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Sample records for bay field gulf

  1. Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois Basin Forest City Basin Northern Appalachian Basin Powder River Basin Uinta Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin C e n t r a l A p p a l a c h i a n B a s i n Michigan Basin Greater Green River Basin Black Warrior Basin North Central Coal Region Arkoma Basin Denver Basin Southwestern Coal Region Piceance Basin Big Horn Basin Wind River Basin Raton Basin Black Mesa Basin Terlingua Field Kaiparowits Basin Deep River Basin SW Colorado

  2. Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission) Jump to: navigation, search Name Field's Point Wastewater Treatment Facility (Narragansett Bay Commission)...

  3. Other Locales Gulf Stream Locale -A Field Laboratory for Cloud Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gulf Stream Locale -A Field Laboratory for Cloud Process S. Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC 27695-8028 Clouds associated with the Gulf Stream Locale, (Figure 1) are in general due to the cyclogenesis or redevelopments of the storms off the east coast of the United States in winters, movement along the coast of the storms that are generated over the Gulf of Mexico in the spring and fall and mesoscale convective circulations

  4. Gulf Coast Green Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gulf Coast Green Energy Place: Bay City, Texas Zip: 77414 Product: The Texas-based company is the exclusive distributor of...

  5. Daya Bay

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bay Daya Bay Basics The basics of Daya Bay computing at PDSF. Read More » Data Management All Daya Bay raw data is transferred to PDSF. Read More » File Systems Daya Bay has space on 2 elizas: 6TB on /eliza7 and 35TB on /eliza16. Read More » Running on Carver The Daya Bay software is installed on PDSF on /common so is therefore unavailable on Carver. At this point there has been no effort to port the code to /project for use on... Read More » Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:11

  6. IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY FROM UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER CARBONATES THROUGH THE APPLICATION OF ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES AT WOMACK HILL OIL FIELD, CHOCTAW AND CLARKE COUNTIES, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-05-20

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates are undertaking a focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling and an integrated field demonstration project at Womack Hill Oil Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The principal research efforts for Year 3 of the project have been recovery technology analysis and recovery technology evaluation. The research focus has primarily been on well test analysis, 3-D reservoir simulation, microbial core experiments, and the decision to acquire new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field area. Although Geoscientific Reservoir Characterization and 3-D Geologic Modeling have been completed and Petrophysical and Engineering Characterization and Microbial Characterization are essentially on schedule, a no-cost extension until September 30, 2003, has been granted by DOE so that new seismic data for the Womack Hill Field can be acquired and interpreted to assist in the determination as to whether Phase II of the project should be implemented.

  7. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-05-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

  8. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-12-31

    Pruet Production Co. and the Center for Sedimentary Basin Studies at the University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, and Wayne Stafford and Associates proposed a three-phase, focused, comprehensive, integrated and multidisciplinary study of Upper Jurassic Smackover carbonates (Class II Reservoir), involving reservoir characterization and 3-D modeling (Phase I) and a field demonstration project (Phases II and III) at Womack Hill Field Unit, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. Phase I of the project has been completed. The principal objectives of the project are: increasing the productivity and profitability of the Womack Hill Field Unit, thereby extending the economic life of this Class II Reservoir and transferring effectively and in a timely manner the knowledge gained and technology developed from this project to producers who are operating other domestic fields with Class II Reservoirs. The major tasks of the project included reservoir characterization, recovery technology analysis, recovery technology evaluation, and the decision to implement a demonstration project. Reservoir characterization consisted of geoscientific reservoir characterization, petrophysical and engineering property characterization, microbial characterization, and integration of the characterization data. Recovery technology analysis included 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and microbial core experiments. Recovery technology evaluation consisted of acquiring and evaluating new high quality 2-D seismic data, evaluating the existing pressure maintenance project in the Womack Hill Field Unit, and evaluating the concept of an immobilized enzyme technology project for the Womack Hill Field Unit. The decision to implement a demonstration project essentially resulted in the decision on whether to conduct an infill drilling project in Womack Hill Field. Reservoir performance, multiwell productivity analysis, and reservoir simulation studies indicate that water injection continues to provide stable support to maintain production from wells in the western unitized area of the field and that the strong water drive present in the eastern area of the field is adequate to sustain production from this part of the field. Although the results from the microbial characterization and microbial core experiments are very promising, it is recommended that an immobilized enzyme technology project not be implemented in the Womack Hill Field Unit until live (freshly taken and properly preserved) cores from the Smackover reservoir in the field are acquired to confirm the microbial core experiments to date. From 3-D geologic modeling, reservoir performance analysis, and reservoir simulation, four areas in the Womack Hill Field were identified as prospective infill drilling sites to recover undrained oil from the field. It was determined that the two areas in the unit area probably can be effectively drained by perforating higher zones in the Smackover reservoir in currently producing wells. The two areas in the eastern (non-unitized) part of the field require the drilling of new wells. The successful drilling and testing of a well in 2003 by J. R. Pounds, Inc. has proven the oil potential of the easternmost site in the non-unitized part of the field. Pruet Production Co. acquired new 2-D seismic data to evaluate the oil potential of the westernmost site. Because of the effects of a fault shadow from the major fault bounding the southern border of the Womack Hill Field, it is difficult to evaluate conclusively this potential drill site. Pruet Production Co. has decided not to drill this new well at this time and to further evaluate the new 2-D seismic profiles after these data have been processed using a pre-stack migration technique. Pruet Production Co. has elected not to continue into Phase II of this project because they are not prepared to make a proposal to the other mineral interest owners regarding the drilling of new wells as part of an infil

  9. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

  10. Evaluation of solitary waves as a mechanism for oil transport in poroelastic media: A case study of the South Eugene Island field, Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joshi, Ajit; Appold, Martin S.; Nunn, Jeffrey A.

    2012-11-01

    Hydrocarbons in shallow reservoirs of the Eugene Island 330 field in the Gulf of Mexico basin are thought to have migrated rapidly along low permeability sediments of the Red fault zone as discrete pressure pulses from source rocks at depths of about 4.5 km. The aim of this research was to evaluate the hypothesis that these pressure pulses represent solitary waves by investigating the mechanics of solitary wave formation and motion and wave oil transport capability. A two-dimensional numerical model of Eugene Island minibasin formation predicted overpressures at the hydrocarbon source depth to increase at an average rate of 30 Pa/yr, reaching 52 MPa by the present day and oil velocities of 1E?¢????12 m/yr, far too low for kilometer scale oil transport to fill shallow Plio-Pleistocene reservoirs within the 3.6 million year minibasin history. Calculations from a separate one-dimensional model that used the pressure generation rate from the two-dimensional model showed that solitary waves could only form and migrate within sediments that have very low permeabilities between 1E?¢????25 to 1E?¢????24 m2 and that are highly overpressured to 91-93% of lithostatic pressure. Solitary waves were found to have a maximum pore volume of 105 m3, to travel a maximum distance of 1-2 km, and to have a maximum velocity of 1E?¢????3 m/yr. Based on these results, solitary waves are unlikely to have transported oil to the shallowest reservoirs in the Eugene Island field in a poroelastic fault gouge rheology at the pressure generation rates likely to have been caused by disequilibrium compaction and hydrocarbon generation. However, solitary waves could perhaps be important agents for oil transport in other locations where reservoirs are closer to the source rocks, where the pore space is occupied by more than one fluid, or where sudden fracturing of overpressured hydrocarbon source sediments would allow the solitary waves to propagate as shock waves. Hydrocarbons in shallow reservoirs of the Eugene Island 330 field in the Gulf of Mexico basin are thought to have migrated rapidly along low permeability sediments of the Red fault zone as discrete pressure pulses from source rocks at depths of about 4.5 km. The aim of this research was to evaluate the hypothesis that these pressure pulses represent solitary waves by investigating the mechanics of solitary wave formation and motion and wave oil transport capability. A two-dimensional numerical model of Eugene Island minibasin formation predicted overpressures at the hydrocarbon source depth to increase at an average rate of 30 Pa/yr, reaching 52 MPa by the present day and oil velocities of 1E?¢????12 m/yr, far too low for kilometer scale oil transport to fill shallow Plio-Pleistocene reservoirs within the 3.6 million year minibasin history. Calculations from a separate one-dimensional model that used the pressure generation rate from the two-dimensional model showed that solitary waves could only form and migrate within sediments that have very low permeabilities between 1E?¢????25 to 1E?¢????24 m2 and that are highly overpressured to 91-93% of lithostatic pressure. Solitary waves were found to have a maximum pore volume of 100,000 m3, to travel a maximum distance of 1-2 km, and to have a maximum velocity of 1E?¢????3 m/yr. Based on these results, solitary waves are unlikely to have transported oil to the shallowest reservoirs in the Eugene Island field in a poroelastic fault gouge rheology at the pressure generation rates likely to have been caused by disequilibrium compaction and hydrocarbon generation. However, solitary waves could perhaps be important agents for oil transport in other locations where reservoirs are closer to the source rocks, where the pore space is occupied by more than one fl

  11. Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: Evaluation of SNL-SWAN and Sensitivity Studies in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool was evaluated, optimized, and utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters a nd wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deployment scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that wave direction and WEC device type we r e most sensitive to the variation in the model parameters examined in this study . Generally, the changes in wave height we re the primary alteration caused by the presence of a WEC array. Specifically, W EC device type and subsequently their size directly re sult ed in wave height variations; however, it is important to utilize ongoing laboratory studies and future field tests to determine the most appropriate power matrix values for a particular WEC device and configuration in order to improve modeling results .

  12. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Grace Chang; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

    2014-08-01

    A n indust ry standard wave modeling tool was utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters and wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deploym ent scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that b oth wave height and near - bottom orbital velocity we re subject to the largest pote ntial variations, each decreas ed in sensitivity as transmission coefficient increase d , as number and spacing of WEC devices decrease d , and as the deployment location move d offshore. Wave direction wa s affected consistently for all parameters and wave perio d was not affected (or negligibly affected) by varying model parameters or WEC configuration .

  13. Computing Sciences Staff Help East Bay High Schoolers Upgrade...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IT fields, the Laney College Computer Information Systems Department offered its Upgrade: Computer Science Program. Thirty-eight students from 10 East Bay high schools registered...

  14. Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Judd, Chaeli; Engel-Cox, Jill A.; Gulbransen, Thomas; Anderson, Michael G.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Guzy, Michael; Hardin, Danny; Estes, Maury

    2007-12-01

    This report presents the results of the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative (GoMRC), a year-long project funded by NASA. The GoMRC project was organized around end user outreach activities, a science applications team, and a team for information technology (IT) development. Key outcomes are summarized below for each of these areas. End User Outreach; Successfully engaged federal and state end users in project planning and feedback; With end user input, defined needs and system functional requirements; Conducted demonstration to End User Advisory Committee on July 9, 2007 and presented at Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) meeting of Habitat Identification committee; Conducted significant engagement of other end user groups, such as the National Estuary Programs (NEP), in the Fall of 2007; Established partnership with SERVIR and Harmful Algal Blooms Observing System (HABSOS) programs and initiated plan to extend HABs monitoring and prediction capabilities to the southern Gulf; Established a science and technology working group with Mexican institutions centered in the State of Veracruz. Key team members include the Federal Commission for the Protection Against Sanitary Risks (COFEPRIS), the Ecological Institute (INECOL) a unit of the National Council for science and technology (CONACYT), the Veracruz Aquarium (NOAA’s first international Coastal Ecology Learning Center) and the State of Veracruz. The Mexican Navy (critical to coastal studies in the Southern Gulf) and other national and regional entities have also been engaged; and Training on use of SERVIR portal planned for Fall 2007 in Veracruz, Mexico Science Applications; Worked with regional scientists to produce conceptual models of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) ecosystems; Built a logical framework and tool for ontological modeling of SAV and HABs; Created online guidance for SAV restoration planning; Created model runs which link potential future land use trends, runoff and SAV viability; Analyzed SAV cover change at five other bays in the Gulf of Mexico to demonstrate extensibility of the analytical tools; and Initiated development of a conceptual model for understanding the causes and effects of HABs in the Gulf of Mexico IT Tool Development; Established a website with the GoMRC web-based tools at www.gomrc.org; Completed development of an ArcGIS-based decision support tool for SAV restoration prioritization decisions, and demonstrated its use in Mobile Bay; Developed a web-based application, called Conceptual Model Explorer (CME), that enables non-GIS users to employ the prioritization model for SAV restoration; Created CME tool enabling scientists to view existing, and create new, ecosystem conceptual models which can be used to document cause-effect relationships within coastal ecosystems, and offer guidance on management solutions; Adapted the science-driven advanced web search engine, Noesis, to focus on an initial set of coastal and marine resource issues, including SAV and HABs; Incorporated map visualization tools with initial data layers related to coastal wetlands and SAVs; and Supported development of a SERVIR portal for data management and visualization in the southern Gulf of Mexico, as well as training of end users in Mexican Gulf States.

  15. Oil Production Capacity Expansion Costs for the Persian Gulf

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Provides estimates of development and operating costs for various size fields in countries surrounding the Persian Gulf. In addition, a forecast of the required reserve development and associated costs to meet the expected demand through the year 2010 is presented.

  16. Gulf Petro Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fathi Boukadi

    2011-02-05

    In this report, technologies for petroleum production and exploration enhancement in deepwater and mature fields are developed through basic and applied research by: (1) Designing new fluids to efficiently drill deepwater wells that can not be cost-effectively drilled with current technologies. The new fluids will be heavy liquid foams that have low-density at shallow dept to avoid formation breakdown and high density at drilling depth to control formation pressure. The goal of this project is to provide industry with formulations of new fluids for reducing casing programs and thus well construction cost in deepwater development. (2) Studying the effects of flue gas/CO{sub 2} huff n puff on incremental oil recovery in Louisiana oilfields bearing light oil. An artificial neural network (ANN) model will be developed and used to map recovery efficiencies for candidate reservoirs in Louisiana. (3) Arriving at a quantitative understanding for the three-dimensional controlled-source electromagnetic (CSEM) geophysical response of typical Gulf of Mexico hydrocarbon reservoirs. We will seek to make available tools for the qualitative, rapid interpretation of marine CSEM signatures, and tools for efficient, three-dimensional subsurface conductivity modeling.

  17. Western Gulf Coast Analysis | NISAC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SheetsWestern Gulf Coast Analysis content top Western Gulf Coast Analysis One focus area for NISAC is the importance of local and regional infrastructures-understanding their interactions and importance to our overall national economic health. In 2004 and 2005, NISAC evaluated the western Gulf Coast region. NISAC developed a National Petroleum System Simulator to evaluate the potential short-term effects of disruptions in the western Gulf Coast petroleum infrastructure operations on the rest of

  18. Reconnaissance survey of eight bays in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strand, J.A.; Crecelius, E.A.; Pearson, W.H.; Fellingham, G.W.; Elston, R.E.

    1988-03-01

    From 1983 to 1985, Battelle/Marine Research Laboratory conducted reconnaissance-level field and laboratory studies to better characterize toxic contamination problems occurring in selected urban-industrialized bays (Bellingham Bay, Port Gardner - Everett Harbor, Fourmile Rock - Elliot Bay dump site vicinity, Sinclair Inlet) of Puget Sound. It was envisioned that this goal was best achieved by simultaneously determining levels of contamination in selected baseline or 'reference bays' (Samish Bay, Case Inlet, Dabob Bay, Sequim Bay). Two major tasks composed this effort. The first was conducted in 1983 and consisted of preliminary or screening surveys to collect and analyze sediment samples from 101 stations distributed in the four urban-industrialized bays (Figure 1), and at 80 stations distributed in the four baseline bays (Figure 2). The second task was undertaken in 1984 and involved detailed surveys and analyses of the same bays, but at a limited number of stations (32 in urban embayments, 16 in baseline bays). The stations to be resampled in 1984 were the ''cleanest'' of the clean and the ''dirtiest'' of the dirty as determined by the 1983 sediment chemical analyses, and within restrictions imposed by sediment type.

  19. Bay Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Page Edit History Bay Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Bay Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Bay Area 1.2 Research and Development...

  20. Gulf Powerbeat | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Powerbeat Place: Bahrain Product: Bahrain-based Gulf Powerbeat manufactures long life batteries and was acquired by Time Technoplast, through Time's subsidiary NED Energy....

  1. Gulf Ethanol Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gulf Ethanol Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gulf Ethanol Corp Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77055 Sector: Biomass Product: Focused on developing biomass preprocessing...

  2. Gulf Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Gulf Wind Farm Facility Gulf Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Pattern Energy...

  3. Chesapeake Bay Test Site | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chesapeake Bay Test Site Jump to: navigation, search Name Chesapeake Bay Test Site Facility Chesapeake Bay Test Site Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status...

  4. Vermilion Bay | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Proposed Owner Coastal Point Energy LLC Developer Coastal Point Energy LLC Location Gulf of Mexico LA Coordinates 29.741, -92.057 Show Map Loading map......

  5. Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana open bays. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1996-03-22

    The US Department of Energy (USDOE) has a program of research in the environmental aspects of oil and gas extraction. This sampling project will characterize the environmental impacts associated with the discharge of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), metals and organics in produced water. This report is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico, supported by the USDOE. These assessments are being coordinated with the field study, using the collected data to perform human health and ecological risk assessments. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the development and use of appropriate discharge practices. The initial human health and ecological risk assessments consist of conservative screening analyses meant to identify potentially important contaminants, and to eliminate others from further consideration. More quantitative assessments were done for contaminants identified, in the screening analysis, as being of potential concern. Section 2 gives an overview of human health and ecological risk assessment to help put the analyses presented here in perspective. Section 3 provides the hazard assessment portion of the risk assessment, and identifies the important receptors and pathways of concern. Section 3 also outlines the approach taken to the risk assessments presented in the rest of the report. The remaining sections (4 through 9) present the human health and ecological risk assessments for discharges of produced water to open bays in Louisiana.

  6. Gulf Power Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gulf Power Co Place: Florida Phone Number: 1-800-225-5797 Website: www.gulfpower.com Facebook: https:www.facebook.comGulfPowerCompany Outage Hotline: 1-800-487-6937 Outage Map:...

  7. Learning from Gulf Coast Community Leaders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    After hearing the stories about the work that leaders from the gulf coast and their organizations have done, it’s clear to me that they are changing the paradigm of gulf coast recovery -- changing the way buildings are developed in the gulf and creating a generation of green builders in New Orleans who work closely with low-income communities.

  8. A Path Forward for the Gulf Coast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Our country has made a promise to the people and small businesses of the Gulf Coast to restore their environment, economy and health, and continue a conversation with the fisherman, environmental workers, elected officials, health officials, scientists and Gulf residents on how to restore the Gulf.

  9. Computing Sciences Staff Help East Bay High Schoolers Upgrade their Summer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computing Sciences Staff Help East Bay High Schoolers Upgrade their Summer Computing Sciences Staff Help East Bay High Schoolers Upgrade their Summer August 6, 2015 Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 5849 To help prepare students from underrepresented groups learn about careers in a variety of IT fields, the Laney College Computer Information Systems Department offered its Upgrade: Computer Science Program. Thirty-eight students from 10 East Bay high schools registered for the eight-week

  10. Hooper Bay Efficiency Feasibility Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    I L L I A M N A N E N G , G E N E R A L M A N A G E R VILLAGE CORPORATION OF HOOPER BAY, ALASKA SEA LION CORPORATION TO PROTECT OUR LANDS AND ENHANCE THE CULTURE AND LIVES OF NAPARYARMIUT (OUR PEOPLE) Hooper Bay Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study "Askinuk" or "Askinaghamiut" are the early Eskimo names for Hooper Bay. The village was first reported in 1878 by E.W. Nelson of the U.S. Signal Service. The 1890 Census found 138 persons living in 14 homes. The name Hooper Bay came

  11. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

    field field-type-text field-field-page-name">
  12. field

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09%2A en Ten-Year Site Plans (TYSP) http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsinfopsinfopstysp

    field field-type-text field-field-page-name">
  13. Bay Biodiesel LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biodiesel LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bay Biodiesel LLC Place: Martinez, California Zip: 94553 Product: Biodiesel producers in Martinez, California. References: Bay...

  14. Bay Solar Power Design | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Power Design Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bay Solar Power Design Place: California Product: US-based PV system installer. References: Bay Solar Power Design1 This...

  15. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM ...

  16. DOE_Gulf_Response.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Gulf_Response.pdf DOE_Gulf_Response.pdf PDF icon DOE_Gulf_Response.pdf More Documents & Publications Deepwater_Response.pdf UDAC Meeting - September 2012 April 30, 2010 Situation Report

  17. Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Company Level Imports Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf January - December 2015 | Release Date: February 29, 2016 | Next Release Date: August 31, 2016 2015 Crude Oil Imports From Persian Gulf Highlights It should be noted that several factors influence the source of a company's crude oil imports. For example, a company like Motiva, which is partly owned by Saudi Refining Inc., would be expected to import a large percentage from the Persian Gulf, while Citgo Petroleum Corporation, which is

  18. Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

  19. EECBG Success Story: Gulf Coast's Texas City Sees Easy Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gulf Coast's Texas City Sees Easy Energy Savings EECBG Success Story: Gulf Coast's Texas ... of the Cape Coral Youth Center EECBG Success Story: Cape Coral Youth Center Helps ...

  20. LISBURNE LISBURNE KUPARUK RIVER PRUDHOE BAY MILNE POINT ALPINE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BOE Reserve Class Prudhoe Bay Area Barrow Area Index Map Northern Alaska Oil and Gas Fields 2004 Onshore Area BOE Reserve Class No 2004 Reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE

  1. LISBURNE LISBURNE KUPARUK RIVER PRUDHOE BAY MILNE POINT ALPINE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas Reserve Class Prudhoe Bay Area Barrow Area Index Map Northern Alaska Oil and Gas Fields 2004 Onshore Area Gas Reserve Class No 2004 Gas Reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF

  2. LISBURNE LISBURNE KUPARUK RIVER PRUDHOE BAY MILNE POINT ALPINE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liquids Reserve Class Prudhoe Bay Area Barrow Area Index Map Northern Alaska Oil and Gas Fields 2004 Onshore Area Liquids Reserve Class No 2004 Liquids Reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl > 10,000 Mbbl

  3. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico production volumes are presented as a separate data series beginning in 2001. Production data for the Gulf of Mexico for years prior to 2001 are presented as part of the production volumes for the States of Alabama, Louisiana

  4. Mississippi Nuclear Profile - Grand Gulf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Grand Gulf" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date" 1,"1,251","9,643",88.0,"BWR","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"1,251","9,643",88.0 "Data for 2010" "BWR = Boiling Water Reactor."

  5. Tuscola Bay Wind | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name Tuscola Bay Wind Facility Tuscola Bay Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy...

  6. Felton Bay Logistics, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Logistics, LLC1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Felton Bay Logistics, LLC is a company based in San Diego, California. Felton Bay offers training,...

  7. BayWa Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BayWa Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: BayWa Group Place: Munich, Germany Zip: 81925 Sector: Services, Solar Product: Germany-based company with international operations...

  8. Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana Open Bays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1995-06-23

    Data were collected prior to termination of discharge at three sites (including two open bay sites at Delacroix Island and Bay De Chene) for the risk assessments. The Delacroix Island Oil and Gas Field has been in production since the first well drilling in 1940; the Bay De Chene Field, since 1942. Concentrations of 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Po, and 228Th were measured in discharges. Radium conc. were measured in fish and shellfish tissues. Sediment PAH and metal conc. were also available. Benthos sampling was conducted. A survey of fishermen was conducted. The tiered risk assessment showed that human health risks from radium in produced water appear to be small; ecological risk from radium and other radionuclides in produced water also appear small. Many of the chemical contaminants discharged to open Louisiana bays appear to present little human health or ecological risk. A conservative screening analysis suggested potential risks to human health from Hg and Pb and a potential risk to ecological receptors from total effluent, Sb, Cd, Cu, Pb, Ni, Ag, Zn, and phenol in the water column and PAHs in sediment; quantitiative risk assessments are being done for these contaminants.

  9. Improved Oil Recovery from Upper Jurassic Smackover Carbonates through the Application of Advanced Technologies at Womack Hill Oil Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plan (Phase II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Joe Benson; David Hilton; David Cate; Lewis Brown

    2006-05-29

    The principal research efforts for Phase II of the project were drilling an infill well strategically located in Section 13, T. 10 N., R. 2 W., of the Womack Hill Field, Choctaw and Clarke Counties, Alabama, and obtaining fresh core from the upper Smackover reservoir to test the feasibility of implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in this field. The Turner Land and Timber Company 13-10 No. 1 well was successfully drilled and tested at a daily rate of 132 barrels of oil in Section 13. The well has produced 27,720 barrels of oil, and is currently producing at a rate of 60 barrels of oil per day. The 13-10 well confirmed the presence of 175,000 barrels of attic (undrained) oil in Section 13. As predicted from reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation, the top of the Smackover reservoir in the 13-10 well is structurally high to the tops of the Smackover in offsetting wells, and the 13-10 well has significantly more net pay than the offsetting wells. The drilling and testing of the 13-10 well showed that the eastern part of the field continues to have a strong water drive and that there is no need to implement a pressure maintenance program in this part of the Womack Hill Field at this time. The success achieved in drilling and testing the 13-10 infill well demonstrates the benefits of building a geologic model to target areas in mature fields that have the potential to contain undrained oil, thus increasing the productivity and profitability of these fields. Microbial cultures that grew at 90 C and converted ethanol to acid were recovered from fresh cuttings from the Smackover carbonate reservoir in an analogous field to the Womack Hill Field in southwest Alabama; however, no viable microorganisms were found in the Smackover cores recovered from the drilling of the 13-10 well in Womack Hill Field. Further evaluation is, therefore, required prior to implementing an immobilized enzyme technology project in the Womack Hill Field.

  10. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT - GULF LNG LIQUEFACTION COMPANY, LLC - FE...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    GULF LNG LIQUEFACTION COMPANY, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-47-LNG - ORDER 3104 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT - GULF LNG LIQUEFACTION COMPANY, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-47-LNG - ORDER 3104 PDF icon ...

  11. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per Day) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet per...

  12. A Preliminary Regional Geothermal Assessment Of The Gulf Of Suez...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    along its eastern margin. The most promising areas for geothermal development in the NW Red Sea-Gulf of Suez rift system are locations along the eastern shore of the Gulf of Suez...

  13. Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

  14. Gulf of Mexico Fact Sheet - Energy Information Administration

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Fact Sheet Overview Data Petroleum and Other Liquids Crude Oil, Condensate and NGL Proved Reserves Natural Gas Natural Gas Proved Reserves Refinery Capacity Natural Gas Processing Plants The Gulf of Mexico area, both onshore and offshore, is one of the most important regions for energy resources and infrastructure. Gulf of Mexico federal offshore oil production accounts for 17% of total U.S. crude oil production and federal offshore natural gas production in the Gulf accounts for

  15. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community Presentation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Keweenaw Bay Indian Community PRESENTATION Assessing the Feasibility of Renewable Energy Development and Energy Efficiency Deployment on Tribal Lands DOE Tribal Energy Program Review October 25 29, 2010 Gregg Nominelli, J.D. Economic Developer BACKGROUND INFORMATION  U.S. Department of Justice - Community Capacity Development Office  Alternative & Renewable Energy Committee Established by Tribal Council  Council for Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) - Developed Strategic Energy Plan

  16. Development of a Hydrodynamic and Transport model of Bellingham Bay in Support of Nearshore Habitat Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang

    2010-04-22

    In this study, a hydrodynamic model based on the unstructured-grid finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was developed for Bellingham Bay, Washington. The model simulates water surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity in a three-dimensional domain that covers the entire Bellingham Bay and adjacent water bodies, including Lummi Bay, Samish Bay, Padilla Bay, and Rosario Strait. The model was developed using Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys high-resolution Puget Sound and Northwest Straits circulation and transport model. A sub-model grid for Bellingham Bay and adjacent coastal waters was extracted from the Puget Sound model and refined in Bellingham Bay using bathymetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and river channel cross-section data. The model uses tides, river inflows, and meteorological inputs to predict water surface elevations, currents, salinity, and temperature. A tidal open boundary condition was specified using standard National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predictions. Temperature and salinity open boundary conditions were specified based on observed data. Meteorological forcing (wind, solar radiation, and net surface heat flux) was obtained from NOAA real observations and National Center for Environmental Prediction North American Regional Analysis outputs. The model was run in parallel with 48 cores using a time step of 2.5 seconds. It took 18 hours of cpu time to complete 26 days of simulation. The model was calibrated with oceanographic field data for the period of 6/1/2009 to 6/26/2009. These data were collected specifically for the purpose of model development and calibration. They include time series of water-surface elevation, currents, temperature, and salinity as well as temperature and salinity profiles during instrument deployment and retrieval. Comparisons between model predictions and field observations show an overall reasonable agreement in both temporal and spatial scales. Comparisons of root mean square error values for surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity time series are 0.11 m, 0.10 m/s, 1.28oC, and 1.91 ppt, respectively. The model was able to reproduce the salinity and temperature stratifications inside Bellingham Bay. Wetting and drying processes in tidal flats in Bellingham Bay, Samish Bay, and Padilla Bay were also successfully simulated. Both model results and observed data indicated that water surface elevations inside Bellingham Bay are highly correlated to tides. Circulation inside the bay is weak and complex and is affected by various forcing mechanisms, including tides, winds, freshwater inflows, and other local forcing factors. The Bellingham Bay model solution was successfully linked to the NOAA oil spill trajectory simulation model General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment (GNOME). Overall, the Bellingham Bay model has been calibrated reasonably well and can be used to provide detailed hydrodynamic information in the bay and adjacent water bodies. While there is room for further improvement with more available data, the calibrated hydrodynamic model provides useful hydrodynamic information in Bellingham Bay and can be used to support sediment transport and water quality modeling as well as assist in the design of nearshore restoration scenarios.

  17. Bay Front Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NEEDS 2006 Database Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBayFrontBiomassFacility&oldid397174" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating...

  18. Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Authority Name: Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Address: 10 Park Plaza, Suite 3910 Boston, MA 02116 Zip: 02116 Website: www.mbta.com Coordinates:...

  19. Hooper Bay Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alaska Village Electric Coop (AVEC) Developer Alaska Village Electric Coop (AVEC) Energy Purchaser Alaska Village Electric Coop (AVEC) Location Hooper Bay AK Coordinates...

  20. Glacier Bay Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Glacier Bay Inc Place: Oakland, California Zip: 94601 Product: US-based, advanced thermal control, sound reduction, and DC power management technologies...

  1. Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dillingham, Gavin

    2013-09-30

    The Gulf Coast Clean Energy Application Center was initiated to significantly improve market and regulatory conditions for the implementation of combined heat and power technologies. The GC CEAC was responsible for the development of CHP in Texas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. Through this program we employed a variety of outreach and education techniques, developed and deployed assessment tools and conducted market assessments. These efforts resulted in the growth of the combined heat and power market in the Gulf Coast region with a realization of more efficient energy generation, reduced emissions and a more resilient infrastructure. Specific t research, we did not formally investigate any techniques with any formal research design or methodology.

  2. EIA - Gulf of Mexico Energy Data

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gulf of Mexico Fact Sheet Overview Data Petroleum and Other Liquids Crude Oil, Condensate and NGL Proved Reserves Natural Gas Natural Gas Proved Reserves Refinery Capacity Natural Gas Processing Plants Release Date: July 2, 2015 Energy Data all tables + EXPAND ALL U.S. Petroleum and Other Liquid Fuels Facts for 2014 million barrels per day Share of Total U.S. Liquid Fuels Consumed Liquid Fuels Production 14.3 75% U.S. Crude Oil Production 8.7 46% Total U.S. Federal Offshore 1.4 8% Gulf of Mexico

  3. Cold Bay Hot Spring Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cold Bay Hot Spring Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Cold Bay Hot Spring Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and...

  4. San Luis Bay Estates Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Estates Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name San Luis Bay Estates Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility San Luis Bay...

  5. Near Fish Bay Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Near Fish Bay Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Near Fish Bay Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  6. Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bay Area Ethanol Consortium Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tampa Bay Area Ethanol Consortium Place: Tampa, Florida Sector: Biomass Product: Consortium researching ethanol from...

  7. San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Conservation and Development Commission Jump to: navigation, search Logo: San Francisco Bay Conservation and Development Commission Name: San Francisco Bay Conservation and...

  8. Pedro Bay Village Council (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pedro Bay Village Council (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pedro Bay Village Council Place: Alaska Phone Number: (907) 850-2225 Website: www.swamc.orghtml...

  9. Doe Bay Village Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Doe Bay Village Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Doe Bay Village Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  10. Bay Resource Management Center Biomass Facility | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Management Center Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bay Resource Management Center Biomass Facility Facility Bay Resource Management Center Sector Biomass...

  11. Egypt`s first remotely controlled subsea completion -- A Gulf of Suez case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Hawary, A.; Hoffman, J.G.

    1995-11-01

    A case history of the Gulf of Suez Petroleum Company`s (GUPCO) first remotely controlled subsea completion is provided. The first completion was for well GS 373-2, a previously drilled and tested exploration well located in the south portion of the Gulf of Suez. Subsea technology was utilized to economically justify development of this one well marginal field which was discovered in 1978. Traditional methods proved to be too costly for development, therefore application of a low cost subsea tree was utilized to capture the resources. In the Gulf of Suez many fields have been discovered by have not been developed due to low reserves. These marginal projects can have a profound impact on the revenue and shareholder value if any economic method is used to exploit these opportunities. Platform installation was not feasible due to reserve size, hence the well has remained abandoned until recently. Capturing the experience of Amoco in the Gulf of Mexico and in the Dutch North Sea, GUPCO was able to build a low cost subsea system which would allow for the economic development of the marginal fields discovered in the past. This paper presents a summarized look at subsea completion technology. The cost comparison of traditional development methods will be made, given the local cost structure in Egypt. The application of this technology has some limitations and constraints which will be discussed in the paper. Furthermore the actual field installation of Egypt`s first remotely controlled subsea tree will be summarized. Also included is a discussion on simple remote controls,and offshore installation operations.

  12. New and Underutilized Technology: High Bay LED Lighting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following information outlines key deployment considerations for high bay LED lighting within the Federal sector.

  13. Egypt`s first subsea completion: A Gulf of Suez case history

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Hawary, A.; Hoffman, J.G.

    1996-06-01

    A case history of the Gulf of Suez Petroleum Co.`s (Gupco) first subsea completion is provided. The first completion was for Well GS 373-2, a previously drilled and tested exploration well located in the south portion of the gulf of Suez. Subsea technology was used to economically justify development of this one-well marginal field, which was discovered in 1978. Traditional methods proved to be too costly for development, therefore application of a low-cost subsea tree was used to capture the resources. In the Gulf of Suez, many fields have been discovered but have not been developed because of low reserves. These marginal projects can have a profound impact on the revenue and shareholder value if an economic method is used to exploit these opportunities. Platform installation was not feasible because of reserve size, hence the well has remained abandoned until recently. This paper presents a summarized look at subsea completion technology. The cost comparison of traditional development methods will be made, given the local cost structure in Egypt. The application of this technology has some limitations and constraints that will be discussed in the paper. Furthermore, the actual field installation of Egypt`s first subsea tree will be summarized. Also included is a discussion on simple remote controls and offshore installation operations.

  14. ORISE: Incident Management Training Put to Test in Gulf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Incident Management Training Put to Test in Gulf ORISE emergency management staff provided critical support during Deepwater Horizon disaster On April 20, 2010, an explosion on the Deepwater Horizon oil rig in the Gulf of Mexico killed 11 people and touched off a massive offshore oil spill that continued for more than 12 weeks. U.S. Department of Energy and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education emergency management personnel were among those who traveled to the Gulf to assist

  15. Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan The natural resources of the Gulf's ecosystem are vital to many of the region's industries that directly support economic progress and job creation, including tourism and recreation, seafood production and sales, energy production and navigation and commerce. Among the key priorities of the strategy are: 1) Stopping the Loss of Critical

  16. Cathodic Protection of the Yaquina Bay Bridge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Laylor, H.M.; Cryer, C.B.

    2001-02-01

    The Yaquina Bay Bridge in Newport, Oregon, was designed by Conde B. McCullough and built in 1936. The 3,223-foot (982 m) structure is a combination of concrete arch approach spans and a steel through arch over the shipping channel. Cathodic protection is used to prevent corrosion damage to the concrete arches. The Oregon Department of Transportation (Oregon DOT) installed a carbon anode coating (DAC-85) on two of the north approach spans in 1985. This anode was operated at a current density of 6.6 mA/m2(0.6 mA/ft2). No failure of the conductive anode was observed in 1990, five years after application, or in 2000, 15 years after application. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes 20 mils (0.5 mm) thick were applied to half the south approach spans beginning in 1990. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes 15 mils (0.4 mm) thick were applied to the remaining spans in 1996. These anodes were operated at a current density of 2.2 mA/m2(0.2 mA/ft2). In 1999, four zones on the approach spans were included in a two-year field trial of humectants to improve zinc anode performance. The humectants LiNO3 and LiBr were applied to two zones; the two adjacent zones were left untreated as controls. The humectants substantially reduced circuit resistance compared to the controls.

  17. Continuity and internal properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    properties of Gulf Coast sandstones and their implications for geopressured fluid production Morton, R.A.; Ewing, T.E.; Tyler, N. 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOPRESSURED...

  18. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Nonassociated...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

  19. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Crude Oil plus Lease...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"06302009"...

  20. ,"Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

  1. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Crude...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Crude Oil plus Lease Condensate Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014...

  2. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Associated...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

  3. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Nonassociated Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

  4. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Dry Natural Gas Proved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"06301981" ,"Release...

  5. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Dry Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves",10,"Annual",2014,"06301981"...

  6. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Coalbed...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and...

  7. ,"Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Associated-Dissolved...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

  8. Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the flow of excess nutrients into the Gulf by supporting state nutrient reduction frameworks, new nutrient reduction approaches, and targeted watershed work to reduce ...

  9. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community- 2010 Wind Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) is committed to preserving our natural environment and reducing the amount of fossil fuels consumed while developing "green" business manufacturing jobs on tribal lands.

  10. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) is committed to preserving our natural environment and reducing the amount of fossil fuels consumed while developing "green" business manufacturing jobs on tribal lands.

  11. Keeping comets and asteroids at bay

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Keeping Comets And Asteroids At Bay Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Keeping comets and asteroids at bay Every two years, experts from around the globe convene at the Planetary Defense Conference. August 1, 2012 dummy image Read our archives Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Every two years, experts from around the globe convene at

  12. Really Off the Grid: Hooper Bay, AK

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Really Off the Grid - Hooper Bay, AK Old Housing - Energy Efficiency Vintage Hooper Bay Renewable Energy - Before & After DOE Tribal Energy Grant * $200,000 - Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study * Hire & train 2-5 local energy assessors * Energy audits of 24 homes with blower doors, etc. - Reduce energy consumption from air leakage - Moisture/mold issues - Reduce drafts * $7/gallon heating fuel * ~ $0.55/kWh - electricity (over half of households behind on utility payments) Is your house

  13. Gradient Analysis and Classification of Carolina Bay Vegetation: A Framework for Bay Wetlands Conservation and Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diane De Steven,Ph.D.; Maureen Tone,PhD.

    1997-10-01

    This report address four project objectives: (1) Gradient model of Carolina bay vegetation on the SRS--The authors use ordination analyses to identify environmental and landscape factors that are correlated with vegetation composition. Significant factors can provide a framework for site-based conservation of existing diversity, and they may also be useful site predictors for potential vegetation in bay restorations. (2) Regional analysis of Carolina bay vegetation diversity--They expand the ordination analyses to assess the degree to which SRS bays encompass the range of vegetation diversity found in the regional landscape of South Carolina's western Upper Coastal Plain. Such comparisons can indicate floristic status relative to regional potentials and identify missing species or community elements that might be re-introduced or restored. (3) Classification of vegetation communities in Upper Coastal Plain bays--They use cluster analysis to identify plant community-types at the regional scale, and explore how this classification may be functional with respect to significant environmental and landscape factors. An environmentally-based classification at the whole-bay level can provide a system of templates for managing bays as individual units and for restoring bays to desired plant communities. (4) Qualitative model for bay vegetation dynamics--They analyze present-day vegetation in relation to historic land uses and disturbances. The distinctive history of SRS bays provides the possibility of assessing pathways of post-disturbance succession. They attempt to develop a coarse-scale model of vegetation shifts in response to changing site factors; such qualitative models can provide a basis for suggesting management interventions that may be needed to maintain desired vegetation in protected or restored bays.

  14. Understanding the Flushing Capability of Bellingham Bay and Its Implication on Bottom Water Hypoxia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2015-05-05

    In this study, an unstructured-grid finite-volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM) was used to simulate hydrodynamic circulation and assess the flushing capability in Bellingham Bay, Washington, USA. The model was reasonably calibrated against field observations for water level, velocity and salinity, and was further used to calculate residence time distributions in the study site. The model results suggest that, despite the large tidal ranges (~4 m during spring tide), tidal currents are relatively weak in Bellingham Bay with surface currents generally below 0.5 m/s. The local residence time in Bellingham Bay varies from to near zero to as long as 15 days, depending on the location and river flow condition. In general, Bellingham Bay is a well-flushed coastal embayment affected by freshwater discharge, tides, wind, and density-driven circulation. The basin-wide global residence time ranges from 5-7 days. The model results also provide useful information on possible causes of the emerging summertime hypoxia problem in the north central region of Bellingham Bay. It was concluded that the formation of the bottom hypoxic water should result from the increased consumption rate of oxygen in the bottom oceanic inflow with low dissolved oxygen by organic matters accumulated at the regions characterized with relatively long residence time in summer months.

  15. Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Data Series 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 View History Dry Natural Gas (billion cubic feet) 24,689 22,059 18,812 17,007 14,549 13,634 1992-2007 Depth Less Than 200 Meters 14,423 12,224 10,433 8,964 8,033 NA 1992-2007 Depth Greater Than 200 Meters 10,266 9,835 8,379 8,043 6,516 NA 1992-2007 Percentage from Depth Greater

  16. Galveston Bay Biodiesel LP GBB | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Galveston Bay Biodiesel LP GBB Jump to: navigation, search Name: Galveston Bay Biodiesel LP (GBB) Place: Houston, Texas Product: Developer of a 75.8m litre per year biodiesel...

  17. EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-342-A Royal Bank of Canada...

  18. Bay County, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    is classified as ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 5 Climate Zone Subtype A. Registered Energy Companies in Bay County, Michigan Dow Chemical Co Dow Kokam Places in Bay County,...

  19. Bay Mills Indian Community Energy Reduction Feasibility Study

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. Environmental Services Division Chris Kushman Bay Mills Indian Community Energy Reduction Feasibility Study *DOE Tribal Energy Program *Tribal Energy Program Review presenters *Bay Mills Indian Community Thank You * Great relationship between ITCMI and Bay Mills * Proactive in exploring renewable energy alternatives - Bay Mills Community College Alternative Energy Curriculum - Biofuels and the crops to support biofuels - Wind resource data collection * Upper

  20. Bristol Bay Native Corporation- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC), through its subsidiary, Bristol Environmental and Engineering Services Corporation, will assess renewable energy opportunities within the BBNC region of southwest Alaska. The goals of this initiative are to encourage tribal self-sufficiency, create jobs, improve environmental quality, and help make our nation more secure through the development of clean, affordable, and reliable renewable energy technologies. The study will identify technologies or systems that could potentially reduce the cost or improve the sustainability of electricity within the Bristol Bay region.

  1. The Gulf War and the environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Baz, F. (ed.) (Boston Univ., MA (United States). Center for Remote Sensing); Makharita, R.M. (ed.) (World Bank, Washington, DC (United States))

    1994-01-01

    The Gulf War inflicted dramatic environmental damage upon the fragile desert and shore environments of Kuwait and northeastern Saudi Arabia. Coastal and marine environments experienced oil spills of more than 8 million barrels, which killed wildlife and damaged the fishing industry. In inland Kuwait, hundreds of oil lakes are scattered across the desert surface: these lakes emit noxious gases, drown insects and birds, and may seep to pollute groundwater. Exploding and burning oil wells released soot particles, oil droplets, and noxious chemicals into the atmosphere, spreading air pollution, acid rain, and respiratory problems. Military diggings, constructions, and vehicles have destroyed much of the desert pavement, resulting in increased dust storms and large, moving dunes.

  2. Gulf County, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    169-2006 Climate Zone Number 2 Climate Zone Subtype A. Places in Gulf County, Florida Port St. Joe, Florida Wewahitchka, Florida Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. Entergy Gulf States Louisiana LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    States Louisiana LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Entergy Gulf States Louisiana LLC Place: Louisiana Phone Number: 1-800-368-3749 Website: www.entergy-louisiana.com Twitter:...

  4. Gulf Stream, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Gulf Stream is a town in Palm Beach County, Florida. It falls under Florida's 22nd...

  5. Gulf Coast Electric Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Coop, Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Gulf Coast Electric Coop, Inc Place: Florida Phone Number: 1-800-568-3667 Website: www.gcec.com Outage Hotline: 1-800-568-3667...

  6. Entergy (Louisiana and Gulf States)- Residential Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Residential customers of Entergy Louisiana, and Entergy Gulf States Louisiana can participate in energy efficiency programs designed to help offset cost of installing energy efficient equipment and...

  7. Gulf Coast's Texas City Sees Easy Energy Savings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In Texas City, an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) awarded last year has already been utilized to start saving the Texas Gulf Coast city money by installing more efficient lights and applying UV reduction films to windows.

  8. Gulf of California Rift Zone Geothermal Region | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: Name The Gulf of California rift zone is a complex transition zone between the dextral (right-lateral) motion of the San Andreas transform...

  9. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  10. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0...

  11. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

  12. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  13. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Extracted in Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

  14. Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas May 20, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The U.S. Department of Energy today issued a conditional authorization approving an application to export liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the Sabine Pass LNG Terminal in Louisiana, paving the way for thousands of new construction and domestic natural gas production jobs in Louisiana, Texas, and

  15. Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Approves Gulf Coast Exports of Liquefied Natural Gas May 20, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today issued a conditional authorization approving an application to export liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the Sabine Pass LNG Terminal in Louisiana, paving the way for thousands of new construction and domestic natural gas production jobs in Louisiana, Texas, and several

  16. EIS-0504: Gulf LNG Liquefaction Project, Jackson County, Mississippi |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy 4: Gulf LNG Liquefaction Project, Jackson County, Mississippi EIS-0504: Gulf LNG Liquefaction Project, Jackson County, Mississippi SUMMARY The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) announced its intent to prepare an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to expand an existing liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in Jackson County Mississippi and modify related facilities to enable the terminal to liquefy natural gas for export. DOE

  17. Recent applications of coiled tubing in remedial wellwork at Prudhoe Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loveland, K.R.; Bond, A.J.

    1996-12-31

    The vast number of wells and unique operating conditions in Alaska`s Prudhoe Bay field have presented many opportunities for those involved in remedial wellwork. Among the technologies that have either been pioneered, tested, or applied there, coiled tubing (CT) ranks as one of the most long lasting and widely used. This paper highlights the more recent applications of CT in the field. The paper begins with a brief overview of the Prudhoe Bay Unit`s (PBU) CT wellwork program and then follows with discussions on eight CT applications that have been developed or expanded in the last two years. Some are new technology and others are old techniques with a new design. Descriptions and procedures are given for each in addition to performance results thus far.

  18. Top 100 Oil and Gas Fields of 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Barrels of 42 U.S. Gallons) 200 9 2009 Est. Non 2009 Proved Production Producing Discov er 2008 Rank Field Name Location Reserves Volume Reserves Y ear Rank 1 PRUDHOE BAY AK 95.9 ...

  19. Thorne Bay School - A Model in Sustainability

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Thorne Bay School - A Model in Sustainability 1 2 Community Supported Wood Supply Innovative Operations Plan 3 Embracing the Benefits 4 Beyond an Energy Vision 5 Alaska's Process  Regional Planning  Outreach  Statements of Interest  Pre-feasibility Studies  Sustainable Fuel Supply  Technology Options  Economics  Community Education  Community Decision 6 7 Devany Plentovich dplentovich@aidea.oprg AKEnergyAuthority.org 8

  20. Bay Area | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home / Bay

  1. Project Reports for Keweenaw Bay Indian Community - 2010 Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Keweenaw Bay Indian Community - 2010 Project Project Reports for Keweenaw Bay Indian Community - 2010 Project The Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) is committed to preserving our natural environment and reducing the amount of fossil fuels consumed while developing "green" business manufacturing jobs on tribal lands. Learn more about this project or find details in the below status reports. PDF icon November 2009 status report PDF icon October 2010 status

  2. Covered Product Category: Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay) | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay) Covered Product Category: Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay) The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay). Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Meeting Energy Efficiency Requirements for Industrial

  3. EA-1995: Trestle Bay Ecosystem Restoration Project, Clatsop County, Oregon

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy 5: Trestle Bay Ecosystem Restoration Project, Clatsop County, Oregon EA-1995: Trestle Bay Ecosystem Restoration Project, Clatsop County, Oregon SUMMARY The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers prepared, with DOE's Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as a cooperating agency, an EA that evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to improve estuary habitat in Trestle Bay. BPA's proposed action is to partially fund the proposal. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None

  4. Kawela Bay, Hawaii: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kawela Bay, Hawaii: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 21.7033333, -158.01 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice...

  5. Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    as an ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone Number 7. Places in Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska King Salmon, Alaska Naknek, Alaska South Naknek, Alaska Retrieved from "http:...

  6. Promising Technology: High Bay Light-Emitting Diodes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High bay LEDs offer several advantages over conventional high intensity discharge (HID) luminaires including longer lifetimes, reduced maintenance costs, and lower energy consumption.

  7. San Francisco Bay Area Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Bay Area Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  8. Bay Harbor Islands, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bay Harbor Islands is a town in Miami-Dade County, Florida. It falls under Florida's 20th congressional district.12 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and...

  9. MHK Projects/Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kachemak Bay Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","...

  10. U.S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fact sheet describes the Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) success story on environmental stewardship and cost savings at the U.S. Naval Station at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

  11. McKay Bay Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biomass Facility Facility McKay Bay Facility Sector Biomass Facility Type Municipal Solid Waste Location Hillsborough County, Florida Coordinates 27.9903597, -82.3017728...

  12. Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    VI, LLC | Department of Energy 9 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application from Great Bay Energy to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-327-A DC Energy, LLC

  13. Final Report: Risk assessment for produced water discharges to Louisiana open bays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; DePhillips, M.P.; Holtzman, S.

    1996-03-01

    Potential human health and environmental impacts from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico are of concern to regulators at the State and Federal levels, the public, environmental interest groups and industry. Current and proposed regulations require a zero discharge limit for coastal facilities, based primarily on studies in low energy, poorly flushed environments. However, produced water discharges in coastal Louisiana include a number of open bay sites, where potential human health and environmental impacts are likely to be smaller than those demonstrated for low energy canal environments, but greater than the minimal impacts associated with offshore discharges. Additional data and assessments are needed to support risk managers at the State and Federal levels in the development of regulations that protect human health and the environment without unnecessary cost to the economic welfare of the region and the nation. This project supports the Natural Gas and Oil Initiative objectives to: (1) improve coordination on environmental research; (2) streamline State and Federal regulation; (3) enhance State, and Federal regulatory decision making capability; (4) enhance dialogue through industry/government/public partnerships; and (5) work with States and Native American Tribes.

  14. Gulf of Mexico pipelines heading into deeper waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1987-06-08

    Pipeline construction for Gulf of Mexico federal waters is following drilling and production operations into deeper waters, according to U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) Minerals Management Service (MMS) records. Review of MMS 5-year data for three water depth categories (0-300 ft, 300-600 ft, and deeper than 600 ft) reveals this trend in Gulf of Mexico pipeline construction. Comparisons are shown between pipeline construction applications that were approved by the MMS during this period and projects that have been reported to the MMS as completed. This article is the first of annual updates of MMS gulf pipeline data. Future installments will track construction patterns in water depths, diameter classifications, and mileage. These figures will also be evaluated in terms of pipeline-construction cost data.

  15. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment...

  16. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 1,317,031 1,002,608 1,000,964 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Processing Natural Gas Processed (Summary)

  17. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Barrels) (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 590 605 603 630 753 906 919 994 2000's 1,074 967 965 717 713 688 649 620 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Federal Offshore Gulf

  18. Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves By Water Depth, 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth, 2009 1 Gulf of Mexico Proved Reserves and Production by Water Depth The Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore region (GOM Fed) has long been one of the Nation's principal sources of proved reserves. At the end of 2009, the GOM Fed accounted for close to one-fifth of oil proved reserves (second only to Texas) and just over four percent of natural gas proved reserves (the country's seventh largest reporting region). 1 Natural gas proved reserves

  19. Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Egypt (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,954 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Gulf LNG, MS LNG Imports from Egypt

  20. Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf LNG, Mississippi Liquefied Natural Gas Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2011 2,820 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry Gulf LNG, MS LNG

  1. Neutron calibration sources in the Daya Bay experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, J.; Carr, R.; Dwyer, D. A.; Gu, W. Q.; Li, G. S.; McKeown, R. D.; Qian, X.; Tsang, R. H. M.; Wu, F. F.; Zhang, C.

    2015-07-09

    We describe the design and construction of the low rate neutron calibration sources used in the Daya Bay Reactor Anti-neutrino Experiment. Such sources are free of correlated gamma-neutron emission, which is essential in minimizing induced background in the anti-neutrino detector. Thus, the design characteristics have been validated in the Daya Bay anti-neutrino detector.

  2. Low-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple low-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: Low-wattage T8 lighting retrofit, T12 to T8 lighting retrofit, LED Exit signs retrofit, Occupancy sensors, Screw-in lighting retrofit, and central lighting controls. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cooling load reduction, heating load increases, cost savings, building life cycle costs including: Simple payback, discounted payback,more » net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  3. Proceedings of the Gulf Coast Cogeneration Association spring conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the Gulf Coast Cogeneration Association cogeneration conference held March 23, 1993. The topics of the papers contained in the conference proceedings include planning for additional capacity by electric utilities, fuel selection, fuel supply, competition and market pressures, power transmission and access to power transmission facilities, case studies of successful cogeneration projects.

  4. SOLUTION MINING IN SALT DOMES OF THE GULF COAST EMBAYMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griswold, G. B.

    1981-02-01

    Following a description of salt resources in the salt domes of the gulf coast embayment, mining, particularly solution mining, is described. A scenario is constructed which could lead to release of radioactive waste stored in a salt dome via inadvertent solution mining and the consequences of this scenario are analyzed.

  5. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production (Million Barrels)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 267 266 265 292 303 342 372 421 2000's 419 459 451 485 467 409 406 414

  6. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production (Million Barrels) (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 44 46 47 49 60 70 72 87 2000's 106 101 90 78 74 62 58

  7. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production (Million

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Barrels) (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 91 97 98 85 101 140 139 167 2000's 199 192 184 148 155 123 125

  8. Targeted technology applications for infield reserve growth: A synopsis of the Secondary Natural Gas Recovery project, Gulf Coast Basin. Topical report, September 1988--April 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, R.A.; Finley, R.J.; Hardage, B.A.

    1994-06-01

    The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR): Targeted Technology Applications for Infield Reserve Growth is a joint venture research project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), the US Department of Energy (DOE), the State of Texas through the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, with the cofunding and cooperation of the natural gas industry. The SGR project is a field-based program using an integrated multidisciplinary approach that integrates geology, geophysics, engineering, and petrophysics. A major objective of this research project is to develop, test, and verify those technologies and methodologies that have near- to mid-term potential for maximizing recovery of gas from conventional reservoirs in known fields. Natural gas reservoirs in the Gulf Coast Basin are targeted as data-rich, field-based models for evaluating infield development. The SGR research program focuses on sandstone-dominated reservoirs in fluvial-deltaic plays within the onshore Gulf Coast Basin of Texas. The primary project research objectives are: To establish how depositional and diagenetic heterogeneities cause, even in reservoirs of conventional permeability, reservoir compartmentalization and hence incomplete recovery of natural gas. To document examples of reserve growth occurrence and potential from fluvial and deltaic sandstones of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin as a natural laboratory for developing concepts and testing applications. To demonstrate how the integration of geology, reservoir engineering, geophysics, and well log analysis/petrophysics leads to strategic recompletion and well placement opportunities for reserve growth in mature fields.

  9. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W.

    2010-08-04

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  10. Oil, Water, and Wildlife: The Gulf of Mexico Disaster and Related Environmental Issues

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bickman, John W. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana, United States

    2010-09-01

    The BP Macondo oil field spill in the Gulf of Mexico is the largest oil spill in U.S. history and has the potential to impact sea turtle and marine mammal populations, and others. This presentation will review the genotoxic effects of oil exposure in wildlife and discuss the potential for an oil spill to impact wildlife populations. Whereas some aspects of a spill are predictable, each spill is different because oils are highly variable, as are the environments in which they occur. The presentation will discuss what has been learned from previous spills, including the Exxon Valdez and the soviet oil legacy in Azerbaijan, and the potential dangers of offshore oil development in the Arctic. Related Purdue University research efforts in oil-spill related engineering and science also will be highlighted.

  11. EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    9-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-389-A Great Bay Energy VI, LLC Rescission of export authorization to export electric energy to Canada. PDF icon EA-389-A Great Bay Energy Rescission (CN).pdf More Documents & Publications EA-389 Greay Bay Energy VI, LLC Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-389 Great Bay Energy VI, LLC EA-342-A Royal Bank of Canada

  12. High-bay Lighting Energy Conservation Measures

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-12-31

    This software requires inputs of simple high-bay lighting system inventory information and calculates the energy and cost benefits of various retrofit opportunities. This tool includes energy conservation measures for: 1000 Watt to 750 Watt High-pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, 400 Watt to 360 Watt High Pressure Sodium lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T5 lighting retrofit, High Intensity Discharge to T8 lighting retrofit, and Daylighting. This tool calculates energy savings, demand reduction, cost savings, building lifemore » cycle costs including: simple payback, discounted payback, net-present value, and savings to investment ratio. In addition this tool also displays the environmental benefits of a project.« less

  13. Muon Simulation at the Daya Bay SIte

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mengyun, Guan; Jun, Cao; Changgen, Yang; Yaxuan, Sun; Luk, Kam-Biu

    2006-05-23

    With a pretty good-resolution mountain profile, we simulated the underground muon background at the Daya Bay site. To get the sea-level muon flux parameterization, a modification to the standard Gaisser's formula was introduced according to the world muon data. MUSIC code was used to transport muon through the mountain rock. To deploy the simulation, first we generate a statistic sample of sea-level muon events according to the sea-level muon flux distribution formula; then calculate the slant depth of muon passing through the mountain using an interpolation method based on the digitized data of the mountain; finally transport muons through rock to get underground muon sample, from which we can get results of muon flux, mean energy, energy distribution and angular distribution.

  14. Bay-annulated indigo (BAI) as an excellent electron accepting building block for high performance organic semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Yi; He, Bo; Pun, Andrew

    2015-11-24

    A novel electron acceptor based on bay-annulated indigo (BAI) was synthesized and used for the preparation of a series of high performance donor-acceptor small molecules and polymers. The resulting materials possess low-lying LUMO energy level and small HOMO-LUMO gaps, while their films exhibited high crystallinity upon thermal treatment, commensurate with high field effect mobilities and ambipolar transfer characteristics.

  15. Project Reports for Keweenaw Bay Indian Community- 2010 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the project is to build the staff capacity to enable the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) to establish a tribal weatherization program that promotes energy sufficiency throughout the tribal community.

  16. Morro Bay, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Morro Bay is a city in San Luis Obispo County, California. It falls under California's 23rd congressional...

  17. The ecology of Tampa Bay, Florida: An estuarine profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, R.R. III; Estevez, E.D.

    1988-09-01

    Tampa Bay is Florida's largest open-water estuary and one of the most highly urbanized. This report summarizes and synthesizes many years of scientific investigation into Tampa Bay's geology, hydrology and hydrography, water chemistry, and biotic components. The estuary is a phytoplankton-based system, with mangroves being the second most important primary producer. Benthic organisms are abundant and diverse, although in parts of the bay the benthos consists of a relatively few opportunistic and pollution indicator species. The estuary provides habitat for the juveniles and adults of a number of commercial and recreational fishery species. Significant changes occurring as a result of urbanization and industrialization include significant declines in intertidal wetlands and seagrass meadows, changes in circulation and flushing, and degradation of water quality. Important management issues include dredge and fill operations, restoration of fisheries, increasing freshwater flow to the bay, and eutrophication. 257 refs., 85 figs., 27 tabs.

  18. City of Larsen Bay, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    City of Larsen Bay Place: Alaska Phone Number: (907)847-2211 Website: www.swamc.orghtmlsouthwest-a Outage Hotline: (907)847-2211 References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File...

  19. Nassau Bay, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Nassau Bay is a city in Harris County, Texas. It falls under Texas's 22nd congressional district.12 References...

  20. BayWa Sunways JV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    JV that specialises in developing, planning and realizing medium-sized to large photovoltaic systems and solar plants. References: BayWa & Sunways JV1 This article is a stub....

  1. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community- 2010 Energy Efficiency Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goal of the project is to build the staff capacity to enable the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) to establish a tribal weatherization program that promotes energy sufficiency throughout the tribal community.

  2. North Bay Village, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it. North Bay Village is a city in Miami-Dade County, Florida. It falls under Florida's 20th congressional district.12 References US Census Bureau Incorporated place and...

  3. Cross-media approach to saving the Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleton, E.L.

    1995-12-01

    A project EPA began in August will investigate the possibility of cross-media emissions trading as a new approach to reducing nitrogen loadings to the Chesapeake Bay. Working with the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), the Agency hopes to device a NO{sub x} trading framework along the lines of existing sulfur dioxide trading plans to control acid rain. The Chesapeake Air Project will examine the feasibility of using emissions trading between and water sources, including trading credits between power plants and mobile sources, to reduce the atmospheric deposition of nitrogen to the bay. The progress of the Bay Program nutrient reduction goals is up for reevaluation in 1997, and Knopes and EDF economist Brian Morton have high hopes that the trading plan, which would place a cap on the mass of emissions and rate of deposition allowed by all sources, will become the atmospheric deposition portion of the Chesapeake Bay Program`s Nutrient Reduction Strategy. 6 refs.

  4. West Bay Shore, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. West Bay Shore is a census-designated place in Suffolk County, New York.1 References ...

  5. Tampa Bay Designated as the Newest Clean Cities Coalition | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This week, Clean Cities welcomed another major partner in the effort to reduce our nation's dependence on petroleum - the brand-new Tampa Bay Clean Cities Coalition. Through its ...

  6. Huntington Bay, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Huntington Bay is a village in Suffolk County, New York. It falls under New York's 2nd...

  7. Pipelines following exploration in deeper Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1988-07-04

    Gulf of Mexico pipeline construction has been falling of sharply to shallow-water (less than 300 ft) areas, while construction for middle depth (300 - 600 ft) and deepwater (600 + ft) areas as been holding steady. These trends are evident from analyses of 5-year data compiled by the U.S. Department of Interior (DOI) Minerals Management Service (MMS). This article continues a series of updates based on MMS gulf pipeline data (OGJ, June 8, 1987, p. 50). These installments track construction patterns in water depths, diameter classifications, and mileage. The figures are also evaluated in terms of pipeline-construction cost data published in Oil and Gas Journal's annual Pipeline Economics Reports.

  8. NREL: Wind Research - Building 251 and High Bay

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building 251 and High Bay Photo of an aerial shot of a large blue and grey building with parking lot and cars in the foreground. Building 251 at the NWTC houses administrative and research support offices and well as a high bay for testing wind turbine components. Building 251 is the hub of the National Wind Technology Center. In addition to housing administrative and research support offices, the facility's conference rooms enable NREL to host international wind power specialists, conferences,

  9. EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Jackson Counties, Texas | Department of Energy EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas EIS-0494: Excelerate Liquefaction Solutions Lavaca Bay LNG Project, Calhoun and Jackson Counties, Texas SUMMARY The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) is preparing, with DOE as a cooperating agency, an EIS to analyze the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to construct and operate a liquefied natural gas terminal

  10. Microsoft Word - Green Bay Notes - FINAL.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    (DOE) TRANSPORTATION EXTERNAL COORDINATION (TEC) WORKING GROUP MEETING September 13-14, 2006 Green Bay, WI Welcome and Meeting Overview The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Transportation External Coordination Working Group (TEC) held its 26 th meeting on September 13-14, 2006, in Green Bay, WI. One- hundred thirty-two participants, representing national, State, Tribal, and local government; industry; professional organizations; and other interested parties, met to address a variety of issues

  11. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 2 3 3 7 8 8 13 27 2000's 45 51 38 30 27 26 23

  12. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 42 43 44 42 52 62 59 60 2000's 61 50 52 48 47 36 35

  13. Location of Natural Gas Production Facilities in the Gulf of Mexico

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Location of Natural Gas Production Facilities in the Gulf of Mexico 2014 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Natural Gas Annual 102 1,179,714 4.6 Gulf of Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Dry Production: Table S12. Summary statistics for natural gas - Gulf of Mexico, 2010-2014 Gulf of Mexico - Table S12 Federal Offshore Production trillion cubic feet 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

  14. Impact of Tropical Cyclones on Gulf of Mexico Crude Oil and Natural Gas Production, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2006-01-01

    This is a special analysis report on hurricanes and their effects on oil and natural gas production in the Gulf of Mexico region.

  15. MHK Projects/Gulf of Mexico Ocean test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gulf of Mexico Ocean test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"R...

  16. GULF OF MEXICO SEAFLOOR STABILITY AND GAS HYDRATE MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Robin C. Buchannon

    2004-11-01

    The gas hydrates research Consortium (HRC), established and administered at the University if Mississippi's Center for Marine Research and Environmental Technology (CMRET) has been active on many fronts in FY 03. Extension of the original contract through March 2004, has allowed completion of many projects that were incomplete at the end of the original project period due, primarily, to severe weather and difficulties in rescheduling test cruises. The primary objective of the Consortium, to design and emplace a remote sea floor station for the monitoring of gas hydrates in the Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005 remains intact. However, the possibility of levering HRC research off of the Joint Industries Program (JIP) became a possibility that has demanded reevaluation of some of the fundamental assumptions of the station format. These provisions are discussed in Appendix A. Landmark achievements of FY03 include: (1) Continuation of Consortium development with new researchers and additional areas of research contribution being incorporated into the project. During this period, NOAA's National Undersea Research Program's (NURP) National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST) became a Consortium funding partner, joining DOE and Minerals Management Service (MMS); (2) Very successful annual and semiannual meetings in Oxford Mississippi in February and September, 2003; (3) Collection of piston cores from MC798 in support of the effort to evaluate the site for possible monitoring station installation; (4) Completion of the site evaluation effort including reports of all localities in the northern Gulf of Mexico where hydrates have been documented or are strongly suspected to exist on the sea floor or in the shallow subsurface; (5) Collection and preliminary evaluation of vent gases and core samples of hydrate from sites in Green Canyon and Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico; (6) Monitoring of gas activity on the sea floor, acoustically and thermally; (7) Design, construction, and successful deployment of an in situ pore-water sampling device; (8) Improvements to the original Raman spectrometer (methane sensor); (9) Laboratory demonstration of the impact of bacterially-produced surfactants' rates of hydrate formation; (10) Construction and sea floor emplacement and testing--with both watergun and ship noise sources--of the prototypal vertical line array (VLA); (11) Initiation of studies of spatial controls on hydrates; (12) Compilation and analyses of seismic data, including mapping of surface anomalies; (13) Additional field verification (bottom samples recovered), in support of the site selection effort; (14) Collection and preliminary analyses of gas hydrates from new sites that exhibit variant structures; (15) Initial shear wave tests carried out in shallow water; (16) Isolation of microbes for potential medicinal products development; (17) Preliminary modeling of occurrences of gas hydrates.

  17. Establishment of the United States Navy Mine Warfare Center of Excellence in the Corpus Christi Bay Area, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosclski, J.L.; Boyer, R.; Sloger, W.

    1997-08-01

    The proposed establishment of the US Navy Mine Warfare Center of Excellence (MWCE) in the Corpus Christi Bay Area, Texas, involved the collocation of the Navy`s Mine Warfare and Mine Counter Measures assets in proximity to each other at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Ingleside and Naval Air Station (NAS) Corpus Christi, Texas. Collocation of these Navy forces would provide significant advantages in meeting mission and operational requirements. This action would improve the operational training and readiness of the forces. In addition to new construction or modifications at NAVSTA Ingleside, NAS Corpus Christi, and off-base; the establishment of offshore training and operating areas was required. When the project was first proposed in 1993, considerable concern was expressed by environmental interests, shrimpers, and state and federal resource agencies regarding the impact of the proposed training activities within Gulf waters. The Navy and Turner Collie and Braden, Inc., under contract to the Navy, conducted several technical studies and extensive coordination with concerned interests during the environmental impact statement process to identify and document the potential intensity, magnitude, and duration of impact from each proposed training activity.

  18. Replacement of tritiated water from irradiated fuel storage bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castillo, I.; Boniface, H.; Suppiah, S.; Kennedy, B.; Minichilli, A.; Mitchell, T.

    2015-03-15

    Recently, AECL developed a novel method to reduce tritium emissions (to groundwater) and personnel doses at the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor irradiated fuel storage bay (also known as rod or spent fuel bay) through a water swap process. The light water in the fuel bay had built up tritium that had been transferred from the heavy water moderator through normal fuel transfers. The major advantage of the thermal stratification method was that a very effective tritium reduction could be achieved by swapping a minimal volume of bay water and warm tritiated water would be skimmed off the bay surface. A demonstration of the method was done that involved Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of the swap process and a test program that showed excellent agreement with model prediction for the effective removal of almost all the tritium with a minimal water volume. Building on the successful demonstration, AECL fabricated, installed, commissioned and operated a full-scale system to perform a water swap. This full-scale water swap operation achieved a tritium removal efficiency of about 96%.

  19. Microsoft Word - Accessing Gulf Resources article.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    New Orleans, LA May 27, 2014 Testimony by Ted M Falgout Having had the opportunity to be Port Director of Port Fourchon for 31 years, and to participate in the Port's evolution from a place where mostly muskrats and mosquitoes were the main inhabitants, to what now is the most significant intermodal transfer facility for energy support in the World, has given me a perspective that I hope you will find informative. We all know that the Gulf of Mexico has evolved into this country's premiere

  20. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 5,875 1990's 5,098 5,085 4,637 4,570 4,982 5,385 5,492

  1. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Coalbed Methane

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 0 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Coalbed Methane Proved Reserves as of Dec.

  2. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Nonassociated

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 22,897 1990's 17,952 16,943 15,369 15,181 16,226 16,279 16,627 16,241 15,427 14,950 2000's

  3. Recent Gulf of Mexico pipeline activity reflects industry's recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1990-08-27

    Pipeline construction in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico has improved considerably in recent years, especially activity in shallow water (less than 300 ft). Construction for middle depths (300-600 ft) has been flat, while deepwater (600+ ft) projects have held firm or increased slightly. Overall pipeline mileage constructed in federal waters 1985-89 period showed a strengthening industry, especially during the 1988-89 period. These trends are evident from analyses of 5-year data. The author tracks comparisons between applications that were approved by the MMS during this period and projects that have been reported to the MMS as completed.

  4. Subsea technology progress buoys Gulf of Mexico deepwater action

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koen, A.D.

    1996-09-02

    This paper reviews the technological advances in subsea oil and gas equipment to drive a new era of exploration and development in the outer continental shelf and other areas considered to complex to economically pursue. As subsea technology expands into deep waters, operators in the Gulf are using subsea production systems based on template and well cluster designs. Subsea cluster systems are gaining favor among operators because they allow more flexibility with shallow water flow which occurs during the first 1,000 feet of clay formations below the seabed. The paper also provides insight into deep water drilling, remote operated vehicles, deep water umbilicals, and other deep water production equipment.

  5. Load test of the 272W Building high bay roof deck and support structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, R.M.

    1994-09-28

    This reports the results of the Load Test of the 272W Building High Bay Roof Deck and Support Structure.

  6. Geek-Up[2.24.2011]: Dynamical Fingerprints and Daya Bay | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 24.2011]: Dynamical Fingerprints and Daya Bay Geek-Up[2.24.2011]: Dynamical Fingerprints and Daya Bay February 25, 2011 - 4:37pm Addthis Nuclear power plants like the twin Daya Bay reactors, yield large amounts of electron antineutrinos -- millions of quadrillions of them every second. | Photo Courtesy of Roy Kaltschmidt, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Nuclear power plants like the twin Daya Bay reactors, yield large amounts of electron antineutrinos -- millions of quadrillions

  7. Project Reports for Bristol Bay Native Corporation- 2003 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC), through its subsidiary, Bristol Environmental and Engineering Services Corporation, will assess renewable energy opportunities within the BBNC region of southwest Alaska. The goals of this initiative are to encourage tribal self-sufficiency, create jobs, improve environmental quality, and help make our nation more secure through the development of clean, affordable, and reliable renewable energy technologies. The study will identify technologies or systems that could potentially reduce the cost or improve the sustainability of electricity within the Bristol Bay region.

  8. Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Volume III (of 4): Characterization and simulation of representative resources. Final report, February 14, 1995--October 13, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

    1997-01-13

    Significant innovations have been made in seismic processing and reservoir simulation. In addition, significant advances have been made in deviated and horizontal drilling technologies. Effective application of these technologies along with improved integrated resource management methods offer opportunities to significantly increase Gulf of Mexico production, delay platform abandonments, and preserve access to a substantial remaining oil target for both exploratory drilling and advanced recovery processes. In an effort to illustrate the impact that these new technologies and sources of information can have upon the estimates of recoverable oil in the Gulf of Mexico, additional and detailed data was collected for two previously studied reservoirs: a South March Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil, whose exact location has been blind-coded at their request, and an additional third representative reservoir in the Gulf of Mexico, the KEKF-1 reservoir in West Delta Block 84 Field. The new data includes reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data was used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation also provided additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressures, and water compatibility. Geologic investigations were also conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. These results were also used, in part, to assist in the recharacterization of these reservoirs.

  9. Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-04

    This is the ninth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1990 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the United States. There are 54,963 field records in this year's Oil and Gas Field Code Master List (FCML). This amounts to 467 more than in last year's report. As it is maintained by EIA, the Master List includes: Field records for each state and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides;field records for each alias field name; fields crossing state boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective state naming authorities.

  10. DOE Announces Three Projects to Help the Gulf Coast Recover and Rebuild |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Three Projects to Help the Gulf Coast Recover and Rebuild DOE Announces Three Projects to Help the Gulf Coast Recover and Rebuild January 20, 2006 - 10:52am Addthis ROBINSONVILLE, MS - Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced three Department of Energy (DOE) initiatives to help the people in the Gulf coast region recover from the hurricanes in 2005, as well as prevent loss of life and damage in the future. During his speech to the Energy Leadership Forum, the

  11. Expedition Provides New Insight on Gas Hydrates in Gulf of Mexico |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Expedition Provides New Insight on Gas Hydrates in Gulf of Mexico Expedition Provides New Insight on Gas Hydrates in Gulf of Mexico May 14, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis USGS technicians Eric Moore and Jenny White deploy instruments at the start of a seismic survey to explore gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico from April to May 2013 | Photo courtesy of USGS USGS technicians Eric Moore and Jenny White deploy instruments at the start of a seismic survey to explore gas

  12. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Wednesday, 24 November 2010 00:00 Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary

  13. Covered Product Category: Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements for Industrial Luminaires (High/Low Bay). Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  14. San Francisco Bay Area Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration Bay Area Aerial Radiation Assessment Survey | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases

  15. A coastal hazards data base for the US Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, R.C.; Gornitz, V.M.; White, T.W.

    1994-06-01

    This document describes the contents of a digital data base that may be used to identify coastlines along the US Gulf Coast at risk to sea-level rise. The data base integrates point, line, and polygon data for the US Gulf Coast into 0.25{degree} latitude by 0.25{degree} longitude grid cells and into 1:2,000,000 digitized line segments that can be used by raster or vector geographic information systems (GIS) as well as by non-GIS data base systems. Each coastal grid cell and line segment contains data on elevation, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights. To allow for the identification of coastlines at risk from sea-level rise, 7 of the 22 original data variables in this data base were classified by vulnerability and used to create 7 relative risk variables. These relative risk variables range in value from 1 to 5 and may be used to calculate a coastal vulnerability index for each grid cell and/or line segment. The data for these 29 variables (i.e., the 22 original variables and 7 risk variables) have been placed into the following data formats: (1) Gridded polygon data for the 22 original data variables. Data include elevation, geology, geomorphology, sea-level trends, shoreline displacement (erosion/accretion), tidal ranges, and wave heights. (2) Gridded polygon data for the seven classified risk variables. The risk variables are classified versions of: mean coastal elevation, geology, geomorphology, local subsidence trend, mean shoreline displacement, maximum tidal range, and maximum significant wave height. (3) 1:2,000,000 line segment data containing the 29 data variables (the 22 original data variables and the seven classified risk variables). (4) Supplemental point data for the stations used in calculating the sea-level trend and tidal range data sets. (5) Supplemental line segment data containing a 1:2,000,000 digitized coastline of the US Gulf Coast as defined by this document.

  16. Assessment of damage to the desert surfaces of Kuwait due to the Gulf War

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Baz, F. . Center for Remote Sensing); Al-Ajmi, D. . Environmental and Earth Sciences Div.)

    1993-01-01

    This is a preliminary report on a joint research project by Boston University and the Kuwait Institute for Scientific Research that commenced in April 1992. The project aim is to establish the extent and nature of environmental damage to the desert surface and coastal zone of Kuwait due to the Gulf War and its aftermath. Change detection image enhancement techniques were employed to enhance environmental change by comparison of Landsat Thematic Mapper images obtained before the wars and after the cessation of the oil and well fires. Higher resolution SPOT images were also utilized to evaluate the nature of the environmental damage to specific areas. The most prominent changes were due to: (1) the deposition of oil and course-grained soot on the desert surface as a result of oil rain'' from the plume that emanated from the oil well fires; (2) the formation of hundreds of oil lakes, from oil seepage at the damaged oil well heads; (3) the mobilization of sand and dust and (4) the pollution of segments of the coastal zone by the deposition of oil from several oil spills. Interpretation of satellite image data are checked in the field to confirm the observations, and to assess the nature of the damage. Final results will be utilized in establishing the needs for remedial action to counteract the harmful effects of the various types of damage to the environment of Kuwait.

  17. Gulf of Mexico miocene CO₂ site characterization mega transect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meckel, Timothy; Trevino, Ramon

    2014-09-30

    This project characterized the Miocene-age sub-seafloor stratigraphy in the near-offshore portion of the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Texas coast. The large number of industrial sources of carbon dioxide (CO₂) in coastal counties and the high density of onshore urbanization and environmentally sensitive areas make this offshore region extremely attractive for long-term storage of carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources (CCS). The study leverages dense existing geologic data from decades of hydrocarbon exploration in and around the study area to characterize the regional geology for suitability and storage capacity. Primary products of the study include: regional static storage capacity estimates, sequestration “leads” and prospects with associated dynamic capacity estimates, experimental studies of CO₂-brine-rock interaction, best practices for site characterization, a large-format ‘Atlas’ of sequestration for the study area, and characterization of potential fluid migration pathways for reducing storage risks utilizing novel high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic surveys. In addition, three subcontracted studies address source-to-sink matching optimization, offshore well bore management and environmental aspects. The various geologic data and interpretations are integrated and summarized in a series of cross-sections and maps, which represent a primary resource for any near-term commercial deployment of CCS in the area. The regional study characterized and mapped important geologic features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone, the regionally extensive Marginulina A and Amphistegina B confining systems, etc.) that provided an important context for regional static capacity estimates and specific sequestration prospects of the study. A static capacity estimate of the majority of the Study area (14,467 mi2) was estimated at 86 metric Gigatonnes. While local capacity estimates are likely to be lower due to reservoir-scale characteristics, the offshore Miocene interval is a storage resource of National interest for providing CO₂ storage as an atmospheric emissions abatement strategy. The natural petroleum system was used as an analog to infer seal quality and predict possible migration pathways of fluids in an engineered system of anthropogenic CO₂ injection and storage. The regional structural features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone) that exert primary control on the trapping and distribution of Miocene hydrocarbons are expected to perform similarly for CCS. Industrial-scale CCS will require storage capacity utilizing well-documented Miocene hydrocarbon (dominantly depleted gas) fields and their larger structural closures, as well as barren (unproductive, brine-filled) closures. No assessment was made of potential for CO₂ utilization for enhanced oil and gas recovery. The use of 3D numerical fluid flow simulations have been used in the study to greatly assist in characterizing the potential storage capacity of a specific reservoir. Due to the complexity of geologic systems (stratigraphic heterogeneity) and inherent limitations on producing a 3D geologic model, these simulations are typically simplified scenarios that explore the influence of model property variability (sensitivity study). A specific site offshore San Luis Pass (southern Galveston Island) was undertaken successfully, indicating stacked storage potential. Downscaling regional capacity estimates to the local scale (and the inverse) has proven challenging, and remains an outstanding gap in capacity assessments. In order to characterize regional seal performance and identify potential brine and CO₂ leakage pathways, results from three high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic datasets acquired by the study using novel HR3D (P-Cable) acquisition system showed steady and significant improvements in data quality because of improved acquisition and processing technique. Finely detailed faults and stratigraphy in the shallowest 1000 milliseconds (~800 m) of data allowed for the identification and mapping of unconformable surfaces including what is probably a surface associated with the last Pleistocene glacial lowstand. The identification of a previously unrecognized (in commercial seismic data) gas chimney that was clearly defined in the 2013 HR3D survey, indicates that HR3D surveys may be useful as both a characterization tool for the overburden of a potential carbon sequestration site and as an additional monitoring tool for future engineered injection sites. Geochemical modeling indicated that injection of CO₂ would result in minor dissolution of calcite, K-feldspar and albite. In addition, modeling of typical brines in Miocene age rocks indicate that approximately 5% of injection capacity would result from CO₂ dissolution into the brine. After extensive searches, no rock samples of the Marginulina A and Amphistegina B seals (“caprocks”) were obtained, but analyses of available core samples of other Miocene age mudrocks (seals or caprocks) indicate that they have sealing ability sufficient for potential CO2 storage in underlying sandstone units.

  18. Recent ooids from Mesopotamian shallow shelf, northwest Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aqrawi, A.A.M.; Sadooni, F.N.

    1987-05-01

    Petrographic and mineralogical analyses of available oolitic samples from Khor Abdulla and Khor Al-Umaya, Mesopotamian shallow shelf of the northwest Arabian Gulf, showed that the ooids exhibit extensive variations in their forms according to their nuclei shapes. The ooids cortices are usually of radial structure and are formed mainly of high magnesium calcite. The sediment distribution of the studied area revealed the existence of an oolitic zone extending NW-SE from east of Bubiyan Island toward the open sea. It is believed that these ooids are usually formed in sheltered environments by direct precipitation of high magnesium-calcite around any available nuclei. Then they are concentrated by agitation on small shoal-margins located to the east of Bubiyan Island. At these shoals they attained their final shapes and then dispersed through the studied area. It is thought that these ooids represent a peculiar example of ooid formation in quiet shallow-water environments.

  19. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,411 6,191 6,956 6,739 6,745 6,504 1990's 6,884 6,305 6,353 6,138 5,739 5,674 5,240 4,799 4,452 4,507 2000's 5,030 5,404 4,967

  20. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 4.4 6.2 6.1 14.1 12.9 12.1 18.7 30.5 2000's 42.2 50.0 36.0 37.2 40.9 35.8 39.6 NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  1. Gulf of Mexico -- Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    -- Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico -- Offshore Natural Gas Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 2000's 0 5,066,015 4,547,627 4,447,348 4,000,685 3,150,818 2,914,131 2,813,197 2,329,955 2,444,102 2010's 2,259,144 1,830,913 1,527,875 1,326,697 1,275,213 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  2. DOE Expedition Discovers the First Gulf of Mexico Resource-Quality Gas Hydrate Deposits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has established that gas hydrate can and does occur at high saturations within reservoir-quality sands in the Gulf of Mexico.

  3. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements)...

  4. Sour gas dehydration in Mobile Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Betts, F.C. Jr.; Lay, A.G.

    1996-12-31

    An evaluation of Mobil`s different methods of sour gas development utilized offshore and processes selected are presented with the maintenance history. The conclusions are based on field data showing past performance with a correlation made for future development and the selection criteria for dehydration.

  5. ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

    2000-12-01

    A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

  6. The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment Sees Evidence that Electron

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Neutrinos Turn into Muon Neutrinos | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment Sees Evidence that Electron Neutrinos Turn into Muon Neutrinos High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of HEP Funding Opportunities Advisory Committees Community Resources Contact Information High Energy Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-25/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3624 F:

  7. The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment Sees Evidence that Electron

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Neutrinos Turn into Muon Neutrinos | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino Experiment Sees Evidence that Electron Neutrinos Turn into Muon Neutrinos Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)

  8. Wind and Hydroelectric Feasibility Study - Bristol Bay Native Corporation Anchorage, Alaska

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Bristol Bristol Bay Bay Native Native Corporation Corporation Wind and Wind and Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Feasibility Feasibility Study Study Tiel Smith Tiel Smith - - BBNC BBNC Doug Vaught, PE Doug Vaught, PE - - Consultant Consultant A Landscape of Promise Bristol Bay Native Corporation Invested in the Region * Southwest Alaska - 29 communities - 7,800 residents - 10,000 brown bears - 55,000,000 salmon * 40,000 square miles- about size of Ohio * 68% Native - Yup'ik Eskimo - Athabascan -

  9. Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. - Bay Mills Indian Community Energy Reduction Feasibility Study

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    --Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. Environmental Services Division Bay Mills Indian Community Energy Reduc<on Feasibility Study Chris K ushman Thank You *DOE Tribal Energy Program *Tribal Energy Program Review presenters *Bay Mills Indian Community Bay Mills Indian Community * Upper Peninsula of Michigan - Cold temperatures - Prolonged exposure to strong north winds off Lake Superior - Short winter daylight * Fishing and fish consuming community * Electricity largely supplied by coal fired

  10. EIS-0515: Bay Delta Conservation Plan; Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    California | Department of Energy 5: Bay Delta Conservation Plan; Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California EIS-0515: Bay Delta Conservation Plan; Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, California SUMMARY The Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, and California Department of Water Resources are jointly preparing an EIS/Environmental Impact Report that analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed Bay Delta Conservation Plan for

  11. Metals in tissues of migrant semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) from Delaware Bay, New Jersey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Niles, Lawrence; Dey, Amanda; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Tsipoura, Nellie

    2014-08-15

    There is an abundance of field data on levels of metals for feathers in a variety of birds, but relatively few data for tissues, especially for migrant species from one location. In this paper we examine the levels of arsenic, cadmium, chromium, lead, manganese, mercury and selenium in muscle, liver, brain, fat and breast feathers from migrant semipalmated sandpipers (Calidris pusilla) collected from Delaware Bay, New Jersey. Our primary objectives were to (1) examine variation as a function of tissue, (2) determine the relationship of metal levels among tissues, and (3) determine the selenium:mercury molar ratio in different tissues since selenium is thought to protect against mercury toxicity. We were also interested in whether the large physiological changes that occur while shorebirds are on Delaware Bay (e.g. large weight gains in 2–3 weeks) affected metal levels, especially in the brain. There were significant differences among tissues for all metals. The brain had the lowest levels of arsenic and cadmium, and was tied for the lowest levels of all other metals except lead and selenium. Correlations among metals in tissues were varied, with mercury levels being positively correlated for muscle and brain, and for liver and breast feathers. Weights vary among individuals at the Delaware Bay stopover, as they arrive light, and gain weight prior to migration north. Bird weight and levels of arsenic, cadmium, and selenium in the brain were negatively correlated, while they were positively correlated for lead. There was no positive correlation for mercury in the brain as a function of body weight. The selenium:mercury molar ratio varied significantly among tissues, with brain (ratio of 141) and fat having the highest ratios, and liver and breast feathers having the lowest. In all cases, the ratio was above 21, suggesting the potential for amelioration of mercury toxicity. - Highlights: • Metal levels were examined for migrant semipalmated sandpipers. • There were differences in metal levels among internal tissues. • Brain had the lowest levels of arsenic and cadmium. • Bird weight and arsenic, cadmium, and selenium levels in brain were negatively correlated. • Selenium:mercury molar ratio varied among tissues (21–141, suggesting protection)

  12. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing HomesBay...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    43% energy savings are achieved in a 1970s multifamily building through standard, non-invasive retrofit measures. Bay Ridge Gardens-Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep...

  13. Green Bay TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary 10-26-06

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Green Bay, Wisconsin - September 14, 2006 Session Chaired by: Jay Jones, DOE, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, OCRWM Regular Members in Attendance: Sandra Alexander...

  14. Design of a basinwide monitoring program for the Tampa Bay estuary. Final technical pub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochberg, R.J.; Weisberg, S.B.; Frithsen, J.B.

    1992-10-30

    The Tampa Bay National Estuary Program (TBNEP) is developing a Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan (CCMP) to recommend management actions for protecting the Tampa Bay estuary. The purpose of the document is to facilitate development of the monitoring program by assisting the TBNEP to define the objectives of a monitoring program for Tampa Bay identifying indicators and a sampling design that are appropriate to those objectives, and identifying how existing Tampa Bay monitoring programs can be incorporated and modified (if necessary) to meet the monitoring objectives.

  15. Key Neutrino behavior observed at Daya Bay (The College of William and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mary) | Jefferson Lab www.wm.edu/news/stories/2012/key-neutrino-behavior-observed-at-daya-bay-123.php Submitted: Thursday, March 8, 2012

  16. MHK Projects/San Francisco Bay Tidal Energy Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Francisco Bay Tidal Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3",...

  17. Geologic development and characteristics of continental margins, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, J.M.; Prior, D.B.; Roberts, H.H.

    1986-09-01

    The continental slope of the Gulf basin covers more than 500,000 km/sup 2/ and consists of smooth and gently sloping surfaces, prominent escarpments, knolls, intraslope basins, and submarine canyons and channels. It is an area of extremely diverse topographic and sedimentologic conditions. The slope extends from the shelf break, roughly at the 200-m isobath, to the upper limit of the continental rise at a depth of 2800 m. The most complex province in the basin, and the one of most interest to the petroleum industry, is the Texas-Louisiana slope, occupying 120,000 km/sup 2/ and in which bottom slopes range from less than 1/sup 0/ to greater than 20/sup 0/ around the knolls and basins. The near-surface geology and topography of the slope is a function of the interplay between episodes of rapid shelf-edge and slope progradation and contemporaneous modification of the depositional sequence by diapirism. Development of discrete depocenters throughout the Neogene results in rapid shelf-edge progradation, often exceeding 15-20 km/m.y. This rapid progradation of the shelf edge leads to development of thick wedges of sediment accumulation on the continental slope. Slope oversteepening, high pore pressures in rapidly deposited soft sediments, and changes in eustatic sea level cause subaqueous slope instabilities such as landslides and debris flows. Large-scale features such as shelf-edge separation scars and landslide-related canyons often result from such processes.

  18. The oil policies of the Gulf Arab Nations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripple, R.D.; Hagen, R.E.

    1995-03-01

    At its heart, Arab oil policy is inseparable from Arab economic and social policy. This holds whether we are talking about the Arab nations as a group or each separately. The seven Arab nations covered in this report-Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates--participate in several organizations focusing on regional cooperation regarding economic development, social programs, and Islamic unity, as well as organizations concerned with oil policies. This report focuses on the oil-related activities of the countries that may reveal the de facto oil policies of the seven Persian Gulf nations. Nevertheless it should be kept in mind that the decision makers participating in the oil policy organizations are also involved with the collaborative efforts of these other organizations. Oil policies of five of the seven Arab nations are expressed within the forums of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and the Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries (OAPEC). Only Oman, among the seven, is not a member of either OAPEC or OPEC; Bahrain is a member of OAPEC but not of OPEC. OPEC and OAPEC provide forums for compromise and cooperation among their members. Nevertheless, each member state maintains its own sovereignty and follows its own policies. Each country deviates from the group prescription from time to time, depending upon individual circumstances.

  19. Identification of geopressured occurrences outside of the Gulf Coast. Final report, Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strongin, O.

    1980-09-30

    As an extension of its efforts in the development of the geopressured resources of the Gulf Coast, the Division of Geothermal Energy of the US Department of Energy is interested in determining the extent and characteristics of geopressured occurrences in areas outside the Gulf Coast. The work undertaken involved a literature search of available information documenting such occurrences. Geopressured reservoirs have been reported from various types of sedimentary lithologies representing virtually all geologic ages and in a host of geologic environments, many of which are unlike those of the Gulf Coast. These include many Rocky Mountain basins (Green River, Big Horn, Powder River, Wind River, Uinta, Piceance, Denver, San Juan), Mid-Continent basins (Delaware, Anadorko, Interior Salt, Williston, Appalachian), California basins (Sacramento, San Joaquin, Los Angeles, Ventura, Coast Ranges), Alaskan onshore and offshore basins, Pacific Coast offshore basins, and other isolated occurrences, both onshore and offshore.

  20. Produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico: Background information for ecological risk assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.P.

    1996-06-01

    This report reviews ecological risk assessment concepts and methods; describes important biological resources in the Gulf of Mexico of potential concern for produced water impacts; and summarizes data available to estimate exposure and effects of produced water discharges. The emphasis is on data relating to produced water discharges in the central and western Gulf of Mexico, especially in Louisiana. Much of the summarized data and cited literature are relevant to assessments of impacts in other regions. Data describing effects on marine and estuarine fishes, mollusks, crustaceans and benthic invertebrates are emphasized. This review is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the use of appropriate discharge practices.

  1. A field laboratory for improved oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hildebrandt, A.F.; McDonald, J.; Claridge, E.; Killough, J.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of Annex III of the Memorandum of Understanding, undertaken by the Houston Petroleum Research Center at the University of Houston, was to develop a field laboratory for research in improved oil recovery using a Gulf Coast reservoir in Texas. The participants: (1) make a field site selection and conducted a high resolution seismic survey in the demonstration field, (2) obtained characteristics of the reservoir (3) developed an evaluation of local flood efficiency in different parts of the demonstration reservoir, (4) used diverse methodology to evaluate the potential recovery of the remaining oil in the test reservoir, (5) developed cross-well seismic tomography, and (6) will transfer the learned technologies to oil operators through publication and workshops. This abstract is an overview of these tasks.

  2. The Muon System of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, F. P.; Hackenburg, R. W.; Brown, R. E.; Chasman, C.; Dale, E.; Diwan, M. V.; Gill, R.; Hans, S.; Isvan, Z.; Jaffe, D. E.; et al

    2014-10-05

    The Daya Bay experiment consists of functionally identical antineutrino detectors immersed in pools of ultrapure water in three well-separated underground experimental halls near two nuclear reactor complexes. These pools serve both as shields against natural, low-energy radiation, and as water Cherenkov detectors that efficiently detect cosmic muons using arrays of photomultiplier tubes. Each pool is covered by a plane of resistive plate chambers as an additional means of detecting muons. Design, construction, operation, and performance of these muon detectors are described. (auth)

  3. ESnet, Orange Silicon Valley, and Bay Microsystems Demonstrate the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    World's First Long Distance 40Gbps RDMA Data Transfer ESnet, Orange Silicon Valley, and Bay Microsystems Demonstrate the World's First Long Distance 40Gbps RDMA Data Transfer News & Publications ESnet News Media & Press Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Contact Us Media Jon Bashor, jbashor@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 5849 or Media@es.net Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607

  4. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  5. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  6. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  7. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Alabama (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 117,738 96,587 95,078 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Gulf of Mexico-Alabama

  8. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Louisiana (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 988,219 719,435 696,242 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Gulf of Mexico-Louisiana

  9. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Mississippi (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 91,618 74,637 98,497 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Gulf of Mexico-Mississippi

  10. Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Texas (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf Of Mexico Natural Gas Processed in Texas (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 119,456 111,949 111,147 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Processed Gulf of Mexico-Texas

  11. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT - GULF LNG LIQUEFACTION COMPANY, LLC - FE DKT. NO.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    12-47-LNG - ORDER 3104 | Department of Energy REPORT - GULF LNG LIQUEFACTION COMPANY, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-47-LNG - ORDER 3104 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT - GULF LNG LIQUEFACTION COMPANY, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-47-LNG - ORDER 3104 PDF icon October 2012 PDF icon April 2013 PDF icon October 2013 PDF icon April 2014 PDF icon October 2014 PDF icon April 2015 PDF icon October 2015 More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR SOUTHERN LNG COMPANY - FE DKT. NO. 12-54-LNG - ORDER 3106 SEMI-ANNUAL

  12. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2010's 0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas

  13. ,"Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production",10,"Monthly","12/2015","1/15/1997" ,"Release Date:","2/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  14. Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Gulf LNG, Mississippi LNG Imports (Price) (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- -- -- 2010's -- 12.93 -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas

  15. EECBG Success Story: Gulf Coast's Texas City Sees Easy Energy Savings |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Gulf Coast's Texas City Sees Easy Energy Savings EECBG Success Story: Gulf Coast's Texas City Sees Easy Energy Savings July 26, 2010 - 10:00am Addthis By replacing T-12 lights with more efficient T-8 units, Texas City will save 65.5 kW each year. | Courtesy of the City of Texas City, Texas By replacing T-12 lights with more efficient T-8 units, Texas City will save 65.5 kW each year. | Courtesy of the City of Texas City, Texas To start saving money, Texas City installed

  16. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  17. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  18. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  19. Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Measurements of the Deep-Sea Oil Plume in the Gulf of Mexico Print Microbial Mitigation The Deepwater Horizon blowout in the Gulf of Mexico on April 20, 2010, resulted in the largest oil spill in the history of the United States. The biological effects and expected fate of the oil are unknown, partly due to the extreme depth and magnitude of this event and partly due to the primary initial mitigation strategy that injected unprecedented quantities of oil dispersant directly at the

  20. Oil and gas field code master list 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The Oil and Gas Field Code Master List 1997 is the sixteenth annual listing of all identified oil and gas fields in the US. It is updated with field information collected through October 1997. The purpose of this publication is to provide unique, standardized codes for identification of domestic fields. Use of these field codes fosters consistency of field identification by government and industry. As a result of their widespread adoption they have in effect become a national standard. The use of field names and codes listed in this publication is required on survey forms and other reports regarding field-specific data collected by EIA. There are 58,366 field records in this year`s FCML, 437 more than last year. The FCML includes: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (definition of alias is listed); fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. This report also contains an Invalid Field Record List of 4 records that have been removed from the FCML since last year`s report. These records were found to be either technically incorrect or to represent field names which were never recognized by State naming authorities.

  1. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 310 316 311 412 527 527 557 567 2000's 560 482 454 353 290 272 249

  2. Recovery sequences for a station blackout accident at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carbajo, J.J. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Recovery sequences for a low-pressure, short term, station blackout severe accident at the Grand Gulf power plant have been investigated using the computer code MELCOR, version 1.8.3 PN. This paper investigates the effect of reflood timing and mass flow rate on accident recovery.

  3. Biogenic silica fluxes and accumulation rates in the Gulf of California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thunell, R.C.; Pride, C.J.; Tappa, E. ); Muller-Karger, F.E. )

    1994-04-01

    The Gulf of California, though small in size, plays an important role in the global silica cycle. The seasonal pattern of biogenic silica flux in the gulf is closely related to that of phytoplankton biomass levels and is controlled by changes in weather and hydrographic conditions. The highest opal fluxes ([approximately] 0.35 g[center dot]m[sup [minus]2][center dot]d[sup [minus]1]) occur during winter and spring, and they are comparable to those measured in some of the most productive ecosystems of the world. Approximately 15%-25% of the biogenic silica produced in surface waters is preserved in gulf sediments, a figure significantly higher than the average global ocean preservation rate. However, the flux of opal at 500 m water depth is less than 25% of that being produced at the surface, suggesting that most of the recycling of biogenic silica in the Gulf of California occurs in the upper water column. 28 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Lease Condensate New Field Discoveries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9 36 4 2 3 13 2009-2014 Federal Offshore U.S. 9 2 2 0 2 8 2009-2014 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana & Alabama) 0 2 2 0 2 8 2009-2014 Gulf of...

  5. SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR GULF COAST LNG EXPORT, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-05-LNG

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - ORDER 3163 | Department of Energy GULF COAST LNG EXPORT, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-05-LNG - ORDER 3163 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR GULF COAST LNG EXPORT, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-05-LNG - ORDER 3163 PDF icon October 2014 - February 2015 PDF icon April 2015 PDF icon October 2015 More Documents & Publications SEMI-ANNUAL REPORTS FOR PIERIDAE ENERGY (USA), LTD - DKT. NO. 14-179-LNG - ORDER 3639 SEMI-ANNUAL REPORT - GULF LNG LIQUEFACTION COMPANY, LLC - FE DKT. NO. 12-47-LNG - ORDER 3104 SEMI-ANNUAL

  6. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- W R Grace Co - Curtis Bay - MD 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - Curtis Bay - MD 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites W.R. Grace Co., MD Alternate Name(s): W.R. Grace Rare Earths, Inc. Davison Chemical Division Curtis Bay Plant MD.01-2 MD.01-3 Location: Curtis Bay, Baltimore, Maryland MD.01-2 Historical Operations: Conducted developmental research and thorium extraction from monazite ore for AEC. MD.01-6 Eligibility Determination: Eligible MD.01-2 Radiological Survey(s): Assessment Surveys MD.01-3 MD.01-4 MD.01-5 MD.01-6 Site Status: Cleanup in progress by U.S. Army

  7. Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians is located in the northern part of lower Michigan on approximately 590 acres of land. The tribe originally had no consistent vision or strategic plan concerning its energy use. This project had three objectives. The first objective was to produce a comprehensive energy plan for the tribe. The second objective was to create an energy organization and tribal energy code. The third objective was to increase the capacity of the tribe for better understanding (through active tribal participation), capability, knowledge and awareness of energy issues through bimonthly articles in the tribal newsletter and two energy workshops. The vision, strategic plan, and code will provide the focus, direction and guidelines as the tribe seeks to develop renewable energy and energy efficiency.

  8. MHK Projects/OpenHydro Bay of Fundy Nova Scotia CA | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Phase Phase 1 Project Details OpenHydro is working with Canadian utility Nova Scotia Power to create a tidal demonstration project in the Bay of Fundy. Following successful...

  9. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NREL performed a comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of MCBH Kaneohe Bay to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and electric vehicle integration. This report summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations.

  10. Comprehensive characterization report on Winter Quarters Bay, McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crockett, A.B.; White, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    Winter Quarters Bay is a small embayment located adjacent to the United States largest base in Antarctica, McMurdo Station. McMurdo Station, which is managed by the National Science Foundation`s Office of Polar Programs, was constructed in 1955, has been in constant use since that time, and has a population of about 1,000 persons during the summer and about 250 people for the winter. The bay offers shelter for ships and an ice dock is used during January and February to off load fuel and cargo. During earlier times, trash from the McMurdo Station was piled on the steep shoreline of the bay, doused with several thousand gallons of fuel and ignited. That practice has ceased and the site has been regraded to cover the waste. The bottom of the bay is littered with drums, equipment, tanks, tires, all sorts of metal objects, cables, etc., especially the southeastern side where dumping took place. The sediments are gravel in some places yet fine and fluid at other sites with coarse particles intermixed. The original benthic community is not well recorded but significant ecological changes have occurred. Sediments are contaminated with PCBs, metals, and hydrocarbon fuels. This report summarizes available information on Winter Quarters Bay and was originally intended to be used by workshop participants to become familiar with the bay prior to becoming updated with unpublished data by various Antarctic investigators. The proposed workshop was to assist the National Science Foundation in determining whether and how the bay should be remediated and to develop an integrated research plan if additional data were needed. However, plans changed, the workshop was never conducted, but the briefing report was prepared. Most of this report reviews and summarizes other published data. The only new data are those from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory`s investigation into the distribution of organic contaminants in the bay and sediment toxicity testing.

  11. Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing HomesBay Ridge Gardens

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit, Annapolis, Maryland (Fact Sheet) | Department of Energy HomesBay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit, Annapolis, Maryland (Fact Sheet) Building America Whole-House Solutions for Existing HomesBay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit, Annapolis, Maryland (Fact Sheet) Approximately 43% energy savings are achieved in a 1970s multifamily

  12. H. R. 5441: A Bill to establish a Gulf of Mexico environmental and economic restoration and protection program. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session, June 18, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This Act may be cited as the [open quotes]Gulf of Mexico Environmental and Economic Restoration and Protection Act of 1992[close quotes]. The purpose of this Bill is to establish a Gulf of Mexico environmental and economic restoration and protection program. Definitions used in this Bill are presented. The findings and purposes and provisions for the Gulf of Mexico Program; Gulf of Mexico program office; Gulf of Mexico executive board; functions, powers, and duties of the Board; coordinated comprehensive joint plan; funding of the Gulf Restoration Project; grant program; and authorization of appropriations are described.

  13. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Lease Condensate Proved Reserves,

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserve Changes, and Production 92 83 64 51 51 65 1981-2014 Adjustments -3 -1 0 -2 1 0 2009-2014 Revision Increases 27 15 26 30 14 32 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 3 9 29 19 4 2 2009-2014 Sales 0 0 0 4 1 0 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 0 0 2 1 1 2009-2014 Extensions 1 3 0 0 3 0 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 9 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 5 3 0 0 2 0 2009-2014 Estimated Production 20 20 16 20 16 17

  14. Coal underlying Federal lands in the Gulf of Mexico coastal plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex W. Karlsen; John R. SanFilipo; Peter D. Warwick

    2002-09-01

    About 6% of the total coa resource was selected for assessment in the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain region of the NCRA project underlies federally proclaimed management areas. Of the approximately 11 billion short tons of coal in this category, approximately 37 percent are estimated to be federally owned. Much of the coal in these categories may not be available for mining, and much of it is probably not economically recoverable. The dispersed nature of Federal holdings, the complicated nature of surface and mineral estate ownership, and the existence of various legal and technological restrictions may remove a significant portion of this coal resource from consideration for development. Continuing work by USGS scientists suggests that potentially viable energy resources of coal-bed methane are present within both Federal and non-Federal areas of the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Plain coal-bearing region. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production (Billion Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Feet) (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 4,508 4,577 4,725 4,627 4,991 5,133 4,872 4,885 2000's 4,773 4,913 4,423 4,306 3,874 2,906 2,738 NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages: Gulf of

  16. Cleaning of the ocean floor near offshore platforms in the Gulf coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, C.S.; Smith, S.A. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    For decades in offshore drilling, the drill cuttings were separated from the circulating drilling fluid by the shale shaker and hydrocyclone, and discharged to the ocean. The drilling fluid itself was discharged to the ocean intermittently to maintain its required properties during the drilling process. These discharges contain many environmentally undesirable chemicals, such as hydrocarbons chemical additives and heavy metals. As a result, the ocean floor near some of the offshore platforms in the Gulf of Mexico are covered by contaminated sediment. Ocean current is not as effective in washing out the discarded ocean muds as previously believed. An attempt was made to clean some of the offshore platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. The quantity and characteristics of the drilling discharges are estimated the technology used to clean the ocean floor near platforms is described, and advanced treatments for hydrocarbon removal, chemical oxidation and activated carbon adsorption, are discussed. 8 references.

  17. Savannah River Region: Transition between the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zullo, V.A.; Harris, W.B.; Price, V. [eds.

    1990-12-31

    The focus of the this conference of Coastal Plains geologists was on the Savannah River region of Georgia and South Carolina, and particularly on the geology of the US Department of Energy`s 300 square mile Savannah River Site (SRS) in western South Carolina. Current geological studies indicate that the Mesozoic-Cenozoic section in the Savannah River region is transitional between that of the Gulf Coastal Plain to the southwest and that of the Atlantic Coastal Plain to the northeast. With the transitional aspect of the region as its theme, the first session was devoted to overviews of Cretaceous and Paleogene geology in the Gulf and Atlantic Coastal Plains. Succeeding presentations and resulting discussions dealt with more specific problems in structural, lithostratigraphic, hydrological, biostratigraphic, and cyclostratigraphic analysis, and of correlation to standard stratigraphic frameworks. For these conference proceedings, individual papers have been processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  18. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production from Greater than 200

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 46 46 53 77 90 123 171 228 2000's 234 286 288 336 310 305 318 313

  19. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production from Less than 200

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 221 220 212 215 213 219 201 193 2000's 185 173 163 149 157 104 87 101

  20. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 48 51 57 192 210 203 234 234 2000's 244 221 195 135 103 104 90

  1. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 262 265 254 220 317 324 323 333 2000's 316 261 259 218 187 168 159

  2. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production from Greater

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 4 6 6 12 13 17 26 51 2000's 84 96 66 55 51 44 50

  3. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production from Less

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 87 91 92 73 88 123 113 116 2000's 115 96 118 93 104 79 75

  4. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves from

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 91 97 110 294 300 349 387 411 2000's 468 443 407 262 292 248 291

  5. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves from

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 499 508 493 336 456 557 532 583 2000's 606 524 558 455 421 440 358

  6. Gulf Stream Locale R. J. Alliss and S. Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R. J. Alliss and S. Raman Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences North Carolina State University Raleigh, NC 27695-8208 Introduction Clouds have long been recognized as having a major impact on the radiation budget in the earth's climate system. One of the preferred areas for the production of clouds is off the east coast of the United States. The formation of clouds in this region, particularly during the winter months, is caused predominately by the presence of the Gulf Stream,

  7. Energy investment advisory series No. 3: Investment opportunities in the Persian Gulf energy sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadgen, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    Sometimes the greatest investment opportunities are in those areas where the least progress seems to be taking place. This report describes energy-based developments taking place in the Persian/Arabian Gulf. The 8 Gulf states are building their nations; each has large minority groups and swelling populations; their economies are built on one product (hydrocarbons). Large expatriate populations, being integrated into local societies and economies, have led to hostility and guarded access to contacts with the outside world. Gulf nations cannot benefit from any oil price rise as they did in the past, as their populations have grown too rapidly. Policies change daily and can be changed back to original ones as well as into new ones. Since the oil and gas industries are the primary source of government revenue, oil and gas are likely to remain longest under government control. A breakdown of energy-base investment potentials in the Middle East is tabulated: upstream oil, refining, domestic oil marketing, upstream gas, LNG, electricity, petrochemical.

  8. HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutken, Carol

    2013-07-31

    A permanent observatory has been installed on the seafloor at Federal Lease Block, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118), northern Gulf of Mexico. Researched and designed by the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) with the geological, geophysical, geochemical and biological characterization of in situ gas hydrates systems as the research goal, the site has been designated by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management as a permanent Research Reserve where studies of hydrates and related ocean systems may take place continuously and cooperatively into the foreseeable future. The predominant seafloor feature at MC118 is a carbonate-hydrate complex, officially named Woolsey Mound for the founder of both the GOM-HRC and the concept of the permanent seafloor hydrates research facility, the late James Robert Bob Woolsey. As primary investigator of the overall project until his death in mid-2008, Woolsey provided key scientific input and served as chief administrator for the Monitoring Station/ Seafloor Observatory (MS-SFO). This final technical report presents highlights of research and accomplishments to date. Although not all projects reached the status originally envisioned, they are all either complete or positioned for completion at the earliest opportunity. All Department of Energy funds have been exhausted in this effort but, in addition, leveraged to great advantage with additional federal input to the project and matched efforts and resources. This report contains final reports on all subcontracts issued by the University of Mississippi, Administrators of the project, Hydrate research activities that both support and derive from the monitoring station/sea-floor Observatory, Mississippi Canyon 118, northern Gulf of Mexico, as well as status reports on the major components of the project. All subcontractors have fulfilled their primary obligations. Without continued funds designated for further project development, the Monitoring Station/Seafloor Observatory is in danger of lapsing into disuse. However, for the present, interest in the site on the continental slope is healthy and The Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology continues to coordinate all activity at the MS/SFO as arranged through the BOEM in 2005. Field and laboratory research projects and findings are reviewed, new technologies and tests described. Many new sensors, systems and two custom ROVs have been developed specifically for this project. Characteristics of marine gas hydrates are dramatically more refined than when the project was initiated and include appear in sections entitled Accomplishments, Products and Publications.

  9. Deep porosity preservation in the Norphlet Formation, Mobil Bay, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajdukiewicz, J.M.; Paxton, S.T.; Szabvo, J.O. )

    1991-03-01

    Compaction and pressure solution have commonly been assumed to destroy primary intergranular porosity in deeply buried sandstones. However, primary porosities of up to 20% are preserved at depths greater than 20,000 feet in the Norphlet Formation of Mobile Bay. Previous workers have called upon a number of mechanisms to preserve these high porosities in the Norphlet, specifically chlorite rim cements, gas emplacement, overpressuring, and decementation. In contrast, our study of data from 23 Norphlet wells, including 450 thin sections, indicates that these suggested mechanisms are not the primary cause of porosity preservation in the Norphlet. The authors propose an alternative interpretation: that in the Norphlet, as in other well-sorted, ductile-grain-poor sandstones, porosity loss from compaction did not go to completion under reservoir (premetamorphic) conditions, but stabilized at depths of about 5,000-8,000 feet and porosity values of about 26%. Porosity loss below these values is due to cementation. For cementation to occur, both an adequate source of cement and geochemical conditions favoring cement precipitation must be present. Computer simulations of Norphlet burial history, including post-depositional fluid-flow patterns, suggest that conditions favorable to quartz cementation never occurred in the bulk of the Norphlet because of the formation's stratigraphic position and isolation from a basinward source of silica-saturated fluids.

  10. HOOPER BAY HOUSING ANALYSIS AND ENERGY FEASIBILITY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEA LION CORPORATION; COLD CLIMATE HOUSING RESEARCH CENTER; SOLUTIONS FOR HEALTHY BREATHING; WHITNEY CONSTRUCTION

    2012-12-30

    Sea Lion applied for and received a grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) towards this end titled ??Energy Efficiency Development and Deployment in Indian Country?. The initial objectives of the Hooper Bay Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study were to demonstrate a 30% reduction in residential/commercial energy usage and identify the economic benefits of implementing energy efficiency measures to the Tribe through: (1) partnering with Whitney Construction and Solutions for Healthy Breathing in the training and hire of 2 local energy assessors to conduct energy audits of 9 representative housing models and 2 commercial units in the community. These homes are representative of 52 homes constructed across different eras. (2) partnering with Cold Climate Housing Research Center to document current electrical and heating energy consumption and analyze data for a final feasibility report (3) assessing the economics of electricity & heating fuel usage; (4) projecting energy savings or fossil fuel reduction by modeling of improvement scenarios and cost feasibility The following two objectives will be completed after the publication of this report: (5) the development of materials lists for energy efficiency improvements (6) identifying financing options for the follow-up energy efficiency implementation phase.

  11. Oil and Gas field code master list 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    This is the fourteenth annual edition of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. It reflects data collected through October 1995 and provides standardized field name spellings and codes for all identified oil and/or gas fields in the US. The Field Code Index, a listing of all field names and the States in which they occur, ordered by field code, has been removed from this year`s publications to reduce printing and postage costs. Complete copies (including the Field Code Index) will be available on the EIA CD-ROM and the EIA World-Wide Web Site. Future editions of the complete Master List will be available on CD-ROM and other electronic media. There are 57,400 field records in this year`s Oil and Gas Field Code Master List. As it is maintained by EIA, the Master List includes the following: field records for each State and county in which a field resides; field records for each offshore area block in the Gulf of Mexico in which a field resides; field records for each alias field name (see definition of alias below); and fields crossing State boundaries that may be assigned different names by the respective State naming authorities. Taking into consideration the double-counting of fields under such circumstances, EIA identifies 46,312 distinct fields in the US as of October 1995. This count includes fields that no longer produce oil or gas, and 383 fields used in whole or in part for oil or gas Storage. 11 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Coalbed Methane

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves, Reserves Changes, and Production 0 0 0 0 0 0 2005-2014 Adjustments 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Revision Increases 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Sales 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Acquisitions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Extensions 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Estimated Production 0 0 0 0 0 0

  13. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Lease Condensate

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Proved Reserves, Reserve Changes, and Production 134 129 129 98 88 108 1981-2014 Adjustments -4 3 0 -3 -1 18 2009-2014 Revision Increases 40 44 30 30 23 23 2009-2014 Revision Decreases 31 28 26 43 14 16 2009-2014 Sales 5 13 8 7 18 10 2009-2014 Acquisitions 1 10 23 11 6 8 2009-2014 Extensions 5 4 2 1 5 3 2009-2014 New Field Discoveries 0 2 2 0 2 8 2009-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 5 1 1 0 1 1 2009-2014 Estimated Production 28 28 24 20 14 15

  14. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Louisiana & Alabama Nonassociated Natural

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separat 5,802 5,457 4,359 3,346 2,502 3,027 1981-2014 Adjustments -3 -25 72 -296 111 499 1981-2014 Revision Increases 997 1,814 740 866 443 561 1981-2014 Revision Decreases 1,021 1,000 1,219 1,161 467 420 1981-2014 Sales 108 697 243 339 597 202 2000-2014 Acquisitions 152 594 355 496 118 305 2000-2014 Extensions 189 139 53 106 18 90 1981-2014 New Field Discoveries 25 65 66 3 34 96 1981-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 150 83 38 22 47 64

  15. Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, Texas Nonassociated Natural Gas Proved

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation 1,822 1,456 1,015 643 535 607 1981-2014 Adjustments 6 -16 1 -65 110 94 1981-2014 Revision Increases 506 240 244 220 103 147 1981-2014 Revision Decreases 379 428 489 345 80 135 1981-2014 Sales 34 130 23 74 160 33 2000-2014 Acquisitions 13 190 63 37 31 66 2000-2014 Extensions 19 107 13 14 10 31 1981-2014 New Field Discoveries 71 0 0 19 0 0 1981-2014 New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields 36 12 0 6 18 26 1981-2014 Estimated Production 353 341 250 184 140

  16. Predicted impacts from offshore produced water discharges on hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierman, V. J.; Hinz, S.C.; Justic, D.; Scavia, D.; Veil, J. A.; Satterlee, K.; Parker, M. E.; Wilson, S.; Environmental Science Division; LimnoTech.; Louisiana State Univ.; Univ of Michigan; Shell E&P Co.; Exxon Mobil Production Co.; U.S. EPA

    2008-06-01

    Summer hypoxia (dissolved oxygen < 2 mg/L) in the bottom waters of the northern Gulf of Mexico has received considerable scientific and policy attention because of potential ecological and economic impacts. This hypoxic zone forms off the Louisiana coast each summer and has increased from an average of 8,300 km{sup 2} in 1985-1992 to over 16,000 km{sup 2} in 1993-2001, reaching a record 22,000 km{sup 2} in 2002. The almost threefold increase in nitrogen load from the Mississippi River Basin (MRB) to the Gulf since the middle of the last century is the primary external driver for hypoxia. A goal of the 2001 Federal Action Plan is to reduce the 5-year running average size of the hypoxic zone to below 5,000 km{sup 2} by 2015. After the Action Plan was developed, a new question arose as to whether sources other than the MRB may also contribute significant quantities of oxygen-demanding substances. One very visible potential source is the hundreds of offshore oil and gas platforms located within or near the hypoxic zone, many of which discharge varying volumes of produced water. The objectives of this study were to assess the incremental impacts of produced water discharges on dissolved oxygen in the northern Gulf of Mexico, and to evaluate the significance of these discharges relative to loadings from the MRB. Predictive simulations were conducted with three existing models of Gulf hypoxia using produced water loads from an industry study. Scenarios were designed that addressed loading uncertainties, settleability of suspended constituents, and different assumptions on delivery locations for the produced water loads. Model results correspond to the incremental impacts of produced water loads, relative to the original model results, which included only loads from the MRB. The predicted incremental impacts of produced water loads on dissolved oxygen in the northern Gulf of Mexico from all three models were small. Even considering the predicted ranges between lower- and upper-bound results, these impacts are likely to be within the errors of measurement for bottomwater dissolved oxygen and hypoxic area at the spatial scale of the entire hypoxic zone.

  17. EA-1992: Funding for Principle Power, Inc., for the WindFloat Pacific Offshore Wind Demonstration Project, offshore of Coos Bay, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Funding for Principle Power, Inc., for the WindFloat Pacific Offshore Wind Demonstration Project, offshore of Coos Bay, Oregon

  18. A field laboratory for improved oil recovery. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hildebrandt, A.F.; McDonald, J.; Claridge, E.; Killough, J.

    1992-09-01

    The purpose of Annex III of the Memorandum of Understanding, undertaken by the Houston Petroleum Research Center at the University of Houston, was to develop a field laboratory for research in improved oil recovery using a Gulf Coast reservoir in Texas. The participants: (1) make a field site selection and conducted a high resolution seismic survey in the demonstration field, (2) obtained characteristics of the reservoir (3) developed an evaluation of local flood efficiency in different parts of the demonstration reservoir, (4) used diverse methodology to evaluate the potential recovery of the remaining oil in the test reservoir, (5) developed cross-well seismic tomography, and (6) will transfer the learned technologies to oil operators through publication and workshops. This abstract is an overview of these tasks.

  19. S. 83: A Bill to ensure the preservation of the Gulf of Mexico by establishing within the Environmental Protection Agency a Gulf of Mexico Program. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundred Third Congress, First Session, January 21, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    S. 83 may be cited as the [open quotes]Gulf of Mexico Preservation Act of 1993.[close quotes] This Bill discusses findings pertaining to resources in the Gulf of Mexico, describes the establishment of the Gulf of Mexico Program, defines the establishment and duties of the Gulf of Mexico Program Office, and proposes a study of international issues. This Bill also includes an assessment to be prepared by the Administrator, a monitoring, management, protection and restoration plan, a grant program, authorization of appropriations, administrative provisions, and the relationship of the Bill to existing federal and state laws and international treaties.

  20. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.; Kandt, A.; Lisell, L.; Booth, S.; Walker, A.; Roberts, J.; Falcey, J.

    2011-11-01

    DOD's U.S. Pacific Command has partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess opportunities for increasing energy security through renewable energy and energy efficiency in Hawaii installations. NREL selected Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay to receive technical support for net zero energy assessment and planning funded through the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI). NREL performed a comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of MCBH Kaneohe Bay to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and electric vehicle integration. This report summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations.

  1. Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Travel to Bay Area to Highlight State of the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Union Address, Commitment to Clean Energy | Department of Energy Steven Chu to Travel to Bay Area to Highlight State of the Union Address, Commitment to Clean Energy Energy Secretary Steven Chu to Travel to Bay Area to Highlight State of the Union Address, Commitment to Clean Energy January 31, 2012 - 7:38pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - As part of the Energy Department's ongoing efforts to highlight President Obama's State of the Union address and discuss the Obama Administration's commitment

  2. Oil, shrimp, mangroves: an evaluation of contingency planning for the Gulf of Guayaquil, Ecuador. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filho, I.P.

    1983-10-01

    The possibility of finding oil in the Gulf of Guayaquil has led several Ecuadorian agencies to prepare contingency plans to deal with the eventuality of an oil spill in the area. This report characterizes the importance of the oil and fisheries industries to the Ecuadorian economy, and describes the region where these activities may conflict. It also elaborates on the biological effects of oil in tropical environments, and on aspects of prevention, control/clean- up and oil spill contingency planning. Compensation for oil pollution damages and methods for damage assessment are also discussed herein.

  3. Potential Economic Impacts from Offshore Wind in the Gulf of Mexico Region (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flores, F.; Keyser, D.; Tegen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Offshore wind is a clean, renewable source of energy and can be an economic driver in the United States. To better understand the employment opportunities and other potential regional economic impacts from offshore wind development, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funded research that focuses on four regions of the country. The studies use multiple scenarios with various local job and domestic manufacturing content assumptions. Each regional study uses the new offshore wind Jobs and Economic Development Impacts (JEDI) model, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This fact sheet summarizes the potential economic impacts for the Gulf of Mexico region.

  4. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Crude Oil + Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 3,704 2010's 4,043 4,567 4,602 4,591 4,352 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  5. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 614 566 532 512 575 1990's 519 545 472 490 500 496 621 785 776 833 2000's 921 785 783 598 615 603 575 528 464 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  6. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 474 320 541 522 532 494 1990's 446 407 691 574 679 891 794 1,228 1,224 1,383 2000's 1,395 1,406 1,267

  7. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Crude Oil + Lease Condensate Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 303 2010's 304 252 354 359 352 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 11/19/2015 Next Release Date: 12/31/2016 Referring Pages:

  8. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's NA NA 215 207 2000's 222 180 154 147 72 64 68 53 56 125 2010's 102 52 34 33 84 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date:

  9. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reserves (Million Barrels) Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas Plant Liquids, Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 62 66 64 88 80 100 89 89 78 1990's 82 79 118 115 103 134 132 121 143 161 2000's 153 182 182 119 98 85 74 92 83 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  10. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves (Million Barrels)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,835 2,072 2,127 2,518 2,567 2,949 2,793 2,744 2000's 3,174 4,288 4,444 4,554 4,144 4,042 3,655 3,464

  11. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves from Greater than

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 557 824 877 1,241 1,311 1,682 1,611 1,626 2000's 2,021 3,208 3,372 3,627 3,280 3,272 2,983 2,836

  12. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves from Less than

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1,278 1,248 1,250 1,277 1,256 1,267 1,182 1,118 2000's 1,153 1,080 1,072 927 864 770 672 628

  13. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production from Greater

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 162 224 288 361 544 565 711 1,099 2000's 1,165 1,334 1,328 1,513 1,222 1,069 1,086

  14. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production from Less than

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 4,346 4,353 4,437 4,266 4,447 4,568 4,161 3,786 2000's 3,608 3,578 3,095 2,793 2,652 1,837 1,652

  15. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves from

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3,225 3,438 4,709 5,751 6,322 7,343 7,425 7,533 2000's 8,506 10,943 10,266 9,835 8,379 8,043 6,516

  16. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves from Less

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 23,424 22,606 22,509 22,166 21,530 20,579 18,997 17,918 2000's 17,666 15,513 14,423 12,224 10,433 8,964 8,033

  17. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 4,576 4,651 4,797 4,679 5,045 5,230 4,967 5,000 2000's 4,901 5,027 4,544 4,397 3,967 2,968 2,805 2,762

  18. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 166 229 294 354 549 577 724 1,124 2000's 1,196 1,367 1,365 1,545 1,251 1,070 1,112 1,050

  19. Bird Movements and Behaviors in the Gulf Coast Region: Relation to Potential Wind-Energy Developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, M. L.

    2006-06-01

    The purpose of this paper is to discuss the possible impacts of wind development to birds along the lower Gulf Coast, including both proposed near-shore and offshore developments. The report summarizes wind resources in Texas, discusses timing and magnitude of bird migration as it relates to wind development, reviews research that has been conducted throughout the world on near- and offshore developments, and provides recommendations for research that will help guide wind development that minimizes negative impacts to birds and other wildlife resources.

  20. Price of Gulf Gateway Natural Gas LNG Imports from Qatar (Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) Qatar (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Gulf Gateway Natural Gas LNG Imports from Qatar (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 9.47 -- -- 2010's -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Liquefied Natural Gas

  1. Price of Gulf Gateway Natural Gas LNG Imports from Trinidad and Tobago

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Trinidad and Tobago (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Gulf Gateway Natural Gas LNG Imports from Trinidad and Tobago (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 7.31 7.30 -- -- 2010's -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring

  2. Price of Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas LNG Imports (Nominal Dollars per

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Thousand Cubic Feet) (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas LNG Imports (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 8.87 7.31 8.36 -- -- 2010's -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Liquefied

  3. Price of Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas LNG Imports from Malaysia (Nominal

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Malaysia (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas LNG Imports from Malaysia (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 6.67 -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of

  4. Price of Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas LNG Imports from Nigeria (Nominal

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Nigeria (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Price of Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas LNG Imports from Nigeria (Nominal Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's -- 11.11 -- 8.29 -- -- 2010's -- -- -- - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 2/29/2016 Next Release Date: 3/31/2016 Referring

  5. EIS-0296: South Oregon Coast Reinforcement Project, Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Bonneville Power Administration proposes to build a 500- kilovolt (kV) transmission line and new substation to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of the state of Oregon. Nucor Steel, a division of Nucor Corporation, may build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon, area.

  6. EIS-0296: South Oregon Coast Reinforcement Project, Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes BPA's proposed action to build a 500- kilovolt (kV) transmission line and new substation to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of the state of Oregon. Nucor Steel, a division of Nucor Corporation, may build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend, Oregon, area.

  7. Pipeline transportation of natural gas from the Gulf Coast to the Northeast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boehm, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    Transcontinental Gas Pipe Line Corp.'s national gas pipeline system from the Gulf Coast producing area (where 75% of its supply lies offshore) extends for 1832 mi along the Gulf Coast through the southeastern Piedmont and north to terminate in New York City. It serves high-priority markets in 11 southern and Atlantic seaboard states with a daily flowing capacity of 3.0 billion cu ft/day and an additional 1.5 billion cu ft/day available from storage. Also discussed are gas conditioning for the removal of hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, water vapor and entrained salt water and solids, and measurement of gas volume with a meter and gravitometer and of heating value with a calorimeter; gas transmission through 9,295 mi of pipeline, made up mostly of four, 30-42 in. dia parallel pipelines with 1,062,452 hp of compression capacity; LNG storage, including unique facilities at the Eminence, Miss., Salt Dome Storage facility and the Carlstadt, N.J., LNG plant; odorization; operations; and pipeline protection against third-party damage and against corrosion.

  8. Environmental Field Surveys, EMF Rapid Program, Engineering Project No.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enertech Consultants

    1996-04-01

    The EMF Research and Public Information Dissemination Program (RAPID) includes several engineering research in the area of exposure assessment and source characterization. RAPID engineering project No. 3: ''Environmental Field Surveys'' was performed to obtain information on the levels and characteristics of different environments, for which only limited data were available, especially in comparison to magnetic field data for the residential environment and for electric utility facilities, such as power lines and substations. This project was also to provide information on the contribution of various field sources in the surveyed environments. Magnetic field surveys were performed at four sites for each of five environments: schools, hospitals, office buildings, machine shops, and grocery stores. Of the twenty sites surveyed, 11 were located in the San Francisco Bay Area and 9 in Massachusetts. The surveys used a protocol based on magnetic field measurements and observation of activity patterns, designed to provide estimates of magnetic field exposure by type of people and by type of sources. The magnetic field surveys conducted by this project produced a large amount of data which will form a part of the EMF measurement database Field and exposure data were obtained separately for ''area exposure'' and ''at exposure points''. An exposure point is a location where persons engage in fixed, site specific activities near a local source that creates a significant increase in the area field. The area field is produced by ''area sources'', whose location and field distribution is in general not related to the location of the people in the area.

  9. Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kushman, Chris

    2014-02-03

    In 2011 the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. was awarded an Energy Efficiency Development and Deployment in Indian Country grant from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Tribal Energy Program. This grant aimed to study select Bay Mills Indian Community community/government buildings to determine what is required to reduce each building’s energy consumption by 30%. The Bay Mills Indian Community (BMIC) buildings with the largest expected energy use were selected for this study and included the Bay Mills Ellen Marshall Health Center building, Bay Mills Indian Community Administration Building, Bay Mills Community College main campus, Bay Mills Charter School and the Waishkey Community Center buildings. These five sites are the largest energy consuming Community buildings and comprised the study area of this project titled “Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community”. The end objective of this study, plan and the Tribe is to reduce the energy consumption at the Community’s most energy intensive buildings that will, in turn, reduce emissions at the source of energy production, reduce energy expenditures, create long lasting energy conscious practices and positively affect the quality of the natural environment. This project’s feasibility study and resulting plan is intended to act as a guide to the Community’s first step towards planned energy management within its buildings/facilities. It aims to reduce energy consumption by 30% or greater within the subject facilities with an emphasis on energy conservation and efficiency. The energy audits and related power consumption analyses conducted for this study revealed numerous significant energy conservation and efficiency opportunities for all of the subject sites/buildings. In addition, many of the energy conservation measures require no cost and serve to help balance other measures requiring capital investment. Reoccurring deficiencies relating to heating, cooling, thermostat setting inefficiencies, powering computers, lighting, items linked to weatherization and numerous other items were encountered that can be mitigated with the energy conservation measures developed and specified during the course of this project.

  10. Field Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecologist for a Day Field Guide Program supported by: ©2011, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - Outreach Program INVERTEBRATES Page 1 Brown Millipede Burgundy Millipede Red Millipede Green Centipede Small Gray Millipede Carrion Beetle Larva Red Centipede Orb Weaver Trapdoor Spider W lf S id Harvestman (Daddy long legs) S i d Mi th Wolf Spiders Harvestman (Daddy-long-legs) Spined Micrathena MOUS SPIDER Black and Yellow Argiope Widow Spider Crab Spider Cross Spider ©2011, Savannah River Ecology

  11. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Hawaii, Kaneohe Bay: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.; Kandt, A.; Lisell, L.; Booth, S.

    2012-05-01

    This paper summarizes the results of an NREL assessment of Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay to appraise the potential of achieving net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and hydrogen vehicle integration. In 2008, the U.S. Department of Defense's U.S. Pacific Command partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess opportunities for increasing energy security through renewable energy and energy efficiency at Hawaii military installations. DOE selected Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH), Kaneohe Bay, to receive technical support for net zero energy assessment and planning funded through the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI). NREL performed a comprehensive assessment to appraise the potential of MCBH Kaneohe Bay to achieve net zero energy status through energy efficiency, renewable energy, and hydrogen vehicle integration. This paper summarizes the results of the assessment and provides energy recommendations. The analysis shows that MCBH Kaneohe Bay has the potential to make significant progress toward becoming a net zero installation. Wind, solar photovoltaics, solar hot water, and hydrogen production were assessed, as well as energy efficiency technologies. Deploying wind turbines is the most cost-effective energy production measure. If the identified energy projects and savings measures are implemented, the base will achieve a 96% site Btu reduction and a 99% source Btu reduction. Using excess wind and solar energy to produce hydrogen for a fleet and fuel cells could significantly reduce energy use and potentially bring MCBH Kaneohe Bay to net zero. Further analysis with an environmental impact and interconnection study will need to be completed. By achieving net zero status, the base will set an example for other military installations, provide environmental benefits, reduce costs, increase energy security, and exceed its energy goals and mandates.

  12. Field Evaluation of Four Novel Roof Designs for Energy-Efficient Manufactured Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, E.; Dentz, J.; Ansanelli, E.; Barker, G.; Rath, P.; Dadia, D.

    2015-12-01

    A five-bay roof test structure was built, instrumented and monitored in an effort to determine through field testing and analysis the relative contributions of select technologies toward reducing energy use in new manufactured homes. The roof structure in Jamestown, California was designed to examine how differences in roof construction impact space conditioning loads, wood moisture content and attic humidity levels. Conclusions are drawn from the data on the relative energy and moisture performance of various configurations of vented and sealed attics.

  13. Gulf of Mexico Sales 147 and 150: Central and Western planning areas. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 1: Sections 1 through 4.C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) covers the proposed 1994 Gulf of Mexico OCS oil and gas lease sales [Central Gulf of Mexico Sale 147 (March 1994) and Western Gulf of Mexico Sale 150 (August 1994)]. This document includes the purpose and background of the proposed actions, the alternatives, the descriptions of the affected environment, and the potential environmental impacts of the proposed actions and alternatives. Proposed mitigating measures and their effects are analyzed, in addition to potential cumulative impacts resulting from proposed activities.

  14. Field O

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -- ! Department of Energy Field O ffice, O s k Ridge P.O . Box 2001 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37031- 0723 April 20. 1993 Dr. Robert Kulikowskf Director, Bureau of Radiation Control New York City Department of Health 111 Livingston Street Brooklyn, New York 11201 Dear Dr. Kulfkowskf: BAKER AN0 W ILLIAM W AREHOUSES SITE - CORPLETION O F CLEANUP ACTIVITIES The purpose of this notice is to inform you about further scheduled c leanup activities to be conducted by the Department of Energy (WE) at 513-519

  15. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2002-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been essentially completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The model represents an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic model served as the framework for the simulations. A technology workshop on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields was conducted to transfer the results of the project to the petroleum industry.

  16. Alaska North Slope National Energy Strategy initiative: Analysis of five undeveloped fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.P.; Allaire, R.B.; Doughty, T.C.; Faulder, D.D.; Irving, J.S.; Jamison, H.C.; White, G.J.

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy was directed in the National Energy Strategy to establish a federal interagency task force to identify specific technical and regulatory barriers to the development of five undeveloped North Slope Alaska fields and make recommendations for their resolution. The five fields are West Sak, Point Thomson, Gwydyr Bay, Seal Island/Northstar, and Sandpiper Island. Analysis of environmental, regulatory, technical, and economic information, and data relating to the development potential of the five fields leads to the following conclusions: Development of the five fields would result in an estimated total of 1,055 million barrels of oil and 4.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and total investment of $9.4 billion in 1992 dollars. It appears that all five of the fields will remain economically marginal developments unless there is significant improvement in world oil prices. Costs of regulatory compliance and mitigation, and costs to reduce or maintain environmental impacts at acceptable levels influence project investments and operating costs and must be considered in the development decision making process. The development of three of the fields (West Sak, Point Thomson, and Gwydyr Bay) that are marginally feasible would have an impact on North Slope production over the period from about 2000 to 2014 but cannot replace the decline in Prudhoe Bay Unit production or maintain the operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) beyond about 2014 with the assumption that the TAPS will shut down when production declines to the range of 400 to 200 thousand barrels of oil/day. Recoverable reserves left in the ground in the currently producing fields and soon to be developed fields, Niakuk and Point McIntyre, would range from 1 billion to 500 million barrels of oil corresponding to the time period of 2008 to 2014 based on the TAPS shutdown assumption.

  17. 4-D stratigraphic architecture and 3-D reservoir zonation of the Mirado Formation, Cusiana Field, Colombia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fajardo, A.A. ); Cross, T.A. )

    1996-01-01

    A high-resolution sequence stratigraphic study using 2300 feet of core calibrated with geophysical logs from 14 wells and 1800 measurements of porosity and permeability established the 4-D stratigraphy and 3-D reservoir zonation of the Mirador. Virtually all reservoir-quality facies are through cross-stratified sandstones which occur in channel facies successions in the lower Mirador, but in bay-head delta and estuarine channel facies successions in the upper Mirador. Petrophysical properties and the geometry, continuity and volume of reservoir-quality sandstones change regularly as function of their stratigraphic position. These vertical facies successions reflect increasing accommodation-to-sediment supply (A/S) ratio through each intermediate-term cycle. The upper long-term cycle comprises four intermediate-term, landward-stepping, symmetrical base-level cycles. These cycles consist of estuarine channel, bay-head to bay-fill facies successions. The transition from channel to bay-head to bay-fill facies successions represents an increase in A/S ratio, and the reverse transition indicates a decrease in A/S ratio. Sixteen reservoir zones were defined within the Cusiana field. Reservoirs within the upper and lower long-term cycles are separated by a continuous middle Mirador mudstone which creates two large reservoir divisions. At the second level of zonation, the reservoir compartments and fluid-flow retardants coincide with the intermediate-term stratigraphic cycles. A third level of reservoir compartmentalization follows the distribution of facies successions within the intermediate-term cycles. A strong stratigraphic control on reservoir properties occurs at the three scales of stratigraphic cyclicity. In all cases as A/S ratio increases, porosity and permeability decrease.

  18. 4-D stratigraphic architecture and 3-D reservoir zonation of the Mirado Formation, Cusiana Field, Colombia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fajardo, A.A.; Cross, T.A.

    1996-12-31

    A high-resolution sequence stratigraphic study using 2300 feet of core calibrated with geophysical logs from 14 wells and 1800 measurements of porosity and permeability established the 4-D stratigraphy and 3-D reservoir zonation of the Mirador. Virtually all reservoir-quality facies are through cross-stratified sandstones which occur in channel facies successions in the lower Mirador, but in bay-head delta and estuarine channel facies successions in the upper Mirador. Petrophysical properties and the geometry, continuity and volume of reservoir-quality sandstones change regularly as function of their stratigraphic position. These vertical facies successions reflect increasing accommodation-to-sediment supply (A/S) ratio through each intermediate-term cycle. The upper long-term cycle comprises four intermediate-term, landward-stepping, symmetrical base-level cycles. These cycles consist of estuarine channel, bay-head to bay-fill facies successions. The transition from channel to bay-head to bay-fill facies successions represents an increase in A/S ratio, and the reverse transition indicates a decrease in A/S ratio. Sixteen reservoir zones were defined within the Cusiana field. Reservoirs within the upper and lower long-term cycles are separated by a continuous middle Mirador mudstone which creates two large reservoir divisions. At the second level of zonation, the reservoir compartments and fluid-flow retardants coincide with the intermediate-term stratigraphic cycles. A third level of reservoir compartmentalization follows the distribution of facies successions within the intermediate-term cycles. A strong stratigraphic control on reservoir properties occurs at the three scales of stratigraphic cyclicity. In all cases as A/S ratio increases, porosity and permeability decrease.

  19. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Dry Natural Gas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 28,260 1990's 22,679 21,611 19,653 19,383 20,835 21,392 21,856 21,934 20,774 19,598 2000's 19,788 19,721 18,500 16,728 14,685 13,665 11,824 11,090 10,450 9,362 2010's 8,896 8,156

  20. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas, Wet

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Louisiana and Alabama Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 28,772 1990's 23,050 22,028 20,006 19,751 21,208 21,664 22,119 22,428 21,261 20,172 2000's 20,466 20,290 19,113 17,168 15,144 14,073 12,201 11,458

  1. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Dry Natural Gas Expected Future

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,878 6,493 7,444 7,219 7,241 6,968 1990's 7,300 6,675 6,996 6,661 6,383 6,525 5,996 5,988 5,648 5,853 2000's 6,384 6,775 6,189 5,331 4,127 3,342 2,725 2,544 2,392 2,451 2010's 2,145 1,554 1,450 1,450 1,397 - =

  2. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,885 6,511 7,497 7,261 7,277 6,998 1990's 7,330 6,712 7,044 6,712 6,418 6,565 6,034 6,027 5,676 5,890 2000's 6,425 6,810 6,234 5,354 4,144 3,354 2,738 2,550 2,402 2,451 2010's

  3. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Billion Cubic Feet) Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 26,649 26,044 27,218 27,917 27,852 27,922 26,422 25,451 2000's 26,172 26,456 24,689 22,059 18,812 17,007 14,549 13,634 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  4. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 4,410 4,422 4,503 4,315 4,496 4,653 4,243 3,876 2000's 3,705 3,660 3,180 2,852 2,716 1,898 1,692 1,712

  5. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 27,050 26,463 27,626 28,229 28,153 28,455 26,937 26,062 2000's 26,891 27,100 25,347 22,522 19,288 17,427 14,938 14,008 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  6. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3,273 3,495 4,772 5,811 6,389 7,491 7,575 7,726 2000's 8,731 11,229 10,540 10,041 8,591 8,042 6,690 4,120

  7. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Less than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 23,777 22,968 22,854 22,418 21,764 20,964 19,362 18,336 2000's 18,160 15,871 14,807 12,481 10,698 9,385 8,248 9,888

  8. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Crude Oil Production from

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Crude Oil Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 17.2 17.3 20.1 26.4 29.7 36.0 46.0 54.2 2000's 55.8 62.2 63.9 69.3 66.4 75.0 78.5 76.0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  9. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Crude Oil Proved Reserves

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Crude Oil Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 30.4 39.8 41.2 49.3 51.1 57.0 57.8 59.3 2000's 63.7 74.8 75.9 79.6 79.2 81.0 81.6 82.0 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  10. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Dry Natural Gas Production

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Dry Natural Gas Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3.6 4.9 6.1 7.8 10.9 11.0 14.6 22.5 2000's 24.4 27.4 30.0 35.1 31.5 36.8 39.6 NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  11. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Dry Natural Gas Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 12.1 13.2 17.3 20.6 22.7 26.3 28.1 29.6 2000's 32.5 41.4 41.6 44.6 44.5 47.3 44.8 NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  12. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Condensate Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 4.4 6.2 6.1 14.1 12.9 12.1 18.7 30.5 2000's 42.2 50.2 42.2 38.5 36.2 41.9 40.1 NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  13. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Condensate Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 15.4 16.0 18.2 46.7 39.8 38.5 42.1 41.3 2000's 43.6 45.8 43.0 38.2 35.6 38.2 36.2 NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  14. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Proved

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 15.4 16.0 18.2 46.7 39.8 38.5 42.1 41.3 2000's 43.6 45.8 42.2 36.5 40.9 36.0 44.8 NA - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  15. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Separation, Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 3.6 4.9 6.1 7.8 10.9 11.0 14.6 22.5 2000's 24.4 27.2 30.0 35.1 31.5 36.1 39.6 29.8 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  16. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 12.1 13.2 17.3 20.6 22.7 26.3 28.1 29.6 2000's 32.5 41.4 41.6 44.6 44.5 46.1 44.8 29.4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA

  17. The Gulf Oil Spill: Ecogenomics and Ecoresilience (Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, Terry [LBNL] [LBNL

    2011-03-22

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Berkeley Lab microbial ecologist Terry Hazen delivers a keynote on "The Gulf Oil Spill: Ecogenomics and Ecoresilience" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011.

  18. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Feet) Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 432,713 396,681 438,926 423,131 435,592 426,888 434,325 439,712 428,689 440,668 425,849 441,756 1998 443,757 398,519 448,486 438,144 457,815 435,237 439,093 443,144 336,241 421,315 414,058 434,518 1999 436,171 395,293 435,012 424,724 432,489 414,495 431,981 424,513 408,237 421,312 409,660 419,049 2000

  19. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cubic Feet) Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Marketed Production (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 429,954 394,104 436,222 420,503 432,864 423,879 431,157 436,557 425,610 437,613 422,552 438,287 1998 441,123 396,059 445,905 435,635 455,211 432,364 436,068 440,131 333,302 418,456 410,971 431,271 1999 434,362 393,604 433,239 423,001 430,700 412,522 429,904 422,444 406,218 419,349 407,540 416,820

  20. The Gulf Oil Spill: Ecogenomics and Ecoresilience (Keynote - 2011 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hazen, Terry [LBNL

    2011-06-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI) invited scientists interested in the application of genomics to bioenergy and environmental issues, as well as all current and prospective users and collaborators, to attend the annual DOE JGI Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting held March 22-24, 2011 in Walnut Creek, Calif. The emphasis of this meeting was on the genomics of renewable energy strategies, carbon cycling, environmental gene discovery, and engineering of fuel-producing organisms. The meeting features presentations by leading scientists advancing these topics. Berkeley Lab microbial ecologist Terry Hazen delivers a keynote on "The Gulf Oil Spill: Ecogenomics and Ecoresilience" at the 6th Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2011.

  1. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Million Cubic Feet) Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0 2000's 0 114,017 109,277 98,372 90,025 78,139 102,242 115,528 102,389 103,976 2010's 108,490 101,217 93,985 95,207 93,855 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  2. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Dry Natural Gas Production (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2006 244,584 213,829 239,860 238,542 256,010 247,754 256,378 250,819 238,653 242,261 235,960 237,319 2007 235,396 213,877 238,889 232,357 242,298 228,908 231,048 228,054 221,195 238,095 231,929 256,671 2008 241,064 228,507 239,263 209,165 208,428 219,044 230,193 211,888 61,961 133,579 157,377 173,874 2009

  3. Summary Report on Information Technology Integration Activities For project to Enhance NASA Tools for Coastal Managers in the Gulf of Mexico and Support Technology Transfer to Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulbransen, Thomas C.

    2009-04-27

    Deliverable to NASA Stennis Space Center summarizing summarizes accomplishments made by Battelle and its subcontractors to integrate NASA's COAST visualization tool with the Noesis search tool developed under the Gulf of Mexico Regional Collaborative project.

  4. Review of the NURE Assessment of the U.S. Gulf Coast Uranium Province

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Susan M.

    2013-09-15

    Historic exploration and development were used to evaluate the reliability of domestic uranium reserves and potential resources estimated by the U.S. Department of Energy national uranium resource evaluation (NURE) program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Uranium Province. NURE estimated 87 million pounds of reserves in the $30/lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8} cost category in the Coast Plain uranium resource region, most in the Gulf Coast Uranium Province. Since NURE, 40 million pounds of reserves have been mined, and 38 million pounds are estimated to remain in place as of 2012, accounting for all but 9 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the reserve or production categories in the NURE estimate. Considering the complexities and uncertainties of the analysis, this study indicates that the NURE reserve estimates for the province were accurate. An unconditional potential resource of 1.4 billion pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, 600 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8} in the forward cost category of $30/lb U{sub 3}O{sub 8} (1980 prices), was estimated in 106 favorable areas by the NURE program in the province. Removing potential resources from the non-productive Houston embayment, and those reserves estimated below historic and current mining depths reduces the unconditional potential resource 33% to about 930 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}, and that in the $30/lb cost category 34% to 399 million pounds of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Based on production records and reserve estimates tabulated for the region, most of the production since 1980 is likely from the reserves identified by NURE. The potential resource predicted by NURE has not been developed, likely due to a variety of factors related to the low uranium prices that have prevailed since 1980.

  5. Permeability and porosity of hydrate-bearing sediments in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann; Malinverno, Alberto

    2015-10-14

    Hydrate-bearing sands are being actively explored because they contain the highest concentrations of hydrate and are the most economically recoverable hydrate resource. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms or timescales of hydrate formation, which are related to methane supply, fluid flux, and host sediment properties such as permeability. We used logging-while-drilling data from locations in the northern Gulf of Mexico to develop an effective medium theory-based model for predicting permeability based on clay-sized sediment fraction. The model considers permeability varying between sand and clay endpoint permeabilities that are defined from laboratory data. We verified the model using permeabilitymore » measurements on core samples from three boreholes, and then used the model to predict permeability in two wells drilled in Walker Ridge Block 313 during the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II expedition in 2009. We found that the cleanest sands (clay-sized fraction <0.05) had intrinsic (hydrate-free) permeability contrasts of 5-6 orders of magnitude with the surrounding clays, which is sufficient to provide focused hydrate formation due to advection of methane from a deep source or diffusion of microbial methane from nearby clay layers. In sands where the clay-sized fraction exceeds 0.05, the permeability reduces significantly and focused flow is less pronounced. In these cases, diffusion of dissolved microbial methane is most likely the preferred mode of methane supply for hydrate formation. In conclusion, our results provide important constraints on methane supply mechanisms in the Walker Ridge area and have global implications for evaluating rates of methane migration and hydrate formation in hydrate-bearing sands.« less

  6. Permeability and porosity of hydrate-bearing sediments in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann; Malinverno, Alberto

    2015-10-14

    Hydrate-bearing sands are being actively explored because they contain the highest concentrations of hydrate and are the most economically recoverable hydrate resource. However, relatively little is known about the mechanisms or timescales of hydrate formation, which are related to methane supply, fluid flux, and host sediment properties such as permeability. We used logging-while-drilling data from locations in the northern Gulf of Mexico to develop an effective medium theory-based model for predicting permeability based on clay-sized sediment fraction. The model considers permeability varying between sand and clay endpoint permeabilities that are defined from laboratory data. We verified the model using permeability measurements on core samples from three boreholes, and then used the model to predict permeability in two wells drilled in Walker Ridge Block 313 during the Gulf of Mexico Gas Hydrate Joint Industry Project Leg II expedition in 2009. We found that the cleanest sands (clay-sized fraction <0.05) had intrinsic (hydrate-free) permeability contrasts of 5-6 orders of magnitude with the surrounding clays, which is sufficient to provide focused hydrate formation due to advection of methane from a deep source or diffusion of microbial methane from nearby clay layers. In sands where the clay-sized fraction exceeds 0.05, the permeability reduces significantly and focused flow is less pronounced. In these cases, diffusion of dissolved microbial methane is most likely the preferred mode of methane supply for hydrate formation. In conclusion, our results provide important constraints on methane supply mechanisms in the Walker Ridge area and have global implications for evaluating rates of methane migration and hydrate formation in hydrate-bearing sands.

  7. Evaluation of CALPUFF nitrogen deposition modeling in the Chesapeake Bay Watershed Area using NADP data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, M.; Mayes, P.; Sherwell, J.

    1998-12-31

    The CALMET/CALPUFF modeling system has been used to estimate nitrogen deposition in an area surrounding Baltimore and the northern portion of the Chesapeake Bay. Comprehensive NO{sub x} emissions inventories and meteorological data bases have been developed to conduct the modeling. This paper discusses the results of an evaluation of predicted nitrogen wet deposition rates compared to measured rates at two NADP/NTN sites in Maryland, Wye and White Rock. Underprediction of wet deposition rates is investigated through the use of sensitivity and diagnostic evaluations of model performance. A suggested change to the calculation of NO{sub x} transformation rates involving an alternative specification of minimum NO{sub x} concentrations was made to CALPUFF and the performance evaluation was re-done. Results of the new evaluation show significantly improved model performance, and therefore the modification is tentatively proposed for use in further applications of CALPUFF to the assessment of nitrogen deposition in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

  8. Bay-Area National Labs Team to Tackle Long-Standing Automotive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen-Storage Challenge Bay-Area National Labs Team to Tackle Long-Standing Automotive Hydrogen-Storage Challenge - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering

  9. Improved coiled-tubing squeeze-cementing techniques at Prudhoe Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hornbrook, P.R.; Mason, C.M. )

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents major changes in coiled-tubing squeeze-cementing techniques used in the Prudhoe Bay Unit Western Operating Area (PBUWOA). Changes include introduction of a polymer diluent to replace borax contamination, increased differential pressures placed on squeeze and coil, reduced cement volumes, and incorporation of an inflow test and resqueeze procedure. These changes resulted in increased squeeze effectiveness by reducing equipment and engineering time requirements and by shortening well shut-in time after the workover.

  10. Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Targeting Net Zero Energy at Marine Corps Base Kaneohe Bay, Hawaii: Assessment and Recommendations K. Burman, A. Kandt, L. Lisell, S. Booth, A. Walker, J. Roberts and J. Falcey Technical Report NREL/ TP-7A40-52897 November 2011 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 *

  11. Final Report: Energy Efficiency and Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Report Energy Efficiency Feasibility Study and Resulting Plan for the Bay Mills Indian Community U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program Award # DE-EE0005173 Project Officer: Lizana K. Pierce lizana.pierce@go.doe.gov Prepared by: Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. Environmental Services Division Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783 Technical Contact: Chris Kushman ckushman@itcmi.org March 2014 1 Executive Summary In 2011 the Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc. was awarded an Energy

  12. Keweenaw Bay Indian Community: 'First Steps' Toward Tribal Weatherization Human Capacity Building

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Keweenaw Bay Indian Community 'First Steps' Toward Tribal Weatherization Human Capacity Building Denver, CO - October 29 th , 2010 Debra L. Picciano . CAP Administrator Federally Recognized in 1934 Enrolled Members 3,500 - 1,200 on Rez. Land Base 59,071 Acres - 92 Sq. Miles Promote energy sufficiency in the community Increase staff knowledge base through training Expand energy efficiency programs Provide and Evaluate energy audits Collaborative Training Effort Involving: The Community Assistance

  13. Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians - Renewable Energy Strategic Plan

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Strategic Plan Little Traverse Bay Bands Of Odawa Indians Albert Colby Jr. and Steve Smiley Tribal History 1855 Treaty established present reservation boundaries in Northern Michigan. Tribe reaffirmed on September 21, 1994. 1995 Tribe received first BIA contract designed to establish service programs to Tribal members, including Law Enforcement, Tribal Court, Housing, Natural Resources, Human Services and Enrollment Departments. Tribal History 1995 Tribe received first Indian Health Service

  14. Green Bay TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary 10-26-06

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Green Bay, Wisconsin - September 14, 2006 Session Chaired by: Jay Jones, DOE, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, OCRWM Regular Members in Attendance: Sandra Alexander (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, CTUIR); Kenny Anderson, Las Vegas Paiute Tribe; Richard Arnold, Las Vegas Indian Center/Pahrump Paiute Tribe); Kevin Tafoya, Santa Clara Pueblo; Christina Nelson, National Conference of State Legislatures; Ed Gonzales, ELG Engineering/Pueblo de San Ildefonso;

  15. Manilla Bay 1, 1A, 1A sidetrack; success against all odds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkee, E.F.; Rillera, F.G. )

    1996-01-01

    The discovery of gas in Manila Bay is one of the more significant exploration discoveries in the Western Pacific in recent years. Within the Philippine Archipelago there is no better geographic or economic location to discover gas than at Manila Bay. Geologically, the well has proven that new concepts applied to old areas, in opposition to past beliefs and dogmas is still a valid way to find hydrocarbons. This is especially true re the western margin of the Central Valley of Luzon. New Venture reviewers (more than 100) were generally negative about the possibility of limestone objectives at this setting. The operators eventually drilled the prospect by themselves. The Manila Bay discovery well is on a large basement uplift with more than 2000 feet of vertical closure and 8,000 acres of areal closure at Miocene levels. The geological surprise was that the well drilled through a Pliocene Limestone (700 feet) charged with gas. An estimated in place resource of up to 2 TCF is possible. This is economically very significant for the Philippines as it is only 30 km from downtown Manila, a city of some 10 million people without any indigenous energy supply. Over-pressured fresh water sands induced drilling problems in the initial well MB-1AST and the deeper primary objectives in Middle to Lower Miocene, also predicted to be carbonates, were not reached. A second well to appraise the Pliocene and explore the deep zones will be drilled in early 1996.

  16. Manilla Bay 1, 1A, 1A sidetrack; success against all odds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durkee, E.F.; Rillera, F.G.

    1996-12-31

    The discovery of gas in Manila Bay is one of the more significant exploration discoveries in the Western Pacific in recent years. Within the Philippine Archipelago there is no better geographic or economic location to discover gas than at Manila Bay. Geologically, the well has proven that new concepts applied to old areas, in opposition to past beliefs and dogmas is still a valid way to find hydrocarbons. This is especially true re the western margin of the Central Valley of Luzon. New Venture reviewers (more than 100) were generally negative about the possibility of limestone objectives at this setting. The operators eventually drilled the prospect by themselves. The Manila Bay discovery well is on a large basement uplift with more than 2000 feet of vertical closure and 8,000 acres of areal closure at Miocene levels. The geological surprise was that the well drilled through a Pliocene Limestone (700 feet) charged with gas. An estimated in place resource of up to 2 TCF is possible. This is economically very significant for the Philippines as it is only 30 km from downtown Manila, a city of some 10 million people without any indigenous energy supply. Over-pressured fresh water sands induced drilling problems in the initial well MB-1AST and the deeper primary objectives in Middle to Lower Miocene, also predicted to be carbonates, were not reached. A second well to appraise the Pliocene and explore the deep zones will be drilled in early 1996.

  17. Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed-Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, J.; Moore, M.; Thompson, M.

    2013-08-01

    Under this project, Newport Partners (as part of the BA-PIRC research team) evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost-effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place DER at the Bay Ridge multifamily (MF) development in Annapolis, Maryland. The design and construction phase of the Bay Ridge project was completed in August 2012. This report summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a 'base scope' retrofit which was estimated to achieve a 30%+ savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on 186 apartments, and a 'DER scope' which was estimated to achieve 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on a 12-unit building. The base scope was applied to the entire apartment complex, except for one 12-unit building which underwent the DER scope. A wide range of efficiency measures was applied to pursue this savings target for the DER building, including improvements/replacements of mechanical equipment and distribution systems, appliances, lighting and lighting controls, the building envelope, hot water conservation measures, and resident education. The results of this research build upon the current body of knowledge of multifamily retrofits. Towards this end, the research team has collected and generated data on the selection of measures, their estimated performance, their measured performance, and risk factors and their impact on potential measures.

  18. Ecological Forecasting in Chesapeake Bay: Using a Mechanistic-Empirical Modelling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C. W.; Hood, Raleigh R.; Long, Wen; Jacobs, John M.; Ramers, D. L.; Wazniak, C.; Wiggert, J. D.; Wood, R.; Xu, J.

    2013-09-01

    The Chesapeake Bay Ecological Prediction System (CBEPS) automatically generates daily nowcasts and three-day forecasts of several environmental variables, such as sea-surface temperature and salinity, the concentrations of chlorophyll, nitrate, and dissolved oxygen, and the likelihood of encountering several noxious species, including harmful algal blooms and water-borne pathogens, for the purpose of monitoring the Bay's ecosystem. While the physical and biogeochemical variables are forecast mechanistically using the Regional Ocean Modeling System configured for the Chesapeake Bay, the species predictions are generated using a novel mechanistic empirical approach, whereby real-time output from the coupled physical biogeochemical model drives multivariate empirical habitat models of the target species. The predictions, in the form of digital images, are available via the World Wide Web to interested groups to guide recreational, management, and research activities. Though full validation of the integrated forecasts for all species is still a work in progress, we argue that the mechanisticempirical approach can be used to generate a wide variety of short-term ecological forecasts, and that it can be applied in any marine system where sufficient data exist to develop empirical habitat models. This paper provides an overview of this system, its predictions, and the approach taken.

  19. Characterizing Natural Gas Hydrates in the Deep Water Gulf of Mexico: Applications for Safe Exploration and Production Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, Jimmy

    2014-05-31

    In 2000 Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deep water portion of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Chevron is an active explorer and operator in the Gulf of Mexico and is aware that natural gas hydrates need to be understood to operate safely in deep water. In August 2000 Chevron worked closely with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and held a workshop in Houston, Texas to define issues concerning the characterization of natural gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, the workshop was meant to clearly show where research, the development of new technologies, and new information sources would be of benefit to the DOE and to the oil and gas industry in defining issues and solving gas hydrate problems in deep water.

  20. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2014 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: 2014 Hurricane Outlook i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other

  1. Short-Term Energy Outlook Supplement: 2013 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3 Outlook for Gulf of Mexico Hurricane-Related Production Outages June 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Supplement: 2013 Hurricane Outlook i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other

  2. Summary of Training Workshop on the Use of NASA tools for Coastal Resource Management in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Chaeli; Judd, Kathleen S.; Gulbransen, Thomas C.; Thom, Ronald M.

    2009-03-01

    A two-day training workshop was held in Xalapa, Mexico from March 10-11 2009 with the goal of training end users from the southern Gulf of Mexico states of Campeche and Veracruz in the use of tools to support coastal resource management decision-making. The workshop was held at the computer laboratory of the Institute de Ecologia, A.C. (INECOL). This report summarizes the results of that workshop and is a deliverable to our NASA client.

  3. Selectively reducing offshore royalty rates in the Gulf of Mexico could increase oil production and federal government revenue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowsher, C.A.

    1985-05-10

    The US government leases large areas in the Outer Continental Shelf in the Gulf of Mexico for the development of oil resources and receives royalties on the oil produced. Conventional methods of oil recovery have recovered or are expected to recover about half of the 16 billion barrels of oil discovered in this area. Other oil recovery methods, collectively known as enhanced oil recovery (EOR), could potentially increase production by about 1 billion barrels of oil. EOR in the Gulf is expensive and does not appear to be economically justified in most cases. Under existing economic conditions and federal policies, GAO's review indicates that utilizing EOR methods will probably produce only about 10 percent of the additional recoverable oil. However, financial incentives in the form of royalty reductions could increase both oil production and federal government revenue if applied on a project-by-project basis. Universal applications of royalty reduction for EOR, however, while achieving increased oil production, would not increase federal government revenue. GAO recommends that the Department of the Interior's Minerals Management Service initiate action that would allow for selective royalty reductions for EOR projects in the Gulf in instances where both total oil production and federal government revenue will increase. 6 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly I: Root of the main crustal decollement for the Appalachian-Ouachita orogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, D.J. (Total Minatome Corporation, Houston, TX (USA))

    1990-09-01

    The Gulf Coast-East Coast magnetic anomaly extends for at least 4000 km from south-central Texas to offshore Newfoundland as one of the longest continuous tectonic features in North America and a major crustal element of the entire North Atlantic-Gulf Coast region. Analysis of 28 profiles spaced at 100km intervals and four computed models demonstrate that the anomaly may be explained by a thick zone of mafic and ultramafic rocks averaging 13-15 km in depth. The trend of the anomaly closely follows the trend of main Appalachian features: in the Gulf Coast of Louisiana, the anomaly is as far south of the Ouachita front as it is east of the western limit of deformation through the central Appalachians. Because the anomaly continues across well-known continental crust in northern Florida and onshore Texas, it cannot plausibly be ascribed to an edge effect at the boundary of oceanic with continental crustal compositions. The northwest-verging, deep-crustal events discovered in COCORP data from the Ouachitas and Appalachians suggest an analogy with the main suture of the Himalayan orogen in the Tibetan Plateau. In this paper the anomaly is identified with the late Paleozoic Alleghenian megasuture, in which the northwest-verging crustal-detachment surfaces ultimately root.

  5. Characteristics of produced water discharged to the Gulf of Mexico hypoxiczone.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Kimmell, T. A.; Rechner, A. C.

    2005-08-24

    Each summer, an area of low dissolved oxygen (the hypoxic zone) forms in the shallow nearshore Gulf of Mexico waters from the Mississippi River Delta westward to near the Texas/Louisiana border. Most scientists believe that the leading contributor to the hypoxic zone is input of nutrients (primarily nitrogen and phosphorus compounds) from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. The nutrients stimulate growth of phytoplankton. As the phytoplankton subsequently die, they fall to the bottom waters where they are decomposed by microorganisms. The decomposition process consumes oxygen in the bottom waters to create hypoxic conditions. Sources other than the two rivers mentioned above may also contribute significant quantities of oxygen-demanding pollutants. One very visible potential source is the hundreds of offshore oil and gas platforms located within or near the hypoxic zone. Many of these platforms discharge varying volumes of produced water. However, only limited data characterizing oxygen demand and nutrient concentration and loading from offshore produced water discharges have been collected. No comprehensive and coordinated oxygen demand data exist for produced water discharges in the Gulf of Mexico. This report describes the results of a program to sample 50 offshore oil and gas platforms located within the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone. The program was conducted in response to a requirement in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) general National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for offshore oil and gas discharges. EPA requested information on the amount of oxygen-demanding substances contained in the produced water discharges. This information is needed as inputs to several water quality models that EPA intends to run to estimate the relative contributions of the produced water discharges to the occurrence of the hypoxic zone. Sixteen platforms were sampled 3 times each at approximately one-month intervals to give an estimate of temporal variability. An additional 34 platforms were sampled one time. The 50 sampled platforms were scattered throughout the hypoxic zone to give an estimate of spatial variability. Each platform was sampled for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), total organic carbon (TOC), nitrogen (ammonia, nitrate, nitrite, and total Kjeldahl nitrogen [TKN]), and phosphorus (total phosphorus and orthophosphate). In addition to these parameters, each sample was monitored for pH, conductivity, salinity, and temperature. The sampling provided average platform concentrations for each parameter. Table ES-1 shows the mean, median, maximum, and minimum for the sampled parameters. For some of the parameters, the mean is considerably larger than the median, suggesting that one or a few data points are much higher than the rest of the points (outliers). Chapter 4 contains an extensive discussion of outliers and shows how the sample results change if outliers are deleted from consideration. A primary goal of this study is to estimate the mass loading (lb/day) of each of the oxygen-demanding pollutants from the 50 platforms sampled in the study. Loading is calculated by multiplying concentrations by the discharge volume and then by a conversion factor to allow units to match. The loadings calculated in this study of 50 platforms represent a produced water discharge volume of about 176,000 bbl/day. The total amount of produced water generated in the hypoxic zone during the year 2003 was estimated as 508,000 bbl/day. This volume is based on reports by operators to the Minerals Management Service each year. It reflects the volume of produced water that is generated from each lease, not the volume that is discharged from each platform. The mass loadings from offshore oil and gas discharges to the entire hypoxic zone were estimated by multiplying the 50-platform loadings by the ratio of total water generated to 50-platform discharge volume. The loadings estimated for the 50 platforms and for the entire hypoxic zone are shown in Table ES-2. These estimates and the sampling data from 50 platfo

  6. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

    2005-08-01

    A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient energy supply and normal functioning of the pressure compensated battery even following recharge after the first deployment, (H) Survival of the acoustic modem following both deployments though it was found to have developed a slow leak through the transducer following the second deployment due, presumably, to deployment in excess of 300m beyond its rating. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (A) The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed, (B) The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments, (C) The MPS has been adapted to serve as an energy source for both p- and s-wave studies at the station as well as to deploy the horizontal line arrays and the SFP. (3) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (A) Components for the prototype have been assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed, (B) The prototype has been constructed and preliminary data collected, (C) The construction of the field system is underway. (4) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (A) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate. These measurements have been used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station, (B) Laboratory tests performed using the project prototype have produced a conductivity data set that is being used to refine parameters of the field model. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (A) Preliminary designs of mounting pieces for electrical components of ''sphereIR'' have been completed using AutoCAD software, (B) The preliminary design of an electronics baseplate has been completed and aided in the optimization of

  7. Impact of induced seismic events on seal integrity, Texas Gulf Coast

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Meckel, Timothy A.; Carr, David A.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2014-12-31

    Recent publications have suggested that large-scale CO2 injection could trigger earthquakes and that even small- to moderate-sized earthquakes may threaten the seal integrity of the injection zone, and potentially damage buildings and other surface structures. In this study, we compared seal thickness to estimated fault displacement due to a single hypothetical seismic event in a selected area of the Texas Gulf Coast comprising an offshore strip of state waters along two Texas counties. To evaluate the slip generated by a single seismic event, we compiled well log information on shale/sand sequences and seismic information on fault geometric characteristics of amore » section of Lower Miocene age. The section is thousands of feet thick and is overlain and underlain by marine shales (Amph. B and Anahuac, respectively) that are relatively easy to correlate between wells. The Amph. B. shale is the secondary and ultimate seal for all injection intervals in the Lower Miocene. Given its thickness, no realistic seismic event or small series of seismic events will offset it significantly. However, this may not be true of smaller local primary seals. An analysis of geophysical logs of a total of 71 wells yielded a total of 2,871 sand / shale binary intervals. An analysis of the dedicated 3D seismic survey counted 723 fault traces at five roughly horizontal horizons within the Lower Miocene Fault displacement estimated using the product of the fault length times an uncertain multiplier coefficient assumed to follow a triangular distribution with a 10-3 to 10-5 range and a mode of 8 × 10-5. We then compared estimated single-event fault displacements to seal thicknesses by means of a Monte-Carlo analysis. Only 1.8% of thickness/displacement pairs display a displacement greater than 20% of the seal thickness. Only 0.26% of the pairs result in a displacement of half the seal thickness and only 0.05% of thickness/displacement pairs result in a clear seal rupture. The next step was to compare the magnitude of the event generated by such a displacement to documented magnitudes of “large” earthquakes generated by waterflooding and fluid disposal. Based on this analysis, we conclude that seismicity that may arise from CO2 injection appears not to be a serious complication for CO2 storage integrity, at least in the Gulf Coast area.« less

  8. Impact of induced seismic events on seal integrity, Texas Gulf Coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicot, Jean-Philippe; Meckel, Timothy A.; Carr, David A.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2014-12-31

    Recent publications have suggested that large-scale CO2 injection could trigger earthquakes and that even small- to moderate-sized earthquakes may threaten the seal integrity of the injection zone, and potentially damage buildings and other surface structures. In this study, we compared seal thickness to estimated fault displacement due to a single hypothetical seismic event in a selected area of the Texas Gulf Coast comprising an offshore strip of state waters along two Texas counties. To evaluate the slip generated by a single seismic event, we compiled well log information on shale/sand sequences and seismic information on fault geometric characteristics of a section of Lower Miocene age. The section is thousands of feet thick and is overlain and underlain by marine shales (Amph. B and Anahuac, respectively) that are relatively easy to correlate between wells. The Amph. B. shale is the secondary and ultimate seal for all injection intervals in the Lower Miocene. Given its thickness, no realistic seismic event or small series of seismic events will offset it significantly. However, this may not be true of smaller local primary seals. An analysis of geophysical logs of a total of 71 wells yielded a total of 2,871 sand / shale binary intervals. An analysis of the dedicated 3D seismic survey counted 723 fault traces at five roughly horizontal horizons within the Lower Miocene Fault displacement estimated using the product of the fault length times an uncertain multiplier coefficient assumed to follow a triangular distribution with a 10-3 to 10-5 range and a mode of 8 10-5. We then compared estimated single-event fault displacements to seal thicknesses by means of a Monte-Carlo analysis. Only 1.8% of thickness/displacement pairs display a displacement greater than 20% of the seal thickness. Only 0.26% of the pairs result in a displacement of half the seal thickness and only 0.05% of thickness/displacement pairs result in a clear seal rupture. The next step was to compare the magnitude of the event generated by such a displacement to documented magnitudes of large earthquakes generated by waterflooding and fluid disposal. Based on this analysis, we conclude that seismicity that may arise from CO2 injection appears not to be a serious complication for CO2 storage integrity, at least in the Gulf Coast area.

  9. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-25

    The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on reservoir architecture and geographic distribution of Smackover reservoirs is the fabric and texture of the depositional lithofacies, diagenesis (chiefly dolomitization) is a significant factor that preserves and enhances reservoir quality. The evaporative pumping mechanism is favored to explain the dolomitization of the thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone reservoir flow units at Appleton and Vocation Fields. Geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and the testing and applying the resulting integrated geologic-engineering models have shown that little oil remains to be recovered at Appleton Field and a significant amount of oil remains to be recovered at Vocation Field through a strategic infill drilling program. The drive mechanisms for primary production in Appleton and Vocation Fields remain effective; therefore, the initiation of a pressure maintenance program or enhanced recovery project is not required at this time. The integrated geologic-engineering model developed for a low-relief paleohigh (Appleton Field) was tested for three scenarios involving the variables of present-day structural elevation and the presence/absence of potential reef thrombolite lithofacies. In each case, the predictions based upon the model were correct. From this modeling, the characteristics of the ideal prospect in the basement ridge play include a low-relief paleohigh associated with dendroidal/chaotic thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone that has sufficient present-day structural relief so that these carbonates rest above the oil-water contact. Such a prospect was identified from the modeling, and it is located northwest of well Permit No. 3854B (Appleton Field) and south of well No. Permit No.11030B (Northwest Appleton Field).

  10. RESULTS FROM THE (1) DATA COLLECTION WORKSHOP, (2) MODELING WORKSHOP AND (3) DRILLING AND CORING METHODS WORKSHOP AS PART OF THE JOINT INDUSTRY PARTICIPATION (JIP) PROJECT TO CHARACTERIZE NATURAL GAS HYDRATES IN THE DEEPWATER GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen A. Holditch; Emrys Jones

    2002-09-01

    In 2000, Chevron began a project to learn how to characterize the natural gas hydrate deposits in the deepwater portions of the Gulf of Mexico. A Joint Industry Participation (JIP) group was formed in 2001, and a project partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began in October 2001. The primary objective of this project is to develop technology and data to assist in the characterization of naturally occurring gas hydrates in the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. These naturally occurring gas hydrates can cause problems relating to drilling and production of oil and gas, as well as building and operating pipelines. Other objectives of this project are to better understand how natural gas hydrates can affect seafloor stability, to gather data that can be used to study climate change, and to determine how the results of this project can be used to assess if and how gas hydrates act as a trapping mechanism for shallow oil or gas reservoirs. As part of the project, three workshops were held. The first was a data collection workshop, held in Houston during March 14-15, 2002. The purpose of this workshop was to find out what data exist on gas hydrates and to begin making that data available to the JIP. The second and third workshop, on Geoscience and Reservoir Modeling, and Drilling and Coring Methods, respectively, were held simultaneously in Houston during May 9-10, 2002. The Modeling Workshop was conducted to find out what data the various engineers, scientists and geoscientists want the JIP to collect in both the field and the laboratory. The Drilling and Coring workshop was to begin making plans on how we can collect the data required by the project's principal investigators.

  11. Geologic development and characteristics of the continental margins, Gulf of Mexico. Research report, 1983-1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, J.M.; Prior, D.B.; Roberts, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    The continental slope of the Gulf Basin covers more than 500,000 sq km and consists of smooth and gently sloping surfaces, prominent escarpments, knolls, intraslope basins, and submarine canyons and channels. It is an area of extremely diverse topographic and sedimentologic conditions. The slope extends from the shelf break, roughly at the 200 m isobath, to the upper limit of the continental rise, at a depth of 2800 m. The most-complex province in the basin, and the one of most interest to the petroleum industry, is the Texas-Louisiana slope, occupying 120,000 sq km and in which bottom slopes range from < 1 deg to > 20 deg around the knolls and basins. The near-surface geology and topography of the slope are functions of the interplay between episodes of rapid shelf-edge and slope progradation and contemporaneous modification of the depositional sequence by diapirism. Development of discrete depo-centers throughout the Neogene results in rapid shelf-edge progradation, often in excess of 15-20 km/my. This rapid progradation of the shelf edge leads to development of thick wedges of sediment accumulation on the continental slope. Oversteeping, high pore pressures in rapidly deposited soft sediments and changes in eustatic sea level cause subaqueous slope instabilities such as landsliding and debris flows. Large scale features such as shelf edge separation scars and landslide related canyons often results from such processes.

  12. Upper Pleistocene-to-Holocene depositional sequences in the north-central Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowland, C. ); Wood, L.J. )

    1991-03-01

    Upper Quaternary depositional sequences and their systems tracts can be delineated in the Main Pass area using minisparker seismic data. Core collected by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Shelf/Slope Research Consortium (Amoco, ARCO, BP, Chevron, Elf-Aquitaine, Exxon, Marathon, Mobil, and Texaco) sampled these systems tracts on one site in Main Pass 303. At the shelfbreak, a distinct change in depositional style occurs across the latest Wisconsinan sequence boundary. Widespread progradational systems (late highstand systems tract) below become focused into discrete depocenters with predominantly aggradational deposits (lowstand systems tract) above. Focusing was probably a result of localized high subsidence rates due to salt movement, progradation into rapidly deepening water, and, possibly, stabilization of sediment transport paths on the exposed shelf. No age-equivalent submarine canyons are present in this area. The oldest mappable systems tract is a highstand systems tract deposited during stage 3 interstadial and the early-to-middle stage 2 glacial. The overlying transgressive systems tract was deposited coeval with the stage 2-stage 1 transition. It thins in a land-ward direction, except where an updip depocenter was present. At the corehole site, the transgressive systems tract consists of fining-upward deposits ranging from medium-grained sands to clays. The transgressive systems tract includes small slope-front-fill lenses deposited on the uppermost slope above and adjacent to lowstand deltaic depocenters. These lenses likely comprise silt and clay derived from either reworking of lowstand deltas or sediment bypassing the outer shelf.

  13. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Feet) Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 2,759 2,577 2,704 2,628 2,728 3,009 3,168 3,155 3,079 3,055 3,298 3,469 1998 2,634 2,460 2,582 2,509 2,605 2,873 3,025 3,012 2,940 2,859 3,086 3,247 1999 1,809 1,689 1,773 1,723 1,789 1,973 2,077 2,068 2,019 1,963 2,119 2,230 2000 2,535 2,432 2,503 2,403 2,472 2,717 2,977 2,947 3,184 2,870 3,060 3,207 2001 1,207 1,359

  14. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2001 1,994 1,804 1,837 1,504 1,798 1,541 1,890 1,954 1,742 2,018 1,823 1,711 2002 1,661 1,512 1,693 1,728 1,794 1,738 1,809 1,820 1,523 1,433 1,667 1,714 2003 1,728 1,590 1,801 1,753 1,774

  15. Final report on decommissioning boreholes and wellsite restoration, Gulf Coast Interior Salt Domes of Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    In 1978, eight salt domes in Texas, Louisiana, and Mississippi were identified for study as potential locations for a nuclear waste repository as part of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program. Three domes were selected in Mississippi for ``area characterization`` phase study as follows: Lampton Dome near Columbia, Cypress Creek Dome near New Augusta, and Richton Dome near Richton. The purpose of the studies was to acquire geologic and geohydrologic information from shallow and deep drilling investigations to enable selection of sites suitable for more intensive study. Eleven deep well sites were selected for multiple-well installations to acquire information on the lithologic and hydraulic properties of regional aquifers. In 1986, the Gulf Coast salt domes were eliminated from further consideration for repository development by the selection of three candidate sites in other regions of the country. In 1987, well plugging and restoration of these deferred sites became a closeout activity. The primary objectives of this activity are to plug and abandon all wells and boreholes in accordance with state regulations, restore all drilling sites to as near original condition as feasible, and convey to landowners any wells on their property that they choose to maintain. This report describes the activities undertaken to accomplish these objectives, as outlines in Activity Plan 1--2, ``Activity Plan for Well Plugging and Site Restoration of Test Hole Sites in Mississippi.``

  16. An analysis of uranium dispersal and health effects using a Gulf War case study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Albert Christian

    2005-07-01

    The study described in this report used mathematical modeling to estimate health risks from exposure to depleted uranium (DU) during the 1991 Gulf War for both U.S. troops and nearby Iraqi civilians. The analysis found that the risks of DU-induced leukemia or birth defects are far too small to result in an observable increase in these health effects among exposed veterans or Iraqi civilians. Only a few veterans in vehicles accidentally struck by U.S. DU munitions are predicted to have inhaled sufficient quantities of DU particulate to incur any significant health risk (i.e., the possibility of temporary kidney damage from the chemical toxicity of uranium and about a 1% chance of fatal lung cancer). The health risk to all downwind civilians is predicted to be extremely small. Recommendations for monitoring are made for certain exposed groups. Although the study found fairly large calculational uncertainties, the models developed and used are generally valid. The analysis was also used to assess potential uranium health hazards for workers in the weapons complex. No illnesses are projected for uranium workers following standard guidelines; nonetheless, some research suggests that more conservative guidelines should be considered.

  17. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The models represent an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic models served as the framework for the simulations. The geologic-engineering models of the Appleton and Vocation Field reservoirs have been developed. These models are being tested. The geophysical interpretation for the paleotopographic feature being tested has been made, and the study of the data resulting from drilling of a well on this paleohigh is in progress. Numerous presentations on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been made at professional meetings and conferences and a short course on microbial reservoir characterization and modeling based on these fields has been prepared.

  18. Final Project Report, Bristol Bay Native Corporation Wind and Hydroelectric Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaught, Douglas J.

    2007-03-31

    The Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) grant project focused on conducting nine wind resource studies in eight communities in the Bristol Bay region of southwest Alaska and was administered as a collaborative effort between BBNC, the Alaska Energy Authority, Alaska Village Electric Cooperative, Nushagak Electric Cooperative (NEC), Naknek Electric Association (NEA), and several individual village utilities in the region. BBNCs technical contact and the project manager for this study was Douglas Vaught, P.E., of V3 Energy, LLC, in Eagle River, Alaska. The Bristol Bay region of Alaska is comprised of 29 communities ranging in size from the hub community of Dillingham with a population of approximately 3,000 people, to a few Native Alaska villages that have a few tens of residents. Communities chosen for inclusion in this project were Dillingham, Naknek, Togiak, New Stuyahok, Kokhanok, Perryville, Clarks Point, and Koliganek. Selection criteria for conduction of wind resource assessments in these communities included population and commercial activity, utility interest, predicted Class 3 or better wind resource, absence of other sources of renewable energy, and geographical coverage of the region. Beginning with the first meteorological tower installation in October 2003, wind resource studies were completed at all sites with at least one year, and as much as two and a half years, of data. In general, the study results are very promising for wind power development in the region with Class 6 winds measured in Kokhanok; Class 4 winds in New Stuyahok, Clarks Point, and Koliganek; Class 3 winds in Dillingham, Naknek, and Togiak; and Class 2 winds in Perryville. Measured annual average wind speeds and wind power densities at the 30 meter level varied from a high of 7.87 meters per second and 702 watts per square meter in Kokhanok (Class 6 winds), to a low of 4.60 meters per second and 185 watts per square meter in Perryville (Class 2 winds).

  19. Internal split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat; Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-01-03

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  20. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: First Results Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chandler, K.; Eudy, L.

    2011-08-01

    This report documents the early implementation experience for the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, the largest fleet of fuel cell buses in the United States. The ZEBA Demonstration group includes five participating transit agencies: AC Transit (lead transit agency), Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority (VTA), Golden Gate Transit (GGT), San Mateo County Transit District (SamTrans), and San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni). The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service.

  1. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results. Fourth Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, Leslie; Post, Matthew

    2015-07-02

    This report presents results of a demonstration of fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) leads the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) demonstration, which includes 12 advanced-design fuel cell buses and two hydrogen fueling stations. The FCEBs in service at AC Transit are 40-foot, low-floor buses built by Van Hool with a hybrid electric propulsion system that includes a US Hybrid fuel cell power system and EnerDel lithium-based energy storage system. The buses began revenue service in May 2010.

  2. Systematic vegetation change analysis of mangrove dieoff in Florida Bay and southern Everglades National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, M.M.; Sargent, F.J.; Sargent, W.B.

    1997-06-01

    A very brief summary is provided of a project to link hydrological and ecological relationships of the Florida Everglades watershed and the Florida Bay estuary. The creation of vegetation maps and systematic spatial analysis of vegetation and hydrological features will provide information about the interaction between these two ecosystems. The distribution of mangroves, salt marshes, and related vegetative communities are being mapped using existing aerial photography. Historical photographic records are being used to create geographic information system data layers. Changes in the composition of wetlands and vegetative patterns will be compared over a 45-year period.

  3. A fuel-based motor vehicle emission inventory for the San Francisco Bay area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, D.R.; Singer, B.C.; Harley, R.A.; Martien, P.T.; Fanai, A.K.

    1997-12-31

    Traditionally, regional motor vehicle emission inventories (MVEI) have been estimated by combining travel demand model and emission factor model predictions. The accuracy of traditional MVEIs is frequently challenged, and development of independent methods for estimating vehicle emissions has been identified as a high priority for air quality research. In this study, an alternative fuel-based MVEI was developed for the San Francisco Bay Area using data from 1990--1992. To estimate CO emissions from motor vehicles in the Bay Area, estimates of gasoline sales were combined with infrared remote sensing measurements of CO and CO{sub 2} exhaust concentrations from over 10,000 light-duty vehicles in summer 1991. Once absolute estimates of CO emissions have been computed, it is possible to use ambient NO{sub x}/CO and NMOC/CO ratios from high traffic areas to estimate emissions for NO{sub x} and NMOC (excluding some resting loss and diurnal evaporative emissions). Ambient ratios were generated from special-study measurements of NMOC and CO in 1990 and 1992, and from routine sampling of NO{sub x} and CO in 1991. All pollutant concentrations were measured on summer mornings at Bay Area monitoring sites in areas with high levels of vehicle traffic and no other significant sources nearby. Stabilized CO emissions calculated by the fuel-based method for cars and light-duty trucks were 1720{+-}420 tons/day. This value is close to California`s MVEI 7G model estimates. Total on-road vehicle emissions of CO in the Bay Area were estimated to be 2900{+-}800 tons/day. Emissions of NMOC were estimated to be 570{+-}200 tons/day, which is 1.6{+-}0.6 times the value predicted by MVEI 7G. In the present study, emissions of NO{sub x} from on-road vehicles were estimated to be 250{+-}90 tons/day, which is 0.6{+-}0.2 times the value predicted by MVEI 7G.

  4. Renewable Energy Resoure Assessment for the Communities of Cold Bay, False Pass, and Nelson Lagoon

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Resource Assessment Aleutians East Borough 5/18/10 PAGE 1 OF 56 "Celebrate the power of nature"TM ... with YourCleanEnergy LLC 308 G Street #212, Anchorage AK 99501 907-274-2007 www.yourcleanenergy.us Renewable Energy Resource Assessment for the Communities of Cold Bay, False Pass, and Nelson Lagoon This report for Aleutians East Borough was funded by a grant from the Alaska Energy Authority, Project No. 407051 FINAL REPORT COMPLETED MAY 18, 2010 BY: ANDY BAKER, P.E. & LEE

  5. Existing Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit, Annapolis, Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-10-01

    Under this project, the BA-PIRC research team evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost-effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place deep energy retrofit at the Bay Ridge multifamily development in Annapolis, Maryland. The design and construction phase of the Bay Ridge project was completed in August 2012. This case study summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete.

  6. Bay Ridge Gardens - Mixed Humid Affordable Multifamily Housing Deep Energy Retrofit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, James; Moore, Mike; Thompson, Margo

    2013-08-01

    Under this project, Newport Partners (as part of the BA-PIRC research team) evaluated the installation, measured performance, and cost effectiveness of efficiency upgrade measures for a tenant-in-place deep energy retrofit (DER) at the Bay Ridge multifamily development in Annapolis, Maryland. This report summarizes system commissioning, short-term test results, utility bill data analysis, and analysis of real-time data collected over a one-year period after the retrofit was complete. The Bay Ridge project is comprised of a "base scope" retrofit which was estimated to achieve a 30%+ savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on 186 apartments, and a "DER scope" which was estimated to achieve 50% savings (relative to pre-retrofit) on a 12-unit building. A wide range of efficiency measures was applied to pursue this savings target for the DER building, including improvements/replacements of mechanical equipment and distribution systems, appliances, lighting and lighting controls, the building envelope, hot water conservation measures, and resident education. The results of this research build upon the current body of knowledge of multifamily retrofits. Towards this end, the research team has collected and generated data on the selection of measures, their estimated performance, their measured performance, and risk factors and their impact on potential measures.

  7. Occurrence of gas hydrate in Oligocene Frio sand: Alaminos Canyon Block 818: Northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, R.D.; Shelander, D.; Lee, M.; Latham, T.; Collett, T.; Guerin, G.; Moridis, G.; Reagan, M.; Goldberg, D.

    2009-07-15

    A unique set of high-quality downhole shallow subsurface well log data combined with industry standard 3D seismic data from the Alaminos Canyon area has enabled the first detailed description of a concentrated gas hydrate accumulation within sand in the Gulf of Mexico. The gas hydrate occurs within very fine grained, immature volcaniclastic sands of the Oligocene Frio sand. Analysis of well data acquired from the Alaminos Canyon Block 818 No.1 ('Tigershark') well shows a total gas hydrate occurrence 13 m thick, with inferred gas hydrate saturation as high as 80% of sediment pore space. Average porosity in the reservoir is estimated from log data at approximately 42%. Permeability in the absence of gas hydrates, as revealed from the analysis of core samples retrieved from the well, ranges from 600 to 1500 millidarcies. The 3-D seismic data reveals a strong reflector consistent with significant increase in acoustic velocities that correlates with the top of the gas-hydrate-bearing sand. This reflector extends across an area of approximately 0.8 km{sup 2} and delineates the minimal probable extent of the gas hydrate accumulation. The base of the inferred gas-hydrate zone also correlates well with a very strong seismic reflector that indicates transition into units of significantly reduced acoustic velocity. Seismic inversion analyses indicate uniformly high gas-hydrate saturations throughout the region where the Frio sand exists within the gas hydrate stability zone. Numerical modeling of the potential production of natural gas from the interpreted accumulation indicates serious challenges for depressurization-based production in settings with strong potential pressure support from extensive underlying aquifers.

  8. Sedimentation pulse in the NE Gulf of Mexico following the 2010 DWH blowout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Gregg R.; Larson, Rebekka A.; Schwing, Patrick T.; Romero, Isabel; Moore, Christopher; Reichart, Gert -Jan; Jilbert, Tom; Chanton, Jeff P.; Hastings, David W.; Overholt, Will A.; Marks, Kala P.; Kostka, Joel E.; Holmes, Charles W.; Hollander, David; Chin, Wei -Chun

    2015-07-14

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil discharge at the seafloor as recorded in bottom sediments of the DeSoto Canyon region in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Through a close coupling of sedimentological, geochemical, and biological approaches, multiple independent lines of evidence from 11 sites sampled in November/December 2010 revealed that the upper ~1 cm depth interval is distinct from underlying sediments and results indicate that particles originated at the sea surface. Consistent dissimilarities in grain size over the surficial ~1 cm of sediments correspond to excess 234Th depths, which indicates a lack of vertical mixing (bioturbation), suggesting the entire layer was deposited within a 4–5 month period. In addition, a time series from four deep-sea sites sampled up to three additional times over the following two years revealed that excess 234Th depths, accumulation rates, and 234Th inventories decreased rapidly, within a few to several months after initial coring. The interpretation of a rapid sedimentation pulse is corroborated by stratification in solid phase Mn, which is linked to diagenesis and redox change, and the dramatic decrease in benthic formanifera density that was recorded in surficial sediments. Results are consistent with a brief depositional pulse that was also reported in previous studies of sediments, and marine snow formation in surface waters closer to the wellhead during the summer and fall of 2010. Although sediment input from the Mississippi River and advective transport may influence sedimentation on the seafloor in the DeSoto Canyon region, we conclude based on multidisciplinary evidence that the sedimentation pulse in late 2010 is the product of marine snow formation and is likely linked to the DWH discharge.

  9. Metagenomics, metatranscriptomics and single cell genomics reveal functional response of active Oceanospirillales to Gulf oil spill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Olivia U.; Hazen, Terry C.; Borglin, Sharon; Chain, Patrick S. G.; Dubinsky, Eric A.; Fortney, Julian L.; Han, James; Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Hultman, Jenni; Lamendella, Regina; Mackelprang, Rachel; Malfatti, Stephanie; Tom, Lauren M.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Woyke, Tanja; Zhou, Jizhong; Rubin, Edward M.; Jansson, Janet K.

    2012-06-12

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico resulted in a deep-sea hydrocarbon plume that caused a shift in the indigenous microbial community composition with unknown ecological consequences. Early in the spill history, a bloom of uncultured, thus uncharacterized, members of the Oceanospirillales was previously detected, but their role in oil disposition was unknown. Here our aim was to determine the functional role of the Oceanospirillales and other active members of the indigenous microbial community using deep sequencing of community DNA and RNA, as well as single-cell genomics. Shotgun metagenomic and metatranscriptomic sequencing revealed that genes for motility, chemotaxis and aliphatic hydrocarbon degradation were significantly enriched and expressed in the hydrocarbon plume samples compared with uncontaminated seawater collected from plume depth. In contrast, although genes coding for degradation of more recalcitrant compounds, such as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, total xylenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, were identified in the metagenomes, they were expressed at low levels, or not at all based on analysis of the metatranscriptomes. Isolation and sequencing of two Oceanospirillales single cells revealed that both cells possessed genes coding for n-alkane and cycloalkane degradation. Specifically, the near-complete pathway for cyclohexane oxidation in the Oceanospirillales single cells was elucidated and supported by both metagenome and metatranscriptome data. The draft genome also included genes for chemotaxis, motility and nutrient acquisition strategies that were also identified in the metagenomes and metatranscriptomes. These data point towards a rapid response of members of the Oceanospirillales to aliphatic hydrocarbons in the deep sea.

  10. Steam Dryer Segmentation and Packaging at Grand Gulf Nuclear Station - 13577

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreitman, Paul J.; Sirianni, Steve R.; Pillard, Mark M.

    2013-07-01

    Entergy recently performed an Extended Power Up-rate (EPU) on their Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, near Port Gibson, Mississippi. To support the EPU, a new Steam Dryer Assembly was installed during the last refueling outage. Due to limited access into the containment, the large Replacement Steam Dryer (RSD) had to be brought into the containment in pieces and then final assembly was completed on the refueling floor before installation into the reactor. Likewise, the highly contaminated Original Steam Dryer (OSD) had to be segmented into manageable sections, loaded into specially designed shielded containers, and rigged out of containment where they will be safely stored until final disposal is accomplished at an acceptable waste repository. Westinghouse Nuclear Services was contracted by Entergy to segment, package and remove the OSD from containment. This work was performed on critical path during the most recent refueling outage. The segmentation was performed underwater to minimize radiation exposure to the workers. Special hydraulic saws were developed for the cutting operations based on Westinghouse designs previously used in Sweden to segment ABB Reactor Internals. The mechanical cutting method was selected because of its proven reliability and the minimal cutting debris that is generated by the process. Maintaining stability of the large OSD sections during cutting was accomplished using a custom built support stand that was installed into the Moisture Separator Pool after the Moisture Separator was installed back in the reactor vessel. The OSD was then moved from the Steam Dryer Pool to the Moisture Separator Pool for segmentation. This scenario resolved the logistical challenge of having two steam dryers and a moisture separator in containment simultaneously. A water filtration/vacuum unit was supplied to maintain water clarity during the cutting and handling operations and to collect the cutting chips. (authors)

  11. Sedimentation pulse in the NE Gulf of Mexico following the 2010 DWH blowout

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brooks, Gregg R.; Larson, Rebekka A.; Schwing, Patrick T.; Romero, Isabel; Moore, Christopher; Reichart, Gert -Jan; Jilbert, Tom; Chanton, Jeff P.; Hastings, David W.; Overholt, Will A.; et al

    2015-07-14

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impacts of the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil discharge at the seafloor as recorded in bottom sediments of the DeSoto Canyon region in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Through a close coupling of sedimentological, geochemical, and biological approaches, multiple independent lines of evidence from 11 sites sampled in November/December 2010 revealed that the upper ~1 cm depth interval is distinct from underlying sediments and results indicate that particles originated at the sea surface. Consistent dissimilarities in grain size over the surficial ~1 cm of sediments correspond to excess 234Th depths, which indicatesmore » a lack of vertical mixing (bioturbation), suggesting the entire layer was deposited within a 4–5 month period. In addition, a time series from four deep-sea sites sampled up to three additional times over the following two years revealed that excess 234Th depths, accumulation rates, and 234Th inventories decreased rapidly, within a few to several months after initial coring. The interpretation of a rapid sedimentation pulse is corroborated by stratification in solid phase Mn, which is linked to diagenesis and redox change, and the dramatic decrease in benthic formanifera density that was recorded in surficial sediments. Results are consistent with a brief depositional pulse that was also reported in previous studies of sediments, and marine snow formation in surface waters closer to the wellhead during the summer and fall of 2010. Although sediment input from the Mississippi River and advective transport may influence sedimentation on the seafloor in the DeSoto Canyon region, we conclude based on multidisciplinary evidence that the sedimentation pulse in late 2010 is the product of marine snow formation and is likely linked to the DWH discharge.« less

  12. Design and operating characteristics of cathodic protection systems associated with large seawater intake reinforced concrete structures in the Arabian Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M.; Chaudhary, Z.; Al-Muhid, T.M.M.

    1999-07-01

    The large reinforced concrete seawater intake structures, which are part of a cooling system in several petrochemical plants located in the Arabian Gulf, have been catholically protected to arrest chloride-induced corrosion of the steel reinforcement. The cathodic protection systems have an operating history of 1--5 years. The design and operating features of the cathodic protection systems are described and discussed. Monitoring data of each system collected over the years since commissioning of the systems are described and discussed to evaluate performance of each system.

  13. SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

    2006-06-01

    The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel, the M/V Ocean Quest and its two submersibles, but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  14. ,"Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Dry Natural Gas Expected Future Production (Billion Cubic Feet)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release Date:","11/19/2015" ,"Next Release

  15. Measurements of the Radiated Fields and Conducted Current Leakage from the Pulsed Power Systems in the National Ignition Facility at LLNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R A; Clancy, T J; Fulkerson, S; Petersen, D; Pendelton, D; Hulsey, S; Ullery, G; Tuck, J; Polk, M; Kamm, R; Newton, M; Moore, W B; Arnold, P; Ollis, C; Hinz, A; Robb, C; Fornes, J; Watson, J

    2003-07-31

    An important pulsed power system consideration is that they inherently generate fields and currents that can cause interference in other subsystems and diagnostics. Good pulsed power design, grounding and isolation practices can help mitigate these unwanted signals. During the laser commissioning shots for the NIF Early Light milestone at LLNL, measurements were made of the radiated field and conducted currents caused by the Power Conditioning System (PCS) modules with flash lamp load and the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) driver. The measurements were made in the capacitor bay, laser bay, control room and target bay. The field measurements were made with B-dot and E-dot probes with bandwidth of about 100MHz. The current measurements were made with a clamp on probe with a bandwidth of about 20 MHz. The results of these measurements show fields and currents in the NIF Facility well below that required for interference with other subsystems. Currents on the target chamber from the pulsed power systems are well below the background noise currents.

  16. Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

  17. EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Draft Environmental AssessmentThis EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a project that would use the tidal currents of Cobscook Bay to generate electricity via cross-flow Kinetic System turbine generator units (TGU) mounted on the seafloor. The TGUs would capture energy from the flow in both ebb and flood directions.

  18. External split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-21

    A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

  19. livermore field office

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    donation to those in need.

    Livermore Field Office sets core values as part of continuous improvement process http:nnsa.energy.govbloglivermore-field-office-sets-cor...

  20. Bay Area

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    8%2A en NNSA to Conduct Aerial Radiological Surveys Over San Francisco, Pacifica, Berkeley, And Oakland, CA Areas http:nnsa.energy.govmediaroompressreleasesamsca

  1. Lease Condensate New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4 8 29 7 24 12 2009-2014 Federal Offshore U.S. 10 4 1 0 3 1 2009-2014 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 2009-2014 Gulf of Mexico (Louisiana & Alabama) 5 1 1 0 1 1 2009-2014 Gulf of...

  2. Why the Gulf War still matters: Foreign perspectives on the war and the future of international security. Report No. 16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrity, P.J.

    1993-07-01

    This report summarizes the main findings of a Center for National Security Studies (CNSS) project that examined how a number of nations other than the United States have reacted to the course and outcome of the Persian Gulf War of 1991. The project was built around studies of key countries on which the Gulf War might reasonably be expected to have had a significant impact: Argentina, the ASEAN states, Brazil, China, Cuba, Egypt, France, Germany, India, Iran, Iraq, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Libya, North Korea, Russia, Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Spain, Syria, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, Vietnam, and the states of the former Yugoslavia. These country studies were written by well-recognized independent experts following a common set of guidelines provided by CNSS. When the country studies were completed, they were reviewed and supplemented through a series of peer assessments and workshops. The report represents a synthesis of material generated through this process, and is intended to stimulate thought and further analysis on the critical topics discussed herein.

  3. Field Evaluation of Four Novel Roof Designs for Energy-Efficient Manufactured Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, E.; Dentz, J.; Ansanelli, E.; Barker, G.; Rath, P.; Dadia, D.

    2015-12-03

    "9A five-bay roof test structure was built, instrumented and monitored in an effort to determine through field testing and analysis the relative contributions of select technologies toward reducing energy use in new manufactured homes. The roof structure in Jamestown, California was designed to examine how differences in roof construction impact space conditioning loads, wood moisture content and attic humidity levels. Conclusions are drawn from the data on the relative energy and moisture performance of various configurations of vented and sealed attics.

  4. Project Reports for Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians- 2005 Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians is located in the northern part of lower Michigan on approximately 590 acres of land. The tribe originally had no consistent vision or strategic plan concerning its energy use. This project had three objectives. The first objective was to produce a comprehensive energy plan for the tribe. The second objective was to create an energy organization and tribal energy code. The third objective was to increase the capacity of the tribe for better understanding (through active tribal participation), capability, knowledge and awareness of energy issues through bimonthly articles in the tribal newsletter and two energy workshops. The vision, strategic plan, and code will provide the focus, direction and guidelines as the tribe seeks to develop renewable energy and energy efficiency.

  5. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration: Second Results Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2012-07-01

    This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 new fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. The first results report was published in August 2011, describing operation of these new FCEBs from September 2010 through May 2011. New results in this report provide an update through April 2012.

  6. Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Results: Third Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Post, M.

    2014-05-01

    This report presents results of a demonstration of 12 fuel cell electric buses (FCEB) operating in Oakland, California. The 12 FCEBs operate as a part of the Zero Emission Bay Area (ZEBA) Demonstration, which also includes two new hydrogen fueling stations. This effort is the largest FCEB demonstration in the United States and involves five participating transit agencies. The ZEBA partners are collaborating with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate the buses in revenue service. NREL has published two previous reports, in August 2011 and July 2012, describing operation of these buses. New results in this report provide an update covering eight months through October 2013.

  7. A Radiocarbon Chronology of Hunter-Gatherer Occupation from Bodega Bay, California, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, M A; Russell, A D; Guilderson, T P

    2005-04-27

    The evolution of hunter-gatherer maritime adaptations in western North America has been a prominent topic of discussion among archaeologists in recent years (e.g. Arnold 1992; Erlandson and Colten 1991; Erlandson and Glassow 1997; Lightfoot 1993). Although vast coastal regions of the northeastern Pacific (for example, southern California) have been investigated in detail, our understanding of hunter-gatherer developments along the coast of northern California is limited. Previous research indicates that humans have exploited marine mammals, fish and shellfish along the northern California shoreline since the early Holocene (Schwaderer 1992). By the end of the late Holocene, some groups remained year-round on the coast subsisting primarily on marine resources (e.g. Gould 1975; Hildebrandt and Levulett 2002). However, a paucity of well-dated cultural deposits has hindered our understanding of these developments, particularly during the early and middle Holocene. The lack of a long and reliable chronological sequence has restricted our interpretations of behavioral change, including the adaptive strategies (such as foraging, mobility and settlement) used by human foragers to colonize and inhabit the coastal areas of this region. These shortcomings have also hindered comparative interpretations with other coastal and inland regions in western North America. Here we present a Holocene radiocarbon chronology of hunter-gatherer occupation based on contemporaneous samples of charcoal and Mytilus californianus (California sea mussel) shell recovered from seven archaeological sites near Bodega Bay, California. A series of 127 {sup 14}C ages reveal a chronological sequence that spans from ca. 8940-110 cal BP (1{sigma}) (7890-160 {sup 14}C yr BP = charcoal; 8934-101 {sup 14}C yr BP = shell). As part of this sequence, we report new {sup 14}C dates from the stratified cave and open-air midden deposits at Duncan's Landing (CA-SON-348/H). In addition, we present {sup 14}C ages from three middle Holocene sites located in the Bodega Dunes, and from three late Holocene sites, including Kili (CASON-299), the oldest known village site in the region. Bodega Bay (38 degrees 19 minutes N, 123 degrees 03 minutes W) is situated about 90 km north of San Francisco Bay, California (Figure 1). The Pacific, in conjunction with prominent geomorphological features, has given rise to a series of coastal habitats (e.g. semi-protected and protected shorelines) around Bodega Bay that are rather unique for the unprotected, surf swept rocky shores of northern California. This stretch of coastline also lies within a zone of particularly strong seasonal upwelling between Point Reyes Peninsula and Cape Mendocino; a region characterized by high Ekman transport (Huyer 1983), and high coastal concentrations of the nutrients silica and phosphate (van Geen and Husby 1996). The interaction between land and sea results in a productive marine ecosystem that has attracted hunter-gatherers for much of the Holocene.

  8. Pore size distribution and methane equilibrium conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bihani, Abhishek; Daigle, Hugh; Cook, Ann; Glosser, Deborah; Shushtarian, Arash

    2015-12-15

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  9. Top-down methane emissions estimates for the San Francisco Bay Area from 1990 to 2012

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fairley, David; Fischer, Marc L.

    2015-01-30

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that is now included in both California State and San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) bottom-up emission inventories as part of California's effort to reduce anthropogenic GHG emissions. Here we provide a top-down estimate of methane (CH4) emissions from the SFBA by combining atmospheric measurements with the comparatively better estimated emission inventory for carbon monoxide (CO). Local enhancements of CH4 and CO are estimated using measurements from 14 air quality sites in the SFBA combined together with global background measurements. Mean annual CH4 emissions are estimated from the product of Bay Area Air Qualitymore » Management District (BAAQMD) emission inventory CO and the slope of ambient local CH4 to CO. The resulting top-down estimates of CH4 emissions are found to decrease slightly from 1990 to 2012, with a mean value of 240 ± 60 GgCH4 yr⁻¹ (at 95% confidence) in the most recent (2009–2012) period, and correspond to reasonably a constant factor of 1.5–2.0 (at 95% confidence) times larger than the BAAQMD CH4 emission inventory. However, we note that uncertainty in these emission estimates is dominated by the variation in CH4:CO enhancement ratios across the observing sites and we expect the estimates could represent a lower-limit on CH4 emissions because BAAQMD monitoring sites focus on urban air quality and may be biased toward CO rather than CH4 sources.« less

  10. Top-down methane emissions estimates for the San Francisco Bay Area from 1990 to 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fairley, David; Fischer, Marc L.

    2015-01-30

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas (GHG) that is now included in both California State and San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) bottom-up emission inventories as part of California's effort to reduce anthropogenic GHG emissions. Here we provide a top-down estimate of methane (CH4) emissions from the SFBA by combining atmospheric measurements with the comparatively better estimated emission inventory for carbon monoxide (CO). Local enhancements of CH4 and CO are estimated using measurements from 14 air quality sites in the SFBA combined together with global background measurements. Mean annual CH4 emissions are estimated from the product of Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD) emission inventory CO and the slope of ambient local CH4 to CO. The resulting top-down estimates of CH4 emissions are found to decrease slightly from 1990 to 2012, with a mean value of 240 60 GgCH4 yr? (at 95% confidence) in the most recent (20092012) period, and correspond to reasonably a constant factor of 1.52.0 (at 95% confidence) times larger than the BAAQMD CH4 emission inventory. However, we note that uncertainty in these emission estimates is dominated by the variation in CH4:CO enhancement ratios across the observing sites and we expect the estimates could represent a lower-limit on CH4 emissions because BAAQMD monitoring sites focus on urban air quality and may be biased toward CO rather than CH4 sources.

  11. Accumulation of Pb and Cu heavy metals in sea water, sediment, and leaf and root tissue of Enhalus sp. in the seagrass bed of Banten Bay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauziah, Faiza Choesin, Devi N.

    2014-03-24

    Banten Bay in Indonesia is a coastal area which has been highly affected by human activity. Previous studies have reported the presence of lead (Pb) and copper (Cu) heavy metals in the seawater of this area. This study was conducted to measure the accumulation of Pb and Cu in seawater, sediment, leaf tissue, and root tissue of the seagrass species Enhalus sp. Sampling was conducted at two observation stations in Banten Bay: Station 1 (St.1) was located closer to the coastline and to industrial plants as source of pollution, while Station 2 (St.2) was located farther away offshore. At each station, three sampling points were established by random sampling. Field sampling was conducted at two different dates, i.e., on 29 May 2012 and 30 June 2012. Samples were processed by wet ashing using concentrated HNO{sub 3} acid and measured using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS). Accumulation of Pb was only detected in sediment samples in St.1, while Cu was detected in all samples. Average concentrations of Cu in May were as follows: sediment St.1 = 0.731 ppm, sediment St.2 = 0.383 ppm, seawater St.1 = 0.163 ppm, seawater St.2 = 0.174 ppm, leaf St.1 = 0.102 ppm, leaf St.2 = 0.132 ppm, root St.1= 0.139 ppm, and root St.2 = 0.075 ppm. Average measurements of Cu in June were: sediment St.1 = 0.260 ppm, leaf St.1 = 0.335 ppm, leaf St.2 = 0.301 ppm, root St.1= 0.047 ppm, and root St.2 = 0.060 ppm. In June, Cu was undetected in St.2 sediment and seawater at both stations. In May, Cu concentration in seawater exceeded the maximum allowable threshold for water as determined by the Ministry of the Environment. Spatial and temporal variation in Pb and Cu accumulation were most probably affected by distance from source and physical conditions of the environment (e.g., water current and mixing)

  12. MOSRC Field Definitions 01202016 MOSRC Field Definitions

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    MOSRC Field Definitions 01202016 MOSRC Field Definitions 1/5 1/20/2016 Field Name Definition Prime Contract Procurement Instrument Identifier The unique Prime Contractor identifier as it is recorded on the original (or base) contract in FPDS-NG. This must be a valid DOE M&O PIID, as recorded in FPDS-NG. Prime Contract DUNS Number The Prime Contractor's Dun and Bradstreet Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) as it is recorded on the prime contract in FPDS-NG. Subcontract DUNS Number The

  13. Nevada Field Office

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

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