National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for bath electric gas

  1. Bath Electric Gas & Water Sys | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric Gas & Water Sys Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bath Electric Gas & Water Sys Place: New York Phone Number: (607) 776-3072 Website: www.villageofbath.orgBEGWS.ht Outage...

  2. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric) - Residential Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AC: 30 Recycling RefrigeratorFreezer: 50 ACDehumidifier: 25 Summary The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) offers rebates for residential customers to improve the...

  3. Public Service Electric & Gas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electric & Gas Jump to: navigation, search Name: Public Service Electric & Gas Place: Newark, NJ Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type...

  4. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Gas)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) offers Natural Gas Connection program to residential customers to switch from electric to natural gas for heat. The program waives connection charge (...

  5. EA-160 Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    60 Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation EA-160 Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation Order authorizing Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation to export electric energy to ...

  6. (Electric and Gas) Residential Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energize CT in coordination with participating utilities offers various rebates for energy efficient electric and natural gas equipment.  

  7. EA-159 Cincinnati Gas and Electric Corporation | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    59 Cincinnati Gas and Electric Corporation EA-159 Cincinnati Gas and Electric Corporation Order authorizing Cincinnati Gas and Electric Corporation to export energy to Canada. PDF ...

  8. Texas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Electric Power Price Texas Natural Gas Prices Natural Gas ...

  9. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (BGE) offers rebates for residential customers to improve the energy efficiency of eligible homes. Rebates are available for ENERGY STAR clothes washers,...

  10. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric)- Commercial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Baltimore Gas and Electric (BGE) offers four different programs for its commercial customers for technical assistance, retrofitting inefficient equipment, purchasing new equipment, and combined...

  11. NIPSCO Prescriptive Electric and Natural Gas Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIPSCO’s Commercial and Industrial Prescriptive Natural Gas & Electric Program offers rebates to NIPSCO's large commercial, industrial, non-profit, governmental and institutional customers, who...

  12. Minnesota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet) Minnesota Natural ... Referring Pages: Natural Gas Electric Power Price Minnesota Natural Gas Prices Natural Gas ...

  13. Tennessee Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date: 5312016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

  14. Utah Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date: 5312016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

  15. Texas Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Date: 5312016 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

  16. Natural Gas Electric Power Price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas ... Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports ...

  17. Pacific Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PG&E) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pacific Gas & Electric Co Abbreviation: PGE Place: California Service Territory: California Phone Number: 800-743-5002 Website: www.pge.com...

  18. Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas ...

  19. Biomass Gas Electric LLC BG E | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Electric LLC BG E Jump to: navigation, search Name: Biomass Gas & Electric LLC (BG&E) Place: Norcross, Georgia Zip: 30092 Sector: Biomass Product: Project developer...

  20. How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo...

  1. Comments of Baltimore Gas & Electric Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Baltimore Gas & Electric Company Comments of Baltimore Gas & Electric Company BGE comments to DOE addressing policy and logistical challenges PDF icon Comments of Baltimore Gas & Electric Company More Documents & Publications NBP RFI: Data Access, Third Party Use and Privacy- Comments of Baltimore Gas & Electric Company NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Comments of Baltimore Gas & Electric Company The Need for Essential Consumer Protections: Smart Metering Proposals

  2. Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES Project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Henderson; Robert Fickes

    2007-12-31

    The Oilfield Flare Gas Electricity Systems (OFFGASES) project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under Preferred Upstream Management Projects (PUMP III). Project partners included the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) as lead agency working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the California Oil Producers Electric Cooperative (COPE). The project was designed to demonstrate that the entire range of oilfield 'stranded gases' (gas production that can not be delivered to a commercial market because it is poor quality, or the quantity is too small to be economically sold, or there are no pipeline facilities to transport it to market) can be cost-effectively harnessed to make electricity. The utilization of existing, proven distribution generation (DG) technologies to generate electricity was field-tested successfully at four marginal well sites, selected to cover a variety of potential scenarios: high Btu, medium Btu, ultra-low Btu gas, as well as a 'harsh', or high contaminant, gas. Two of the four sites for the OFFGASES project were idle wells that were shut in because of a lack of viable solutions for the stranded noncommercial gas that they produced. Converting stranded gas to useable electrical energy eliminates a waste stream that has potential negative environmental impacts to the oil production operation. The electricity produced will offset that which normally would be purchased from an electric utility, potentially lowering operating costs and extending the economic life of the oil wells. Of the piloted sites, the most promising technologies to handle the range were microturbines that have very low emissions. One recently developed product, the Flex-Microturbine, has the potential to handle the entire range of oilfield gases. It is deployed at an oilfield near Santa Barbara to run on waste gas that is only 4% the strength of natural gas. The cost of producing oil is to a large extent the cost of electric power used to extract and deliver the oil. Researchers have identified stranded and flared gas in California that could generate 400 megawatts of power, and believe that there is at least an additional 2,000 megawatts that have not been identified. Since California accounts for about 14.5% of the total domestic oil production, it is reasonable to assume that about 16,500 megawatts could be generated throughout the United States. This power could restore the cost-effectiveness of thousands of oil wells, increasing oil production by millions of barrels a year, while reducing emissions and greenhouse gas emissions by burning the gas in clean distributed generators rather than flaring or venting the stranded gases. Most turbines and engines are designed for standardized, high-quality gas. However, emerging technologies such as microturbines have increased the options for a broader range of fuels. By demonstrating practical means to consume the four gas streams, the project showed that any gases whose properties are between the extreme conditions also could be utilized. The economics of doing so depends on factors such as the value of additional oil recovered, the price of electricity produced, and the alternate costs to dispose of stranded gas.

  3. INNOVATIVE HYBRID GAS/ELECTRIC CHILLER COGENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd Kollross; Mike Connolly

    2004-06-30

    Engine-driven chillers are quickly gaining popularity in the market place (increased from 7,000 tons in 1994 to greater than 50,000 tons in 1998) due to their high efficiency, electric peak shaving capability, and overall low operating cost. The product offers attractive economics (5 year pay back or less) in many applications, based on areas cooling requirements and electric pricing structure. When heat is recovered and utilized from the engine, the energy resource efficiency of a natural gas engine-driven chiller is higher than all competing products. As deregulation proceeds, real time pricing rate structures promise high peak demand electric rates, but low off-peak electric rates. An emerging trend with commercial building owners and managers who require air conditioning today is to reduce their operating costs by installing hybrid chiller systems that combine gas and electric units. Hybrid systems not only reduce peak electric demand charges, but also allow customers to level their energy load profiles and select the most economical energy source, gas or electricity, from hour to hour. Until recently, however, all hybrid systems incorporated one or more gas-powered chillers (engine driven and/or absorption) and one or more conventional electric units. Typically, the cooling capacity of hybrid chiller plants ranges from the hundreds to thousands of refrigeration tons, with multiple chillers affording the user a choice of cooling systems. But this flexibility is less of an option for building operators who have limited room for equipment. To address this technology gap, a hybrid chiller was developed by Alturdyne that combines a gas engine, an electric motor and a refrigeration compressor within a single package. However, this product had not been designed to realize the full features and benefits possible by combining an engine, motor/generator and compressor. The purpose of this project is to develop a new hybrid chiller that can (1) reduce end-user energy costs, (2) lower building peak electric load, (3) increase energy efficiency, and (4) provide standby power. This new hybrid product is designed to allow the engine to generate electricity or drive the chiller's compressor, based on the market price and conditions of the available energy sources. Building owners can minimize cooling costs by operating with natural gas or electricity, depending on time of day energy rates. In the event of a backout, the building owner could either operate the product as a synchronous generator set, thus providing standby power, or continue to operate a chiller to provide air conditioning with support of a small generator set to cover the chiller's electric auxiliary requirements. The ability to utilize the same piece of equipment as a hybrid gas/electric chiller or a standby generator greatly enhances its economic attractiveness and would substantially expand the opportunities for high efficiency cooling products.

  4. NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Comments of Baltimore Gas & Electric

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Company | Department of Energy Baltimore Gas & Electric Company NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Comments of Baltimore Gas & Electric Company Comments of Baltimore Gas & Electric Company on Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policy PDF icon NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Comments of Baltimore Gas & Electric Company More Documents & Publications Comments of

  5. Comments of San Diego Gas & Electric Company | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Comments of San Diego Gas & Electric Company Comments from The Center for Democracy and Technology and the Electric Frontier Foundation: Implementing ...

  6. Requirements for Petitions to Construct Electric and Gas Facilities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    requirements for petitions to construct electric generation, electric transmission, and natural gas facilities pursuant to 30 V.S.A. 248. In addition, the rule clarifies...

  7. Electric and Gas Industries Association | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Industries Association Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electric and Gas Industries Association Place: Sacramento, CA Zip: 95821 Website: www.egia.org Coordinates:...

  8. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","Minnesota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power ... 6:59:00 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power ...

  9. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3045NM2" "Date","New Mexico Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric ...

  10. Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOEPatents Data Explorer Search Results Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption Title: Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption Gases are stored, separated, and/or concentrated. An electric field is applied across a porous dielectric adsorbent material. A gas component from a gas mixture may be selectively separated inside the energized dielectric. Gas is stored in the energized dielectric for as long as the dielectric is energized. The energized

  11. Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity Rebate and Performance Incentive

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Anaerobic Digester Gas-to-Electricity program is designed to support small-sized electricity generation where the energy generated is used primarily at the electric customer's location (third...

  12. METAL COATING BATHS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robinson, J.W.

    1958-08-26

    A method is presented for restoring the effectiveness of bronze coating baths used for hot dip coating of uranium. Such baths, containing a high proportion of copper, lose their ability to wet uranium surfaces after a period of use. The ability of such a bath to wet uranium can be restored by adding a small amount of metallic aluminum to the bath, and skimming the resultant hard alloy from the surface.

  13. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1999-01-01

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided.

  14. Electrical swing adsorption gas storage and delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, R.R.; Burchell, T.D.

    1999-06-15

    Systems and methods for electrical swing natural gas adsorption are described. An apparatus includes a pressure vessel; an electrically conductive gas adsorptive material located within the pressure vessel; and an electric power supply electrically connected to said adsorptive material. The adsorptive material can be a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve (CFCMS). The systems and methods provide advantages in that both a high energy density and a high ratio of delivered to stored gas are provided. 5 figs.

  15. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: San Diego Gas & Electric | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy San Diego Gas & Electric Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: San Diego Gas & Electric Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: San Diego Gas & Electric Joined the Challenge: January 2013 Headquarters: San Diego, CA Charging Locations: San Diego, CA; South Orange County,CA Domestic Employees: 5,000 To serve the growing list of SDG&E employees that have purchased plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), and to provide implementation examples for our commercial/industrial

  16. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Pacific Gas & Electric Company |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Pacific Gas & Electric Company Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Pacific Gas & Electric Company Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Pacific Gas & Electric Company Joined the Challenge: October 2014 i>Headquarters: San Francisco, CA Charging Locations: San Francisco, CA; San Ramon, CA ; Concord, CA Domestic Employees: 22,000 In keeping with its strong support for clean transportation, PG&E employees now have an opportunity to charge plug-in

  17. ,"California Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3045CA3" "Date","California Natural Gas Price ...

  18. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1: West Virginia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3045WV3" "Date","West Virginia Natural Gas Price ...

  19. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3045WV2" "Date","West Virginia Natural Gas Deliveries to ...

  20. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3045NM3" "Date","New Mexico Natural Gas Price Sold ...

  1. ,"Texas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3045TX3" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Price Sold to ...

  2. San Diego Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name: San Diego Gas & Electric Co Place: San Diego, California Service Territory: California Website: www.sdge.com Green Button Access:...

  3. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  4. ,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  5. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  6. ,"New York Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  7. ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  8. ,"New York Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  9. ,"South Carolina Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Carolina Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  10. ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  11. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  12. ,"Rhode Island Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Rhode Island Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  13. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  14. ,"North Dakota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  15. ,"New Jersey Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Jersey Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  16. ,"South Carolina Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Carolina Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  17. ,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","102015" ,"Release...

  18. ,"North Carolina Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","North Carolina Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

  19. Holyoke Gas & Electric- Residential Energy Conservation Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Holyoke Gas & Electric (HG&E) Residential Energy Conservation Program provides residential customers with loans to help make energy saving improvements to eligible homes. The loan...

  20. Comments of San Diego Gas & Electric Company | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    public electric and gas utility operating pursuant to authorities granted to it by the Federal Energy Regulatory ... Inform Federal Smart Grid Policy Reply Comments of T-Mobile ...

  1. Holyoke Gas & Electric- Commercial Energy Conservation Loan Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Holyoke Gas & Electric's Commercial Energy Conservation Program offers zero interest loans to its commercial customers who are making energy efficiency improvements to facilities. The...

  2. Pacific Gas and Electric Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pacific Gas and Electric Company Address: PO Box 770000 Place: San Francisco Zip: 94177 Region: United States Sector: Marine and...

  3. NIPSCO Custom Commercial and Industrial Gas and Electric Incentive Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NIPSCO’s Commercial and Industrial Custom Electric and Natural Gas Incentive Program offers financial incentives to qualifying large commercial, industrial, non-profit, governmental and...

  4. Louisville Gas & Electric- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Louisville Gas & Electric's Home Energy Rebate program provides incentives for residential customers to upgrade to energy efficiency home appliances and heat and air conditioning equipment. ...

  5. Holyoke Gas & Electric - Commercial Energy Efficiency Loan Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Utility Administrator Holyoke Gas and Electric Department Website http:www.hged.comhtmlincentiveprograms.htmlCommercialAssist State Massachusetts Program Type Loan...

  6. Gas storage and separation by electric field swing adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Currier, Robert P; Obrey, Stephen J; Devlin, David J; Sansinena, Jose Maria

    2013-05-28

    Gases are stored, separated, and/or concentrated. An electric field is applied across a porous dielectric adsorbent material. A gas component from a gas mixture may be selectively separated inside the energized dielectric. Gas is stored in the energized dielectric for as long as the dielectric is energized. The energized dielectric selectively separates, or concentrates, a gas component of the gas mixture. When the potential is removed, gas from inside the dielectric is released.

  7. EA-137-A New York State Electric and Gas Corporation | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -A New York State Electric and Gas Corporation EA-137-A New York State Electric and Gas Corporation Order authorizing New York State Electric and Gas Corporation to export electric ...

  8. EA-137 NYSEG New York State Electric and Gas Corporation | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EA-137 NYSEG New York State Electric and Gas Corporation EA-137 NYSEG New York State Electric and Gas Corporation Order authorizing New York State Electric and Gas Corporation to...

  9. EA-137 NYSEG New York State Electric and Gas Corporation | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NYSEG New York State Electric and Gas Corporation EA-137 NYSEG New York State Electric and Gas Corporation Order authorizing New York State Electric and Gas Corporation to export ...

  10. PP-79 San Diego Gas & Electric Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9 San Diego Gas & Electric Company PP-79 San Diego Gas & Electric Company Presidential Permit authorize San Diego Gas & Electric Company to construct, operate, and maintain transmission facilities at the U.S. - Mexico Border. PDF icon PP-79 San Diego Gas & Electric Company More Documents & Publications PP-49-1 San Diego Gas & Electric Company PP-68-2 San Diego Gas & Electric Company PP-48-3 El Paso Eelctric

  11. VEA-0008- In the Matter of Cincinnati Gas & Electric Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Decision and Order considers an Appeal filed by Cincinnati Gas & Electric Company (CG&E) from a determination issued on December 8, 1997, by the Office of Energy Efficiency and...

  12. San Diego Gas and Electric | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Graham7781(2017) Super contributor 16 January, 2013 - 11:09 SDG&E Customers Can Connect Home Area Network Devices With Smart Meters OpenEI San Diego Gas and Electric Smart Meters...

  13. Louisville Gas & Electric- Commercial Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Louisville Gas and Electric (LGE) offers rebates to all commercial customers who pay a DSM charge on monthly bills. Rebates are available on lighting measures, sensors, air conditioners, heat pumps...

  14. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:41:09 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  15. ,"Alaska Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:40:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  16. ,"Maine Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:40:53 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maine Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  17. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:40:50 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  18. ,"Nebraska Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:41:01 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  19. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:40:54 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  20. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:40:55 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  1. ,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:40:52 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Massachusetts Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  2. ,"Utah Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:41:16 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  3. ,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:41:19 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wisconsin Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  4. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:41:07 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  5. ,"Idaho Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:40:45 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  6. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:41:16 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  7. ,"Nevada Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:41:05 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nevada Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  8. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:40:38 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  9. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:41:13 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  10. ,"Washington Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:41:18 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Washington Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  11. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:40:48 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  12. ,"Iowa Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:40:44 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Iowa Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  13. ,"Maryland Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"03282016 11:40:52 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maryland Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ...

  14. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  15. ,"Hawaii Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:49 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  16. ,"Georgia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:48 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  17. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:44 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  18. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:53 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  19. ,"Arizona Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  20. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  1. ,"Florida Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:47 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  2. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:55 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  3. ,"Delaware Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Delaware Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  4. ,"Illinois Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1292016 12:16:52 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Illinois Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

  5. "Table 7b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected" "Projected Price in Nominal Dollars" " (nominal dollars per million Btu)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,200...

  6. Method for minimizing contaminant particle effects in gas-insulated electrical apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pace, Marshall O.; Adcock, James L.; Christophorou, Loucas G.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical breakdown of a gas insulator in high voltage apparatus is preved by placing an electrical insulative coating on contaminant particles in the gas insulator.

  7. Method for minimizing contaminant particle effects in gas-insulated electrical apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pace, M.O.; Adcock, J.L.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1984-01-01

    Electrical breakdown of a gas insulator in high voltage apparatus is prevented by placing an electrical insulative coating on contaminant particles in the gas insulator.

  8. Table 7.3 Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, and ...

  9. Erratum: ''Evaluation of gas permeation barrier properties using electrical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    measurements of calcium degradation'' [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 064701 (2007)] (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Erratum: ''Evaluation of gas permeation barrier properties using electrical measurements of calcium degradation'' [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 064701 (2007)] Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Erratum: ''Evaluation of gas permeation barrier properties using electrical measurements of calcium degradation'' [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 78, 064701 (2007)] No abstract prepared. Authors:

  10. San Diego Gas & Electric Video (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Narrator: Having a workplace charging stations is a great way to encourage employees to switch to electric vehicles but there are a few things you may want to consider. There are several companies...

  11. Infrastructure Needs: Natural Gas/Electricity Transmission,...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    miles of transmission lines, 72,000 miles of distribution lines, and 6,300 miles of natural gas pipelines. Our over 8,600 employees are committed to our mission to deliver...

  12. PP-49-1 San Diego Gas & Electric Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    9-1 San Diego Gas & Electric Company PP-49-1 San Diego Gas & Electric Company Presidential Permit authorizing San Diego Gas & Electric Company to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Mexico Border. PDF icon PP-49-1 San Diego Gas & Electric Company More Documents & Publications PP-79 San Diego Gas & Electric Company PP-68-2 San Diego Gas & Electric Company PP-48-3 El Paso Eelctric

  13. PP-68-2 San Diego Gas & Electric Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8-2 San Diego Gas & Electric Company PP-68-2 San Diego Gas & Electric Company Presidential Permit authorizes San Diego Gas & Electric Company to construct, operate, and maintain electric transmissison facilities at the U.S. - Mexico Border. PDF icon PP-68-2 San Diego Gas & Electric Company More Documents & Publications PP-49-1 San Diego Gas & Electric Company PP-79 San Diego Gas & Electric Company PP-48-3 El Paso Eelctric Company

  14. Pacific Gas and Electric Company Presentation by Steve Metague

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Verenium Biofuels Fact Sheet Pacific Ethanol, Inc Verenium Pilot- and Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery

    Flambeau_River_Biofuels.pdf Flambeau River Biofuels Demonstration-Scale Biorefinery Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations

    Major DOE Biofuels Project Locations Pacific Ethanol, Inc Pacific Ethanol, Inc

    RSE Pulp & Chemical, LLC (Subsidiary of Red Shield Environmental, LLC)

    Pacific Ethanol, Inc

    Metague Sr. Director, Project Development Pacific Gas & Electric

  15. Electricity Shortage in California: Issues for Petroleum and Natural Gas Supply

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    This report addresses the potential impact of rotating electrical outages on petroleum product and natural gas supply in California.

  16. Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Electric Utility Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 0.17 0.13 0.23 0.23 0.29 0.60 0.53 2000's 0.81 1.29 1.98 1.68 2.14 1.79 2.34 2.57 2.46 3.30 2010's 3.81 4.53 4.40 4.08 4.23 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016

  17. Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Electric and Gas Water Heaters Energy Cost Calculator for Electric and Gas Water Heaters Vary equipment size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Type of Water Heater Electric Gas Electric Average Daily Usage (gallons per day)* gallons 64* Energy Factor† 0.92 (electric) 0.61 (gas) Energy Cost $ / kWh $0.06 per kWh $.60 per therm Quantity of

  18. EIS-0164: Pacific Gas Transmission/Pacific Gas and Electric and Altamont Natural Gas Pipeline Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has prepared the PGT/PG&E and Altamont Natural Gas Pipeline Projects Environmental Impact Statement to satisfy the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act. This project addresses the need to expand the capacity of the pipeline transmission system to better transfer Canadian natural gas to Southern California and the Pacific Northwest. The U.S. Department of Energy cooperated in the preparation of this statement because Section 19(c) of the Natural Gas Act applies to the Department’s action of authorizing import/export of natural gas, and adopted this statement by the spring of 1992. "

  19. Natural gas will account for biggest share of U.S. electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural gas will account for biggest share of U.S. electricity for first time in 2016 For the first time on an annual basis, the amount of U.S. electricity generated by natural ...

  20. Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure- EAC 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recommendations from the Electricity Advisory Committee on actions to be taken by the Department of Energy given the interdependence of the Nation’s electric infrastructure and natural gas...

  1. To: U.S. Department of Energy From: San Diego Gas & Electric Company

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Via email To: U.S. Department of Energy From: San Diego Gas & Electric Company Date: October 17, 2014 Comments of San Diego Gas & Electric Company on the Department of Energy's National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Draft for Public Comment I. Introduction On August 19, 2014, the Department of Energy ("Department") issued a Notice 1 inviting public comment on the draft National Electric Transmission Congestion Study. 2 The Draft Study is the third congestion study

  2. Major Fuels","Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (million square feet)","Total of Major Fuels","Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" "All Buildings ...",4657,67338,81552,66424,10...

  3. "Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7.4;" " Unit: Percents." " ",," "," ",," "," " ,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and" "Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal" ...

  4. Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

    2013-03-20

    Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

  5. Future States: The Convergence of Smart Grid, Renewables, Shale Gas, and Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dick Cirillo; Guenter Conzelmann

    2013-06-07

    Dick Cirillo and Guenter Conzelmann present on research involving renewable energy sources, the use of natural gas, electric vehicles, and the SMART grid.

  6. Midwest Energy (Gas and Electric)- How$mart Energy Efficiency Finance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Midwest Energy offers its residential and small commercial electricity and natural gas customers in good standing a way to finance energy efficiency improvements on eligible properties. Under the...

  7. U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Electric Power Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot) U.S. Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries ... Release Date: 4292016 Next Release Date: 5312016 Referring Pages: Heat Content of ...

  8. Major Fuels","Electricity",,"Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Buildings (thousand)","Floorspace (million square feet)","Sum of Major Fuels","Electricity",,"Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat" ,,,,"Primary","Site" "All Buildings...

  9. How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/epantha An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/epantha A digital electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nbehmans A digital electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of

  10. How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters How to Read Residential Electric and Natural Gas Meters An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/epantha An electromechanical electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/epantha A digital electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/nbehmans A digital electric meter on the side of a house. | Photo courtesy of

  11. Microsoft Word - Gas-Electricity Briefing Memo 072414 FINAL

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Conversely, after the "Polar Vortex" of 2013-2014, demand ... net load - a key advantage of natural gas technologies. ... gas power plants - a process that will potentially be ...

  12. Light transmissive electrically conductive oxide electrode formed in the presence of a stabilizing gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tran, Nang T.; Gilbert, James R.

    1992-08-04

    A light transmissive, electrically conductive oxide is doped with a stabilizing gas such as H.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O. The oxide is formed by sputtering a light transmissive, electrically conductive oxide precursor onto a substrate at a temperature from 20.degree. C. to 300.degree. C. Sputtering occurs in a gaseous mixture including a sputtering gas and the stabilizing gas.

  13. Executive Summary - Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

    2013-01-01

    In November 2012, the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) released a new report, 'Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity.' The study provides a new methodological approach to estimate natural gas related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, tracks trends in regulatory and voluntary industry practices, and explores various electricity futures. The Executive Summary provides key findings, insights, data, and figures from this major study.

  14. Madison Gas & Electric- Clean Power Partner Solar Buyback Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Annual green energy purchases must be at least as large as the AC output of the PV system. This arrangement requires that the customer have two electricity meters: one to measure electricity...

  15. Electricity production levelized costs for nuclear, gas and coal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Electricity Production in Mexico Independent 15.74% Hydro 7.4% Wind 0.004% Nuclear 5.81% Coal 9.83% Geothermal 3.47% Thermal 58.15% Figure 1. Distribution of the total electricity ...

  16. Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Sector

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased electric power sector natural gas use. To perform this analysis, the U.S. Department of Energy commissioned Deloitte MarketPoint to examine scenarios in its North American Integrated Model (NAIM), which simultaneously models the electric power and the natural gas sectors. This study concludes that, under scenarios in which natural gas demand from the electric power sector increases, the incremental increase in interstate natural gas pipeline expansion is modest, relative to historical capacity additions. Similarly, capital expenditures on new interstate pipelines in the scenarios considered here are projected to be significantly less than the capital expenditures associated with infrastructure expansion over the last 15 years.

  17. TEA-0013 - In the Matter of Madison Gas and Electric Company | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy 3 - In the Matter of Madison Gas and Electric Company TEA-0013 - In the Matter of Madison Gas and Electric Company This Decision and Order considers an Appeal filed by the Madison Gas and Electric Company (MGE) from a determination issued on September 17, 2009, on behalf of the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE) of the Department of Energy (DOE), under the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 490. In its determination, EE denied a request filed by MGE for

  18. Madison Gas and Electric Company Smart Grid Project | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    installation of advanced metering infrastructure (AMI), deployment of a new distribution management system, and installation of electric vehicle charging stations. These...

  19. Adapting On-site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Internal combustion reciprocating engine generators (gensets) are regularly deployed at distribution centers, small municipal utilities, and public institutions to provide on-site electricity...

  20. Low Interest Energy Efficiency Loan Program (Electric and Gas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energize CT offers low interest loans for commercial and industrial customers for investments in energy efficiency improvements. Electric customers of Connecticut Light & Power, United...

  1. Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, J.; Heath, G.; Macknick, J.; Paranhos, E.; Boyd, W.; Carlson, K.

    2012-11-01

    The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset of the wider dialogue on natural gas: 1. What are the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity?; 2. What are the existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and how are they changing in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns?; 3. How are natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices?; and 4. How might demand for natural gas in the electric sector respond to a variety of policy and technology developments over the next 20 to 40 years?

  2. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Electric Power Price (Dollars per Thousand...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12292015 2:58:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Electric Power Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3045US3"...

  3. QER Public Meeting in Denver, CO: Gas-Electricity Interdependencies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    President and CEO, Public Service Company of Colorado - Written Statement PDF icon Curtis Moffatt, Deputy General Counsel and Vice President - Gas Legal, Kinder Morgan, Inc. -...

  4. QER Public Meeting in Denver, CO: Gas-Electricity Interdependencies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    President and CEO, Public Service Company of Colorado - Written Statement PDF icon Curtis Moffatt, Deputy General Counsel and Vice President - Gas Legal, Kinder Morgan, Inc. - ...

  5. Electricity price impacts of alternative Greenhouse gas emission cap-and-trade programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelston, Bruce; Armstrong, Dave; Kirsch, Laurence D.; Morey, Mathew J.

    2009-07-15

    Limits on greenhouse gas emissions would raise the prices of the goods and services that require such emissions for their production, including electricity. Looking at a variety of emission limit cases and scenarios for selling or allocating allowances to load-serving entities, the authors estimate how the burden of greenhouse gas limits are likely to be distributed among electricity consumers in different states. (author)

  6. Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings | Department of Energy Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings Mid-South Metallurgical Makes Electrical and Natural Gas System Upgrades to Reduce Energy Use and Achieve Cost Savings This case study describes how Mid-South Metallurgical implemented several recommendations resulting from a plant-wide energy assessment from DOE's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) at

  7. Adapting On-Site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas - Fact

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sheet, April 2014 | Department of Energy Adapting On-Site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas - Fact Sheet, April 2014 Adapting On-Site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas - Fact Sheet, April 2014 The University of Minnesota, Morris, in collaboration with the University of Minnesota Center for Diesel Research, Cummins Power Generation Inc., ALL Power Labs, and Hammel, Green & Abrahamson (HGA), integrated a biomass gasifier and a reciprocating engine generator

  8. DOE/EA-1752 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    52 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY (PG&E) COMPRESSED AIR ENERGY STORAGE (CAES) COMPRESSION TESTING PHASE PROJECT, SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory May 2014 DOE/EA-1752 FINAL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY (PG&E) COMPRESSED AIR ENERGY STORAGE (CAES) COMPRESSION TESTING PHASE PROJECT, SAN JOAQUIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA U.S. Department of Energy National

  9. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01

    Analysts at NREL have developed and applied a systematic approach to review the LCA literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a procedure called 'harmonization.' Harmonization of the literature provides increased precision and helps clarify the impacts of specific electricity generation choices, producing more robust results.

  10. Natural Gas and the Transformation of the U.S. Energy Sector: Electricity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Domestic natural gas production was largely stagnant from the mid-1970s until about 2005. However, beginning in the late 1990s, advances linking horizontal drilling techniques with hydraulic fracturing allowed drilling to proceed in shale and other formations at much lower cost. The result was a slow, steady increase in unconventional gas production. The Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis (JISEA) designed this study to address four related key questions, which are a subset from the wider dialogue on natural gas; regarding the life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with shale gas compared to conventional natural gas and other fuels used to generate electricity; existing legal and regulatory frameworks governing unconventional gas development at federal, state, and local levels, and changes in response to the rapid industry growth and public concerns; natural gas production companies changing their water-related practices; and demand for natural gas in the electric sector respond to a variety of policy and technology developments over the next 20 to 40 years.

  11. Gas separation device based on electrical swing adsorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, Roddie R.; Burchell, Timothy D.

    1999-10-26

    A method and apparatus for separating one constituent, especially carbon dioxide, from a fluid mixture, such as natural gas. The fluid mixture flows through an adsorbent member having an affinity for molecules of the one constituent, the molecules being adsorbed on the adsorbent member. A voltage is applied to the adsorbent member, the voltage imparting a current flow which causes the molecules of the one constituent to be desorbed from the adsorbent member.

  12. Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From 2002 to 2012, most states have reduced their reliance on coal for electricity generation. The figure below shows the percent change in electricity generated by coal and natural gas for each...

  13. Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of generating electricity from non-conventional low temperature (150 to 300º F) geothermal resources in oil and gas settings. PDF icon low_gosnold_coproduced_fluids.pdf More Documents & Publications Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced and Other Oil Field Fluids AAPG Low-Temperature Webinar Low Temperature/Coproduced/Geopressured Subprogram Overview

  14. Electric and gas utility marketing of residential energy conservation case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-05-01

    The objective of this research was to obtain information about utility conservation marketing techniques from companies actively engaged in performing residential conservation services. Many utilities currently are offering comprehensive services (audits, listing of contractors and lenders, post-installation inspection, advertising, and performing consumer research). Activities are reported for the following utilities: Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation; Tampa Electric Company; Memphis Light, Gas, and Water Division; Northern States Power-Wisconsin; Public Service Company of Colorado; Arizona Public Service Company; Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Sacramento Municipal Utility District; and Pacific Power and Light Company.

  15. Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Fact #844: Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown

  16. Opportunities for Synergy Between Natural Gas and Renewable Energy in the Electric Power and Transportation Sectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, A.; Zinaman, O.; Logan, J.

    2012-12-01

    Use of both natural gas and renewable energy has grown significantly in recent years. Both forms of energy have been touted as key elements of a transition to a cleaner and more secure energy future, but much of the current discourse considers each in isolation or concentrates on the competitive impacts of one on the other. This paper attempts, instead, to explore potential synergies of natural gas and renewable energy in the U.S. electric power and transportation sectors.

  17. Flexible gas insulated transmission line having regions of reduced electric field

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cookson, Alan H.; Fischer, William H.; Yoon, Kue H.; Meyer, Jeffry R.

    1983-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line having radially flexible field control means for reducing the electric field along the periphery of the inner conductor at predetermined locations wherein the support insulators are located. The radially flexible field control means of the invention includes several structural variations of the inner conductor, wherein careful controlling of the length to depth of surface depressions produces regions of reduced electric field. Several embodiments of the invention dispose a flexible connector at the predetermined location along the inner conductor where the surface depressions that control the reduced electric field are located.

  18. Rate impacts and key design elements of gas and electric utility decoupling: a comprehensive review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesh, Pamela G.

    2009-10-15

    Opponents of decoupling worry that customers will experience frequent and significant rate increases as a result of its adoption, but a review of 28 natural gas and 17 electric utilities suggests that decoupling adjustments are both refunds to customers as well as charges and tend to be small. (author)

  19. State Commission electricity regulation under Federal Greenhouse gas cap-and-trade policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeler, Andrew G.

    2008-05-15

    Given the current uncertainty about the timing and severity of greenhouse gas constraints on electric generation that will result from a federal program, commissions need to begin crafting strategies and procedures to best serve the public interest in this new environment. (author)

  20. Derivatives and Risk Management in the Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Electricity Industries

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    In February 2002 the Secretary of Energy directed the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to prepare a report on the nature and use of derivative contracts in the petroleum, natural gas, and electricity industries. Derivatives are contracts ('financial instruments') that are used to manage risk, especially price risk.

  1. Implications of Lower Natural Gas Prices for Electric Generators in the Southeast, The

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This supplement to the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) May 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) focuses on changes in the utilization of coal- and natural-gas-fired generation capacity in the electric utility sector as the differential between delivered fuel prices narrows.

  2. Semi-flexible gas-insulated transmission line using electric field stress shields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cookson, A.H.; Dale, S.J.; Bolin, P.C.

    1982-12-28

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath, and insulating supports insulatably supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath. The inner conductor is provided with flexibility by use of main conductor sections which are joined together through a conductor hub section and flexible flexing elements. Stress shields are provided to control the electric field at the locations of the conductor hub sections where the insulating supports are contacting the inner conductor. The flexing elements and the stress shields may also be utilized in connection with a plug and socket arrangement for providing electrical connection between main conductor sections. 10 figs.

  3. Semi-flexible gas-insulated transmission line using electric field stress shields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cookson, Alan H.; Dale, Steinar J.; Bolin, Philip C.

    1982-12-28

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath, and insulating supports insulatably supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath. The inner conductor is provided with flexibility by use of main conductor sections which are joined together through a conductor hub section and flexible flexing elements. Stress shields are provided to control the electric field at the locations of the conductor hub sections where the insulating supports are contacting the inner conductor. The flexing elements and the stress shields may also be utilized in connection with a plug and socket arrangement for providing electrical connection between main conductor sections.

  4. High-voltage electrical apparatus utilizing an insulating gas of sulfur hexafluoride and helium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wootton, Roy E.

    1980-01-01

    High-voltage electrical apparatus includes an outer housing at low potential, an inner electrode disposed within the outer housing at high potential with respect thereto, and support means for insulatably supporting the inner electrode within the outer housing. Conducting particles contaminate the interior of the outer housing, and an insulating gas electrically insulates the inner electrode from the outer housing even in the presence of the conducting particles. The insulating gas is comprised of sulfur hexafluoride at a partial pressure of from about 2.9 to about 3.4 atmospheres absolute, and helium at a partial pressure from about 1.1 to about 11.4 atmospheres absolute. The sulfur hexafluoride comprises between 20 and 65 volume percent of the insulating gas.

  5. Advanced gas turbines: The choice for low-cost, environmentally superior electric power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeh, C.M.

    1996-08-01

    In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated an ambitious 8-year program to advance state-of-the-art gas turbine technology for land-based electric power generation. The program, known as the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program, is a joint government/industry program with the objective to demonstrate advanced industrial and utility gas turbine systems by the year 2000. The goals of the ATS Program are to develop gas turbine systems capable of providing low-cost electric power, while maintaining environmental superiority over competing power generation options. A progress report on the ATS Program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and systems designs meeting the goals of the program will be described and discussed.

  6. Boost Converters for Gas Electric and Fuel Cell Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKeever, JW

    2005-06-16

    Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) are driven by at least two prime energy sources, such as an internal combustion engine (ICE) and propulsion battery. For a series HEV configuration, the ICE drives only a generator, which maintains the state-of-charge (SOC) of propulsion and accessory batteries and drives the electric traction motor. For a parallel HEV configuration, the ICE is mechanically connected to directly drive the wheels as well as the generator, which likewise maintains the SOC of propulsion and accessory batteries and drives the electric traction motor. Today the prime energy source is an ICE; tomorrow it will very likely be a fuel cell (FC). Use of the FC eliminates a direct drive capability accentuating the importance of the battery charge and discharge systems. In both systems, the electric traction motor may use the voltage directly from the batteries or from a boost converter that raises the voltage. If low battery voltage is used directly, some special control circuitry, such as dual mode inverter control (DMIC) which adds a small cost, is necessary to drive the electric motor above base speed. If high voltage is chosen for more efficient motor operation or for high speed operation, the propulsion battery voltage must be raised, which would require some type of two-quadrant bidirectional chopper with an additional cost. Two common direct current (dc)-to-dc converters are: (1) the transformer-based boost or buck converter, which inverts a dc voltage, feeds the resulting alternating current (ac) into a transformer to raise or lower the voltage, and rectifies it to complete the conversion; and (2) the inductor-based switch mode boost or buck converter [1]. The switch-mode boost and buck features are discussed in this report as they operate in a bi-directional chopper. A benefit of the transformer-based boost converter is that it isolates the high voltage from the low voltage. Usually the transformer is large, further increasing the cost. A useful feature of the switch mode boost converter is its simplicity. Its inductor must handle the entire current, which is responsible for its main cost. The new Z-source inverter technology [2,3] boosts voltage directly by actively using the zero state time to boost the voltage. In the traditional pulse width modulated (PWM) inverter, this time is used only to control the average voltage by disconnecting the supply voltage from the motor. The purpose of this study is to examine the Z-source's potential for reducing the cost and improving the reliability of HEVs.

  7. Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2013-06-30

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh�s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  8. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CS) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): EA-363 Noble Americas Gas & Power Corporation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Record of Categorical Exclusion (CS) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE):  Noble Americas Gas & Power Corporation to export electric energy to Mexico

  9. Record of Categorical Exclusion (CS) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE): OE Docket EA-364 Noble Americas Gas & Power Corporation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Record of Categorical Exclusion (CS) Determination, Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE):  Application from Noble Americas Gas & Power Corporation to export electric...

  10. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release Date:","5/31/2016" ,"Excel File

  11. Should we transport coal, gas, or electricity: cost, efficiency, and environmental implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joule A. Bergerson; Lester B. Lave

    2005-08-15

    The authors examine the life cycle costs, environmental discharges, and deaths of moving coal via rail, coal to synthetic natural gas via pipeline, and electricity via wire from the Powder River Basin (PRB) in Wyoming to Texas. Which method has least social cost depends on how much additional investment in rail line, transmission, or pipeline infrastructure is required, as well as how much and how far energy is transported. If the existing rail lines have unused capacity, coal by rail is the cheapest method (up to 200 miles of additional track could be added). If no infrastructure exists, greater distances and larger amounts of energy favor coal by rail and gasified coal by pipeline over electricity transmission. For 1,000 miles and 9 gigawatts of power, a gas pipeline is cheapest, has less environmental discharges, uses less land, and is least obtrusive. 28 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Analytical investigation of electrical breakdown properties in a nitrogen-SF{sub 6} mixture gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhm, Han S.; Byeon, Yong S.; Song, Ki B.; Choi, Eun H.; Ryu, Han-Yong; Lee, Jaimin

    2010-11-15

    The electrical breakdown properties in nitrogen gas mixed with SF{sub 6} are analytically investigated in this article by making use of the ionization and attachment coefficients of the mixed gas. The ionization coefficients of nitrogen and SF{sub 6} gas are obtained in terms of the electron temperature T{sub e} by assuming a Maxwellian distribution of the electron energy. The attachment coefficient of SF{sub 6} gas is also obtained in terms of the gas temperature T{sub e}. An algebraic equation is obtained, relating explicitly the electron breakdown temperature T{sub b} in terms of the SF{sub 6} mole fraction {chi}. It was found from this equation that the breakdown temperature T{sub b} increases from approximately 2 to 5.3 eV as the mole fraction {chi} increases from zero to unity. The breakdown temperature T{sub b} of the electrons increases very rapidly from a small value and then approaches 5.3 eV slowly as the SF{sub 6} mole fraction increases from zero to unity. This indicates that even a small mole fraction of SF{sub 6} in the gas dominates the electron behavior in the breakdown system. The breakdown electric field E{sub b} derived is almost linearly proportional to the breakdown electron temperature T{sub b}. The experimental data agree remarkably well with the theoretical results. Therefore, it is concluded that even a small fraction of SF{sub 6} gas dominates nitrogen in determining the breakdown field. In this context, nearly 25% of the SF{sub 6} mole fraction provides a reasonable enhancement of the breakdown field for practical applications.

  13. Electron beam method and apparatus for obtaining uniform discharges in electrically pumped gas lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fenstermacher, Charles A.; Boyer, Keith

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for obtaining uniform, high-energy, large-volume electrical discharges in the lasing medium of a gas laser whereby a high-energy electron beam is used as an external ionization source to ionize substantially the entire volume of the lasing medium which is then readily pumped by means of an applied potential less than the breakdown voltage of the medium. The method and apparatus are particularly useful in CO.sub.2 laser systems.

  14. VUV generation by adiabatically expanded and excited by a DC electrical discharge Argon gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pipergias, K.; Yasemidis, D.; Reppa, E.; Pentaris, D.; Efthimiopoulos, T.; Merlemis, N.; Giannetas, V.

    2010-11-10

    We investigate the emission of Argon (Ar) gas which is adiabatically expanded through a nozzle and excited using a DC electrical discharge. Because of the expansion and the electronic excitation, Ar dimers and clusters are formed, which give radiation in the second (2nd) and in the third (3rd) continua of Ar, centered at about 126 and 254 nm respectively. We particularly focus our study on the 2nd continuum, in order to develop a laser at this wavelength.

  15. Antitrust Enforcement in the Electricity and Gas Industries: Problems and Solutions for the EU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leveque, Francois

    2006-06-15

    Antitrust enforcement in the electricity and gas industries raises specific problems that call for specific solutions. Among the issues: How can the anticompetitive effects of mergers be assessed in a changing regulatory environment? Should long-term agreements in energy purchasing be prohibited? What are the benefits of preventive action such as competition advocacy and market surveillance committees? Should Article 82 (a) of the EC Treaty be used to curb excessive pricing?. (author)

  16. Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galowitz, Stephen

    2012-12-31

    The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

  17. Use of GTE-65 gas turbine power units in the thermal configuration of steam-gas systems for the refitting of operating thermal electric power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, A. S.; Kovalevskii, V. P.; Getmanov, E. A.; Ermaikina, N. A.

    2008-07-15

    Thermal configurations for condensation, district heating, and discharge steam-gas systems (PGU) based on the GTE-65 gas turbine power unit are described. A comparative multivariant analysis of their thermodynamic efficiency is made. Based on some representative examples, it is shown that steam-gas systems with the GTE-65 and boiler-utilizer units can be effectively used and installed in existing main buildings during technical refitting of operating thermal electric power plants.

  18. Walcot Electric Machines | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Efficiency Product: A spin-out from Bath University which that will develop and licence process relating to high efficiency electric motors for fixed speed applications, and will...

  19. Battery-Powered Electric and Hybrid Electric Vehicle Projects to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions: A Resource for Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2002-07-31

    The transportation sector accounts for a large and growing share of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Worldwide, motor vehicles emit well over 900 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) each year, accounting for more than 15 percent of global fossil fuel-derived CO2 emissions.1 In the industrialized world alone, 20-25 percent of GHG emissions come from the transportation sector. The share of transport-related emissions is growing rapidly due to the continued increase in transportation activity.2 In 1950, there were only 70 million cars, trucks, and buses on the world’s roads. By 1994, there were about nine times that number, or 630 million vehicles. Since the early 1970s, the global fleet has been growing at a rate of 16 million vehicles per year. This expansion has been accompanied by a similar growth in fuel consumption.3 If this kind of linear growth continues, by the year 2025 there will be well over one billion vehicles on the world’s roads.4 In a response to the significant growth in transportation-related GHG emissions, governments and policy makers worldwide are considering methods to reverse this trend. However, due to the particular make-up of the transportation sector, regulating and reducing emissions from this sector poses a significant challenge. Unlike stationary fuel combustion, transportation-related emissions come from dispersed sources. Only a few point-source emitters, such as oil/natural gas wells, refineries, or compressor stations, contribute to emissions from the transportation sector. The majority of transport-related emissions come from the millions of vehicles traveling the world’s roads. As a result, successful GHG mitigation policies must find ways to target all of these small, non-point source emitters, either through regulatory means or through various incentive programs. To increase their effectiveness, policies to control emissions from the transportation sector often utilize indirect means to reduce emissions, such as requiring specific technology improvements or an increase in fuel efficiency. Site-specific project activities can also be undertaken to help decrease GHG emissions, although the use of such measures is less common. Sample activities include switching to less GHG-intensive vehicle options, such as electric vehicles (EVs) or hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). As emissions from transportation activities continue to rise, it will be necessary to promote both types of abatement activities in order to reverse the current emissions path. This Resource Guide focuses on site- and project-specific transportation activities. .

  20. Analysis of Critical Permeabilty, Capillary Pressure and Electrical Properties for Mesaverde Tight Gas Sandstones from Western U.S. Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; Robert Cluff; John Webb; John Victorine; Ken Stalder; Daniel Osburn; Andrew Knoderer; Owen Metheny; Troy Hommertzheim; Joshua Byrnes; Daniel Krygowski; Stefani Whittaker

    2008-06-30

    Although prediction of future natural gas supply is complicated by uncertainty in such variables as demand, liquefied natural gas supply price and availability, coalbed methane and gas shale development rate, and pipeline availability, all U.S. Energy Information Administration gas supply estimates to date have predicted that Unconventional gas sources will be the dominant source of U.S. natural gas supply for at least the next two decades (Fig. 1.1; the period of estimation). Among the Unconventional gas supply sources, Tight Gas Sandstones (TGS) will represent 50-70% of the Unconventional gas supply in this time period (Fig. 1.2). Rocky Mountain TGS are estimated to be approximately 70% of the total TGS resource base (USEIA, 2005) and the Mesaverde Group (Mesaverde) sandstones represent the principal gas productive sandstone unit in the largest Western U.S. TGS basins including the basins that are the focus of this study (Washakie, Uinta, Piceance, northern Greater Green River, Wind River, Powder River). Industry assessment of the regional gas resource, projection of future gas supply, and exploration programs require an understanding of reservoir properties and accurate tools for formation evaluation. The goal of this study is to provide petrophysical formation evaluation tools related to relative permeability, capillary pressure, electrical properties and algorithms for wireline log analysis. Detailed and accurate moveable gas-in-place resource assessment is most critical in marginal gas plays and there is need for quantitative tools for definition of limits on gas producibility due to technology and rock physics and for defining water saturation. The results of this study address fundamental questions concerning: (1) gas storage; (2) gas flow; (3) capillary pressure; (4) electrical properties; (5) facies and upscaling issues; (6) wireline log interpretation algorithms; and (7) providing a web-accessible database of advanced rock properties. The following text briefly discusses the nature of these questions. Section I.2 briefly discusses the objective of the study with respect to the problems reviewed.

  1. Comparison of electrical capacitance tomography and gamma densitometer measurement in viscous oil-gas flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archibong Eso, A.; Zhao, Yabin; Yeung, Hoi

    2014-04-11

    Multiphase flow is a common occurrence in industries such as nuclear, process, oil and gas, food and chemical. A prior knowledge of its features and characteristics is essential in the design, control and management of such processes due to its complex nature. Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) and Gamma Densitometer (Gamma) are two promising approaches for multiphase visualization and characterization in process industries. In two phase oil and gas flow, ECT and Gamma are used in multiphase flow monitoring techniques due to their inherent simplicity, robustness, and an ability to withstand wide range of operational temperatures and pressures. High viscous oil (viscosity > 100 cP) is of interest because of its huge reserves, technological advances in its production and unlike conventional oil (oil viscosity < 100 cP) and gas flows where ECT and Gamma have been previously used, high viscous oil and gas flows comes with certain associated concerns which include; increased entrainment of gas bubbles dispersed in oil, shorter and more frequent slugs as well as oil film coatings on the walls of flowing conduits. This study aims to determine the suitability of both devices in the visualization and characterization of high-viscous oil and gas flow. Static tests are performed with both devices and liquid holdup measurements are obtained. Dynamic experiments were also conducted in a 1 and 3 inch facility at Cranfield University with a range of nominal viscosities (1000, 3000 and 7500 cP). Plug, slug and wavy annular flow patterns were identified by means of Probability Mass Function and time series analysis of the data acquired from Gamma and ECT devices with high speed camera used to validate the results. Measured Liquid holdups for both devices were also compared.

  2. Processing A Printed Wiring Board By Single Bath Electrodeposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meltzer, Michael P. (Oakland, CA); Steffani, Christopher P. (Livermore, CA); Gonfiotti, Ray A. (Livermore, CA)

    2003-04-15

    A method of processing a printed wiring board by single bath electrodeposition. Initial processing steps are implemented on the printed wiring board. Copper is plated on the printed wiring board from a bath containing nickel and copper. Nickel is plated on the printed wiring board from the bath containing nickel and copper and final processing steps are implemented on the printed wiring board.

  3. Electrical and gas sensing properties of self-aligned copper-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonawane, Yogesh S.; Kanade, K.G.; Kale, B.B. Aiyer, R.C.

    2008-10-02

    Electrical and gas sensing properties of nanocrystalline ZnO:Cu, having Cu X wt% (X = 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5) in ZnO, in the form of pellet were investigated. Copper chloride and zinc acetate were used as precursors along with oxalic acid as a precipitating reagent in methanol. Material characterization was done by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and inductive coupled plasma with optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). FE-SEM showed the self-aligned Cu-doped ZnO nano-clusters with particles in the range of 40-45 nm. The doping of 0.5% of copper changes the electrical conductivity by an order of magnitude whereas the temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) reduces with increase in copper wt% in ZnO. The material has shown an excellent sensitivity for the H{sub 2}, LPG and CO gases with limited temperature selectivity through the optimized operating temperature of 130, 190 and 220 deg. C for H{sub 2}, LPG and CO gases, respectively at 625 ppm gas concentration. The %SF was observed to be 1460 for H{sub 2} at 1% Cu doping whereas the 0.5% Cu doping offered %SF of 950 and 520 for CO and LPG, respectively. The response and recovery time was found to be 6 to 8 s and 16 s, respectively.

  4. Preliminary Results from Electric Arc Furnace Off-Gas Enthalpy Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nimbalkar, Sachin U; Thekdi, Arvind; Keiser, James R; Storey, John Morse

    2015-01-01

    This article describes electric arc furnace (EAF) off-gas enthalpy models developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate overall heat availability (sensible and chemical enthalpy) and recoverable heat values (steam or power generation potential) for existing EAF operations and to test ORNL s new EAF waste heat recovery (WHR) concepts. ORNL s new EAF WHR concepts are: Regenerative Drop-out Box System and Fluidized Bed System. The two EAF off-gas enthalpy models described in this paper are: 1.Overall Waste Heat Recovery Model that calculates total heat availability in off-gases of existing EAF operations 2.Regenerative Drop-out Box System Model in which hot EAF off-gases alternately pass through one of two refractory heat sinks that store heat and then transfer it to another gaseous medium These models calculate the sensible and chemical enthalpy of EAF off-gases based on the off-gas chemical composition, temperature, and mass flow rate during tap to tap time, and variations in those parameters in terms of actual values over time. The models provide heat transfer analysis for the aforementioned concepts to confirm the overall system and major component sizing (preliminary) to assess the practicality of the systems. Real-time EAF off-gas composition (e.g., CO, CO2, H2, and H2O), volume flow, and temperature data from one EAF operation was used to test the validity and accuracy of the modeling work. The EAF off-gas data was used to calculate the sensible and chemical enthalpy of the EAF off-gases to generate steam and power. The article provides detailed results from the modeling work that are important to the success of ORNL s EAF WHR project. The EAF WHR project aims to develop and test new concepts and materials that allow cost-effective recovery of sensible and chemical heat from high-temperature gases discharged from EAFs.

  5. Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawless, R.K.; LaCamera, A.F.; Troup, R.L.; Ray, S.P.; Hosler, R.B.

    1999-08-17

    An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride. 4 figs.

  6. Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dawless, Robert K.; LaCamera, Alfred F.; Troup, R. Lee; Ray, Siba P.; Hosler, Robert B.

    1999-01-01

    An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride.

  7. Table 7a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected Projected Price in Constant Dollars (constant dollars per million Btu in "dollar year" specific to each AEO) AEO $ Year 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 1992 2.44 2.48 2.57 2.66 2.70 2.79 2.84 2.92 3.04 3.16 3.25 3.36 3.51 3.60 3.77 3.91 3.97 4.08 AEO 1995 1993 2.39 2.48 2.42 2.45 2.45 2.53 2.59 2.78 2.91 3.10 3.24 3.38 3.47 3.53 3.61 3.68

  8. "Table 7a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected" "Projected Price in Constant Dollars" " (constant dollars per million Btu in ""dollar year"" specific to each AEO)" ,"AEO $ Year",1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013 "AEO 1994",1992,2.44,2.48,2.57,2.66,2.7,2.79,2.84,2.92,3.04,3.16,3.25,3.36,3.51,3.6,3.77,3.91,3.97,4.08 "AEO

  9. CO{sub 2} Allowance Allocation in the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative and the Effect on Electricity Investors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burtraw, Dallas; Kahn, Danny; Palmer, Karen

    2006-03-01

    The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative among Northeastern states is expected to lead to an increase in the price of electricity in the region and beyond. In the RGGI region, changes in the value of electricity-generating assets may be positive or negative, while changes outside the Northeast are virtually always positive. For stakeholders in the industry, the change depends on the portfolio of assets held by affected firms. (author)

  10. An expanded review and comparison of greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel and geothermal electrical generating facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booth, R.B.; Neil, P.E.

    1998-12-31

    This paper provides a review of the greenhouse gas emissions due to fossil fuel and geothermal electrical generation and to the emissions of their respective support activities. These support activities consist of, exploration, development, and transportation aspects of the fuel source, including waste management. These support activities could amount to an additional 6% for coal, 22% for oil, 13% for natural gas and 1% for geothermal. The presented methodologies and underlying principles can be used to better define the resultant emissions, rankings and global impacts of these electrical generating industries.

  11. Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing Oil/Gas Wells in Texas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Technical Demonstration and Economic Validation of Geothermal-Produced Electricity from Coproduced Water at Existing Oil/Gas Wells in Texas.

  12. EIS-0002: Allocation of Petroleum Feedstock, Baltimore Gas & Electric Co., Sollers Point SNG Plant, Sollers Point, Baltimore County, MD

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Economic Regulatory Administration (ERA) developed this EIS to evaluate the social, economic and environmental impacts which may occur within the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BG&E) service area as a result of the ERA' s proposed decision to allocate up to 2,186,000 barrels per year of naphtha feedstock to BG&E to operate BG&E's existing synthetic natural gas facility located on Sollers Point in Baltimore County, Maryland.

  13. Recovery process for electroless plating baths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, R.W.; Neff, W.A.

    1992-05-12

    A process is described for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO[sub 3]. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths. 18 figs.

  14. Recovery process for electroless plating baths

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Roger W.; Neff, Wayne A.

    1992-01-01

    A process for removing, from spent electroless metal plating bath solutions, accumulated byproducts and counter-ions that have deleterious effects on plating. The solution, or a portion thereof, is passed through a selected cation exchange resin bed in hydrogen form, the resin selected from strong acid cation exchangers and combinations of intermediate acid cation exchangers with strong acid cation exchangers. Sodium and nickel ions are sorbed in the selected cation exchanger, with little removal of other constituents. The remaining solution is subjected to sulfate removal through precipitation of calcium sulfate hemihydrate using, sequentially, CaO and then CaCO.sub.3. Phosphite removal from the solution is accomplished by the addition of MgO to form magnesium phosphite trihydrate. The washed precipitates of these steps can be safely discarded in nontoxic land fills, or used in various chemical industries. Finally, any remaining solution can be concentrated, adjusted for pH, and be ready for reuse. The plating metal can be removed from the exchanger with sulfuric acid or with the filtrate from the magnesium phosphite precipitation forming a sulfate of the plating metal for reuse. The process is illustrated as applied to processing electroless nickel plating baths.

  15. Secretary Chu Announces Best Buy, Johnson Controls, Pacific Gas and Electric, and Veolia to Join National Clean Fleets Partnership

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced that four new corporate partners – Best Buy, Johnson Controls, Pacific Gas and Electric, and Veolia – are joining the Energy Department’s National Clean Fleets Partnership, a broad public-private partnership that assists the nation’s largest fleet operators in reducing the amount of gasoline and diesel they use nationwide.

  16. Decreasing Soft Costs for Solar Photovoltaics by Improving the Interconnection Process. A Case Study of Pacific Gas and Electric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardani, Kristen; Margolis, Robert

    2015-09-01

    As of the end of 2014, Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) had connected over 130,000 DG PV systems in its service territory, more than any other utility in the U.S. In this case study, we examine how PG&E achieved a faster, more efficient interconnection approval process despite rising application volumes.

  17. Metal spray apparatus with a U-shaped electric inlet gas heater and a one-piece electric heater surrounding a nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glovan, R.J.; Tierney, J.C.; McLean, L.L.; Johnson, L.L.; Verbael, D.J.

    1995-10-17

    An electrically heated metal spray apparatus is provided with a supersonic nozzle. Molten metal is injected into a gas stream flowing through the nozzle under pressure. By varying the pressure of the injected metal, the droplet can be made in various selected sizes with each selected size having a high degree of size uniformity. A unique one piece graphite heater provides easily controlled uniformity of temperature in the nozzle and an attached tundish which holds the pressurized molten metal. A unique U-shaped gas heater provides extremely hot inlet gas temperatures to the nozzle. A particularly useful application of the spray apparatus is coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy. This permits a fastener to be easily inserted and removed but provides for a secure locking of the fastener in high temperature environments. 12 figs.

  18. Metal spray apparatus with a U-shaped electric inlet gas heater and a one-piece electric heater surrounding a nozzle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glovan, Ronald J. (Butte, MT); Tierney, John C. (Butte, MT); McLean, Leroy L. (Butte, MT); Johnson, Lawrence L. (Butte, MT); Verbael, David J. (Butte, MT)

    1995-01-01

    An electrically heated metal spray apparatus is provided with a supersonic nozzle. Molten metal is injected into a gas stream flowing through the nozzle under pressure. By varying the pressure of the injected metal, the droplet can be made in various selected sizes with each selected size having a high degree of size uniformity. A unique one piece graphite heater provides easily controlled uniformity of temperature in the nozzle and an attached tundish which holds the pressurized molten metal. A unique U-shaped gas heater provides extremely hot inlet gas temperatures to the nozzle. A particularly useful application of the spray apparatus is coating of threads of a fastener with a shape memory alloy. This permits a fastener to be easily inserted and removed but provides for a secure locking of the fastener in high temperature environments.

  19. Evaluation of Public Service Electric & Gas Company`s standard offer program, Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, C.A.; Kito, M.S.; Moezzi, M.M.

    1995-07-01

    In May 1993, Public Service Electric and Gas (PSE&G), the largest investor-owned utility in New Jersey, initiated the Standard Offer program, an innovative approach to acquiring demand-side management (DSM) resources. In this program, PSE&G offers longterm contracts with standard terms and conditions to project sponsors, either customers or third-party energy service companies (ESCOs), on a first-come, first-serve basis to fill a resource block. The design includes posted, time-differentiated prices which are paid for energy savings that will be verified over the contract term (5, 10, or 15 years) based on a statewide measurement and verification (M&V) protocol. The design of the Standard Offer differs significantly from DSM bidding programs in several respects. The eligibility requirements and posted prices allow ESCOs and other energy service providers to market and develop projects among customers with few constraints on acceptable end use efficiency technologies. In contrast, in DSM bidding, ESCOs typically submit bids without final commitments from customers and the utility selects a limited number of winning bidders who often agree to deliver a pre-specified mix of savings from various end uses in targeted markets. The major objectives of the LBNL evaluation were to assess market response and customer satisfaction; analyze program costs and cost-effectiveness; review and evaluate the utility`s administration and delivery of the program; examine the role of PSE&G`s energy services subsidiary (PSCRC) in the program and the effect of its involvement on the development of the energy services industry in New Jersey; and discuss the potential applicability of the Standard Offer concept given current trends in the electricity industry (i.e., increasing competition and the prospect of industry restructuring).

  20. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

    2012-04-01

    This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

  1. Table 7b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Natural Gas Price, Electric Power Sector, Actual vs. Projected Projected Price in Nominal Dollars (nominal dollars per million Btu) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 AEO 1994 2.49 2.60 2.76 2.93 3.05 3.24 3.39 3.60 3.86 4.15 4.40 4.70 5.08 5.39 5.85 6.27 6.59 7.01 AEO 1995 2.44 2.61 2.61 2.70 2.78 2.95 3.11 3.44 3.72 4.10 4.43 4.78 5.07 5.33 5.64 5.95 6.23 AEO 1996 2.08 2.19 2.20 2.39 2.47 2.54 2.64 2.74 2.84 2.95 3.09

  2. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    you nay give us will be greatly uppreckted. VPry truly your23, 9. IX. Sin0j3, Mtinager lclectronics and Nuclear Physics Dept. omh , WESTINGHOUSE-THE NAT KING IN ELECTRICITY

  3. Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews

    2007-09-15

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Processing a printed wiring board by single bath electrodeposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meltzer, Michael P. (Oakland, CA); Steffani, Christopher P. (Livermore, CA); Gonfiotti, Ray A. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-12-07

    A method of processing a printed wiring board. Initial processing steps are implemented on the printed wiring board. Copper is plated on the printed wiring board from a bath containing nickel and copper. Nickel is plated on the printed wiring board from a bath containing nickel and copper and final processing steps are implemented on the printed wiring board.

  5. ,"Maine Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maine Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  6. ,"Maryland Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  7. ,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Massachusetts Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next

  8. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  9. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next

  10. ,"Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  11. ,"Montana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  12. ,"Nebraska Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  13. ,"Nevada Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  14. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next

  15. ,"Ohio Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  16. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  17. ,"Oregon Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  18. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next

  19. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next

  20. ,"Texas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  1. ,"Utah Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  2. ,"Vermont Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Vermont Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  3. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  4. ,"Washington Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next

  5. ,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next

  6. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  7. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  8. ,"Alaska Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  9. ,"Arizona Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  10. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  11. ,"California Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next

  12. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  13. ,"Connecticut Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Connecticut Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next

  14. ,"Delaware Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  15. ,"Florida Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  16. ,"Georgia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Georgia Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  17. ,"Hawaii Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Hawaii Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  18. ,"Idaho Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  19. ,"Illinois Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  20. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  1. ,"Iowa Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Iowa Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  2. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  3. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next Release

  4. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Price Sold to Electric Power Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)",1,"Monthly","2/2016" ,"Release Date:","4/29/2016" ,"Next

  5. OPTIMIZING TECHNOLOGY TO REDUCE MERCURY AND ACID GAS EMISSIONS FROM ELECTRIC POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

    2005-10-01

    Maps showing potential mercury, sulfur, chlorine, and moisture emissions for U.S. coal by county of origin were made from publicly available data (plates 1, 2, 3, and 4). Published equations that predict mercury capture by emission control technologies used at U.S. coal-fired utilities were applied to average coal quality values for 169 U.S. counties. The results were used to create five maps that show the influence of coal origin on mercury emissions from utility units with: (1) hot-side electrostatic precipitator (hESP), (2) cold-side electrostatic precipitator (cESP), (3) hot-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (hESP/FGD), (4) cold-side electrostatic precipitator with wet flue gas desulfurization (cESP/FGD), and (5) spray-dry adsorption with fabric filter (SDA/FF) emission controls (plates 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9). Net (lower) coal heating values were calculated from measured coal Btu values, and estimated coal moisture and hydrogen values; the net heating values were used to derive mercury emission rates on an electric output basis (plate 10). Results indicate that selection of low-mercury coal is a good mercury control option for plants having hESP, cESP, or hESP/FGD emission controls. Chlorine content is more important for plants having cESP/FGD or SDA/FF controls; optimum mercury capture is indicated where chlorine is between 500 and 1000 ppm. Selection of low-sulfur coal should improve mercury capture where carbon in fly ash is used to reduce mercury emissions. Comparison of in-ground coal quality with the quality of commercially mined coal indicates that existing coal mining and coal washing practice results in a 25% reduction of mercury in U.S. coal before it is delivered to the power plant. Further pre-combustion mercury reductions may be possible, especially for coal from Texas, Ohio, parts of Pennsylvania and much of the western U.S.

  6. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

    2012-04-01

    A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

  7. Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil and/or Gas Wells

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil and/or Gas Wells PI - Bernie Karl Chena Hot Springs Resort Track 1 Project Officer: Eric Hass Total Project Funding: $724,000 April 22, 2013 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or otherwise restricted information. 2 | US DOE Geothermal Office eere.energy.gov Relevance/Impact of Research Project Objectives * Design, build, and operate low temperature, mobile, geothermal power plant capable of

  8. Table 11.5b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,520,229,870 169,653,294 133,545,718 363,247 4,365,768 1,828,157,897 13,815,263 832 809,873 6,874

  9. Bath for electrolytic reduction of alumina and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2002-11-26

    An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises a molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: (a) AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and (b) about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound may be, for example, a fluoride, oxide, or carbonate. The metal can be nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath can be employed in a combination that includes a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the bath of the present invention during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum can improve the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode. Removing sulfur from the bath can also minimize cathode deposits. Aluminum formed on the cathode can be removed directly from the cathode.

  10. Greenhouse gas emission impacts of electric vehicles under varying driving cycles in various counties and US cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, M.Q.; Marr, W.W.

    1994-02-10

    Electric vehicles (EVs) can reduce greenhouse gas emissions, relative to emissions from gasoline-fueled vehicles. However, those studies have not considered all aspects that determine greenhouse gas emissions from both gasoline vehicles (GVs) and EVs. Aspects often overlooked include variations in vehicle trip characteristics, inclusion of all greenhouse gases, and vehicle total fuel cycle. In this paper, we estimate greenhouse gas emission reductions for EVs, including these important aspects. We select four US cities (Boston, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Washington, D.C.) and six countries (Australia, France, Japan, Norway, the United Kingdom, and the United States) and analyze greenhouse emission impacts of EVs in each city or country. We also select six driving cycles developed around the world (i.e., the US federal urban driving cycle, the Economic Community of Europe cycle 15, the Japanese 10-mode cycle, the Los Angeles 92 cycle, the New York City cycle, and the Sydney cycle). Note that we have not analyzed EVs in high-speed driving (e.g., highway driving), where the results would be less favorable to EVs; here, EVs are regarded as urban vehicles only. We choose one specific driving cycle for a given city or country and estimate the energy consumption of four-passenger compact electric and gasoline cars in the given city or country. Finally, we estimate total fuel cycle greenhouse gas emissions of both GVs and EVs by accounting for emissions from primary energy recovery, transportation, and processing; energy product transportation; and powerplant and vehicle operations.

  11. Major Fuels","Site Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel, 1999" ,"All Buildings",,"Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu)",,,,,"Primary Electricity (trillion Btu)" ,"Number of Buildings...

  12. Overview of the Safety Issues Associated with the Compressed Natural Gas Fuel System and Electric Drive System in a Heavy Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, S.C.

    2002-11-14

    This report evaluates the hazards that are unique to a compressed-natural-gas (CNG)-fueled heavy hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) design compared with a conventional heavy vehicle. The unique design features of the heavy HEV are the CNG fuel system for the internal-combustion engine (ICE) and the electric drive system. This report addresses safety issues with the CNG fuel system and the electric drive system. Vehicles on U. S. highways have been propelled by ICEs for several decades. Heavy-duty vehicles have typically been fueled by diesel fuel, and light-duty vehicles have been fueled by gasoline. The hazards and risks posed by ICE vehicles are well understood and have been generally accepted by the public. The economy, durability, and safety of ICE vehicles have established a standard for other types of vehicles. Heavy-duty (i.e., heavy) HEVs have recently been introduced to U. S. roadways, and the hazards posed by these heavy HEVs can be compared with the hazards posed by ICE vehicles. The benefits of heavy HEV technology are based on their potential for reduced fuel consumption and lower exhaust emissions, while the disadvantages are the higher acquisition cost and the expected higher maintenance costs (i.e., battery packs). The heavy HEV is more suited for an urban drive cycle with stop-and-go driving conditions than for steady expressway speeds. With increasing highway congestion and the resulting increased idle time, the fuel consumption advantage for heavy HEVs (compared with conventional heavy vehicles) is enhanced by the HEVs' ability to shut down. Any increase in fuel cost obviously improves the economics of a heavy HEV. The propulsion system for a heavy HEV is more complex than the propulsion system for a conventional heavy vehicle. The heavy HEV evaluated in this study has in effect two propulsion systems: an ICE fueled by CNG and an electric drive system with additional complexity and failure modes. This additional equipment will result in a less reliable vehicle with a lower availability than a conventional heavy vehicle. Experience with heavy HEVs to date supports this observation. The key safety concern for the electric drive system is the higher voltages and currents that are required in the electric drive system. Faults that could expose personnel to these electric hazards must be considered, addressed, and minimized. The key issue for the CNG-fueled ICE is containment of the high-pressure natural gas. Events that can result in a release of natural gas with the possibility of subsequent ignition are of concern. These safety issues are discussed. The heavy HEV has the potential to have a safety record that is comparable to that of the conventional vehicle, but adequate attention to detail will be required.

  13. ELECTRIC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ELECTRIC cdrtrokArJclaeT 3 I+ &i, y$ \I &OF I*- j< t j,fci..- ir )(yiT !E-li, ( \-,v? Cl -p/4.4 RESEARCH LABORATORIES EAST PITTSBURGH, PA. 8ay 22, 1947 Mr. J. Carrel Vrilson General ?!!mager Atomic Qxzgy Commission 1901 Constitution Avenue Kashington, D. C. Dear Sir: In the course of OUT nuclenr research we are planning to study the enc:ri;y threshold anti cross section for fission. For thib program we require a s<>piAroted sample of metallic Uranium 258 of high purity. A

  14. Bath for electrolytic reduction of alumina and method therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Craig W.; Brooks, Richard J.; Frizzle, Patrick B.; Juric, Drago D.

    2001-07-10

    An electrolytic bath for use during the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum. The bath comprises a molten electrolyte having the following ingredients: (a) AlF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF, and LiF; and (b) about 0.004 wt. % to about 0.2 wt. %, based on total weight of the molten electrolyte, of at least one transition metal or at least one compound of the metal or both. The compound may be, for example, a fluoride, oxide, or carbonate. The metal can be nickel, iron, copper, cobalt, or molybdenum. The bath can be employed in a combination that includes a vessel for containing the bath and at least one non-consumable anode and at least one dimensionally stable cathode in the bath. Employing the bath of the present invention during electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum can improve the wetting of aluminum on a cathode by reducing or eliminating the formation of non-metallic deposits on the cathode.

  15. Implications of High Renewable Electricity Penetration in the U.S. for Water Use, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Land-Use, and Materials Supply

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Recent work found that renewable energy could supply 80% of electricity demand in the contiguous United States in 2050 at the hourly level. This paper explores some of the implications of achieving such high levels of renewable electricity for supply chains and the environment in scenarios with renewable supply up to such levels. Transitioning to high renewable electricity supply would lead to significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and water use, with only modest land-use implications. While renewable energy expansion implies moderate growth of the renewable electricity supply chains, no insurmountable long-term constraints to renewable electricity technology manufacturing capacity or materials supply are identified.

  16. Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure - EAC 2011 Interdependence of Electricity System Infrastructure and Natural Gas Infrastructure - ...

  17. VEE-0044- In the Matter of Public Service Electric and Gas Company (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On July 14, 1997, the Office of Hearings and Appeals received from the Energy Information Administration (EIA) a “letter of appeal” that had been filed with the EIA by the Public Service Electric...

  18. State-level Greenhouse Gas Emission Factors for Electricity Generation, Updated 2002

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This report documents the preparation of updated state-level electricity coefficients for carbon dioxide (CO ), methane (CH ), and nitrous oxide (NO), which represent a three-year weighted average for 1998-2000.

  19. ADVANCED FLUE GAS CONDITIONING AS A RETROFIT UPGRADE TO ENHANCE PM COLLECTION FROM COAL-FIRED ELECTRIC UTILITY BOILERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Jean Bustard; Kenneth E. Baldrey; Richard Schlager

    2000-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy and ADA Environmental Solutions has begun a project to develop commercial flue gas conditioning additives. The objective is to develop conditioning agents that can help improve particulate control performance of smaller or under-sized electrostatic precipitators on utility coal-fired boilers. The new chemicals will be used to control both the electrical resistivity and the adhesion or cohesivity of the flyash. There is a need to provide cost-effective and safer alternatives to traditional flue gas conditioning with SO{sub 3} and ammonia. Preliminary testing has identified a class of common deliquescent salts that effectively control flyash resistivity on a variety of coals. A method to evaluate cohesive properties of flyash in the laboratory has been selected and construction of an electrostatic tensiometer test fixture is underway. Preliminary selection of a variety of chemicals that will be screened for effect on flyash cohesion has been completed.

  20. Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.

    2012-07-06

    Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

  1. High voltage capability electrical coils insulated with materials containing SF.sub.6 gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lanoue, Thomas J.; Zeise, Clarence L.; Wagenaar, Loren; Westervelt, Dean C.

    1988-01-01

    A coil is made having a plurality of layers of adjacent metal conductor windings subject to voltage stress, where the windings have insulation therebetween containing a small number of minute disposed throughout its cross-section, where the voids are voids filled with SF.sub.6 gas to substitute for air or other gaseous materials in from about 60% to about 95% of the cross-sectional void volume in the insulation, thus incorporating an amount of SF.sub.6 gas in the cross-section of the insulation effective to substantially increase corona inception voltages.

  2. Electrical Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Co-produced from Oil & Gas

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: To validate and realize the potential for the production of low temperature resource geothermal production on oil & gas sites. Test and document the reliability of this new technology.; Gain a better understanding of operational costs associated with this equipment.

  3. Well-to-wheels analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Poch, L.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.; Mahalik, M.; Rousseau, A.

    2010-06-14

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are being developed for mass production by the automotive industry. PHEVs have been touted for their potential to reduce the US transportation sector's dependence on petroleum and cut greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions by (1) using off-peak excess electric generation capacity and (2) increasing vehicles energy efficiency. A well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis - which examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation - can help researchers better understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for PHEV recharging, as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs. For the WTW analysis, Argonne National Laboratory researchers used the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model developed by Argonne to compare the WTW energy use and GHG emissions associated with various transportation technologies to those associated with PHEVs. Argonne researchers estimated the fuel economy and electricity use of PHEVs and alternative fuel/vehicle systems by using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) model. They examined two PHEV designs: the power-split configuration and the series configuration. The first is a parallel hybrid configuration in which the engine and the electric motor are connected to a single mechanical transmission that incorporates a power-split device that allows for parallel power paths - mechanical and electrical - from the engine to the wheels, allowing the engine and the electric motor to share the power during acceleration. In the second configuration, the engine powers a generator, which charges a battery that is used by the electric motor to propel the vehicle; thus, the engine never directly powers the vehicle's transmission. The power-split configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 10- and 20-mile electric range because they require frequent use of the engine for acceleration and to provide energy when the battery is depleted, while the series configuration was adopted for PHEVs with a 30- and 40-mile electric range because they rely mostly on electrical power for propulsion. Argonne researchers calculated the equivalent on-road (real-world) fuel economy on the basis of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency miles per gallon (mpg)-based formulas. The reduction in fuel economy attributable to the on-road adjustment formula was capped at 30% for advanced vehicle systems (e.g., PHEVs, fuel cell vehicles [FCVs], hybrid electric vehicles [HEVs], and battery-powered electric vehicles [BEVs]). Simulations for calendar year 2020 with model year 2015 mid-size vehicles were chosen for this analysis to address the implications of PHEVs within a reasonable timeframe after their likely introduction over the next few years. For the WTW analysis, Argonne assumed a PHEV market penetration of 10% by 2020 in order to examine the impact of significant PHEV loading on the utility power sector. Technological improvement with medium uncertainty for each vehicle was also assumed for the analysis. Argonne employed detailed dispatch models to simulate the electric power systems in four major regions of the US: the New England Independent System Operator, the New York Independent System Operator, the State of Illinois, and the Western Electric Coordinating Council. Argonne also evaluated the US average generation mix and renewable generation of electricity for PHEV and BEV recharging scenarios to show the effects of these generation mixes on PHEV WTW results. Argonne's GREET model was designed to examine the WTW energy use and GHG emissions for PHEVs and BEVs, as well as FCVs, regular HEVs, and conventional gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEVs). WTW results are reported for charge-depleting (CD) operation of PHEVs under different recharging scenarios. The combined WTW results of CD and charge-sustaining (CS) PHEV operations (using the utility factor method) were also examined and reported. According to the utility factor method, the share of vehicle miles traveled during CD operation is 25% for PHEV10 and 51% for PHEV40. Argonne's WTW analysis of PHEVs revealed that the following factors significantly impact the energy use and GHG emissions results for PHEVs and BEVs compared with baseline gasoline vehicle technologies: (1) the regional electricity generation mix for battery recharging and (2) the adjustment of fuel economy and electricity consumption to reflect real-world driving conditions. Although the analysis predicted the marginal electricity generation mixes for major regions in the United States, these mixes should be evaluated as possible scenarios for recharging PHEVs because significant uncertainties are associated with the assumed market penetration for these vehicles. Thus, the reported WTW results for PHEVs should be directly correlated with the underlying generation mix, rather than with the region linked to that mix.

  4. Efforts to Harmonize Gas Pipeline Operations with the Demands of the Electricity Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Costello, Ken

    2006-12-15

    A possible future course of action is for pipelines to continue their efforts to provide new services with FERC approval. Over time, pipelines could satisfy power generators by giving them the flexibility and services they desire and for which they are willing to pay. Another possibility is that FERC will enact new rules governing regional electricity markets that would function similarly to nationwide business practices. (author)

  5. Electrical Resistivity Investigation of Gas Hydrate Distribution in Mississippi Canyon Block 118, Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunbar, John

    2012-12-31

    Electrical methods offer a geophysical approach for determining the sub-bottom distribution of hydrate in deep marine environments. Methane hydrate is essentially non-conductive. Hence, sediments containing hydrate are more resistive than sediments without hydrates. To date, the controlled source electromagnetic (CSEM) method has been used in marine hydrates studies. This project evaluated an alternative electrical method, direct current resistivity (DCR), for detecting marine hydrates. DCR involves the injection of direct current between two source electrodes and the simultaneous measurement of the electric potential (voltage) between multiple receiver electrodes. The DCR method provides subsurface information comparable to that produced by the CSEM method, but with less sophisticated instrumentation. Because the receivers are simple electrodes, large numbers can be deployed to achieve higher spatial resolution. In this project a prototype seafloor DCR system was developed and used to conduct a reconnaissance survey at a site of known hydrate occurrence in Mississippi Canyon Block 118. The resulting images of sub-bottom resistivities indicate that high-concentration hydrates at the site occur only in the upper 50 m, where deep-seated faults intersect the seafloor. Overall, there was evidence for much less hydrate at the site than previously thought based on available seismic and CSEM data alone.

  6. Well-to-wheels energy use and greenhouse gas emissions analysis of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Burnham, A.; Wang, M.; Molburg, J.; Rousseau, A.; Energy Systems

    2009-03-31

    Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory expanded the Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) model and incorporated the fuel economy and electricity use of alternative fuel/vehicle systems simulated by the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) to conduct a well-to-wheels (WTW) analysis of energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). The WTW results were separately calculated for the blended charge-depleting (CD) and charge-sustaining (CS) modes of PHEV operation and then combined by using a weighting factor that represented the CD vehicle-miles-traveled (VMT) share. As indicated by PSAT simulations of the CD operation, grid electricity accounted for a share of the vehicle's total energy use, ranging from 6% for a PHEV 10 to 24% for a PHEV 40, based on CD VMT shares of 23% and 63%, respectively. In addition to the PHEV's fuel economy and type of on-board fuel, the marginal electricity generation mix used to charge the vehicle impacted the WTW results, especially GHG emissions. Three North American Electric Reliability Corporation regions (4, 6, and 13) were selected for this analysis, because they encompassed large metropolitan areas (Illinois, New York, and California, respectively) and provided a significant variation of marginal generation mixes. The WTW results were also reported for the U.S. generation mix and renewable electricity to examine cases of average and clean mixes, respectively. For an all-electric range (AER) between 10 mi and 40 mi, PHEVs that employed petroleum fuels (gasoline and diesel), a blend of 85% ethanol and 15% gasoline (E85), and hydrogen were shown to offer a 40-60%, 70-90%, and more than 90% reduction in petroleum energy use and a 30-60%, 40-80%, and 10-100% reduction in GHG emissions, respectively, relative to an internal combustion engine vehicle that used gasoline. The spread of WTW GHG emissions among the different fuel production technologies and grid generation mixes was wider than the spread of petroleum energy use, mainly due to the diverse fuel production technologies and feedstock sources for the fuels considered in this analysis. The PHEVs offered reductions in petroleum energy use as compared with regular hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). More petroleum energy savings were realized as the AER increased, except when the marginal grid mix was dominated by oil-fired power generation. Similarly, more GHG emissions reductions were realized at higher AERs, except when the marginal grid generation mix was dominated by oil or coal. Electricity from renewable sources realized the largest reductions in petroleum energy use and GHG emissions for all PHEVs as the AER increased. The PHEVs that employ biomass-based fuels (e.g., biomass-E85 and -hydrogen) may not realize GHG emissions benefits over regular HEVs if the marginal generation mix is dominated by fossil sources. Uncertainties are associated with the adopted PHEV fuel consumption and marginal generation mix simulation results, which impact the WTW results and require further research. More disaggregate marginal generation data within control areas (where the actual dispatching occurs) and an improved dispatch modeling are needed to accurately assess the impact of PHEV electrification. The market penetration of the PHEVs, their total electric load, and their role as complements rather than replacements of regular HEVs are also uncertain. The effects of the number of daily charges, the time of charging, and the charging capacity have not been evaluated in this study. A more robust analysis of the VMT share of the CD operation is also needed.

  7. Limited Electricity Generation Supply and Limited Natural Gas Supply Cases (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    Development of U.S. energy resources and the permitting and construction of large energy facilities have become increasingly difficult over the past 20 years, and they could become even more difficult in the future. Growing public concern about global warming and CO2 emissions also casts doubt on future consumption of fossil fuels -- particularly coal, which releases the largest amount of CO2 per unit of energy produced. Even without regulations to limit greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, the investment community may already be limiting the future use of some energy options. In addition, there is considerable uncertainty about the future availability of, and access to, both domestic and foreign natural gas resources.

  8. State-level Greenhouse Gas Emission Factors for Electricity Generation, Updated

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2001-01-01

    To assist reporters in estimating emissions and emission reductions, The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has made available in the instructions to Forms EIA-1605 and EIA-1605EZ emission coefficients for most commonly used fossil fuels and electricity. These coefficients were based on 1992 emissions and generation data. In 1999, updated coefficients were prepared based on the most recent data (1998) then available; however, the updated coefficients were not included in the instructions for the 1999 data year. This year, they have been updated again, but based on three years worth of data (1997, 1998, and 1999) rather than a single year.

  9. A stochastic reorganizational bath model for electronic energy transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujita, Takatoshi E-mail: aspuru@chemistry.harvard.edu; Huh, Joonsuk; Aspuru-Guzik, Aln E-mail: aspuru@chemistry.harvard.edu

    2014-06-28

    Environmentally induced fluctuations of the optical gap play a crucial role in electronic energy transfer dynamics. One of the simplest approaches to incorporate such fluctuations in energy transfer dynamics is the well known Haken-Strobl-Reineker (HSR) model, in which the energy-gap fluctuation is approximated as white noise. Recently, several groups have employed molecular dynamics simulations and excited-state calculations in conjunction to account for excitation energies thermal fluctuations. On the other hand, since the original work of HSR, many groups have employed stochastic models to simulate the same transfer dynamics. Here, we discuss a rigorous connection between the stochastic and the atomistic bath models. If the phonon bath is treated classically, time evolution of the exciton-phonon system can be described by Ehrenfest dynamics. To establish the relationship between the stochastic and atomistic bath models, we employ a projection operator technique to derive the generalized Langevin equations for the energy-gap fluctuations. The stochastic bath model can be obtained as an approximation of the atomistic Ehrenfest equations via the generalized Langevin approach. Based on this connection, we propose a novel scheme to take account of reorganization effects within the framework of stochastic models. The proposed scheme provides a better description of the population dynamics especially in the regime of strong exciton-phonon coupling. Finally, we discuss the effect of the bath reorganization in the absorption and fluorescence spectra of ideal J-aggregates in terms of the Stokes shifts. We find a simple expression that relates the reorganization contribution to the Stokes shifts the reorganization shift to the ideal or non-ideal exciton delocalization in a J-aggregate. The reorganization shift can be described by three parameters: the monomer reorganization energy, the relaxation time of the optical gap, and the exciton delocalization length. This simple relationship allows one to understand the physical origin of the Stokes shifts in molecular aggregates.

  10. Electricity Monthly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Update November 28, 2012 Map of Electric System Selected for Daily Peak Demand was replaced with the correct map showing Selected Wholesale Electricity and Natural Gas Locations....

  11. Optimizing Techology to Reduce Mercury and Acid Gas Emissions from Electric Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey C. Quick; David E. Tabet; Sharon Wakefield; Roger L. Bon

    2004-01-31

    More than 56,000 coal quality data records from five public data sets have been selected for use in this project. These data will be used to create maps showing where coals with low mercury and acid-gas emissions might be found for power plants classified by air-pollution controls. Average coal quality values, calculated for 51,156 commercial coals by U.S. county-of-origin, are listed in the appendix. Coal moisture values are calculated for commercially shipped coal from 163 U.S. counties, where the raw assay data (including mercury and chlorine values) are reported on a dry basis. The calculated moisture values are verified by comparison with observed moisture values in commercial coal. Moisture in commercial U.S. coal shows provincial variation. For example, high volatile C bituminous rank coal from the Interior province has 3% to 4% more moisture than equivalent Rocky Mountain province coal. Mott-Spooner difference values are calculated for 4,957 data records for coals collected from coal mines and exploration drill holes. About 90% of the records have Mott-Spooner difference values within {+-}250 Btu/lb.

  12. Influence of hydrogen patterning gas on electric and magnetic properties of perpendicular magnetic tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeong, J. H.; Endoh, T.; Kim, Y.; Kim, W. K.; Park, S. O.

    2014-05-07

    To identify the degradation mechanism in magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs) using hydrogen, the properties of the MTJs were measured by applying an additional hydrogen etch process and a hydrogen plasma process to the patterned MTJs. In these studies, an additional 50?s hydrogen etch process caused the magnetoresistance (MR) to decrease from 103% to 14.7% and the resistance (R) to increase from 6.5?k? to 39?k?. Moreover, an additional 500?s hydrogen plasma process decreased the MR from 103% to 74% and increased R from 6.5?k? to 13.9?k?. These results show that MTJs can be damaged by the hydrogen plasma process as well as by the hydrogen etch process, as the atomic bonds in MgO may break and react with the exposed hydrogen gas. Compounds such as MgO hydrate very easily. We also calculated the damaged layer width (DLW) of the patterned MTJs after the hydrogen etching and plasma processes, to evaluate the downscaling limitations of spin-transfer-torque magnetic random-access memory (STT-MRAM) devices. With these calculations, the maximum DLWs at each side of the MTJ, generated by the etching and plasma processes, were 23.8?nm and 12.8?nm, respectively. This result validates that the hydrogen-based MTJ patterning processes cannot be used exclusively in STT-MRAMs beyond 20?nm.

  13. Reduction and carburization reactions in the iron bath smelter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uemura, Kenichiro

    1993-01-01

    Slag-metal-coal reactions in the iron-bath smelter were analyzed based on a reaction model. It was concluded that the productivity and carbon content of the hot metal produced in a smelter can be controlled by adjusting the slag volume and iron oxide content in slag. Furthermore, iron oxide content is determined by the slag volume and the stirring intensity of the slag.

  14. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhardt, J. J.; Heath, G.; Cohen, E.

    2012-04-01

    In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, this analysis focuses on reducing variability and clarifying the central tendency of published estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emissions estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough (trough) technology and 17 for power tower (tower) technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published estimates for troughs and towers were 83 and 20 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO2-eq/kWh),1 respectively; median estimates were 26 and 38 g CO2-eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. The IQR and median were reduced by 87% and 17%, respectively, for troughs. For towers, the IQR and median decreased by 33% and 38%, respectively. Next, five trough LCAs reporting detailed life cycle inventories were identified. The variability and central tendency of their estimates are reduced by 91% and 81%, respectively, after light harmonization. By harmonizing these five estimates to consistent values for global warming intensities of materials and expanding system boundaries to consistently include electricity and auxiliary natural gas combustion, variability is reduced by an additional 32% while central tendency increases by 8%. These harmonized values provide useful starting points for policy makers in evaluating life cycle GHG emissions from CSP projects without the requirement to conduct a full LCA for each new project.

  15. ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,..."Natural Gas ... " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,..."Natu...

  16. Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a high-current electric discharge in a closed volume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Gritsinin, S. I.; Kop'ev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kuleshov, P. S.; Popov, N. A.; Starik, A. M.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2009-06-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies and numerical calculations of the ignition of a stoichiometric CH{sub 4}: O{sub 2} gas mixture by a high-current gliding discharge. It is shown that this type of discharge generates an axially propagating thermal wave (precursor) that penetrates into the gas medium and leads to fast gas heating. This process is followed by an almost simultaneous ignition of the gas mixture over the entire reactor volume.

  17. Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    This report examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation to help researchers understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies

  18. Geisha Williams Executive Vice President, Electric Operations

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geisha Williams Executive Vice President, Electric Operations Pacific Gas and Electric ... My name is Geisha Williams, and I am the Executive Vice President of Electric Operations ...

  19. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Hester, J.C.; Harriz, J.T.; Ritz, G.J.

    1991-02-01

    The objective of this study is to develop standardized air blown fixed bed gasification hot gas cleanup integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) systems.

  20. Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Han, J.; Poch, L.; Wang, M.; Vyas, A.; Mahalik, M.; Rousseau, A.

    2010-06-01

    This report examines energy use and emissions from primary energy source through vehicle operation to help researchers understand the impact of the upstream mix of electricity generation technologies for recharging plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), as well as the powertrain technology and fuel sources for PHEVs.

  1. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    . Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 . Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels |...

  3. Two-level system in spin baths: Non-adiabatic dynamics and heat transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Segal, Dvira

    2014-04-28

    We study the non-adiabatic dynamics of a two-state subsystem in a bath of independent spins using the non-interacting blip approximation, and derive an exact analytic expression for the relevant memory kernel. We show that in the thermodynamic limit, when the subsystem-bath coupling is diluted (uniformly) over many (infinite) degrees of freedom, our expression reduces to known results, corresponding to the harmonic bath with an effective, temperature-dependent, spectral density function. We then proceed and study the heat current characteristics in the out-of-equilibrium spin-spin-bath model, with a two-state subsystem bridging two thermal spin-baths of different temperatures. We compare the behavior of this model to the case of a spin connecting boson baths, and demonstrate pronounced qualitative differences between the two models. Specifically, we focus on the development of the thermal diode effect, and show that the spin-spin-bath model cannot support it at weak (subsystem-bath) coupling, while in the intermediate-strong coupling regime its rectifying performance outplays the spin-boson model.

  4. Electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Quiet, clean, and efficient, electric vehicles (EVs) may someday become a practical mode of transportation for the general public. Electric vehicles can provide many advantages for the nation's environment and energy supply because they run on electricity, which can be produced from many sources of energy such as coal, natural gas, uranium, and hydropower. These vehicles offer fuel versatility to the transportation sector, which depends almost solely on oil for its energy needs. Electric vehicles are any mode of transportation operated by a motor that receives electricity from a battery or fuel cell. EVs come in all shapes and sizes and may be used for different tasks. Some EVs are small and simple, such as golf carts and electric wheel chairs. Others are larger and more complex, such as automobile and vans. Some EVs, such as fork lifts, are used in industries. In this fact sheet, we will discuss mostly automobiles and vans. There are also variations on electric vehicles, such as hybrid vehicles and solar-powered vehicles. Hybrid vehicles use electricity as their primary source of energy, however, they also use a backup source of energy, such as gasoline, methanol or ethanol. Solar-powered vehicles are electric vehicles that use photovoltaic cells (cells that convert solar energy to electricity) rather than utility-supplied electricity to recharge the batteries. This paper discusses these concepts.

  5. Development of finite local perturbations of electrical conductivity in the flow of a weakly-conducting gas when a magnetic field is present

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaklyaz'minskiy, L.; Sokolov, V.; Degtyarev, L.; Kurdyusov, S.; Samarskiy, A.

    1988-08-08

    A study has been made of the possibility of development of a T-layer from local finite perturbation of electrical conductivity, introduced artificially into a steady-state flow of a weakly conducting gas. The analysis is made with the help of a numerical solution of equations of magnetic hydrodynamics, formulated in the assumption that the electron, ion and neutral components of the medium are found in thermodynamic equilibrium; the viscosity, Hall effect and transfer of energy by radiation are not taken into account.

  6. Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This study assessed five potential methane reduction scenarios from natural gas transmission, storage, and distribution (TS&D) infrastructure using published literature on the costs and the estimated quantity of methane reduced. The results show that implementation of these five measures could support approximately 85,000 jobs annually from 2015 to 2019 and reduce CH4 emissions from natural gas TS&D by over 40%. Based on standard input/output analysis methodology, measures are estimated to support over $8 billion in GDP annually over the same time period and allow producers to recover approximately $912 million annually in captured gas. Mitigation of methane emission reductions through repair, replacement and new technologies are found to support economic development and jobs. The study also found that a portfolio approach to infrastructure modernization may be appropriate to meaningfully improve safety, maintain or create high levels of employment, and significant losses of methane from across TS&D segments of natural gas systems.

  7. Suppression of unimolecular decay of laser desorbed peptide and protein ions by entrainment in rarefied supersonic gas jets under weak electric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hieke, Andreas

    2014-01-21

    Unimolecular decay of sample ions imposes a limit on the usable laser fluence in matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) ion sources. Traditionally, some modest degree of collisional sample ion cooling has been achieved by connecting MALDI ion sources directly to gas-filled radio frequency (RF) multipoles. It was also discovered in the early 1990s that gas-filled RF multipoles exhibit increased ion transmission efficiency due to collisional ion focusing effects. This unexpected experimental finding was later supported by elementary Monte Carlo simulations. Both experiments and simulations assumed a resting background gas with typical pressures of the order of 1 Pa. However, considerable additional improvements can be achieved if laser desorbed sample ions are introduced immediately after desorption, still within the ion source, in an axisymmetric rarefied supersonic gas jet with peak pressure of the order of 100 Pa and flow velocities >300 m/s, and under weak electric fields. We describe here the design principle and report performance data of an ion source coined “MALDI-2,” which incorporates elements of both rarefied aerodynamics and particle optics. Such a design allows superb suppression of metastable fragmentation due to rapid collisional cooling in <10 μs and nearly perfect injection efficiency into the attached RF ion guide, as numerous experiments have confirmed.

  8. Future of Natural Gas

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Natural Gas Bill Eisele, CEM SC Electric & Gas Co Hosted by: FEDERAL UTILITY PARTNERSHIP WORKING GROUP SEMINAR November 5-6, 2014 Cape Canaveral. Florida Agenda * Gas Facts * ...

  9. Electricity Monthly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    cheap price of natural gas reduced coals share of electricity production. Days of Burn Days of burn Coal capacity The average number of days of burn held at electric power...

  10. 2012 National Electricity Forum

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Planning, Arizona Public Service * Jan Strack, Grid Planning, Regulatory & Economics Manager, San Diego Gas & Electric * Mario Villar, Vice President, Transmission, NV ...

  11. Electric dipole polarizabilities at imaginary frequencies for hydrogen, the alkali-metal, alkaline-earth, and noble gas atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derevianko, Andrei Porsev, Sergey G. Babb, James F.

    2010-05-15

    The electric dipole polarizabilities evaluated at imaginary frequencies for hydrogen, the alkali-metal atoms, the alkaline-earth atoms, and the noble gases are tabulated along with the resulting values of the atomic static polarizabilities, the atom-surface interaction constants, and the dispersion (or van der Waals) constants for the homonuclear and the heteronuclear diatomic combinations of the atoms.

  12. Table 11.5a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and 11.5c; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2010 (Sum of Tables 11.5b and 11.5c; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total 1989 1,573,566,415 218,383,703 145,398,976 363,247 5,590,014 1,943,302,355 14,468,564 1,059 984,406

  13. Table 11.5c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    c Emissions From Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2010 (Subset of Table 11.5a; Metric Tons of Gas) Year Carbon Dioxide 1 Sulfur Dioxide Nitrogen Oxides Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Geo- thermal 5 Non- Biomass Waste 6 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Coal 2 Natural Gas 3 Petroleum 4 Other 7 Total Commercial Sector 8<//td> 1989 2,319,630 1,542,083 637,423 [ –] 803,754 5,302,890 37,398 4

  14. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 2003" ,"All Buildings* Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  15. Overview of advanced Stirling and gas turbine engine development programs and implications for solar thermal electrical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alger, D.

    1984-03-01

    The DOE automotive advanced engine development projects managed by the NASA Lewis Research Center were described. These included one Stirling cycle engine development and two air Brayton cycle development. Other engine research activities included: (1) an air Brayton engine development sponsored by the Gas Research Institute, and (2) plans for development of a Stirling cycle engine for space use. Current and potential use of these various engines with solar parabolic dishes were discussed.

  16. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Carbon Dioxide Capture for Natural Gas and Industrial Applications Technology Assessment

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Gas and Industrial Applications Carbon Dioxide Capture Technologies Carbon Dioxide Storage Technologies Crosscutting Technologies in Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Fast-spectrum Reactors Geothermal Power High Temperature Reactors Hybrid Nuclear-Renewable Energy Systems Hydropower Light Water Reactors Marine and Hydrokinetic Power Nuclear Fuel Cycles Solar Power Stationary Fuel Cells Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Wind Power ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Clean Power Quadrennial

  17. Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals-Phase I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond Hobbs

    2007-05-31

    The Advanced Hydrogasification Process (AHP)--conversion of coal to methane--is being developed through NETL with a DOE Grant and has successfully completed its first phase of development. The results so far are encouraging and have led to commitment by DOE/NETL to begin a second phase--bench scale reactor vessel testing, expanded engineering analysis and economic perspective review. During the next decade new means of generating electricity, and other forms of energy, will be introduced. The members of the AHP Team envision a need for expanded sources of natural gas or substitutes for natural gas, to fuel power generating plants. The initial work the team has completed on a process to use hydrogen to convert coal to methane (pipeline ready gas) shows promising potential. The Team has intentionally slanted its efforts toward the needs of US electric utilities, particularly on fuels that can be used near urban centers where the greatest need for new electric generation is found. The process, as it has evolved, would produce methane from coal by adding hydrogen. The process appears to be efficient using western coals for conversion to a highly sought after fuel with significantly reduced CO{sub 2} emissions. Utilities have a natural interest in the preservation of their industry, which will require a dramatic reduction in stack emissions and an increase in sustainable technologies. Utilities tend to rank long-term stable supplies of fuel higher than most industries and are willing to trade some ratio of cost for stability. The need for sustainability, stability and environmentally compatible production are key drivers in the formation and progression of the AHP development. In Phase II, the team will add a focus on water conservation to determine how the basic gasification process can be best integrated with all the plant components to minimize water consumption during SNG production. The process allows for several CO{sub 2} reduction options including consumption of the CO{sub 2} in the original process as converted to methane. The process could under another option avoid emissions following the conversion to SNG through an adjunct algae conversion process. The algae would then be converted to fuels or other products. An additional application of the algae process at the end use natural gas fired plant could further reduce emissions. The APS team fully recognizes the competition facing the process from natural gas and imported liquid natural gas. While we expect those resources to set the price for methane in the near-term, the team's work to date indicates that the AHP process can be commercially competitive, with the added benefit of assuring long-term energy supplies from North American resources. Conversion of coal to a more readily transportable fuel that can be employed near load centers with an overall reduction of greenhouses gases is edging closer to reality.

  18. Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells The primary objective of this ...

  19. Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Principal ... Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells 3 | US DOE ...

  20. Table N11.4. Expenditures for Purchased Electricity, Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, ...

  1. Development of a Hydrogasification Process for Co-Production of Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) and Electric Power from Western Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiaolei; Rink, Nancy

    2011-04-30

    This report presents the results of the research and development conducted on an Advanced Hydrogasification Process (AHP) conceived and developed by Arizona Public Service Company (APS) under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) contract: DE-FC26-06NT42759 for Substitute Natural Gas (SNG) production from western coal. A double-wall (i.e., a hydrogasification contained within a pressure shell) down-flow hydrogasification reactor was designed, engineered, constructed, commissioned and operated by APS, Phoenix, AZ. The reactor is ASME-certified under Section VIII with a rating of 1150 pounds per square inch gage (psig) maximum allowable working pressure at 1950 degrees Fahrenheit ({degrees}F). The reaction zone had a 1.75 inch inner diameter and 13 feet length. The initial testing of a sub-bituminous coal demonstrated ~ 50% carbon conversion and ~10% methane yield in the product gas under 1625{degrees}F, 1000 psig pressure, with a 11 seconds (s) residence time, and 0.4 hydrogen-to-coal mass ratio. Liquid by-products mainly contained Benzene, Toluene, Xylene (BTX) and tar. Char collected from the bottom of the reactor had 9000-British thermal units per pound (Btu/lb) heating value. A three-dimensional (3D) computational fluid dynamic model simulation of the hydrodynamics around the reactor head was utilized to design the nozzles for injecting the hydrogen into the gasifier to optimize gas-solid mixing to achieve improved carbon conversion. The report also presents the evaluation of using algae for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) management and biofuel production. Nannochloropsis, Selenastrum and Scenedesmus were determined to be the best algae strains for the project purpose and were studied in an outdoor system which included a 6-meter (6M) radius cultivator with a total surface area of 113 square meters (m{sup 2}) and a total culture volume between 10,000 to 15,000 liters (L); a CO{sub 2} on-demand feeding system; an on-line data collection system for temperature, pH, Photosynthetically Activate Radiation (PAR) and dissolved oxygen (DO); and a ~2 gallons per minute (gpm) algae culture dewatering system. Among the three algae strains, Scenedesmus showed the most tolerance to temperature and irradiance conditions in Phoenix and the best self-settling characteristics. Experimental findings and operational strategies determined through these tests guided the operation of the algae cultivation system for the scale-up study. Effect of power plant flue gas, especially heavy metals, on algae growth and biomass adsorption were evaluated as well.

  2. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adolf, Douglas B.; Shahinpoor, Mohsen; Segalman, Daniel J.; Witkowski, Walter R.

    1993-01-01

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots.

  3. Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adolf, D.B.; Shahinpoor, M.; Segalman, D.J.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1993-10-05

    Electrically controlled polymeric gel actuators or synthetic muscles are described capable of undergoing substantial expansion and contraction when subjected to changing pH environments, temperature, or solvent. The actuators employ compliant containers for the gels and their solvents. The gels employed may be cylindrical electromechanical gel fibers such as polyacrylamide fibers or a mixture of poly vinyl alcohol-polyacrylic acid arranged in a parallel aggregate and contained in an electrolytic solvent bath such as salt water. The invention includes smart, electrically activated devices exploiting this phenomenon. These devices are capable of being manipulated via active computer control as large displacement actuators for use in adaptive structure such as robots. 11 figures.

  4. STEO December 2012 - natural gas production

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A big portion of that natural gas is going to the U.S. electric power sector, which is generating more electricity from gas in place of coal. Consumption of natural gas for power ...

  5. Baltimore Gas & Electric Company (Electric) - Commercial Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and up to 75% of the incremental cost of new construction projects. The program is open to all non-residential customers in BGE service territory with rate schedule G, GS,...

  6. Central Hudson Gas & Electric (Electric) - Commercial Lighting...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    project based on the quality assurance plan at completion to verify that the upgrade matches the performance specified in the auditor's proposal. Incentives for this program will...

  7. Economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas-fired fuel cell. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The final report provides a summary of results of the Cost of Ownership Model and the circumstances under which a distributed fuel cell is economically viable. The analysis is based on a series of micro computer models estimate the capital and operations cost of a fuel cell central utility plant configuration. Using a survey of thermal and electrical demand profiles, the study defines a series of energy user classes. The energy user class demand requirements are entered into the central utility plant model to define the required size the fuel cell capacity and all supporting equipment. The central plant model includes provisions that enables the analyst to select optional plant features that are most appropriate to a fuel cell application, and that are cost effective. The model permits the choice of system features that would be suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. Other applications are also practical; however, such applications have a higher relative demand for thermal energy, a characteristic that is well-suited to a fuel cell application with its free source of hot water or steam. The analysis combines the capital and operation from the preceding models into a Cost of Ownership Model to compute the plant capital and operating costs as a function of capacity and principal features and compares these estimates to the estimated operating cost of the same central plant configuration without a fuel cell.

  8. Granger Electric Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Granger Electric Company Jump to: navigation, search Name: Granger Electric Company Place: Lansing, Michigan Zip: 48906-1044 Product: Michigan-based landfill gas-to-energy project...

  9. Randolph Electric Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Randolph Electric Biomass Facility Facility Randolph Electric Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Norfolk County,...

  10. Minnesota Valley Electric Cooperative -Residential Energy Resource...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    installation Heat pump installation Heat pump with high efficient gas furnace Electric heating solutions to supplement propane heat Electric heat product installations (i.e....

  11. MassSAVE (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    include Columbia Gas of Massachusetts, The Berkshire Gas Company, Cape Light Compact, National Grid, New England Gas Company, NSTAR, Unitil, and Western Massachusetts Electric...

  12. MassSAVE (Electric) - Commercial Retrofit Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    include Columbia Gas of Massachusetts, The Berkshire Gas Company, Cape Light Compact, National Grid, New England Gas Company, NSTAR, Unitil, and Western Massachusetts Electric...

  13. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    while the OFO was in effect. Pacific Gas and Electric Company extended a systemwide high-inventory OFO on its California Gas Transmission system through Saturday, July 5. It was...

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    the OFO customers who delivered more than 110 percent of their actual gas usage into the system would be assessed for charges. Pacific Gas and Electric Company issued a...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the technology that drove Enron's North American wholesale electricity and natural gas trading unit. That technology, together with reportedly over 600 former Enron...

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    constraint. Pacific Gas and Electric Company issued a systemwide Stage 2 high-inventory OFO for Saturday, May 5, because of projections that linepack on the California...

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Accounting Standards Board. The changes will allow FERC an understanding of the nature and extent to which hedging activities are used by electric utilities and gas...

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    which summarizes the likely demand, supply, and prices for natural gas, heating oil, propane, and electricity during the upcoming winter (October 2004 - March 2005). According to...

  19. Ohio Electricity Restructuring Active

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Restructuring Ohio Restructuring Active Other Links Ohio Electricity Profile Ohio Energy Profile Ohio Web Sites Acronyms for the State of Ohio AEP-American Electric Power CG&E-Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company CRES-Certified Retail Electric Supplier DP&L-Dayton Power and Light Company FERC-Federal Energy Regulatory Commission ISO-Independent System Operator OCC-Ohio Consumers' Counsel PUCO-Public Utilities Commission of Ohio Last Updated: September 2010 08/09: Dominion Energy offered

  20. Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of...

  1. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    C9. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number of Buildings...

  2. Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures by Census Division, 1999" ,"All Buildings Using Electricity",,,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"Number...

  3. Lincoln Electric System - Renewable Generation Rate (Nebraska...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Applicable Sector Commercial, Industrial Eligible Technologies Solar Thermal Electric, Photovoltaics, Landfill Gas, Wind, Biomass, Hydroelectric, Anaerobic Digestion, Small...

  4. National Electric Transmission Congestion Study

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ...legalmaj-ord- regland-docsorder2003.asp, p. 23) ... requirements, the pace of general economic recovery, relative fuel prices for electricity generation, new natural gas, ...

  5. November 2011 Electrical Safety Occurrences

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    tagout) or disturbance of a previously unknown or mislocated hazardous energy source (e.g., live electrical power circuit, steam line, pressurized gas) resulting in a person...

  6. Preparation of CIGS-based solar cells using a buffered electrodeposition bath

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Raghu Nath

    2007-11-20

    A photovoltaic cell exhibiting an overall conversion efficiency of at least 9.0% is prepared from a copper-indium-gallium-diselenide thin film. The thin film is prepared by simultaneously electroplating copper, indium, gallium, and selenium onto a substrate using a buffered electro-deposition bath. The electrodeposition is followed by adding indium to adjust the final stoichiometry of the thin film.

  7. Electricity Monthly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California (CAISO) due to very low natural gas prices. Hawaii's retail electricity revenue per kilowatthour fell the most of any state for the fifth month in a row, down 24%...

  8. EA-364 Noble Americas Gas & Power Corporation | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Noble Americas Gas & Power Corporation EA-364 Noble Americas Gas & Power Corporation Order authorizong Noble Americas Gas & Power Corporation to export electric energy to Canada ...

  9. EA-363 Noble Americas Gas & Power Corporation | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gas & Power Corporation Order authorizong Noble Americas Gas & Power Corporation to export electric energy to Mexico PDF icon EA-363 Noble Americas Gas & Power Corporation...

  10. Natural Gas Electric Power Price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 5.27 4.89 3.54 4.49 5.19 3.37 1997-2015 Alabama 4.85 W 3.09 4.14 4.74 3.06 1997-2015 Alaska W 5.04 4.32 4.73 5.06 5.40 1997-2015 Arizona 4.84 W 3.51 4.60 5.30 3.43 1997-2015 Arkansas 5.11 W 3.19 4.32 W W 1997-2015 California 4.99 4.71 3.68 4.53 5.23 3.39 1997-2015 Colorado 5.16 4.98 W 4.91

  11. Natural Gas Electric Power Price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3.22 3.19 3.03 2.78 2.71 3.16 2002-2016 Alabama 3.13 3.07 2.78 W W 2.95 2002-2016 Alaska 5.21 5.48 5.45 5.48 5.44 6.47 2002-2016 Arizona 3.47 W W W W W 2002-2016 Arkansas W W W W W ...

  12. Natural Gas Electric Power Price

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5.27 4.89 3.54 4.49 5.19 3.37 1997-2015 Alabama 4.85 W 3.09 4.14 4.74 3.06 1997-2015 Alaska W 5.04 4.32 4.73 5.06 5.40 1997-2015 Arizona 4.84 W 3.51 4.60 5.30 3.43 1997-2015 ...

  13. Electrically conductive diamond electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swain, Greg; Fischer, Anne ,; Bennett, Jason; Lowe, Michael

    2009-05-19

    An electrically conductive diamond electrode and process for preparation thereof is described. The electrode comprises diamond particles coated with electrically conductive doped diamond preferably by chemical vapor deposition which are held together with a binder. The electrodes are useful for oxidation reduction in gas, such as hydrogen generation by electrolysis.

  14. MassSAVE (Gas)- Residential Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    MassSAVE, through Gas Networks, organizes residential conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies and municipal aggregators. These utilities...

  15. Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the ...

  16. Table N8.3. Average Prices of Purchased Electricity, Natural...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity, Natural Gas, and Steam, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Supplier Sources of Purchased Electricity, Natural Gas, ...

  17. Casimir-Polder interaction between an atom and an infinite boundary in a thermal bath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    She Wuying; Yu Hongwei; Zhu Zhiying

    2010-01-15

    We study the energy level shift of a static two-level atom interacting with a massless scalar field in a thermal bath with the presence of a plane boundary, which gives rise to the Casimir-Polder force. We separately calculate contributions of both thermal fluctuations and radiation reaction using the formalism suggested by J. Dalibard, J. Dupont-Roc, and C. Cohen-Tannoudji [J. Phys. (France) 43, 1617 (1982); 45, 673 (1984)] and analyze in detail the behaviors of the total energy level shifts in three distinct distance regimes in both the low- and high-temperature limits. A comparison of our results with those of a uniformly accelerated atom reveals that uniformly accelerated atoms, in general, do not behave the same as static ones in a thermal bath at the Unruh temperature in terms of the atomic energy level shifts.

  18. Method of preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Yu-Min; Wang, Jih-Wen; Liue, Chun-Ying; Yeh, Shinn-Horng

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals includes the steps of washing the silicon carbide particles with an organic solvent; washing the silicon carbide particles with an inorganic acid; grinding the silicon carbide particles; and heating the silicon carbide particles in a nickel-containing solution at a boiling temperature for a predetermined period of time.

  19. Survey and analysis of selected jointly owned large-scale electric utility storage projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine and document the issues surrounding the curtailment in commercialization of large-scale electric storage projects. It was sensed that if these issues could be uncovered, then efforts might be directed toward clearing away these barriers and allowing these technologies to penetrate the market to their maximum potential. Joint-ownership of these projects was seen as a possible solution to overcoming the major barriers, particularly economic barriers, of commercializaton. Therefore, discussions with partners involved in four pumped storage projects took place to identify the difficulties and advantages of joint-ownership agreements. The four plants surveyed included Yards Creek (Public Service Electric and Gas and Jersey Central Power and Light); Seneca (Pennsylvania Electric and Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company); Ludington (Consumers Power and Detroit Edison, and Bath County (Virginia Electric Power Company and Allegheny Power System, Inc.). Also investigated were several pumped storage projects which were never completed. These included Blue Ridge (American Electric Power); Cornwall (Consolidated Edison); Davis (Allegheny Power System, Inc.) and Kttatiny Mountain (General Public Utilities). Institutional, regulatory, technical, environmental, economic, and special issues at each project were investgated, and the conclusions relative to each issue are presented. The major barriers preventing the growth of energy storage are the high cost of these systems in times of extremely high cost of capital, diminishing load growth and regulatory influences which will not allow the building of large-scale storage systems due to environmental objections or other reasons. However, the future for energy storage looks viable despite difficult economic times for the utility industry. Joint-ownership can ease some of the economic hardships for utilites which demonstrate a need for energy storage.

  20. Development of standardized air-blown coal gasifier/gas turbine concepts for future electric power systems. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadowski, R.S.; Brown, M.J.; Hester, J.C.; Harriz, J.T.; Ritz, G.J.

    1991-02-01

    The objective of this study is to develop standardized air blown fixed bed gasification hot gas cleanup integrated gasifier combined cycle (IGCC) systems.

  1. Electric Resistance Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat & Cool » Home Heating Systems » Electric Resistance Heating Electric Resistance Heating Baseboard heaters are one type of electric resistance heaters. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/drewhadley Baseboard heaters are one type of electric resistance heaters. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/drewhadley Electric resistance heating is 100% energy efficient in the sense that all the incoming electric energy is converted to heat. However, most electricity is produced from coal, gas, or

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Rhode Island Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Rhode Island profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,284 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 281 3.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - -

  4. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,389 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10 0.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood

  5. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 18,424 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 230 1.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 4 * Solar 28 0.2 Wind 8 * Wood/Wood

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Rhode Island profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,782 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 28 1.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 0.2 Solar - - Wind 2 0.1

  7. Georgia Green Power Electric Member Cooperative EMC | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Hydro Product: A partnership of Georgian electricity cooperatives, which produces power by low-impact hydro projects and landfill gas-to-electricity projects and sells it...

  8. Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil andor Gas Wells Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil andor Gas ...

  9. ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Othera"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7. Energy Sources, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings Using Any Energy Source","Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Othera" "All Buildings ................",4657,4403,4395,2670,434,117,50,451,153 "Building

  10. ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Othera"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Energy Sources, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Buildings Using Any Energy Source","Energy Sources Used (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Electricity","Natural Gas","Fuel Oil","District Heat","District Chilled Water","Propane","Othera" "All Buildings ................",67338,65753,65716,45525,13285,5891,2750,6290,2322

  11. T-1025 IU SciBath-768 detector tests in MI-12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tayloe, Rex; Cooper, R.; Garrison, L.; Thornton, T.; Rebenitsch, L.; DeJongh, Fritz; Loer, Benjamin; Ramberg, Erik; Yoo, Jonghee; /Fermilab

    2012-02-11

    This is a memorandum of understanding between the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) and the experimenters of Department of Physics and Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Indiana University, who have committed to participate in detector tests to be carried out during the 2012 Fermilab Neutrino program. The memorandum is intended solely for the purpose of recording expectations for budget estimates and work allocations for Fermilab, the funding agencies and the participating institutions. it reflects an arrangement that currently is satisfactory to the parties; however, it is recognized and anticipated that changing circumstances of the evolving research program will necessitate revisions. The parties agree to modify this memorandum to reflect such required adjustments. Actual contractual obligations will be set forth in separate documents. The experimenters propsoe to test their prototype 'SciBat-768' detector in the MI-12 building for 3 months (February-April) in Spring 2012. The major goal of this effort is to measure or limit the flux of beam-induced neutrons in a far-off-axis (> 45{sup o}) location of the Booster Neutrino Beamline (BNB). This flux is of interest for a proposed coherent neutral-current neutrino-argon elastic scattering experiment. A second goal is to collect more test data for the SciBath-768 to enable better understanding and calibration of the device. The SciBath-768 detector successfully ran for 3 months in the MINOS Underground Area in Fall 2011 as testbeam experiment T-1014 and is currently running above ground in the MINOS service building. For the run proposed here, the experiments are requesting: space in MI-12 in which to run the SciBath detector during February-April 2012 while the BNB is operating; technical support to help with moving the equipment on site; access to power, internet, and accelerator signals; and a small office space from which to run and monitor the experiment.

  12. Measurement of Neutron and Muon Fluxes 100~m Underground with the SciBath Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, Lance

    2014-01-01

    The SciBath detector is an 80 liter liquid scintillator detector read out by a three dimensional grid of 768 wavelength-shifting fibers. Initially conceived as a fine-grained charged particle detector for neutrino studies that could image charged particle tracks in all directions, it is also sensitive to fast neutrons (15-200 MeV). In fall of 2011 the apparatus performed a three month run to measure cosmic-induced muons and neutrons 100~meters underground in the FNAL MINOS near-detector area. Data from this run has been analyzed and resulted in measurements of the cosmic muon flux as \

  13. Green Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... including San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E), Pacific Gas & Electric, Southern California Edison, ComEd, and Pepco in the United States, and London Hydro and Hydro One in Canada. ...

  14. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) expanded an existing operational flow order (OFO) into a system-wide stage-3 high-inventory OFO on Thursday, September 28, 2006. The company will...

  15. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    to shippers who deliver more than 110 percent of their actual usage into the pipeline system. Pacific Gas and Electric Company declared a systemwide stage 2 high-inventory...

  16. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Transportation Update: Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) extended a Stage 2 high-inventory operational flow order (OFO) from Friday, June 8, through Wednesday, June 13,...

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    California markets where Pacific Gas & Electric Company issued a two-day operational flow order and prices were between 13 and 22 cents above last Wednesday's prices. The Rocky...

  18. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    part of a 65 billion project to supply the United States with oil, natural gas, and electricity from Siberia. The tunnel, which would be the world's longest, would take 10 to 15...

  19. Tempe Transportation Division: LNG Turbine Hybrid Electric Buses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2002-02-01

    Fact sheet describes the performance of liquefied natural gas (LNG) turbine hybrid electric buses used in Tempe's Transportation Division.

  20. SCE&G (Electric)- Residential EnergyWise Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Carolina Electric and Gas (SCE&G) provides energy efficiency incentives to home owners in its service territory.

  1. Electricity Data Browser

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Browser - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade,

  2. Review of Sector and Regional Trends in U.S. Electricity Markets. Focus on Natural Gas. Natural Gas and the Evolving U.S. Power Sector Monograph Series. Number 1 of 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, Jeffrey; Medlock, III, Kenneth B.; Boyd, William C.

    2015-10-15

    This study explores dynamics related to natural gas use at the national, sectoral, and regional levels, with an emphasis on the power sector. It relies on a data set from SNL Financial to analyze recent trends in the U.S. power sector at the regional level. The research aims to provide decision and policy makers with objective and credible information, data, and analysis that informs their discussions of a rapidly changing energy system landscape. This study also summarizes regional changes in natural gas demand within the power sector. The transition from coal to natural gas is occurring rapidly along the entire eastern portion of the country, but is relatively stagnant in the central and western regions. This uneven shift is occurring due to differences in fuel price costs, renewable energy targets, infrastructure constraints, historical approach to regulation, and other factors across states.

  3. EIS-0105: Conversion to Coal, Baltimore Gas & Electric Company, Brandon Shores Generating Station Units 1 and 2, Anne Arundel County, Maryland

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Economic Regulatory Administration Office of Fuels Program, Coal and Electricity Division prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts associated with prohibiting the use of petroleum products as a primary energy source for Units 1 and 2 of the Brandon Shores Generating Station, located in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

  4. New topics in coherent anti-stokes raman scattering gas-phase diagnostics : femtosecond rotational CARS and electric-field measurements.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lempert, Walter R.; Barnat, Edward V.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Serrano, Justin Raymond

    2010-07-01

    We discuss two recent diagnostic-development efforts in our laboratory: femtosecond pure-rotational Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) for thermometry and species detection in nitrogen and air, and nanosecond vibrational CARS measurements of electric fields in air. Transient pure-rotational fs-CARS data show the evolution of the rotational Raman polarization in nitrogen and air over the first 20 ps after impulsive pump/Stokes excitation. The Raman-resonant signal strength at long time delays is large, and we additionally observe large time separation between the fs-CARS signatures of nitrogen and oxygen, so that the pure-rotational approach to fs-CARS has promise for simultaneous species and temperature measurements with suppressed nonresonant background. Nanosecond vibrational CARS of nitrogen for electric-field measurements is also demonstrated. In the presence of an electric field, a dipole is induced in the otherwise nonpolar nitrogen molecule, which can be probed with the introduction of strong collinear pump and Stokes fields, resulting in CARS signal radiation in the infrared. The electric-field diagnostic is demonstrated in air, where the strength of the coherent infrared emission and sensitivity our field measurements is quantified, and the scaling of the infrared signal with field strength is verified.

  5. Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Electric Power Sector | Department of Energy Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector Report: Natural Gas Infrastructure Implications of Increased Demand from the Electric Power Sector This report examines the potential infrastructure needs of the U.S. interstate natural gas pipeline transmission system across a range of future natural gas demand scenarios that drive increased electric power sector natural gas use. To perform this

  6. (Electric) Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All Connecticut Utilities implement electric and gas efficiency rebate programs funded by Connecticut's public benefits charge through the Energy Efficiency Fund. The Connecticut Light and Power...

  7. Mass Save (Electric)- Large Commercial Retrofit Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mass Save organizes commercial, industrial, and institutional conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies and municipal aggregators. These...

  8. Proposed Changes to Electricity and Renewable (Photovoltaic)...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... U.S. Energy Information Administration | 2017 Proposed Solar & Electricity Survey Form ... Fuel receipts and costs EIA-923: Natural gas receipts would no longer be reported by ...

  9. Mass Save (Electric)- Residential Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mass Save organizes residential energy conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies, and municipal aggregators. Rebates for various energy...

  10. Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations September...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Parks, Senior Technical Advisor, DOE OE Panel - Gas-Electric Issues: Regulatory ... Hoffman and William Parks PDF icon Panel Presentation - Bob Ethier PDF icon Panel ...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    California Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (California) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 74,646 2 Electric utilities 28,201 4 IPP & CHP 46,446 2 Net generation (megawatthours) 198,807,622 5 Electric utilities 71,037,135 14 IPP & CHP 127,770,487 4 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,102 46 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 98,348 5 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,223 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 49

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,086 46 Electric utilities 102 46 IPP & CHP 2,984 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,703,584 47 Electric utilities 49,050 46 IPP & CHP 7,654,534 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 824 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,836 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,276 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 45 Nitrogen oxide

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 9 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 9 51 Net generation (megawatthours) 67,612 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 67,612 51 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 0 51 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 147 51 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 48 50 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 51 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 3

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Florida Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 59,440 3 Electric utilities 51,775 1 IPP & CHP 7,665 15 Net generation (megawatthours) 230,015,937 2 Electric utilities 211,970,587 1 IPP & CHP 18,045,350 15 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 126,600 10 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 91,356 6 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 111,549 2 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 30 Nitrogen

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,657 15 Electric utilities 18,120 16 IPP & CHP 8,537 13 Net generation (megawatthours) 104,229,402 15 Electric utilities 58,518,271 17 IPP & CHP 45,711,131 8 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 96,240 14 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 83,112 8 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,137 15 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 21

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Maine Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,470 43 Electric utilities 10 49 IPP & CHP 4,460 20 Net generation (megawatthours) 13,248,710 44 Electric utilities 523 49 IPP & CHP 13,248,187 27 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,990 38 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,622 46 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,298 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 25 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh)

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,128 32 Electric utilities 971 42 IPP & CHP 12,157 9 Net generation (megawatthours) 31,118,591 40 Electric utilities 679,986 43 IPP & CHP 30,438,606 12 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,748 41 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,831 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,231 39 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 40

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,090 26 Electric utilities 13,494 19 IPP & CHP 2,597 34 Net generation (megawatthours) 55,127,092 29 Electric utilities 47,084,382 21 IPP & CHP 8,042,710 34 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 101,093 13 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,993 32 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,037 33 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 5

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,485 34 Electric utilities 8,480 29 IPP & CHP 2,006 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 36,000,537 37 Electric utilities 27,758,728 33 IPP & CHP 8,241,809 33 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,229 40 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 18,606 39 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 16,222 37 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 38 Nitrogen

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    York Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 40,404 6 Electric utilities 10,989 27 IPP & CHP 29,416 5 Net generation (megawatthours) 137,122,202 7 Electric utilities 34,082 31 IPP & CHP 103,039,347 5 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,878 28 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,971 21 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,240 26 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 39 Nitrogen oxide

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 24,048 17 Electric utilities 17,045 17 IPP & CHP 7,003 16 Net generation (megawatthours) 70,155,504 22 Electric utilities 48,096,026 19 IPP & CHP 22,059,478 14 Emissions Sulfur dioxide 78,556 18 Nitrogen oxide 44,874 23 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 43,994 18 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 17 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,810 49 Electric utilities 8 50 IPP & CHP 1,803 38 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,281,748 49 Electric utilities 10,670 48 IPP & CHP 6,271,078 36 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 100 49 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 1,224 49 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,566 48 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 48 Nitrogen oxide

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 112,914 1 Electric utilities 29,113 2 IPP & CHP 83,800 1 Net generation (megawatthours) 437,629,668 1 Electric utilities 94,974,953 7 IPP & CHP 342,654,715 1 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 349,245 2 Nitrogen Oxide short tons) 229,580 1 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 254,488 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 26 Nitrogen Oxide

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Alaska) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 2,464 48 Electric utilities 2,313 39 IPP & CHP 151 50 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,042,830 50 Electric utilities 5,509,991 40 IPP & CHP 532,839 50 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 4,129 43 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 19,281 38 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,558 44 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.4 28 Nitrogen oxide

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (California) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 74,646 2 Electric utilities 28,201 4 IPP & CHP 46,446 2 Net generation (megawatthours) 198,807,622 5 Electric utilities 71,037,135 14 IPP & CHP 127,770,487 4 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 3,102 46 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 98,348 5 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,223 14 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 49

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 3,086 46 Electric utilities 102 46 IPP & CHP 2,984 31 Net generation (megawatthours) 7,703,584 47 Electric utilities 49,050 46 IPP & CHP 7,654,534 35 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 824 48 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 2,836 48 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 4,276 43 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 45 Nitrogen oxide

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 9 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 9 51 Net generation (megawatthours) 67,612 51 Electric utilities IPP & CHP 67,612 51 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 0 51 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 147 51 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 48 50 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 51 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 3

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Florida) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 59,440 3 Electric utilities 51,775 1 IPP & CHP 7,665 15 Net generation (megawatthours) 230,015,937 2 Electric utilities 211,970,587 1 IPP & CHP 18,045,350 15 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 126,600 10 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 91,356 6 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 111,549 2 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 30 Nitrogen

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Louisiana) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 26,657 15 Electric utilities 18,120 16 IPP & CHP 8,537 13 Net generation (megawatthours) 104,229,402 15 Electric utilities 58,518,271 17 IPP & CHP 45,711,131 8 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 96,240 14 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 83,112 8 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 57,137 15 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 21

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Maine) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 4,470 43 Electric utilities 10 49 IPP & CHP 4,460 20 Net generation (megawatthours) 13,248,710 44 Electric utilities 523 49 IPP & CHP 13,248,187 27 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,990 38 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 8,622 46 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 3,298 46 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 25 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh)

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 13,128 32 Electric utilities 971 42 IPP & CHP 12,157 9 Net generation (megawatthours) 31,118,591 40 Electric utilities 679,986 43 IPP & CHP 30,438,606 12 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 6,748 41 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 13,831 43 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 12,231 39 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 40

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Mississippi) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 16,090 26 Electric utilities 13,494 19 IPP & CHP 2,597 34 Net generation (megawatthours) 55,127,092 29 Electric utilities 47,084,382 21 IPP & CHP 8,042,710 34 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 101,093 13 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 23,993 32 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 24,037 33 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 5

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Nevada) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 10,485 34 Electric utilities 8,480 29 IPP & CHP 2,006 35 Net generation (megawatthours) 36,000,537 37 Electric utilities 27,758,728 33 IPP & CHP 8,241,809 33 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 10,229 40 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 18,606 39 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 16,222 37 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 38 Nitrogen

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (New York) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural Gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 40,404 6 Electric utilities 10,989 27 IPP & CHP 29,416 5 Net generation (megawatthours) 137,122,202 7 Electric utilities 34,082 31 IPP & CHP 103,039,347 5 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 31,878 28 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 46,971 21 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 33,240 26 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 39 Nitrogen oxide

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 24,048 17 Electric utilities 17,045 17 IPP & CHP 7,003 16 Net generation (megawatthours) 70,155,504 22 Electric utilities 48,096,026 19 IPP & CHP 22,059,478 14 Emissions Sulfur dioxide 78,556 18 Nitrogen oxide 44,874 23 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 43,994 18 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 17 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Rhode Island) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 1,810 49 Electric utilities 8 50 IPP & CHP 1,803 38 Net generation (megawatthours) 6,281,748 49 Electric utilities 10,670 48 IPP & CHP 6,271,078 36 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 100 49 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 1,224 49 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 2,566 48 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.0 48 Nitrogen oxide

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Electricity Profile 2014 Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Texas) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 112,914 1 Electric utilities 29,113 2 IPP & CHP 83,800 1 Net generation (megawatthours) 437,629,668 1 Electric utilities 94,974,953 7 IPP & CHP 342,654,715 1 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 349,245 2 Nitrogen Oxide short tons) 229,580 1 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric tons) 254,488 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 26 Nitrogen Oxide

  18. Electric turbocompound control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Algrain, Marcelo C.

    2007-02-13

    Turbocompound systems can be used to affect engine operation using the energy in exhaust gas that is driving the available turbocharger. A first electrical device acts as a generator in response to turbocharger rotation. A second electrical device acts as a motor to put mechanical power into the engine, typically at the crankshaft. Apparatus, systems, steps, and methods are described to control the generator and motor operations to control the amount of power being recovered. This can control engine operation closer to desirable parameters for given engine-related operating conditions compared to actual. The electrical devices can also operate in "reverse," going between motor and generator functions. This permits the electrical device associated with the crankshaft to drive the electrical device associated with the turbocharger as a motor, overcoming deficient engine operating conditions such as associated with turbocharger lag.

  19. NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Comments of Baltimore Gas...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policy PDF icon NBP RFI: Communications Requirements- Comments of Baltimore Gas & Electric Company More Documents & Publications ...

  20. Automotive Fuel Efficiency Improvement via Exhaust Gas Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Electricity Automotive Fuel Efficiency Improvement via Exhaust Gas Waste Heat Conversion to Electricity Working to expand the usage of thermoelectric technology beyond seat ...

  1. Pulse circuit apparatus for gas discharge laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradley, Laird P.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus and method using a unique pulse circuit for a known gas discharge laser apparatus to provide an electric field for preconditioning the gas below gas breakdown and thereafter to place a maximum voltage across the gas which maximum voltage is higher than that previously available before the breakdown voltage of that gas laser medium thereby providing greatly increased pumping of the laser.

  2. Erratum: ''Evaluation of gas permeation barrier properties using...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Erratum: ''Evaluation of gas permeation barrier properties using electrical measurements ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Erratum: ''Evaluation of gas permeation barrier ...

  3. Gas concentration cells for utilizing energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salomon, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    An apparatus and method for utilizing energy, in which the apparatus may be used for generating electricity or as a heat pump. When used as an electrical generator, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first gas concentration cell is heated and generates electricity. The second gas concentration cell repressurizes the gas which travels between the cells. The electrical energy which is generated by the first cell drives the second cell as well as an electrical load. When used as a heat pump, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first cell is supplied with electrical energy from a direct current source and releases heat. The second cell absorbs heat. The apparatus has no moving parts and thus approximates a heat engine.

  4. Gas concentration cells for utilizing energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salomon, R.E.

    1987-06-30

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for utilizing energy, in which the apparatus may be used for generating electricity or as a heat pump. When used as an electrical generator, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first gas concentration cell is heated and generates electricity. The second gas concentration cell repressurizes the gas which travels between the cells. The electrical energy which is generated by the first cell drives the second cell as well as an electrical load. When used as a heat pump, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first cell is supplied with electrical energy from a direct current source and releases heat. The second cell absorbs heat. The apparatus has no moving parts and thus approximates a heat engine. 4 figs.

  5. Chemical bath deposition of cadmium sulfide on graphene-coated flexible glass substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seo, Won-Oh; Jung, Younghun; Kim, Jihyun, E-mail: hyunhyun7@korea.ac.kr [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Korea University, Anam-dong, Sungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-713 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jiwan [Flexible Display Research Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Yatap-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 463-816 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Donghwan [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-31

    We demonstrate a flexible structure of cadmium sulfide (CdS) on graphene-coated glass substrate, where CdS was deposited by the chemical bath deposition method on defective tri-layer graphene. The defects in graphene, confirmed by micro-Raman spectroscopy, were created by a ultra-violet treatment with varying exposure time from 10 to 60?min. The number of defect sites in the graphene as a seed layer was related to the quality of the CdS thin films determined from the results from X-ray diffraction, optical transmittance, scanning electron microscopy, and room temperature micro-photoluminescence. Our film-on-substrate structure of CdS-graphene-on-glass was maintained up to a tensile strain of 0.3%, where graphene with a high failure strain was employed as a transparent conductive layer.

  6. Verification of electrical spin injection into InGaAs two-dimensional electron gas from CoFe electrode by four-terminal non-local geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hidaka, S.; Kondo, T.; Akabori, M.; Yamada, S.

    2013-12-04

    We performed electrical spin injection into In{sub 0.75}Ga{sub 0.25}As two-dimensional electron gases from Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2} electrodes by four-terminal non-local spin-valve (NLSV) measurement. We observed clear SV signals in NL resistance at 1.5 K. From the electrode spacing dependence of the signals, we estimated spin diffusion length and spin polarization to be ?5.1 ?m and ?5.7 %, respectively. These are larger than those reported in similar systems.

  7. Variable gas leak rate valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eernisse, Errol P.; Peterson, Gary D.

    1976-01-01

    A variable gas leak rate valve which utilizes a poled piezoelectric element to control opening and closing of the valve. The gas flow may be around a cylindrical rod with a tubular piezoelectric member encircling the rod for seating thereagainst to block passage of gas and for reopening thereof upon application of suitable electrical fields.

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Vermont Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,128 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 408 36.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 324 28.7 Solar - - Wind 5 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 76 6.7 MSW/Landfill Gas 3

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Wyoming Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,986 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,722 21.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 307 3.8 Solar - - Wind 1,415 17.7 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,067 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 422 20.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 414 20.1 Solar - - Wind 7 0.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source - Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source - Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 790 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity - - Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Georgia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 36,636 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,689 7.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 2,052 5.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 617 1.7 MSW/Landfill Gas

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,543 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,082 8.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 3 * Solar - - Wind 1,072 8.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 7 0.1 Other Biomass - -

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 26,744 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 517 1.9 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 192 0.7 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 311 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 12,516 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 799 6.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 590 4.7 Solar 1 * Wind 70 0.6 Wood/Wood Waste 3 * MSW/Landfill Gas

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,697 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 566 4.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 262 1.9 Solar 4 * Wind 10 0.1 Wood/Wood

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wood/Wood Waste Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 15,691 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 235 1.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 235 1.5 MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,739 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,030 4.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 564 2.6 Solar - - Wind 459 2.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,857 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 443 5.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 278 3.5 Solar - - Wind 154 2.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 6

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 1,128 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 408 36.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 324 28.7 Solar - - Wind 5 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 76 6.7 MSW/Landfill Gas 3

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 24,109 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,487 6.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 866 3.6 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 331 1.4 MSW/Landfill Gas

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 16,495 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 715 4.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 285 1.7 Solar - - Wind 431 2.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - -

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,986 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,722 21.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 307 3.8 Solar - - Wind 1,415 17.7 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass - -

  4. Connecticut Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,284 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 281 3.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 122 1.5 Solar - - Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 159 1.9 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net

  5. Delaware Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 3,389 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10 0.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional - - Solar - - Wind 2 0.1 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 8 0.2 Other Biomass - - Generation (thousand megawatthours) Total Electricity Net Generation 5,628

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alabama Table 1. 2014 Summary statistics (Alabama) Item Value Rank Primary energy source Natural gas Net summer capacity (megawatts) 31,953 8 Electric utilities 23,050 8 IPP & CHP 8,903 11 Net generation (megawatthours) 149,340,447 6 Electric utilities 112,340,555 3 IPP & CHP 36,999,892 10 Emissions Sulfur dioxide (short tons) 152,225 8 Nitrogen oxide (short tons) 61,909 13 Carbon dioxide (thousand metric tons) 67,635 10 Sulfur dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 19 Nitrogen oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 38

  7. Natural gas beats coal in power generation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural gas beats coal in power generation The amount of U.S. electricity generated by natural gas is expected to exceed the output from coal-fired power plants this year and in ...

  8. Wakefield Municipal Gas & Light Department - Residential Conservation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Programmable Thermostats: 25 Water Heater: 100 Summary The Wakefield Municipal Gas & Light Department (WMGLD), in cooperation with the Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric...

  9. Nonthermal plasma processor utilizing additive-gas injection and/or gas extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosocha, Louis A.

    2006-06-20

    A device for processing gases includes a cylindrical housing in which an electrically grounded, metal injection/extraction gas supply tube is disposed. A dielectric tube surrounds the injection/extraction gas supply tube to establish a gas modification passage therearound. Additionally, a metal high voltage electrode circumscribes the dielectric tube. The high voltage electrode is energizable to create nonthermal electrical microdischarges between the high voltage electrode and the injection/extraction gas supply tube across the dielectric tube within the gas modification passage. An injection/extraction gas and a process gas flow through the nonthermal electrical microdischarges within the gas modification passage and a modified process gas results. Using the device contaminants that are entrained in the process gas can be destroyed to yield a cleaner, modified process gas.

  10. SCE&G (Gas)- Residential EnergyWise Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    South Carolina Electric and Gas (SCE&G) provides energy efficiency incentives to home owners in its service territory. Natural gas customers are eligible for rebates on water heaters, gas logs...

  11. PG&E (Gas)- Non-Residential Energy Efficiency Rebates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) offers rebates and other incentives to non-residential natural gas customers to increase energy efficiency. Natural gas equipment eligible for...

  12. Electrically insulating and sealing frame

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guthrie, Robin J. (East Hartford, CT)

    1983-11-08

    A combination gas seal and electrical insulator having a closed frame shape interconnects a fuel cell stack and a reactant gas plenum of a fuel cell generator. The frame can be of rectangular shape including at least one slidable spline connection in each side to permit expansion or contraction consistent with that of the walls of the gas plenum and fuel cell stack. The slidable spline connections in the frame sides minimizes lateral movement between the frame side members and sealing material interposed between the frame and the fuel cell stack or between the frame and the reactant gas plenum.

  13. Natural Gas Citygate Price

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From

  14. Structure and proteinprotein interactions of methanol dehydrogenase from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culpepper, Megen A.; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2014-10-07

    In the initial steps of their metabolic pathway, methanotrophic bacteria oxidize methane to methanol with methane monooxygenases (MMOs) and methanol to formaldehyde with methanol dehydrogenases (MDHs). Several lines of evidence suggest that the membrane-bound or particulate MMO (pMMO) and MDH interact to form a metabolic supercomplex. To further investigate the possible existence of such a supercomplex, native MDH from Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) has been purified and characterized by size exclusion chromatography with multi-angle light scattering and X-ray crystallography. M. capsulatus (Bath) MDH is primarily a dimer in solution, although an oligomeric species with a molecular mass of ~450560 kDa forms at higher protein concentrations. The 2.57 resolution crystal structure reveals an overall fold and ???? dimeric architecture similar to those of other MDH structures. In addition, biolayer interferometry studies demonstrate specific proteinprotein interactions between MDH and M. capsulatus (Bath) pMMO as well as between MDH and the truncated recombinant periplasmic domains of M. capsulatus (Bath) pMMO (spmoB). These interactions exhibit KD values of 833 409 nM and 9.0 7.7 ?M, respectively. The biochemical data combined with analysis of the crystal lattice interactions observed in the MDH structure suggest a model in which MDH and pMMO associate not as a discrete, stoichiometric complex but as a larger assembly scaffolded by the intracytoplasmic membranes.

  15. Solar Electric Propulsion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Propulsion - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  16. California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and ... Number of Producing Gas Wells Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary) California Natural ...

  17. Overview of SoCalGas/SDG&E System Design & Operations

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Design & Operations SoCalGasSDG&E Gas Transmission System with Electric Generation Plants 2 SoCalGasSDG&E Gas Transmission System 24,100 square mile service territory ...

  18. Electrical properties of commercial sheet insulation materials for cryogenic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R; Pace, Marshall O

    2008-01-01

    Dielectric properties of electrical insulation materials are needed for low-temperature power applications. Performance of materials and their compatibility determine the size of the electrical insulation in power equipment. In this work we report the dielectric properties of some commercially available materials in sheet form. The selected materials are polypropylene laminated paper from Sumitomo Electric U.S.A., Inc., porous polyethylene (Tyvek\\texttrademark) from Dupont, and polyamide paper (Nomex\\texttrademark) from Dupont. The dielectric properties are characterized with an electrical impedance analyzer in the frequency domain. The impedances are recorded in a cryocooler in the temperature range from 50 to 300 K. The dielectric breakdown characteristics of the materials are measured in a liquid nitrogen bath at atmospheric pressure.

  19. Electrical Safety

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Electrical Design Criteria ... of High-Voltage and Low-Current ... as a higher level of authority. Per the Integrated Safety Management model, ...

  20. Electric Vehicles

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-07-23

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  1. Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozpineci, Burak

    2014-05-02

    Burak Ozpineci sees a future where electric vehicles charge while we drive them down the road, thanks in part to research under way at ORNL.

  2. Optical Properties of Zn(O,S) Thin Films Deposited by RF Sputtering, Atomic Layer Deposition, and Chemical Bath Deposition: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, J.; Glynn, S.; Christensen, S.; Mann, J.; To, B.; Ramanathan, K.; Noufi, R.; Furtak, T. E.; Levi, D.

    2012-06-01

    Zn(O,S) thin films 27 - 100 nm thick were deposited on glass or Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2/Molybdenum/glass with RF sputtering, atomic layer deposition, and chemical bath deposition.

  3. DOE Technical Assistance on Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies in the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Power Sector | Department of Energy DOE Technical Assistance on Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies in the Electric Power Sector DOE Technical Assistance on Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies in the Electric Power Sector The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will continue to offer analysis and technical support for state, local, tribal and regional planning efforts related to reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the electric power sector. DOE is ready to support state, local, and

  4. Roles of electricity: Electric steelmaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burwell, C.C.

    1986-07-01

    Electric steel production from scrap metal continues to grow both in total quantity and in market share. The economics of electric-steel production in general, and of electric minimills in particular, seem clearly established. The trend towards electric steelmaking provides significant economic and competitive advantages for producers and important overall economic, environmental, and energy advantages for the United States at large. Conversion to electric steelmaking offers up to a 4-to-1 advantage in terms of the overall energy used to produce a ton of steel, and s similar savings in energy cost for the producer. The amount of old scrap used to produce a ton of steel has doubled since 1967 because of the use of electric furnaces.

  5. Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions | Department of Energy Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Volume 1: Nationwide Greenhouse Gas Emissions In the most comprehensive environmental assessment of electric transportation to date, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) are examining the greenhouse gas emissions

  6. Thermoacoustic natural gas liquefier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.; Gardner, D.; Hayden, M.; Radebaugh, R.; Wollan, J.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project sought to develop a natural-gas-powered natural-gas liquefier that has absolutely no moving parts and requires no electrical power. It should have high efficiency, remarkable reliability, and low cost. The thermoacoustic natural-gas liquefier (TANGL) is based on our recent invention of the first no-moving-parts cryogenic refrigerator. In short, our invention uses acoustic phenomena to produce refrigeration from heat, with no moving parts. The required apparatus comprises nothing more than heat exchangers and pipes, made of common materials, without exacting tolerances. Its initial experimental success in a small size lead us to propose a more ambitious application: large-energy liquefaction of natural gas, using combustion of natural gas as the energy source. TANGL was designed to be maintenance-free, inexpensive, portable, and environmentally benign.

  7. Natural Gas Fuel Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Only about one-tenth of 1% of all the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation fuel. About one-third goes to residential and commercial uses, one-third to industrial uses, and one-third to electric power production.

  8. Electric machine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    El-Refaie, Ayman Mohamed Fawzi; Reddy, Patel Bhageerath

    2012-07-17

    An interior permanent magnet electric machine is disclosed. The interior permanent magnet electric machine comprises a rotor comprising a plurality of radially placed magnets each having a proximal end and a distal end, wherein each magnet comprises a plurality of magnetic segments and at least one magnetic segment towards the distal end comprises a high resistivity magnetic material.

  9. Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States (September 2015) | Department of Energy Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States (September 2015) Conceptual Framework for Developing Resilience Metrics for the Electricity, Oil, and Gas Sectors in the United States (September 2015) This report has been written for the Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability to support the Office of

  10. Less electricity use this summer slightly offset by higher power...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8% in their summer electricity bills. EIA forecasts that more electricity will be generated this year by natural gas, solar energy, and wind and less from coal-fired power plants.

  11. Environmental Assessment of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Vehicles Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles An Energy Evolution:Alternative Fueled Vehicle Comparisons

  12. " Electricity Sales/Transfers Out",96,4

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "RSE Column Factor:",1 "Coal ",2105,4 "Natural Gas",6835,3 "Net Electricity",2656,2 " Purchased Electricity",2689,1 " Transfers In",53,4 " Generation from Noncombustible",," " ...

  13. Green Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers Green Button Initiative Makes Headway with Electric Industry and Consumers July 22, 2015 - 3:01pm Addthis Photo courtesy of San Diego Gas & Electric Photo courtesy of San Diego Gas & Electric Kristen Honey Science and Technology Policy Fellow, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy David Wollman Deputy Director of the Smart Grid and Cyber-Physical Systems Program at the National

  14. Large Power Transformers and the U.S. Electric Grid

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... gas, and electric power, except for hydroelectric and commercial nuclear power facilities. ... being Japan, Germany, United States, France, Korea, and China (see Figure 5). 50 ...

  15. Distributed Solar PV for Electricity System Resiliency: Policy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    other technologies, such as energy storage and auxiliary generation. Strengthening policy and regulatory support ... of Energy, San Diego Gas and Electric, the California ...

  16. Chapter 4: Advancing Clean Electric Power Technologies | Wind...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... 35% of U.S. power requirements with high grid ... responsible deployment. 8 Market Application Land-based. ... Annual Energy Outlook natural gas-fueled electricity ...

  17. Mass Save (Electric)- Small Business Direct Install Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Mass Save organizes commercial, industrial, and institutional conservation services for programs administered by Massachusetts electric companies, gas companies and municipal aggregators. These...

  18. Hawaii Electric Co. Inc. Smart Grid Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reliability and Power Quality Reduced Operating and Maintenance Costs Reduced Electricity Costs for Customers Reduced Truck Fleet Fuel Usage Reduced Greenhouse Gas and...

  19. Texas - PUC Substantive Rule 25.174 - Electric Service Providers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    74 - Electric Service Providers-Renewable Energy Resources and Use of Natural Gas Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  20. List of Geothermal Electric Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coal with CCS Concentrating Solar Power Energy Storage Fuel Cells Geothermal Electric Natural Gas Nuclear Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy BiomassBiogas Hydroelectric...

  1. DTE Energy (Electric)- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energy Efficiency Program for Business offers prescriptive incentives for both electric and natural gas energy efficient improvements in areas of lighting, HVAC, processes, compressed air,...

  2. Secretary Bodman Hosts Iraqi Ministers of Oil and Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to talk to professionals in electricity generation, transmission and distribution, and oil sector ... will allow much needed foreign investment in the oil and natural gas sector ...

  3. Electric Power Generation Systems | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electric Power Generation Systems Coal gasification-based power plants Coal combustion-based power plants Natural gas-fueled power plants Turbines Fuel cells Existing power plants...

  4. Substrate Studies of an Electrically-Assisted Diesel Particulate Filter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transient distributed DPF wall and gas temperature were simultaneously measured using the optical and thermocouple systems, on both electrically assisted and conventional fuel-only DPF regeneration cycles

  5. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  6. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Ohio Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 33,071 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 231 0.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 101 0.3 Solar 13 * Wind 7 * Wood/Wood Waste 60 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 48 0.1

  7. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Oklahoma Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,022 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,412 11.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 858 4.1 Solar - - Wind 1,480 7.0 Wood/Wood Waste 58 0.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 16 0.1 Other Biomass

  8. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 108,258 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,985 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 689 0.6 Solar 14 * Wind 9,952 9.2 Wood/Wood Waste 215 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 88 0.1 Other Biomass 28

  9. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 13,777 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,010 14.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 662 4.8 Solar 41 0.3 Wind 1,294 9.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 3 * Other Biomass 10

  10. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Municipal Solid Waste/Landfill Gas Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 59,222 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,182 2.0 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 55 0.1 Solar 123 0.2 Wind - - Wood/Wood Waste 344 0.6

  11. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Other Biomass Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 2,536 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 340 13.4 Geothermal 31 1.2 Hydro Conventional 24 0.9 Solar 2 0.1 Wind 62 2.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 60 2.4 Other Biomass

  12. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 44,127 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,112 4.8 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 34 0.1 Solar 9 * Wind 1,946 4.4 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 123 0.3 Other Biomass - -

  13. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 27,638 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,452 5.3 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 60 0.2 Solar - - Wind 1,340 4.8 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 53 0.2 Other Biomass s *

  14. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,592 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 3,728 25.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 144 1.0 Solar - - Wind 3,569 24.5 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 11 0.1 Other Biomass 3 *

  15. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 4,430 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,692 38.2 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 738 16.6 Solar - - Wind 263 5.9 Wood/Wood Waste 600 13.6 MSW/Landfill Gas

  16. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wood/Wood Waste Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 29,831 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 807 2.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 237 0.8 Solar - - Wind 163 0.5 Wood/Wood Waste 232 0.8 MSW/Landfill Gas

  17. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 14,715 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,588 17.6 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 193 1.3 Solar - - Wind 2,009 13.7 Wood/Wood Waste 177 1.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 134 0.9 Other

  18. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 8,130 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 818 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 82 1.0 Solar 30 0.4 Wind 700 8.6 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 6 0.1

  19. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 6,188 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 1,941 31.4 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 508 8.2 Solar - - Wind 1,423 23.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas - - Other Biomass 10

  20. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 33,071 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 231 0.7 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 101 0.3 Solar 13 * Wind 7 * Wood/Wood Waste 60 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 48 0.1

  1. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 21,022 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 2,412 11.5 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 858 4.1 Solar - - Wind 1,480 7.0 Wood/Wood Waste 58 0.3 MSW/Landfill Gas 16 0.1 Other Biomass

  2. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Wind Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Wind Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 108,258 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 10,985 10.1 Geothermal - - Hydro Conventional 689 0.6 Solar 14 * Wind 9,952 9.2 Wood/Wood Waste 215 0.2 MSW/Landfill Gas 88 0.1 Other Biomass 28

  3. EIA - Renewable Electricity State Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah Renewable Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. Summary Renewable Electric Power Industry Statistics (2010) Primary Renewable Energy Capacity Source Hydro Conventional Primary Renewable Energy Generation Source Hydro Conventional Capacity (megawatts) Value Percent of State Total Total Net Summer Electricity Capacity 7,497 100.0 Total Net Summer Renewable Capacity 528 7.0 Geothermal 42 0.6 Hydro Conventional 255 3.4 Solar - - Wind 222 3.0 Wood/Wood Waste - - MSW/Landfill Gas 9 0.1

  4. Electrical connector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dilliner, Jennifer L.; Baker, Thomas M.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Hoff, Brian D.

    2006-11-21

    An electrical connector includes a female component having one or more receptacles, a first test receptacle, and a second test receptacle. The electrical connector also includes a male component having one or more terminals configured to engage the one or more receptacles, a first test pin configured to engage the first test receptacle, and a second test pin configured to engage the second test receptacle. The first test receptacle is electrically connected to the second test receptacle, and at least one of the first test pin and the second test pin is shorter in length than the one or more terminals.

  5. Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-04-25

    The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GENSIM) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration ofmore » a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emission trade-offs. The base case results using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8 cents/kwhr.« less

  6. Kansas Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SPP NERC ERCOT Yes NERC MRO Yes NERC RFC Yes NERC SERC Yes NERC SPP Yes ISO Ercot Yes RTO PJM Yes RTO SPP Yes ISO MISO Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes...

  7. NIPSCO (Gas & Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Air Sealing: 40% of total cost up to 450 Lighting: Varies Summary Northern Indiana Public Service Corporation (NIPSCO) offers rebates to residential customers that install...

  8. Louisville Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes Activity Bundled Services Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes...

  9. Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7,387,184 7,573,863 9,110,793 8,190,756 8,149,111 9,671,095 1997-2015 Alabama 281,722 342,841 401,306 333,897 345,102 397,961 1997-2015 Alaska 39,732 41,738 39,758 33,944 30,444 27,722 1997-2015 Arizona 224,430 180,966 228,818 222,985 207,085 249,477 1997-2015 Arkansas 96,553 107,014 129,059 93,552 71,921 108,755 1997-2015 California 736,092 616,564 855,342 825,713 824,868 816,787 1997-2015 Colorado 92,657 85,015 86,309 89,508 98,269 92,757 1997-2015 Connecticut 85,144 107,897 114,054 106,863

  10. Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7,573,863 9,110,793 8,190,756 8,149,111 9,671,095 1997-2015 Alabama 281,722 342,841 401,306 333,897 345,102 397,961 1997-2015 Alaska 39,732 41,738 39,758 33,944 30,444 27,722 ...

  11. Electric Power Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    901,839 797,631 737,310 771,355 776,525 692,006 2001-2016 Alabama 33,356 31,534 31,034 33,249 34,029 29,307 2001-2016 Alaska 1,863 2,096 2,164 2,336 2,283 1,992 2001-2016 Arizona 31,091 24,561 17,672 17,515 15,294 12,584 2001-2016 Arkansas 8,552 4,130 5,434 6,754 8,589 5,839 2001-2016 California 89,295 84,917 59,484 63,111 60,889 47,924 2001-2016 Colorado 9,582 8,172 9,658 8,346 7,962 6,288 2001-2016 Connecticut 10,504 10,291 9,814 11,119 10,473 9,671 2001-2016 Delaware 4,903 3,068 2,330 2,190

  12. Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    901,839 797,631 737,310 771,355 776,525 692,006 2001-2016 Alabama 33,356 31,534 31,034 33,249 34,029 29,307 2001-2016 Alaska 1,863 2,096 2,164 2,336 2,283 1,992 2001-2016 Arizona 31,091 24,561 17,672 17,515 15,294 12,584 2001-2016 Arkansas 8,552 4,130 5,434 6,754 8,589 5,839 2001-2016 California 89,295 84,917 59,484 63,111 60,889 47,924 2001-2016 Colorado 9,582 8,172 9,658 8,346 7,962 6,288 2001-2016 Connecticut 10,504 10,291 9,814 11,119 10,473 9,671 2001-2016 Delaware 4,903 3,068 2,330 2,190

  13. Rochester Gas and Electric | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Avenue Place: Rochester, New York Zip: 14649 Region: Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Sector: Services Product: Green Power Marketer Website: www.rge.com Coordinates: 43.156495,...

  14. Pacific Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page: www.pge.commyhomemyacco Green Button Reference Page: www.pge.commyhomemyacco References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  15. Madison Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    18,117 1,301 18,937 49 26,140 248,863 132,520 2009-01 11,321 81,826 129,293 17,586 184,607 20,538 1,337 19,279 53 30,244 285,712 149,884 2008-12 11,241 80,619 125,322 17,075...

  16. Natural Gas Delivered to Electric Power Consumers

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    901,839 797,631 737,310 771,355 776,525 692,006 2001-2016 Alabama 33,356 31,534 31,034 33,249 34,029 29,307 2001-2016 Alaska 1,863 2,096 2,164 2,336 2,283 1,992 2001-2016 Arizona ...

  17. Pacific Gas & Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4,981,622 366,194.909 3,088,208.885 696,433 96,159.604 1,119,573.177 1,209 911,568 7,132,365 5,679,264 2008-11 288,416.805 1,938,382.637 3,974,401 371,831.382 2,503,391.419...

  18. (Electric and Gas) Residential New Construction Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Energize CT offers a program designed to encourage the construction of energy efficient homes. The Residential New Construction Program offers incentives targeted at increasing energy...

  19. Electricity Capacity Expansion Modeling, Analysis, and Visualization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and includes more sectors than ReEDS. For example, it includes modeling of the natural gas and coal supply markets, and a model of electricity load. The ReEDS model...

  20. " Electricity Generation by Census Region, Industry...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...,"Distillate","Natural Gas(d)"," ","Coal","and Breeze"," ","RSE" "SIC"," ","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","(billion","LPG","(1000","(1000","Other(e)","Row" ...