error of closure was 4.54 millimeters. The initial leveling of this well was performed in 1977. A thorough search for their monumentation was conducted. No monuments were found due to the lack of adequate monument descriptions. Therefore, an elevation comparison summary for this report is only available along the NGS lines outside the well area. The first order level tie to line No. 101 (BMA-1208) was +3.37 millimeters in 17.21 kilometers. The allowable error of closure was 12.44 millimeters.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Sampling and Analysis Procedures for Gas, Condensate, Brine, and Solids: Pleasant Bayou Well Test, 1988-Present  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This section covers analyses performed on gas. Chemical analyses can only be related to well performance if the quantity of the various fluids are known. The IGT on-line data computer system measures the flowrate, the pressures, and the temperatures every 10 seconds. These values are automatically recorded over operator selected intervals both on magnetic media and on paper. This allows review of samples versus operating conditions. This paper covers analyses performed on gas, including: An approximate sampling schedule during flow tests; On-site sample handling and storage of gas samples; Addresses of laboratories that perform off site analyses; Sample shipping instructions; Data archiving; and Quality Control/Quality Assurance. It is expected that the above procedures will change as the flow test progresses, but deviations from the written procedures should be approved by C. Hayden of IGT and noted on the results of the analysis.

Hayden, Chris

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Timber Lakes, Utah: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utah: Energy Resources Utah: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.4732871°, -111.2476714° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4732871,"lon":-111.2476714,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

108

Supporting rural wood industry through timber utilization research. Research paper  

SciTech Connect

The report evaluates the potential impact of USDA Forest Service wood utilization and wood energy research on rural employment and income. Recent projections suggest employment will decrease in many forest products industries, such as softwood sawmilling, but will eventually increase in softwood plywood and reconstituated panel mills. Forest products industries expected to provide wages exceeding the average manufacturing production wage include logging, softwood sawmills, millwork, softwood plywood--veneer, structural wood members, particle-board, wood partitions, pulp mills, paper mills, and paperboard mills. Industries expected to pay 90 percent of the average manufacturing production wage include wood kitchen cabinets, mobile homes, prefabricated wood buildings, and wood preservatives.

Skog, K.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Securing major investment in the UK timber processing industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Europe, securing hundreds of jobs and highlighting the role of forestry in regional economic development as `FSC certified' and its use of the largest known biomass heating boiler in the UK as part of the new. · Installation of a 50 mw biomass boiler for plant heating requirements. · Attract related businesses to the area

110

ECE/TIM/SP/23 Timber Section, Geneva, Switzerland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during a prescribed burn at the University of Idaho's experimental forest. NATIONAL CENTER FOR LANDSCAPE that successful data sharing efforts must: have a plan that addresses the entire data lifecycle from design with the build-out of an experimental communication and data network on the Powell Ranger District in Idaho

Enomoto, Ryoji

111

ECE/TIM/SP/23 Timber Section, Geneva, Switzerland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production, these sugars can be converted to bioethanol through fermentation processes [24]. The primary challenge in biomass conversion to bioethanol is achieving yields that make it cost fungi such as T. reesei [28]. The initial conversion of biomass into sugars is a key bottleneck

112

ASEM Conference on Forests, forest governance and timber products trade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:00-10:30 Co-chairs of the Conference: H.E. Chheng Kim Sun, Cambodia Cambodia, H.E. Timo Makela, European.E. Timo Makela, Director of Sustainable Development and Integration, Directorate General Environment

113

Understanding Wye Using Traditional Timber to Connect Young People  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biblins Youth Campsite accessible to groups from all backgrounds and abilities by improving facilities constructed. · Solar powered toilets and shower facilities will be installed before the end of 2007 and opened to follow for successful projects. · Joined-up thinking is essential between FC staff, stakeholders

114

Poverty program participation and employment in timber-dependent counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

County Employment State AFDC-UP Both State Variables AreDepartment, various years), and AFDC-UP program caseload (Children-Unemployed Parent (AFDC-UP). The study is conducted

Berck, Peter; Costello, Christopher; Hoffman, Sandra; Fortmann, Louise

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

South Dakota timber industry: An assessment of timber product output and use, 1993. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

Reports findings of a survey of all primary wood-using mills in South Dakota in 1993 and compares those findings with earlier surveys. Reports production and receipts of industrial roundwood by product, species, and county. Also reports the quantity, type, and disposition of wood and bark residues generated by South Dakota`s primary wood-using industry.

Hackett, R.L.; Sowers, R.A.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

116

Subsidence monitoring and evaluation plan for strategic petroleum reserve storage sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsidence is occurring at all six Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) sites. It results from a combination of cavern closure, Frasch-process sulphur extraction, fluid withdrawal, and from natural causes. Of these, cavern closure resulting from slat creep is the predominant source. A subsidence monitoring program is recommended that includes: (a) continuation of annual releveling; (b) quadrennial determination of horizontal drift; (c) triennial measurement of gravity values to determine elevation change and to validate releveling data; (d) 1/2400 air photos quadrennially; (e) coordination of other subsidence monitoring efforts, especially involving regional subsidence; (f) continuation of cavern creep modeling; (g) engineering evaluation of observed and predicted subsidence effects; (h) information dissemination in the form of an annual review and report. A priority sequence is suggested that considers observed subsidence and operational factors such as oil inventories and risk appraisal. First (highest) priority is assigned to Weeks Island and West Hackberry. Second (intermediate) priority is given to Bayou Choctaw and Bryan Mound. Third, (lowest) priority is assigned to Sulphur Mines and Big Hill. The priority strategy can be used as a management tool in allocating resources and in determining relative attention that is required at the six sites. 32 refs., 1 tab.

Neal, J.T.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Strategic Petroleum Reserve quarterly report  

SciTech Connect

This August 15, 1991, Strategic Petroleum Reserve Quarterly Report describes activities related to the site development, oil acquisition, budget and cost of the Reserve during the period April 1, 1991, through June 30, 1991. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve storage facilities development program is proceeding on schedule. The Reserve's capacity is currently 726 million barrels. A total of 5.5 million barrels of new gross cavern volume was developed at Big Hill and Bayou Choctaw during the quarter. There were no crude oil deliveries to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve during the calendar quarter ending June 30, 1991. Acquisition of crude oil for the Reserve has been suspended since August 2, 1990, following the invasion of Kuwait by Iraq. As of June 30, 1991, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve inventory was 568.5 million barrels. The reorganization of the Office of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve became effective June 28, 1991. Under the new organization, the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Project Management Office in Louisiana will report to the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Program Office in Washington rather than the Oak Ridge Field Office in Tennessee. 2 tabs.

1991-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Annual Strategic Petroleum Reserve report  

SciTech Connect

The annual report on the Strategic Petroleum reserve for the period covering February 16, 1977 to February 18, 1978 contains the following: (1) a detailed statement of the status of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve; (2) a summary of the actions taken to develop and implement the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Plan and the Early Storage Reserve Plan; (3) an analysis of the impact and effectiveness of such actions on the vulnerability of the United States to interruption in supplies of petroleum products; (4) a summary of existing problems with respect to further implementation of the Early Storage Reserve Plan and the Strategic Petroleum Reserve Plan. Four sites with existing underground storage capacity were acquired in 1977. They are: (1) West Hackberry salt dome, Cameron Parish, Louisiana, with estimated existing capacity of 50 MMB; (2) Bryan Mound salt dome, Brazoria County, Texas, with estimated existing capacity of 62 MMB; (3) Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Iberville Parish, Louisiana, with estimated existing capacity of 74 MMB; and (4) Weeks Island salt mine, New Iberia Parish, Louisiana, with estimated existing capacity of 89 MMB. The status of each site is summarized.

1978-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

119

Rebuilding plan implementation in New Orleans, LA : a case study of Freret Street Commercial Corridor and Bayou Road Cultural Corridor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three major rebuilding plans emerged from the planning process that followed the devastation of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans. Outlining the visions and goals of individual communities across New Orleans, the intent of ...

Alao, Oreoluwa

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

n this paper, we use obsidian source data as a method for identifying prehistoric and historic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[495] 3 7 1 Mississippi -- Choctaw Indians [496] 3 7 2 Montana -- Blackfeet Indians, 1923-1936 [497] 3

Scheiber, Laura L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Compilation of gas intrusion measurements, variations, and consequence modeling for SPR caverns.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intrusion of gas into oils stored within the SPR has been examined. When oil is stored in domal salts, gases intrude into the stored oil from the surrounding salt. Aspects of the mechanism of gas intrusion have been examined. In all cases, this gas intrusion results in increases in the oil vapor pressure. Data that have been gathered from 1993 to August 2002 are presented to show the resultant increases in bubble-point pressure on a cavern-by-cavern as well as on a stream basis. The measurement techniques are presented with particular emphasis on the TVP 95. Data analysis methods are presented to show the methods required to obtain recombined cavern oil compositions. Gas-oil ratios are also computed from the data and are presented on a cavern-by-cavern and stream basis. The observed increases in bubble-point pressure and gas-oil ratio are further statistically analyzed to allow data interpretation. Emissions plume modeling is used to determine adherence to state air regulations. Gas intrusion is observed to be variable among the sites and within each dome. Gas intrusions at Bryan Mound and Big Hill have resulted in the largest increases in bubble-point pressure for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR). The streams at Bayou Choctaw and West Hackberry show minimal bubble-point pressure increases. Emissions plume modeling, using the state mandated ISCST code, of oil storage tanks showed that virtually no gas may be released when H2S standards are considered. DOE plans to scavenge H2S to comply with the very tight standards on this gas. With the assumption of scavenging, benzene releases become the next most controlling factor. Model results show that a GOR of 0.6 SCF/BBL may be emissions that are within standards. Employing the benzene gas release standard will significantly improve oil deliverability. New plume modeling using the computational fluid dynamics code, FLUENT, is addressing limitations of the state mandated ISCST model.

Hinkebein, Thomas E.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Environmental assessment of oil degasification at four Strategic Petroleum Reserve facilities in Texas and Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to treat gassy oil at four Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) storage sites to lower the gas content of the stored crude oil and help ensure safe transfer of the oil during drawdown. The crude oil is stored underground in caverns created in salt domes. The degree of gassiness of the oil varies substantially among sites and among caverns within a site. This environmental assessment describes the proposed degasification operation, its alternatives, and potential environmental impacts. The need for degasification has arisen because over time, gases, principally methane and nitrogen, have migrated into and become dissolved in the stored crude oil. This influx of gas has raised the crude oil vapor pressure above limits required by safety and emission guidelines. When oil is drawn from the caverns, excess gases may come out of solution. Based on preliminary data from an ongoing sampling program, between 200 and 350 million of the 587 million barrels of crude oil stored at these four sites would require processing to remove excess gas. Degasification, a commonly used petroleum industry process, would be done at four crude oil storage facilities: Bryan Mound and Big Hill in Texas, and West Hackberry and Bayou Choctaw in Louisiana. DOE would use a turnkey services contract for engineering, procurement, fabrication, installation, operation and maintenance of two degasification plants. These would be installed initially at Bryan Mound and West Hackberry. Degasification would be complete in less than three years of continuous operations. This report summarizes the environmental impacts of this gasification process.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Strategic Petroleum Reserve Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Site Environmental Report (SER) is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. The SER, provided annually in accordance with Department of Energy DOE Order 5400.1, serves the public by summarizing monitoring data collected to assess how the Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) impacts the environment. This report (SER) provides a balanced synopsis of non-radiological monitoring and regulatory compliance data and affirms that the SPR has been operating within acceptable regulatory limits. Included in this report is a description of each site`s environment, an overview of the SPR environmental program, and a recapitulation of special environmental activities and events associated with each SPR site during 1994. Two of these highlights include decommissioning of the Weeks Island facility (disposition of 73 million barrels of crude oil inventory) as well as the degasification of up to 144 million barrels of crude oil inventory at the Bayou Choctaw, Big Hill, Bryan Mound, and West Hackberry facilities. The decision to decommission the Weeks Island facility is a result of diminishing mine integrity from ground water intrusion. Degasifying the crude oil is required to reduce potentially harmful emissions that would occur during oil movements. With regard to still another major environmental action, 43 of the original 84 environmental findings from the 1992 DOE Tiger Team Assessment were closed by the end of 1994. Spills to the environment, another major topic, indicates a positive trend. Total volume of oil spilled in 1994 was only 39 barrels, down from 232 barrels in 1993, and the total volume of brine spilled was only 90 barrels, down from 370 barrels in 1993. The longer term trend for oil and brine spills has declined substantially from 27 in 1990 down to nine in 1994.

NONE

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil-Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 2: a geopressured geothermal test well, 1980. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description of baseline air and water quality of the test well site, a summary of microseismic activity before and during 1980, and a description of the monitoring of a liquid tiltmeter at the test well site are included.

Gustavson, T.C.; Howard, R.C.; McGookey, D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Geopressured-geothermal drilling and testing plan. General Crude Oil--Dept. of Energy Pleasant Bayou No. 1 well, Brazoria County, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a result of geopressured resource assessment studies in the Gulf Coast region, the Brazoria fairway, located in Brazoria County, Texas was determined to be an optimum area for additional studies. A plan is presented for drilling, completion, and testing of one geopressured-geothermal well and two disposal wells in Brazoria County, Texas. The objectives of the well drilling and testing program are to determine the following parameters: reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, rock material properties, depth, temperature, and pressure; reservoir fluid content, specific gravity, resistivity, viscosity, and hydrocarbons in solution; reservoir fluid production rates, pressure, temperature, production decline, and pressure decline; geopressured well and surface equipment design requirements for high-volume production and possible sand production; specific equipment design for surface operations, hydrocarbons distribution, and effluent disposal; and possibilities of reservoir compaction and/or surface subsidence. (JGB)

Not Available

1978-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Pipeline corridors through wetlands - impacts on plant communities: Bayou Pointe Aux Chenes, Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana. Topical report, August 1991--April 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and night- of-way management practices. This report presents the results of a survey conducted on August 22, 1991, in an emergent intertidal estuarine wetland in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana. The site includes three pipelines installed between 1958 and 1969. Vegetation within the site comprises three native tidal marsh grasses: Spartina alterniflora, Spartina patens, and Distichlis spicata. All three species occurred over the pipelines, within the right-of-way and in both natural areas. Vegetative differences attributable to the installation or presence of the pipelines were not obvious over the pipelines or in the habitat east of the pipelines. However, because of the presence of a canal west of the 1969 pipeline, vegetation was less abundant in that area, and D. spicata was absent from all but the most distant plots of the transacts. Data obtained in the study indicate that when rights-of-way through brackish marsh are restored to their original elevations, they are revegetated with native vegetation similar to that in surrounding areas.

Van Dyke, G.D.; Shem, L.M.; Zimmerman, R.E.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Class II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objectives of this project was to: increase the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. Efforts for Year 1 of this project has been reservoir characterization, which has included three (3) primary tasks: geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, and microbial characterization.

Mancini, Ernest A.; Cate, David; Blasingame, Thomas; Major, R.P.; Brown, Lewis; Stafford, Wayne

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

128

Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Class II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the project were: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs.

Mancini, Ernest, A.; Crate, David; Blasingame, Thomas; Major, R.P.; Brown, Lewis; Stafford, Wayne

2002-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

129

CONTROLLING THE INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN ILLEGALLY LOGGED TIMBER AND WOOD PRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 11, 2001, World Trade Center terrorist attack. Heather Ho, a former Hawai`i resident, was pastry chef, sprang into action, helping handle the tag lines as a deep-sea water sampling system was Students find

130

TIMBER COMMITTEE EUROPEAN FORESTRY COMMISSION Forest Products Marketing--from Principles to Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: the particular considerations in Bosnia-Herzegovina', in Stubbs, P. and Gregson, K. (eds) Social Policy, Protection and Practice; The Care of Vulnerable Groups in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Sarajevo, I.P.Svjetlost (Also in Bosnia-Herzegovina: Globalism and the New Feudalism' in Journal of European Social Policy, 8.2. Deacon, B

131

UNECE TIMBER COMMITTEE Sixty-first session, 7-10 October 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISCUSSIONS Theme of 2003 discussions: "Market effects of wood energy policies" 7-8 October 2003 Geneva 2003 Theme: Market effects of wood energy policies · Theme chosen at 2002 TC Market Discussions on the market effects of wood energy policies from Forest Products Annual Market Analysis · Energy markets

132

Non-laminated FRP Strap Elements for Reinforced Concrete, Timber and Masonry Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a role in a wide range of civil, structural and mechanical applications. These elements could be used as individual stand-alone components e.g. as rock anchors or composite connection rods for pumps or combustion engines (Winistrfer and Mottram... and wood but rather supplement them as called for. This remains an important observation in that we must look to take advantage of the properties of any given material to develop advanced systems. So in the same way that a FRP strap needs...

Lees, Janet M.; Winistrfer, A. U.

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

133

Green cottage design in the New Forest Two new timber cottages in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the panels to the frame, traditional oak pegs hold the entire building together. Insulation and ventilation features incorporated into every aspect of the build ­ from high quality natural materials, to maximum insulation levels, and renewable technologies Anderwood End Cottages are the first houses to be constructed

134

Tropical timber import export Africa Asia volume Congo India Nigeria Papua New Guinea & the Solomon Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] assess the extent of any fraud in the volumes and export values declared by enterprises which supply logs) correlates closely with loss of carbon capture. (The prospective market for palm oil as a fuel is contracting

135

Excerpt from The Red Land to the South: American Indian Writers and Indigenous Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Writers and Indigenous Mexico (Minneapolis: University ofLiterature and Indigenous Mexico T he publication of Choctaws detective novels set in Mexico could read Philip Ainsworth

Cox, James H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

U.S. Department of Energy NEPA Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OK-TRIBE-CHOCTAW NATION OF OKLAHOMA OK-TRIBE-CHOCTAW NATION OF OKLAHOMA Location: Tribe OK-TRIBE- CHOCTAW NATION OF OKLAHOMA OK American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma plans to construct a 50 ft x 90 ft metal building on a concrete slab that will be utilized as a storage area for materials to be recycled, two offices, a restroom, and a small storage closet. The facility will be constructed on a current gravel parking lot located behind the Choctaw Transportation Building, and no new ground disturbance will be required. The facility will be connected to existing facilities. Materials will be collected, sorted, and packaged for shipment to an off-site facility that will do further processing of the materials. In addition to construction of the facility, funds will be used to

137

Fermilab Today  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hall Cafe Monday, Jan. 28 - Breakfast: apple cinnamon multigrain pancakes - Spicy Thai beef noodle soup - Bayou tuna chicken sandwich - Garam masala salmon - Smart cuisine:...

138

Environmental baseline monitoring in the area of general crude oil - Department of Energy Pleasant Bayou Number 1 - a geopressured-geothermal test well, 1978. Volume III. Appendix II. Air quality monitoring, Radian Corporation, Austin, Texas. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The air monitoring program, instrument types, and bag sampling program are described in each of five quarterly reports. The operating statistics for each of the major subsystems contained in the monitoring station are presented. National ambient air quality standards are presented for criteria pollutants and the monthly statistics for the monitoring station for the month are displayed. Daily averages, maximum daily five-minute averages retained in the data base as well as the times of occurrence, the five largest averages, and the diurnal variation of various recording times are tabulated. (MHR)

Gustavson, T.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MS-TRIBE-MISSISSIPPI BAND OF CHOCTAW INDIANS MS-TRIBE-MISSISSIPPI BAND OF CHOCTAW INDIANS Location: Tribe MS-TRIBE- MISSISSIPPI BAND OF CHOCTAW INDIANS MS American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians proposes to 1) conduct energy surveys and analyses for selected tribally-owned and operated buildings and 2) conduct building retrofits to include installation of energy-efficient lighting fixtures and switches on tribally-owned and operated buildings that are less than 50 years of age. Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21 This action would not: threaten a violation of applicable statutory, regulatory, or permit requirements for environment, safety, and health,

140

CX-002083: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83: Categorical Exclusion Determination 83: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002083: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma-Tribe-Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 04/21/2010 Location(s): Choctaw Nation, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant for: The Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma plans to construct a 50 foot x 90 foot metal building on a concrete slab that will be utilized as a storage area for materials to be recycled, two offices, a restroom, and a small storage closet. The facility will be constructed on a current gravel parking lot located behind the Choctaw Transportation Building, and no new ground disturbance will be required. The facility will be connected to existing facilities. Materials

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CX-006330: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Louisiana - Tribe - Jena Band of Choctaw Indians, LouisianaCX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1Date: 06/20/2011Location(s): LouisianaOffice(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

142

Data:Dd3d2c12-a21e-43ef-a56f-eec753ee1976 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c12-a21e-43ef-a56f-eec753ee1976 c12-a21e-43ef-a56f-eec753ee1976 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Choctaw Nation Senior Citizens Center Sector: Commercial Description: * Available to the Choctaw Nation for multi-building complexes having electric space heating where more than one building is served from a single transformer. Electric service shall be billed to and paid by the Choctaw Nation on one monthly bill. Subject to Tax Adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4 Source Parent: Comments

143

CX-001374: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exclusion Determination CX-001374: Categorical Exclusion Determination Timber Mountain Weather Station CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 03182010 Location(s): Timber Mountain, Nevada...

144

Jim Pepper and the Evolution of Environmental Studies at UC Santa Cruz: An Oral History  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

field of conservation with the Lyme Timber Company, which isis what theyre doing at Lyme Timber as well, I must add. So

Pepper, James; Jarrell, Randall; Reti, Irene

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Download CX-001374: Categorical Exclusion Determination Timber Mountain Weather Station CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 03182010 Location(s): Timber Mountain, Nevada...

146

Expert Paper for the UNECE, Timber Committee Market Discussions, Geneva, 7-8 October 2003 1 Trends and Market Effects of Wood Energy Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the future direction of electricity production from wood and co-firing of wood in coal power plants and pulp and paper production; ethanol and wood pellets projects have been more directed production from wood and co-firing of wood in coal power plants is the variable with the highest potential

147

Predictions of individual-tree and whole-stand attributes for loblolly pine plantations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. T. A. Hargrove, Manager of Champion's Newberry Office; Mr. Ellis Davenport, Champion Timber Marker

Cao, Quang V.

148

Indoor Humidity and Human Health--Part I: Literature Review of Health Effects of Humidity-Influenced Indoor Pollutants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

when samples of timber, plywood, gypsumboard, fiberboard,materials, is including plywood, particleboard, and other

Baughman, A.; Arens, Edward A

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

DNA migration mechanism analyses for applications in capillary and microchip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of paper, particle board, and plywood, as well as timber for construc- tion. Approximately two million

Barron, Annelise E.

150

Annual Report and Accounts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Owners during Period ­ Still in Region in 2005 Lyme Timber Timbervest GMO Renewable Resources Brascan

151

The Research Agency of the Forestry Commission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Owners during Period ­ Still in Region in 2005 Lyme Timber Timbervest GMO Renewable Resources Brascan

152

Case study data base companion report 3 to simulation of geothermal subsidence (LBL-10571)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The data base developed for selection and evaluation of geothermal subsidence case studies is presented. Data from this data base were used in case studies of Wairakei, The Geysers, and Austin Bayou Prospect (Report LBL 10571).

Miller, I.; Dershowitz, W.; Jones, K.; Myer, L.; Roman, K.; Schauer, M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

AREAS OF GROUND SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEO-FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a depth of 2000 feet. water produced with the o i l and gast h e reservoir. The amount of water produced can a l s o becharacter of t h e water produced a t Chocolate Bayou has

Grimsrud, G. Paul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

FORESTRY COLORADO WESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Cheryl Drake Telephone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FORESTRY FORESTRY COLORADO WESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Cheryl Drake Telephone (720) 962-7154 Email drake@wapa.gov Timber tract operations 113110 Cutting and transporting timber 113310 GEORGIA SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN POC Ann Craft Telephone (706) 213-3823 Email annc@sepa.doe.gov Timber tract operations 113110 Cutting and transporting timber 113310 NEW MEXICO NNSA SERVICE CENTER POC Gregory Gonzales Telephone (505) 845-5420 Email ggonzales@doeal.gov Timber tract operations 113110 Cutting and transporting timber 113310 OHIO EM BUSINESS CENTER POC Karen Bahan Telephone (513) 246-0555 Email karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov Timber tract operations 113110 Cutting and transporting timber 113310 OKLAHOMA SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN POC Gary Bridges Telephone (918) 595-6671 Email gary.bridges@swpa.gov Timber tract operations 113110

155

Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes September 6, 2013 - 2:01pm Addthis The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use.

156

BHSU_QuarkNet_AnnualReport2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H.S., Lead, SD LuAnn Lindskov, Timber Lake H.S., Timber Lake, SD Mechelle Powers, Custer Middle School, Custer, SD John McEnelly, Chamberlain H.S., Huron, SD (from...

157

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8,773 results. Download CX-001374: Categorical Exclusion Determination Timber Mountain Weather Station CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 03182010 Location(s): Timber Mountain, Nevada...

158

Optimization and heat and water integration for biodiesel production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Tennessee is hydroelectric. The state is also working to develop bioenergy--burning biogas, timber residues

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

159

Preservation vs Conservation...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/est 74% undiscovered · 37% US coal · timber · "Sagebrush Rebellion"/ANWR conflicts/ local politics, e

Callender, Craig

160

2010 Kansas Field Conference June 24, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010 Kansas Field Conference June 2­4, 2010 Flint Hills, Cross Timbers, and Verdigris River Valley 2 3 4 7 5 6 8 9 10 #12;2010 Field Conference Flint Hills, Cross Timbers, and Verdigris River Valley..........................................................................................1 - 2 Kansas Field Conference 2010 Field Conference Overview "Flint Hills, Cross Timbers

Peterson, Blake R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Evaluation of land ownership, lease status, and surface features in five geopressured geothermal prospects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was accomplished for the purpose of gathering information pertaining to land and lease ownership, surface features and use and relevant environmental factors in the Lake Theriot (West and East), Kaplan, Bayou Hebert and Freshwater Bayou geopressured geothermal prospects in Louisiana, and the Blessing geopressured geothermal prospect in Texas. This information and recommendations predicated upon it will then be used to augment engineering and geological data utilized to select geopressured geothermal test well sites within the prospects. The five geopressured geothermal prospects are briefly described and recommendations given.

Hackenbracht, W.N.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information |  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Halito! Halito! by Erin Anderson on Fri, 4 Nov, 2011 That is Choctaw for hello. My name is Erin Anderson and I am a tribal member of the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. I am an employee of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), where one of my duties is to manage the DOE Green Energy product. November is Native American Heritage Month and it has traditionally been a time set aside to recognize the contributions, sacrifices, cultural and historical legacy of the American Indian and Alaska Native peoples. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported efforts of Native American individual scientists and researchers, as well as tribal governments and educational institutions. Much science is being done in areas related to

163

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 24860 of 28,905 results. 51 - 24860 of 28,905 results. Download CX-002083: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma-Tribe-Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 04/21/2010 Location(s): Choctaw Nation, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-002083-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005569: Categorical Exclusion Determination Montgomery County American Recovery and Reinvestment Act -Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant - Act 1 (County Retrofits - Madison Lakes Park Geothermal) CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 04/04/2011 Location(s): Montgomery County, Ohio Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005569-categorical-exclusion-determination

164

CX-004231: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31: Categorical Exclusion Determination 31: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004231: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mississippi-Tribe-Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 10/13/2010 Location(s): Mississippi Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians proposes to 1) conduct energy surveys and analyses for selected tribally-owned and operated buildings and 2) conduct building retrofits to include installation of energy-efficient lighting fixtures and switches on tribally-owned and operated buildings that are less than 50 years of age. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-004231.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-004236: Categorical Exclusion Determination

165

Newsletter Features | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

About Us » News & Blog » Newsletter Features About Us » News & Blog » Newsletter Features Newsletter Features Below are featured articles from the Indian Energy Beat newsletter. Download full issues of the newsletter. September 6, 2013 The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians are converting waste vegetable oil and grease to biofuel in an effort to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. Fuel from Waste Helps Power Two Tribes The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians and the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians had plenty of used vegetable oil and grease on hand and a desire to convert the waste to biofuel to reduce the environmental impact of their energy use. The Tribes participated in a demonstration project with the intent to share their experience and lessons learned so that other Tribes

166

Recovery Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 16, 2011 March 16, 2011 A Former "Most Wanted" Building Gets a Reprieve City Hall reforms itself from the most in-efficient building in West Texas with the help of grant funds. March 14, 2011 Vids4Grids: Smart Meters and Super Cables Find out more about the power engineers behind the exciting new technologies that are essential to constructing a national Smart Grid. March 8, 2011 New Choctaw Nation Recycling Center Posts Quick Results "If you build it, they will come" ...to recycle. That line from the 1989 film Field of Dreams is as good a way as any to describe how the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma's new regional recycling center is being received. March 4, 2011 A Million Meter Milestone These devices are allowing Houston area residents to take personal control

167

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.6 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

21, 2010 21, 2010 CX-002083: Categorical Exclusion Determination Oklahoma-Tribe-Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 04/21/2010 Location(s): Choctaw Nation, Oklahoma Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 20, 2010 CX-002059: Categorical Exclusion Determination New Jersey-City-Hamilton, Township of CX(s) Applied: A9, A11, B3.6, B5.1 Date: 04/20/2010 Location(s): Hamilton, New Jersey Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy April 20, 2010 CX-001798: Categorical Exclusion Determination Subtask 4.12 - Algae Harvesting in an Integrated Power Plant-Algae System CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/20/2010 Location(s): Grand Forks, North Dakota Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 20, 2010 CX-001713: Categorical Exclusion Determination

168

Evaluation of potential geopressure geothermal test sites in southern Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Six geopressured-geothermal prospects in southern Louisiana were studied in detail to assess their potential use as test sites for the production of geopressure-geothermal energy. Each of the six sites contains substantial quantities of energy. Three of these prospects, Grand Lake, Lake Theriot, and Bayou Hebert, appear to be suitable for a test site. A summary of the findings is presented.

Bassiouni, Z.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A study of hydrocarbons associated with brines from DOE geopressured wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments are summarized on the following tasks: distribution coefficients and solubilities, DOE design well sampling, analysis of well samples, review of theoretical models of geopressured reservoir hydrocarbons, monitor for aliphatic hydrocarbons, development of a ph meter probe, DOE design well scrubber analysis, removal and disposition of gas scrubber equipment at Pleasant Bayou Well, and disposition of archived brines.

Keeley, D.F.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A study of hydrocarbons associated with brines from DOE geopressured wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments are summarized on the following tasks: distribution coefficients and solubilities, DOE design well sampling, analysis of well samples, review of theoretical models of geopressured reservoir hydrocarbons, monitor for aliphatic hydrocarbons, development of a ph meter probe, DOE design well scrubber analysis, removal and disposition of gas scrubber equipment at Pleasant Bayou Well, and disposition of archived brines.

Keeley, D.F.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

EARTH SURFACE PROCESSES AND LANDFORMS Earth Surf. Process. Landforms 35, 284293 (2010)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Rockefeller State Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana, USA. The tidal measurements were integrated with measurements Constance Bayou, a tidal channel in the Grand Chenier Plain, Louisiana, USA (Figure 1). The tidal channel., 1995). The chenier plains in Louisiana are a system of shelly, elongated ridges perched on muddy

Fagherazzi, Sergio

172

Engineering and Technology who wants to help plan and build the first resort on the imaginary, earth-like planet Goldilocks? At the ExxonMobil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

school child can do this and more. Each day, campers will attend highly-interactive classes in the natural sciences, engineering, mathematics and technology, taught by a teaching team of secondary classroom teachers and USA faculty. All camp activities will culminate in designing and building a model sustainable resort on Planet Goldilocks. Who may apply EXX-Treme Engineering is open to rising 6 th, 7 th, and 8 th graders enrolled in Baldwin, Choctaw,

Bernard Harris; Summer Science Camp; Marcy Matherne; Marcy Matherne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Forestry | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Forestry Jump to: navigation, search Forestry is "the science of planting and caring for forests and the management of growing timber." References...

174

Governing Change: An Institutional Geography of Rural Land Use, Environmental Management, and Change in the North Coastal Basin of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

timber producing land while sediment pollution is associatedin Rural Land Use, Nonpoint Source Pollution, and Evolvingto reduce sediment pollution from private lands within the

Short, Anne Garrity

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

EPIGEAL INSECT COMMUNITIES & NOVEL PEST MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES IN PACIFIC NORTHWEST HYBRID POPLAR PLANTATIONS .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hybrid poplars are a short rotation woody crop grown for a variety of target markets including paper pulp, saw timber, and biofuels in the Pacific (more)

[No author

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Optimization Online - The optimal harvesting problem with price ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2011 ... Abstract: In this paper we study the exploitation of a one species forest plantation when timber price is governed by a stochastic process.

177

The optimal harvesting problem with price uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2011 ... tation when timber price is governed by a stochastic process. ... in terms of the parameters of the price process and the discount factor.

178

ESTIMATION AND MODELING OF FOREST ATTRIBUTES ACROSS LARGE SPATIAL SCALES USING BIOMEBGC, HIGH-RESOLUTION IMAGERY, LIDAR DATA, AND INVENTORY DATA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The accurate estimation of forest attributes at many different spatial scales is a critical problem. Forest landowners may be interested in estimating timber volume, forest (more)

Golinkoff, Jordan Seth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Draft for consultation Partnership approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of HDM41 to optimise all forest traffic. 1 HDM4 = the Highway Development and Management System, which" .. and for the purposes of such management and maintenance .. they shall .. have power to reconstruct, alter, widen................................................................................... 17 Argyll Timber Transport Group guidance note. Timber traffic management on sensitive roads

180

Events | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

25 26 27 28 Intertribal Timber Council National Indian Timber Symposium 8:00AM to 5:00PM EDT DOE Tribal Renewable Energy Series Webinar: Net Metering 11:00AM EDT 29 30 1 2 3 4 5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, third quarter 1995. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report presents current information on the timber situation in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, Idaho, and British Columbia, including data on lumber and plywood production and prices; timber harvest; employment in forest products industries; international trade in logs, pulpwood, chips, lumber, and plywood; log prices in the Pacific Northwest; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, third quarter 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report presents current information on the timber situation in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, Idaho, and British Columbia, including data on lumber and plywood production and prices; timber harvest; employment in forest products industries; international trade in logs, pulpwood, chips, lumber, and plywood; log prices in the Pacific Northwest; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, fourth quarter 1995. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

This report presents current information on the timber situation in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, Idaho, and British Columbia, including data on lumber and plywood production and prices; timber harvest; employment in forest products industries; international trade in logs, pulpwood, chips, lumber, and plywood; log prices in the Pacific Northwest; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Production, prices, employment, and trade in northwest forest industries, fourth quarter 1994. Forest Service resource bulletin  

SciTech Connect

The report presents current information on the timber situation in Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, Montana, Idaho, and British Columbia, including data on lumber and plywood production and prices; timber harvest; employment in forest products industries; international trade in logs, pulpwood, chips, lumber, and plywood; log prices in the Pacific Northwest; volume and average prices of stumpage sold by public agencies; and other related items.

Warren, D.D.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

CX-004115: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

115: Categorical Exclusion Determination 115: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004115: Categorical Exclusion Determination Harris County North Bayou Central Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/24/2010 Location(s): Harris County, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Harris County, Texas proposes to use $13,773,400 of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funds to support the purchase of an energy efficiency package to be installed within the newly constructed Harris County North Bayou Central Plant (NBCP). The proposed project is part of a larger scope of work which involves the construction of the NBCP building, however; EECBG funds will only be used towards the purchase of energy efficiency equipment and any cost associated with labor/installation of the

186

The industrial consortium for the utilization of the geopressured-geothermal resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four feasibility studies have been developed by the INEL on thermal enhanced oil recovery (TEOR) Use of Supercritical Fluid processes for Detoxification of Pollutants, and Hydraulic Conversion to Electricity, and Direct Use. The studies provide information bases for potential industrial partners in the resource utilization. A joint proposal from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and INEL on supercritical fluid processes in going forward. Western Resources Technology has begun development of a dozen geopressured well projects. An hydraulic turbine test will be conducted at Pleasant Bayou in Summer of 1991. Dr. Wayne Steele of Anglewood, TX, a retired medical doctor, is proposing to raise fresh water Australian lobsters in the Pleasant Bayou Well fire water pond. Additional projects such as catfish farming, crayfish, desalintion plant and agricultural greenhouse use of the resource heat are waiting in the wings'' for the DOE wells to become available for pilot use projects. 2 figs.

Negus-de Wys, J.

1991-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

187

CX-002864: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

864: Categorical Exclusion Determination 864: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002864: Categorical Exclusion Determination Harris County North Bayou Central Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 07/01/2010 Location(s): Harris County, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Harris County, Texas proposes to use $13,773,400 of Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) funds to support the purchase of an energy efficiency package to be installed within the newly constructed Harris County North Bayou Central Plant (NBCP). The proposed project is part of a larger scope of work which involves the construction of the NBCP building, however; EECBG funds will only be used toward the purchase of energy efficient equipment and any costs associated with labor/installation of the

188

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sites Sites These rankings are based on the EM-40 Release Site Methodology. Select a release site to receive information concerning that site. Please note that not all of the listed sites are linked to further information. Big Bayou Creek Big Bayou Creek Monitoring Station C-100 South Side Berm C-100 Trailer Complex Soil Contamination C-200 Underground Gasoline Tanks (UST) C-304 Bldg/HVAC Piping System (Soil Backfill) C-310 PCB Soil Contamination (West Side) C-331 PCB Soil Contamination (Southeast) C-331 PCB Soil Contamination (West) C-331 RCW Leak East Side C-331 RCW Leak Northwest Side C-333-A Vaporizer C-333 PCB Soil Contamination C-333 Cooling Tower Scrap Wood Pile C-333 PCB Soil Contamination (West) C-333 PCB Waste Storage Area C-333A Sewage Treatment Aeration Tank

189

Economic analysis of geopressured resources: site specific consideration of geopressured methane gas at Brazoria. Final report, 1 March 1980-28 February 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current project is aimed first at narrowing the range of uncertainties in economic information of geopressured resource in light of the recently collected data on the Brazoria Fairway. Secondly, the project has developed a basic analytical framework for determining the investment potential of the geopressured resource at Brazoria. Thirdly, the project quantitatively evaluates the relative effectiveness of a number of financial incentives and other public policy initiatives designed to accelerate the commercialization of geopressured resources. Final results of this project are reported including: (1) a review of current estimates of important resource parameters at the Austin Bayou Project, (2) initial cash flow simulations of development of the Austin Bayou Prospect, (3) sensitivity analysis of these simulations and evaluation of the uncertainties' impact on measures of profitability and investment decision analysis, and (4) a brief review of the well-testing program.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Report on the Biological Monitoring Program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1992--December 1993  

SciTech Connect

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The goals of BMP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, characterize potential health and environmental impacts, document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, bioaccumulation studies, and ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1992 to December 1993, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A.; Hinzman, R.L.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Subsurface and seismic investigation of the geopressured-geothermal potential of south Louisiana. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Specific sites (areas) for geopressured-geothermal energy potential have been evaluated: (1) Abbeville Area, (2) Chloe Area, (3) Turtle Bayou Field-Kent Bayou Field Area and (4) Lirette-Chauvin-Lake Boudreaux Area. To arrive at geologic conclusions concerning the geopressured-geothermal energy potential of each area, the following factors have been considered in this study: (1) depth of geopressured sands, (2) geopressured sand volumes, (3) porosities, (4) permeabilities, (5) temperatures, (6) salinities, (7) dissolved gas content, (8) structure - especially as it relates to continuity of reservoirs, and (9) petroleum prodution - espeially if the geopressured fluids are driving mechanisms for current petroleum prodution. To evaluate these parameters the most useful source of information has been petroleum well logs which most commonly are a continuous depth survey of the spontaneous potential (SP) and the electrical resistivity of the subsurface formations. A separate thesis for each of the above four areas was processed separately.

Kinsland, G.L.; Paine, W.R.; Duhon, M.P.; Dungan, J.R.; Kurth, R.J.; Moore, D.R.; Lyons, W.S.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Areas of ground subsidence due to geofluid withdrawal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed information is provided on four geothermal areas with histories of subsidence. These were selected on the basis of: physical relevance of subsidence areas to high priority US geothermal sites in terms of withdrawn geofluid type, reservoir depth, reservoir geology and rock characteristics, and overburden characteristics; and data completeness, quality, and availability. The four areas are: Chocolate Bayou, Raft River Valley, Wairakei, and the Geysers. (MHR)

Grimsrud, G.P.; Turner, B.L.; Frame, P.A.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal reservoir simulation: final task report (year 4). Final report, 1 August 1979-31 July 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of the short-term production tests run on the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well are summarized. These tests were analyzed using conventional pressure test analysis methods. The effects of reservoir heterogeneties onm production behavior and, in particular, permeability distribution and faulting of reservoir sand were studied to determine the sensitivity of recovery to these parameters. A study on the effect of gas buildup around a producing well is reported. (MHR)

MacDonald, R.C.; Sepehrnoori, K.; Ohkuma, H.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Session: Geopressured-Geothermal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Overview of Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Allan J. Jelacic; ''Geothermal Well Operations and Automation in a Competitive Market'' by Ben A. Eaton; ''Reservoir Modeling and Prediction at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir'' by G. Michael Shook; ''Survey of California Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Kelly Birkinshaw; and ''Technology Transfer, Reaching the Market for Geopressured-Geothermal Resources'' by Jane Negus-de Wys.

Jelacic, Allan J.; Eaton, Ben A.; Shook, G. Michael; Birkinshaw, Kelly; Negus-de Wys, Jane

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Evaluation of NEPA-based environmental commitments at four geopressure design wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The implementation of environmental mitigation and monitoring commitments made for four geopressure design well projects was evaluated. The evaluation was based on site visits conducted in August 1982 and April 1983 and on a review of monitoring and project activity reports provided by DOE contractors. The projects evaluated include: Pleasant Bayou No. 1 in Brazoria County, Texas; Dow Parcperdue in Vermilion Parish, Louisiana; and Gladys McCall and Sweet Lake No. 1 well sites in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The contractors responsible for drilling and testing activities at the well sites have adequately implemented most of the mitigation measures described in each project's site-specific Environmental Assessment (EA). Exceptions include the lack of impermeable liners for drilling mud pits at the Dow Parcperdue, Gladys McCall, and Pleasant Bayou sites and the lack of a ring levee at the Pleasant Bayou site. Air and water quality and noise monitoring activities were not performed as strictly as outlined in the EAs. A review of the monitoring data collected to date indicates that no significant environmental degradation has occurred. This report recommends additional or future monitoring needs, especially with regard to soil contamination, subsidence, and microseismicity, and provides guidance for decommissioning.

Reed, A.W.; Hunsaker, D.B. Jr.; Roop, R.D.; Webb, J.W.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Changing Pattern of Forest Consumption: A Case Study from An Eastern Hill Village in Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the herding practices of the people. Change on herding practices created new social involvement. In the past, for example, herding was the duty of children but now collecting dung, operating gas-pit and taking care the livestock are of the duties of the adult... , but they had also a tendency to stock timber for future construction. With the introduction of community forestry timber consumption behaviour is regularized by forest user groups. Now one can get timber on the basis of his/her needs rather than wants...

Pokharel, Binod

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

"1. Victor J Daniel Jr","Gas","Mississippi Power Co",1992 "2. Grand Gulf","Nuclear","System Energy Resources, Inc",1251  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi" Mississippi" "1. Victor J Daniel Jr","Gas","Mississippi Power Co",1992 "2. Grand Gulf","Nuclear","System Energy Resources, Inc",1251 "3. Baxter Wilson","Gas","Entergy Mississippi Inc",1176 "4. Jack Watson","Coal","Mississippi Power Co",998 "5. Magnolia Power Plant","Gas","Magnolia Energy LP",863 "6. Batesville Generation Facility","Gas","LSP Energy Ltd Partnership",858 "7. Reliant Energy Choctaw County","Gas","RRI Energy Wholesale Generation LLC",848 "8. TVA Southaven Combined Cycle","Gas","Tennessee Valley Authority",774

199

Expectations of land value in rural and suburban regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Timberland has become a new and emerging asset class among investors. Institutional investors have committed large amounts of capital through the private equity market. Timber real estate investment trusts (REITs) have ...

Carlson, Dianna Marie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

National Environmental Policy Act  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratory (ORNL) CX-ORR-13-007 SC 9172013 Timber Salvage from Pine Ridge Storm Damage CX-ORR-13-008 SC 9252013 Office of Secure Transportation Multiple Actions...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Management and Conservation Territory Occupancy by Common Loons in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Creek Timber Company, Glacier National Park, Blackfeet Indian Reservation, and private landowners.g., observations complet- ed in rain, snow, wind, etc.) were verified by a second observer. Covariate Data

Montana, University of

202

2009 The Authors Journal Compilation 2009 Blackwell Publishing Ltd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Creek Timber Company, Glacier National Park, Blackfeet Indian Reservation, and private landowners.g., observations complet- ed in rain, snow, wind, etc.) were verified by a second observer. Covariate Data

Resler, Lynn M.

203

Chemical and Structural Features of Plants That Contribute to Biomass Recalcitrance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WT. Estimating Heating Times of Wood Boards, Square Timbers,Heating Times for Round and Rectangular Cross Sections of Woodheating times for a large combination of variables (including chip size, temperature, wood

DeMartini, Jaclyn Diana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

book review: The Making of a Biogeographer: the life of Jack Briggs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that it will take a long time before this book is outdated.The book can be ordered for 110 US$ from http://tion. Timber Press, Portland. book review The Making of a

Bernardi, Giacomo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Microsoft Word - S05212_2008 Post-Closure InspRpt.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

savannas, pine lands, and sandy bogs (Photo A-8.). It contributes to desirable plant diversity at the site. 2.4.3 Gopher Tortoise Habitat During the timber survey, two gopher...

206

The applications of autonomous systems to forestry management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public and private timberland owners continually search for new, cost effective methods to monitor and nurture their timber stand investments. Common management tasks include monitoring tree growth and tree health, estimating ...

Przybylko, Joshua

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Structure-Infesting Wood-Boring Beetles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several kinds of beetles damage stored wood, structural timbers and other wood products. This publication explains how to detect, identify, prevent and control powderpost beetle, old house borer and others.

Jackman, John A.

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

208

Woody Biomass Supply Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Woody biomass is the feedstock for the majority of biomass power producers. Woody biomass consists of bark and wood and is generally obtained as a byproduct or waste product. Approximately 40% of timber biomass is left behind in the form of slash, consisting of tree tops, branches, and stems after a timber harvest. Collecting and processing this residue provides the feedstock for many utility biomass projects. Additional sources of woody biomass include urban forestry, right-of-way clearance, and trees k...

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Learning Lessons to Promote Certification and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1.1 The European Union 17 3.1.2 The USA 20 3.1.3 Japan 21 3.1.4 China 22 3.2 Lessons on the Nature of Demand and Paper's creditors 15 #12;3. Lessons on Linking Demand for Sustainable Timber Products to Supply from Indonesia 16 3.1 Demand for Sustainable Timber Products in Markets Where the Alliance is Active 16 3

210

The adoption of e-commerce for wood enterprises  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lately, the internet has become a major means in electronic commerce (e-commerce), as it offers various advantages and benefits. In Greece, there are many Small- and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs) in the context of the timber ... Keywords: Greece, ICT adoption, PROMETHEE II method, SMEs, e-commerce, electronic commerce, multi-criteria analysis, small and medium-sized enterprises, timber trade, web content, website ranking, wood processing, wood products

Z. S. Andreopoulou; T. Koutroumanidis; B. Manos

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Design and operation of a geopressurized-geothermal hybrid cycle power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured-geothermal resources can contribute significantly to the national electricity supply once technical and economic obstacles are overcome. Power plant performance under the harsh conditions of a geopressured resource was unproven, so a demonstration power plant was built and operated on the Pleasant Bayou geopressured resource in Texas. This one megawatt facility provided valuable data over a range of operating conditions. This power plant was a first-of-a-kind demonstration of the hybrid cycle concept. A hybrid cycle was used to take advantage of the fact that geopressured resources contain energy in more than one form -- hot water and natural gas. Studies have shown that hybrid cycles can yield thirty percent more power than stand-alone geothermal and fossil fuel power plants operating on the same resource. In the hybrid cycle at Pleasant Bayou, gas was burned in engines to generate electricity directly. Exhaust heat from the engines was then combined with heat from the brine to generate additional electricity in a binary cycle. Heat from the gas engine was available at high temperature, thus improving the efficiency of the binary portion of the hybrid cycle. Design power output was achieved, and 3445 MWh of power were sold to the local utility over the course of the test. Plant availability was 97.5% and the capacity factor was over 80% for the extended run at maximum power production. The hybrid cycle power plant demonstrated that there are no technical obstacles to electricity generation at Pleasant Bayou. 14 refs., 38 figs., 16 tabs.

Campbell, R.G.; Hattar, M.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The Geopressured-Geothermal Program: Energy conversion status and future possibilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geopressured-Geothermal Program, sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) began in 1976 with the Wells of Opportunity. This early research concentrated on resource characterization at several locations in Texas and Louisiana. More recently, the program has included well operations and supporting university research in geoscience and engineering. Long term flow testing, reinjection of brine, and scale prevention were accomplished at the Gladys McCall Well. The Pleasant Bayou Well provided additional data for modeling and predicting geopressured reservoir behavior. This year a hybrid power system (HPS) was constructed at Pleasant Bayou in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). This is the first conversion of the geopressured-geothermal resource to electricity. An economic review of geopressured-geothermal resource development concludes that using off-the-shelf technology, electricity can be produced for $0.125/kWh from a Gladys McCall type resource (40,000 bpd brine production, 27 scf methane/bbl, 288{degree}F brine, and 10-year resource life). The Pleasant Bayou type resource can produce electricity for $0.32/kWh. Advanced technology could reduce the cost to $0.16/kWh. A review and status of the HPS is presented with future possibilities for the program, including (1) recovery of medium and heavy oil with hot geopressured brine, (2) direct use, especially aquaculture, and (3) development and use of advanced technology for conversion at the Hulin Well, the deepest, hottest well in the program. The estimated improvement in efficiencies with advanced conversion technology range from 100 to 160%. This would greatly reduce the cost to produce electricity. 6 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Negus-de Wys, J.; Lawford, T.W.; Faulder, D.D. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Geopressured-geothermal aquifers. Final contract report  

SciTech Connect

Task 1 is to provide petrophysical and reservoir analysis of wells drilled into geopressured-geothermal aquifers containing dissolved methane. The list of Design Wells and Wells of Opportunity analyzed: Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 (WOO), Pleasant Bayou No. 2 (Design), Amoco Fee No. 1 (Design), G.M. Koelemay No. 1 (WOO), Gladys McCall No. 1 (Design), P.R. Girouard No. 1 (WOO), and Crown Zellerbach No. 2 (WOO). Petrophysical and reservoir analysis of the above wells were performed based on availability of data. The analysis performed on each well, the assumptions made during simulation, and conclusions reached.

Not Available

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Session: Geopressured-Geothermal  

SciTech Connect

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Overview of Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Allan J. Jelacic; ''Geothermal Well Operations and Automation in a Competitive Market'' by Ben A. Eaton; ''Reservoir Modeling and Prediction at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal Reservoir'' by G. Michael Shook; ''Survey of California Geopressured-Geothermal'' by Kelly Birkinshaw; and ''Technology Transfer, Reaching the Market for Geopressured-Geothermal Resources'' by Jane Negus-de Wys.

Jelacic, Allan J.; Eaton, Ben A.; Shook, G. Michael; Birkinshaw, Kelly; Negus-de Wys, Jane

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Finding Benefits by Modeling and Optimizing Steam and Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A site-wide steam modeling and optimization program (Visual MESA) was implemented at the INEOS Chocolate Bayou site. This program optimizes steam production, compressor turbine extraction, pump operation (turbine/motor) operation, as well as the monitoring of the entire steam system. This is used for both day-to-day site optimization as well as long-term site planning. In this presentation, we will discuss who the main users of the program are and how they and the plant derive benefits from its use.

Jones, B.; Nelson, D.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Computer simulation of production from geothermal-geopressured aquifers. Final report, October 1, 1978 through January 31, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effort utilized a computer to interpret the results of well tests and compile data on gas solubility in brine and the viscosity of brine. A detailed computer reservoir study of a geopressured test well that had been abandoned as a dry hole but became a commercial producer of hydrocarbons is presented. A number of special topical reports pertaining to test activities performed on Department of Energy test wells (MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 Well, Leroy Sweezy No. 1 Well, and Pleasant Bayou No. 2 Well) are appended. A referenced article written under this study that appeared in the Journal of Petroleum Technology is also reproduced.

Doherty, M.G.; Poonawala, N.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Effect of shale-water recharge on brine and gas recovery from geopressured reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of shale-water recharge has often been discussed and preliminary assessments of its significance in the recovery of geopressured fluids have been given previously. The present study uses the Pleasant Bayou Reservoir data as a base case and varies the shale formation properties to investigate their impact on brine and gas recovery. The parametric calculations, based on semi-analytic solutions and finite-difference techniques, show that for vertical shale permeabilities which are at least of the order of 10/sup -5/ md, shale recharge will constitute an important reservoir drive mechanism and will result in much larger fluid recovery than that possible in the absence of shale dewatering.

Riney, T.D.; Garg, S.K.; Wallace, R.H. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Environmental analysis of geopressured-geothermal prospect areas, Brazoria and Kenedy Counties, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary environmental data, including current land use, substrate lithology, soils, natural hazards, water resources, biological assemblages, meteorological data, and regulatory considerations have been collected and analyzed for approximately 150 km/sup 2/ of land: (1) near Chocolate Bayou, Brazoria County, Texas, where a geopressured-geothermal test well was drilled in 1978, and (2) near the rural community of Armstrong, Kenedy County, Texas, where future geopressured-geothermal test well development may occur. The study was designed to establish an environmental data base and to determine, within spatial constraints set by subsurface reservoir conditions, environmentally suitable sites for geopressured-geothermal wells.

White, W.A.; McGraw, M.; Gustavson, T.C.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

SBOT NAICS Series  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

113110 Timber tract operations 113110 Timber tract operations BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN Gary Bridges (918) 595-6671 gary.bridges@swpa.gov WESTERN POWER ADMIN Cheryl Drake (720) 962-7154 drake@wapa.gov 113310 Cutting and transporting timber BONNEVILLE POWER ADMIN Greg Eisenach (360) 418-8063 gaeisenach@bpa.gov EM BUSINESS CENTER Karen Bahan (513) 246-0555 karen.bahan@emcbc.doe.gov NNSA SERVICE CENTER Gregory Gonzales (505) 845-5420 ggonzales@doeal.gov SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMIN Ann Craft (706) 213-3823 annc@sepa.doe.gov SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMIN

220

Data:Be0576c7-20b2-447a-afd3-ec39d5b62dc0 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

576c7-20b2-447a-afd3-ec39d5b62dc0 576c7-20b2-447a-afd3-ec39d5b62dc0 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Single Phase Service Sector: Commercial Description: * Available to all consumers for single phase service except houses,camps, cottages and other seasonal dwellings not used as a principal residence of the owner. Subject to tax adjustments For consumers with usage less than 100kWh per month, the Cooperative may estimate the monthly usage for billing purposes. Source or reference: Rate binder #4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Data:2c8dadfc-1ce6-4160-a119-33a31ba4bc3a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

c8dadfc-1ce6-4160-a119-33a31ba4bc3a c8dadfc-1ce6-4160-a119-33a31ba4bc3a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: 250 Watt HPS, Metered Sector: Lighting Description: * Available to all members for illumination of outdoor areas, with all services being supplied at one point and subject to the Cooperative's Terms and Conditions. The above charges are for installation on an existing pole. Subject to tax adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder #4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW):

222

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LA Louisiana Total Sum City, County, and SEO LA Louisiana Total Sum City, County, and SEO Allocations All $ 24,624,200 LA Louisiana State Energy Office $ 13,805,700 LA Alexandria City $ 226,700 LA Baton Rouge City $ 2,354,700 LA Bossier City City $ 608,600 LA Kenner City $ 601,100 LA Lafayette City $ 1,193,300 LA Lake Charles City $ 715,000 LA Monroe City $ 555,600 LA New Iberia City $ 145,500 LA New Orleans City $ 2,440,100 LA Shreveport City $ 1,977,900 In addition, today's announcement includes funding for the following Tribal governments in the state: LA Chitimacha Tribe of Louisiana $ 25,000 LA Coushatta Tribe of Louisiana $ 25,000 LA Jena Band of Choctaw Indians, Louisiana $ 25,000

223

Data:58b57a03-9c83-47df-bbed-de2e0e8db023 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a03-9c83-47df-bbed-de2e0e8db023 a03-9c83-47df-bbed-de2e0e8db023 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Seasonal Homes Sector: Residential Description: * Available to all houses,camps,cottages and other seasonal dwellings, which are not use as principal residence of the owner. Subject to tax adjustments Source or reference: Rate binder #4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

224

FE Categorical Exclusions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2011 28, 2011 CX-005653: Categorical Exclusion Determination Pilot-Scale Testing Evaluating the Effects of Bromine Additions on Continuous Mercury Monitors at Low Mercury Concentrations CX(s) Applied: A9, B3.6 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Grand Forks, North Dakota Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 27, 2011 CX-005649: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/27/2011 Location(s): Choctaw, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 19, 2011 CX-005638: Categorical Exclusion Determination Extended Pilot-Scale Testing of the Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne Compact Reformer CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 04/19/2011

225

STGWG  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

APPROVED MEMBERS APPROVED MEMBERS Blue Lake Rancheria  Jana Ganion, BLR Energy Director Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon  Jim Manion, General Manger, Warm Springs Power Ewiiaapaayp Band of Kumeyaay Indians  William Micklin, CEO Gila River Indian Community  Barney Enos, Jr., District 4 Community Council Ho-Chunk Nation  Susan Weber, Representative Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians  John Hendrix,Director of Economic Development Passamaquoddy Tribe at Indian Township  Joseph Socobasin, Tribal Chief Seminole Tribe of Florida  James E. Billie, Chairman Sisseton Wahpeton Oyate Tribe  Robert Shepherd, Chairman Three Affiliated Tribes  Tex Hall, Chairman  Alternate: Mark Fox, Tax Director and Water Resources Coordinator

226

Data:Aa816ac0-2b09-498d-ae05-d7344568c1f5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ac0-2b09-498d-ae05-d7344568c1f5 ac0-2b09-498d-ae05-d7344568c1f5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Cooperative Furnished Investment 100 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: * Available under written contract with municipalities or government authorities for the purpose of lighting highways, streets, and other areas Service is available subject to the Cooperative's Terms and conditions on file with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Subject to tax adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

227

Data:A810291d-b9b6-4637-8e52-f922aa20e524 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91d-b9b6-4637-8e52-f922aa20e524 91d-b9b6-4637-8e52-f922aa20e524 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Customer Furnished Investment 200 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: * Available under written contract with municipalities or government authorities for the purpose of lighting highways, streets, and other areas Service is available subject to the Cooperative's Terms and conditions on file with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Subject to tax adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

228

Data:43b2aa7e-899d-4f63-b086-e554b37ed674 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aa7e-899d-4f63-b086-e554b37ed674 aa7e-899d-4f63-b086-e554b37ed674 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Customer Furnished Investment 250 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: * Available under written contract with municipalities or government authorities for the purpose of lighting highways, streets, and other areas Service is available subject to the Cooperative's Terms and conditions on file with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Subject to tax adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

229

Data:9e36c369-f7b9-499f-b282-635b7cc716e1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-f7b9-499f-b282-635b7cc716e1 9-f7b9-499f-b282-635b7cc716e1 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Cooperative Furnished Investment 150 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: * Available under written contract with municipalities or government authorities for the purpose of lighting highways, streets, and other areas Service is available subject to the Cooperative's Terms and conditions on file with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Subject to tax adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

230

Data:9d8a4d58-2bbb-4471-b01d-13a920359766 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d58-2bbb-4471-b01d-13a920359766 d58-2bbb-4471-b01d-13a920359766 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Cooperative Furnished Investment 200 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: * Available under written contract with municipalities or government authorities for the purpose of lighting highways, streets, and other areas Service is available subject to the Cooperative's Terms and conditions on file with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Subject to tax adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

231

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 - 15040 of 31,917 results. 31 - 15040 of 31,917 results. Download CX-005658: Categorical Exclusion Determination International Colloquium on Environmentally Preferred Advanced Power Generation - ICEPAG 2011 CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 04/28/2011 Location(s): Irvine, California Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005658-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005649: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/27/2011 Location(s): Choctaw, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-005649-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-005623: Categorical Exclusion Determination

232

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: B3.7 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 17, 2011 May 17, 2011 CX-006719: Categorical Exclusion Determination Casing Drilling Test CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B3.7, B5.12 Date: 05/17/2011 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC April 29, 2011 CX-005662: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Use of Scrap Tires for Oil Well Stimulation CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/29/2011 Location(s): Upper Falls, West Virginia Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 27, 2011 CX-005649: Categorical Exclusion Determination Soil Amendment Product for Oilfield Brine Contaminated Soil ? Field Testing Part II CX(s) Applied: B3.7 Date: 04/27/2011 Location(s): Choctaw, Oklahoma Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory April 20, 2011 CX-006721: Categorical Exclusion Determination Permanent Borehole Array

233

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 25360 of 31,917 results. 51 - 25360 of 31,917 results. Download CX-004231: Categorical Exclusion Determination Mississippi-Tribe-Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 10/13/2010 Location(s): Mississippi Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004231-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004232: Categorical Exclusion Determination Nebraska-County-Sarpy CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 10/13/2010 Location(s): Sarpy County, Nebraska Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004232-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-004233: Categorical Exclusion Determination North Carolina-County-Iredell CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.5, B5.1 Date: 10/13/2010

234

Data:41391c93-5199-4593-8f9a-db53cfac4d8c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-5199-4593-8f9a-db53cfac4d8c 3-5199-4593-8f9a-db53cfac4d8c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Directional Flood 1000 Watt HPS,Metered Sector: Lighting Description: * Available to all members for illumination of outdoor areas, with all services being supplied at one point and subject to the Cooperative's Terms and Conditions. The above charges are for installation on an existing pole. Subject to tax adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW)

235

Data:0ea2fe17-e1f8-4703-a420-13f7ad9797e6 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7-e1f8-4703-a420-13f7ad9797e6 7-e1f8-4703-a420-13f7ad9797e6 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Cooperative Furnished Investment 400 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: * Available under written contract with municipalities or government authorities for the purpose of lighting highways, streets, and other areas Service is available subject to the Cooperative's Terms and conditions on file with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Subject to tax adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

236

Data:804740f8-6979-4aa6-8b0f-5224a135c607 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f8-6979-4aa6-8b0f-5224a135c607 f8-6979-4aa6-8b0f-5224a135c607 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Customer Furnished Investment 100 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: * Available under written contract with municipalities or government authorities for the purpose of lighting highways, streets, and other areas Service is available subject to the Cooperative's Terms and conditions on file with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Subject to tax adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

237

Data:6a77cfd2-6826-4f5b-a2e5-f627f0994550 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cfd2-6826-4f5b-a2e5-f627f0994550 cfd2-6826-4f5b-a2e5-f627f0994550 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/09/21 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power 2 ,Three-Phase,Level 1 Sector: Commercial Description: * Available to consumers with installed capacity of 1,000kW of demand per month and taken at primary voltage with a service under term contract. Service will be delivered to one location through one meter.This rate will not be available for service as standby or auxiliary. Subject to only Power Cost Adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

238

Data:1dfbc558-81fb-450f-b6c2-ef422f4bb34c | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dfbc558-81fb-450f-b6c2-ef422f4bb34c dfbc558-81fb-450f-b6c2-ef422f4bb34c No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2012/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Broken Bow Public Works Authority Sector: Commercial Description: * Avialable to the Broken Bow Public Works Authority for use or resale. Electric service shall be billed to and paid by Broken Bow Public Works Authority. Subject to all taxes, but not limited to gross receipts taxes. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months):

239

Audit Report: OAS-RA-13-28 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 8 Audit Report: OAS-RA-13-28 July 18, 2013 Costs Incurred by Selected Tribal Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Recipients Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, the Department of Energy's (Department) Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) Program received $3.2 billion to improve energy efficiency and reduce energy use and fossil fuel emissions. The Department's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy allocated about $2.7 billion of the funds using a population-driven formula to over 2,000 entities including states and territories, cities and counties, and Native American tribes. The Navajo Tribal Utility Authority (NTUA), the Cherokee Nation, Muscogee Creek Nation, Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma, and Chickasaw Nation received the

240

Data:D8bd11b2-4e1b-421a-b4c0-1b6e22a7fbb2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

b2-4e1b-421a-b4c0-1b6e22a7fbb2 b2-4e1b-421a-b4c0-1b6e22a7fbb2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Customer Furnished Investment 400 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: * Available under written contract with municipalities or government authorities for the purpose of lighting highways, streets, and other areas Service is available subject to the Cooperative's Terms and conditions on file with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Subject to tax adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Data:783be988-32fb-415c-a077-118c5ff727a8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

88-32fb-415c-a077-118c5ff727a8 88-32fb-415c-a077-118c5ff727a8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Customer Furnished Investment 150 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: * Available under written contract with municipalities or government authorities for the purpose of lighting highways, streets, and other areas Service is available subject to the Cooperative's Terms and conditions on file with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Subject to tax adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

242

Data:1c10a400-dd28-4c82-a012-f68705bc6e89 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

a400-dd28-4c82-a012-f68705bc6e89 a400-dd28-4c82-a012-f68705bc6e89 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Poultry and Swine Service,Single-Phase Sector: Commercial Description: * Available to all single-phase consumers for service associated with contract poultry or swine operations.Residential and other commercial uses are not eligible Subject to tax adjustments. Source or reference: Rate binder #4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

243

Data:0cbe24dd-13ef-4a55-91d2-372198aa308a | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cbe24dd-13ef-4a55-91d2-372198aa308a cbe24dd-13ef-4a55-91d2-372198aa308a No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power 2 ,Three-Phase,Level 3 Sector: Commercial Description: * Available to consumers with installed capacity of 1,000kW of demand per month and taken at primary voltage with a service under term contract. Service will be delivered to one location through one meter.This rate will not be available for service as standby or auxiliary. Subject to only Power Cost Adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

244

Data:Cd0e08f3-2fb2-41b3-b757-1686df5354c9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

f3-2fb2-41b3-b757-1686df5354c9 f3-2fb2-41b3-b757-1686df5354c9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power 6 Sector: Commercial Description: * Available only to Tyson Processing,Broken Bow,Oklahama with installed capacity of 5,000kW.This rate will not be available for service as standby or auxiliary. Subject to only power factor adjustment and Gross Receipt tax. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4 Source Parent: Comments fixed monthly charge per metering point Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW):

245

Data:42bcfcd4-530d-4e95-8d2d-0cb26718d234 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bcfcd4-530d-4e95-8d2d-0cb26718d234 bcfcd4-530d-4e95-8d2d-0cb26718d234 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/09/21 End date if known: Rate name: Cooperative Furnished Investment 250 Watt HPS Sector: Lighting Description: * Available under written contract with municipalities or government authorities for the purpose of lighting highways, streets, and other areas Service is available subject to the Cooperative's Terms and conditions on file with the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Subject to tax adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

246

Frio sandstone reservoirs in the deep subsurface along the Texas Gulf Coast: their potential for production of geopressured geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed geological, geophysical, and engineering studies conducted on the Frio Formation have delineated a geothermal test well site in the Austin Bayou Prospect which extends over an area of 60 square miles. A total of 800 to 900 feet of sandstone will occur between the depths of 13,500 and 16,500 feet. At leat 30 percent of the sand will have core permeabilities of 20 to 60 millidarcys. Temperature at the top of the sandstone section will be 300/sup 0/F. Water, produced at a rate of 20,000 to 40,000 barrels per day, will probably have to be disposed of by injection into shallower sandstone reservoirs. More than 10 billion barrels of water are in place in these sandstone reservoirs of the Austin Bayou Prospect; there should be approximately 400 billion cubic feet of methane in solution in this water. Only 10 percent of the water and methane (1 billion barrels of water and 40 billion cubic feet of methane) will be produced without reinjection of the waste water into the producing formation. Reservoir simulation studies indicate that 90 percent of the methane can be produced with reinjection. 106 figures.

Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Gregory, A.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana; Final report, 1 January 1992--31 December 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has operated continuous-recording, microearthquake monitoring networks at geopressured-geothermal test well sites since 1980. These microseismic networks were designed to detect microearthquakes indicative of fault activation and/or subsidence that can potentially result from the deep subsurface withdrawal and underground disposal of large volumes of brine during well testing. Seismic networks were established before the beginning of testing to obtain background levels of seismicity. Monitoring continued during testing and for some time after cessation of flow testing to assess any delayed microseismicity caused by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. No flow testing has been done at the Hulin well since January 1990, and the Pleasant Bayou well has been shut down since September 1992. Microseismic monitoring continued at the Hulin and Pleasant Bayou sites until 31 December 1992, at which time both operations were shut down and field sites dismantled. During 1992, the networks recorded seismic signals from earthquakes, sonic booms, geophysical blasting, thunderstorms, etc. However, as in previous years, no local microseismic activity attributable to geopressured-geothermal well testing was recorded.

John, C.J.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant December 1993 to December 1994  

SciTech Connect

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was implemented in 1987 by the University of Kentucky. Research staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) served as reviewers and advisers to the University of Kentucky. Beginning in fall 1991, ESD added data collection and report preparation to its responsibilities for the PGDP BMP. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream biota, and (4) recommend any program improvements that would increase effluent treatability. In September 1992, a renewed Kentucky Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (KPDES) permit was issued to PGDP. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent and ambient toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report includes ESD activities occurring from December 1993 to December 1994, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Report on the biological monitoring program at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, January--December 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On September 24, 1987, the Commonwealth of Kentucky Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Cabinet issued an Agreed Order that required the development of a Biological Monitoring Program (BMP) for the Paducah Gaseous diffusion Plant (PGDP). The PGDP BMP was conducted by the University of Kentucky Between 1987 and 1992 and by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) from 1991 to present. The goals of BMP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for PGDP protect and maintain the use of Little Bayou and Big Bayou creeks for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, (2) characterize potential environmental impacts, and (3) document the effects of pollution abatement facilities on stream. The BMP for PGDP consists of three major tasks: (1) effluent toxicity monitoring, (2) bioaccumulation studies, and (3) ecological surveys of stream communities (i.e., benthic macroinvertebrates and fish). This report focuses on ESD activities occurring from January 1996 to December 1996, although activities conducted outside this time period are included as appropriate.

Kszos, L.A. [ed.; Konetsky, B.K.; Peterson, M.J.; Petrie, R.B.; Ryon, M.G.; Smith, J.G.; Southworth, G.R.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production. Annual report, May 1, 1979-May 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Differing extents of diagenetic modification is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the Upper and Lower Texas Gulf Coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area are less stable, chemically and mechanically, than Frio sandstones from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury dome area. Vicksburg sandstones are mineralogically immature and contain greater proportions of feldspars and rock fragments than do Frio sandstones. Thr reactive detrital assemblage of Vicksubrg sandstones is highly susceptible to diagenetic modification. Susceptibility is enhanced by higher than normal geothermal gradients in the McAllen Ranch Field area. Thus, consolidation of Vicksburg sandstones began at shallower depth of burial and precipitation of authigenic phases (especially calcite) was more pervasive than in Frio sandstones. Moreover, the late-stage episode of ferroan calcite precipitation that occluded most secondary porosity in Vicksburg sandstones did not occur significantly in Frio sandstones. Therefore, regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production.

Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Structural evolution of three geopressured-geothermal areas in the Texas Gulf Coast  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed analysis of geological and seismic data from several geopressured geothermal areas (Cuero, Blessing, Pleasant Bayou) reveals similarities in structural-stratigraphic relationships that form geopressured aquifers as well as differences in structural complexity and evolution that characterize the different areas. In these examples, geopressured sandstones are isolated on the updip side by downfaulting against shelf-slope shales, and on the downdip side by upfaulting against transgressive marine shales. Moreover, they are isolated above and below by thick sequences of transgressive shale or interbedded sandstone and shale. Prospective reservoirs are found where delatic and associated sandstones (distributary channel, delta front, barrie-strandplain) were deposited seaward of major growth faults and near the shelf margin. Structural development in these areas began with rapid movement of relatively straight to sinuous down-to-the basin growth faults with narrow to wide spacings and varying amounts of rollover. Later structural movement was characterized by continued but slower movement of most growth faults. In the Pleasant Bayou area, late salt diapirism superimposed a dome-and-withdrawal-basin pattern on the earlier growth-fault style.

Winker, C.D.; Morton, R.A.; Garcia, D.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Applicant Organization:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Range Fuels, Inc. Range Fuels, Inc. (formerly Kergy, Inc.) Corporate HQ: Broomfield, CO Proposed Facility Location: Near Soperton, Treutlen County, Georgia Description: This venture has developed a promising thermo-chemical conversion process, whose success could expand the range of feedstocks available for ethanol production. CEO or Equivalent: Mitch Mandich Participants: Merrick and Company, PRAJ Industries Ltd., Western Research Institute, Georgia Forestry Commission, Yeomans Wood and Timber; Truetlen County Development Authority; BioConversion Technology; Khosla Ventures; CH2MHill, Gillis Ag and Timber Production: * 10 million gallons/year from first unit; ~40 million gallons/year of ethanol and about 9 million gallons/year of methanol from commercial unit

253

Destructive Winds Caused by an Orographically Induced Mesoscale Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustained winds in excess of 70 kt and gusts of close to 100 kt were measured at the Hood Canal Bridge in western Washington on the morning of 13 February 1979 shortly before the bridge collapsed. An extraordinary blowdown of timber also occurred ...

Richard J. Reed

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Modern Wood Energy Systems and Markets 16-17 September 2008, Timisoara, Romania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern Wood Energy Systems and Markets 16-17 September 2008, Timisoara, Romania International Wood Energy Market Developments Ed Pepke Forest Products Marketing Specialist UNECE/FAO Timber Section, Geneva #12;Modern Wood Energy Systems and Markets 16-17 September 2008, Timisoara, Romania Subjects I

255

OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 PRELIMINARY REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Excavator Mound Spacing on Restocking Sites 231 Corstorphine Road Edinburgh EH12 7AT www, reducing the risk of frost damage. The position of mounds determines plant spacing and must be carefully mounds at the establishment stage can reduce plant mortality, improve timber quality and lower the risk

256

www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, coal mining became the region's economic mainstay. After the virgin timber cut, the Appalachian forest and good plant- ing stock. The FRA method has been used successfully by many coal-mining firms productivity of land mined for coal. Thus, mining firms that can dem- onstrate the capability to restore

Liskiewicz, Maciej

257

WATER CURRENT (continued on page 4)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and natural resources tour with stops at a uranium mine, forested state park, and no-till garbanzo bean farm- June Tour Encompasses Diversity of Mining, Logging, Water Use and Natural Resources Management ByKearney.Thetourfocusedonlocal response to LB962 a year after the bill became law, as well as irrigation,mining and timber har

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

258

20/02/20132 `State of The Nations' Forests'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

·Forest Habitat ·Forest Habitat Condition ·Forest Management ·Forest Use ·Carbon Sequestration ·Timber and increment forecast · Carbon forecast (to be published) · Biomass forecast run (to be published / dead Natural Regeneration NVC & ground, field & shrub layer vegetation General health Dead wood

259

Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health, Part B, 11:548608, 2008 Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of mortar and concrete using fine powder of molten slag made from municipal waste as a cementitious material, slag, silica fume, natural pozzolans, and other similar materials), aggregates, concrete, timber emissions were nearly identical. Iron and steel slag is also used as aggregate. In 2005, 25,747,000 tons

Ahmad, Sajjad

260

Wyre Community Discovery Centre Wyre Community Discovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

boiler and the building must be carefully considered. Ideally have an all-year-round need to balance use wood chip boiler provides heating and hot water to the Discovery Centre. The boiler is fuelled using contractor to chip and store locally-sourced timber. Hot water from the boiler is stored in an accumulator

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Research Agenda for Forest Products Marketing and Business Development in Louisiana: 2009-2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wood product exports to Japan. Maness (1993) concurred that, in addition to secondary manufacturing that consists of about 930 primary and secondary manufacturing establishments (Aguilar and Vlosky, 2006 with approximately 17,000 manufacturing jobs and 8,000 jobs in the harvesting/transportation of timber (LFA 2008

262

From prehistoric times when firewood was used for cook-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Zheng et al. 2001). In addition to excessive harvesting that out- stripped regeneration, natural of wood-based panels, pri- marily in construction and manufacturing of furni- ture and flooring, reached- sets this gap by timber imports (Fig. 2), plantations, and by manufactur- ing wood-based and non

263

10/9/2003 1 Export of biomass from Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10/9/2003 1 Export of biomass from Russia in the context of climate change policies By: Hans Jansen of the forest sector · Customs cooperation · Timber port logistics · Trade facilitation procedures · Biomass;The Russian FederationThe Russian Federation #12;Biomass as Alternative Energy "Organic matter

264

Dendrochronological dating of coal mine workings at the Joggins Fossil Cliffs, Nova Scotia, Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dendrochronological dating of coal mine workings at the Joggins Fossil Cliffs, Nova Scotia, Canada,NovaScotia,wasoneofthefirstplacesinNorthAmericawherecoalwasmined.Dendrochronologicalmeth- ods were employed to date timber pit props preserved within relic coal mine workings on the closely"levels"thatcomprisepart of a later mine dug by the Joggins Coal Mining Company (1872­1877). Findings improve knowledge of the Joggins

Laroque, Colin

265

Ethics, Place and Environment Vol. 9, No. 1, 2145, March 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been logging and milling by large industrial timber operations and oil and gas extraction. Because believe in animal rights, and duck hunters, who want birds to shoot, can agree on a policy of wetland of the place that now bears their name. After an extended stopover in Louisiana they eventually took up

Monticino, Michael

266

UK Climate Change Risk Assessment and National  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change #12;Weather & climate impacts - economic, societal, environmental Water consumption per capita: Climate Change Risk Assessment Elevensectors(forinitial analysis) Health Energy Transport Built-24000 deaths avoided in winter) by 2050s Increases in drought and some pest and diseases could reduce timber

Wirosoetisno, Djoko

267

Fort Campbell, Kentucky A Forester position is available with the Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands. This position is  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Forest Management Plan. · Integrate military training support with habitat management, sustainable timber · Experience in the design and execution of forest inventories · Experience in forest inventory data analysis for Environmental Management of Military Lands. This position is located at Fort Campbell, Kentucky. ORGANIZATION

268

E-Mail: tliss@umn.edu Web Site: tli.umn.edu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management, Maintenance & Rehabilitation Structural and functional evaluation of steel, concrete, and timber technologies being transferred to industry. After 9/11 he directed all security-related research of public/private educational, commercial and industrial projects, as well as consulting on development

Amin, S. Massoud

269

Restoring forest landscapes for biodiversity conservation and rural livelihoods: A spatial optimisation model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conserving nature in the presence of humans is especially challenging in areas where livelihoods are largely based on locally available natural resources. The restoration of forests in such contexts calls for the identification of sites and actions that ... Keywords: Ecosystem services, Integer-linear programming (ILP), Land use allocation, Poverty, Reforestation priorities, Spatial optimisation, Timber harvest

Francesco Orsi; Richard L. Church; Davide Geneletti

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

An innovative and sustainable building system using structural insulated panels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An innovative and sustainable building system using structural insulated panels Researcher: Mrst October 2010 Funding bodies: EPSRC and ErgoHome Ltd. Introduction Structural Insulated Panels (SIPs) are high performance building panels which are considered to be the next generation of timber

Birmingham, University of

271

Mercury speciation in Galveston Bay, Texas: the importance of complexation by natural organic ligands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The major goal of this research is the development of a competitive ligand equilibration-solvent solvent extraction (CLE-SSE) method to determine organically complexed mercury species in estuarine water. The method was applied to estuarine surface waters of Galveston Bay and the water column of Offatts Bayou. Thermodynamic equilibrium modeling estimated organically complexed mercury species in estuarine water using the conditional stability constants of mercury-organic complexes and the concentrations of organic ligands determined by CLE-SSE. Two competing ligands, chloride and thiosalicylic acid (TSA), were used for CLE-SSE. Chloride ion competition determined conditional stability constants for 1 : 1 mercury-ligand complexes ranging from ~1023 to ~1024 with concentrations of organic ligands at low nM levels. TSA competition determined stronger mercury-binding ligands by manipulating the TSA concentration such that a higher binding strength was achieved than that for the mercury-chloride complex. TSA competition determined conditional stability constants for 1 : 1 mercury-ligand complexes ranging from ~1027 to ~1029, with ligand concentrations ranging from 10 to 100 pM. Mercury-organic binding strengths in these ranges are consistent with bidentate mercury complexation by low molecular weight organic thiols. A linear relationship was observed between log stability constants for the mercury-ligand complex and log ligand concentrations, supporting the hypothesis that there is a continuum of mercury binding site strengths associated with dissolved organic matter. In Galveston Bay, organically complexed mercury accounted for > 95 % of the total dissolved mercury in surface water. Organic complexation of mercury coupled with mercury dissolution from particulate phases controls the filter-passing mercury distribution in surface waters of Galveston Bay. The estuarine distributional features of mercury-complexing organic ligands were similar to those of glutathione, supporting mercury complexation by a thiol binding group. In Offatts Bayou, a seasonally anoxic bayou on Galveston Bay, thermodynamic equilibrium modeling suggests that the speciation of dissolved mercury in anoxic systems is dominated by sulfide complexation rather than organic complexation.

Han, Seunghee

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) can be an important pathway for mercury removal from an aquatic environment. DGM evasional fluxes from an aquatic system can account for up to 95% of atmospheric Hg and its deposition pathways. While this makes DGM an important species of mercury to investigate, the difficulty of accurately analyzing DGM has prevented many from studying it. In this study, DGM was measured in two different types of estuarine environments and with two different methods, discrete and continuous analysis. The discrete technique works reasonably well and is reproducible, but it does not allow one to observe rapid changes in DGM concentration due to long analysis times (~2 hr per sample). When used in this study, the discrete sampling technique agreed well with the continuous technique for Offatts Bayou, Galveston, Texas, and Georgiana Slough in the California Bay-Delta region. The average DGM concentration during the March continuous study at Offatts Bayou was 25.3 8.8 pg L-1. This is significantly higher than the average DGM concentration from Georgiana Slough during late March 2006 (9.6 6.6 pg L-1). DGM seemed to correlate best with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) data in every study, suggesting that the primary control of its formation is solar irradiation. Stronger positive correlations with PAR were seen when DGM data was shifted back one hour, indicating that mercury photoreactions take time to complete. DGM also correlated positively with wind speed in most instances. However, increased wind speed should enhance air to water transfer of elemental mercury, thus one would expect a negative correlation. DGM co-varied negatively with salinity during the continuous studies, suggesting that the DGM pool is reduced in surface waters by chloride mediated oxidation. Three predictive flux models were used in the study to assess the potential for DGM water to air transfer. For both the Georgiana Slough and Offatts Bayou studies, the predicted flux dropped to or below zero after sunset. This study does contribute to the understanding of DGM cycling in aquatic environments as there are few studies that have made continuous DGM measurements in estuarine environments.

Landin, Charles Melchor

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) can be an important pathway for mercury removal from an aquatic environment. DGM evasional fluxes from an aquatic system can account for up to 95% of atmospheric Hg and its deposition pathways. While this makes DGM an important species of mercury to investigate, the difficulty of accurately analyzing DGM has prevented many from studying it. In this study, DGM was measured in two different types of estuarine environments and with two different methods, discrete and continuous analysis. The discrete technique works reasonably well and is reproducible, but it does not allow one to observe rapid changes in DGM concentration due to long analysis times (~2 hr per sample). When used in this study, the discrete sampling technique agreed well with the continuous technique for Offatts Bayou, Galveston, Texas, and Georgiana Slough in the California Bay-Delta region. The average DGM concentration during the March continuous study at Offatts Bayou was 25.3 + 8.8 pg L-1. This is significantly higher than the average DGM concentration from Georgiana Slough during late March 2006 (9.6 + 6.6 pg L-1). DGM seemed to correlate best with photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) data in every study, suggesting that the primary control of its formation is solar irradiation. Stronger positive correlations with PAR were seen when DGM data was shifted back one hour, indicating that mercury photoreactions take time to complete. DGM also correlated positively with wind speed in most instances. However, increased wind speed should enhance air to water transfer of elemental mercury, thus one would expect a negative correlation. DGM co-varied negatively with salinity during the continuous studies, suggesting that the DGM pool is reduced in surface waters by chloride mediated oxidation. Three predictive flux models were used in the study to assess the potential for DGM water to air transfer. For both the Georgiana Slough and Offatts Bayou studies, the predicted flux dropped to or below zero after sunset. This study does contribute to the understanding of DGM cycling in aquatic environments as there are few studies that have made continuous DGM measurements in estuarine environments.

Landin, Charles Melchor

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Analysis of five forest harvesting simulation models. II. Paths, pitfalls, and other considerations  

SciTech Connect

This is the second of two papers describing the conclusions from a study to determine the state of the art in timber harvesting computer simulation modeling. Five models were evaluated -- Forest Harvesting Simulation Model (FHSM), Full Tree Field Chipping (FTFC), Harvesting System Simulator (HSS), Simulation Applied to Logging Systems (SAPLOS), and Timber Harvesting and Transport Simulator (THATS) -- for their potential use in southern forest harvesting operations. In Part I, modeling characteristics and overall model philosophy were identified and illustrated. This included a detailed discussion of the wood flow process in each model, accounting strategies for productive/nonproductive times, performance variables used, and the different harvesting systems modelable. In Part II user implementation problems are discussed. Those dealt with in detail are the following: What questions can be asked of the model. What are the modeling tradeoffs, and how do they impact on the analysis. What are the computer skills necessary to work effectively with the model. What computer support is needed. Are the models operational. The results provide a good picture of the state of the art in timber harvesting computer simulation. Much learning has occurred in the generation of these models, and many modeling and implementation problems have been uncovered, some of which remain unsolved. Hence, the user needs to examine closely the model and the intended application so that results will represent useable, valid data. It is recommended that the development of timber harvesting computer simulation modeling continue so that existing and proposed timber harvesting strategies can be adequately evaluated. Design criteria are proposed. (Refs. 22).

Goulet, D.V.; Iff, R.H.; Sirois, D.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Five forest harvesting simulation models, part 1: modeling characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the first of two describing the conclusions from a study to determine the state of the art in timber harvesting computer simulation modeling. Five models were evaluated -- Forest Harvesting Simulation Model (FHSM), Full Tree Field Chipping (FTFC), Harvesting System Simulator (HSS), Simulation Applied to Logging Systems (SAPLOS), and Timber Harvesting and Transport Simulator (THATS) -- for their potential use in southern forest harvesting operations. In Part I, modeling characteristics and overall model philosophy are identified and illustrated. This includes a detailed discussion of the wood flow process in each model, accounting strategies for productive/non-productive times, performance variables, and the different types of harvesting systems modelable. In Part II we discuss user implementation problems. Those dealt with in detail are: What questions can be asked of the model. What are the modeling tradeoffs, and how do they impact on the analysis. What are the computer skills necessary to effectively work with the model. What computer support is needed. Are the models operational. The results provide a good picture of the state of the art in timber harvesting computer simulation. Much learning has occurred in the generation of these models, and many modeling and implementation problems have been uncovered, some of which remain unsolved. Hence, the user needs to examine closely the model and the intended application so that results will represent usable, valid data. It is recommended that the development of timber harvesting computer simulation modeling continue, so that existing and proposed timber harvesting strategies can be adequately evaluated. A set of design criteria are proposed. (Refs. 21).

Goulet, D.V.; Iff, R.H.; Sirois, D.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

EIS-0246-SA-33: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Supplement Analysis 3: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-33: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program, Flathead County, Montana Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund a fish barrier project with Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks that proposes to block migrating rainbow trout during spawning to prevent the production and recruitment of approximately 2,500 rainbow trout into the Flathead River system annually. This action will reduce the opportunity for hybridization between rainbow and native westslope cutthroat trout; a species currently under consideration for threatened status under the Endangered Species Act. The project will be accomplished by replacing an existing culvert and retrofitting a fish passage barrier to the bayou. DOE/EIS-0246, Bonneville Power Administration and Montana Fish, Wildlife,

277

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

51 - 18660 of 26,764 results. 51 - 18660 of 26,764 results. Download CX-004115: Categorical Exclusion Determination Harris County North Bayou Central Plant CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/24/2010 Location(s): Harris County, Texas Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-004115-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003981: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Green Jobs Revolving Loan Fund/Borrower: Estate Products Manufacturing Group, Incorporated CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 09/22/2010 Location(s): Louisville, Kentucky Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-003981-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-003982: Categorical Exclusion Determination

278

MHK Technologies/SmarTurbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » MHK Technologies/SmarTurbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage SmarTurbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow Power Corporation Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project *MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project *MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project *MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project *MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend *MHK Projects/Barfield Point *MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache *MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute *MHK Projects/Breeze Point *MHK Projects/Brilliant Point Project *MHK Projects/Burke Landing *MHK Projects/Carrolton Bend Project *MHK Projects/Cat Island Project *MHK Projects/Claiborne Island Project

279

CX-000378: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8: Categorical Exclusion Determination 8: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000378: Categorical Exclusion Determination Monitoring, Verification, and Analysis Feasibility Study (for Demonstration of Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production) CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 11/12/2009 Location(s): Austin, Texas Office(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Desktop studies performed by Gulf Coast Carbon Center primarily at the University of Texas Austin facility; a trip to the Plano offices of Denbury Resources for a planning meeting and a site survey at Oyster Bayou field. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-000378.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000327: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002841: Categorical Exclusion Determination

280

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1, 2003 1, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEC-4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-33) Ron Morinaka Fish and Wildlife Project Manager, KEWU-4 Proposed Action: Gooderich Bayou Culvert Replacement (Hungry Horse Fisheries Mitigation Program) Project No: 1991-019-03 Wildlife Management Techniques or Actions Addressed Under This Supplement Analysis (See App. A of the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS): 8.2 Control of Predators and Nuisance Animals - Removal or Reduction of Undesirable Wildlife Species. Location: Flathead County, Montana Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks (MFWP) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA is proposing to fund a fish barrier project with Montana Fish,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Property:Number of Build Out Units Deployed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Build Out Units Deployed Build Out Units Deployed Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Build Out Units Deployed Property Type String Pages using the property "Number of Build Out Units Deployed" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 50 + MHK Projects/AWS II + 20 + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 500 + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 500 + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 3700 + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 450 + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 2350 + MHK Projects/Barfield Point + 2851 + MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache + 1260 + MHK Projects/BioSTREAM Pilot Plant + 1 + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + 3802 + MHK Projects/Breeze Point + 4942 + MHK Projects/Brilliant Point Project + 1400 +

282

Property:Permit/License Buildout (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Permit/License Buildout (MW) Permit/License Buildout (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Permit/License Buildout (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Permit/License Buildout (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 40 + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 20 + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 15 + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 148 + MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal + 30 + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 18 + MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal + 3 + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 94 + MHK Projects/Barfield Point + 114 + MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache + 50 + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + 152 + MHK Projects/Breeze Point + 198 + MHK Projects/Brilliant Point Project + 56 + MHK Projects/Brough Head Wave Farm + 200 +

283

MHK Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Projects MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Click one of the following Marine Hydrokinetic Projects for more information: Loading... 40MW Lewis project ADM 3 ADM 4 ADM 5 AW Energy EMEC AWS II Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project Agucadoura Alaska 1 Alaska 13 Alaska 17 Alaska 18 Alaska 24 Alaska 25 Alaska 28 Alaska 31 Alaska 33 Alaska 35 Alaska 36 Alaska 7 Algiers Cutoff Project Algiers Light Project Amity Point Anconia Point Project Angoon Tidal Energy Plant Aquantis Project Ashley Point Project Astoria Tidal Energy Atchafalaya River Hydrokinetic Project II Avalon Tidal Avondale Bend Project BW2 Tidal Bar Field Bend Barfield Point Bayou Latenache Belair Project Belleville BioSTREAM Pilot Plant Bluemill Sound Bondurant Chute Bonnybrook Wastewater Facility Project 1

284

Intern experience at MEL, Incorporated, Inc., Baton Rouge, Louisiana: an intern report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a requirement of the Doctor of Engineering program, the author spent a one year internship at MEL, Inc., an engineering consulting firm located in Baton Roughe, Louisiana. During this period, he was responsible for the following assignments: 1. specifying the appropriate computer to implement an existing financial management system, 2. developing a "Project Management Quality Control Manual" which contains guidelines and checklists for the management and administration of a project from conception through completion, 3. designing the mechanical systems on a lift span bridge to be constructed over Bayou Grain Caillou in Terrebonne Parish, Louisiana, 4. serving as project manager on three projects, 5. developing computer programs for billing clients and keeping drafting time records, and 6. particiipating in contract negotiations, fee proposal preparation, and Management Committee meetings. These assignments exposed the author to a broad spectrum of both technical and managerial problems and practices. The internship experience proved to be a valuable part of his overall education.

Morgan, James Oliver, 1939-

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Improve Boiler System Operations- Application of Statistical Process Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Utilities Department provides utility services to Monsanto and Cain Chemical Company production units at Chocolate Bayou. Over two years ago the department recognized that a significant reduction in waste and rework could be achieved by improving steam boiler and boiler feedwater system operations. The processes were experiencing high maintenance cost due to metering pump and analyzer failures, equipment failures and fouling due to poor control of chemical treatment, and steam vent losses due to unproven system reliability. The team used statistical process control to prevent overadjustment of the process, identified special causes, interviewed customers and applied the ten steps to quality improvement. Results include a six-fold reduction in process variability, $2.3 million/year cost reduction, and improved reliability and customer relations.

Scarr, D.; Shea, D.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Innovative techniques cut costs in wetlands drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on an approach to drilling oil and gas wells in sensitive wetlands areas contributed to a savings of over $1.2 million on a three-well, $3 million drilling project in south Louisiana. ARCO Oil and Gas Co. drilled a three-well project in the Bayou Sale field with a truck-mounted workover rig and a modified solids-control system. This smaller equipment eliminated the need to build a large location in the marsh. Traditional drilling techniques require a large drillsite to accommodate all the equipment of a modern drilling complex. However, recently imposed environmental regulations substantially limit, and in some cases prohibit, the use of these conventional techniques for drilling wells in wetlands areas. Based on the potentially huge economic and operational impact on the drilling industry because of these stricter regulations, alternatives to these traditional practices are essential.

Navarro, A.R. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Lafayette, LA (US))

1991-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

287

Computer simulation of production from geothermal-geopressured aquifers. Final report, October 1, 1978-January 31, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report on research conducted to improve the technical and scientific understanding of geopressured and geothermal resources. The effort utilized a computer to interpret the results of well tests and compile data on gas solubility in brine and the viscosity of brine. A detailed computer reservoir study of a geopressured test well that had been abandoned as a dry hole but became a commercial producer of hydrocarbons is presented. A number of special topical reports pertaining to test activities performed on Department of Energy test wells (MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 Well, Leroy Sweezy No. 1 Well, and Pleasant Bayou No. 2 Well) are appended to the report. A referenced article written under this study that appeared in the Journal of Petroleum Technology is also reproduced.

Doherty, M.G.; Poonawala, N.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Strategic Petroleum Reserve annual environmental monitoring report, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress made in the monitoring and inspection program for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve during 1983 is reported. The following sites were monitored: Bayou Choctau, Bryan Mound, St. James Terminal, Sulfur Mines, Weeks Island and West Hackberry. Discussion is presented under the headings: air quality monitoring; oil spills and NPDES compliance; and water quality monitoring. The discussion on water quality monitoring is by far the most extensive. Surface waters from the sites previously mentioned were sampled and monitored for general water quality (except for St. James Terminal where there is a lack of potentially impacted surface waters). The following parameters were measured: pH value; salinity; total suspended particulates; temperature; dissolved oxygen; biochemical oxygen demand; oil and grease; and general observations. 12 references, 6 figures. (DMC)

Not Available

1984-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Property:Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nameplate Capacity (MW) Nameplate Capacity (MW) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Device Nameplate Capacity (MW) Property Type String Pages using the property "Device Nameplate Capacity (MW)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/40MW Lewis project + 0 8MW 1MW Farms of multiple machines will be deployed with installed capacity of circa 20MW + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Ashley Point Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Barfield Point + 40 kW + MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache + 40 kW + MHK Projects/BioSTREAM Pilot Plant + 250kW pilot 1MW commercial scale + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + 40 kW +

290

Property:FERC License Docket Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

License Docket Number License Docket Number Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type string. Pages using the property "FERC License Docket Number" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Projects/Admirality Inlet Tidal Energy Project + P-12690 + MHK Projects/Algiers Light Project + P-12848 + MHK Projects/Anconia Point Project + P-12928 + MHK Projects/Astoria Tidal Energy + P-12665 + MHK Projects/Avalon Tidal + P-14228 + MHK Projects/Avondale Bend Project + P-12866 + MHK Projects/BW2 Tidal + P-14222 + MHK Projects/Bar Field Bend + P-12942 + MHK Projects/Barfield Point + P-13489 + MHK Projects/Bayou Latenache + P-13542 + MHK Projects/Belair Project + P-13125 + MHK Projects/Bondurant Chute + P-13477 + MHK Projects/Breeze Point + P-13480 +

291

Geopressured geothermal fairway evaluation and test-well site location, Frio Formation, Texas Gulf Coast  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tertiary strata of the Texas Gulf Coast comprise a number of terrigenous depositional wedges, some of which thicken abruptly at their downdip ends as a result of contemporaneous movement of growth faults and underlying salt. The Frio Formation, one of these wedges, has been studied regionally by means of a grid of correlation cross sections aided by micropaleontological control. By means of these sections, the Frio was subdivided into six map units; maps of sandstone distribution within these units delineate principal elongate sandstone trends parallel to the Gulf Coast composed of deltaic, barrier-bar, and strandplain sandstones. These broad regional studies, followed by detailed local investigations, were pursued in order to delineate prospective areas for production of geopressured geothermal energy. A prospective area must meet the following minimum requirements; reservoir volume of 3 cubic miles, minimum permeability of 20 millidarcys (md), and fluid temperatures of 300/sup 0/F. Several geothermal fairways were identified as a result of this Frio study. In summary, detailed geological, geophysical, and engineering studies conducted on the Frio Formation have delineated a geothermal test well site in the Austin Bayou Prospect which extends over an area of 60 square miles. A total of 800 to 900 feet of sandstone will occur between the depths of 13,500 and 16,500 feet. At least 30% of the sand will have core permeabilities of 20 to 60 millidarcys. Temperature at the top of the sandstone section will be 300/sup 0/F. Water, produced at a rate of 20,000 to 40,000 barrels per day, will probably have to be disposed of by injection into shallower sandstone reservoirs. More than 10 billion barrels of water are in place in these sandstone reservoirs of the Austin Bayou Prospect; there should be approximately 400 billion cubic feed of methane in solution in this water.

Bebout, D.G.; Loucks, R.G.; Gregory, A.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, July 1, 1993--September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This document is a brief progress report from each of the research and education projects that are currently funded through the ERWM contract. During third quarter 1993, approval was given by DOE for purchase of equipment. Equipment purchases were initiated and much of the equipment has been received and installed. The committees in charge of coordination of sampling and analyses associated with the collaborative research groups continued to meet and address these issues. Sampling has been done in the lower part of Devil`s Swamp and in the Devil`s Swamp Lake area. In addition, extensive sampling has been done in Bayou Trepagnier and in Bayou St. John. During this period, Tulane and Xavier Universities continued working closely with Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL). The ORNL 1993 summer student internship program was completed. Plans were made for expanding the program to support 8 students next summer. Leonard Price, a Xavier University Chemistry professor and John Walz, a Tulane University Engineering professor each spent 5 weeks at ORNL. During this time these faculty worked with ORNL researchers exploring mutual interests and discussing possible future collaborations. In September, Drs. Carl Gehrs, Lee Shugart and Marshall Adams of ORNL, visited the Tulane and Xavier campuses. They presented two seminars and met with several of the investigators being supported by the ERWM contract. Tulane/Xavier project administrators participated in the Office of Technology Development`s ``New Technologies and Program Exhibition`` in the Rayburn House Office Building on September 23 and in the Hart Senate Office Building on September 27.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Feasibility Study for Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project Objective: The Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) conducted a study of the feasibility of siting a renewable energy biomass-based installation on tribal lands. The purpose of the study was to determine whether such an installation can be economically sustainable, as well as consistent with the cultural, social, and economic goals of the Tribe. Scope: To achieve the goal of the feasibility study, the following tasks were carried out: (1) Resource availability assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the availability of both poultry litter and wood residues for use in the proposed facility. (2) Power utilization assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the potential market size for power produced, the existing infrastructure for delivering power to that market, and the costs and economic returns for doing so. (3) Technology review--The objective of this review was to identify one, or more, technical options for detailed economic and technical assessment. The study considered a range of feedstock and product mixtures of poultry litter; wood residues as feedstock; and electrical power and other ancillary products as outputs. Distributed power sources was also examined. Technologies ranging from gasification to systems that produce both power and value-added chemicals were considered. Technologies selected for detailed review were those that can be sized to process the amount of available feed (poultry litter, or poultry litter and wood residues), and that also appear to make economic sense in terms of the value of their inputs. The technology review leaned heavily on the experience from similar prior DOE projects, particularly those conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). NREL was involved in a consultative role, so that the project team could leverage their experience. (4) Systems Design(s)--Based on the technology review, a pre-conceptual design for an installation was developed. This included identification of unit operations and equipment, maintenance, manpower, feedstock requirements, and output (power and any other ancillary products). Energy and mass flows were identified. (5) Manpower development assessment--The objectives of this assessment was to identify training needs for the selected option(s), and determine how they can best be met. Using the manpower estimates from the pre-conceptual system design, skills and training needs were to be identified. A plan for providing the needed manpower was to be developed, and any associated costs determined. (6) Economic assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine the economic viability and sustainability of the technology option(s) identified through the technical review option. The costs of bringing the feedstock to the proposed facility were combined with nominal operation costs and potential production distribution costs to identify total costs. Revenue from power distribution (and, possibly, from sale of ancillary products) were combined with any possible government credits or payments to identify gross revenue. Economic viability was determined by net revenue and return on investment. A business plan for the selected option was to be produced that would consider long-term sustainability of the project. (7) MBCI compatibility assessment--The objective of this assessment was to determine whether the renewable energy technology was compatible with the MBCI's cultural, social and economic values. As part of this assessment, the environmental impacts and benefits were to be determined (Environmental stewardship is an important part of the Choctaw culture.). The effects of a project on employment were projected. The compatibility of the renewable energy project with MBCI cultural and social values were determined. Most importantly, the compatibility of the renewable energy installation with the MBCIs economic development goals and directions were determined. A project team led by the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians (MBCI) conducted the feasibility study. The team included th

John Hendrix, Project Director; Charles Weir, Project Manager; Dr. John Plodinec, Technology Advisor; Dr. Steve Murray, Economic Advisor

2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

294

Enforecement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group INC, - July  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enforecement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group INC, Enforecement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group INC, - July 13, 2009 Enforecement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group INC, - July 13, 2009 July 13, 2009 Enforcement Letter issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to a Form Wood Timber Fire at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, conducted an evaluation of the deficiencies associated with the January 24, 2009, fire event described in Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) report NTS-SRSO--PSC-SWPF-2009-0001, Form Wood Timber Fire. The evaluation included a review of documents and discussions with you and members of your staff. Parsons Infrastructure &

295

Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability (9/19/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

900 900 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 182 / Friday, September 19, 2003 / Notices ERP No. DA-AFS-G65062-NM Rating LO, Agua/Caballos Timber Sale, Timber Harvest and Existing Vegetation Management, Implementation, Carson National Forest, El Rito Ranger District, Taos County, NM. Summary: EPA expressed a lack of objections to the selection of the preferred alternative. ERP No. DS-NRS-E36161-MS Rating LO, Town Creek Watershed Project, Impacts of Floodwater Retarding Structures (FWRS) No. 1, 5, 8, and 59 and Deletion of FWRS No. 10A, Funding, Lee, Pontotoc, Prentiss and Union Counties, MS. Summary: EPA determined that the unavoidable losses associated with implementation of this flood control proposal are within acceptable limits and will be appropriately mitigated.

296

EIS-0246-SA-25: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Supplement Analysis 5: Supplement Analysis EIS-0246-SA-25: Supplement Analysis Wildlife Mitigation Program BPA proposes to fund a portion of the cost of a conservation easement on 56,400 acres of land along the Fisher River to preclude development and protect riparian habitat. The land is owned by the Plum Creek Timber Company, and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) will own and monitor the perpetual easement. The goal of the project is to protect approximately 142,000 acres owned by Plum Creek Timber Company: 56,400 in the Fisher River valley and 86,000 in the Thompson River valley. The total cost for the easement over 142,000 acres is estimated at around $30 million. BPA will contribute $500,000 toward the smaller parcel in the Fisher River valley, for each of fiscal years 2002, 2003, and 2004, for a total of $1.5

297

EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood 50: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel Biorefinery, Park Falls, Wisconsin EA-1850: Flambeau River BioFuels, Inc. Proposed Wood Biomass-to-Liquid Fuel Biorefinery, Park Falls, Wisconsin Summary NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide federal funding to Flambeau River Biofuels (FRB) to construct and operate a biomass-to-liquid biorefinery in Park Falls, Wisconsin, on property currently used by Flambeau Rivers Paper, LLC (FRP) for a pulp and paper mill and Johnson Timber Corporation's (JTC) Summit Lake Yard for timber storage. This project would design a biorefinery which would produce up to 1,150 barrels per day (bpd) of clean syncrude. The biorefinery would also supply

298

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. BC-10-112  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

112 112 Title: Remove Abandoned BC Timber Bridge Over North/South Canal Description: Subcontractor shall furnish all materials, labor, equipment, supplies, transportation, facilities, supervision, and services required to remove and dispose of the abandoned BC Timber Bridge over the North/South Canal. Tasks also include installation of erosion protection/bank stabilization as required. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following:

299

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project ID No. BC-10-071  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Title: Replace BC Timber Pile Pipe Supports Description: Subcontractor shall provide all materials, equipment, tools, transportation, supervision, labor, mobile lifting equipment, and rigging needed to replace the timber piles and cross beams which support aboveground steel pipelines at BC. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment (categorical exclusions). (b) To find that a proposal is categorically excluded, DOE shall determine the following: (1) The proposed action fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix A or B of Subpart D;

300

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-13 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-13 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in October 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite unit hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute MesaOasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. This well may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Development of forest industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development of forestry for wood pulp and products. The production of structural timber, wooden logs, plywood, and wood fibers is discussed. Also discussed are forest management, forest growth and mortality, inventory management, and harvest residues for energy production. Employment opportunities, marketing, international trade, and air pollution are considered.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Development of forest industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development of forestry for wood pulp and products. The production of structural timber, wooden logs, plywood, and wood fibers is discussed. Also discussed are forest management, forest growth and mortality, inventory management, and harvest residues for energy production. Employment opportunities, marketing, international trade, and air pollution are considered.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Development of forest industries. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). NewSearch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the development of forestry for wood pulp and products. The production of structural timber, wooden logs, plywood, and wood fibers is discussed. Also discussed are forest management, forest growth and mortality, inventory management, and harvest residues for energy production. Employment opportunities, marketing, international trade, and air pollution are considered. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Waste Management Programmes in Response to Large Disasters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a ...the re-use of materials salvaged from damaged buildings should be promoted where feasible, either as primary construction materials (bricks or stone masonry, roof timber, roof tiles, etc.) or as secondary material (rubble for foundations or levelling roads, etc.). SPHERE Handbook, Shelter and Settlement, Standard 5: Construction, Guidance note 1, 2004 ...the production and supply of construction material and the building process minimises the long-term depletion of natural resources.

Joseph Ashmore; Maoya Bassiouni; Martin Bjerregard; Tom Corsellis; Igor Fedotov; Heiner Gloor

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A political ecology of community-based forest and wildlife management in Tanzania: politics, power and governance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in perspective. Finally, to Jonathan, who is always steady as a rock and untiring in his insistence that it will all be better than alright. Thank you for joining me in my adventures and for taking me on yours. Table of Contents... management rights for natural resources to local communities, who retain full revenue from diverse income sources, including hunting, tourism and non-timber forest products (Roe et al., 2009). In 1999 a report by the Food and Agriculture Organisation...

Humphries, Kathryn

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

306

Predicted Geology of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley Phase II Drilling Initiative  

SciTech Connect

Pahute MesaOasis Valley (PM-OV) Phase II drilling will occur within an area that encompasses approximately 117 square kilometers (45 square miles) near the center of the Phase I PM-OV hydrostratigraphic framework model area. The majority of the investigation area lies within dissected volcanic terrain between Pahute Mesa on the north and Timber Mountain on the south. This area consists of a complex distribution of volcanic tuff and lava of generally rhyolitic composition erupted from nearby calderas and related vents. Several large buried volcanic structural features control the distribution of volcanic units in the investigation area. The Area 20 caldera, including its structural margin and associated caldera collapse collar, underlies the northeastern portion of the investigation area. The southern half of the investigation area lies within the northwestern portion of the Timber Mountain caldera complex, including portions of the caldera moat and resurgent dome. Another significant structural feature in the area is the west-northwest-trending Northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone, which bisects the northern portion of the investigation area and forms a structural bench. The proposed wells of the UGTA Phase II drilling initiative can be grouped into four generalized volcanic structural domains based on the stratigraphic distribution and structural position of the volcanic rocks in the upper 1,000 meters (3,300 feet) of the crust, a depth that represents the approximate planned total depths of the proposed wells.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

307

Data:B2303a40-133b-4adc-a953-c126d5ea9e5e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

03a40-133b-4adc-a953-c126d5ea9e5e 03a40-133b-4adc-a953-c126d5ea9e5e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power 3 ,Three-Phase Level 2 Sector: Commercial Description: * Available to consumers with installed capacity of 5,000kW of demand per month and taken at primary voltage with a service under term contract. Service will be delivered to one location through one meter.This rate will not be available for service as standby or auxiliary. Subject to only Power Cost Adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

308

Data:997d877a-bfae-4a75-b0b1-a273e4e4685f | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d877a-bfae-4a75-b0b1-a273e4e4685f d877a-bfae-4a75-b0b1-a273e4e4685f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power 3 ,Three-Phase Level 1 Sector: Commercial Description: * Available to consumers with installed capacity of 5,000kW of demand per month and taken at primary voltage with a service under term contract. Service will be delivered to one location through one meter.This rate will not be available for service as standby or auxiliary. Subject to only Power Cost Adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

309

Data:58b66ad6-5e82-4cca-8876-5b96fbe0b74e | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ad6-5e82-4cca-8876-5b96fbe0b74e ad6-5e82-4cca-8876-5b96fbe0b74e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power 5 ,Three-Phase Sector: Commercial Description: * Available only to Meridian,Tyson Feed Mill and Tyson Hatchery with installed capacity of 1,000kW.This rate will not be available for service as standby or auxiliary. Subject to only power factor adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh)

310

Data:E659b1bd-8e1d-4503-b9f9-0f49b0d141d8 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

bd-8e1d-4503-b9f9-0f49b0d141d8 bd-8e1d-4503-b9f9-0f49b0d141d8 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power 4 ,LPC 97 Sector: Commercial Description: * Available only to Mcleod Correctional Center and Kiamchi Sand(Meridian) with installed capacity of 1,000kW. Subject to only power factor adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage

311

Data:Ddf3a2cc-a723-48d2-a174-1363fac214d9 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ddf3a2cc-a723-48d2-a174-1363fac214d9 Ddf3a2cc-a723-48d2-a174-1363fac214d9 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power 2 ,Three-Phase,Level 2 Sector: Commercial Description: * Available to consumers with installed capacity of 1,000kW of demand per month and taken at primary voltage with a service under term contract. Service will be delivered to one location through one meter.This rate will not be available for service as standby or auxiliary. Subject to only Power Cost Adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

312

Data:0e24faca-a0a3-4a9b-9092-d8011e288a25 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

faca-a0a3-4a9b-9092-d8011e288a25 faca-a0a3-4a9b-9092-d8011e288a25 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2012/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Large Power 3 ,Three-Phase Level 3 Sector: Commercial Description: * Available to consumers with installed capacity of 5,000kW of demand per month and taken at primary voltage with a service under term contract. Service will be delivered to one location through one meter.This rate will not be available for service as standby or auxiliary. Subject to only Power Cost Adjustment. Source or reference: Rate binder # 4

313

Data:F2b43b87-34da-463d-aa68-1d6f639be172 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3b87-34da-463d-aa68-1d6f639be172 3b87-34da-463d-aa68-1d6f639be172 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Choctaw Electric Coop Inc Effective date: 2008/10/21 End date if known: Rate name: Single Phase All Electric Sector: Commercial Description: * Available to all customers having electric space heating with a rated capacity of at least 5kW. Subject to tax adjustments. Source or reference: Rate binder #4 Source Parent: Comments Applicability Demand (kW) Minimum (kW): Maximum (kW): History (months): Energy (kWh) Minimum (kWh): Maximum (kWh): History (months): Service Voltage Minimum (V): Maximum (V):

314

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

EIS-0385-DEIS-03-2006_Part1.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A A p p e n d i x B A t t a c h m e n t : L a r g e F o r m a t M a p s May 2006 Mcfaddin Reservoir Mcfaddin Reservoir p i n d l e t o p p i n d l e t o p F i s h e r R e s e r v i o r F i s h e r R e s e r v i o r H i l l e r b r a n d t B a y o u H i l l e r b r a n d t B a y o u P P e e v v i i t t o o t t G G u u l l ll y y K i d d G u l l y K i d d G u l l y D i n B a y o u D i n B a y o u N e c h e s N e c h e s R i v e r R i v e r S e a R i m S t a t e P a r k S e a R i m S t a t e P a r k Existing and Proposed Big Hill Site Boundaries Existing and Proposed Big Hill Site Boundaries 7000 Feet of Brine Disposal Pipeline To Be Replaced Existing Sun Terminal S a l t L a k e S a l t L a k e Shell Lake Shell Lake Willow Slough Marsh Willow Slough Marsh T a y l o r B a y o u T a y l o r B a y o u B l i n d B a y o u B l i n d B a y o u I n t r a c o a s t a l W a t e r w a y I n t r a c o a s t a l W a t e r w a y Salt Bayou Salt Bayou Johnson Lake Johnson Lake Blind Lake Blind Lake Willow Lake Willow Lake B i g B i g H i l l H i l l R e s e r v o i r R e s e r v o i r Keith Lake Keith Lake Barnett Lake Barnett Lake Viterbo

316

Well Test Analysis and Improved Models for Geopressured-Geothermal Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In accordance with the S-CUBED Subcontract Work Statement, S-CUBED has concentrated on the synthesis, correlation and analysis of all pertinent data from the Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal research wells undergoing testing during the contract period. This work has included the development of reservoir simulation models for the geopressured-geothermal resource in hydrological connection with each well. Existing S-CUBED simulation techniques have been applied to develop, update and improve the models for the reservoirs tested. During the contract period, data have been available from the Gladys McCall, Pleasant Bayou and Hulin test wells. S-CUBED has also contributed to the design of the well tests and participated in DOE's planning and review meetings in support of the geopressured-geothermal program. Detailed technical Topical Reports have been prepared and issued as appropriate during the contract period as referenced in the following summary of the work performed during the final year of the S-CUBED Subcontract to UTA.

Riney, T.D.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - NETL CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION (CX) DESIGNATION FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Denbury Onshore, LLC (Project Sub) Denbury Onshore, LLC (Project Sub) FE DE-FE0002381 Major Projects Division 2010 Anthony Zinn 11/16/2009 - 06/15/2010 Austin, TX; Plano, TX; Alvin, TX; More... MVA Feasibility Study (for Demonstration of Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production) Desktop studies performed by GCCC primarily at the University of Texas Austin facility; a trip to the Plano offices of Denbury Resources for a planning meeting and a site survey at Oyster Bayou field. Anthony Zinn Digitally signed by Anthony Zinn DN: cn=Anthony Zinn, o=Major Projects Division, ou=NETL, email=anthony.zinn@netl.doe.gov, c=US Date: 2009.11.09 11:40:04 -05'00' 11 12 2009 Mark Lusk Digitally signed by Mark Lusk DN: cn=Mark Lusk, o=NETL-DOE, ou=140 OPFC, email=mark.lusk@netl.doe.gov, c=US

318

Great Plaines installs directionally drilled crossings in Texas  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on installing a five- line wide, one-line long products system for ARCO Pipe Line Co. (APLC) in a crowded utility right of way required Great Plains Pipeline Construction Co. to complete three directionally drilled crossings and over 50 conventional bored crossings in the Channelview, Texas area. The pipe line route closely parallels a 4-mi ROW section of Houston Power and Light Co. (HP and L) and about 4 mi of Union Pacific Railroad tracks. Due to overhead towers carrying high-voltage electric transmission lines, Great Plains bored under the existing towers in HP and L's easement to preserve the right of way for future tower expansion. Laney, Inc., subcontracted the conventional bores underneath towers and minor roads. Laney Directional Drilling Co. was the prime contractor for two horizontal directionally drilled crossings of the Houston Ship Channel and Carpenter's Bayou. Great Plains, with its own crew, completed three roadway crossings in high-traffic areas. Engineering and material procurement was handled by APLC.

Thiede, K.L.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Properties of geopressured brines and wells in the Gulf Coast and opportunities for industrial/research participation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured reservoirs exhibit pressure gradients in excess of the normal hydrostatic gradient. (In the Gulf Coast area the normal gradient is 0.465 psi/ft.) Pressures may approach lithostatic pressure and have been measured as high as 1.05 psi/ft in the Gulf Coast area. Geopressured basins exist worldwide and in a number of US locations, east, west, north and south. The Gulf Coast area has been studied extensively and is the subject of the DOE geopressured-geothermal research at present. Present industrial interest in the Pleasant Bayou and Hulin wells include: desalination plants, an economic study by a power company for regional use, use of generated electricity by a coalition of towns, aquaculture (catfish farming) research program, and an unsolicited proposal for enhanced oil recovery of heavy oil. Direct uses of the hot brine cover dozens of industries and processes. An example of multiple uses in the USSR is shown. A research spin-off: a sensitive in-line benzene monitor has been designed by USL and will be tested in the near future. An in-line pH monitor is also under development for the harsh conditions of the geopressured-geothermal wells. 24 refs., 12 figs.

Negus-de Wys, J.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

A Comparison of the Effects of Petroleum Substances on the Settlement of the Eastern Oyster, Crassostrea virginica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Galveston Bay, Texas, the eastern oyster, Crassostrea virginica, is found throughout the bay both intertidal along mudflats and subtidal where their self-built reefs extend vertically deeper. The eastern oyster is an important ecological and economical resource and as such has led to studies regarding their community structure to permit effective creation of artificially built reefs and restoration of existing ones. The presence of the oil and gas industry coupled with increased oyster mortality led to investigations to determine the effects of petroleum substances on the setting, growth, and mortality of the eastern oyster. Many of those studies indicated increased settlement and increased growth of oysters on substrate coated with oil. A field conducted experiment was used to assess the settlement of oyster larvae on cleaned oyster shells coated with two different types of petroleum substances (mineral oil and motor oil), comparing viscosities, in a shallow bayou in Galveston, Texas, where the eastern oyster dominates the intertidal zone. Oyster shells were used as cultch material and divided into three groups; a non-treated control group, mineral oil treated group, and a motor oil treated group. Nekton assemblages, distributions of the ivory barnacle, Balanus eberneus, and Dermo disease infection were assessed. Settlement of oyster larvae occurred in all three groups with no significant difference of preference; algae and sediment present on the shells coupled with the presence of predators most likely caused reduced numbers of spat settlement. Species richness was equal among the groups but varied in evenness of individual species.

Alsept, Karen Sue

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Investigation and Evaluation of Geopressured-Geothermal Wells; Detailed Reentry Prognosis for Geopressure-Geothermal Testing of Gladys McCall No. 1 Well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Gruy Federal Type III-A geopressured-geothermal (Geo) prospect was drilled as the Getty Oil Company and Buttes Gas and Oil Company, No.1 Gladys McCall. It is located in Section 27, Township 15S, Range 5W, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The well is accessible by way of the original canal levee road, approximately 2 1/2 miles south of Louisiana State Route 82; one bridge must be replaced and a board road must be laid on the levee. Buttes completed this well in january, 1970, as a shut-in gas well through perforations from 11,924 to 11,928 feet. it was plugged and abandoned in April, 1970, without having produced. The location is shown on the north central area of the USGS topographic sheet ''Hog Bayou''. A portion of this sheet is included, which shows this well location as well as the State Lease 4183 Nos. 1 and 2 wells on the adjacent Rockefeller Wildlife Refuge and Game Preserve.

None

1978-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

Factors controlling reservoir quality in tertiary sandstones and their significance to geopressured geothermal production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Variable intensity of diagenesis is the factor primarily responsible for contrasting regional reservoir quality of Tertiary sandstones from the upper and lower Texas coast. Detailed comparison of Frio sandstone from the Chocolate Bayou/Danbury Dome area, Brazoria County, and Vicksburg sandstones from the McAllen Ranch Field area, Hidalgo County, reveals that extent of diagenetic modification is most strongly influenced by (1) detrital mineralogy and (2) regional geothermal gradients. The regional reservoir quality of Frio sandstones from Brazoria County is far better than that characterizing Vicksburg sandstones from Hidalgo County, especially at depths suitable for geopressured geothermal energy production. However, in predicting reservoir quality on a site-specific basis, locally variable factors such as relative proportions for porosity types, pore geometry as related to permeability, and local depositional environment must also be considered. Even in an area of regionally favorable reservoir quality, such local factors can significantly affect reservoir quality and, hence, the geothermal production potential of a specific sandstone unit.

Loucks, R.G.; Richmann, D.L.; Milliken, K.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Geothermal Well Operations and Automation in a Competitive Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

America's increasing dependence on foreign energy sources, and the national environmental initiatives, based on the increasing awareness of the need for protection of the environment, have led to the development of the Department of Energy's (DOE) domestic US alternative energy programs. One of these programs is the current US Gulf Coast Geopressured-Geothermal Program, conducted at three sites in Louisiana and Texas. Excellent results have been obtained in reaching the objectives for this production operation and energy conversion project, which are: (1) to determine the size of geopressured-geothermal reservoirs and the drive mechanisms by long-term, high volume, flow testing; (2) prove long-term injectability of large volumes of spent brine; (3) develop modified scale inhibitor treatment procedures; (4) develop methods for reduction of erosion/corrosion; (5) develop technology for automated operation of geopressured-geothermal production system; and (6) develop technology to produce power economically from the geopressured-geothermal resources. The long-term flow test at the Gladys McCall site has shown the producing reservoir is many times it original, projected size. Flow tests are being conducted at the Pleasant Bayou site in Texas. Another reservoir, at the Hulin site in Louisiana, remains for initiation of testing, at a time to be determined. Gas sales and electrical power generation from the geopressured-geothermal resources have proven that these are reliable alternative power sources. Continuing work is being done for field automation to improve the economics of these operations.

Eaton, B.A.; Featherston, C.R.; Meahl, T.E.; Randolph, P.L.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

324

Fiscal Year 1992 Annual Operating Plan for the Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program ($4.3 Million Budget)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan describes the Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program. A Geopressured well in Texas (Pleasant Bayou) will undergo a slow test and a pressure buildup test. A geopressured well in Louisiana (Gladys McCall) will be flow tested for a short period, logged, plugged and abandoned or turned over to industry early in FY 92. A second deep geopressured well in Louisiana, the Hulin Well, is being kept on standby. Related university research in geology, numerical reservoir modeling, subsidence, microseismicity, and water quality will continue, with program data reviews initiated in appropriate areas. Increased emphasis on integrated reservoir engineering will be implemented. The well activities coupled with the related university research are designed to improve the ability to forecast reservoir productive capacity, to verify the reliability of the resource as a long-term energy resource, and to determine the environmental effects of long-term production. By these means, the Geopressured-Geothermal Research Program is developing a solid technology base that private industry can use to evaluate the geopressured-geothermal resource. The Industrial Consortium for utilization of the resource will be continued. Use projects in Louisiana and Texas will be evaluated. A geopressured reservoir review will be managed by INEL. The DOE Field Office, Idaho will make preparations to complete the program. [DJE-2005

None

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

The ecology of Barataria Basin, Louisiana: An estuarine profile  

SciTech Connect

The Barataria Basin lies entirely in Louisiana between the natural levees of the active Mississippi River and the abandoned Bayou Lafourche distributary. It is characterized by a network of interconnecting water bodies which allows transport of water, materials, and migrating organisms throughout the basin. Natural and artificial levees and barrier islands are the only high, well-drained ground in the basin, which is otherwise characterized by extensive swamp forests and fresh, brackish, and salt marshes. These wetlands and water bodies are extremely productive biologically and provide valuable nursery habitat for a number of commercial and recreational fish and shellfish, as well as habitat for wintering waterfowl and furbearers. The basin is a dynamic system undergoing constant change because of geologic and human processes. The network of bays, lakes, and bayous has gradually enlarged over time due to natural subsidence and erosion. Superimposed on these natural processes has been the construction of levees for flood control and network of canals constructed for oil and gas exploration and extraction. These human activities have altered natural hydrologic patterns in the basin and may directly or indirectly contribute to wetland losses. Controlling wetland deterioration in the basin is a major management concern.

Conner, W.H.; Day, J.W. Jr. (eds.)

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Consolidation of geologic studies of geopressured geothermal resources in Texas. 1982 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed structural mapping at several horizons in selected study areas within the Frio growth-fault trend demonstrates a pronounced variability in structural style. At Sarita in South Texas, shale mobilization produced one or more shale ridges, one of which localized a low-angle growth fault trapping a wedge of deltaic sediments. At Corpus Christi, shale mobilization produced a series of large growth faults, shale-cored domed anticlines, and shale-withdrawal basins, which become progressively younger basinward. At Blessing, major growth faults trapped sands of the Greta/Carancahua barrier system with little progradation. At Pleasant Bayou, a major early growth-fault pattern was overprinted by later salt tectonics - the intrusion of Danbury Dome and the development of a salt-withdrawal basin. At Port Arthur, low-displacement, long-lived faults formed on a sand-poor shelf margin contemporaneously with broad salt uplifts and basins. Variability in styles is related to the nature and extent of Frio sedimentation and shelf-margin progradation and to the presence or absence of salt. Structural styles that are conducive to the development of large geothermal reservoirs include blocks between widely spaced growth faults having dip reversal, salt-withdrawal basins, and shale-withdrawal basins. These styles are widespread on the Texas Gulf Coast. However, actually finding a large reservoir depends on demonstrating the existence of sufficient sandstone with adequate quality to support geopressured geothermal energy production.

Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Kaiser, W.R.; Finley, R.J.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Waste-water characterization survey, Barksdale AFB, Louisiana. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The USAFOEHL conducted an on-site waste-water-quality survey at Barksdale AFB, LA from 14 to 28 March 1988 at the request of the 2nd Strategic Hospital/SGPB. The survey was requested to resolve a 1 October 1987 EPA Region VI 30-day administrative order. All samples were analyzed for pH, chemical oxygen demand (COD), conductivity, total suspended solids (TSS) and oil and grease. Samples taken from industrial areas were selectively analyzed for purgeable halocarbons, purgeable aromatics, total recoverable phenols (EPA Method 420), phenols (EPA Method 604), fluorides, surfactants (MBAS), characteristic hazardous waste and metals by the ICP metals screen. Lift stations (buildings 4725 and 3455) and NPDES site 003 were also analyzed for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD). Sampling results were evaluated against the following criteria: (1) Bossier City, Louisiana Wastewater Permit Standard BC0022; (2) Pretreatment Standards for Existing Sources, 40 CFR Part 433 - Metal finishing point source category; (3) NPDES Permit LA0007293 for Mack's Bayou.

Zimmer, A.T.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

The geopressured-geothermal resource: Transition to commercialization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geopressured-Geothermal resource has an estimated 5700 recoverable quad of gas and 11,000 recoverable quad of thermal energy in the onshore Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast area alone. After 15 years the program is now beginning a transition to commercialization. The program presently has three geopressured-geothermal wells in Texas and Louisiana. The Pleasant Bayou Well has a 1 MWe hybrid power system converting some gas and the thermal energy to electricity. The Gladys McCall Well produced over 23 MM bbls brine with 23 scf per bbl over 4 1/2 years. It is now shut-in building up pressure. The deep Hulin Well has been cleaned out and short term flow tested. It is on standby awaiting funds for long-term flow testing. In January 1990 an Industrial Consortium for the Utilization of the Geopressured-Geothermal Resource was convened at Rice University, Houston, TX. Sixty-five participants heard industry cost-shared proposals for using the hot geopressured brine. Proposals ranged from thermal enhanced oil recovery to aquaculture, conversion, and environmental clean up processes. By the September meeting at UTA-Balcones Research Center, industry approved charters will have been received, an Advisory Board will be appointed, and election of officers from industry will be held. 11 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Negus-de Wys, J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Dorfman, M. (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (USA). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Characterization of a fluidized-bed combustion ash to determine potential for environmental impact. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A 440-megawatt, circulating fluidized-bed combustion (CFBC), lignite-fired power plant is planned for construction in Choctaw County north of Ackerman, Mississippi. This power plant will utilize Mississippi lignite from the first lignite mine in that state. Malcolm Pirnie, Inc., is working with the power plant developer in the current planning and permitting efforts for this proposed construction project. In order to accommodate Mississippi state regulatory agencies and meet appropriate permit requirements, Malcolm Pirnie needed to provide an indication of the characteristics of the by-products anticipated to be produced at the proposed plant. Since the Mississippi lignite is from a newly tapped mine and the CFBC technology is relatively new, Malcolm Pirnie contacted with the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) to develop and perform a test plan for the production and characterization of ash similar to ash that will be eventually produced at the proposed power plant. The work performed at the EERC included two primary phases: production of by-products in a bench-scale CFBC unit using lignite provided by Malcolm Pirnie with test conditions delineated by Malcolm Pirnie to represent expected operating conditions for the full-scale plant; and an extensive characterization of the by-products produced, focusing on Mississippi regulatory requirements for leachability, with the understanding that return of the by-product to the mine site was an anticipated by-product management plan. The overall focus of this project was the environmental assessment of the by-product expected to be produced at the proposed power plant. Emphasis was placed on the leachability of potentially problematic trace elements in the by-products. The leaching research documented in this report was performed to determine trends of leachability of trace elements under leaching conditions appropriate for evaluating land disposal in monofills, such as returning the by-products to the mine site.

Hassett, D.J.; Henderson, A.K.; Pflughoeft-Hassett, D.F.; Mann, M.D.; Eylands, K.E.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) Protection of Forest Resources (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation This statute addresses the conservation and protection of forest resources by encouraging the use of land management best practices pertaining to soil erosion, timber sale planning, associated road construction and

331

2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dawn.Deel@NETL.DOE.gov Dawn.Deel@NETL.DOE.gov Principal Investigator John Kadyszewski, Winrock International - Ecosystem Services, JKadyszewski@winrock.org Field Test Information: Field Test Name WESTCARB Lake County terrestrial sequestration pilot Test Location Lake County, Oregon Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Source TBD. Includes fuel management/biomass energy and afforestation. Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Lake County Resources Initiative, GreenWood Resources, The Collins Companies, Jeld- Wen Timber & Ranch, Oregon Forest Resources Institute, Oregon Department of Forestry, USDA Forest Service - Pacific Southwest Research Station, Oregon State University, USDA Forest Service - Pacific Northwest Research Station, The Climate

332

Interview on life and work of Li Bozhong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, in agriculture animal-energy played quite a large role with buffaloes pulling ploughs etc., but it did not have useful water power, and wind power was not reliable, and of course, there was no coal, or sufficient timber; during the Qing this area could have... and harvesting rice; according to Mao's policy we had to be re-educated by the peasants, but they treated us very well, just like their family; they knew little about what had happened in Kunming and assumed that our parents couldn?t support us which was why we...

Li, Bozhong

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Bulletin of Tibetology: Volume 11 Number 3 : Full issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Mauryan times. From the find of a relic casket within an ancient breach inside the core of the stupa, the excavator surmised that this was the stupa built by the Lichchhavis over their share of the body-relics of Lord Buddha, which, according... liberal me of actud timber. The evolution of the shapes of the window-arch from a simple to elaborate curve, of the pillar from a plain to decorated fOI m, and of the stupa-dome from a hembphere to a cylinder are other gUiding principles. The earliest...

Namgyal Institute of Tibetology

334

2. Annual Quantities of Land Clearing Debris Generated and Used (1) Sectors that generate Land Clearing Debris:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land clearing debris is defined as growing stock and other timber sources cut or otherwise destroyed in the process of converting forest land to non-forest uses. 1 Growing stock that is removed in silvicultural operations such as pre-commercial thinning is also included in this definition. Land clearing debris is typically in the form of tree tops and branches, trees cut or knocked down and left on site, and stumps. In non-forested areas, such as grasslands and desert, land clearing debris may include soil, rocks, and shrubs, although fuel is primarily derived from previously forested areas.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Method of determining forest production from remotely sensed forest parameters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining forest production entirely from remotely sensed data in which remotely sensed multispectral scanner (MSS) data on forest 5 composition is combined with remotely sensed radar imaging data on forest stand biophysical parameters to provide a measure of forest production. A high correlation has been found to exist between the remotely sensed radar imaging data and on site measurements of biophysical 10 parameters such as stand height, diameter at breast height, total tree height, mean area per tree, and timber stand volume.

Corey, J.C.; Mackey, H.E. Jr.

1987-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Continuing Customs of Negotiation and Contestation in Bhutan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Negotiation and Contestation in Bhutan 2 0 7 butter containers (S19,R9), incense (S19,R18), leather bags (S1,R6), paper (S14,R8), cloth (S14,R7), wool (S20,R13), baskets and buckets (S19,R24), shingles for roofing (S22, R2) and timber (S20,R21). A number... of paddy to the monk body. 20th Session of the National Assembly, Wood Dragon Year (1964) 13. Matter Relating to Wool The people of Bumthang were required to supply wool to the store officer of Bumthang in excess of his legitimate needs. As such, the store...

Adam Pain; Pema, Deki

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Logging and Agricultural Residue Supply Curves for the Pacific Northwest  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report quantified the volume of logging residues at the county level for current timber harvests. The cost of recovering logging residues was determined for skidding, yearding, loading, chipping and transporting the residues. Supply curves were developed for ten candidate conversion sites in the Pacific Northwest Region. Agricultural field residues were also quantified at the county level using five-year average crop yields. Agronomic constraints were applied to arrive at the volumes available for energy use. Collection costs and transportation costs were determined and supply curves generated for thirteen candidate conversion sites.

Kerstetter, James D.; Lyons, John Kim

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Carbon sequestration, optimum forest rotation and their environmental impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to their large biomass forests assume an important role in the global carbon cycle by moderating the greenhouse effect of atmospheric pollution. The Kyoto Protocol recognises this contribution by allocating carbon credits to countries which are able to create new forest areas. Sequestrated carbon provides an environmental benefit thus must be taken into account in cost-benefit analysis of afforestation projects. Furthermore, like timber output carbon credits are now tradable assets in the carbon exchange. By using British data, this paper looks at the issue of identifying optimum felling age by considering carbon sequestration benefits simultaneously with timber yields. The results of this analysis show that the inclusion of carbon benefits prolongs the optimum cutting age by requiring trees to stand longer in order to soak up more CO{sub 2}. Consequently this finding must be considered in any carbon accounting calculations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon sequestration in forestry is an environmental benefit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It moderates the problem of global warming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It prolongs the gestation period in harvesting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper uses British data in less favoured districts for growing Sitka spruce species.

Kula, Erhun, E-mail: erhun.kula@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Economics, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey); Gunalay, Yavuz, E-mail: yavuz.gunalay@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Business Studies, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

The Federal manufactured home construction and safety standards -- implications for foam panel construction  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development construction code for (HUD-code) manufactured homes, Part 3280: Manufactured Home Construction and Safety Standards (the HUD Code), to identify sections that might be relevant in determining if insulated foam core panels (or structural insulated panels, SIPs) meet the requirements of Part 3280 for use in manufactured home construction. The U.S. Department of Energy and other parties are interested in the use of SIPs in residential construction, including HUD-Code manufactured homes, because the foam panels can have a higher effective insulation value than standard stud-framed construction and use less dimensional lumber. Although SIPs have not been used in manufactured housing, they may be well suited to the factory production process used to manufacture HUD-Code homes and the fact that they require less virgin timber may reduce the effect of volatile and increasing timber prices. Part 3280 requirements for fire resistance, wind resistance, structural load strength, ventilation, transportation shock, and thermal protection are reviewed. A brief comparison is made between the HUD Code requirements and data collected from foam panel manufacturers. 8 refs.

Lee, A.D.; Schrock, D.W.; Flintoft, S.A.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Microsoft Word - MaryRose.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. The starboard side of the Mary Rose (about ⅓ of the hull, ~280 tons oak timbers) is since 1994 being sprayed with an aqueous solution of PEG 200. Figure 2. Sulfur K-edge XANES spectrum of Mary Rose oak core surface (0-3 mm). Standard spectra used for model fitting: 1 (solution), 1´(solid) disulfides R-SS-R (cystine with peaks at 2472.7 and 2474.4 eV); 45%; 2: Thiols R-SH (cysteine, 2473.6 eV) 23%; 3: Elemental sulfur (S 8 in xylene 2473.0 eV) 10%; 4: Sulfoxide R(SO)R´ (methionine sulfoxide, 2476.4 eV) 5%; 5: Sulfonate R-SO 3 - (methyl sulfonate, 2481.2 eV) 10%; 6: Sulfate SO 4 2- (sodium sulfate, 2482.6 eV) 7%. Sulfur in the Timbers of Henry VIII's Warship Mary Rose: Synchrotrons Illuminate Conservation Concerns Magnus Sandström

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Covered Bridges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Covered Bridges Covered Bridges Nature Bulletin No. 644 June 3, 1961 Forest Preserve District of Cook County John J. Duffy, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist COVERED BRIDGES Covered bridges have a peculiar fascination for most of us. W e wish they could talk. Many of them are truly historic landmarks. Each one is a unique and picturesque relic of the days when .America was a young country. As a locality became more thickly settled the people demanded roads, improved roads, with bridges across creeks and rivers where fords or ferries had been the only means of crossing. There were no steel mills. But there were skilled woodsmen and virgin forests with huge trees from which they could fashion timbers of any dimension and length desired. Equally important, in certain regions there were master builders: craftsmen with shrewd knowledge of stresses and strains in trusses and arches. That is why covered bridges were and are so numerous in Vermont, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Ohio and Indiana. Lack of such men may explain the absence of those structures in Minnesota and other states where timber was plentiful.

342

The Batavia shipwreck  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Batavia, a Dutch East Indiaman, sank in 1629 on its maiden voyage to the Indies in the Houtman Abrolhos Archipelago off the coast of Western Australia. The ship gained notoriety for the mutiny and horrific massacre that engulfed the survivors after the wreck, but the vessel itself was lost for centuries. The remains of the ship were discovered in 1963, and excavated between 1971 and 1980 by a team of archaeologists from the Western Australian Museum. The surviving hull timbers, raised from the seabed by archaeologists, represent approximately 3.5 percent of the original hull. They include part of the transom and aft port quarter of the ship. To date, Batavia represents the only excavated remains of an early seventeenthcentury Dutch East Indiaman that have been raised and conserved in a way that permits detailed study. This is of great significance as there are no lines drawings or construction plans for any Dutch ships from this period. The study and comparison of the Batavia hull timbers with those of other Dutch shipwrecks and historic documentation contributes to the understanding of Dutch shipbuilding techniques at the end of the sixteenth and beginning of the seventeenth centuries.

Van Duivenvoorde, Wendy

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

and Price Statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is part of an annual series that presents current and historical information on the production, trade, consumption, and prices of timber products in the United States. The report focuses on national statistics, but includes some data for individual States and regions and for Canada. The data were collected from industry trade associations and government agencies. They are intended for use by forest land managers, forest industries, trade associations, forestry schools, renewable resource organizations, libraries, organizations, individuals in the major timber producing and consuming countries of the world, and the general public. A major use of the data presented here is tracking technological change over time. One of the major technology shifts occurring in the wood-using industry is the substitution of oriented strandboard (OSB) for plywood in the structural panel sector, as well as a shift in plywood production from the west to the south United States. Some data show these shifts. United States production of structural panels totaled 29.4 billion ft in 1999. Production of OSB increased from less than 3 billion ft in 1985 to 11.6 billion ft in 1999. Plywood production was 20.1 billion ft in 1985 before falling to 17.8 billion ft in 1999. The decline in plywood production reflects the continued increase in the OSB share of the traditional plywood market

United States; Forest Service; James L. Howard Abstract

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Floodplain/wetland assessment of the effects of construction and operation ofa depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Paducah, Kentucky,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This floodplain/wetland assessment has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to Executive Order 11988 (''Floodplain Management''), Executive Order 11990 (Protection of Wetlands), and DOE regulations for implementing these Executive Orders as set forth in Title 10, Part 1022, of the ''Code of Federal Regulations'' (10 CFR Part 1022 [''Compliance with Floodplain and Wetland Environmental Review Requirements'']), to evaluate potential impacts to floodplains and wetlands from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Paducah site. Reconstruction of the bridge crossing Bayou Creek would occur within the Bayou Creek 100-year floodplain. Replacement of bridge components, including the bridge supports, however, would not be expected to result in measurable long-term changes to the floodplain. Approximately 0.16 acre (0.064 ha) of palustrine emergent wetlands would likely be eliminated by direct placement of fill material within Location A. Some wetlands that are not filled may be indirectly affected by an altered hydrologic regime, due to the proximity of construction, possibly resulting in a decreased frequency or duration of inundation or soil saturation and potential loss of hydrology necessary to sustain wetland conditions. Indirect impacts could be minimized by maintaining a buffer near adjacent wetlands. Wetlands would likely be impacted by construction at Location B; however, placement of a facility in the northern portion of this location would minimize wetland impacts. Construction at Location C could potentially result in impacts to wetlands, however placement of a facility in the southeastern portion of this location may best avoid direct impacts to wetlands. The hydrologic characteristics of nearby wetlands could be indirectly affected by adjacent construction. Executive Order 11990, ''Protection of Wetlands'', requires federal agencies to minimize the destruction, loss, or degradation of wetlands, and to preserve and enhance the natural and beneficial uses of wetlands. DOE regulations for implementing Executive Order 11990 as well as Executive Order 11988, ''Floodplain Management'', are set forth in 10 CFR Part 1022. Mitigation for unavoidable impacts may be developed in coordination with the appropriate regulatory agencies. Unavoidable impacts to wetlands that are within the jurisdiction of the USACE may require a CWA Section 404 Permit, which would trigger the requirement for a CWA Section 401 Water Quality Certification from the Commonwealth of Kentucky. A mitigation plan may be required prior to the initiation of construction. Cumulative impacts to floodplains and wetlands are anticipated to be negligible to minor under the proposed action, in conjunction with the effects of existing conditions and other activities. Habitat disturbance would involve settings commonly found i

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

345

Significant test results, energy potential, and geology of some Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal sandstone reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geopressured-geothermal reservoir found in the northern Gulf of Mexico basin represent a large potential future energy resource. Three reservoirs in various stages of developmental testing are of current interest. Over a four-year testing period the Gladys McCall 1 (Cameron Parish, Louisiana) produced 27.3 million bbl of brine and 676 million scf of gas at an average rate of 20,000 bbl/day from perforations between 15,158 and 15,490 ft. This lower Miocene sandstone section forms part of a genetic unit of interconnected channel and point-bar sandstones deposited in a lower shelf environment. Pleasant Bayou 2 well (Brazoria County, Texas) is currently being flow-tested at 20,000 bbl/day and has a gas/brine ratio of approximately 23 scf/stb and a temperature of 291/degrees/F. An electric energy conversion system being set up here will test potential for electric generation from geopressured-geothermal energy. Superior Hulin 1 (Vermilion Parish, Louisiana) is a deep (21,549 ft) former gas well proposed to be completed as a geopressured-geothermal well. Initial log analysis indicates that a 570-ft thick sandstone, of probable submarine fan origin, may contain free gas in addition to solution gas and may thus represent an economically feasible geopressured-geothermal well. Gas-separated brine is disposed by subsurface injection into disposal wells. However, in areas where hydrocarbon fields with wells penetrating geopressured sands are present, hot brines could be injected into depleted hydrocarbon zones to aid secondary recovery.

John, C.J.; Stevenson, D.A.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Geopressured aquifer simulator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ten natural gas companies have funded the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) development of a laboratory facility for fluid and core analyses at temperatures and pressures characteristic of geopressured aquifers. The facility has been designed and constructed to measure the following parameters at pressures up to 20,000 psi and temperatures to 450/sup 0/F: solubility of methane in brines from actual geopressured aquifers; dependence of compression and compaction reservoir drive upon pressure; dependence of permeability upon reservoir pressure and temperatures; dependence of relative permeabilities to gas and to water upon the water saturation of pores, pressure, and temperature. Brine pumped through the core can be either gas-free or from a reservoir of brine with gas in solution. The facility is modular in design with major components including the reservoir of gas-saturated brine, high-pressure positive displacement pumps, and the core holder housed in a large oven. All components contacted by high-pressure, high-temperature brine are fabricated from Hastelloy C-276, Elgaloy, or Inconel 625 to avoid corrosion. The temperatures, pressures, differential pressure, and flow rates are controlled and/or recorded by a digital microcomputer/microprocessor. Operation will be controlled from a separate room and programmed; hands-off operation will be the normal mode of operation. The facility has been constructed and is now being tested.Following performance testing with Berea sandstone, initial emphasis will be upon studies of brine and available core from DOE's Pleasant Bayou No. 1 and No. 2 wells.

Byrnes, A.P.; Rockar, E.M.; Randolph, P.L.; Kelkar, S.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

CARBON FLUX TO THE ATMOSPHERE FROM LAND-USE CHANGES: 1850 TO 1990 (APPENDIX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B: REGIONAL LAND-USE CHANGE AND WOOD HARVEST DATA B: REGIONAL LAND-USE CHANGE AND WOOD HARVEST DATA The following listing provides the regional details of fuelwood (nonindustrial logging) and timber (industrial logging) harvest by forest type, changes in area of pasture, forest plantation, afforestation, forest clearing for croplands, and lands in shifting cultivation. The values in this listing replace the values in the indicated ascii and binary spreadsheet files in Houghton and Hackler (1995), the previous version of this database. South and Southeast Asia The following values replace the data in files asia-rat.* in Houghton and Hackler (1995). South and Southeast Asia Fuelwood Harvest (10^6 Mg C per year): Tropical Tropical Tropical moist seasonal open Year forest forest forest 1751 8.58 10.50 4.50

348

Enforcement Documents | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 13, 2009 July 13, 2009 Enforecement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group INC, - July 13, 2009 Enforcement Letter issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to a Form Wood Timber Fire at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site July 10, 2009 Enforcement Letter , Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC - July 10, 2009 Enforcement Letter issued to Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC related to the Protection of Classified Information at the Y-12 National Security Complex June 1, 2009 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Western Allied Mechanical, Inc. - WEA-2010-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Sandia Corporation related to the Inadvertent Ignition of a Rocket Motor May 20, 2009

349

Microsoft Word - DOE_FinalReport_12-26-2012a  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

TECHNICAL REPORT Biomass to Gasoline and Diesel Using Integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion Reporting Period: April 1, 2010 through December 1, 2012 DOE Award Number: U.S. DOE Award DE-EE-0002873 Revised: December 28, 2012 Prepared For: U.S. Department of Energy GTI Technical Contact: Michael Roberts, Project Manager 847-768-0518; mike.roberts@gastechnology.org Terry Marker, Principal Investigator 847-544-3491; terry.marker@gastechnology.org Contributors: GTI: Terry Marker; Martin Linck; Larry Felix; Pedro Ortiz-Toral; Jim Wangerow CRI-Criterion: Larry Kraus; Celeste McLeod; Alan DelPaggio NREL: Eric Tan Johnson Timber: John Gephart Cargill: Dmitri Gromov; Ian Purtle; Jack Starr; John Hahn Aquaflow: Paul Dorrington Blue Marble: James Stevens

350

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Agency/Company /Organization: Resources for the Future Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry, Agriculture Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.rff.org/documents/RFF-DP-01-19.pdf Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses Screenshot References: Estimating Carbon Supply Curves for Global Forests and Other Land Uses[1] Abstract "This study develops cumulative carbon "supply curves" for global forests utilizing an dynamic timber supply model for sequestration of forest carbon. Because the period of concern is the next century, and

351

EI Summary of SIC 24  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lumber (24) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Lumber (24) All (20-39) Food (20) Textiles (22) Apparel (23) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments engaged in cutting timber and pulpwood; merchant sawmills, lath mills, and shingle mills, cooperage stock mills, planing mills and plywood and veneer mills engaged in producing lumber and wood basic materials; and establishments engaged in manufacturing finished articles made entirely or mainly of wood or related materials. If you found this information useful, please try... Energy Consumption Use of Energy

352

RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION Project 10 No. BM-11-051  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 Title: BM Building BE-2 Drainage Improvements and Foundation Repair Description: Subcontractor shall furnish all labor, materials, equipment, tools, transportation, supervision, mobile lifting equipment, and rigging required to repair timber piles which support Bryan Mound Building BE-2. Subcontractor shall modify the ground surface around the building with crushed stone to prevent soil washout and improve drainage conditions which led to disrepair of the building foundation. Regulatory Requirements: NEPA Implementing Procedures (10 CFR 1021) 10 CFR 1021.410 (Application of Categorical Exclusions) (a) The actions listed in Appendices A and B of Subpart D are classes of actions that DOE has determined do not individually or cumulatively have a significant effect on the human environment

353

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

proposed activity includes widening a secondary (gravel) road outside of the P-Area Fence. The road intersects a railroad. At the intersection a proposed activity includes widening a secondary (gravel) road outside of the P-Area Fence. The road intersects a railroad. At the intersection a timber railroad crossing will be installed per Site Standards drawing C-C1-G-0015. The secondary road will be widened to 34 ft using a crusher run base. The purpose for this proposed activity is to improve the gravel road necessary for the increased truck activity in and around P-Area. The frequent passage of large vehicles calls for a wider path. SRS Railroad Crossing Installation Savannah River Site Aiken South Carolina ARRA - P - 2010 - 204, Rev.0 Dec 17, 2010 Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US

354

CX-001634: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Categorical Exclusion Determination 4: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001634: Categorical Exclusion Determination Meteorological Tower Installation Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwa Indian Reservation CX(s) Applied: B3.1, A9 Date: 04/08/2010 Location(s): County of Mille Lacs, Minnesota Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office This project is for the commissioning of a meteorological (met) tower to be installed at the Ledin Site, located on the west side of Lake Mille Lacs on the Mille Lacs Band of Ojibwa Indian Reservation, City of Onamia, Township of Kathio, County of Mille Lacs, State of Minnesota. The site is to the west of the Mille Lacs wastewater treatment facility, which has a physical address of 43282 Timber Trail Rd, Onamia, MN 56359. The Ledin Site is a

355

Wild Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Life Restoration in the Forest Preserves Nature Bulletin No. 613 October 15, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist WILD LIFE RESTORATION IN THE FOREST PRESERVES The wealth of wildlife in the Cook County forest preserves rivals that in any of the other 101 Illinois counties, in spite of the fact that over half of the state's people are crowded within its boundaries. The large variety of birds, mammals and other animal life now in this county is possible largely because the Forest Preserve District protects their natural habitats, including many that have been restored. These include timbered rolling uplands, wooded stream valleys, prairie remnants, sand flats, marshes, and a hundred bodies of water. Protection, for as much as forty years, against fire, hunting, trapping and other destruction has allowed the natural comeback of these habitats and the build-up of wildlife populations.

356

Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Bridge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Bridge Philip R. Columbus Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management Headquarters, Department of the Army 180900ZMay2012 1 Philip R. Columbus/571-256-9774/philip.r.columbus.civ@mail.mil/ Overview * The purpose of this project was to demonstrate that a thermoplastic composite I-beam bridge could be constructed to accommodate a M-1 battle tank. * This effort determined the engineering and construction of such a structure was possible and be cost competitive to a wood timber bridge * The materials are virtually maintenance-free and not subject to degradation from moisture, rot, insects and weather. 180900ZMay2012 2 Philip R. Columbus/571-256-9774/philip.r.columbus.civ@mail.mil/ Background

357

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Over 70 wood chemical plants operated in northern Pennsylvania Over 70 wood chemical plants operated in northern Pennsylvania between ca. 1890 and 1950, all located within 72 kilometers of the NY state border. Their original purpose was to salvage the small unwanted hardwood trees left behind by the lumber mills and to make charcoal, calcium acetate and methanol for a growing number of industrial uses. Scrap timber was loaded into large metal retorts, which were then heated, driving off volatile compounds by destructive distillation and leaving the charcoal behind. One byproduct of this process was a large amount of wood tar, which was sometimes burned as fuel, but more often dumped locally. By the 1920s and 1930s, the industrial demand for the products of the wood chemical plant had declined, or cheaper

358

The effectiveness of forest carbon sequestration strategies with system-wide adjustments, Resources for the Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the effectiveness of tree planting and forest conservation strategies to increase the sink of carbon in global forests. Because forests are expected to sequester additional carbon without explicit human intervention, a baseline case is presented. The baseline predicts that forests will sequester an additional 17.9 Pg (10 15 grams) of carbon over the next 150 years, with nearly 95 % of this accruing to storage in marketed forest products. The paper then compares strategies which assume markets adjust to changes in future timber supply to an optimistic regional planner case in which no market adjustment occurs. The resulting predictions show that system wide market interactions may lead to substantial leakage of carbon from the forest system.

Brent Sohngen; Robert Mendelsohn; Roger Sedjo

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Corporate) Corporate) Clean Energy Production Tax Credit (Corporate) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Residential Utility Savings Category Bioenergy Buying & Making Electricity Water Solar Wind Maximum Rebate $2.5 million (total credits allowed during five-year period) Program Info Start Date 01/01/2006 State Maryland Program Type Corporate Tax Credit Rebate Amount $0.0085/kWh ($0.005/kWh for co-fired electricity) Provider Maryland Energy Administration Maryland offers a production tax credit for electricity generated by wind, geothermal energy, solar energy, hydropower, hydrokinetic, municipal solid waste and biomass resources. Eligible biomass resources include anaerobic digestion, landfill gas, wastewater-treatment gas, and cellulosic material derived from forest-related resources (excluding old-growth timber and mill

360

CX-007506: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

06: Categorical Exclusion Determination 06: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-007506: Categorical Exclusion Determination Record of Categorical Exclusion for Bryan Mound Building BE-2 Drainage Improvements and Foundation Repair CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 11/16/2011 Location(s): Texas Offices(s): Strategic Petroleum Reserve Field Office Subcontractor shall furnish all labor, materials, equipment, tools, transportation, supervision, mobile lifting equipment, and rigging required to repair timber piles which support Bryan Mound Building BE-2. Subcontractor shall modify the ground surface around the building with crushed stone to prevent soil washout and improve drainage conditions which led to disrepair of the building foundation. CX-007506.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-009716: Categorical Exclusion Determination

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Why sequence Postia placenta ?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Postia placenta? Postia placenta? Commonly found in forest ecosystems, brown rot fungi such as Postia placenta are a major cause of wood decay and are thought to be responsible for 10 percent of the wood decay in the annual timber harvest. Unlike white-rot fungi, however, brown-rot fungi can rapidly break down the cellulose in wood without affecting the lignin. The 33 Mbp genome of P. placenta was sequenced in 2006 using the tried-and-true Sanger method, and was published in 2009. The information allowed researchers to compare white-rot, brown-rot and soft-rot fungal genomes for the first time. Now researchers plan to resequence the genome using new sequencing technologies in order to further refine the genomic data collected during the assembly and annotation process. The fungal

362

Microsoft Word - Key-note-Cold climate_HVAC2009-neuer.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

software tools for moisture Protection of buildings in software tools for moisture Protection of buildings in different climate zones Special Example: Control of air humidifier in a cold climate for high comfort and no risk of mould growth in building room Krus Martin 1* , Thierry Nouidui 1 and Sedlbauer Klaus 1 1 Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, Germany * Corresponding email: Martin.Krus@ibp.fraunhofer.de SUMMARY The application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in different climatic zones is demonstrated in this paper. The basics of the programs are presented together with a typical application for a problem specific for the chosen climatic zone. A 1-D calculation has been performed for tropical climate zone with the improvement of a flat roof in Bangkok as an example. For half timbered buildings, which are common in the temperate zone with the

363

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Poncha 230-kV Transmission Line Poncha 230-kV Transmission Line Cross Bar Ranch Project A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to fund off right-of-way (ROW) vegetation restoration treatments immediately adjacent to Western's Curecanti-Poncha 230-kV Transmission Line (CCI-PON) in Gunnison County, Colorado. This project is a continuation of the larger Forest Service Calf Creek Project which focused on timber stand improvements, wildlife habitat improvements, and reduction in fuels build-up to improve plant vigor and reduce fire hazard in approximately 2,885 acres of adjacent Forest Service lands. The Cross Bar Ranch Project is the final segment required to secure the transmission line corridor crossing the Black Sage Pass area. The proposed action intends to reduce wildfire risk and enhance

364

Montana Sustainable Building Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Systems Systems Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Montana Sustainable Building Systems Name Montana Sustainable Building Systems Address 201 Second St E Place Whitefish, Montana Zip 59937 Sector Buildings Product Cross-laminated timber panel building systems Year founded 2009 Phone number 406-862-9222 Website http://www.smartwoods.com Coordinates 48.410317°, -114.340704° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.410317,"lon":-114.340704,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

365

Pacific Ethanol, Inc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flambeau River Biofuels LLC Flambeau River Biofuels LLC Corporate HQ: Park Falls, Wisconsin Proposed Facility Location: Park Falls, Wisconsin Description: Construct a demonstration biomass-to-liquids (BTL) biorefinery CEO or Equivalent: Bob Byrne, President and Chief Operating Officer Participants: ANL Consultants, Auburn University, Brigham Young University, Citigroup Global Markets, CleanTech Partners, Emerging Fuels Technology, Flambeau River Papers, Johnson Timber, National Renewable Energy Lab, Michigan Technological University, NC State University, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, ThermoChem Recovery International, University of Wisconsin, USDA Forest Products Laboratory Production: * Capacity of 6 million gallons per year of Fisher-Tropsch (F-T) liquids in the form of renewable sulfur-free diesel fuels and waxes

366

Enforcement Letters | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 20, 2010 January 20, 2010 Enforcement Letter, Isoteck Systems, LLC - January 20, 2010 Enforcement Letter issued to Isotek Systems, LLC related to Quality Assurance Issues associated with the U233 Material Downblending and Disposition Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory September 14, 2009 Enforcement Letter, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC - September 14, 2009 Enforcement Letter issued to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC related to a Failed Scram Event at the Neutron Radiography Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory July 13, 2009 Enforecement Letter, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group INC, - July 13, 2009 Enforcement Letter issued to Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., related to a Form Wood Timber Fire at the Salt Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site

367

Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Agency/Company /Organization: World Business Council for Sustainable Development Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Finance Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: www.pwc.co.uk/pdf/forest_finance_toolkit.pdf Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit Screenshot References: Sustainable Forest Finance Toolkit[1] Overview "This Toolkit has been developed jointly by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) and the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD). It is a globally applicable resource designed to help financial institutions support the management of forest resources through sustainable and legal timber production and processing, and markets for carbon and other

368

Data:5d43d429-2b6b-4528-9a14-9fb3627352c3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

d429-2b6b-4528-9a14-9fb3627352c3 d429-2b6b-4528-9a14-9fb3627352c3 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Platte-Clay Electric Coop, Inc Effective date: 2013/01/01 End date if known: Rate name: SL - 300 watt HPS Timber Creek & Park Sector: Lighting Description: Available for lighting streets, walkways, or outdoor lighting of public or private areas when such facilities are operated and maintained as an extension of the Cooperative's distribution system. Electric usage will be unmetered. Source or reference: Rate Binder Kelly 11 ISU Documentation Source Parent: Comments Applicability

369

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability (11/28/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

824 824 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 229 / Friday, November 28, 2003 / Notices ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [ER-FRL-6645-9] Environmental Impact Statements and Regulations; Availability of EPA Comments Availability of EPA comments prepared pursuant to the Environmental Review Process (ERP), under Section 309 of the Clean Air Act and Section 102(2)(c) of the National Environmental Policy Act as amended. Requests for copies of EPA comments can be directed to the Office of Federal Activities at (202) 564-7167. An explanation of the ratings assigned to draft environmental impact statements (EISs) was published in FR dated April 04, 2003 (68 FR 16511). Draft EISs ERP No. D-AFS-L65436-OR Rating LO, Juncrock Timber Sale Project, Treat Forest Vegetation, MT. Hood National

370

OTTER Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Campaigns > OTTER (Oregon) Field Campaigns > OTTER (Oregon) The Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) Project Overview The purpose of the Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) Project was to estimate major fluxes of carbon, nitrogen, and water in forest ecosystems using an ecosystem-process model driven by remotely sensed data. The project was conducted from 1990 to 1991. The DAAC's data holdings include background data from 1989. OTTER data sets include: Canopy Chemistry Meteorology Field Sunphotometer Airborne Sunphotometer Timber Measurements These data were transferred to the ORNL DAAC from the Ames Research Center node of the Pilot Land Data System (PLDS). The ORNL DAAC LBA Data archive includes 14 data products. Study sites included a coastal forest of western hemlock, sitka spruce, and

371

Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Bridge  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Recycled Thermoplastic Composite Bridge Philip R. Columbus Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management Headquarters, Department of the Army 180900ZMay2012 1 Philip R. Columbus/571-256-9774/philip.r.columbus.civ@mail.mil/ Overview * The purpose of this project was to demonstrate that a thermoplastic composite I-beam bridge could be constructed to accommodate a M-1 battle tank. * This effort determined the engineering and construction of such a structure was possible and be cost competitive to a wood timber bridge * The materials are virtually maintenance-free and not subject to degradation from moisture, rot, insects and weather. 180900ZMay2012 2 Philip R. Columbus/571-256-9774/philip.r.columbus.civ@mail.mil/ Background

372

SRS - Deer Hunt Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SRS Home SRS Home Welcome to the Savannah River Site Deer Control Activities NOTICE: The Wounded Warrior and Mobility-Impaired deer hunts for the 2013 season have been rescheduled for Friday, Dec. 6, and Saturday, Dec. 7, with the primary hunts rescheduled for Friday, Dec. 20, and Saturday, Dec. 21. Individual letters will be sent to hunters previously selected to participate in the 2013 Deer Hunt Program prior to its being cancelled due to a lapse in federal appropriations. These letters will contain an opportunity to participate in the rescheduled hunts.. The mission of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Deer Control Activities is to conduct a harvest intended to lower the incidence of animal-vehicle collisions on the site and reduce the feral hog damage to valuable plant communities, timber plantations, and ecological research sites.

373

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availability; DOE/EIS-0286: Final Hanford Site Solid Waste Program Environmental Impact Statement, Richland, Washington (2/13/04)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

15 15 Federal Register / Vol. 69, No. 30 / Friday, February 13, 2004 / Notices ratings assigned to draft environmental impact statements (EISs) was published in FR dated April 04, 2003 (68 FR 16511). Draft EISs ERP No. D-AFS-J65397-WY Rating LO, Woodrock Project, Proposal for Timber Sale, Travel Management and Watershed Restoration, Implementation, Bighorn National Forest, Tongue Ranger District, Sheridan County, WY. Summary: EPA has lack of objections to the proposed action based on the predicted overall improvement of forest resource conditions. EPA suggests that the final EIS provide qantification sediment from erosion estimates and monitor water quality and habitat quality in streams. ERP No. D-AFS-K65265-AZ Rating LO, Bar T Bar Anderson Springs Allotment Management Plans to

374

KT Monograph Black and White Photos 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

footings of W626 and W627 C6:38 - Rm 20, SW corner; jars in destruction debris C6:40 - Rm 21, looking west, showing extent of bluish-grey ash on floor (90%) C6:39 - Rm 21: burnt timbers of threshold socket, with square socket, look- ing NE C6:42 - Rm 22... . C7:1), looking NW with storage jar 909 in Level IIc Rm4 behind C8:1 - H18b/d Rm e1 foundations (W779, 782), looking SW (see Fig. C8:1) C8:2 - Rm e5: roof(?) beams on floor (J18/315, 321; see J18b in Fig. C8:1) C8:3 - Rm e6: stone-faced benches...

Douglas, B; Densham, M; Thomas, D C; Postgate, J N

2005-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

375

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-15 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-15 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in October and November 2010, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section in the area between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute MesaOasis Valley hydrostratigraphic model. In particular, the well was intended to help define the structural position and hydraulic parameters of volcanic aquifers potentially down-gradient from underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. It may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-12 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-12 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June and July 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section in the area between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute MesaOasis Valley hydrostratigraphic model. In particular, the well was intended to help define the structural position and hydraulic parameters for volcanic aquifers potentially down-gradient from historic underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. It may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Effects of wood fuel use on plant management  

SciTech Connect

During the winter of 1979-80, about 20% of homeowners in the New England region relied on wood fuel as their primary source of heat; an additional 30% used wood heat on a supplementary basis. The demand for wood put a great strain on the New England forests. However, experts in forest management believe that with proper management and utilization, national forest growth could replace as much as four billion gpy of oil by 2023. Implications for the forests of the Upper Great Lakes region of increased use of public and private woodlands for fuel are examined. Conflicts that could arise with the tourist and recreation industry, and with wilderness preservation interests, and discussed. Wood wastes generated by timber harvesting, sawmills, and lumber manufacturing could be collected and used as fuel, thus reducing the amount of raw wood resources needed to fill the increasing demand. (6 photos)

Harris, M.; Buckmann, C.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Age constraints on fluid inclusions in calcite at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The {sup 207}Pb/{sup 235}U ages for 14 subsamples of opal or chalcedony layers younger than calcite formed at elevated temperature range between 1.88 {+-} 0.05 and 9.7 {+-} 1.5 Ma with most values older than 6-8 Ma. These data indicate that fluids with elevated temperatures have not been present in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain since about 1.9 Ma and most likely since 6-8 Ma. Discordant U-Pb isotope data for chalcedony subsamples representing the massive silica stage in the formation of the coatings are interpreted using a model of the diffusive loss of U decay products. The model gives an age estimate for the time of chalcedony formation around 10-11 Ma, which overlaps ages of clay minerals formed in tuffs below the water table at Yucca Mountain during the Timber Mountain thermal event.

Neymark, Leonid A.; Amelin, Yuri V.; Paces, James B.; Peterman, Zell E.; Whelan, Joseph F.

2001-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

379

Assessment of Aided Phytostabilization of Copper-Contaminated Soil by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Chemical Extractions  

SciTech Connect

Field plots were established at a timber treatment site to evaluate remediation of Cu contaminated topsoils with aided phytostabilization. Soil containing 2600 mg kg{sup -1} Cu was amended with a combination of 5 wt% compost and 2 wt% iron grit, and vegetated. Sequential extraction was combined with extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to correlate changes in Cu distribution across five fractions with changes in the predominant Cu compounds two years after treatment in parallel treated and untreated field plots. Exchangeable Cu dominated untreated soil, most likely as Cu(II) species non-specifically bound to natural organic matter. The EXAFS spectroscopic results are consistent with the sequential extraction results, which show a major shift in Cu distribution as a result of soil treatment to the fraction bound to poorly crystalline Fe oxyhydroxides forming binuclear inner-sphere complexes.

J Kumpiene; M Mench; C Bes; J Fitts

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

Advanced Blade Manufacturing Project - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The original scope of the project was to research improvements to the processes and materials used in the manufacture of wood-epoxy blades, conduct tests to qualify any new material or processes for use in blade design and subsequently build and test six blades using the improved processes and materials. In particular, ABM was interested in reducing blade cost and improving quality. In addition, ABM needed to find a replacement material for the mature Douglas fir used in the manufacturing process. The use of mature Douglas fir is commercially unacceptable because of its limited supply and environmental concerns associated with the use of mature timber. Unfortunately, the bankruptcy of FloWind in June 1997 and a dramatic reduction in AWT sales made it impossible for ABM to complete the full scope of work. However, sufficient research and testing were completed to identify several promising changes in the blade manufacturing process and develop a preliminary design incorporating these changes.

POORE, ROBERT Z.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Effect of coarse woody debris manipulation on soricid and herpetofaunal communities in upland pine stands of the southeastern coastal plain.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract -The majority of studies investigating the importance of coarse woody debris (CWD) to forest- floor vertebrates have taken place in the Pacific Northwest and southern Appalachian Mountains, while comparative studies in the southeastern Coastal Plain are lacking. My study was a continuation of a long-term project investigating the importance of CWD as a habitat component for shrew and herpetofaunal communities within managed pine stands in the southeastern Coastal Plain. Results suggest that addition of CWD can increase abundance of southeastern and southern short-tailed shrews. However, downed wood does not appear to be a critical habitat component for amphibians and reptiles. Rising petroleum costs and advances in wood utilization technology have resulted in an emerging biofuels market with potential to decrease CWD volumes left in forests following timber harvests. Therefore, forest managers must understand the value of CWD as an ecosystem component to maintain economically productive forests while conserving biological diversity.

Davis, Justin, Charles

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

California's forest resources. Preliminary assessment  

SciTech Connect

This Preliminary Assessment was prepared in response to the California Forest Resources Assessment and Policy Act of 1977 (FRAPA). This Act was passed to improve the information base upon which State resource administrators formulate forest policy. The Act provides for this report and a full assessment by 1987 and at five year intervals thereafter. Information is presented under the following chapter titles: introduction to the forest resources assessment program; the forest area: a general description; classifications of the forest lands; the watersheds; forest lands and the air resource; fish and wildlife resources; the forested rangelands; the wilderness; forest lands as a recreation resource; the timber resource; wood energy; forest lands and the mineral, fossil fuels, and geothermal energy resources; mathematically modeling California's forest lands; vegetation mapping using remote sensing technology; important forest resources legislation; and, State and cooperative State/Federal forestry programs. Twelve indexes, a bibliography, and glossary are included. (JGB)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Implementation of the hazardous debris rule  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous debris includes objects contaminated with hazardous waste. Examples of debris include tree stumps, timbers, boulders, tanks, piping, crushed drums, personal protective clothing, etc. Most of the hazardous debris encountered comes from Superfund sites and other facility remediation, although generators and treaters of hazardous waste also generate hazardous debris. Major problems associated with disposal of debris includes: Inappropriateness of many waste treatments to debris; Difficulties in obtaining representative samples; Costs associated with applying waste specific treatments to debris; Subtitle C landfill space was being used for many low hazard debris types. These factors brought about the need for debris treatment technologies and regulations that addressed these issues. The goal of such regulation was to provide treatment to destroy or remove the contamination if possible and, if this is achieved, to dispose of the cleaned debris as a nonhazardous waste. EPA has accomplished this goal through promulgation of the Hazardous Debris Rule, August 18, 1992.

Sailer, J.E.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-130- Keeler-Tillamook)(3/10/03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0, 2003 0, 2003 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEP/4 SUBJECT: Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-130- Keeler-Tillamook) Mark Newbill Natural Resource Specialist- TFE/Chemawa Proposed Action: Vegetation Management for the Keeler Tillamook 115 kV transmission line from structure 1/7 through structure 58/2, and along adjacent portions of the Keeler-Forest Grove #2 115KV transmission line. In addition the project includes 11miles of the 115KV Timber Tap. Location: The project is located in the BPA Eugene Region, Tillamook and Washington Counties, Oregon. Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). Description of the Proposal: BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-

385

Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Name Liberia-US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation Agency/Company /Organization United States Forest Service Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Background analysis Website http://www.fs.fed.us/global/to Country Liberia Western Africa References US Forest Service Climate Change Technical Cooperation[1] "Liberia contains over 40% of the remaining closed canopy rainforest in West Africa, a sizeable carbon sink. The Forest Service works with the Government of Liberia to reorganize its forest service and forestry sector in the post-conflict era. The US Forest Service helped develop a chain of custody system for tracking timber and a financial management

386

Good Practice Guidance on the Sustainable Mobilisation of Wood in Europe |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Good Practice Guidance on the Sustainable Mobilisation of Wood in Europe Good Practice Guidance on the Sustainable Mobilisation of Wood in Europe Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Good Practice Guidance on the Sustainable Mobilisation of Wood in Europe Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Economic Commission for Europe Partner: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Sector: Land Focus Area: Biomass, Forestry Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.unece.org/publications/oes/Timber_wood-mobilization-good_practice- UN Region: "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

387

ARM - Feature Stories and Releases Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 8, 2013 [Feature Stories and Releases] July 8, 2013 [Feature Stories and Releases] Aerosol Research Heats Up During Summer Fire Season Bookmark and Share Smoke plumes rise from a forest fire. Smoke plumes rise from a forest fire. While the impacts of wildfires on people and the surrounding environment are apparent, the effect on the atmosphere from smoky soot particles-a type of aerosol-is much less so. Whether from grass, timber, or brush, each type of biological material releases its own sooty chemical signature that interacts differently with sunlight, clouds, and other particles in the sky. How does this mingling affect Earth's climate? Enter the Biomass Burning Observation Project, or BBOP. Beginning in July, scientists funded by the U.S. Department of Energy will maneuver a high-tech research aircraft into the plumes of wildfires to

388

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency; Environmental Impact Statements; Notice of Availbility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

02 02 Federal Register / Vol. 68, No. 70 / Friday, April 11, 2003 / Notices Exchange for Construction of New Seismically Stable Facilities, Cities of El Sequndo and Hawthorne, Los Angeles County, CA, Comment Period Ends: May 27, 2003, Contact: Jason Taylor, (310) 363-0142. This document is available on the Internet at: http://www.pirniewest.com/ LAAFB. EIS No. 030159, Final EIS, AFS, CA, North Fork Fire Salvage Project, Harvest Salvage, Merchantable Timber Volume Sale and Sierra National Forest Land and Resource Management Plan, Implementation, Bass Lake Ranger District, Madera County, CA, Wait Period Ends: May 12, 2003, Contact: Michael Price, (559) 877-2218. EIS No. 030160, Final Supplement, AFS, UT, Griffin Springs Resource Management Project, New Information concerning the Life

389

Forestry Policies (New York) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Forestry Policies (New York) Forestry Policies (New York) Forestry Policies (New York) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Program Info State New York Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Environmental Conservation New York has nearly 19 million acres of forested land, about 63 percent of the states land area. These lands are managed by the State Department of Environmental Conservation. The Department issued its Forest Action Plan in 2010, which includes discussion of sustainable markets and the promotion of forest products for energy uses by focusing on technical assistance, favorable policies and incentives: http://www.dec.ny.gov/docs/lands_forests_pdf/fras070110.pdf The Department provides directory for timber and mill residue users: http://www.dec.ny.gov/lands/46935.html

390

Completion report for Well ER-EC-6  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-6 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the DOE's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 66-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 485.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 434.6 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with four isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 33 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 504.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. Intense hydrothermal alteration was observed below the depth of 640 m. The preliminary geologic interpretation indicates that this site may be located on a buried structural ridge that separates the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

M. J. Townsend

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-1  

SciTech Connect

Well ER-EC-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 675.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 566.3 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 31 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 680 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, the Crater Flat Group, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-EC-1 indicates the presence of a structural trough or bench filled with a thick section of post-Rainier Mesa lava. These data also suggest that this site is located on a buried structural ridge that may separate the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

Townsend, M.J.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-4 was drilled for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 263.7 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,062.8 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of 228.3 meters, two months after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 35 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 286.5 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well was collared in basalt and penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Thirsty Canyon Group, the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon, and the Timber Mountain Group. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from this well helps pinpoint the location of the western margin of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southern Nevada volcanic field.

M. J. Townsend

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The origin of the lost fleet of the mongol empire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1281 C.E., under the rule of Kublai Khan, the Mongols sent a fleet of more than 4000 vessels to subjugate the island nation of Japan. A powerful typhoon, called kamikaze, dashed the invading fleet into pieces on the shores of Japan and thus saved the nation from foreign rule. Historical sources suggest there were three principal vessel types involved in this event: V-shaped cargo ships for transporting provisions to the front, constructed in Chinas Fukien Province; miscellaneous flat and round bottomed vessels made along the Yangtze River; and flat bottomed landing craft from Korea. In the recent past, the remains of the fleet were discovered at the Takashima underwater site in western Japan, unveiling numerous artifacts including weaponry, shipboard items, and sections of hull; however, between 1281 and the late twentieth century the site has seen major disturbances, and the artifacts are often in poor condition. Because the site contains the remains of ships built in China and Korea, the interpretation of the artifacts is also extremely complex. In order to determine the origin of the vessels, a logical framework is necessary. The author has created a timber category database, analyzed methods of joinery, and studied contemporary approaches to shipbuilding to ascertain the origins and types of vessels that composed the Mongol fleet. Although no conclusive statements can be made regarding the origins of the vessels, it appears that historical documents and archaeological evidence correspond well to each other, and that many of the remains analyzed were from smaller vessels built along the Yangtze River Valley. Large, V-shaped cargo ships and the Korean vessels probably represent a small portion of the timbers raised at the Takashima site. As the first research project of its kind in the region, this study is a starting point for understanding the real story of the Mongol invasion of Japan, as well as the history of shipbuilding in East Asia.

Sasaki, Randall James

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Geophysical framework of the southwestern Nevada volcanic field and hydrogeologic implications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gravity and magnetic data, when integrated with other geophysical, geological, and rock-property data, provide a regional framework to view the subsurface geology in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. The authors have loosely divided the region into six domains based on structural style and overall geophysical character. For each domain, they review the subsurface tectonic and magmatic features that have been inferred or interpreted from previous geophysical work. Where possible, they note abrupt changes in geophysical fields as evidence for potential structural or lithologic control on ground-water flow. They use inferred lithology to suggest associated hydrogeologic units in the subsurface. The resulting framework provides a basis for investigators to develop hypotheses for regional ground-water pathways where no drill-hole information exists. The authors discuss subsurface features in the northwestern part of the Nevada Test Site and west of the Nevada Test Site in more detail to address potential controls on regional ground-water flow away from areas of underground nuclear-weapons testing at Pahute Mesa. Subsurface features of hydrogeologic importance in these areas are (1) the resurgent intrusion below Timber Mountain, (2) a NNE-trending fault system coinciding with western margins of the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes, (3) a north-striking, buried fault east of Oasis Mountain extending for 15 km, which they call the Hogback fault, and (4) an east-striking transverse fault or accommodation zone that, in part, bounds Oasis Valley basin on the south, which they call the Hot Springs fault. In addition, there is no geophysical nor geologic evidence for a substantial change in subsurface physical properties within a corridor extending from the northwestern corner of the Rainier Mesa caldera to Oasis Valley basin (east of Oasis Valley discharge area). This observation supports the hypothesis of other investigators that regional ground water from Pahute Mesa is likely to follow a flow path that extends southwestward to Oasis Valley discharge area.

Grauch, V.J.S.; Sawyer, D.A.; Fridrich, C.J.; Hudson, M.R.

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

395

Properties of Geopressured Brines and Wells in the Gulf Coast and Opportunities for Industrial/Research Participation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geopressured reservoirs exhibit pressure gradients in excess of the normal hydrostatic gradient. In the Gulf Coast area the normal gradient is 0.465 psi/ft. Pressures may approach lithostatic pressure and have been measured as high as 1.05 psi/ft in the Gulf Coast area. Geopressured basins exist worldwide and in a number of U.S. locations, east, west, north and south. The Gulf Coast area has been studied extensively and is the subject of the DOE geopressured-geothermal research at present. The assumed ranges in resource characteristics include: depth from -12,000 to > -20,000 feet, brine flow rate from 20,000 to 40,000 bpd, temperature from 300 to 400 F, bottomhole pressure from 12,000 to 18,500 psi; salinity from 20,000 to 200,000 mg/L, gas-water ratio from 40 to 80 scf/bbl., and condensate from a trace to production. Energy in the geopressured resource includes gas, thermal, and hydraulic energy. It has been estimated that there are 6,000 quads of methane and 11,000 quads of thermal energy in the Gulf Coast area geopressured-geothermal reservoirs. Estimates run as high as 50,000 quad for the thermal energy (Wallace et al, 1978). Present industrial interest in the Pleasant Bayou and Hulin wells includes: desalination plants, an economic study by a power company for regional use, use of generated electricity by a coalition of towns, aquaculture (catfish farming) research program, and an unsolicited proposal for enhanced oil recovery of heavy oil. Direct uses of the hot brine cover dozens of industries and processes. An example of multiple uses in the USSR is shown. Outside agency interest includes the U.S.G.S., N.S.F., G.R.I., and possibly other areas within DOE. A research spin-off: a sensitive in-line benzene monitor has been designed by USL and will be tested in the near future. An in-line pH monitor is also under development for the harsh conditions of the geopressured-geothermal wells.

Wys, J. Nequs- de

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

396

Preliminary test results and geology of the DOE/Superior Hulin. number sign. 1 geopressured-geothermal well, Vermillion Parish, Louisiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE/Superior Hulin {number sign}1 well is the most recent of the current three geopressured-geothermal prospects being tested by the Department of Energy (DOE) under its geopressured-geothermal program initiated in 1975. The other prospects under evaluation are Gladys McCall {number sign}1 (Cameron Parish, LA) and Pleasant Bayou {number sign}2 (Brazoria County, TX). The main objective of this research program is to evaluate the commercial viability of energy production from high temperature (275{degrees}+F.), geopressured, natural-gas-saturated brine sandstone aquifers occur-ring in the Gulf Coast area. The DOE/Superior Hulin {number sign}1 well is located 7.5 mi (12 km) south of the town of Erath, Louisiana. It was originally drilled and later sidetracked as an exploration well by Superior Oil Company to a depth of 21,549 ft (6,568 m) and completed in 1979. The well produced 0.3 bcf gas in 19 months from the interval between 21,059 and 21,094 ft (6,419-6,429 m). Later, owing to production problems caused by tubing/casing failure, Superior abandoned production and transferred the well to DOE for testing under the geopressured-geothermal program. The well has recently been cleaned and recompleted by Eaton Operating Company, Houston, Texas, and plugged back to 20,725 ft (6,317 m). This well penetrates the deepest known Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal reservoir and has a maximum recorded temperature of 338{degrees}F with a 560 ft (171 m) thick sandstone. Regional geologic work indicates that the Hulin sandstone represents either a submarine canyon or an unstable shelf delta type of environment. The well is presently perforated at the bottom of the sandstone from 20,610 to 20,690 ft (6282-6306 m) for preliminary short-term testing now in progress. Initial testing indicates the gas-brine ratio to be 31 SCF/STB.

John, C.J.; Stevenson, D.A.; Groat, C.G. (Louisiana Geological Survey, Baton Rouge (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Silvicultural Activities in Relation to Water Quality in Texas: An Assesment of Potential Problems and Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southern forests are expected to supply a large portion of the Nation's future timber requirement. Projected demands on southern forests continue to exceed allowable cut. As an outgrowth of this demand, intensive management of pine forests enabled the South to produce 45 percent of the Nation's timber harvest in 1970 (USDA, Forest Service, 1973). The Southern Forest Resource Analysis Committee (1969) stated that, if projected timber needs of the year 2000 are to be met, at least ten million acres of bare or poorly stocked land must be planted with pine by 1985 and another twenty million acres converted from low-grade hardwoods to pine. The challenge facing forestry in the South is how to meet this increased demand and maintain an acceptable forest environment in the face of increased taxes, rising labor and equipment costs and predicted petroleum shortages. Undisturbed forests are generally recognized as primary sources of high quality water. Although the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 (Public Law No. 92-500) make pollution from forest practices increasingly more important, the effects of these practices on water quality are not known for East Texas. The quality of streamflow from forested watersheds fluctuates constantly in response to natural stress, and can be influenced greatly by man's activities. Forest management practices can potentially influence the following water quality parameters: (1) sediment, (2) nutrients, (3) temperature, (4) dissolved oxygen/organic matter, and (5) introduced chemicals. It must be realized from the onset that sediment due to geologic erosion is a natural component of fresh water streams and that high concentrations may have occurred naturally for short periods due to perturbations in the ecosystem such as wildfires. Sediment is not necessarily a pollutant and only becomes one when it can be demonstrated that it is exceeding natural levels and is interfering with the beneficial use of water. A certain amount of sediment and nutrients are needed in Gulf Bays and Estuaries to maintain their productivity (Mathewson and Minter, 1976; Diener, 1964; Ketchum, 1967). Texas does not have a stream water quality standard for sediment and due to the complexities involved will probably not develop one. Thus, sediment as used in this report, becomes important: (1) as a carrier of plant nutrients and forest chemicals, and (2) in that practices which reduce sediment loss will usually reduce nutrient, organic matter and introduced chemical losses and prevent water temperature increases, as well. This report is the result of an interagency contract between Texas Department of Water Resources, Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and Texas Water Resources Institute to: (1) develop an overview of commercial forests and forestry operations in Texas, (2) identify, describe and characterize control strategies for nonpoint sources of pollution from silvicultural activities, and (3) develop and demonstrate a methodology for selecting control strategies in given problem situations. The following topics are covered: (1) an overview of forestry in East Texas, (2) silvicultural practices and nonpoint sources of pollution, (3) control strategies, (4) methodology for the selection of control strategies, (5) institutional aspects of controlling silvicultural nonpoint source pollution, (6) ongoing research and research needs, and (7) hydrology of East Texas. It is important to recognize that this report does not specify that nonpoint pollution from forestlands in East Texas is a problem. Likewise, the report does not set pollution control goals or criteria that should be met by a control plan, since this is the responsibility of the State. In areas where a potential nonpoint pollution problem exists; the suggested control strategies should be useful in selecting control measures that are appropriate to the special conditions imposed by differences in climate, soil, topography, and forest practice.

Blackburn, W. H.; Hickman, C. A.; deSteiguer, J. E.; Jackson, B. D.; Blume, T. A.; DeHaven, M. G.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

399

Shaking Table Tests Validating Two Strengthening Interventions on Masonry Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Masonry buildings constitute quite often a precious cultural heritage for our cities. In order to future generations can enjoy this heritage, thence, effective projects of protection should be developed against all the anthropical and natural actions which may irreparably damage old masonry buildings. However, the strengthening interventions on these constructions have to respect their authenticity, without altering the original conception, not only functionally and aesthetically of course, but also statically. These issues are of central interests in the Messina area, where the seismic protection of new and existing constructions is a primary demand. It is well known, in fact, that the city of Messina lies in a highly seismic zone, and has been subjected to two destructive earthquakes in slightly more than one century, the 1783 Calabria earthquake and the more famous 1908 Messina-Reggio Calabria earthquake. It follows that the retrofitting projects on buildings which survived these two events should be designed with the aim to save the life of occupants operating with 'light' techniques, i.e. respecting the original structural scheme. On the other hand, recent earthquakes, and in particular the 1997 Umbria-Marche sequence, unequivocally demonstrated that some of the most popular retrofitting interventions adopted in the second half the last century are absolutely ineffective, or even unsafe. Over these years, in fact, a number of 'heavy' techniques proliferated, and therefore old masonry buildings suffered, among others, the substitution of existing timber slabs with more ponderous concrete slabs and/or the insertion of RC and steel members coupled with the original masonry elements (walls, arches, vaults). As a result, these buildings have been transformed by unwise engineers into hybrid structures, having a mixed behaviour (which frequently proved to be also unpredictable) between those of historic masonry and new members. Starting from these considerations, a numerical and experimental research has been carried out, aimed at validating two different strengthening interventions on masonry buildings: (i) the substitution of the existing roof with timber-concrete composite slabs, which are able to improve the dynamic behaviour of the structure without excessively increase the mass, and (ii) the reinforcement of masonry walls with FRP materials, which allow increasing both stiffness and strength of the construction. The experimental tests have been performed on a 1:2 scale model of a masonry building resembling a special type, the so-called 'tipo misto messinese', which is proper to the reconstruction of the city of Messina after the 1783 Calabria earthquake. The model, incorporating a novel timber-concrete composite slab, has been tested on the main shaking table available at the ENEA Research Centre 'Casaccia', both before and after the reinforcement with FRP materials. Some aspects related to the definition of the model and to the selection of an appropriate seismic input will be discussed, and numerical results confirming the effectiveness of the interventions mentioned above will be presented.

De Canio, Gerardo; Poggi, Massimo; Clemente, Paolo [Research Centre 'Casaccia', ENEA, Roma (Italy); Muscolino, Giuseppe [Department of Civil Engineering, University of Messina (Italy); Palmeri, Alessandro [School of Engineering, Design and Technology, University of Bradford (United Kingdom)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

400

Biological assessment of the effects of construction and operation of adepleted uranium hexafluoride conversion facility at the Portsmouth, Ohio,site.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) Management Program evaluated alternatives for managing its inventory of DUF{sub 6} and issued the ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'' (DUF{sub 6} PEIS) in April 1999 (DOE 1999). The DUF{sub 6} inventory is stored in cylinders at three DOE sites: Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), near Oak Ridge, Tennessee. In the Record of Decision for the DUF{sub 6} PEIS, DOE stated its decision to promptly convert the DUF{sub 6} inventory to a more stable chemical form. Subsequently, the U.S. Congress passed, and the President signed, the ''2002 Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery from and Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States'' (Public Law No. 107-206). This law stipulated in part that, within 30 days of enactment, DOE must award a contract for the design, construction, and operation of a DUF{sub 6} conversion plant at the Department's Paducah, Kentucky, and Portsmouth, Ohio, sites, and for the shipment of DUF{sub 6} cylinders stored at ETTP to the Portsmouth site for conversion. This biological assessment (BA) has been prepared by DOE, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 and the Endangered Species Act of 1974, to evaluate potential impacts to federally listed species from the construction and operation of a conversion facility at the DOE Portsmouth site. The Indiana bat is known to occur in the area of the Portsmouth site and may potentially occur on the site during spring or summer. Evaluations of the Portsmouth site indicated that most of the site was found to have poor summer habitat for the Indiana bat because of the small size, isolation, and insufficient maturity of the few woodlands on the site. Potential summer habitat for the Indiana bat was identified outside the developed area bounded by Perimeter Road, within the corridors along Little Beaver Creek, the Northwest Tributary stream, and a wooded area east of the X-100 facility. However, no Indiana bats were collected during surveys of these areas in 1994 and 1996. Locations A, B, and C do not support suitable habitat for the Indiana bat and would be unlikely to be used by Indiana bats. Indiana bat habitat also does not occur at Proposed Areas 1 and 2. Although Locations A and C contain small wooded areas, the small size and lack of suitable maturity of these areas indicate that they would provide poor habitat for Indiana bats. Trees that may be removed during construction would not be expected to be used for summer roosting by Indiana bats. Disturbance of Indiana bats potentially roosting or foraging in the vicinity of the facility during operations would be very unlikely, and any disturbance would be expected to be negligible. On the basis of these considerations, DOE concludes that the proposed action is not likely to adversely affect the Indiana bat. No critical habitat exists for this species in the action area. Although the timber rattlesnake occurs in the vicinity of the Portsmouth site, it has not been observed on the site. In addition, habitat for the timber rattlesnake is not present on the Portsmouth site. Therefore, DOE concludes that the proposed action would not affect the timber rattlesnake.

Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-14, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-14 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2012, as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute MesaOasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. The main 55.9-centimeter (cm) hole was drilled to a total depth of 325.5 meters (m) and cased with 40.6-cm casing to 308.1 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 37.5 cm, and drilling continued to a total depth of 724.8 m. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 690.9 m, consists of 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-cm carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Rainier Mesa Tuff. Two piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-14. Both piezometer strings, each with one slotted interval, consist of 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing at the surface, then cross over to 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing just above the water table. The shallow piezometer string was landed at 507.8 m, and the deep piezometer string was landed at 688.6 m. Both piezometer strings are set to monitor groundwater within moderately to densely welded Rainier Mesa Tuff. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, water quality (including tritium and other radionuclides) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 15.2 m of alluvium and 709.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rocks. The stratigraphy and general lithology were not as expected due to the position of Well ER-EC-14 relative to the buried caldera margins of the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The well is located inside the Rainier Mesa caldera, but outside the younger Ammonia Tanks caldera. On November 5, 2012, a preliminary fluid level in the shallow piezometer string was measured at the depth of 311.8 m. This water level depth was taken before installation of the bridge plug (to be placed within the main completion casing to separate the two slotted zones). Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling, will be conducted at a later date. No tritium above levels detectable by field methods were encountered in this hole. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-EC-14 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-EC-14 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. All sanitary and hydrocarbon waste generated was properly handled and disposed of.

None

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

402

Economic Effects of Land Subsidence Due to Excessive Groundwater Withdrawal in the Texas Gulf Coast Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land surface subsidence continues to be a destructive force in the Texas Gulf Coast area. The sinking of the surface has been linked by engineers to the withdrawal of groundwater. Subsidence causes damages and property value losses as saltwater encroachment is increased, property is permanently inundated, and temporary flooding is intensified. This study provides estimates of private and public costs attributable to land subsidence in a 945 square mile area that has subsided one foot or more since 1943. Estimates are divided into three sub-areas within this total area to provide insight into the incidence of subsidence-related costs. The sub-areas considered in this study were sub-area I, an 83 square mile area between Houston and Baytown containing square mile sample blocks adjacent to the upper Galveston bay and/or Buffalo Bayou and the Houston Ship Channel; sub-area II, the 25 square mile area surrounding Clear Lake and adjacent land fronting on Galveston bay; and sub-area III, the remaining area within the total 945 square mile area that had experienced subsidence of approximately two feet or more since 1943. Personal interviews, using questionnaires designed for reporting of damages and property value losses by a random sample of owners of residential, commercial and industrial property, comprised the data base for estimating total private costs attributable to subsidence. Public costs (federal, state, county and municipal) were obtained from personal interviews with public officials. In total, over 1100 interviews were conducted in the study area. Data from these interviews were expanded to total cost estimates for the subsiding area. Physical effects of surface subsidence were found to be largely dependent upon location of the property. Most damages and losses in property value occur in those areas in close proximity to Galveston bay and/or major waterways. Temporary flooding, permanent inundation, bulkheading and landfilling were the major subsidence-related causes of cost and/or losses in property value. Structural damages, largely from subsidence aggravated surface faults, were also significant. These comprised a higher proportion of damages in areas remote from the waterfront than in low lying areas subject to frequent flooding or permanent inundation. Estimated annual costs and property value losses totaled over $31.7 million per year for the study area as a whole. These were primarily costs to residential, commercial and industrial property owners, but included over $.5 million per year in public costs for damage abatement or repair to public facilities. Estimated costs by sub-areas revealed a higher incidence and intensity of damage and property value loss in waterfront (I and II) than in non-waterfront areas (III). Estimated costs in sub-areas I, II and III were $8.79 million, $5 million and $17.4 million, respectively. Sub-area I, which made up about 8.8 percent of the total study area, experienced 27.7 percent of total subsidence-related costs. Sub-area II experienced 15.8 percent of total costs while occupying only 3 percent of the total study area. And, although sub-area III had almost 55 percent of the total costs, it includes over 88 percent of the total area. Hence, subsidence damages and losses in property value are concentrated heavily in areas in close proximity to the immediate coastline of Galveston bay, Buffalo Bayou, Clear Lake and Taylor Lake. Other sections throughout the study area experienced damages and property losses but less frequently and less intensively. A comparative analysis of the total costs of groundwater pumping with alternative surface water importation was developed to examine the economic feasibility of importing surface water to displace groundwater as a means of avoiding annual subsidence costs. A break-even analysis revealed that for the five year period 1969-73, the importation of surface water to meet all the area's water needs (up to 198.16 billion gallons per year) would have been economically justifi

Jones, L. L.; Larson, J.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Assessing Potential Acidification of Marine Archaeological Wood Based on Concentration of Sulfur Species  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The presence of sulfur in marine archaeological wood presents a challenge to conservation. Upon exposure to oxygen, sulfur compounds in waterlogged wooden artifacts are being oxidized, producing sulfuric acid. This speeds the degradation of the wood, potentially damaging specimens beyond repair. Sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to identify the species of sulfur present in samples from the timbers of the Mary Rose, a preserved 16th century warship known to undergo degradation through acidification. The results presented here show that sulfur content varied significantly on a local scale. Only certain species of sulfur have the potential to produce sulfuric acid by contact with oxygen and seawater in situ, such as iron sulfides and elemental sulfur. Organic sulfurs, such as the amino acids cysteine and methionine, may produce acid but are integral parts of the wood's structure and may not be released from the organic matrix. The sulfur species contained in the sample reflect the exposure to oxygen while submerged, and this exposure can differ greatly over time and position. A better understanding of the species pathway to acidifications required, along with its location, in order to suggest a more customized and effective preservation strategy. Waterlogged archaeological wood, frequently in the form of shipwrecks, is being excavated for historical purposes in many countries around the world. Even after extensive efforts towards preservation, scientists are discovering that accumulation of sulfate salts results in acidic conditions on the surfaces of the artifacts. Sulfuric acid degrades structural fibers in the wood by acid hydrolysis of cellulose, accelerating the decomposition of the ship timbers. Determining the sulfur content of waterlogged wood is now of great importance in maritime archaeology. Artifact preservation is often more time consuming and expensive than the original excavation; but it is key to the availability of objects for future study as well as maintaining the integrity of historical data and preserving the value of museum pieces. Sulfur occurs in a wide number of oxidation states from -2 to +6, and appears in numerous organic and inorganic compounds in nature. However, it is a very minor component of wood. Sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a valuable technique because it has the ability to detect very low concentrations of sulfur in the specimen. XAS is also sensitive to differences in oxidation states, as well as long and short range order in molecules.

Not Available

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

404

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Flathead River Focus Watershed Coordinator, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has long been involved with funding of the Cooperative Habitat Protection and Improvement with Private Landowners program in accordance with the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish & Wildlife Program (Section 7.7). Section 7.7B.1 requires the establishment of ''at least one model watershed coordinator selected by each representative state''. This project was initiated in 1997 with the purpose of fulfilling the NWPCC's watershed program within the Flathead River basin in western Montana. Currently, the Flathead watershed has been radically altered by hydropower and other land uses. With the construction of Hungry Horse, Bigfork and Kerr dams, the Flathead River system has been divided into isolated populations. Bull trout have been listed as threatened by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and westslope cutthroat trout have been petitioned for listing. Many streams in the drainage have been destabilized during recent decades. Past legal and illegal species introductions are also causing problems. This project fosters in-kind, out-of-place mitigation to offset the impacts of hydroelectric power to 72 miles of the South Fork of the Flathead River and its tributaries upstream of Hungry Horse Dam. Key subbasins within the Flathead drainage, which are critical to native species restoration, are experiencing rapid changes in land ownership and management direction. Subdivision and residential development of agricultural and timber lands adjacent to waterways in the drainage pose one of the greatest threats to weak but recoverable stocks of trout species. Plum Creek Timber Company, a major landholder in the Flathead drainage is currently divesting itself of large tracks of its lakeshore and streamside holdings. Growth of small tract development throughout the area and its tributaries is occurring at a record rate. Immediate to short-term action is required to protect stream corridors through many of these areas if cost-effective recovery efforts are to be implemented. In order to adequately address the issues, other segments of society and other (non-BPA) funding sources must be incorporated into the solution. As stated in the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (section 7.7), ''Comprehensive watershed management should enhance and expedite implementation of actions by clearly identifying gaps in programs and knowledge, by striving over time to resolve conflicts, and by keying on activities that address priorities''. A watershed coordinator helps to initiate and facilitate efforts for addressing the issues mentioned above and pulling together a plan for mitigation. Local support is essential before local governments and individual citizens are going to allow government initiatives to be implemented.

DuCharme, Lynn (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

406

Plant cell walls throughout evolution: towards a molecular understanding of their design principles  

SciTech Connect

Throughout their life, plants typically remain in one location utilizing sunlight for the synthesis of carbohydrates, which serve as their sole source of energy as well as building blocks of a protective extracellular matrix, called the cell wall. During the course of evolution, plants have repeatedly adapted to their respective niche,which is reflected in the changes of their body plan and the specific design of cell walls. Cell walls not only changed throughout evolution but also are constantly remodelled and reconstructed during the development of an individual plant, and in response to environmental stress or pathogen attacks. Carbohydrate-rich cell walls display complex designs, which together with the presence of phenolic polymers constitutes a barrier for microbes, fungi, and animals. Throughout evolution microbes have co-evolved strategies for efficient breakdown of cell walls. Our current understanding of cell walls and their evolutionary changes are limited as our knowledge is mainly derived from biochemical and genetic studies, complemented by a few targeted yet very informative imaging studies. Comprehensive plant cell wall models will aid in the re-design of plant cell walls for the purpose of commercially viable lignocellulosic biofuel production as well as for the timber, textile, and paper industries. Such knowledge will also be of great interest in the context of agriculture and to plant biologists in general. It is expected that detailed plant cell wall models will require integrated correlative multimodal, multiscale imaging and modelling approaches, which are currently underway.

Sarkar, Purbasha; Bosneaga, Elena; Auer, Manfred

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

407

Natural resource management activities at the Savannah River Site. Environmental Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This environmental assessment (EA) reviews the environmental consequences of ongoing natural resource management activities on the Savannah River Site (SRS). Appendix A contains the Natural Resources Management Plant (NRMP). While several SRS organizations have primary responsibilities for different elements of the plan, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Forest Service, Savannah River Forest Station (SRFS) is responsible for most elements. Of the river scenarios defined in 1985, the High-Intensity Management alternative established the upper bound of environmental consequences; it represents a more intense level of resource management than that being performed under current resource management activities. This alternative established compliance mechanisms for several natural resource-related requirements and maximum practical timber harvesting. Similarly, the Low-Intensity Management alternative established the lower bound of environmental consequences and represents a less intense level of resource management than that being performed under current resource management activities. This alternative also established compliance mechanisms, but defined a passively managed natural area. The Proposed Action of this EA describes the current level of multiple-natural resource management. This EA reviews the proposed action, and the high and low intensity alternative scenarios.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

The Beaver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beaver Beaver Nature Bulletin No. 246-A November 26, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE BEAVER The beaver was the first hydraulic engineer. Back in the days when our ancestors were still living in caves, the beaver had been building elaborate dams across streams, digging canals, and sleeping safely in artificial-island homes for thousands of years. This had a profound effect on streams and stream valleys in Europe, Siberia and most of North America, literally changing the face of the earth. Their dams held back flood waters in wet seasons, maintained the flow of streams in times of drought, and built up ground water supplies. The ponds above these dams, which were occasionally more than 1000 feet long, allowed sediment to settle out of the water and form broad meadows which eventually were occupied by tracts of timber and, now, some of our finest farmland. Waterfowl, fish, and a host of other living things thrived here because of the beaver.

409

SRS - Environmental Report for 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Environmental Report - 2004 Environmental Data - 2004 Soil & Groundwater Closure Solid Waste SREL High-Level Waste Site D&D Forestry Maps SRS Search SRS pine cone The Longleaf Pine The longleaf pine (pinus palustris) is one of the dominant pine species at SRS. Distributed in the Atlantic and Gulf coastal plains from Virginia to Texas, the trees are common in dry, sandy locations. At maturity, they generally reach 80-120 feet in height and up to two-and-a-half feet in diameter (with a maximum height of 150 feet and diameter of four feet). They produce cones up to 10 inches long. The longleaf is the preferred pine species of the endangered red-cockaded woodpecker, and large areas of SRS are managed for the species because of the woodpecker. The trees are harvested for timber, and their pine straw (from needles reaching 15 inches in length) is used extensively in landscaping projects. The 2004 SRS Environmental Report's interactive CD and associated web page were designed by Don Lechner and the report cover by Eleanor Justice-both of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's Documentation and Information Services Section - Media Documentation Group. The photograph was taken by Al Mamatey of the company's Environmental Services Section.

410

Springs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Springs Springs Nature Bulletin No. 618 November 19, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist SPRINGS Springs -- cold, clear springs bubbling from hillsides or welling up from secret depths -- played an important part in the settlement of these United States from the Blue Ridge mountains of Virginia and the Great Smokies in Tennessee to the Ozarks of Illinois, Missouri and Arkansas. Always more plentiful in mountainous and hilly country, they were much more numerous and vigorous in those days before the great forests were cut over or destroyed. Then, most of the rainfall was retained and sank into the ground. Springs are fed by ground water. An early settler, penetrating a frontier wilderness with his family and their meager possessions, traveled and searched until he found a suitable home-site. That was determined not only by the quality of the land and what brew on it but also by the availability of water and timber. Although some preferred to dig a well, fearful that the dreaded milk sickness and "the shakes" or ague might lurk in spring water, a favorite location was near some good "strong" spring.

411

Sleeping Birds  

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Sleeping Birds Sleeping Birds Nature Bulletin No. 445-A February 19, 1972 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SLEEPING BIRDS Each winter, a few years ago, several thousand crows, roosted in the big woods near our house. In daytime they spread out over the countryside to find food but each evening, about sundown, they came streaming back in a continuous parade that took almost an hour to pass. In flocks of dozens or hundreds with scattered birds between, they flew the same route every day. In downstate Illinois, similar flocks roost in overgrown hedgerows of osage orange, isolated groves of timber, or on willow grown islands in large rivers. A much smaller flock still roosts the year-round in our woods. Ordinarily they slip in a little before dusk and settle down quietly but occasionally there is a hullabaloo as if they were squabbling over a favorite perch occupied by some newcomers. Just before dawn, one old bird we call "the bugler" caws three times. A minute or two later he repeats it. Then, one by one, drowsy voices of other crows are heard -- much like human sleepyheads in the morning. Sometimes an alarm call is heard during the night followed by a general clamor as if the flock had been disturbed by a marauding owl, weasel or raccoon. Crows are very wary and, like most birds, light sleepers.

412

Bats  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bats Bats Nature Bulletin No. 147 March 20, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt of Conservation BATS Flying squirrels only glide. Bats are the only fur bearing animals that truly fly, and they've been doing it for at least 50 million years Twisting, looping and zig-zagging through the air, at dusk and dawn, they catch flying insects more skillfully than the swallow or the chimney swift. Each twist and turn means another insect caught, A bat can consume one-half its weight in insects in a single twilight. Harmful? No, We have one in Trailside Museum that likes to be handled and fed mealworms. They do not get in women's hair. They do not distribute our kind of bed bugs. They are not blind; even in daytime they see fairly well. But they can fly through timber or the narrow twisting passages of caves in total darkness because they have radar, Bats have large specialized ears, Their squeak is pitched so high that few people can hear it, As they fly they also make a supersonic squeak about 30 times per second and are guided by the echoes bouncing back from obstacles.

413

Sod Houses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Houses Houses Nature Bulletin No. 620 December 3, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist SOD HOUSES In the 1860's and 70's, when pioneer settlers came to homestead free land on the vast lonely prairies of Kansas and Nebraska, they found a country that, except for fringes of cottonwoods and willows along the streams, was treeless. There was no rock and mighty little timber for building houses and barns. Lumber was very expensive and scarce. So was money. However, the prairies were thickly covered with short, drought- enduring buffalo and blue grama grasses. Some of the Indian tribes which not only hunted buffalo but also grew corn -- notably the Pawnee, Osage and Hidatsa -- had large earthlodges. They used sod in the walls and the conical or dome-like roofs had pole rafters covered with willow brush, slough hay, sod, and finally clay. So the homesteaders were inspired to build their homes with slabs of the remarkably thick and tough prairie sod: "Nebraska marble".

414

The Catalpa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalpa Catalpa Nature Bulletin No. 343-A May 3, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation THE CATALPA During the summer of 1905 we were hired by the T. P. & W. Railroad, which runs east and west across central Illinois, to tend the thousands of young Catalpa trees planted along its right-of-way. Other railroads had similar plantations in various parts of the country, some of them very large, from which they expected to grow their own timber for ties, telegraph poles and fence posts. Thousands of farmers, especially in the treeless midwestern prairies, had or were planting windbreaks and orchard-like woodlots of Catalpa. It was known to be a very fast growing tree in the Ohio valley where it was native, and erroneously supposed to be exceptionally durable in contact with the soil -- equal to cedar, black locust, mulberry, osage orange and other species notable for this desirable quality.

415

Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

Castor, S.B. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Lock, D.E. [Mackay School of Mines, Reno, NV (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Conoco's new approach to drill site construction in difficult, remote, swamp and jungle terrain Irian Jaya, Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

In October 1982, Conoco Irian Jaya as operator: and partners: Pertamina, Inpex Bintuni Limited, and Moeco Irian Jaya Company, mobilized construction equipment from Singapore to the KBS ''A'' contract area in Irian Jaya, Indonesia for the purpose of constructing a base camp and drill three exploratory sites. What made this construction effort different from others previously used in Irian Jaya; was that it incorporated several new and unique features, namely: a turnkey approach to construction; that is Conoco providing complete set of specifications and conditions with contractor assuming risks for a lump sum payment; special equipment designed by contractor for Irian Jaya operations; an incentive to co pensate or penalize contractor for helicopter hours flown below or above a predetermined number; structural steel pile platform designs for two swamp locations (Ayot and Aum), as opposed to the more conventional corduroy timber log-plank arrangement; and drilling rig pads designed for specific heli-rig with limited extra space. All work was successfully completed within the time frame stipulated in the contract, that is five months from the time the contractor was notified to begin mobilization of equipment, materials and personnel.

Roodriguez, F.H.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Implementing PURPA : Renewable Resource Development in the Pacific Northwest : Executive Summary.  

SciTech Connect

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities (QFs) and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided cost of providing both capacity and energy. Facilities that qualify for PURPA benefits include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. The mandate of PURPA, coupled with the electrical energy deficits projected to occur in the Pacific Northwest by the mid 1980s, led to resurgence of interest in the development of small, decentralized, non-utility owned and operated generating stations. A variety of would-be developers conducted feasibility studies and initiated environmental permitting and power marketing discussions with appropriate authorities. While many proposed PURPA projects fill by the wayside, others were successfully brought on-line. A variety of public and private sector developers, including cities, counties, irrigation districts, utilities, ranchers, timber companies, and food processing plants, successfully negotiated PURPA-based, or share-the-savings'' power purchase contracts. Other developers run their meter backwards'' or provide energy to their local utilities at the same rate that would otherwise be paid to Bonneville. This document provides a summary resource development of these renewable projects in the Pacific Northwest.

Washington State Energy Office.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Silviculture: growing more wood on less land  

SciTech Connect

Maximizing the production of a concentrated, homogeneous wood supply virtually dictates intensively managed plantations. This management system implies: (1) improving the composite genotype of plantation trees; (2) optimizing their morphological and physiological condition prior to and at planting time; (3) improving the physiological environment of the crop at all stages of development; (4) protecting the plantation from pests and catastrophic events; and (5) modifying the shapes, dimensions, and qualities of crop trees to enhance the utility and value of harvested timber. Beneficiation of forest residuals for fiber and fuel is pushing forest industry relentlessly toward total stand utilization. Relative to the productivity of undisturbed or partially logged humid tropical forests, plantation growth rates represent four-fold to ten-fold increases in volume production. Displacement of some proportion of shifting agriculture and natural forest management systems by intensively managed plantations is desirable and biologically feasible. A key to successful tropical forest management and preservation is population stability, a condition toward which integrated wood conversion facilities supplied by a reliable plantation system can make a major contribution. There are some pressing and many esoteric reasons for conserving forest resources but pressures for utilizing and renewing these resources are immediate and unavoidable.

Gladstone, W.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A conceptual model and preliminary estimate of potential tritium migration from the Benham (U-20c) site, Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U-20c is the site of a large below-water-table nuclear test near the Nevada Test Site boundary. A conceptual model of potential groundwater migration of tritium from U-20c is constructed and quantitatively evaluated in this report. The lower portion of the collapse chimney at Benham is expected to intersect 200 m of permeable rhyolite lava, overlain by similar thicknesses of low-permeability zeolitized bedded tuff, then permeable welded tuff. Vertical groundwater flow through the chimney is predicted to be minimal, horizontal transport should be controlled by the regional groundwater flow. Analytic solutions treating only advective transport indicate 1 to 2 km of tritium movement (95% confidence interval 0.7--2.5 km) within 5 years after test-related pressure-temperature transients have dissipated. This point lies at the axis of a potentiometric surface trough along the west edge of Area 20, Nevada Test Site. Within 25 years, movement is predicted to extend to 3 km (95% confidence interval 2--5 km) approximately to the intersection of the trough and the Nevada Test Site boundary. Considering the effects of radioactive decay, but not dispersion, plume concentration would fall below Safe Drinking Water Act standards by 204 years, at a predicted distance of 11 km (95% confidence interval 7--31 km). This point is located in the eastern portion of the Timber Mountain Caldera moat within the Nellis Air Force Range (military bombing range).

Brikowski, T.; Mahin, G. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Bald eagle habitat suitability on Melton Hill Reservoir and the Clinch River  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The area around Melton Hill Reservoir and sections of the Clinch River along the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) provide suitable habitat for bald eagles for both breeding and wintering activities. Primary limitations on habitat suitability appear to be human activity in aquatic habitats and along shoreline areas, and human development along shoreline areas. ORR provides the majority of the suitable habitat because shoreline development is very limited. Four eagle management strategies discussed for ORR include planning development away from high-quality habitats, allowing forest stands near water to mature, conducting timber stand improvement to foster growth and development in pines and hardwoods, and using introductions to foster the development of a breeding population. The primary objective of this project was to make a qualitative assessment of bald eagle habitat suitability along Melton Hill Reservoir and the Clinch River and in adjacent areas on the ORR, including the proposed Advanced Neutron Source site. This survey`s aim was to provide ORR managers with an indication of whether suitable habitat exists and, if so, where it occurs on ORR. This information should provide the basis for incorporating eagle management into the overall ORR land management plan.

Buehler, D.A. [Univ., of Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "bayou choctaw timber" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Western Ledge Reef Wreck: The Analysis and Reconstruction of the Late 16th-Century Ship of the Spanish Empire  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Western Ledge Reef Wreck, discovered and later excavated in Bermuda between 1989 and 1991, is a prime example of Iberian shipbuilding within a broader Atlantic context. Operating during the late 16th-century, arguably one of the most fascinating periods of Spanish maritime history, the ship epitomizes the culture and technology identified with the celebrated fleets of the Carrera de Indias. By combining the new and previously unavailable data with that of the original reports, this dissertation outlines the structural details of this small utilitarian vessel which plowed the Atlantic Ocean between Spain and the Spanish America. Regarded as one of the better preserved Iberian shipwrecks in the New World, the hull timbers were disassembled and raised to the surface for detailed recording and analysis; the most comprehensive being the study and reconstruction presented in this dissertation. This data not only illustrates the transition from late medieval ship construction founded on the unempirical and intuitive style of local shipwrights to that of the geometrically- and scientific-rooted Renaissance design philosophy, but also to a frame-led assembly sequence. The hull remains and associated cultural material excavated from the site prove to be an important 16th- and 17th-century collection of Spanish and New World origin, which collectively reinforce the notion that the Western Ledge Reef Wreck was on its homebound course when it sunk among treacherous Bermuda reefs sometime between 1560 and 1600.

Bojakowski, Piotr

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Completion Report for Well ER-EC-11 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well ER-EC-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2009 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to investigate radionuclide migration down-gradient from Well Cluster ER-20-5 and Well ER-20-7 and across the northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone into the area referred to as the Bench, between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex. A secondary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the shallow- to intermediate-depth Tertiary volcanic section in the Bench area. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section to reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model (Bechtel Nevada, 2002). The main 52.1-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 507.5 meters and then opened to a diameter of 66.0 centimeters. It was cased with 50.8-centimeter casing to 504.9 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 47.0 centimeters, and drilling continued to a total depth of 979.3 meters. It was then cased with 34.0-centimeter casing set at 965.5 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 1,264.3 meters. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 1,262.5 meters, consists of 19.4-centimeter stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-centimeter carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring aquifers. Four piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-11. A string of carbon-steel 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 50.8-centimeter casing, within the 66.0-centimeter borehole for access to the Timber Mountain aquifer, and landed at 475.3 meters. A second string of 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 34.0-centimeter casing, within the 47.0-centimeter borehole for access to the Benham aquifer, and landed at 911.7 meters. A third piezometer string consists of 7.3-centimeter stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 6.0-centimeter carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 1,029.5 meters to monitor the Tiva Canyon aquifer. The deepest string of 7.3-centimeter tubing was landed at 1,247.8 meters to monitor the Topopah Spring aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 meters, 67 percussion gun and rotary sidewall core samples, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 1,264.3 meters of Tertiary volcanic rock, including three saturated welded-tuff aquifers and one saturated lava-flow aquifer. A water level was measured in the Timber Mountain aquifer at 449.6 meters, during open-hole geophysical logging on September 20, 2009. The fluid level measured after the total depth was reached and the upper aquifer was cased off was 450.0 meters when measured in the open borehole on October 17, 2009. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated that tritium levels averaging approximately 12,430 picocuries per liter (less than Safe Drinking Water Act levels) were encountered within the Benham aquifer. Tritium was below the minimum detectable activity concentration for samples collected from the Tiva Canyon aquifer and the Topopah Spring aquifer.

NSTec Environmental Management

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Concrete Decks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), several crashworthy wood bridge railings and approach railing transitions have been adapted for use on concrete bridge decks. These railings meet testing and evaluation criteria outlined in National Cooperative Research Program (NCHRP) Report 350, Recommended Procedures for the Safety Performance Evaluation of Highway Features, and include a glued-laminated timber (glulam) rail, with and without a curb, at Test Level- 2 (TL-2), a glulam rail with curb at TL-4, and a glulam curb rail for low-volume roads at TL-1. In adapting the railings from a wood deck to a concrete deck, the critical consideration was railing attachment to the deck. A comparable connection was obtained by an analysis of maximum loads measured by field instrumentation during crash testing or by equating the ultimate capacity of connections used on the wood deck to those required for a concrete deck. For the convenience of the user, full drawing sets are provided in customary U.S. and S.I. units.

United States; Forest Service; Wood Bridge Railings For; Michael A. Ritter; Ronald K. Faller; Paula D. Hilbrich Lee; Barry T. Rosson; Sheila Rimal; Duwadi Abstract

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The Pantano Longarini shipwreck: a reanalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A late antique shipwreck was excavated in the Pantano Longarini marsh in the southeastern corner of Sicily in the 1960s. Despite its excellent preservation, problematic circumstances surrounding its excavation and publication have resulted in scholars ignoring or misinterpreting it. The majority of the data, including original field notes and documentation, are lost, and the drawings, plans, and photographs that remain are sometimes inconsistent and incomplete. My research reanalyzes the remains of this ship to determine how the Sicilians adapted to their marine and economic conditions within the turbulent socio-economic and political climate of late antiquity. The Pantano Longarini shipwreck demonstrates early stages in a shift from the tradition of plank-based construction to the modern system of reliance on an internal framework for structural support. Contemporary wrecks provide parallels, but unique elements distinguish this ship from those typically studied. Extremely thick timbers, a relatively flat bottom and bow and stern ramps argue that the Pantano Longarini ship was designed to carry bulk loads. Although the ship was originally reported as an extremely advanced ship, the present analysis points to a different type of watercraft: a coastal barge. Correctly identifying the Pantano Longarini ship allows us to gather information about the needs of its builders, as well as extends our knowledge of shipping and ship construction in the seventh century.

Kampbell, Sarah Marie

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Load test of the 277W Building high bay roof deck and support structure  

SciTech Connect

The 277W Building high bay roof area was load tested according to the approved load-test procedure, WHC-SD-GN-TP-30015, Revision 1. The 277W Building is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and has the following characteristics: roof deck -- wood decking supported by 4 x 14 timber purlins; roof membrane -- tar and gravel; roof slope -- flat (<10 deg); and roof elevation -- maximum height of about 63 ft. The 227W Building was visited in March 1994 for a visual inspection. During this inspection, cracked areas were visible in the decking, but it was not possible to determine whether these cracks extended completely through the decking, which is 2-in. thick. The building was revisited in March 1994 for the purpose of writing this test report. Because the roof requires personnel access, a test was determined to be the best way to qualify the roof. The conclusions are that the roof has been qualified for 500-lb total roof load and that the ``No Roof Access`` signs can be changed to ``Roof Access Restricted`` signs.

McCoy, R.M.

1994-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

426

Load test of the 277W Building high bay roof deck and support structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 277W Building high bay roof area was load tested according to the approved load-test procedure, WHC-SD-GN-TP-30015, Revision 1. The 277W Building is located in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site and has the following characteristics: roof deck -- wood decking supported by 4 x 14 timber purlins; roof membrane -- tar and gravel; roof slope -- flat (roof elevation -- maximum height of about 63 ft. The 227W Building was visited in March 1994 for a visual inspection. During this inspection, cracked areas were visible in the decking, but it was not possible to determine whether these cracks extended completely through the decking, which is 2-in. thick. The building was revisited in March 1994 for the purpose of writing this test report. Because the roof requires personnel access, a test was determined to be the best way to qualify the roof. The conclusions are that the roof has been qualified for 500-lb total roof load and that the ``No Roof Access`` signs can be changed to ``Roof Access Restricted`` signs.

McCoy, R.M.

1994-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

427

Facility Location Evaluation for Satsop Integrating Transmission : Final Supplement to the Environmental Statement, Fiscal Year 1976 Proposed Program.  

SciTech Connect

Proposed is the construction of a substation near Satsop and two 500-kV transmission lines from the proposed Satsop Substation approximately 24 miles west of Olympia, one running from Satsop to Paul Substation and one running from Satsop to Olympia Substation. Approximately 74 miles of 500-kV transmission line between the proposed Satsop Substation and Olympia and Paul Substations over existing, parallel, and new right-of-way would be required. Between 15 and 31 miles of new access road would also be required. Land use affected would include clearing from 560 to 1180 acres of timber. Approximately one acre of agricultural land would be removed from production and 37 acres temporarily disrupted. In addition approximately 30 acres of land would be required for the substation. Other impacts would include the removal of wildlife habitat associated with the above mentioned right-of-way requirements. Disturbance to wildlife during construction would occur. Some erosion and sedimentation would occur. Visual impacts would result from clearing rights-of-way through heavily forested areas. Noise and other disturbances to residents will occur, primarily during construction.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1976-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

428

Draft Supplement to the Environmental Statement Fiscal Year 1976 Proposed Program : Facility Location Evaluation for Pebble Springs-Marion 500-KV Line Study Area 75-B.  

SciTech Connect

Proposed is construction of an approximately 160 mile long, 500-kV, double-circuit transmission line from the proposed Pebble Springs Substation located southeast of Arlington, Oregon, to the existing Marion Substation, 11 miles west of Maupin, Oregon. Development is also proposed of a major switching complex, Pebble Springs Substation, near Arlington, Oregon. Depending on the final route chosen, from 45 to 71 miles of parallel, 9 to 42 miles of new, and 74 miles of existing right-of-way will be required. New access road requirements will range from 45 to 90 miles. Land use affected by the proposed facilities includes 800 to 855 acres of forestland removed from timber production. In addition, 50 miles of cropland, primarily wheat, and approximately 35 miles of grassland will be crossed. Disturbance to wildlife during construction will occur and habitat associated with the above land uses will be eliminated. Soil erosion and siltation, primarily during and immediately after construction will also occur. Visual impacts will occur near several highways, lakes, rivers, and recreation areas. Disturbances to nearby residents will occur during construction. An additional 45 acres of rangeland will be required for the proposed Pebble Springs Substation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1974-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

429

Implementing PURPA : Renewable Resource Development in the Pacific Northwest : Executive Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1979 requires that electrical utilities interconnect with qualifying facilities (QFs) and purchase electricity at a rate based upon their full avoided cost of providing both capacity and energy. Facilities that qualify for PURPA benefits include solar or geothermal electric units, hydropower, municipal solid waste or biomass-fired power plants, and cogeneration projects that satisfy maximum size, fuel use, ownership, location, and/or efficiency criteria. The mandate of PURPA, coupled with the electrical energy deficits projected to occur in the Pacific Northwest by the mid 1980s, led to resurgence of interest in the development of small, decentralized, non-utility owned and operated generating stations. A variety of would-be developers conducted feasibility studies and initiated environmental permitting and power marketing discussions with appropriate authorities. While many proposed PURPA projects fill by the wayside, others were successfully brought on-line. A variety of public and private sector developers, including cities, counties, irrigation districts, utilities, ranchers, timber companies, and food processing plants, successfully negotiated PURPA-based, or share-the-savings'' power purchase contracts. Other developers run their meter backwards'' or provide energy to their local utilities at the same rate that would otherwise be paid to Bonneville. This document provides a summary resource development of these renewable projects in the Pacific Northwest.

Washington State Energy Office.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Implications of Processing Spatial Data From a Forested  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finland has committed to both increasing timber production and decreasing the nutrient loading caused by forestry, which calls for development of methods to assess environmental impacts of forest management. A simulation model based on the concept of a typical hillslope is applied to describe water and nitrogen processes in a forested catchment. Application of the model requires that spatially distributed catchment data are processed to create parameterisation for a vertical two-dimensional profile. In such a twodimensional catchment description, behaviour of the system at different distances to a stream can be considered. This study explores 1) how changing the location of a clear-cut area is reflected in model results, and 2) how the inevitable simplifications when representing a catchment as a single hillslope may affect the model outcome. The results suggest that description of the catchment with a single two-dimensional profile is a reasonable approximation as long as areas having a high fraction of subsurface runoff (> 60-70%) are not combined with areas where the surface runoff component is dominant. At low hydraulic conductivities the nitrate load was strongly controlled by the distance from the cut area to the stream, and the load increased almost linearly with the inverse of the distance. But when the conductivity value became sufficiently large, the effect of the cutting location became smaller, and the relationship to the inverse of the distance was obscured by snowmelt timing differences in open and forested environments.

Catchment For Hillslope

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Biomass Estimates for Five Western States.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe the woody biomass resource within US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Biomass Program, comprised of southeast Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington. In addition to the regional forest biomass assessment, information will be presented for logging residue, which represents current energy conversion opportunities. The information presented in the report is based on data and relationships already published. Regionally applicable biomass equations are generally not available for species occurring in the west. Because of this, a number of assumptions were made to develop whole-tree biomass tables. These assumptions are required to link algorithms from biomass studies to regional timber inventory data published by the Forest Inventory and Analysis Research Units (FIA), of the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain Research Stations, US Forest Service. These sources and assumptions will be identified later in this report. Tabular biomass data will be presented for 11 resource areas, identified in the FS inventory publications. This report does not include information for the vast area encompassing interior Alaska. Total tress biomass as defined in the report refers to the above ground weight of a tree above a 1.0 foot stump, and exclusive of foliage. A glossary is included that defines specific terms as used in the report. Inventory terminology is derived from forest inventory reports from Forest Inventory and Analysis units at the Intermountain and Pacific Northwest Research Stations. 39 refs., 15 figs., 23 tabs.

Howard, James O.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access Identification of genomic regions related to early flowering in Eucalyptus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The genus Eucalyptus is the most important planted tree to the Brazilian economy. Besides being a source of timber, its wood pulp is mostly used for papermaking. There is a considerable interest in its genetic improvement due to the economic importance of the gender to forestry companies. The time required to obtain ideal populations, after selective breeding, is a limiting factor of classical breeding in these species. However, the breeding program of Suzano Papel & Celulose company obtained a plant of E. grandis with the early flowering character, whose first flowering took place between 60 and 90 days. This plant was grown and its seeds were collected and germinated. Progeny segregated for early flowering after approximately 60 to 90 days. Materials and methods AFLP markers [1] combined with bulk segregant analysis method (BSA) [2] were used to search for specific DNA polymorphisms in the genome to produce markers which could identify the character at any stage of development. AFLP markers showed polymorphisms based on the distribution of restriction sites and differential amplification of the fragments. The methodology followed the routine protocols for the AFLP technique and BSA method. Contrasting bulks were prepared, one bulk with ten normal flowering plants and another with ten early flowering plants. DNA was extracted and digested using two restriction enzymes, a frequent cutting (MseI) and a rare cutting (EcoRI), followed by connection of the adapters.

Vanusa Socorro Leite; Julio Cesar; Santos Otto; Cntia Helena; Duarte Sagawa; Esteban Roberto Gonzalez; Maria Giziane Fagundes; Shinitiro Oda; Celso Luis Marino

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The Seytan Deresi wreck and the Minoan connection in the Eastern Aegean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1975, a team from the Institute of Nautical crographics. Archaeology excavated a pottery assemblage lying at a depth of approximately 30 meters in the bay of keyman Derek (Devil Creek), on the Aegean coast of Turkey east of Bodrum. Despite the absence of ship timbers, the location of the site, the uniform fabric of most of the items, and their distribution on the seabed indicated that the assemblage represented a shipwreck. The potted, comprising exclusively coarseware utilitarian vessels, may have served as merchandise containers and/or constituted trade items, while some may have held the crew' s food and drink supply. After conservation and preliminary study of the material, project director George Bass dated the wreck to the late Middle Bronze Age pointing to Middle Minoan as well as Amatolian influences on the pottery. While it is true that none of the Bronze Age analogues constitutes an exact parallel of any of the Sextan Deresi ceramics, later periods do not provide any closer counterparts. Recent excavations have brought to light material that supports a Middle Bronze Age dating and strengthens the case for the possibly Minoan or Minonmizing nature of the pottery. Additionally, recent work ill Eastern Aegean islands substantiates the tradition of colonization and intensive maritime activity by Minors in the region. Tile pottery from keyman Deresi may have been made in a Minoan settlement of the Eastern Aegean islands or a site on the Anatolian coast where Minors lived and/or traded.

Margariti, Roxani Eleni

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Biomass Estimates for Five Western States.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to describe the woody biomass resource within US Department of Energy's Pacific Northwest and Alaska Regional Biomass Program, comprised of southeast Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington. In addition to the regional forest biomass assessment, information will be presented for logging residue, which represents current energy conversion opportunities. The information presented in the report is based on data and relationships already published. Regionally applicable biomass equations are generally not available for species occurring in the west. Because of this, a number of assumptions were made to develop whole-tree biomass tables. These assumptions are required to link algorithms from biomass studies to regional timber inventory data published by the Forest Inventory and Analysis Research Units (FIA), of the Pacific Northwest and Intermountain Research Stations, US Forest Service. These sources and assumptions will be identified later in this report. Tabular biomass data will be presented for 11 resource areas, identified in the FS inventory publications. This report does not include information for the vast area encompassing interior Alaska. Total tress biomass as defined in the report refers to the above ground weight of a tree above a 1.0 foot stump, and exclusive of foliage. A glossary is included that defines specific terms as used in the report. Inventory terminology is derived from forest inventory reports from Forest Inventory and Analysis units at the Intermountain and Pacific Northwest Research Stations. 39 refs., 15 figs., 23 tabs.

Howard, James O.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

What is the purpose of our national parks?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lively discussion ensues today over the ''mandate'' of America's national parks. Utilitarians say parks are for people-the forest always returns no matter what we do. Consevationists say, let's balance use between recreation and protection of natural resources. Preservationists say, the parks were created to protect the natural resources and recreation must be subordinate. In a capitalistic frenzy following Independence in 1776, Americans consumed, wasted, and sold their forests and wildlife, precipitating a host of ills upon the land such as, drought, floods, and wildlife extinctions. During this period the first 3 public reserves--Hot Springs, Mariposa Bigtree Grove with Yosemite, and Yellowstone were set apartl by Congress for the masses- particularly the poor-as national healing meccas and public playgrounds. Although the nation's timber supply was in danger of depletion by lumber barons who were rapidly harvesting virgin forests, the idea of federal forest reservles was repugnant and resisted by Congress until 1891. During this time Forest Reserves weren't deliberately enacted into law but came in as an amendment to the Timber Culture Act allowing Presidents the right to reserve forests on the headwaters of rivers to prevent seasonal flooding. This was done for conservation--not preservation-reasons, especially during the Teddy Roosevelt/Gifford Pinchot years. Sponsors of the National Park Service bill of 1916 wanted to develop the National Parks for mass use to prevent commercial exploitation by adjacent states of these areas. The law clearly wasn't passed with an environmental agenda in mind. Mather and Albright acting in concert together developed the scenic areas of the parks for recreational use, but left the rest of the park undeveloped which satisfied most environmental groups. Franklin D. Roosevelt sought to help the nation come out of a depression and develop parks with CCC funds. Park visitation improved and rapidly grew following WWII with another infusion of development during the mid-1950's to 60's. An environmental movement took the nation by storm during the period of rapid growth in park visitation. National Parks began losing their scenic appeal from over development and mass visitation. Planning frameworks were developed with names like ROS, C-CAP, VIM, LAC, and VERP to cope with the destructiveness of resource damage from mass visitation. Psychological needs to relieve stress in natural environments have been responsible for millions of visitors seeking recreation in National Parks and retirement communities surrounding them. Parks have been losing species since the 1920's when animal counts began, and will continue unless a science program of species enrichment is adopted. This will require the Park Service to abandon the failing policies of 'natural regulation' and 'nonintervention.' A new policy of natural education should be attempted by the Park Service to instill understanding and overcome fears and discomforts with fauna and flora which exist in the general public.

Manning, Orlinda D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A preliminary assessment of the state of harvest and collection technology for forest residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To meet the 'Twenty in Ten Initiative' goals set in the 2007 State of the Union address, forest resources will be needed as feedstocks for lignocellulosic ethanol production. It has been estimated that 368 million dry tons can be produced annually in the U.S. from logging residues and fuel treatment thinnings. Currently, very little of this woody biomass is used for energy production due to the costs and difficulty in collecting and transporting this material. However, minimizing biomass costs (including harvest, handling, transport, storage, and processing costs) delivered to the refinery is necessary to develop a sustainable cellulosic ethanol industry. Achieving this goal requires a fresh look at conventional timber harvesting operations to identify ways of efficiently integrating energy wood collection and developing cost-effective technologies to harvest small-diameter trees. In conventional whole-tree logging operations, entire trees are felled and skidded from the stump to the landing. The residues (also called slash), consisting of tops and limbs, accumulate at the landing when trees are delimbed. This slash can be ground at the landing with a mobile grinder or transported to another central location with a stationary grinder. The ground material is transported via chip vans, or possibly large roll on/off containers, to the user facility. Cut-to-length harvesting systems are gaining popularity in some locations. In these operations, specialized harvesters that can fall, delimb, and cut logs to length are used. The small diameter tops and limbs accumulate along the machine's track. It can be left in the forest to dry or removed soon after harvest while logs are extracted. Removing slash during the same operation as the wood has been shown to be more efficient. However, leaving residue in the forest to dry reduces moisture content, which improves grinder performance, reduces dry matter loss during storage, and inhibits colonization of fungi that produce harmful spores. In recent years, new machines that are specially designed for collection of small diameter wood have been developed in the U.S. and Europe. Residue bundlers and balers improve transportation and handling efficiency by densifying the material and packaging it so that it can be handled with conventional equipment. An experimental integrated harvester/grinder can fall small diameter trees and feed them into a grinder. The ground material is collected in a bin that can be dumped into a chip van. The harvester head is also capable of delimbing and bucking (cut into sections) small timber to be used for pulp and posts. Limitations of these new technologies are their large capital costs and complexity, leading to high maintenance costs and the need for highly trained operators. To ensure that quality feedstock materials consistently enter the mouth of the refinery, the uniform format supply system concept proposes that feedstock diversity be managed at harvest, much like the current grain supply system. This allows for standardization of key infrastructure components and facilitation of a biomass commodity system. Challenges in achieving a uniform woody biomass supply include, but are not limited to, developing machines for efficient harvest of small-diameter trees in a range of topographies and conditions, developing machines and operating plans for grinding biomass as near to the stump as possible, developing cost-effective drying strategies to reduce losses and mold growth during wood chip storage, and quantifying environmental impacts of slash removal and fuel thinnings to aid landowner decisions and policy development.

Webb, Erin [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Blackwelder, D. Brad [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Muth, David J. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Hess, J. Richard [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Charcoal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charcoal Charcoal Nature Bulletin No. 310 June 9, 1984 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation CHARCOAL The use of charcoal is as old as the written history of mankind. There are many folk tales about the queer lonely men who lived in the forests, cutting wood and converting it into charcoal. In Europe it is still an important fuel for such purposes, for heating homes and, in some countries, for special motors on small automobiles. As late as our Civil War, gunpowder was made from a mixture of saltpeter, charcoal and sulfur -- the charcoal being specifically prepared from the wood of such trees as willow, alder and soft maple. Until 1337, when the hotblast process was discovered, using coke made from coal, charcoal was the only fuel that could be used in the smelting of iron ore. Charcoal burning was an important industry and the "colliers" who supervised the process were respected as craftsmen. Iron making flourished in early New England but by 1750, Pennsylvania, with its wealth of iron ore, limestone, water power and hardwood timber for charcoal. took the lead and became the richest of the thirteen colonies. It supplied most of the pig iron for the armies of General Washington, and rusting cannonballs are still to be found at the remains of some of those old charcoal-fired furnaces. In those days the woodlands of Pennsylvania were always covered with the thin blue haze of smoke from burning charcoal "pits" and the colliers' huts.

438

Tectonic framework of Crater Flat basin, adjacent to Yucca Mountain, Nevada: A preliminary report  

SciTech Connect

Detailed mapping of 9.5--14 Ma volcanic rocks in Crater Flat (CF) and vicinity is being used to test alternative tectonic models which form a basis for seismic risk assessments for a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Preliminary results are: (1) the southern margin of the basin is a NW-trending right-oblique-slip fault; (2) two down-to-the-east normal faults form the western boundary of the basin against 2 different structural domains, a little-extended uplift called Bare Mountain to the south, and the much-extended Fluorspar Hills (FH) to the north. These two domains are separated by the roughly E-trending, left-oblique-slip Fluorspar Canyon fault; (3) Crater Flat basin actually is separated from the Fluorspar Hills by a narrow septum, the Tram Ridge horst (TR), which was a localized site of nondeposition from 11.5--13.1 Ma, and which experienced only minor extension during the peak periods of extension, at 12 and < 11 Ma, in Crater Flat and the Fluorspar Hills, respectively; (4) normal faults within Crater Flat are radial to, and largely decrease in throw northward toward the Timber Mountain caldera complex, which appears to have acted as a pivot point during opening of the basin; (5) increased faulting and tilting of strata with age reflects intermittent tectonism in Crater Flat throughout the volcanic period. The data also suggest a change in least principal stress direction from NNW before 13.1 Ma to WNW after. In combination, these results indicate that Crater Flat basin formed by simultaneous E-W extension and NW-directed right-lateral shear; it could be described as a half-rhombochasm. To date, the authors find no support for a model that explains the basin as a buried caldera. Future mapping is planned to test the differing predictions of strike-slip (Walker Lane) and detachment-fault models.

Fridrich, C. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Federal Center); Price, J. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Geology Dept.)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in Application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in different climate zones Title Application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in different climate zones Publication Type Conference Paper Year of Publication 2009 Authors Krus, Martin, Thierry Stephane Nouidui, and Klaus Sedlbauer Conference Name 6th International Conference on Cold Climate, Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning Conference Location Sisimiut, Groenland Abstract The application of software tools for moisture protection of buildings in different climatic zones is demonstrated in this paper. The basics of the programs are presented together with a typical application for a problem specific for the chosen climatic zone. A 1-D calculation has been performed for tropical climate zone with the improvement of a flat roof in Bangkok as an example. For half timbered buildings, which are common in the temperate zone with the 2-D model an infill insulation and its benefits are demonstrated. Finally the combined appliance of the whole building model and the mould risk prognosis model is shown in detail as a special case for the cold climate zone: In heated buildings of cold climate zones the internal climate with its low relative humidity in wintertime often causes discomfort and health problems for the occupants. In case of using air humidifier the risk of mould growth increases. Instead of an uncontrolled humidifying of the dry air an innovativecontrol system using a thermal bridge, which switches the humidifier off when condensation occurs is presented. To quantify the improvement in the comfort while preventing the risk of mould growth for a typical building comparative calculations of the resulting inner climates and its consequences on comfort have been performed.

440

Food abundance does not determine bird use of early-successional habitat.  

SciTech Connect

Abstract. Few attempts have been made to experimentally address the extent to which temporal or spatial variation in food availability influences avian habitat use. We used an experimental approach to investigate whether bird use differed between treated (arthropods reduced through insecticide application) and control (untreated) forest canopy gaps within a bottomland hardwood forest in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, USA. Gaps were two- to three-year-old group selection timber harvest openings of three sizes (0.13, 0.26, and 0.50 ha). Our study was conducted during four bird use periods (spring migration, breeding, post-breeding, and fall migration) in 2002 and 2003. Arthropods were reduced in treated gaps by 68% in 2002 and 73% in 2003. We used mist-netting captures and foraging attack rates to assess the influence of arthropod abundance on avian habitat use. Evidence that birds responded to arthropod abundance was limited and inconsistent. In 2002, we generally captured more birds in treated gaps of the smallest size (0.13 ha) and fewer birds in treated gaps of the larger sizes. In 2003, we recorded few differences in the number of captures in treated and control gaps. Foraging attack rates generally were lower in treated than in control gaps, indicating that birds were able to adapt to the reduced food availability and remain in treated gaps. We conclude that arthropod abundance was not a proximate factor controlling whether forest birds used our gaps. The abundance of food resources may not be as important in determining avian habitat selection as previous research has indicated, at least for passerines in temperate subtropical regions.

Champlin, Tracey B.; Kilgo, John C.; Moorman, Christopher E.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Status of understanding of the saturated-zone ground-water flow system at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as of 1995  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, which is being studied extensively because it is a potential site for a high-level radioactive-waste repository, consists of a thick sequence of volcanic rocks of Tertiary age that are underlain, at least to the southeast, by carbonate rocks of Paleozoic age. Stratigraphic units important to the hydrology of the area include the alluvium, pyroclastic rocks of Miocene age (the Timber Mountain Group; the Paintbrush Group; the Calico Hills Formation; the Crater Flat Group; the Lithic Ridge Tuff; and older tuffs, flows, and lavas beneath the Lithic Ridge Tuff), and sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic age. The saturated zone generally occurs in the Calico Hills Formation and stratigraphically lower units. The saturated zone is divided into three aquifers and two confining units. The flow system at Yucca Mountain is part of the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek subbasin of the Death Valley groundwater basin. Variations in the gradients of the potentiometric surface provided the basis for subdividing the Yucca Mountain area into zones of: (1) large hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change at least 300 meters in a few kilometers; (2) moderate hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change about 45 meters in a few kilometers; and (3) small hydraulic gradient where potentiometric levels change only about 2 meters in several kilometers. Vertical hydraulic gradients were measured in only a few boreholes around Yucca Mountain; most boreholes had little change in potentiometric levels with depth. Limited hydraulic testing of boreholes in the Yucca Mountain area indicated that the range in transmissivity was more than 2 to 3 orders of magnitude in a particular hydrogeologic unit, and that the average values for the individual hydrogeologic units generally differed by about 1 order of magnitude. The upper volcanic aquifer seems to be the most permeable hydrogeologic unit, but this conclusion was based on exceedingly limited data.

Luckey, R.R.; Tucci, P.; Faunt, C.C.; Ervin, E.M. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

The Great 2008 Chinese ice storm, its socioeconomic-ecological impact, and sustainability lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

. Extreme events often expose vulnerabilities of socioeconomic infrastructures and point to directions of much-needed policy change. Integrated impact assessment of such events can lead to finding of sustainability principles. Southern and central China has for decades been undergoing a breakneck pace of socioeconomic development. In early 2008, a massive ice storm struck this region, immobilizing millions of people. The storm was a consequence of sustained convergence between tropical maritime and continental polar air masses, caused by an anomalously stable atmospheric general circulation pattern in both low and high latitudes. Successive waves of freezing rain occurred during a month period, coating southern and central China with a layer of ice 50 to 160mm in thickness. We conducted an integrated impact assessment of this event to determine whether and how the context of socioeconomic and human-disturbed natural systems may affect the transition of natural events into human disasters. We found: 1) without contingency plans, advanced technologies dependent on interrelated energy supplies can create worse problems during extreme events, 2) the weakest link in disaster response lies between science and decision making, 3) biodiversity is a form of long-term insurance for sustainable forestry against extreme events, 4) sustainable extraction of non-timber goods and services is essential to risk planning for extreme events in forest resources use, 5) extreme events can cause food shortage directly by destroying crops and indirectly by disrupting food distribution channels, 6) concentrated economic development increases societal vulnerability to extreme events, and 7) formalized institutional mechanisms are needed to ensure that unexpected opportunities to learn lessons from weather disasters are not lost in distracting circumstances.

Zhou, Dr. Benzhi [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Ding, Yihui [National Climate Center, China; Wu, Zhongmin [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Shao, Lan [China National Forestry Industry Association; An, Yanfei [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Cao, Yonghui [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Duan, Aiguo [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Kong, Weijian [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Li, Changzhu [Hunan Academy of Forestry, China; Li, Zhengcai [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Sun, Honggang [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Wang, Shengkun [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Wang, Xiaoming [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Wang, Xu [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Yang, Xiaosheng [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Yu, Mukui [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Zeng, Bingshan [Chinese Academy of Forestry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Early life history study of Grande Ronde River Basin chinook salmon. Annual progress report, September 1, 1994--August 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Grande Ronde River originates in the Blue Mountains in northeast Oregon and flows 334 kilometers to its confluence with the Snake River near Rogersburg, Washington. Historically, the Grande Ronde River produced an abundance of salmonids including stocks of spring, summer and fall chinook salmon, sockeye salmon, coho salmon, and summer steelhead. During the past century, numerous factors have caused the reduction of salmon stocks such that only stocks of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead remain. The sizes of spring chinook salmon populations in the Grande Ronde basin also have been declining steadily and are substantially depressed from estimates of historic levels. It is estimated that prior to the construction of the Columbia and Snake River dams, more than 20,000 adult spring chinook salmon returned to spawn in the Grande Ronde River basin. A spawning escapement of 12,200 adults was estimated for the Grande Ronde River basin in 1957. Recent population estimates have been variable year to year, yet remain a degree of magnitude lower than historic estimates. In 1992, the escapement estimate for the basin was 1,022 adults (2.4 {times} number of redds observed). In addition to a decline in population abundance, a constriction of spring chinook salmon spawning distribution is evident in the Grande Ronde basin. Historically, 21 streams supported spawning chinook salmon, yet today the majority of production is limited to eight tributary streams and the mainstem upper Grande Ronde River. Numerous factors are thought to contribute to the decline of spring chinook salmon in the Snake River and its tributaries