Sample records for basis 1980-1994 ndp-081

  1. Livestock Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mintert, James R.; Davis, Ernest E.; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.; Bevers, Stan

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    the cash price. Conversely, a positive basis indicates the futures price is less than the cash price. Basis is usually computed using the nearby (closest to expiration) futures con- tract. For example, in October the nearby corn futures contract... for market in September. The October Live Cattle contract is currently trading at $71 per cwt. But what does that mean to you when feeding and selling fin- ished steers in Hereford, Texas? To more accu- rately estimate what your actual selling price might be...

  2. Distributed Basis Pursuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Index Terms—Basis pursuit, distributed optimization, sensor networks, augmented ... and image denoising and restoration [1], [2], compression, fitting and ...

  3. Basi di dati: Funzionalit,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghelli, Giorgio

    Basi di dati: Funzionalità, Progettazione, Interrogazione Giorgio Ghelli DBMS's 2 Temi · Funzionalità ed uso dei DBMS · Progettazione di una Base di Dati · Interrogazione di una Base di Dati Funzionalità dei DBMS DBMS's 4 Riferimenti · A. Albano, G. Ghelli, R. Orsini, Basi di Dati Relazionali e

  4. Patterns and trends New York State energy profiles: 1980-1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority`s Energy Analysis Program provides public and private sector stakeholders with useful independent and objective energy information. This report provides an overview of one-year and 10-year, energy use trends in New York State. The information presented reflects energy consumption, supply, prices, and expenditures. Section 1 is a 1994 overview of the United States and New York State energy profiles. The national energy consumption data used for comparison are compatible with New York State`s data. Section 2 provides current and historic data for primary and net consumption of energy by fuel type and sector. {open_quotes}Primary{close_quotes} represents total consumption of fuels by the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors including fuels used for generating electricity. {open_quotes}Net{close_quotes} is the end-use consumption by the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors, including electricity sales to each of these sectors but excluding energy losses incurred during electricity generation and distribution. Section 3 presents energy price data at the retail level from 1980 to 1994. Retail energy prices are provided by fuel type for the residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation sectors in nominal dollars cost per physical unit and per million Btu. Section 4 presents the estimated cost of net energy consumption by sector and fuel type in nominal dollars and in 1994 constant dollars. Estimated costs were derived by multiplying quantities of consumption by their respective prices. Section 5 details sources of New York State energy supplies.

  5. Safety Basis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.J. Garrett

    2002-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the internal Integrated Safety Management Assessment verification process, it was determined that there was a lack of documentation that summarizes the safety basis of the current Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site characterization activities. It was noted that a safety basis would make it possible to establish a technically justifiable graded approach to the implementation of the requirements identified in the Standards/Requirements Identification Document. The Standards/Requirements Identification Documents commit a facility to compliance with specific requirements and, together with the hazard baseline documentation, provide a technical basis for ensuring that the public and workers are protected. This Safety Basis Report has been developed to establish and document the safety basis of the current site characterization activities, establish and document the hazard baseline, and provide the technical basis for identifying structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that perform functions necessary to protect the public, the worker, and the environment from hazards unique to the YMP site characterization activities. This technical basis for identifying SSCs serves as a grading process for the implementation of programs such as Conduct of Operations (DOE Order 5480.19) and the Suspect/Counterfeit Items Program. In addition, this report provides a consolidated summary of the hazards analyses processes developed to support the design, construction, and operation of the YMP site characterization facilities and, therefore, provides a tool for evaluating the safety impacts of changes to the design and operation of the YMP site characterization activities.

  6. Technical Planning Basis

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Guide assists DOE/NNSA field elements and operating contractors in identifying and analyzing hazards at facilities and sites to provide the technical planning basis for emergency management programs. Cancels DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 2.

  7. The Brain Basis of Emotions 1 BRAIN BASIS OF EMOTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    The Brain Basis of Emotions 1 BRAIN BASIS OF EMOTION The brain basis of emotion: A meta, Building 149 Charlestown, MA 02129 lindqukr@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu #12;The Brain Basis of Emotions 2 Abstract Researchers have wondered how the brain creates emotions since the early days of psychological science

  8. Radioactive Waste Management Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkins, B K

    2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Radioactive Waste Management Basis is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE Manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  9. Milk Futures, Options and Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haigh, Michael; Stockton, Matthew; Anderson, David P.; Schwart Jr., Robert B.

    2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The milk futures and options market enables producers and processors to manage price risk. This publication explains hedging, margin accounts, basis and how to track it, and other fundamentals of the futures and options market....

  10. Facility worker technical basis document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farm Documented Safety Analysis (DSA). It describes the criteria and methodology for allocating controls to hazardous conditions with significant facility work consequence and presents the results of the allocation.

  11. Basis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade5-F,INITIAL

  12. Basis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade5-F,INITIALoperator bispectral analysis

  13. Facility worker technical basis document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EVANS, C.B.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the technical basis for facility worker safety to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis and described the criteria and methodology for allocating controls to hazardous conditions with significant facility worker consequences and presents the results of the allocation.

  14. INL FCF Basis Review Follow-up

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Basis. The four Significant Issues addressed the: 1) analysis of cadmium releases in seismic events, 2) analysis of radiological releases following an evaluation basis earthquake...

  15. Organic solvent technical basis document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SANDGREN, K.R.

    2003-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the organic solvent fire representative and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described in this report.

  16. Knowing and Managing Grain Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amosson, Stephen H.; Mintert, James R.; Tierney Jr., William I.; Waller, Mark L.

    1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowing and Managing Grain Basis Stephen Amosson, Jim Mintert, William Tierney and Mark Waller* Differences in grain prices throughout the world are the result of surplus or deficit production in various regions. In general, grain prices are lower... in the inland producing regions and higher in grain-deficit, densely populated and port regions. Distances between producing and consuming regions explain the price differential. Transfer costs, which include loading or handling and transportation charges...

  17. TCAP Aluminium Dissolution Flowsheet Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PIERCE, ROBERTA.

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Actinide Technology Section has proposed the use of an nitric acid HNO3 and potassium fluoride KF flowsheet for stripping palladium Pd from palladium-coated kieselguhr Pd/K and removing aluminum (Al) metal foam from the TCAP coils. The basis for the HNO3-KF flowsheet is drawn from many sources. A brief review of the sources will be presented. The basic flowsheet involves three process steps, each with its own chemistry.

  18. Hanford Generic Interim Safety Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lavender, J.C.

    1994-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to identify WHC programs and requirements that are an integral part of the authorization basis for nuclear facilities that are generic to all WHC-managed facilities. The purpose of these programs is to implement the DOE Orders, as WHC becomes contractually obligated to implement them. The Hanford Generic ISB focuses on the institutional controls and safety requirements identified in DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports.

  19. FACILITY WORKER TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHULTZ, M.V.

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-13033, ''Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA). It describes the criteria and methodology for allocating controls to hazardous conditions with significant facility worker (FW) consequence and presents the results of the allocation. The criteria and methodology for identifying controls that address FW safety are in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses''.

  20. FLAMMABLE GAS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support of the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process for the flammable gas representative accidents and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the event frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSC and/or TSR-level controls.

  1. BASIS Set Exchange (BSE): Chemistry Basis Sets from the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Basis Set Library

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Feller, D; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Didier, Brett T.; Elsethagen, Todd; Sun, Lisong; Gurumoorthi, Vidhya; Chase, Jared; Li, Jun

    The Basis Set Exchange (BSE) provides a web-based user interface for downloading and uploading Gaussian-type (GTO) basis sets, including effective core potentials (ECPs), from the EMSL Basis Set Library. It provides an improved user interface and capabilities over its predecessor, the EMSL Basis Set Order Form, for exploring the contents of the EMSL Basis Set Library. The popular Basis Set Order Form and underlying Basis Set Library were originally developed by Dr. David Feller and have been available from the EMSL webpages since 1994. BSE not only allows downloading of the more than 200 Basis sets in various formats; it allows users to annotate existing sets and to upload new sets. (Specialized Interface)

  2. FLAMMABLE GAS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the qualitative evaluation of frequency and consequences for DST and SST representative flammable gas accidents and associated hazardous conditions without controls. The evaluation indicated that safety-significant structures, systems and components (SSCs) and/or technical safety requirements (TSRs) were required to prevent or mitigate flammable gas accidents. Discussion on the resulting control decisions is included. This technical basis document was developed to support WP-13033, Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process for the flammable gas representative accidents and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the event frequency and consequence.

  3. FLAMMABLE GAS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the qualitative evaluation of frequency and consequences for double shell tank (DST) and single shell tank (SST) representative flammable gas accidents and associated hazardous conditions without controls. The evaluation indicated that safety-significant SSCs and/or TSRS were required to prevent or mitigate flammable gas accidents. Discussion on the resulting control decisions is included. This technical basis document was developed to support of the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process for the flammable gas representative accidents and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the event frequency and consequence.

  4. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

  5. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert; E. Schneider

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 25 cost modules—23 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, transuranic, and high-level waste.

  6. Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Shropshire; K. A. Williams; W. B. Boore; J. D. Smith; B. W. Dixon; M. Dunzik-Gougar; R. D. Adams; D. Gombert

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), provides a comprehensive set of cost data supporting a cost analysis for the relative economic comparison of options for use in the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Program. The report describes the AFCI cost basis development process, reference information on AFCI cost modules, a procedure for estimating fuel cycle costs, economic evaluation guidelines, and a discussion on the integration of cost data into economic computer models. This report contains reference cost data for 26 cost modules—24 fuel cycle cost modules and 2 reactor modules. The cost modules were developed in the areas of natural uranium mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, depleted uranium disposition, fuel fabrication, interim spent fuel storage, reprocessing, waste conditioning, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packaging, long-term monitored retrievable storage, near surface disposal of low-level waste (LLW), geologic repository and other disposal concepts, and transportation processes for nuclear fuel, LLW, SNF, and high-level waste.

  7. 324 Building safety basis criteria document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEFFEN, J.M.

    1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Safety Basis Criteria document describes the proposed format, content, and schedule for the preparation of an updated Safety Analysis Report (SAR) and Operational Safety Requirements document (OSR) for the 324 Building. These updated safety authorization basis documents are intended to cover stabilization and deactivation activities that will prepare the facility for turnover to the Environmental Restoration Contractor for final decommissioning. The purpose of this document is to establish the specific set of criteria needed for technical upgrades to the 324 Facility Safety Authorization Basis, as required by Project Hanford Procedure HNF-PRO-705, Safety Basis Planning, Documentation, Review, and Approval.

  8. CRAD, Engineering Design and Safety Basis - December 22, 2009...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Engineering Design and Safety Basis - December 22, 2009 CRAD, Engineering Design and Safety Basis - December 22, 2009 December 22, 2009 Engineering Design and Safety Basis...

  9. CRAD, Safety Basis - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characteriza...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Safety Basis - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Safety Basis - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste...

  10. 222-S Laboratory interim safety basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEAVER, L.L.

    2001-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to establish the Interim Safety Basis (ISB) for the 222-S Laboratory. An ISB is a documented safety basis that provides the justification for the continued operation of the facility until an upgraded documented safety analysis (DSA) is prepared in compliance with 10CFR 830, Subpart B. The 222-S Laboratory ISB is based on revised facility and process descriptions and revised accident analyses that reflect current conditions.

  11. Technical basis document for natural event hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARSON, D.M.

    2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for natural event hazard (NEH)-initiated accidents. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls This report documents the technical basis for assigning risk bins for Natural Event Hazards Representative Accident and associated represented hazardous conditions.

  12. CRAD, Facility Safety- Nuclear Facility Safety Basis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Nuclear Facility Safety Basis.

  13. PRELIMINARY SELECTION OF MGR DESIGN BASIS EVENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.A. Kappes

    1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to identify the preliminary design basis events (DBEs) for consideration in the design of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). For external events and natural phenomena (e.g., earthquake), the objective is to identify those initiating events that the MGR will be designed to withstand. Design criteria will ensure that radiological release scenarios resulting from these initiating events are beyond design basis (i.e., have a scenario frequency less than once per million years). For internal (i.e., human-induced and random equipment failures) events, the objective is to identify credible event sequences that result in bounding radiological releases. These sequences will be used to establish the design basis criteria for MGR structures, systems, and components (SSCs) design basis criteria in order to prevent or mitigate radiological releases. The safety strategy presented in this analysis for preventing or mitigating DBEs is based on the preclosure safety strategy outlined in ''Strategy to Mitigate Preclosure Offsite Exposure'' (CRWMS M&O 1998f). DBE analysis is necessary to provide feedback and requirements to the design process, and also to demonstrate compliance with proposed 10 CFR 63 (Dyer 1999b) requirements. DBE analysis is also required to identify and classify the SSCs that are important to safety (ITS).

  14. The Equitable Basis for sl_2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benkart, Georgia

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article contains an investigation of the equitable basis for the Lie algebra sl_2. Denoting this basis by {x,y,z}, we have [x,y] = 2x + 2y, [y,z] = 2y + 2z, [z, x] = 2z + 2x. One focus of our study is the group of automorphisms G generated by exp(ad x*), exp(ad y*), exp(ad z*), where {x*,y*,z*} is the basis for sl_2 dual to {x,y,z} with respect to the trace form (u,v) = tr(uv). We show that G is isomorphic to the modular group PSL_2(Z). Another focus of our investigation is the lattice L=Zx+Zy+Zz. We prove that the orbit G(x) equals {u in L |(u,u)=2}. We determine the precise relationship between (i) the group G, (ii) the group of automorphisms for sl_2 that preserve L, (iii) the group of automorphisms and antiautomorphisms for sl_2 that preserve L, and (iv) the group of isometries for (,) that preserve L. We obtain analogous results for the lattice L* =Zx*+Zy*+Zz*. Relative to the equitable basis, the matrix of the trace form is a Cartan matrix of hyperbolic type; consequently,we identify the equitable ...

  15. Technical basis document for external events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OBERG, B.D.

    2003-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document supports the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis and presents the technical basis for the frequencies of externally initiated accidents. The consequences of externally initiated events are discussed in other documents that correspond to the accident that was caused by the external event. The external events include aircraft crash, vehicle accident, range fire, and rail accident.

  16. Waste transfer leaks technical basis document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZIMMERMAN, B.D.

    2003-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides technical support for the onsite radiological and toxicological, and offsite toxicological, portions of the waste transfer leak accident presented in the Documented Safety Analysis. It provides the technical basis for frequency and consequence bin selection, and selection of safety SSCs and TSRs.

  17. Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility Safety Basis and Safety Design Basis Documents

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This Standard describes a framework and the criteria to be used for approval of (1) safety basis documents, as required by 10 Code of Federal Regulation (C.F.R.) 830, Nuclear Safety Management, and (2) safety design basis documents, as required by Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD)-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process.

  18. System Design and the Safety Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellingson, Darrel

    2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to present the Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) Lessons Learned for system design as it relates to safety basis documentation. BJC has had to reconcile incomplete or outdated system description information with current facility safety basis for a number of situations in recent months. This paper has relevance in multiple topical areas including documented safety analysis, decontamination & decommissioning (D&D), safety basis (SB) implementation, safety and design integration, potential inadequacy of the safety analysis (PISA), technical safety requirements (TSR), and unreviewed safety questions. BJC learned that nuclear safety compliance relies on adequate and well documented system design information. A number of PIS As and TSR violations occurred due to inadequate or erroneous system design information. As a corrective action, BJC assessed the occurrences caused by systems design-safety basis interface problems. Safety systems reviewed included the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Fluorination System, K-1065 fire alarm system, and the K-25 Radiation Criticality Accident Alarm System. The conclusion was that an inadequate knowledge of system design could result in continuous non-compliance issues relating to nuclear safety. This was especially true with older facilities that lacked current as-built drawings coupled with the loss of 'historical knowledge' as personnel retired or moved on in their careers. Walkdown of systems and the updating of drawings are imperative for nuclear safety compliance. System design integration with safety basis has relevance in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the BJC Lessons Learned in this area. It will be of benefit to DOE contractors that manage and operate an aging population of nuclear facilities.

  19. Integrated Safety Management System as the Basis for Work Planning...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Safety Management System as the Basis for Work Planning and Control for Research and Development Integrated Safety Management System as the Basis for Work Planning and...

  20. ORISE: The Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident Preparedness...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident Preparedness: Medical Management Proceedings of the Fifth International REACTS Symposium on the Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident...

  1. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus Polymer Composites Research in the LM Materials Program Overview...

  2. Systematic expansion for infrared oscillator basis extrapolations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. Furnstahl; S. N. More; T. Papenbrock

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work has demonstrated that the infrared effects of harmonic oscillator basis truncations are well approximated by imposing a partial-wave Dirichlet boundary condition at a properly identified radius L. This led to formulas for extrapolating the corresponding energy E_L and other observables to infinite L and thus infinite basis size. Here we reconsider the energy for a two-body system with a Dirichlet boundary condition at L to identify and test a consistent and systematic expansion for E_L that depends only on observables. We also generalize the energy extrapolation formula to nonzero angular momentum, and apply it to the deuteron. Formulas given previously for extrapolating the radius are derived in detail.

  3. TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT FOR NATURAL EVENT HAZARDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRIPPS, L.J.

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for natural event hazard (NEH)-initiated accidents. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls.

  4. Technical basis document for natural event hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARSON, D.M.

    2003-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for natural event hazards (NEH)-initiated representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', as described in this report.

  5. Chopped random-basis quantum optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommaso Caneva; Tommaso Calarco; Simone Montangero

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we describe in detail the "Chopped RAndom Basis" (CRAB) optimal control technique recently introduced to optimize t-DMRG simulations [arXiv:1003.3750]. Here we study the efficiency of this control technique in optimizing different quantum processes and we show that in the considered cases we obtain results equivalent to those obtained via different optimal control methods while using less resources. We propose the CRAB optimization as a general and versatile optimal control technique.

  6. Reduced Basis Method for Nanodevices Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pau, George Shu Heng

    2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Ballistic transport simulation in nanodevices, which involves self-consistently solving a coupled Schrodinger-Poisson system of equations, is usually computationally intensive. Here, we propose coupling the reduced basis method with the subband decomposition method to improve the overall efficiency of the simulation. By exploiting a posteriori error estimation procedure and greedy sampling algorithm, we are able to design an algorithm where the computational cost is reduced significantly. In addition, the computational cost only grows marginally with the number of grid points in the confined direction.

  7. Technical basis for internal dosimetry at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sula, M.J.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Internal Dosimetry Program, administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy, provides routine bioassay monitoring for employees who are potentially exposed to radionuclides in the workplace. This report presents the technical basis for routine bioassay monitoring and the assessment of internal dose at Hanford. The radionuclides of concern include tritium, corrosion products ({sup 58}Co, {sup 60}Co, {sup 54}Mn, and {sup 59}Fe), strontium, cesium, iodine, europium, uranium, plutonium, and americium,. Sections on each of these radionuclides discuss the sources and characteristics; dosimetry; bioassay measurements and monitoring; dose measurement, assessment, and mitigation and bioassay follow-up treatment. 78 refs., 35 figs., 115 tabs.

  8. Structural Basis for Activation of Cholera Toxin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900SteepStrengthening northern NewStructural Basis for

  9. Structural Basis for Activation of Cholera Toxin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900SteepStrengthening northern NewStructural Basis

  10. Structural Basis for Activation of Cholera Toxin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900SteepStrengthening northern NewStructural BasisStructural

  11. NDRPProtocolTechBasisCompiled020705.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate - Events - Fermilab atNovelNC π5,NDLGS:Basis

  12. Technical Basis for PNNL Beryllium Inventory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Michelle Lynn

    2014-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) issued Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 850, “Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program” (the Beryllium Rule) in 1999 and required full compliance by no later than January 7, 2002. The Beryllium Rule requires the development of a baseline beryllium inventory of the locations of beryllium operations and other locations of potential beryllium contamination at DOE facilities. The baseline beryllium inventory is also required to identify workers exposed or potentially exposed to beryllium at those locations. Prior to DOE issuing 10 CFR 850, Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) had documented the beryllium characterization and worker exposure potential for multiple facilities in compliance with DOE’s 1997 Notice 440.1, “Interim Chronic Beryllium Disease.” After DOE’s issuance of 10 CFR 850, PNNL developed an implementation plan to be compliant by 2002. In 2014, an internal self-assessment (ITS #E-00748) of PNNL’s Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) identified several deficiencies. One deficiency is that the technical basis for establishing the baseline beryllium inventory when the Beryllium Rule was implemented was either not documented or not retrievable. In addition, the beryllium inventory itself had not been adequately documented and maintained since PNNL established its own CBDPP, separate from Hanford Site’s program. This document reconstructs PNNL’s baseline beryllium inventory as it would have existed when it achieved compliance with the Beryllium Rule in 2001 and provides the technical basis for the baseline beryllium inventory.

  13. Radioactive Waste Management BasisSept 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, S S

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Radioactive Waste Management Basis (RWMB) documents radioactive waste management practices adopted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) pursuant to Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The purpose of this RWMB is to describe the systematic approach for planning, executing, and evaluating the management of radioactive waste at LLNL. The implementation of this document will ensure that waste management activities at LLNL are conducted in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management, and the Implementation Guide for DOE manual 435.1-1, Radioactive Waste Management Manual. Technical justification is provided where methods for meeeting the requirements of DOE Order 435.1 deviate from the DOE Manual 435.1-1 and Implementation Guide.

  14. Office of Nuclear Safety Basis and Facility Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Nuclear Safety Basis & Facility Design establishes safety basis and facility design requirements and expectations related to analysis and design of nuclear facilities to ensure protection of workers and the public from the hazards associated with nuclear operations.

  15. Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Fundamentals Self-Study Guide ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Oak Ridge Operations Office Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Fundamentals Self-Study Guide Fulfills ORO Safety Basis Competency 1, 2 (Part 1), or 7 (Part 1) November 2002 Nuclear...

  16. CRAD, Integrated Safety Basis and Engineering Design Review ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrated Safety Basis and Engineering Design Review - August 20, 2014 (EA CRAD 31-4, Rev. 0) CRAD, Integrated Safety Basis and Engineering Design Review - August 20, 2014 (EA...

  17. Authorization basis status report (miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stickney, R.G.

    1998-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a systematic evaluation conducted to identify miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components with potential needed authorization basis upgrades. It provides the Authorization Basis upgrade plan for those miscellaneous TWRS facilities, tanks and components identified.

  18. Gravitational lens modeling with basis sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birrer, Simon; Refregier, Alexandre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a strong lensing modeling technique based on versatile basis sets for the lens and source planes. Our method uses high performance Monte Carlo algorithms, allows for an adaptive build up of complexity and bridges the gap between parametric and pixel based reconstruction methods. We apply our method to a HST image of the strong lens system RXJ1131-1231 and show that our method finds a reliable solution and is able to detect substructure in the lens and source planes simultaneously. Using mock data we show that our method is sensitive to sub-clumps with masses four orders of magnitude smaller than the main lens, which corresponds to about $10^8 M_{\\odot}$, without prior knowledge on the position and mass of the sub-clump. The modelling approach is flexible and maximises automation to facilitate the analysis of the large number of strong lensing systems expected in upcoming wide field surveys. The resulting search for dark sub-clumps in these systems, without mass-to-light priors, offers promise for p...

  19. Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review Overview and Management Oversight...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    This SRP, Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review, consists of five volumes. It provides information to help strengthen the technical rigor of line management oversight and federal...

  20. Engineering Design and Safety Basis Inspection Criteria, Inspection...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to this is our commitment to enhance our program. Therefore, we have developed the Engineering Design and Safety Basis Inspection Criteria, Inspection Activities, and Lines of...

  1. Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on Seismic Risk Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic Risk September 19, 2012 Presenter: Jeffrey Kimball, Technical Specialist (Seismologist)...

  2. The pointer basis and the feedback stabilization of quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Li; A. Chia; H. M. Wiseman

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics for an open quantum system can be `unravelled' in infinitely many ways, depending on how the environment is monitored, yielding different sorts of conditioned states, evolving stochastically. In the case of ideal monitoring these states are pure, and the set of states for a given monitoring forms a basis (which is overcomplete in general) for the system. It has been argued elsewhere [D. Atkins et al., Europhys. Lett. 69, 163 (2005)] that the `pointer basis' as introduced by Zurek and Paz [Phys. Rev. Lett 70, 1187(1993)], should be identified with the unravelling-induced basis which decoheres most slowly. Here we show the applicability of this concept of pointer basis to the problem of state stabilization for quantum systems. In particular we prove that for linear Gaussian quantum systems, if the feedback control is assumed to be strong compared to the decoherence of the pointer basis, then the system can be stabilized in one of the pointer basis states with a fidelity close to one (the infidelity varies inversely with the control strength). Moreover, if the aim of the feedback is to maximize the fidelity of the unconditioned system state with a pure state that is one of its conditioned states, then the optimal unravelling for stabilizing the system in this way is that which induces the pointer basis for the conditioned states. We illustrate these results with a model system: quantum Brownian motion. We show that even if the feedback control strength is comparable to the decoherence, the optimal unravelling still induces a basis very close to the pointer basis. However if the feedback control is weak compared to the decoherence, this is not the case.

  3. Speculations About the Selective Basis for Modern Human Craniofacial Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieberman, Daniel E.

    Speculations About the Selective Basis for Modern Human Craniofacial Form DANIEL E. LIEBERMAN. To name just a few of our unusual craniofacial apo- morphies, we are the only extant pri- mate

  4. Quasi Sturmian Basis in Two-Electron Continuum Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Zaytsev; L. U. Ancarani; S. A. Zaytsev

    2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new type of basis functions is proposed to describe a two-electron continuum which arises as a final state in electron-impact ionization and double photoionization of atomic systems. We name these functions, which are calculated in terms of the recently introduced Quasi Sturmian functions, Convoluted Quasi Sturmian functions (CQS). By construction, the CQS functions look asymptotically like a six-dimensional spherical wave. The driven equation describing an $(e, 3e)$ process on helium in the framework of the Temkin-Poet model has been solved numerically using expansions on the basis CQS functions. The convergence behavior of the solution has been examined as the size of the basis has been increased. The calculations show that the convergence rate is significantly improved by introducing a phase factor corresponding the electron-electron interaction into the basis functions. Such a modification of the boundary conditions leads to appreciable change in the magnitude of the solution.

  5. auf basis einer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assoziiert. Ziel der vorliegenden Studie war es, den Einfluss einer (more) Zachmann, Christin 2014-01-01 23 77Weniger ist mehr Virtuelle Thin Clients auf Linux-Basis...

  6. Is the Preferred Basis selected by the environment?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian Wang; David Hobill

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that in a quantum measurement, the preferred basis is determined by the interaction between the apparatus and the quantum system, instead of by the environment. This interaction entangles three degrees of freedom, one system degree of freedom we are interested in and preserved by the interaction, one system degree of freedom that carries the change due to the interaction, and the apparatus degree of freedom which is always ignored. Considering all three degrees of freedom the composite state only has one decomposition, and this guarantees that the apparatus would end up in the expected preferred basis of our daily experiences. We also point out some problems with the environment-induced super-selection (Einselection) solution to the preferred basis problem, and clarifies a common misunderstanding of environmental decoherence and the preferred basis problem.

  7. Technical Basis Document for PFP Area Monitoring Dosimetry Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COOPER, J.R.

    2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the phantom dosimetry used for the PFP Area Monitoring program and establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) area monitoring dosimetry program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), part 835, ''Occupational Radiation Protection'' Part 835.403; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1), Part 514; HNF-PRO-382, Area Dosimetry Program; and PNL-MA-842, Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual.

  8. Resilient Control Systems Practical Metrics Basis for Defining Mission Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig G. Rieger

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    "Resilience” describes how systems operate at an acceptable level of normalcy despite disturbances or threats. In this paper we first consider the cognitive, cyber-physical interdependencies inherent in critical infrastructure systems and how resilience differs from reliability to mitigate these risks. Terminology and metrics basis are provided to integrate the cognitive, cyber-physical aspects that should be considered when defining solutions for resilience. A practical approach is taken to roll this metrics basis up to system integrity and business case metrics that establish “proper operation” and “impact.” A notional chemical processing plant is the use case for demonstrating how the system integrity metrics can be applied to establish performance, and

  9. The Functional Requirements and Design Basis for Information Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuller, James L.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of the Information Barrier Working Group workshop held at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, February 2-4, 1999. This workshop was convened to establish the functional requirements associated with warhead radiation signature information barriers, to identify the major design elements of any such system or approach, and to identify a design basis for each of these major elements. Such information forms the general design basis to be used in designing, fabricating, and evaluating the complete integrated systems developed for specific purposes.

  10. Simple basis for hydrogenic atoms in magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallas, J.A.C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field-dependent hydrogenic basis is used to obtain the evolution of the energy spectrum of atoms in strong (approx.10/sup 8/ G) and uniform magnetic fields. The basis allows results to be derived analytically. Numerical values for the first 13 excited states of hydrogen are found to be in very good agreement with much more elaborate calculations of Smith et al. and of Brandi. In addition, the possibility of having a remnant type of degeneracy in the presence of the magnetic field is investigated.

  11. Formal Management Review of the Safety Basis Calculations Noncompliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Altenbach, T J

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In Reference 1, LLNL identified a failure to adequately implement an institutional commitment concerning administrative requirements governing the documentation of Safety Basis calculations supporting the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) process for LLNL Hazard Category 2 and Category 3 nuclear facilities. The AB Section has discovered that the administrative requirements of AB procedure AB-006, 'Safety Basis Calculation Procedure for Category 2 and 3 Nuclear Facilities', have not been uniformly or consistently applied in the preparation of Safety Basis calculations for LLNL Hazard Category 2 and 3 Nuclear Facilities. The SEP Associated Director has directed the AB Section to initiate a formal management review of the issue that includes, but is not necessarily limited to the following topics: (1) the basis establishing Ab-006 as a required internal procedure for Safety Basis calculations; (2) how requirements for Safety Basis calculations flow down in the institutional DSA process; (3) the extent to which affected Laboratory organizations have explicitly complied with the requirements of Procedure AB-006; (4) what alternative approaches LLNL organizations has used for Safety Basis calculations and how these alternate approaches compare with Procedure AB-006 requirements; and (5) how to reconcile Safety Basis calculations that were performed before Procedure AB-006 came into existence (i.e., August 2001). The management review2 also includes an extent-of-condition evaluation to determine how widespread the discovered issue is throughout Laboratory organizations responsible for operating nuclear facilities, and to determine if implementation of AB procedures other than AB-006 has been similarly affected. In Reference 2, Corrective Action 1 was established whereby the SEP Directorate will develop a plan for performing a formal management review of the discovered condition, including an extent-of condition evaluation. In Reference 3, a plan was provided to prepare a formal management review, satisfying Corrective Action 1. An AB-006 Working Group was formed,led by the AB Section, with representatives from the Nuclear Materials Technology Program (NMTP), the Radioactive and Hazardous Waste Management (RHWM) Division, and the Packaging and Transportation Safety (PATS) Program. The key action of this management review was for Working Group members to conduct an assessment of all safety basis calculations referenced in their respective DSAs. Those assessments were tasked to provide the following information: (1) list which safety basis calculations correctly follow AB-006 and therefore require no additional documentation; (2) identify and list which safety basis calculations do not strictly follow AB-006, these include NMTP Engineering Notes, Engineering Safety Notes, and calculations by organizations external to the nuclear facilities (such as Plant Engineering), subcontractor calculations, and other internally generated calculations. Each of these will be reviewed and listed on a memorandum with the facility manager's (or designee's) signature accepting that calculation for use in the DSA. If any of these calculations are lacking the signature of a technical reviewer, they must also be reviewed for technical content and that review documented per AB-006.

  12. Molecular basis of infrared detection by Elena O. Gracheva1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Eric A.

    , snakes detect infrared signals through a mechanism involving radiant heating of the pit organ, ratherARTICLES Molecular basis of infrared detection by snakes Elena O. Gracheva1 *, Nicholas T. Ingolia2 system for detecting infrared radiation, enabling them to generate a `thermal image' of predators or prey

  13. Revising Beliefs on the Basis of Evidence James P. Delgrande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delgrande, James P.

    Fraser University Burnaby, B.C., Canada V5A 1S6 jim@cs.sfu.ca Abstract Approaches to belief revision mostRevising Beliefs on the Basis of Evidence James P. Delgrande School of Computing Science Simon is not categorical. In revision, one may circumvent this fact by assuming that, in some fashion or other, an agent

  14. NEAT-IGERT Proposal C. THEMATIC BASIS FOR GROUP EFFORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    NEAT-IGERT Proposal C. THEMATIC BASIS FOR GROUP EFFORT The last decade has seen immense progress the research and teaching interests of fourteen investigators in seven different departments ranging from, to the actual structure and management of the group. The Ph.D.'s from this program will be well poised to embark

  15. Solar Power Tower Design Basis Document, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZAVOICO,ALEXIS B.

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the design basis for a generic molten-salt solar power tower. A solar power tower uses a field of tracking mirrors (heliostats) that redirect sunlight on to a centrally located receiver mounted on top a tower, which absorbs the concentrated sunlight. Molten nitrate salt, pumped from a tank at ground level, absorbs the sunlight, heating it up to 565 C. The heated salt flows back to ground level into another tank where it is stored, then pumped through a steam generator to produce steam and make electricity. This report establishes a set of criteria upon which the next generation of solar power towers will be designed. The report contains detailed criteria for each of the major systems: Collector System, Receiver System, Thermal Storage System, Steam Generator System, Master Control System, and Electric Heat Tracing System. The Electric Power Generation System and Balance of Plant discussions are limited to interface requirements. This design basis builds on the extensive experience gained from the Solar Two project and includes potential design innovations that will improve reliability and lower technical risk. This design basis document is a living document and contains several areas that require trade-studies and design analysis to fully complete the design basis. Project- and site-specific conditions and requirements will also resolve open To Be Determined issues.

  16. Market Split and Basis Reduction: Towards a Solution of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    in the book by Williams [13]. There, the application was related to the oil market in the UKMarket Split and Basis Reduction: Towards a Solution of the Cornu#19;ejols-Dawande Instances K-and-bound. They o#11;ered these market split instances as a challenge to the integer programming community

  17. Implementing Radial Basis Functions Using Bump-Resistor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, John G.

    performance using this for- mulation [SI. Anderson, Platt and Kirk previously demonstrated the use of follower]. An alter- nate strategy used by Anderson, Platt and Kirk [l] 0-7803-1901-X/94$4.0001994 IEEE 1894 #12 . Anderson, J. C. Platt, and D. Kirk. An analog VLSI chip for radial basis functions. In J. Han- son, J

  18. Cognitively Ergonomic Route A Potential Basis for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klippel, Alexander

    1 Cognitively Ergonomic Route Directions A Potential Basis for the OpenLS Navigation Service? Stefan Hansen, Alexander Klippel, Kai-Florian Richter Overview Background Aspect of cognitively ergonomic Ontologies and cognitive modelling (cognitive engineering) Aspects of Cognitively Ergonomic Route Directions

  19. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CROWE, R.D.

    1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support ''HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety, Analysis Report, Annex A,'' ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.'' All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

  20. Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PIEPHO, M.G.

    1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Annex B, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, ''Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR).'' All assumptions, parameters and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the FSAR.

  1. Learning Active Basis Models by EM-Type Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Ying Nian

    Learning Active Basis Models by EM-Type Algorithms Zhangzhang Si1, Haifeng Gong1,2, Song-Chun Zhu1, and scales as latent variables into the image generation process, and learn the template by EM-type scheme for learning image templates of object categories where the learning is not fully supervised. We

  2. PRICING COMMODITY DERIVATIVES WITH BASIS RISK AND PARTIAL OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludkovski, Mike

    LUDKOVSKI Abstract. We study the problem of pricing claims written on an over-the-counter energy con- tractPRICING COMMODITY DERIVATIVES WITH BASIS RISK AND PARTIAL OBSERVATIONS REN´E CARMONA AND MICHAEL. Because the underlying is illiquid, we work with an indifference pricing framework based on a liquid

  3. Theoretical Basis of Likelihood Methods in Molecular Phylogenetic Inference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Rhiju

    for molecular data by the maximum-likelihood approach has been attacked from a theoretical point of view is seen to be a classical statistical problem involving selection between composite hypothesesTheoretical Basis of Likelihood Methods in Molecular Phylogenetic Inference Rhiju Das, Centre

  4. CRAD, Safety Basis- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Safety Basis at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  5. Canister Storage Building (CSB) Design Basis Accident Analysis Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CROWE, R.D.; PIEPHO, M.G.

    2000-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provided the detailed accident analysis to support HNF-3553, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Final Safety Analysis Report, Annex A, ''Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report''. All assumptions, parameters, and models used to provide the analysis of the design basis accidents are documented to support the conclusions in the Canister Storage Building Final Safety Analysis Report.

  6. CRAD, Safety Basis- Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2007 readiness assessment of the Safety Basis at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project.

  7. Data mining with sparse grids using simplicial basis functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sminchisescu, Cristian

    Data mining with sparse grids using simplicial basis functions Jochen Garcke and Michael Griebel we presented a new approach [18] to the classifi- cation problem arising in data mining. It is based with the number of given data points. Finally we report on the quality of the classifier built by our new method

  8. Data mining with sparse grids using simplicial basis functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sminchisescu, Cristian

    Data mining with sparse grids using simplicial basis functions Jochen Garcke and Michael Griebel Recently we presented a new approach [18] to the classi#12;- cation problem arising in data mining scales linearly with the number of given data points. Finally we report on the quality of the classi#12

  9. Basis for NGNP Reactor Design Down-Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the extent of technology development, design and licensing maturity anticipated to be required to credibly identify differences that could make a technical choice practical between the prismatic and pebble bed reactor designs. This paper does not address a business decision based on the economics, business model and resulting business case since these will vary based on the reactor application. The selection of the type of reactor, the module ratings, the number of modules, the configuration of the balance of plant and other design selections will be made on the basis of optimizing the Business Case for the application. These are not decisions that can be made on a generic basis.

  10. Basis for NGNP Reactor Design Down-Selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the extent of technology development, design and licensing maturity anticipated to be required to credibly identify differences that could make a technical choice practical between the prismatic and pebble bed reactor designs. This paper does not address a business decision based on the economics, business model and resulting business case since these will vary based on the reactor application. The selection of the type of reactor, the module ratings, the number of modules, the configuration of the balance of plant and other design selections will be made on the basis of optimizing the Business Case for the application. These are not decisions that can be made on a generic basis.

  11. The SU(3) Algebra in a Cyclic Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Harrison; R. Krishnan; W. G. Scott

    2014-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    With the couplings between the eight gluons constrained by the structure constants of the su(3) algebra in QCD, one would expect that there should exist a special basis (or set of bases) for the algebra wherein, unlike in a Cartan-Weyl basis, {\\em all} gluons interact identically (cyclically) with each other, explicitly on an equal footing. We report here particular such bases, which we have found in a computer search, and we indicate associated $3 \\times 3$ representations. We conjecture that essentially all cyclic bases for su(3) may be obtained from these making appropriate circulant transformations,and that cyclic bases may also exist for other su(n), n>3.

  12. MIXING OF INCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS IN WASTE TANKS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SANDGREN, K.R.

    2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents onsite radiological, onsite toxicological, and offsite toxicological consequences, risk binning, and control decision results for the mixing of incompatible materials in waste tanks representative accident. This technical basis document was developed to support the tank farms documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process, the technical basis for assigning risk bins, and the controls selected for the mixing of incompatible materials representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and/or technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls.

  13. Technical basis document for the evaporator dump accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOETZ, T.G.

    2003-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the evaporator dump representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and/or technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', as described in this report.

  14. Mixing of incompatible materials in waste tanks technical basis document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SANDGREN, K.R.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process, the technical basis for assigning risk bins, and the controls selected for the mixing of incompatible materials representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSCs) and/or technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR level controls. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', as described in this report.

  15. The Neural Basis of Financial Risk-Taking* Supplementary Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Brian

    1 The Neural Basis of Financial Risk-Taking* Supplementary Material Camelia M. Kuhnen1 and Brian in each block, a rational risk-neutral agent should pick stock i if he/she expects to receive a dividend D is the information set up to trial -1. That is: I-1 ={D i t| t-1, i{Stock T, Stock R, Bond C}}. Let x i = Pr{ Stock

  16. Use of Normalized Radial Basis Function in Hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotar, Anton; Brilly, Mitja [Chair of Hydrology and Hydraulic Engineering, University of Ljubljana, Jamova 2, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we will present a use of normalized radial basis function in hydrology for prediction of missing river Reka runoff data. The method is based on multidimensional normal distribution, where standard deviation is first optimized and later the whole prediction process is learned on existing data [5]. We can conclude, that the method works very well for middle ranges of data, but not so well for extremes because of its interpolating nature.

  17. Evolution of Safety Basis Documentation for the Fernald Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.; Kohler, S.; Fisk, P.; Krach, F.; Klein, B.

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Fernald Closure Project (FCP), in suburban Cincinnati, Ohio, is to safely complete the environmental restoration of the Fernald site by 2006. Over 200 out of 220 total structures, at this DOE plant site which processed uranium ore concentrates into high-purity uranium metal products, have been safely demolished, including eight of the nine major production plants. Documented Safety Analyses (DSAs) for these facilities have gone through a process of simplification, from individual operating Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) to a single site-wide Authorization Basis containing nuclear facility Bases for Interim Operations (BIOs) to individual project Auditable Safety Records (ASRs). The final stage in DSA simplification consists of project-specific Integrated Health and Safety Plans (I-HASPs) and Nuclear Health and Safety Plans (N-HASPs) that address all aspects of safety, from the worker in the field to the safety basis requirements preserving the facility/activity hazard categorization. This paper addresses the evolution of Safety Basis Documentation (SBD), as DSAs, from production through site closure.

  18. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Design Basis Capacity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CLEVELAND, K.J.

    2000-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This study of the design basis capacity of process systems was prepared by Fluor Federal Services for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The evaluation uses a summary level model of major process sub-systems to determine the impact of sub-system interactions on the overall time to complete fuel removal operations. The process system model configuration and time cycle estimates developed in the original version of this report have been updated as operating scenario assumptions evolve. The initial document released in Fiscal Year (FY) 1996 varied the number of parallel systems and transport systems over a wide range, estimating a conservative design basis for completing fuel processing in a two year time period. Configurations modeling planned operations were updated in FY 1998 and FY 1999. The FY 1998 Base Case continued to indicate that fuel removal activities at the basins could be completed in slightly over 2 years. Evaluations completed in FY 1999 were based on schedule modifications that delayed the start of KE Basin fuel removal, with respect to the start of KW Basin fuel removal activities, by 12 months. This delay resulted in extending the time to complete all fuel removal activities by 12 months. However, the results indicated that the number of Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) stations could be reduced from four to three without impacting the projected time to complete fuel removal activities. This update of the design basis capacity evaluation, performed for FY 2000, evaluates a fuel removal scenario that delays the start of KE Basin activities such that staffing peaks are minimized. The number of CVD stations included in all cases for the FY 2000 evaluation is reduced from three to two, since the scenario schedule results in minimal time periods of simultaneous fuel removal from both basins. The FY 2000 evaluation also considers removal of Shippingport fuel from T Plant storage and transfer to the Canister Storage Building for storage.

  19. RELEASE OF DRIED RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KOZLOWSKI, S.D.

    2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-23429, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (PDSA) and RPP-23479, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Facility. The main document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative accidents involving the release of dried radioactive waste materials from the Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) and to the associated represented hazardous conditions. Appendices D through F provide the technical basis for assigning risk bins to the representative dried waste release accident and associated represented hazardous conditions for the Contact-Handled Transuranic Mixed (CH-TRUM) Waste Packaging Unit (WPU). The risk binning process uses an evaluation of the frequency and consequence of a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition to determine the need for safety structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls. A representative accident or a represented hazardous condition is assigned to a risk bin based on the potential radiological and toxicological consequences to the public and the collocated worker. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers because credible hazardous conditions with the potential for significant facility worker consequences are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls regardless of their estimated frequency. The controls for protection of the facility workers are described in RPP-23429 and RPP-23479. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described below.

  20. Interim safety basis for fuel supply shutdown facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brehm, J.R.; Deobald, T.L.; Benecke, M.W.; Remaize, J.A.

    1995-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This ISB in conjunction with the new TSRs, will provide the required basis for interim operation or restrictions on interim operations and administrative controls for the Facility until a SAR is prepared in accordance with the new requirements. It is concluded that the risk associated with the current operational mode of the Facility, uranium closure, clean up, and transition activities required for permanent closure, are within Risk Acceptance Guidelines. The Facility is classified as a Moderate Hazard Facility because of the potential for an unmitigated fire associated with the uranium storage buildings.

  1. SRS FTF Section 3116 Basis for Determination | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSARDevelopmental AssignmentApril 2, 2015AwardsOctoberBasis for

  2. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database.

  3. AN APPROACH TO SAFETY DESIGN BASIS DOCUMENTATION CHANGE CONTROL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RYAN GW

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a safety design basis documentation change control process. The process identifies elements that can be used to manage the project/facility configuration during design evolution through the Initiation, Definition, and Execution project phases. The project phases addressed by the process are defined in US Department of Energy (DOE) Order (O) 413.3A, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, in support of DOE project Critical Decisions (CD). This approach has been developed for application to two Hanford Site projects in their early CD phases and is considered to be a key element of safety and design integration. As described in the work that has been performed, the purpose of change control is to maintain consistency among design requirements, the physical configuration, related facility documentation, and the nuclear safety basis during the evolution of the design. The process developed (1) ensures an appropriate level of rigor is applied at each project phase and (2) is considered to implement the requirements and guidance provided in DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process. Presentation of this work is expected to benefit others in the DOE Complex that may be implementing DOE-STD-1189-2008 or managing nuclear safety documentation in support of projects in-process.

  4. Electronic structure basis for the titanic magnetoresistance in WTe?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pletikosic, I.; Ali, Mazhar N.; Fedorov, A. V.; Cava, R. J.; Valla, T.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered non-magnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at the Fermi level, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic, quasi one-dimensional Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. A change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior of the magnetoresistance inmore »WTe? was identified.« less

  5. Electronic structure basis for the titanic magnetoresistance in WTe?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletikosic, I. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ali, Mazhar N. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Fedorov, A. V. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cava, R. J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Valla, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electronic structure basis of the extremely large magnetoresistance in layered non-magnetic tungsten ditelluride has been investigated by angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Hole and electron pockets of approximately the same size were found at the Fermi level, suggesting that carrier compensation should be considered the primary source of the effect. The material exhibits a highly anisotropic, quasi one-dimensional Fermi surface from which the pronounced anisotropy of the magnetoresistance follows. A change in the Fermi surface with temperature was found and a high-density-of-states band that may take over conduction at higher temperatures and cause the observed turn-on behavior of the magnetoresistance in WTe? was identified.

  6. The Gaussian Radial Basis Function Method for Plasma Kinetic Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirvijoki, Eero; Belli, Emily; Embréus, Ola

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fundamental macroscopic description of a magnetized plasma is the Vlasov equation supplemented by the nonlinear inverse-square force Fokker-Planck collision operator [Rosenbluth et al., Phys. Rev., 107, 1957]. The Vlasov part describes advection in a six-dimensional phase space whereas the collision operator involves friction and diffusion coefficients that are weighted velocity-space integrals of the particle distribution function. The Fokker-Planck collision operator is an integro-differential, bilinear operator, and numerical discretization of the operator is far from trivial. In this letter, we describe a new approach to discretize the entire kinetic system based on an expansion in Gaussian Radial Basis functions (RBFs). This approach is particularly well-suited to treat the collision operator because the friction and diffusion coefficients can be analytically calculated. Although the RBF method is known to be a powerful scheme for the interpolation of scattered multidimensional data, Gaussian RBFs also...

  7. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2009-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document.

  8. Order Module--NNSA Orders Self-Study Program Safety Basis Documentatio...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NNSA Orders Self-Study Program Safety Basis Documentation Order Module--NNSA Orders Self-Study Program Safety Basis Documentation The familiar level of this module is divided into...

  9. A Note on the Finite Element Method with Singular Basis Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaneko, Hideaki

    finite element analysis that incorporates singular element functions. A need for introducing * *some singular elements as part of basis functions in certain finite element analysis arises o* *ut A Note on the Finite Element Method with Singular Basis

  10. Technical basis for the aboveground structure failure and associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOETZ, T.G.

    2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the aboveground structure failure representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. This document was developed to support the documented safety analysis.

  11. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with requirements of 10 CFR 835, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program, the DOE Richland Operations Office, DOE Office of River Protection, DOE Pacific Northwest Office of Science, and Hanford’s DOE contractors. The dosimetry system is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to PNNL and all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Maintenance and distribution of controlled hard copies of the manual by PNNL was discontinued beginning with Revision 0.2.

  12. Experimental Progress Report--Modernizing the Fission Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macri, R A

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2010 a proposal (Modernizing the Fission Basis) was prepared to 'resolve long standing differences between LANL and LLNL associated with the correct fission basis for analysis of nuclear test data'. Collaboration between LANL/LLNL/TUNL has been formed to implement this program by performing high precision measurements of neutron induced fission product yields as a function of incident neutron energy. This new program benefits from successful previous efforts utilizing mono-energetic neutrons undertaken by this collaboration. The first preliminary experiment in this new program was performed between July 24-31, 2011 at TUNL and had 2 main objectives: (1) demonstrating the capability to measure characteristic {gamma}-rays from specific fission products; (2) studying background effects from room scattered neutrons. In addition, a new dual fission ionization chamber has been designed and manufactured. The production design of the chamber is shown in the picture below. The first feasibility experiment to test this chamber is scheduled at the TUNL Tandem Laboratory from September 19-25, 2011. The dual fission chamber design will allow simultaneous exposure of absolute fission fragment emission rate detectors and the thick fission activation foils, positioned between the two chambers. This document formalizes the earlier experimental report demonstrating the experimental capability to make accurate (< 2 %) precision gamma-ray spectroscopic measurements of the excitation function of high fission product yields of the 239Pu(n,f) reaction (induced by quasimonoenergetic neutrons). A second experiment (9/2011) introduced an compact double-sided fission chamber into the experimental arrangement, and so the relative number of incident neutrons striking the sample foil at each bombarding energy is limited only by statistics. (The number of incident neutrons often limits the experimental accuracy.) Fission chamber operation was so exceptional that 2 more chambers have been fabricated; thus fission foils of different isotopes may be left in place with sample changes. The scope of the measurements is both greatly expanded and the results become vetted. Experiment 2 is not reported here. A continuing experiment has been proposed for February 2012.

  13. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with requirements of 10 CFR 835, the DOE Laboratory Accreditation Program, the DOE Richland Operations Office, DOE Office of River Protection, DOE Pacific Northwest Office of Science, and Hanford’s DOE contractors. The dosimetry system is operated by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hanford External Dosimetry Program which provides dosimetry services to PNNL and all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Maintenance and distribution of controlled hard copies of the manual by PNNL was discontinued beginning with Revision 0.2.

  14. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. Rev. 0 marks the first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Revision Log: Rev. 0 (2/25/2005) Major revision and expansion. Rev. 0.1 (3/12/2007) Minor revision. Updated Chapters 5, 6 and 9 to reflect change in default ring calibration factor used in HEDP dose calculation software. Factor changed from 1.5 to 2.0 beginning January 1, 2007. Pages on which changes were made are as follows: 5.23, 5.69, 5.78, 5.80, 5.82, 6.3, 6.5, 6.29, 9.2.

  15. Efficient basis for the Dicke Model I: theory and convergence in energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Angel Bastarrachea-Magnani; Jorge G. Hirsch

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An extended bosonic coherent basis has been shown by Chen to provide numerically exact solutions of the finite-size Dicke model. The advantages in employing this basis, as compared with the photon number (Fock) basis, are exhibited to be valid for a large region of the Hamiltonian parameter space by analyzing the converged values of the ground state energy.

  16. Basi di Dati: Realizzazione dei DBMS 9.1 ARCHITETTURA DEI DBMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghelli, Giorgio

    Basi di Dati: Realizzazione dei DBMS 9.1 ARCHITETTURA DEI DBMS Macchina logica: gestore comandi SQL, indici, catalogo, giornale Basi di Dati: Realizzazione dei DBMS 9.2 MEMORIE A DISCO · Un'unità a dischi ms, 0.02 ms/Kb testine Pacco di dischi Cilindro Traccia #12;Basi di Dati: Realizzazione dei DBMS 9

  17. Reactivity accidents: A reassessment of the design-basis events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond, D.J.; Hsu, Chia-Jung; Fitzpatrick, R.; Mirkovic, D.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes a study of light water reactor event sequences which have been investigated for their potential to result in reactivity accidents with severe consequences. The study is an outgrowth of the concern which arose after the accident at Chernobyl and was recommended by the report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the implications of that accident (NUREG-1251). The work was done for the NRC to reconfirm or bring into question previous judgments on reactivity events which must be analyzed for licensing. Event sequences were defined and then a probabilistic assessment was completed to estimate the frequency of the reactivity event and/or a deterministic calculation was completed to estimate the consequences to the fuel. Using the results of this analysis, analysis done by others, and a set of screening criteria developed within this study, judgments were made for each sequence as to its importance, and recommendations were made as to whether the NRC ought to be considering the important sequences as part of the design basis or for further, more detailed, investigation. 31 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Climate Change: The Physical Basis and Latest Results

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2007 Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concludes: "Warming in the climate system is unequivocal." Without the contribution of Physics to climate science over many decades, such a statement would not have been possible. Experimental physics enables us to read climate archives such as polar ice cores and so provides the context for the current changes. For example, today the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere, the second most important greenhouse gas, is 28% higher than any time during the last 800,000 years. Classical fluid mechanics and numerical mathematics are the basis of climate models from which estimates of future climate change are obtained. But major instabilities and surprises in the Earth System are still unknown. These are also to be considered when the climatic consequences of proposals for geo-engineering are estimated. Only Physics will permit us to further improve our understanding in order to provide the foundation for policy decisions facing the global climate change challenge.

  19. Structural basis of substrate discrimination and integrin binding by autotaxin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hausmann, Jens; Kamtekar, Satwik; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Day, Jacqueline E.; Wu, Tao; Fulkerson, Zachary; Albers, Harald M.H.G.; van Meeteren, Laurens A.; Houben, Anna J.S.; van Zeijl, Leonie; Jansen, Silvia; Andries, Maria; Hall, Troii; Pegg, Lyle E.; Benson, Timothy E.; Kasiem, Mobien; Harlos, Karl; Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Smyth, Susan S.; Ovaa, Huib; Bollen, Mathieu; Morris, Andrew J.; Moolenaar, Wouter H.; Perrakis, Anastassis (Pfizer); (Leuven); (Oxford); (NCI-Netherlands); (Kentucky)

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Autotaxin (ATX, also known as ectonucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase-2, ENPP2) is a secreted lysophospholipase D that generates the lipid mediator lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a mitogen and chemoattractant for many cell types. ATX-LPA signaling is involved in various pathologies including tumor progression and inflammation. However, the molecular basis of substrate recognition and catalysis by ATX and the mechanism by which it interacts with target cells are unclear. Here, we present the crystal structure of ATX, alone and in complex with a small-molecule inhibitor. We have identified a hydrophobic lipid-binding pocket and mapped key residues for catalysis and selection between nucleotide and phospholipid substrates. We have shown that ATX interacts with cell-surface integrins through its N-terminal somatomedin B-like domains, using an atypical mechanism. Our results define determinants of substrate discrimination by the ENPP family, suggest how ATX promotes localized LPA signaling and suggest new approaches for targeting ATX with small-molecule therapeutic agents.

  20. Hanford Technical Basis for Multiple Dosimetry Effective Dose Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Robin L.; Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current method at Hanford for dealing with the results from multiple dosimeters worn during non-uniform irradiation is to use a compartmentalization method to calculate the effective dose (E). The method, as documented in the current version of Section 6.9.3 in the 'Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual, PNL-MA-842,' is based on the compartmentalization method presented in the 1997 ANSI/HPS N13.41 standard, 'Criteria for Performing Multiple Dosimetry.' With the adoption of the ICRP 60 methodology in the 2007 revision to 10 CFR 835 came changes that have a direct affect on the compartmentalization method described in the 1997 ANSI/HPS N13.41 standard, and, thus, to the method used at Hanford. The ANSI/HPS N13.41 standard committee is in the process of updating the standard, but the changes to the standard have not yet been approved. And, the drafts of the revision of the standard tend to align more with ICRP 60 than with the changes specified in the 2007 revision to 10 CFR 835. Therefore, a revised method for calculating effective dose from non-uniform external irradiation using a compartmental method was developed using the tissue weighting factors and remainder organs specified in 10 CFR 835 (2007).

  1. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR VENTILATION REQUIREMENTS IN TANK FARMS OPERATING SPECIFICATIONS DOCUMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERGLIN, E J

    2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the technical basis for high efficiency particulate air filter (HEPA) for Hanford tank farm ventilation systems (sometimes known as heating, ventilation and air conditioning [HVAC]) to support limits defined in Process Engineering Operating Specification Documents (OSDs). This technical basis included a review of older technical basis and provides clarifications, as necessary, to technical basis limit revisions or justification. This document provides an updated technical basis for tank farm ventilation systems related to Operation Specification Documents (OSDs) for double-shell tanks (DSTs), single-shell tanks (SSTs), double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTs), catch tanks, and various other miscellaneous facilities.

  2. Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbone, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford External Dosimetry Technical Basis Manual PNL-MA-842 documents the design and implementation of the external dosimetry system used at Hanford. The manual describes the dosimeter design, processing protocols, dose calculation methodology, radiation fields encountered, dosimeter response characteristics, limitations of dosimeter design under field conditions, and makes recommendations for effective use of the dosimeters in the field. The manual describes the technical basis for the dosimetry system in a manner intended to help ensure defensibility of the dose of record at Hanford and to demonstrate compliance with 10 CFR 835, DOELAP, DOE-RL, ORP, PNSO, and Hanford contractor requirements. The dosimetry system is operated by PNNL’s Hanford External Dosimetry Program (HEDP) which provides dosimetry services to all Hanford contractors. The primary users of this manual are DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford using the dosimetry services of PNNL. Development and maintenance of this manual is funded directly by DOE and DOE contractors. Its contents have been reviewed and approved by DOE and DOE contractors at Hanford through the Hanford Personnel Dosimetry Advisory Committee (HPDAC) which is chartered and chaired by DOE-RL and serves as means of coordinating dosimetry practices across contractors at Hanford. This manual was established in 1996. Since its inception, it has been revised many times and maintained by PNNL as a controlled document with controlled distribution. The first revision to be released through PNNL’s Electronic Records & Information Capture Architecture (ERICA) database was designated Revision 0. Revision numbers that are whole numbers reflect major revisions typically involving significant changes to all chapters in the document. Revision numbers that include a decimal fraction reflect minor revisions, usually restricted to selected chapters or selected pages in the document. Maintenance and distribution of controlled hard copies of the manual by PNNL was discontinued beginning with Revision 0.2. Revision Log: Rev. 0 (2/25/2005) Major revision and expansion. Rev. 0.1 (3/12/2007) Updated Chapters 5, 6 and 9 to reflect change in default ring calibration factor used in HEDP dose calculation software. Factor changed from 1.5 to 2.0 beginning January 1, 2007. Pages on which changes were made are as follows: 5.23, 5.69, 5.78, 5.80, 5.82, 6.3, 6.5, 6.29, and 9.2. Rev 0.2 (8/28/2009) Updated Chapters 3, 5, 6, 8 and 9. Chapters 6 and 8 were significantly expanded. References in the Preface and Chapters 1, 2, 4, and 7 were updated to reflect updates to DOE documents. Approved by HPDAC on 6/2/2009. Rev 1.0 (1/1/2010) Major revision. Updated all chapters to reflect the Hanford site wide implementation on January 1, 2010 of new DOE requirements for occupational radiation protection. The new requirements are given in the June 8, 2007 amendment to 10 CFR 835 Occupational Radiation Protection (Federal Register, June 8, 2007. Title 10 Part 835. U.S., Code of Federal Regulations, Vol. 72, No. 110, 31904-31941). Revision 1.0 to the manual replaces ICRP 26 dosimetry concepts and terminology with ICRP 60 dosimetry concepts and terminology and replaces external dose conversion factors from ICRP 51 with those from ICRP 74 for use in measurement of operational quantities with dosimeters. Descriptions of dose algorithms and dosimeter response characteristics, and field performance were updated to reflect changes in the neutron quality factors used in the measurement of operational quantities.

  3. Technical Basis and Considerations for DOE M 435.1-1 (Appendix A)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This appendix establishes the technical basis of the order revision process and of each of the requirements included in the revised radioactive waste management order.

  4. An eigen-based high-order expansion basis for structured spectral ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Zheng

    2011-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 26, 2011 ... Sherwin–Karniadakis basis is smaller (see [1]). Considerations of sparsity have also prompted the use of orthogonalization in.

  5. Evidence of Employment Discrimination on the Basis of Sexual Orientation in State and Local Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sears, Brad; Mallory, Christy

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INSTITUTE EVIDENCE OF EMPLOYMENT DISCRIMINATION: COMPLAINTSCharles W. Gossett, Employment Discrimination in State andJULY 2011 Evidence of Employment Discrimination on the Basis

  6. Technical Basis for Radiological Workplace Air Monitoring and Sampling for the River Corridor Project 300 area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANTOOTH, D.S.

    2000-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the technical basis by which the workplace air monitoring and sampling program is operated in the 324 and 327 Buildings.

  7. CRITICALITY SAFETY CONTROLS AND THE SAFETY BASIS AT PFP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, S

    2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    With the implementation of DOE Order 420.1B, Facility Safety, and DOE-STD-3007-2007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities', a new requirement was imposed that all criticality safety controls be evaluated for inclusion in the facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and that the evaluation process be documented in the site Criticality Safety Program Description Document (CSPDD). At the Hanford site in Washington State the CSPDD, HNF-31695, 'General Description of the FH Criticality Safety Program', requires each facility develop a linking document called a Criticality Control Review (CCR) to document performance of these evaluations. Chapter 5, Appendix 5B of HNF-7098, Criticality Safety Program, provided an example of a format for a CCR that could be used in lieu of each facility developing its own CCR. Since the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is presently undergoing Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D), new procedures are being developed for cleanout of equipment and systems that have not been operated in years. Existing Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSE) are revised, or new ones written, to develop the controls required to support D&D activities. Other Hanford facilities, including PFP, had difficulty using the basic CCR out of HNF-7098 when first implemented. Interpretation of the new guidelines indicated that many of the controls needed to be elevated to TSR level controls. Criterion 2 of the standard, requiring that the consequence of a criticality be examined for establishing the classification of a control, was not addressed. Upon in-depth review by PFP Criticality Safety staff, it was not clear that the programmatic interpretation of criterion 8C could be applied at PFP. Therefore, the PFP Criticality Safety staff decided to write their own CCR. The PFP CCR provides additional guidance for the evaluation team to use by clarifying the evaluation criteria in DOE-STD-3007-2007. In reviewing documents used in classifying controls for Nuclear Safety, it was noted that DOE-HDBK-1188, 'Glossary of Environment, Health, and Safety Terms', defines an Administrative Control (AC) in terms that are different than typically used in Criticality Safety. As part of this CCR, a new term, Criticality Administrative Control (CAC) was defined to clarify the difference between an AC used for criticality safety and an AC used for nuclear safety. In Nuclear Safety terms, an AC is a provision relating to organization and management, procedures, recordkeeping, assessment, and reporting necessary to ensure safe operation of a facility. A CAC was defined as an administrative control derived in a criticality safety analysis that is implemented to ensure double contingency. According to criterion 2 of Section IV, 'Linkage to the Documented Safety Analysis', of DOESTD-3007-2007, the consequence of a criticality should be examined for the purposes of classifying the significance of a control or component. HNF-PRO-700, 'Safety Basis Development', provides control selection criteria based on consequence and risk that may be used in the development of a Criticality Safety Evaluation (CSE) to establish the classification of a component as a design feature, as safety class or safety significant, i.e., an Engineered Safety Feature (ESF), or as equipment important to safety; or merely provides defense-in-depth. Similar logic is applied to the CACs. Criterion 8C of DOE-STD-3007-2007, as written, added to the confusion of using the basic CCR from HNF-7098. The PFP CCR attempts to clarify this criterion by revising it to say 'Programmatic commitments or general references to control philosophy (e.g., mass control or spacing control or concentration control as an overall control strategy for the process without specific quantification of individual limits) is included in the PFP DSA'. Table 1 shows the PFP methodology for evaluating CACs. This evaluation process has been in use since February of 2008 and has proven to be simple and effective. Each control identified i

  8. DETERMINATION OF BASIS VALUES FROM EXPERIMENTAL DATA FOR FABRICS AND COMPOSITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbero, Ever J.

    and systems constructed of reinforced composite materials, textile soft goods, and other novel materials or equations while maintaining key characteristics of level III methodology. This is achieved by employing. A methodology to calculate basis-values other than A- and B-basis is presented in this work for the Normal, Log

  9. Using Economics as Basis for Modelling and Evaluating Software Quality Stefan Wagner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Using Economics as Basis for Modelling and Evaluating Software Quality Stefan Wagner Institut f@in.tum.de Abstract The economics and cost of software quality have been discussed in software engineering for decades, economics should be the basis of any quality analysis. However, this implies several issues that have

  10. On properties of the special coordinate basis of linear systems BEN M. CHEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benmei, Chen

    or technique devel- oped by Sannuti and Saberi in 1987 has a distinct feature of explicitly displaying of the seminal work of Sannuti and Saberi. It makes the theory of the special coordinate basis more complete. 1 work of Sannuti and Saberi (1987). Such a special coordinate basis decomposition or technique has

  11. Local Basis Expansions for MEG Source Localization. Partha P. Mitra1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , but are not identical to, spherical harmonics. Components of the transformed sensor measure- ments which correspond density power. The latter is particularly useful for localization of spontaneous activity. Below we first of the LBEX technique is to transform a global basis set into a local basis set for a given local region

  12. Neural basis of contagious itch and why some people are more prone to it

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    Neural basis of contagious itch and why some people are more prone to it Henning Hollea,1 | insula | touch Itch is--to some degree--socially contagious. Subjective feel- ings of itchiness and based on self-report. The study of the neural basis of contagious itch presents a unique opportunity

  13. Technical basis for the aboveground structure failure accident & associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOETZ, T.G.

    2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the above-ground structure failure representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. This document was developed to support the documented safety analysis.

  14. Technical Report No. 249, Department of Computer Science, ETH Zurich, July 1996 1 Faster Algorithms for Integer Lattice Basis Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storjohann, Arne

    a given integer lattice basis b1 ; b2 ; : : : ; bn 2 ZZ n into a reduced basis. The cost of L 3 ­reduction product. The L 3 ­reduction algorithm presented in [12] guarantees to return a basis with initial vector for Integer Lattice Basis Reduction Arne Storjohann Eidgen¨ossische Technische Hochschule CH­8092 Z

  15. Safety basis academy summary of project implementation from 2007-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, Julie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During fiscal years 2007 through 2009, in accordance with Performance Based Incentives with DOE/NNSA Los Alamos Site Office, Los Alamos National Security (LANS) implemented and operated a Safety Basis Academy (SBA) to facilitate uniformity in technical qualifications of safety basis professionals across the nuclear weapons complex. The implementation phase of the Safety Basis Academy required development, delivery, and finalizing a set of 23 courses. The courses developed are capable of supporting qualification efforts for both federal and contractor personnel throughout the DOE/NNSA Complex. The LANS Associate Director for Nuclear and High Hazard Operations (AD-NHHO) delegated project responsibillity to the Safety Basis Division. The project was assigned to the Safety Basis Technical Services (SB-TS) Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The main tasks were project needs analysis, design, development, implementation of instructional delivery, and evaluation of SBA courses. DOE/NNSA responsibility for oversight of the SBA project was assigned to the Chief of Defense for Nuclear Safety, and delegated to the Authorization Basis Senior Advisor, Continuous Learning Chair (CDNS-ABSA/CLC). NNSA developed a memorandum of agreement with LANS AD-NHHO. Through a memorandum of agreement initiated by NNSA, the DOE National Training Center (NTC) will maintain the set of Safety Basis Academy courses and is able to facilitate course delivery throughout the DOE Complex.

  16. Computationally efficient double hybrid density functional theory using dual basis methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, Jason N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the application of the recently developed dual basis methods of Head-Gordon and co-workers to double hybrid density functional computations. Using the B2-PLYP, B2GP-PLYP, DSD-BLYP and DSD-PBEP86 density functionals, we assess the performance of dual basis methods for the calculation of conformational energy changes in C$_4$-C$_7$ alkanes and for the S22 set of noncovalent interaction energies. The dual basis methods, combined with resolution-of-the-identity second-order M{\\o}ller-Plesset theory, are shown to give results in excellent agreement with conventional methods at a much reduced computational cost.

  17. A Surface-Aware Projection Basis for Quasigeostrophic Flow K. SHAFER SMITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    A Surface-Aware Projection Basis for Quasigeostrophic Flow K. SHAFER SMITH Center for Atmosphere that is not well represented by standard baroclinic modes. Corresponding author address: K. Shafer Smith, Courant

  18. Neural Basis of Theory of Mind: An eye gaze preference task 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elder, Nicola

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This study considers the speculation made by previous researchers that ‘Theory of mind’ (ToM) could have a neural basis. ToM refers to our capacity to make inferences regarding other individuals’ mental states and it is ...

  19. Basis for Identification of Disposal Options for R and D for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in granitic rocks. Basis for Identification of Disposal Options for R&D for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste, FCRD-USED-2011-000071 More Documents & Publications...

  20. Neurobiology of Disease Neural Basis of Dyslexia: A Comparison between Dyslexic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neurobiology of Disease Neural Basis of Dyslexia: A Comparison between Dyslexic and Nondyslexic with developmental dyslexia exhibit reduced parietotemporal activation in functional neuroimaging studies words: dyslexia; age-matched; reading ability-matched; parietotemporal region; fMRI; phonological

  1. Contribution of the basis-dependent adiabatic geometric phase to noncyclic evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. T. Thomaz

    2015-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The geometric phase acquired by the vector states under an adiabatic evolution along a noncyclic path can be calculated correctly in any instantaneous basis of a Hamiltonian that varies in time due to a time-dependent classical field.

  2. Basis for Interim Operation for the K-Reactor in Cold Standby

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shedrow, B.

    1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) document for K Reactor in Cold Standby and the L- and P-Reactor Disassembly Basins was prepared in accordance with the draft DOE standard for BIO preparation (dated October 26, 1993).

  3. Deriving the continuity of maximum-entropy basis functions via variational analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukumar, N.; Wets, R. J. -B.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and V. J. DellaPietra, A maximum entropy approach to naturalJ. and R. K. Bryan, Maximum entropy image reconstruction:Heidelberg, Continuity of maximum-entropy basis functions p

  4. Eavesdropping Attack with Hong-Ou-Mandel Interferometer and Random Basis Shuffling in Quantum Key Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chil-Min Kim; Yun Jin Choi; Young-Jai Park

    2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce new sophisticated attacks with a Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer against quantum key distribution (QKD) and propose a new QKD protocol grafted with random basis shuffling to block up those attacks. When the polarization basis is randomly and independently shuffled by sender and receiver, the new protocol can overcome the attacks even for not-so-weak coherent pulses. We estimate the number of photons to guarantee the security of the protocol.

  5. Basis risk and property derivative hedging in the UK : implications of the 2007 IPF Study of tracking error

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Jia, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines how the basis risk affects property derivative hedging in the UK market, based on the tracking error (basis risk) report from the Investment Property Forum study in 2007 (the IPF Study). The thesis ...

  6. Satisfiability of logic programming based on radial basis function neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamadneh, Nawaf; Sathasivam, Saratha; Tilahun, Surafel Luleseged; Choon, Ong Hong [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we propose a new technique to test the Satisfiability of propositional logic programming and quantified Boolean formula problem in radial basis function neural networks. For this purpose, we built radial basis function neural networks to represent the proportional logic which has exactly three variables in each clause. We used the Prey-predator algorithm to calculate the output weights of the neural networks, while the K-means clustering algorithm is used to determine the hidden parameters (the centers and the widths). Mean of the sum squared error function is used to measure the activity of the two algorithms. We applied the developed technique with the recurrent radial basis function neural networks to represent the quantified Boolean formulas. The new technique can be applied to solve many applications such as electronic circuits and NP-complete problems.

  7. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR THE NUCLEAR CRITICALITY REPRESENTATIVE ACCIDENT & ASSOCIATED REPRESENTED HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOETZ, T.G.

    2003-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the process and basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. Revision 1 incorporates ORP IRT comments to enhance the technical presentation and also makes editorial changes. This technical basis document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence.

  8. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR THE NUCLEAR CRITICALITY REPRESENTATIVE ACCIDENT & ASSOCIATED REPRESENTED HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIGSBY, J.M.

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical Basis Document for the Nuclear Criticality Representative Accident and Associate Represented Hazardous Conditions. Revision 2 of RPP-12371 provides accident consequence estimates for a hypothetical criticality event in an above grade facility (e.g. DBVS, CH-TRUM, and S-109 PWRS). This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-13033, ''Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA)'', and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls.

  9. Design-Basis Flood Estimation for Site Characterization at Nuclear Power Plants in the United States of America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, Rajiv; Hibler, Lyle F.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to describe approaches and methods for estimation of the design-basis flood at nuclear power plant sites. Chapter 1 defines the design-basis flood and lists the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations that require estimation of the design-basis flood. For comparison, the design-basis flood estimation methods used by other Federal agencies are also described. A brief discussion of the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency for estimation of the design-basis floods in its member States is also included.

  10. Physics Basis and Simulation of Burning Plasma Physics for the Fusion Ignition Research Experiment (FIRE)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. Kessel; D. Meade; S.C. Jardin

    2002-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The FIRE [Fusion Ignition Research Experiment] design for a burning plasma experiment is described in terms of its physics basis and engineering features. Systems analysis indicates that the device has a wide operating space to accomplish its mission, both for the ELMing H-mode reference and the high bootstrap current/high beta advanced tokamak regimes. Simulations with 1.5D transport codes reported here both confirm and constrain the systems projections. Experimental and theoretical results are used to establish the basis for successful burning plasma experiments in FIRE.

  11. Core excitation effects in halo nuclei using a transformed oscillator basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lay, J. A.; Arias, J. M.; Moro, A. M. [Departamento de FAMN, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo. 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Gomez-Camacho, J. [Departamento de FAMN, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Apdo. 1065, E-41080 Sevilla, Spain and Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Avda. Thomas A. Edison, E-41092, Sevilla (Spain)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent generalization of the Transformed Harmonic Oscillator basis, intended to consider core excitations in the structure of one nucleon halo nuclei, is applied to the break up of {sup 11}Be. The reaction studied is {sup 11}Be+{sup 208}Pb at 69 MeV/nucleon. The experimental set up is designed to ensure pure dipole Coulomb excitations. Making use of the Equivalent Photon Method and the electromagnetic transition probabilities obtained with the transformed oscillator basis, a relevant contribution of the quadrupole excitations of the core is found. The inclusion of core excitations is, therefore, necessary for the correct extraction of the dipole electromagnetic transition probability of halo nuclei.

  12. Scattering of Spin-Zero and Spin-Half Particles in Momentum-Helicity Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Fachruddin; I. Abdulrahman

    2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattering of 2 particles of spin 0 and 1/2 is evaluated based on a basis constructed from the momentum and the helicity states (the momentum-helicity basis). This shortly called three-dimensional (3D) technique is a good alternative to the standard partial wave (PW) technique especially for higher energies, where PW calculations may become not feasible. Taking as input a simple spin-orbit potential model we calculate as an example the spin averaged differential cross section and polarization.

  13. Quantum key distribution using entangled-photon trains with no basis selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inoue, Kyo [Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); CREST, JST, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Takesue, Hiroki [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); CREST, JST, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols include a basis selection process for providing a secure secret key. In contrast, this paper proposes an entanglement-based QKD with no basis selection procedure. Entangled-photon pulse trains with an average photon number less than one per pulse are sent to two legitimate parties, from which a secret key is created utilizing the entanglement nature. Eavesdropping on a transmission line is prevented by a condition of less than one photon per pulse, and sending classically correlated coherent pulses instead of quantum correlated ones is revealed by monitoring coincident count rate000.

  14. The power of simplification: Operator interface with the AP1000{sup R} during design-basis and beyond design-basis events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, M. G.; Mouser, M. R.; Simon, J. B. [Westinghouse Electric Company, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The AP1000{sup R} plant is an 1100-MWe pressurized water reactor with passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications that enhance construction, operation, maintenance, safety and cost. The passive safety features are designed to function without safety-grade support systems such as component cooling water, service water, compressed air or HVAC. The AP1000 passive safety features achieve and maintain safe shutdown in case of a design-basis accident for 72 hours without need for operator action, meeting the expectations provided in the European Utility Requirements and the Utility Requirement Document for passive plants. Limited operator actions may be required to maintain safe conditions in the spent fuel pool (SFP) via passive means. This safety approach therefore minimizes the reliance on operator action for accident mitigation, and this paper examines the operator interaction with the Human-System Interface (HSI) as the severity of an accident increases from an anticipated transient to a design basis accident and finally, to a beyond-design-basis event. The AP1000 Control Room design provides an extremely effective environment for addressing the first 72 hours of design-basis events and transients, providing ease of information dissemination and minimal reliance upon operator actions. Symptom-based procedures including Emergency Operating Procedures (EOPs), Abnormal Operating Procedures (AOPs) and Alarm Response Procedures (ARPs) are used to mitigate design basis transients and accidents. Use of the Computerized Procedure System (CPS) aids the operators during mitigation of the event. The CPS provides cues and direction to the operators as the event progresses. If the event becomes progressively worse or lasts longer than 72 hours, and depending upon the nature of failures that may have occurred, minimal operator actions may be required outside of the control room in areas that have been designed to be accessible using components that have been designed to be reliable in these conditions. The primary goal of any such actions is to maintain or refill the passive inventory available to cool the core, containment and spent fuel pool in the safety-related and seismically qualified Passive Containment Cooling Water Storage Tank (PCCWST). The seismically-qualified, ground-mounted Passive Containment Cooling Ancillary Water Storage Tank (PCCAWST) is also available for this function as appropriate. The primary effect of these actions would be to increase the coping time for the AP1000 during design basis events, as well as events such as those described above, from 72 hours without operator intervention to 7 days with minimal operator actions. These Operator actions necessary to protect the health and safety of the public are addressed in the Post-72 Hour procedures, as well as some EOPs, AOPs, ARPs and the Severe Accident Management Guidelines (SAMGs). Should the event continue to become more severe and plant conditions degrade further with indications of inadequate core cooling, the SAMGs provide guidance for strategies to address these hypothetical severe accident conditions. The AP1000 SAMG diagnoses and actions are prioritized to first utilize the AP1000 features that are expected to retain a damaged core inside the reactor vessel. Only one strategy is undertaken at any time. This strategy will be followed and its effectiveness evaluated before other strategies are undertaken. This is a key feature of both the symptom-oriented AP1000 EOPs and the AP1000 SAMGs which maximizes the probability of retaining a damaged core inside the reactor vessel and containment while minimizing the chances for confusion and human errors during implementation. The AP1000 SAMGs are simple and straight-forward and have been developed with considerable input from human factors and plant operations experts. Most importantly, and different from severe accident management strategies for other plants, the AP1000 SAMGs do not require diagnosis of the location of the core (i.e., whether reactor vessel failure has occurred). This is a fun

  15. BLIND SOURCE SEPARATION OF CONVOLUTIVE AUDIO USING AN ADAPTIVE STEREO BASIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BLIND SOURCE SEPARATION OF CONVOLUTIVE AUDIO USING AN ADAPTIVE STEREO BASIS Maria G. Jafari.davies@ed.ac.uk ABSTRACT We consider the problem of convolutive blind source sep- aration of audio mixtures. We propose The convolutive blind audio source separation problem arises when an array of sensor microphones is placed

  16. Structural Basis for the Activity and Substrate Specificity of Erwinia chrysanthemi L-Asparaginase,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukemia. Other substrates of asparaginases include L Erwinia chrysanthemi (ErA) have been used as drugs in the treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukemia. The basis of their clinical activity is attributed to the reduction of circulating L

  17. Exclusion of Angiotensinogen Gene in Molecular Basis of Human Hypertension: Sibpair Linkage and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyholt, Dale R.

    Exclusion of Angiotensinogen Gene in Molecular Basis of Human Hypertension: Sibpair Linkage. Benjafield,1 Dale R. Nyholt,2 and Brian J. Morris1 * 1 Hypertension Gene Laboratory, Department of Physiology Research Centre, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia Linkage with essential hypertension

  18. CRAD, Safety Basis- Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a November 2003 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory TRU ALPHA LLWT Project.

  19. Why the Economic Conception of Human Behaviour Might Lack a Bio-logical Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machery, Edouard

    Why the Economic Conception of Human Behaviour Might Lack a Bio- logical Basis Jack J. VROMEN of economic behavior" (Robson 2001a) and several other re- lated papers (Robson 1996, 2001b, 2002) Arthur J to show is that economic behaviour is genetically determined to a considerable degree. Or, alternati- vely

  20. Sensitivity of the Properties of Ruthenium “Blue Dimer” to Method, Basis Set, and Continuum Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Clark, Aurora E.

    2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The ruthenium “blue dimer” [(bpy)2RuIIIOH2]2O4+ is best known as the first well-defined molecular catalyst for water oxidation. It has been subject to numerous computational studies primarily employing density functional theory. However, those studies have been limited in the functionals, basis sets, and continuum models employed. The controversy in the calculated electronic structure and the reaction energetics of this catalyst highlights the necessity of benchmark calculations that explore the role of density functionals, basis sets, and continuum models upon the essential features of blue-dimer reactivity. In this paper, we report Kohn-Sham complete basis set (KS-CBS) limit extrapolations of the electronic structure of “blue dimer” using GGA (BPW91 and BP86), hybrid-GGA (B3LYP), and meta-GGA (M06-L) density functionals. The dependence of solvation free energy corrections on the different cavity types (UFF, UA0, UAHF, UAKS, Bondi, and Pauling) within polarizable and conductor-like polarizable continuum model has also been investigated. The most common basis sets of double-zeta quality are shown to yield results close to the KS-CBS limit; however, large variations are observed in the reaction energetics as a function of density functional and continuum cavity model employed.

  1. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity and Mechanism of NAcetylDneuraminic Acid Lyase from Pasteurella multocida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew J.

    pyruvate and N-acetyl-D-mannosamine. Although equilibrium favors sialic acid cleavage, these enzymes can of excess pyruvate. Engineering these enzymes to synthesize structurally modified natural sialic acidsStructural Basis for Substrate Specificity and Mechanism of NAcetylDneuraminic Acid Lyase from

  2. Combining Regression Trees and Radial Basis Function Networks Mark Orr, John Hallam,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    a model using linear regression. The non-linear transformation is controlled by a set of m basis functions, 1988] transform the n- dimensional inputs non-linearly to an m-dimensional space and then estimate and radii and the second estimates the weights, fw j g m j=1 , of the linear regression model f(x) = m X j=1

  3. Physics basis for a spherical torus power plant S.C. Jardin a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    Physics basis for a spherical torus power plant S.C. Jardin a, *, C.E. Kessel a , J. Menard a , T for a fusion power plant. A special class of wall-stabilized high-b high-bootstrap fraction low-aspect-ratio tokamak; Fusion power plant; Plasma operating regime 1. Introduction The most significant difference

  4. vol. 158, no. 3 the american naturalist september 2001 The Demographic Basis of Population Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oli, Madan K.

    Regulation in Columbian Ground Squirrels F. Stephen Dobson1,* and Madan K. Oli2, 1. Department of Biological on dem- ographic variables, but demographic mechanisms of population regulation have received little attention. We investigated the demo- graphic basis of regulation of Columbian ground squirrel (Spermo

  5. Physics forms the basis of virtually all scientific and engineering undertakings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Physics forms the basis of virtually all scientific and engineering undertakings. Physicists, and astronomy/astrophysics. Visit the Department Web site at http://panda.unm.edu Visit the UNM Web site at http studies in a variety of disciplines ranging from any sort of science, to engineering, mathematics, law

  6. Engineering Multimedia Applications on the basis of Multi-Structured Descriptions of Audiovisual Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Engineering Multimedia Applications on the basis of Multi-Structured Descriptions of Audiovisual of multimedia ap- plications whose purpose is to exploit and make best use of the audiovisual heritage by means provides a multimedia developer with operations on descriptions and their inner descriptors, as well

  7. Dynamical properties of non-ideal plasma on the basis of effective potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Kodanova, S. K.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Issanova, M. K. [IETP, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 Al-Farabi str., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)] [IETP, Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 Al-Farabi str., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, stopping power has been calculated on the basis of the Coulomb logarithm using the effective potentials. Calculations of the Coulomb logarithm and stopping power for different interaction potentials and degrees of ionization are compared. The comparison with the data of other theoretical and experimental works was carried out.

  8. |Research Focus The neural basis of the WeberFechner law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nieder, Andreas

    |Research Focus The neural basis of the Weber­Fechner law: a logarithmic mental number line of number representation. In a recent article, Nieder and Miller demonstrate a neural correlate of Weber. Founding fathers of experimental psychology, inlcuding Weber and Fechner considered as one of their central

  9. Threat Modeling as a Basis for Security Requirements Suvda Myagmar Adam J. Lee William Yurcik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Threat Modeling as a Basis for Security Requirements Suvda Myagmar Adam J. Lee William Yurcik. Prior to claiming the security of a system, it is important to iden- tify the threats to the system in question. Enumerating the threats to a system helps system architects develop realis- tic and meaningful

  10. Genetic basis of eye and pigment loss in the cave crustacean, Asellus aquaticus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Nipam H.

    Genetic basis of eye and pigment loss in the cave crustacean, Asellus aquaticus Meredith E. Protasa and the loss of eyes and pigmentation, have evolved multiple times in a diverse assemblage of cave animals to be involved in pigmen- tation, eye, and appendage development, was used to identify loci of large effect

  11. The neural basis of implicit learning and memory: A review of neuropsychological and neuroimaging research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reber, Paul J.

    expressions of learning and memory. The other type of memory is generally defined by an absence: either to a single research report. The observation of some types of preserved learning in H.M. were first documentedThe neural basis of implicit learning and memory: A review of neuropsychological and neuroimaging

  12. Improving a pavement-watering method on the basis1 of pavement surface temperature measurements2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Improving a pavement-watering method on the basis1 of pavement surface temperature measurements2.hendel@paris.fr)8 Abstract: Pavement-watering has been studied since the 1990's and is currently considered a9 water resource availability problems require that water consumption be optimized. Although11 pavement

  13. FREE QUARK SEARCHES The basis for much of the theory of particle scattering and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to "unglue" quarks. Accelerator searches at increasing energies have pro- duced no evidence for free quarks­ 1­ FREE QUARK SEARCHES The basis for much of the theory of particle scattering and hadron as free particles but are confined to mesons and baryons. Experiments show that it is at best difficult

  14. Defining a Stream Restoration Body of Knowledge as a Basis for National Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Joanna C.

    Forum Defining a Stream Restoration Body of Knowledge as a Basis for National Certification Sue L-7900.0000814 Introduction The practice of stream restoration has become widely accepted as an essential component protocols remain for the practice of stream restoration. Given the lack of consistency, many restoration

  15. CRAD, Safety Basis- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  16. A structural basis for developmental dyslexia: Evidence from diffusion tensor imaging Russell A. Poldrack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poldrack, Russ

    A structural basis for developmental dyslexia: Evidence from diffusion tensor imaging Russell A: 617-726-7422 Email: poldrack@nmr.mgh.harvard.edu #12;Poldrack ­ DTI and dyslexia 2 Abstract Studies of developmental dyslexia using functional imaging techniques have found disrupted activation of the left angular

  17. Reducing the Plagiarism Detection Search Space on the Basis of the Kullback-Leibler Distance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosso, Paolo

    Reducing the Plagiarism Detection Search Space on the Basis of the Kullback-Leibler Distance, jbenedi}@dsic.upv.es http://www.dsic.upv.es/grupos/nle/ Abstract. Automatic plagiarism detection the plagiarised fragments to their potential source. Publications on this task often assume that the search space

  18. Centrifuge Permeameter for Unsaturated Soils. I: Theoretical Basis and Experimental Developments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Centrifuge Permeameter for Unsaturated Soils. I: Theoretical Basis and Experimental Developments Jorge G. Zornberg, M.ASCE1 ; and John S. McCartney, A.M.ASCE2 Abstract: A new centrifuge permeameter the centrifuge permeame- ter for concurrent determination of the soil-water retention curve SWRC and hydraulic

  19. Beer is the basis of modern civilization. Without it, humankind would have not

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    Beer is the basis of modern civilization. Without it, humankind would have not established static communities. Without it, we would not have the modern pharmaceutical industry. With beer, we have the world's favorite alcoholic beverage ­ the drink of moderation. The science and technology of making beer is complex

  20. On the Construction of Initial Basis Function for Efficient Value Function Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jason Yi-Bing

    ) are a general framework for planning and learning under uncertainty. On solving problems with large-scale for the learning process [11]. Incremental basis generation aims to provide feature expansion, and both the work the issues of improving the feature generation methods for the value-function approximation and the state

  1. Develop the Basis for Plasma Material Interface (PMI) Solutions for FNSF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Develop the Basis for Plasma Material Interface (PMI) Solutions for FNSF FESAC Strategic Planning to resolve the PMI challenge 2014 2025 2050 Predictable boundary plasma control to bridge the transition-plasma solutions to mitigate PMI challenges a. Comprehensive measurements and coordinated multi-machine experiments

  2. We have used our Integrated Learning Environment for Mechanics (ILEM) as a basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract We have used our Integrated Learning Environment for Mechanics (ILEM) as a basis.5 -0.25 0 0.25 0.5 0.75 1 DiffIRT Easy Medium Hard 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 time multi-level homework problems, where students choose to work easy (+1), medium (+2), or hard (+3

  3. Viruses' Life History: Towards a Mechanistic Basis of a Trade-Off between Survival

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Viruses' Life History: Towards a Mechanistic Basis of a Trade-Off between Survival and Reproduction Medicale, University of Paris 5, INSERM, Paris, France Life history theory accounts for variations in many traits involved in the reproduction and survival of living organisms, by determining the constraints

  4. CRAD, Safety Basis- Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Safety Basis portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor.

  5. Direct electrodeposition of metals and conducting polymers on nonwoven thermoplastics on a continuous basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathirgamanathan, P.; Boland, B. (Univ. College, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct electrodeposition of nickel and poly(pyrrole) onto carbon impregnated nonwoven polyesters produces conductive tapes suitable for electromagnetic shielding. The use of a partly immersed cylindrical horizontal revolving electrode (PICHRE) permits the production of these tapes on a continuous basis. Conductivity vs. strain characteristics, shielding efficiency, surface transfer impedance, and mechanical properties are described.

  6. Technical basis document for the release from contaminated facility representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OBERG, B.D.

    2003-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document supports the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the release from contaminated facility representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. The representative accidents qualitatively considered are fires, deflagrations, and load drops in contaminated areas. The risks from a separate evaluation of compressed gas hazards are also summarized.

  7. Margin of Safety Definition and Examples Used in Safety Basis Documents and the USQ Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beaulieu, R. A.

    2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Safety Management final rule, 10 CFR 830, provides an undefined term, margin of safety (MOS). Safe harbors listed in 10 CFR 830, Table 2, such as DOE?STD?3009 use but do not define the term. This lack of definition has created the need for the definition. This paper provides a definition of MOS and documents examples of MOS as applied in a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) approved safety basis for an existing nuclear facility. If we understand what MOS looks like regarding Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) parameters, then it helps us compare against other parameters that do not involve a MOS. This paper also documents parameters that are not MOS. These criteria could be used to determine if an MOS exists in safety basis documents. This paper helps DOE, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and its contractors responsible for the safety basis improve safety basis documents and the unreviewed safety question (USQ) process with respect to MOS.

  8. CRAD, Safety Basis- Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Safety Basis at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility.

  9. Grid and basis adaptive polynomial chaos techniques for sensitivity and uncertainty analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perkó, Zoltán, E-mail: Z.Perko@tudelft.nl; Gilli, Luca, E-mail: Gilli@nrg.eu; Lathouwers, Danny, E-mail: D.Lathouwers@tudelft.nl; Kloosterman, Jan Leen, E-mail: J.L.Kloosterman@tudelft.nl

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The demand for accurate and computationally affordable sensitivity and uncertainty techniques is constantly on the rise and has become especially pressing in the nuclear field with the shift to Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty methodologies in the licensing of nuclear installations. Besides traditional, already well developed methods – such as first order perturbation theory or Monte Carlo sampling – Polynomial Chaos Expansion (PCE) has been given a growing emphasis in recent years due to its simple application and good performance. This paper presents new developments of the research done at TU Delft on such Polynomial Chaos (PC) techniques. Our work is focused on the Non-Intrusive Spectral Projection (NISP) approach and adaptive methods for building the PCE of responses of interest. Recent efforts resulted in a new adaptive sparse grid algorithm designed for estimating the PC coefficients. The algorithm is based on Gerstner's procedure for calculating multi-dimensional integrals but proves to be computationally significantly cheaper, while at the same it retains a similar accuracy as the original method. More importantly the issue of basis adaptivity has been investigated and two techniques have been implemented for constructing the sparse PCE of quantities of interest. Not using the traditional full PC basis set leads to further reduction in computational time since the high order grids necessary for accurately estimating the near zero expansion coefficients of polynomial basis vectors not needed in the PCE can be excluded from the calculation. Moreover the sparse PC representation of the response is easier to handle when used for sensitivity analysis or uncertainty propagation due to the smaller number of basis vectors. The developed grid and basis adaptive methods have been implemented in Matlab as the Fully Adaptive Non-Intrusive Spectral Projection (FANISP) algorithm and were tested on four analytical problems. These show consistent good performance both in terms of the accuracy of the resulting PC representation of quantities and the computational costs associated with constructing the sparse PCE. Basis adaptivity also seems to make the employment of PC techniques possible for problems with a higher number of input parameters (15–20), alleviating a well known limitation of the traditional approach. The prospect of larger scale applicability and the simplicity of implementation makes such adaptive PC algorithms particularly appealing for the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of complex systems and legacy codes.

  10. CP-odd Weak Basis Invariants for Neutrino Mass Matrices with a Texture Zero and a Vanishing Minor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dev; Shivani Gupta; Radha Raman Gautam

    2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct the $CP$-odd weak basis invariants in the flavor basis for all the phenomenologically viable neutrino mass matrices with a texture zero and a vanishing minor and, also, find the necessary and sufficient conditions for $CP$ invariance . We examine the interrelationships between different $CP$-odd weak basis invariants for these texture structures and investigate their implications for Dirac- and Majorana-type $CP$ violation.

  11. CP-odd Weak Basis Invariants for Neutrino Mass Matrices with a Texture Zero and a Vanishing Minor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dev, S; Gautam, Radha Raman

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct the $CP$-odd weak basis invariants in the flavor basis for all the phenomenologically viable neutrino mass matrices with a texture zero and a vanishing minor and, also, find the necessary and sufficient conditions for $CP$ invariance . We examine the interrelationships between different $CP$-odd weak basis invariants for these texture structures and investigate their implications for Dirac- and Majorana-type $CP$ violation.

  12. Materials and Security Consolidation Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Security Consolidation Center facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  13. Central Facilities Area Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Central Facilities Area facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facilityspecific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  14. Materials and Fuels Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Materials and Fuels Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool for developing the radioactive waste management basis.

  15. Research and Education Campus Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory Research and Education Campus facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

  16. Bonding, Backbonding, and Spin-Polarized Molecular Orbitals: Basis for Magnetism and Semiconducting Transport in V[TCNE]x~;;2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortright, Jeffrey B

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orbitals: Basis for Magnetism and Semiconducting Transportand photo-induced magnetism [6, 7]. These novel propertiesthe former LUMO splitting. Magnetism and activated transport

  17. The Role of Basis Set Superposition Error in Water Addition Reactions to Ln(III) Cations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kvamme, Brandon; Wander, Matthew C F.; Clark, Aurora E.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our goal in this work was to characterize the importance of basis set superposition error (BSSE) in the reaction energetics of water addition to highly charged metal ions that exhibit strong ion-dipole interactions with water. The gas phase water addition reactions, M(H?O)ł+N + H?O ? M(H?O)ł+N ? ? [M = La(III), Lu(III); N = 0–8] have been studied, with a particular emphasis on a posteriori methods for calculating BSSE and its constituent energetic components as a function of M(H?O) ł+N cluster size and water basis set. Because of accumulation of BSSE within the subclusters in the reaction series, the successive reaction counterpoise method for determining the BSSE correction interaction energies is advocated.

  18. Comparison of CRBR design-basis events with those of foreign LMFBR plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, A.K.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Construction Permit (CP) review of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBR), the Brookhaven National Laboratory was asked to compare the Design Basis Accidents that are considered in CRBR Preliminary Safety Analysis Report with those of the foreign contemporary plants (PHENIX, SUPER-PHENIX, SNR-300, PFR, and MONJU). A brief introductory review of any special or unusual characteristics of these plants is given. This is followed by discussions of the design basis accidents and their acceptance criteria. In spite of some discrepancies due either to semantics or to licensing decisions, there appears to be a considerable degree of unanimity in the selection (definition) of DBAs in all of these plants.

  19. Technical basis document for the steam intrusion from interfacing systems accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOETZ, T.G.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the steam intrusion from interfacing systems representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', as described in this report.

  20. Technical basis for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARSON, D.M.

    2003-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', as described in this report.

  1. Technical basis for the tank bump representative accident and associated hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WILLIAMS, J.C.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the tank bump representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and/or technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', as described in this report.

  2. Integrated Safety Management System as the Basis for Work Planning and Control for Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Slide Presentation by Rich Davies, Kami Lowry, Mike Schlender, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Ted Pietrok, Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO). Integrated Safety Management System as the Basis for Work Planning and Control for Research and Development. Work Planning and Control (WP&C) is essential to assuring the safety of workers and the public regardless of the scope of work Research and Development (R&D) activities are no exception.

  3. Physics Basis for the ARIES-ST Power Plant S.C. Jardin,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physics Basis for the ARIES-ST Power Plant T.K. Mau, a S.C. Jardin, b C.E. Kessel, b J.E. Menard, b -- ARIES-ST, a fusion power plant design based on the spherical tokamak concept, has many attractive] as a potential power plant and volumetric neutron source. At the beginning of 1999, the ARIES Group has completed

  4. FINDING SIMPLICITY IN THE COMPLEX SYSTEMIC ARTERIAL SYSTEM: BASIS OF INCREASED PULSE PRESSURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohiuddin, Mohammad W.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    FINDING SIMPLICITY IN THE COMPLEX SYSTEMIC ARTERIAL SYSTEM : BASIS OF INCREASED PULSE PRESSURE A Dissertation by MOHAMMAD WAQAR MOHIUDDIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... by MOHAMMAD WAQAR MOHIUDDIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Christopher Quick Committee Members...

  5. Technical Basis for Work Place Air Monitoring for the Plutonium Finishing Plan (PFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JONES, R.A.

    1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the basis for the Plutonium Finishing Plant's (PFP) work place air monitoring program in accordance with the following requirements: Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835 ''Occupational Radiation Protection''; Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual (HSRCM-1); HNF-PRO-33 1, Work Place Air Monitoring; WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021, Plutonium Finishing Plant Final Safety Analysis Report; and Applicable recognized national standards invoked by DOE Orders and Policies.

  6. Differentiating neutrino models on the basis of $\\theta_{13}$ and lepton flavor violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albright, Carl H.; /Northern Illinois U. /Fermilab

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors show how models of neutrino masses and mixings can be differentiated on the basis of their predictions for {theta}{sub 13} and lepton flavor violation in radiative charged lepton decays and {mu} - e conversion. They illustrate the lepton flavor violation results for five predictive SO(10) SUSY GUT models and point out the relative importance of their heavy right-handed neutrino mass spectra and {theta}{sub 13} predictions.

  7. The Neural Basis of Dyslexia may Originate in Primary Auditory Cortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goswami, Usha

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 The Neural Basis of Dyslexia may Originate in Primary Auditory Cortex Usha Goswami, University of Cambridge Longitudinal research studies that follow at-risk samples before a disorder is evident, ideally from infancy, are the gold standard... in the field of neurodevelopmental disorders (Goswami, in press). They are also the rarest. In this issue of Brain, Clark and colleagues report a longitudinal structural neuroimaging study of children at high versus low risk of dyslexia that began before...

  8. Technical Basis for U. S. Department of Energy Nuclear Safety Policy, DOE Policy 420.1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document provides the technical basis for the Department of Energy (DOE) Policy (P) 420.1, Nuclear Safety Policy, dated 2-8-2011. It includes an analysis of the revised Policy to determine whether it provides the necessary and sufficient high-level expectations that will lead DOE to establish and implement appropriate requirements to assure protection of the public, workers, and the environment from the hazards of DOE’s operation of nuclear facilities.

  9. Molecular Basis for the High Affinity Binding and Stabilization of Firefly Luciferase by PTC124

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auld, Douglas S.; Lovell, Scott; Thorne, Natasha; Lea, Wendy A.; Maloney, David J.; Shen, Min; Rai, Ganesha; Battaile, Kevin P.; Thomas, Craig J.; Simeonov, Anton; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Inglese, James

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Douglas S. Auld, Scott Lovell, Natasha Thorne, Wendy A. Lea, David J. Maloney, Min Shen, Ganesha Rai, Kevin Battaile, Craig J. Thomas, Anton Simeonov, Robert P. Hanzlik, and James Inglese, "Molecular Basis for the High Affinity Binding... contains the author’s accepted manuscript. For the publisher’s version, see the link in the header of this document.] Paper citation: Douglas S. Auld, Scott Lovell, Natasha Thorne, Wendy A. Lea, David J. Maloney, Min Shen, Ganesha Rai, Kevin...

  10. Analytic eigenenergies of Dirac equation under a confining linear potential using basis functions localized in spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fukushima, Kimichika

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents analytical eigenenergies for a pair of confined fundamental fermion and antifermion under a linear potential derived from the Wilson loop for the non-Abelian Yang-Mills field. We use basis functions localized in spacetime, and the Hamiltonian matrix of the Dirac equation is analytically diagonalized. The squared system eigenenergies are proportional to the string tension and the absolute value of the Dirac's relativistic quantum number related to the total angular momentum, consistent with the expectation.

  11. Generalized Stokes eignefunctions: a new trial basis for the solution of incompressible Navier-Stokes equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batcho, P.F. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Karniadakis, G.E. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)] [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study focuses on the solution of the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in general, non-separable domains, and employs a Galerkin projection of divergence-free vector functions as a trail basis. This basis is obtained from the solution of a generalized constrained Stokes eigen-problem in the domain of interest. Faster convergence can be achieved by constructing a singular Stokes eigen-problem in which the Stokes operator is modified to include a variable coefficient which vanishes at the domain boundaries. The convergence properties of such functions are advantageous in a least squares sense and are shown to produce significantly better approximations to the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations in post-critical states where unsteadiness characterizes the flowfield. Solutions for the eigen-systems are efficiently accomplished using a combined Lanczos-Uzawa algorithm and spectral element discretizations. Results are presented for different simulations using these global spectral trial basis on non-separable and multiply-connected domains. It is confirmed that faster convergence is obtained using the singular eigen-expansions in approximating stationary Navier-Stokes solutions in general domains. It is also shown that 100-mode expansions of time-dependent solutions based on the singular Stokes eigenfunctions are sufficient to accurately predict the dynamics of flows in such domains, including Hopf bifurcations, intermittency, and details of flow structures.

  12. Safety basis for the 241-AN-107 mixer pump installation and caustic addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Vleet, R.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This safety Basis was prepared to determine whether or not the proposed activities of installing a 76 HP jet mixer pump and the addition of approximately 50,000 gallons of 19 M (50:50 wt %) aqueous caustic are within the safety envelope as described by Tank Farms (chapter six of WHC-SD-WM-ISB-001, Rev. 0). The safety basis covers the components, structures and systems for the caustic addition and mixer pump installation. These include: installation of the mixer pump and monitoring equipment; operation of the mixer pump, process monitoring equipment and caustic addition; the pump stand, caustic addition skid, the electrical skid, the video camera system and the two densitometers. Also covered is the removal and decontamination of the mixer pump and process monitoring system. Authority for this safety basis is WHC-IP-0842 (Waste Tank Administration). Section 15.9, Rev. 2 (Unreviewed Safety Questions) of WHC-IP-0842 requires that an evaluation be performed for all physical modifications.

  13. Demonstrating Structural Adequacy of Nuclear Power Plant Containment Structures for Beyond Design-Basis Pressure Loadings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braverman, J.I.; Morante, R.

    2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Demonstrating the structural integrity of U.S. nuclear power plant (NPP) containment structures, for beyond design-basis internal pressure loadings, is necessary to satisfy Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements and performance goals. This paper discusses methods for demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment for beyond design-basis pressure loadings. Three distinct evaluations are addressed: (1) estimating the ultimate pressure capacity of the containment structure (10 CFR 50 and US NRC Standard Review Plan, Section 3.8) ; (2) demonstrating the structural adequacy of the containment subjected to pressure loadings associated with combustible gas generation (10 CFR 52 and 10 CFR 50); and (3) demonstrating the containment structural integrity for severe accidents (10 CFR 52 as well as SECY 90-016, SECY 93-087, and related NRC staff requirements memoranda (SRMs)). The paper describes the technical basis for specific aspects of the methods presented. It also presents examples of past issues identified in licensing activities related to these evaluations.

  14. Noncovalent Interactions by Quantum Monte Carlo: A Speedup by a Smart Basis Set Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubecký, Matúš

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo (FN-DMC) method provides a promising alternative to the commonly used coupled-cluster (CC) methods, in the domain of benchmark noncovalent interaction energy calculations. This is mainly true for a low-order polynomial CPU cost scaling of FN-DMC and favorable FN error cancellation leading to benchmark interaction energies accurate to 0.1 kcal/mol. While it is empirically accepted that the FN-DMC results depend weakly on the one-particle basis sets used to expand the guiding functions, limits of this assumption remain elusive. Our recent work indicates that augmented triple zeta basis sets are sufficient to achieve a benchmark level of 0.1 kcal/mol. Here we report on a possibility of significant truncation of the one-particle basis sets without any visible bias on the overall accuracy of the final FN-DMC energy differences. The approach is tested on a set of seven small noncovalent closed-shell complexes including a water dimer. The reported findings enable cheaper high-quali...

  15. Technical basis for the transportation related handling representative accidents and associated hazards condition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TOMASZEWSKI, T.A.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the handling and movement of tank farm waste sample containers, and mixed, low-level, and hazardous operational waste containers incidental to onsite vehicle transportation representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. See RPP-14286, Facility Worker Technical Basis Document, for these considerations. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described in this report.

  16. Appropriate SCF basis sets for orbital studies of galaxies and a `quantum-mechanical' method to compute them

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constantinos Kalapotharakos; Christos Efthymiopoulos; Nikos Voglis

    2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the question of an appropriate choice of basis functions for the self-consistent field (SCF) method of simulation of the N-body problem. Our criterion is based on a comparison of the orbits found in N-body realizations of analytical potential-density models of triaxial galaxies, in which the potential is fitted by the SCF method using a variety of basis sets, with those of the original models. Our tests refer to maximally triaxial Dehnen gamma-models for values of $\\gamma$ in the range 0<=gamma<=1. When an N-body realization of a model is fitted by the SCF method, the choice of radial basis functions affects significantly the way the potential, forces, or derivatives of the forces are reproduced, especially in the central regions of the system. We find that this results in serious discrepancies in the relative amounts of chaotic versus regular orbits, or in the distributions of the Lyapunov characteristic exponents, as found by different basis sets. Numerical tests include the Clutton-Brock and the Hernquist-Ostriker (HO) basis sets, as well as a family of numerical basis sets which are `close' to the HO basis set. The family of numerical basis sets is parametrized in terms of a quantity $\\epsilon$ which appears in the kernel functions of the Sturm-Liouville (SL) equation defining each basis set. The HO basis set is the $\\epsilon=0$ member of the family. We demonstrate that grid solutions of the SL equation yielding numerical basis sets introduce large errors in the variational equations of motion. We propose a quantum-mechanical method of solution of the SL equation which overcomes these errors. We finally give criteria for a choice of optimal value of $\\epsilon$ and calculate the latter as a function of the value of gamma.

  17. What are the most efficient basis set strategies for correlated wave function calculations of reaction energies and barrier heights?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truhlar, Donald G

    What are the most efficient basis set strategies for correlated wave function calculations of reaction energies and barrier heights? Ewa Papajak and Donald G. Truhlar Citation: J. Chem. Phys. 137 OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 137, 064110 (2012) What are the most efficient basis set strategies for correlated wave

  18. Just in Time DSA-The Hanford Nuclear Safety Basis Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, S. J.; Buhl, A. R.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) is responsible for 30 hazard category 2 and 3 nuclear facilities that are operated by its prime contractors, Fluor Hanford Incorporated (FHI), Bechtel Hanford, Incorporated (BHI) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The publication of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 830, Subpart B, Safety Basis Requirements (the Rule) in January 2001 imposed the requirement that the Documented Safety Analyses (DSA) for these facilities be reviewed against the requirements of the Rule. Those DSA that do not meet the requirements must either be upgraded to satisfy the Rule, or an exemption must be obtained. RL and its prime contractors have developed a Nuclear Safety Strategy that provides a comprehensive approach for supporting RL's efforts to meet its long term objectives for hazard category 2 and 3 facilities while also meeting the requirements of the Rule. This approach will result in a reduction of the total number of safety basis documents that must be developed and maintained to support the remaining mission and closure of the Hanford Site and ensure that the documentation that must be developed will support: compliance with the Rule; a ''Just-In-Time'' approach to development of Rule-compliant safety bases supported by temporary exemptions; and consolidation of safety basis documents that support multiple facilities with a common mission (e.g. decontamination, decommissioning and demolition [DD&D], waste management, surveillance and maintenance). This strategy provides a clear path to transition the safety bases for the various Hanford facilities from support of operation and stabilization missions through DD&D to accelerate closure. This ''Just-In-Time'' Strategy can also be tailored for other DOE Sites, creating the potential for large cost savings and schedule reductions throughout the DOE complex.

  19. Technical basis for classification of low-activity waste fraction from Hanford site tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, C.A.

    1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this report is to provide a technical basis to support a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission determination to classify the low-activity waste from the Hanford Site single-shell and double-shell tanks as `incidental` wastes after removal of additional radionuclides and immobilization.The proposed processing method, in addition to the previous radionuclide removal efforts, will remove the largest practical amount of total site radioactivity, attributable to high-level waste, for disposal is a deep geologic repository. The remainder of the waste would be considered `incidental` waste and could be disposed onsite.

  20. Somatic mutations in PI3K[alpha]: Structural basis for enzyme activation and drug design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabelli, Sandra B.; Mandelker, Diana; Schmidt-Kittler, Oleg; Vogelstein, Bert; Amzel, L. Mario (JHU); (HHMI)

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The PI3K pathway is a communication hub coordinating critical cell functions including cell survival, cell growth, proliferation, motility and metabolism. Because PI3K{alpha} harbors recurrent somatic mutations resulting in gains of function in human cancers, it has emerged as an important drug target for many types of solid tumors. Various PI3K isoforms are also being evaluated as potential therapeutic targets for inflammation, heart disease, and hematological malignancies. Structural biology is providing insights into the flexibility of the PI3Ks, and providing basis for understanding the effects of mutations, drug resistance and specificity.

  1. Somatic Mutations in PI3Kalpha: Structural Basis for Enzyme Activation and Drug Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S Gabelli; D Mandelker; O Schmidt-Kittler; B Vogelstein; L Amzel

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The PI3K pathway is a communication hub coordinating critical cell functions including cell survival, cell growth, proliferation, motility and metabolism. Because PI3K{alpha} harbors recurrent somatic mutations resulting in gains of function in human cancers, it has emerged as an important drug target for many types of solid tumors. Various PI3K isoforms are also being evaluated as potential therapeutic targets for inflammation, heart disease, and hematological malignancies. Structural biology is providing insights into the flexibility of the PI3Ks, and providing basis for understanding the effects of mutations, drug resistance and specificity.

  2. The Structural Basis of Cryptosporidium-Specific IMP Dehydrogenase Inhibitor Selectivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacPherson, Iain S.; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Riera, Thomas V.; D’ Aquino, J. Alejandro; Zhang, Minjia; Cuny, Gregory D.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth (BWH); (Brandeis)

    2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Cryptosporidium parvum is a potential biowarfare agent, an important AIDS pathogen, and a major cause of diarrhea and malnutrition. No vaccines or effective drug treatment exist to combat Cryptosporidium infection. This parasite relies on inosine 5{prime}-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) to obtain guanine nucleotides, and inhibition of this enzyme blocks parasite proliferation. Here, we report the first crystal structures of CpIMPDH. These structures reveal the structural basis of inhibitor selectivity and suggest a strategy for further optimization. Using this information, we have synthesized low-nanomolar inhibitors that display 10{sup 3} selectivity for the parasite enzyme over human IMPDH2.

  3. Microsoft Word - CR-091 Primary Basis of Cost Savings and Cost Savings Amount Custom Fields

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently Asked Questions forCheneyNovember S. DEPARTMENTthe UseCR-091 Primary Basis of Cost

  4. Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility Safety Basis and Safety Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonant Soft X-Ray ScatteringBenefitsReversingReviewBasis

  5. Computing single step operators of logic programming in radial basis function neural networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamadneh, Nawaf; Sathasivam, Saratha; Choon, Ong Hong [School of Mathematical Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Logic programming is the process that leads from an original formulation of a computing problem to executable programs. A normal logic program consists of a finite set of clauses. A valuation I of logic programming is a mapping from ground atoms to false or true. The single step operator of any logic programming is defined as a function (T{sub p}:I?I). Logic programming is well-suited to building the artificial intelligence systems. In this study, we established a new technique to compute the single step operators of logic programming in the radial basis function neural networks. To do that, we proposed a new technique to generate the training data sets of single step operators. The training data sets are used to build the neural networks. We used the recurrent radial basis function neural networks to get to the steady state (the fixed point of the operators). To improve the performance of the neural networks, we used the particle swarm optimization algorithm to train the networks.

  6. Development of Probabilistic Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Parameters for Moderate and High Hazard Facilities at INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. M. Payne; V. W. Gorman; S. A. Jensen; M. E. Nitzel; M. J. Russell; R. P. Smith

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) horizontal and vertical response spectra are developed for moderate and high hazard facilities or Performance Categories (PC) 3 and 4, respectively, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The probabilistic DBE response spectra will replace the deterministic DBE response spectra currently in the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) Architectural Engineering Standards that govern seismic design criteria for several facility areas at the INEEL. Probabilistic DBE response spectra are recommended to DOE Naval Reactors for use at the Naval Reactor Facility at INEEL. The site-specific Uniform Hazard Spectra (UHS) developed by URS Greiner Woodward Clyde Federal Services are used as the basis for developing the DBE response spectra. In 1999, the UHS for all INEEL facility areas were recomputed using more appropriate attenuation relationships for the Basin and Range province. The revised UHS have lower ground motions than those produced in the 1996 INEEL site-wide probabilistic ground motion study. The DBE response spectra were developed by incorporating smoothed broadened regions of the peak accelerations, velocities, and displacements defined by the site-specific UHS. Portions of the DBE response spectra were adjusted to ensure conservatism for the structural design process.

  7. Technical basis document for the unplanned excavation/drilling of 200 area soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEPHENS, L.S.

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the unplanned excavation/drilling of 200 Area soils representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and/or technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous conditions based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses, as described in this report.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Fundamentals Self-Study Guide [Fulfills ORO Safety Basis Competency 1, 2 (Part 1), or 7 (Part 1)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This self-study guide provides an overview of safety basis terminology, requirements, and activities that are applicable to DOE and Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) nuclear facilities on the Oak...

  9. Strategic Basis for License Application Planning for a Potential Yucca Mountain Repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newberry, C. M.; Brocoum, S. J.; Gamble, R. P.; Murray, R. C.; Cline, M.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    If Yucca Mountain, Nevada is designated as the site for development of a geologic repository for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, the Department of Energy (DOE) must obtain Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval first for repository construction, then for an operating license, and, eventually, for repository closure and decommissioning. The licensing criteria defined in Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 63 (10 CFR Part 63) establish the basis for these NRC decisions. Submittal of a license application (LA) to the NRC for authorization to construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain site is, at this point, only a potential future action by the DOE. The policy process defined in the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA), as amended, for recommendation and designation of Yucca Mountain as a repository site makes it difficult to predict whether or when the site might be designated. The DOE may only submit a LA to the NRC if the site designation takes effect. In spite of this uncertainty, the DOE must take prudent and appropriate action now, and over the next several years, to prepare for development and timely submittal of a LA. This is particularly true given the need for the DOE to develop, load, and certify the operation of its electronic information system to provide access to its relevant records as part of the licensing support network (LSN) in compliance with NRC requirements six months prior to LA submittal. The DOE must also develop a LA, which is a substantially different document from those developed to support a Site Recommendation (SR) decision. The LA must satisfy NRC licensing criteria and content requirements, and address the acceptance criteria defined by the NRC in its forthcoming Yucca Mountain Review Plan (YMRP). The content of the LA must be adequate to facilitate NRC acceptance and docketing for review, and the LA and its supporting documents must provide the documented basis for the NR C findings required for a construction authorization. The LA must also support a licensing proceeding before an Atomic Safety and Licensing Board panel prior to NRC action on any decision to authorize construction. The DOE has established a strategic basis for planning that is intended to provide the framework for development of an integrated plan for activities leading to preparation and submittal of a LA.

  10. Advanced Test Reactor Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

  11. Efficient Approximation of Diagonal Unitaries over the Clifford+T Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Welch; Alex Bocharov; Krysta M. Svore

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an algorithm for the approximate decomposition of diagonal operators, focusing specifically on decompositions over the Clifford+$T$ basis, that minimize the number of phase-rotation gates in the synthesized approximation circuit. The equivalent $T$-count of the synthesized circuit is bounded by $k \\, C_0 \\log_2(1/\\varepsilon) + E(n,k)$, where $k$ is the number of distinct phases in the diagonal $n$-qubit unitary, $\\varepsilon$ is the desired precision, $C_0$ is a quality factor of the implementation method ($1total entanglement cost (in $T$ gates). We determine an optimal decision boundary in $(k,n,\\varepsilon)$-space where our decomposition algorithm achieves lower entanglement cost than previous state-of-the-art techniques. Our method outperforms state-of-the-art techniques for a practical range of $\\varepsilon$ values and diagonal operators and can reduce the number of $T$ gates exponentially in $n$ when $k << 2^n$.

  12. B-splines as a basis for the Rayleigh-Ritz-Galerkin procedure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snodgrass, Jerry Grant

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , but this is not possible since B (x) is a basis i=1 w f for S. Thus n A a & 0 implies that A is positive definite and therefore A n = 0 has a unique solution a . By elementary calculus B F 2a(B. , B. ) = 2A; therefore since A is positive definite, Ba Sn. i' j i j 8 F... of knots to be inserted NG ? the degree of the Gauss-Lengendre quadrature formulas (NG & 6) T ? a vector of N+K elements containing the original placement of the knots with K stacked at 0 and 1 X ? a vector of NX elements containing the values at which...

  13. Structural basis of CX-4945 binding to human protein kinase CK2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, Andrew D.; Sheth, Payal R.; Basso, Andrea D.; Paliwal, Sunil; Gray, Kimberly; Fischmann, Thierry O.; Le, Hung V. (Merck)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein kinase CK2 (CK2), a constitutively active serine/threonine kinase, is involved in a variety of roles essential to the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Elevated levels of CK2 expression results in the dysregulation of key signaling pathways that regulate transcription, and has been implicated in cancer. The adenosine-5'-triphosphate-competitive inhibitor CX-4945 has been reported to show broad spectrum anti-proliferative activity in multiple cancer cell lines. Although the enzymatic IC{sub 50} of CX-4945 has been reported, the thermodynamics and structural basis of binding to CK2{alpha} remained elusive. Presented here are the crystal structures of human CK2{alpha} in complex with CX-4945 and adenylyl phosphoramidate at 2.7 and 1.3 {angstrom}, respectively. Biophysical analysis of CX-4945 binding is also described. This data provides the structural rationale for the design of more potent inhibitors against this emerging cancer target.

  14. Improving a pavement-watering method on the basis of pavement surface temperature measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendel, Martin; Diab, Youssef; Royon, Laurent

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pavement-watering has been studied since the 1990's and is currently considered a promising tool for urban heat island reduction and climate change adaptation. However, possible future water resource availability problems require that water consumption be optimized. Although pavement heat flux can be studied to improve pavement-watering methods (frequency and water consumption), these measurements are costly and require invasive construction work to install appropriate sensors in a dense urban environment. Therefore, we analyzed measurements of pavement surface temperatures in search of alternative information relevant to this goal. It was found that high frequency surface temperature measurements (more than every 5 minutes) made by an infrared camera can provide enough information to optimize the watering frequency. Furthermore, if the water retaining capacity of the studied pavement is known, optimization of total water consumption is possible on the sole basis of surface temperature measurements.

  15. B-splines as a basis for the Rayleigh-Ritz-Galerkin procedure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snodgrass, Jerry Grant

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . There is a unioue element u sS rrhich iuilliuii. zes F[u] over S. Proof. (Schultz) n Let IB. (x)I be a basis for S then there exist o. sR, i = 1, ~ ~ . , n l. 1. i=1 n such that u = ) u, B. . Note that S . 1 l. i=1 F n ) / n n n F[u ] = I[ ) n. B. J... ~ MAXMOV ~ INS MAX ~ NG ~ X ~ 8 ~ NX ~ SV) DIMENSION U '{NX) ~ X(NX) ~ 8{ N) rA(N ~ IB) r C(N) ~ DV (K ~ 2) ~ SV(K) DIMENSION T { I ) ~ AD IF{ N ~ K) THIS ROUT INE WAS WR ITTEN BY JERRY SNODGRASS - J UNE ~ )975 THIS ROUTINE COMPUTES THE SOLUTI...

  16. Technical basis for external dosimetry at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, E.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wu, C.F.; Goff, T.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The WIPP External Dosimetry Program, administered by Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division, for the US Department of Energy (DOE), provides external dosimetry support services for operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Site. These operations include the receipt, experimentation with, storage, and disposal of transuranic (TRU) wastes. This document describes the technical basis for the WIPP External Radiation Dosimetry Program. The purposes of this document are to: (1) provide assurance that the WIPP External Radiation Dosimetry Program is in compliance with all regulatory requirements, (2) provide assurance that the WIPP External Radiation Dosimetry Program is derived from a sound technical base, (3) serve as a technical reference for radiation protection personnel, and (4) aid in identifying and planning for future needs. The external radiation exposure fields are those that are documented in the WIPP Final Safety Analysis Report.

  17. Scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A National Research Council study panel, convened by the Board on Radioactive Waste Management, has examined the scientific basis for risk assessment and management of uranium mill tailings and issued this final report containing a number of recommendations. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the problem. Chapter 2 examines the processes of uranium extraction and the mechanisms by which radionuclides and toxic chemicals contained in the ore can enter the environment. Chapter 3 is devoted to a review of the evidence on health risks associated with radon and its decay products. Chapter 4 provides a consideration of conventional and possible new technical alternatives for tailings management. Chapter 5 explores a number of issues of comparative risk, provides a brief history of uranium mill tailings regulation, and concludes with a discussion of choices that must be made in mill tailing risk management. 211 refs., 30 figs., 27 tabs.

  18. Substitution of meat and bone meal and cottonseed meal for soybean meal on a digestible amino acid basis in growing pig diets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobler-Mehner, Carl Heinz

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tryptophan (D. Trp) basis and when 41% CP cottonseed meal (CSM) was substituted for SBM on a digestible lysine (D. Lys) basis. Feedstuffs and yellow corn were characterized, and amino acid digestibility values, determined in previous trials, were used... formulated on a different basis in relation to diet 2: (3) CP basis; (4) D. Trp basis; (5) as 4 plus 10% more D. Trp; (6) as 4 plus digestible isoleucine (D. Ile) basis; (7) contained 18X M&8M; diets 8, 9 and 10 contained 10X CSM (substituted for about one...

  19. Plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) end state basis for interim operation (BIO) for surveillance and maintenance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DODD, E.N.

    1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) was developed for the PUREX end state condition following completion of the deactivation project. The deactivation project has removed or stabilized the hazardous materials within the facility structure and equipment to reduce the hazards posed by the facility during the surveillance and maintenance (S and M) period, and to reduce the costs associated with the S and M. This document serves as the authorization basis for the PUREX facility, excluding the storage tunnels, railroad cut, and associated tracks, for the deactivated end state condition during the S and M period. The storage tunnels, and associated systems and areas, are addressed in WHC-SD-HS-SAR-001, Rev. 1, PUREX Final Safety Analysis Report. During S and M, the mission of the facility is to maintain the conditions and equipment in a manner that ensures the safety of the workers, environment, and the public. The S and M phase will continue until the final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) project and activities are begun. Based on the methodology of DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazards Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, the final facility hazards category is identified as hazards category This considers the remaining material inventories, form and distribution of the material, and the energies present to initiate events of concern. Given the current facility configuration, conditions, and authorized S and M activities, there are no operational events identified resulting in significant hazard to any of the target receptor groups (e.g., workers, public, environment). The only accident scenarios identified with consequences to the onsite co-located workers were based on external natural phenomena, specifically an earthquake. The dose consequences of these events are within the current risk evaluation guidelines and are consistent with the expectations for a hazards category 2 facility.

  20. Green's function multiple-scattering theory with a truncated basis set: An augmented-KKR formalism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alam, Aftab [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay; Khan, Suffian N [Ames Laboratory; Smirnov, A V [Ames Laboratory; Nicholson, D M [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D [Ames Laboratory

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker (KKR) Green's function, multiple-scattering theory is an efficient site-centered, electronic-structure technique for addressing an assembly of N scatterers. Wave functions are expanded in a spherical-wave basis on each scattering center and indexed up to a maximum orbital and azimuthal number Lmax=(l,m)max, while scattering matrices, which determine spectral properties, are truncated at Ltr=(l,m)tr where phase shifts ?l>ltr are negligible. Historically, Lmax is set equal to Ltr, which is correct for large enough Lmax but not computationally expedient; a better procedure retains higher-order (free-electron and single-site) contributions for Lmax>Ltr with ?l>ltr set to zero [X.-G. Zhang and W. H. Butler, Phys. Rev. B 46, 7433 (1992)]. We present a numerically efficient and accurate augmented-KKR Green's function formalism that solves the KKR equations by exact matrix inversion [R3 process with rank N(ltr+1)2] and includes higher-L contributions via linear algebra [R2 process with rank N(lmax+1)2]. The augmented-KKR approach yields properly normalized wave functions, numerically cheaper basis-set convergence, and a total charge density and electron count that agrees with Lloyd's formula. We apply our formalism to fcc Cu, bcc Fe, and L10 CoPt and present the numerical results for accuracy and for the convergence of the total energies, Fermi energies, and magnetic moments versus Lmax for a given Ltr.

  1. C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Natural Gas Annual. 1979: EIA, Natural Gas Production and Consumption, 1979. 1980-1994: EIA, Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposi-...

  2. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Mt St Helens Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goff (2000) Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. SRS BEDROCK PROBABILISTIC SEISMIC HAZARD ANALYSIS (PSHA) DESIGN BASIS JUSTIFICATION (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    (NOEMAIL), R

    2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This represents an assessment of the available Savannah River Site (SRS) hard-rock probabilistic seismic hazard assessments (PSHAs), including PSHAs recently completed, for incorporation in the SRS seismic hazard update. The prior assessment of the SRS seismic design basis (WSRC, 1997) incorporated the results from two PSHAs that were published in 1988 and 1993. Because of the vintage of these studies, an assessment is necessary to establish the value of these PSHAs considering more recently collected data affecting seismic hazards and the availability of more recent PSHAs. This task is consistent with the Department of Energy (DOE) order, DOE O 420.1B and DOE guidance document DOE G 420.1-2. Following DOE guidance, the National Map Hazard was reviewed and incorporated in this assessment. In addition to the National Map hazard, alternative ground motion attenuation models (GMAMs) are used with the National Map source model to produce alternate hazard assessments for the SRS. These hazard assessments are the basis for the updated hard-rock hazard recommendation made in this report. The development and comparison of hazard based on the National Map models and PSHAs completed using alternate GMAMs provides increased confidence in this hazard recommendation. The alternate GMAMs are the EPRI (2004), USGS (2002) and a regional specific model (Silva et al., 2004). Weights of 0.6, 0.3 and 0.1 are recommended for EPRI (2004), USGS (2002) and Silva et al. (2004) respectively. This weighting gives cluster weights of .39, .29, .15, .17 for the 1-corner, 2-corner, hybrid, and Greens-function models, respectively. This assessment is judged to be conservative as compared to WSRC (1997) and incorporates the range of prevailing expert opinion pertinent to the development of seismic hazard at the SRS. The corresponding SRS hard-rock uniform hazard spectra are greater than the design spectra developed in WSRC (1997) that were based on the LLNL (1993) and EPRI (1988) PSHAs. The primary reasons for this difference is the greater activity rate used in contemporary models for the Charleston source zone and proper incorporation of uncertainty and randomness in GMAMs.

  4. Terracentric Nuclear Fission Reactor: Background, Basis, Feasibility, Structure, Evidence, and Geophysical Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Marvin Herndon

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The background, basis, feasibility, structure, evidence, and geophysical implications of a naturally occurring Terracentric nuclear fission georeactor are reviewed. For a nuclear fission reactor to exist at the center of the Earth, all of the following conditions must be met: (1) There must originally have been a substantial quantity of uranium within Earth's core; (2) There must be a natural mechanism for concentrating the uranium; (3) The isotopic composition of the uranium at the onset of fission must be appropriate to sustain a nuclear fission chain reaction; (4) The reactor must be able to breed a sufficient quantity of fissile nuclides to permit operation over the lifetime of Earth to the present; (5) There must be a natural mechanism for the removal of fission products; (6) There must be a natural mechanism for removing heat from the reactor; (7) There must be a natural mechanism to regulate reactor power level, and; (8) The location of the reactor or must be such as to provide containment and prevent meltdown. Herndon's georeactor alone is shown to meet those conditions. Georeactor existence evidence based upon helium measurements and upon antineutrino measurements is described. Geophysical implications discussed include georeactor origin of the geomagnetic field, geomagnetic reversals from intense solar outbursts and severe Earth trauma, as well as georeactor heat contributions to global dynamics.

  5. The Zeeman Effect in Finance: Libor Spectroscopy and Basis Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Bianchetti

    2012-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Once upon a time there was a classical financial world in which all the Libors were equal. Standard textbooks taught that simple relations held, such that, for example, a 6 months Libor Deposit was replicable with a 3 months Libor Deposits plus a 3x6 months Forward Rate Agreement (FRA), and that Libor was a good proxy of the risk free rate required as basic building block of no-arbitrage pricing theory. Nowadays, in the modern financial world after the credit crunch, some Libors are more equal than others, depending on their rate tenor, and classical formulas are history. Banks are not anymore too "big to fail", Libors are fixed by panels of risky banks, and they are risky rates themselves. These simple empirical facts carry very important consequences in derivative's trading and risk management, such as, for example, basis risk, collateralization and regulatory pressure in favour of Central Counterparties. Something that should be carefully considered by anyone managing even a single plain vanilla Swap. In this qualitative note we review the problem trying to shed some light on this modern animal farm, recurring to an analogy with quantum physics, the Zeeman effect.

  6. The Zeeman Effect in Finance: Libor Spectroscopy and Basis Risk Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchetti, Marco

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Once upon a time there was a classical financial world in which all the Libors were equal. Standard textbooks taught that simple relations held, such that, for example, a 6 months Libor Deposit was replicable with a 3 months Libor Deposits plus a 3x6 months Forward Rate Agreement (FRA), and that Libor was a good proxy of the risk free rate required as basic building block of no-arbitrage pricing theory. Nowadays, in the modern financial world after the credit crunch, some Libors are more equal than others, depending on their rate tenor, and classical formulas are history. Banks are not anymore too "big to fail", Libors are fixed by panels of risky banks, and they are risky rates themselves. These simple empirical facts carry very important consequences in derivative's trading and risk management, such as, for example, basis risk, collateralization and regulatory pressure in favour of Central Counterparties. Something that should be carefully considered by anyone managing even a single plain vanilla Swap. In t...

  7. Application of the MELCOR code to design basis PWR large dry containment analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Jesse; Notafrancesco, Allen (USNRC, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Rockville, MD); Tills, Jack Lee (Jack Tills & Associates, Inc., Sandia Park, NM)

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MELCOR computer code has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories under USNRC sponsorship to provide capability for independently auditing analyses submitted by reactor manufactures and utilities. MELCOR is a fully integrated code (encompassing the reactor coolant system and the containment building) that models the progression of postulated accidents in light water reactor power plants. To assess the adequacy of containment thermal-hydraulic modeling incorporated in the MELCOR code for application to PWR large dry containments, several selected demonstration designs were analyzed. This report documents MELCOR code demonstration calculations performed for postulated design basis accident (DBA) analysis (LOCA and MSLB) inside containment, which are compared to other code results. The key processes when analyzing the containment loads inside PWR large dry containments are (1) expansion and transport of high mass/energy releases, (2) heat and mass transfer to structural passive heat sinks, and (3) containment pressure reduction due to engineered safety features. A code-to-code benchmarking for DBA events showed that MELCOR predictions of maximum containment loads were equivalent to similar predictions using a qualified containment code known as CONTAIN. This equivalency was found to apply for both single- and multi-cell containment models.

  8. Structural Basis of Natural Promoter Recognition by a Unique Nuclear Receptor, HNF4[alpha

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Peng; Rha, Geun Bae; Melikishvili, Manana; Wu, Guangteng; Adkins, Brandon C.; Fried, Michael G.; Chi, Young-In (Kentucky)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    HNF4{alpha} (hepatocyte nuclear factor 4{alpha}) plays an essential role in the development and function of vertebrate organs, including hepatocytes and pancreatic {beta}-cells by regulating expression of multiple genes involved in organ development, nutrient transport, and diverse metabolic pathways. As such, HNF4{alpha} is a culprit gene product for a monogenic and dominantly inherited form of diabetes, known as maturity onset diabetes of the young (MODY). As a unique member of the nuclear receptor superfamily, HNF4{alpha} recognizes target genes containing two hexanucleotide direct repeat DNA-response elements separated by one base pair (DR1) by exclusively forming a cooperative homodimer. We describe here the 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of human HNF4{alpha} DNA binding domain in complex with a high affinity promoter element of another MODY gene, HNF1{alpha}, which reveals the molecular basis of unique target gene selection/recognition, DNA binding cooperativity, and dysfunction caused by diabetes-causing mutations. The predicted effects of MODY mutations have been tested by a set of biochemical and functional studies, which show that, in contrast to other MODY gene products, the subtle disruption of HNF4{alpha} molecular function can cause significant effects in afflicted MODY patients.

  9. The Mixed Waste Management Facility. Design basis integrated operations plan (Title I design)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) will be a fully integrated, pilotscale facility for the demonstration of low-level, organic-matrix mixed waste treatment technologies. It will provide the bridge from bench-scale demonstrated technologies to the deployment and operation of full-scale treatment facilities. The MWMF is a key element in reducing the risk in deployment of effective and environmentally acceptable treatment processes for organic mixed-waste streams. The MWMF will provide the engineering test data, formal evaluation, and operating experience that will be required for these demonstration systems to become accepted by EPA and deployable in waste treatment facilities. The deployment will also demonstrate how to approach the permitting process with the regulatory agencies and how to operate and maintain the processes in a safe manner. This document describes, at a high level, how the facility will be designed and operated to achieve this mission. It frequently refers the reader to additional documentation that provides more detail in specific areas. Effective evaluation of a technology consists of a variety of informal and formal demonstrations involving individual technology systems or subsystems, integrated technology system combinations, or complete integrated treatment trains. Informal demonstrations will typically be used to gather general operating information and to establish a basis for development of formal demonstration plans. Formal demonstrations consist of a specific series of tests that are used to rigorously demonstrate the operation or performance of a specific system configuration.

  10. States that "look the same" with respect to every basis in a mutually unbiased set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilya Amburg; Roshan Sharma; Daniel Sussman; William K. Wootters

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete set of mutually unbiased bases in a Hilbert space of dimension $d$ defines a set of $d+1$ orthogonal measurements. Relative to such a set, we define a "MUB-balanced state" to be a pure state for which the list of probabilities of the $d$ outcomes of one of these measurements is independent of the choice of measurement, up to permutations. In this paper we explicitly construct a MUB-balanced state for each prime power dimension $d$ for which $d = 3$ (mod 4). These states have already been constructed by Appleby in unpublished notes, but our presentation here is different in that both the expression for the states themselves and the proof of MUB-balancedness are given in terms of the discrete Wigner function, rather than the density matrix or state vector. The discrete Wigner functions of these states are "rotationally symmetric" in a sense roughly analogous to the rotational symmetry of the energy eigenstates of a harmonic oscillator in the continuous two-dimensional phase space. Upon converting the Wigner function to a density matrix, we find that the states are expressible as real state vectors in the standard basis. We observe numerically that when $d$ is large (and not a power of 3), a histogram of the components of such a state vector appears to form a semicircular distribution.

  11. Technical Basis for Radiological Emergency Plan Annex for WTD Emergency Response Plan: West Point Treatment Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickey, Eva E.; Strom, Daniel J.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Staff of the King County Wastewater Treatment Division (WTD) have concern about the aftermath of a radiological dispersion event (RDE) leading to the introduction of significant quantities of radioactive material into the combined sanitary and storm sewer system in King County, Washington. Radioactive material could come from the use of a radiological dispersion device (RDD). RDDs include "dirty bombs" that are not nuclear detonations but are explosives designed to spread radioactive material (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) 2001). Radioactive material also could come from deliberate introduction or dispersion of radioactive material into the environment, including waterways and water supply systems. This document, Volume 3 of PNNL-15163 is the technical basis for the Annex to the West Point Treatment Plant (WPTP) Emergency Response Plan related to responding to a radiological emergency at the WPTP. The plan primarily considers response to radioactive material that has been introduced in the other combined sanitary and storm sewer system from a radiological dispersion device, but is applicable to any accidental or deliberate introduction of materials into the system.

  12. Terracentric Nuclear Fission Reactor: Background, Basis, Feasibility, Structure, Evidence, and Geophysical Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, J Marvin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The background, basis, feasibility, structure, evidence, and geophysical implications of a naturally occurring Terracentric nuclear fission georeactor are reviewed. For a nuclear fission reactor to exist at the center of the Earth, all of the following conditions must be met: (1) There must originally have been a substantial quantity of uranium within Earth's core; (2) There must be a natural mechanism for concentrating the uranium; (3) The isotopic composition of the uranium at the onset of fission must be appropriate to sustain a nuclear fission chain reaction; (4) The reactor must be able to breed a sufficient quantity of fissile nuclides to permit operation over the lifetime of Earth to the present; (5) There must be a natural mechanism for the removal of fission products; (6) There must be a natural mechanism for removing heat from the reactor; (7) There must be a natural mechanism to regulate reactor power level, and; (8) The location of the reactor or must be such as to provide containment and prevent ...

  13. Characterizing the marginal basis source energy and emissions associated with comfort cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reindl, D.T.; Knebel, D.E.; Gansler, R.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ten-story commercial office building located in Fort Worth, Texas, was used as a prototype to investigate the environmental impact associated with applying various electric and gas technologies for providing ventilation and comfort conditioning. The instantaneous (hourly) electrical and gas requirements demanded by the building were ``traced`` back to their source, the point where fuel is extracted from the ground The total energy consumed and emissions produced are quantified for both electric and gas technologies. On an annual basis, electric technologies had carbon dioxide emissions that were 20% to 26% lower when compared with the gas cooling technology. The gas cooling technology had lower total carbon monoxide emissions; however, after accounting for environmental oxidation of the carbon monoxide emissions, the gas cooling technology had an overall 24% to 35% greater oxide of carbon emission impact. The gas technology had a 19% to 25% lower oxide of nitrogen emission rate when compared with the electric technologies. The gas technology had a 3% to 15% lower annual total emission of sulfur dioxide compared to electric technologies. The primary reason for this is the absence of sulfur in the ``clean`` fuel assumed to be used by the gas technology (natural gas). The gas cooling technologies required 20% to 30% more energy to be extracted from the earth to provide the equivalent space conditioning for the prototypical office building when compared with the worst-and best-case electric technologies, respectively.

  14. 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph A. Krzycki

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gordon Research Conference (GRC) on 2004 Molecular Basis of Microbial One-Carbon Metabolism Gordon Conference - August 1-6, 2004 was held at Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, MA from August 1-6, 2004. The Conference was well-attended with 117 participants (attendees list attached). The attendees represented the spectrum of endeavor in this field coming from academia, industry, and government laboratories, both U.S. and foreign scientists, senior researchers, young investigators, and students. In designing the formal speakers program, emphasis was placed on current unpublished research and discussion of the future target areas in this field. There was a conscious effort to stimulate lively discussion about the key issues in the field today. Time for formal presentations was limited in the interest of group discussions. In order that more scientists could communicate their most recent results, poster presentation time was scheduled. Attached is a copy of the formal schedule and speaker program and the poster program. In addition to these formal interactions, 'free time' was scheduled to allow informal discussions. Such discussions are fostering new collaborations and joint efforts in the field.

  15. Solution to PDEs using radial basis function finite-differences (RBF-FD) on multiple GPUs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bollig, Evan F., E-mail: bollig@scs.fsu.edu [Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, 400 Dirac Science Library, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Flyer, Natasha, E-mail: flyer@ucar.edu [Institute for Mathematics Applied to Geosciences, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Dr., Boulder, CO 80305 (United States)] [Institute for Mathematics Applied to Geosciences, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 1850 Table Mesa Dr., Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Erlebacher, Gordon, E-mail: gerlebacher@fsu.edu [Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, 400 Dirac Science Library, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)] [Department of Scientific Computing, Florida State University, 400 Dirac Science Library, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents parallelization strategies for the radial basis function-finite difference (RBF-FD) method. As a generalized finite differencing scheme, the RBF-FD method functions without the need for underlying meshes to structure nodes. It offers high-order accuracy approximation and scales as O(N) per time step, with N being with the total number of nodes. To our knowledge, this is the first implementation of the RBF-FD method to leverage GPU accelerators for the solution of PDEs. Additionally, this implementation is the first to span both multiple CPUs and multiple GPUs. OpenCL kernels target the GPUs and inter-processor communication and synchronization is managed by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). We verify our implementation of the RBF-FD method with two hyperbolic PDEs on the sphere, and demonstrate up to 9x speedup on a commodity GPU with unoptimized kernel implementations. On a high performance cluster, the method achieves up to 7x speedup for the maximum problem size of 27,556 nodes.

  16. Vacuum Fluctuation (1): the Same Basis of the Relativity and the Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xing-Hao Ye

    2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to reveal the deep relationship between matter and vacuum, and to seek for the same physical basis of the relativity and the quantum mechanics. In doing this, three postulates of vacuum fluctuation are proposed first, the basic premises of the relativity and the quantum mechanics including the velocity limit, the energy-frequency relation and the de Broglie wavelength expression of any matter particles are deduced then. As applications, the idea is used to analyze the Compton effect and the electron-positron annihilation. It is found that the calculation becomes simple, and the physical meaning gets clear. The simplicity comes from the power of the three postulates. To illustrate this, the basic conclusions of the special theory of relativity such as the relations of mass-velocity, mass-energy, energy-momentum, time dilation and length contraction are further deduced. In addition, the significance of the investigation of vacuum fluctuation in the unification of the physical theories is pointed out.

  17. Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Safety Basis and Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Petti; Jim Kinsey; Dave Alberstein

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various international efforts are underway to assess the safety of advanced nuclear reactor designs. For example, the International Atomic Energy Agency has recently held its first Consultancy Meeting on a new cooperative research program on high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) safety. Furthermore, the Generation IV International Forum Reactor Safety Working Group has recently developed a methodology, called the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology, for use in Generation IV advanced reactor technology development, design, and design review. A risk and safety assessment white paper is under development with respect to the Very High Temperature Reactor to pilot the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology and to demonstrate its validity and feasibility. To support such efforts, this information paper on the modular HTGR safety basis and approach has been prepared. The paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach. The paper gives those involved in the assessment of advanced reactor designs an opportunity to assess an advanced design that has already received extensive review by regulatory authorities and to judge the utility of recently proposed new methods for advanced reactor safety assessment such as the Integrated Safety Assessment Methodology.

  18. Human-system Interfaces to Automatic Systems: Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, J.M.; Higgins, J.C.

    2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Automation has become ubiquitous in modern complex systems and commercial nuclear power plants are no exception. Beyond the control of plant functions and systems, automation is applied to a wide range of additional functions including monitoring and detection, situation assessment, response planning, response implementation, and interface management. Automation has become a 'team player' supporting plant personnel in nearly all aspects of plant operation. In light of the increasing use and importance of automation in new and future plants, guidance is needed to enable the NRC staff to conduct safety reviews of the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of modern automation. The objective of the research described in this report was to develop guidance for reviewing the operator's interface with automation. We first developed a characterization of the important HFE aspects of automation based on how it is implemented in current systems. The characterization included five dimensions: Level of automation, function of automation, modes of automation, flexibility of allocation, and reliability of automation. Next, we reviewed literature pertaining to the effects of these aspects of automation on human performance and the design of human-system interfaces (HSIs) for automation. Then, we used the technical basis established by the literature to develop design review guidance. The guidance is divided into the following seven topics: Automation displays, interaction and control, automation modes, automation levels, adaptive automation, error tolerance and failure management, and HSI integration. In addition, we identified insights into the automaton design process, operator training, and operations.

  19. C. Holcomb APS/DPP 2008 DIII-D 10-Year Vision: Developing the Scientific Basis for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    evaluation and optimization of ITER & FNSF scenarios Steerable NBI (20 MW) 0 5 10 15 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 0 5 10 15 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.0 2.5 H 98y / Te0/Ti0 Baseline N=1.7 Electron plasma of 2020 Prepare Basis for ITER Ops and FNSF Design Disruptions and ELM solutions Predictive basis

  20. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR EVALUATING SURFACE BARRIERS TO PROTECT GROUNDWATER FROM DEEP VADOSE ZONE CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FAYER JM; FREEDMAN VL; WARD AL; CHRONISTER GB

    2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. DOE and its predecessors released nearly 2 trillion liters (450 billion gallons) of contaminated liquid into the vadose zone at the Hanford Site. Some of the contaminants currently reside in the deeper parts of the vadose zone where they are much less accessible to characterization, monitoring, and typical remediation activities. The DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) prepared a treatability test plan in 2008 to examine remediation options for addressing contaminants in the deep vadose zone; one of the technologies identified was surface barriers (also known as engineered barriers, covers, and caps). In the typical configuration, the contaminants are located relatively close to the surface, generally within 15 m, and thus they are close to the base of the surface barrier. The proximity of the surface barrier under these conditions yielded few concerns about the effectiveness of the barrier at depth, particularly for cases in which the contaminants were in a lined facility. At Hanford, however, some unlined sites have contaminants located well below depths of 15 m. The issue raised about these sites is the degree of effectiveness of a surface barrier in isolating contaminants in the deep vadose zone. Previous studies by Hanford Site and PNNL researchers suggest that surface barriers have the potential to provide a significant degree of isolation of deep vadose zone contaminants. The studies show that the actual degree of isolation is site-specific and depends on many factors, including recharge rates, barrier size, depth of contaminants, geohydrologic properties ofthe sediments, and the geochemical interactions between the contaminants and the sediments. After the DOE-RL treatability test plan was published, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was contracted to review the information available to support surface barrier evaluation for the deep vadose zone, identify gaps in the information and outcomes necessary to fill the data gaps, and outline tasks to achieve those outcomes. Full understanding of contaminant behavior in the deep vadose zone is constrained by four key data gaps: limited access; limited data; limited time; and the lack of an accepted predictive capability for determining whether surface barriers can effectively isolate deep vadose zone contaminants. Activities designed to fill these data gaps need to have these outcomes: (1) common evaluation methodology that provides a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination; (2) deep vadose zone data that characterize the lithology, the spatial distribution of moisture and contaminants, the physical, chemical, and biological process that affect the mobility of each contaminant, and the impacts to the contaminants following placement of a surface barrier; (3) subsurface monitoring to provide subsurface characterization of initial conditions and changes that occur during and following remediation activities; and (4) field observations that span years to decades to validate the evaluation methodology. A set of six proposed tasks was identified to provide information needed to address the above outcomes. The proposed tasks are: (1) Evaluation Methodology - Develop common evaluation methodology that will provide a clear, consistent, and defensible basis for evaluating groundwater impacts caused by placement of a surface barrier above deep vadose zone contamination. (2) Case Studies - Conduct case studies to demonstrate the applicability ofthe common evaluation methodology and provide templates for subsequent use elsewhere. Three sites expected to have conditions that would yield valuable information and experience pertinent to deep vadose zone contamination were chosen to cover a range of conditions. The sites are BC Cribs and Trenches, U Plant Cribs, and the T Farm Interim Cover. (3) Subsurface Monitoring Technologies - Evaluate minimally invasive geophysical approaches for delineating subsurface plumes and monitoring their migration in the deep

  1. Phenomenology of the Basis-Independent CP-Violating Two-Higgs Doublet Model [Dissertation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deva O'Neil

    2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Two-Higgs Doublet Model (2HDM) is a model of low-energy particle interactions that is identical to the Standard Model except for the addition of an extra Higgs doublet. This extended Higgs sector would appear in experiments as the presence of multiple Higgs particles, both neutral and charged. The neutral states may either be eigenstates of CP (in the CP-conserving 2HDM), or be mixtures of CP eigenstates (in the CP-violating 2HDM). In order to understand how to measure the couplings of these new particles, this document presents the theory of the CP-violating 2HDM in a basis-independent formalism and explicitly identifies the physical parameters of the model, including a discussion of tan(beta)-like parameters. The CP-conserving limit, decoupling limit, and the custodial limit of the model are presented. In addition, phenomenological constraints from the oblique parameters (S, T, and U) are discussed. A survey of the parameter space of this model shows that the 2HDM is consistent with a large range of possible values for T. Our results also suggest that the 2HDM favors a slightly positive value of S and a value of U within .02 of zero, which is consistent with present data within the statistical error. In a scenario in which the heaviest scalar particle is the charged Higgs boson, we find that the measured value of T puts an upper limit on the mass difference between the charged Higgs boson and the heaviest neutral Higgs boson.

  2. Application of Microprocessor-Based Equipment in Nuclear Power Plants - Technical Basis for a Qualification Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korsah, K.

    2001-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document (1) summarizes the most significant findings of the ''Qualification of Advanced Instrumentation and Control (I&C) Systems'' program initiated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); (2) documents a comparative analysis of U.S. and European qualification standards; and (3) provides recommendations for enhancing regulatory guidance for environmental qualification of microprocessor-based safety-related systems. Safety-related I&C system upgrades of present-day nuclear power plants, as well as I&C systems of Advanced Light-Water Reactors (ALWRs), are expected to make increasing use of microprocessor-based technology. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) recognized that the use of such technology may pose environmental qualification challenges different from current, analog-based I&C systems. Hence, it initiated the ''Qualification of Advanced Instrumentation and Control Systems'' program. The objectives of this confirmatory research project are to (1) identify any unique environmental-stress-related failure modes posed by digital technologies and their potential impact on the safety systems and (2) develop the technical basis for regulatory guidance using these findings. Previous findings from this study have been documented in several technical reports. This final report in the series documents a comparative analysis of two environmental qualification standards--Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Std 323-1983 and International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 60780 (1998)--and provides recommendations for environmental qualification of microprocessor-based systems based on this analysis as well as on the findings documented in the previous reports. The two standards were chosen for this analysis because IEEE 323 is the standard used in the U.S. for the qualification of safety-related equipment in nuclear power plants, and IEC 60780 is its European counterpart. In addition, the IEC document was published in 1998, and should reflect any new qualification concerns, from the European perspective, with regard to the use of microprocessor-based safety systems in power plants.

  3. Analysis of waste treatment requirements for DOE mixed wastes: Technical basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The risks and costs of managing DOE wastes are a direct function of the total quantities of 3wastes that are handled at each step of the management process. As part of the analysis of the management of DOE low-level mixed wastes (LLMW), a reference scheme has been developed for the treatment of these wastes to meet EPA criteria. The treatment analysis in a limited form was also applied to one option for treatment of transuranic wastes. The treatment requirements in all cases analyzed are based on a reference flowsheet which provides high level treatment trains for all LLMW. This report explains the background and basis for that treatment scheme. Reference waste stream chemical compositions and physical properties including densities were established for each stream in the data base. These compositions are used to define the expected behavior for wastes as they pass through the treatment train. Each EPA RCRA waste code was reviewed, the properties, chemical composition, or characteristics which are of importance to waste behavior in treatment were designated. Properties that dictate treatment requirements were then used to develop the treatment trains and identify the unit operations that would be included in these trains. A table was prepared showing a correlation of the waste physical matrix and the waste treatment requirements as a guide to the treatment analysis. The analysis of waste treatment loads is done by assigning wastes to treatment steps which would achieve RCRA compliant treatment. These correlation`s allow one to examine the treatment requirements in a condensed manner and to see that all wastes and contaminant sets are fully considered.

  4. Human System Simulation in Support of Human Performance Technical Basis at NPPs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Gertman; Katya Le Blanc; alan mecham; william phoenix; Magdy Tawfik; Jeffrey Joe

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on strategies and progress toward establishing the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Human Systems Simulator Laboratory at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES), a consortium of Idaho State Universities. The INL is one of the National Laboratories of the US Department of Energy. One of the first planned applications for the Human Systems Simulator Laboratory is implementation of a dynamic nuclear power plant simulation (NPP) where studies of operator workload, situation awareness, performance and preference will be carried out in simulated control rooms including nuclear power plant control rooms. Simulation offers a means by which to review operational concepts, improve design practices and provide a technical basis for licensing decisions. In preparation for the next generation power plant and current government and industry efforts in support of light water reactor sustainability, human operators will be attached to a suite of physiological measurement instruments and, in combination with traditional Human Factors Measurement techniques, carry out control room tasks in simulated advanced digital and hybrid analog/digital control rooms. The current focus of the Human Systems Simulator Laboratory is building core competence in quantitative and qualitative measurements of situation awareness and workload. Of particular interest is whether introduction of digital systems including automated procedures has the potential to reduce workload and enhance safety while improving situation awareness or whether workload is merely shifted and situation awareness is modified in yet to be determined ways. Data analysis is carried out by engineers and scientists and includes measures of the physical and neurological correlates of human performance. The current approach supports a user-centered design philosophy (see ISO 13407 “Human Centered Design Process for Interactive Systems, 1999) wherein the context for task performance along with the requirements of the end-user are taken into account during the design process and the validity of design is determined through testing of real end users

  5. Comparative analysis of environmental impacts of maize-biogas and photovoltaics on a land use basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graebig, Markus; Fenner, Richard [Centre for Sustainable Development, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Bringezu, Stefan [Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy. P.B. 100480, 42004 Wuppertal (Germany)

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study aims to stimulate the discussion on how to optimize a sustainable energy mix from an environmental perspective and how to apply existing renewable energy sources in the most efficient way. Ground-mounted photovoltaics (PV) and the maize-biogas-electricity route are compared with regard to their potential to mitigate environmental pressure, assuming that a given agricultural area is available for energy production. Existing life cycle assessment (LCA) studies are taken as a basis to analyse environmental impacts of those technologies in relation to conventional technology for power and heat generation. The life-cycle-wide mitigation potential per area used is calculated for the impact categories non-renewable energy input, green house gas (GHG) emissions, acidification and eutrophication. The environmental performance of each system depends on the scenario that is assumed for end energy use (electricity and heat supply have been contemplated). In all scenarios under consideration, PV turns out to be superior to biogas in almost all studied impact categories. Even when maize is used for electricity production in connection with very efficient heat usage, and reduced PV performance is assumed to account for intermittence, PV can still mitigate about four times the amount of green house gas emissions and non-renewable energy input compared to maize-biogas. Soil erosion, which can be entirely avoided with PV, exceeds soil renewal rates roughly 20-fold on maize fields. Regarding the overall Eco-indicator 99 (H) score under most favourable assumptions for the maize-biogas route, PV has still a more than 100% higher potential to mitigate environmental burden. At present, the key advantages of biogas are its price and its availability without intermittence. In the long run, and with respect to more efficient land use, biogas might preferably be produced from organic waste or manure, whereas PV should be integrated into buildings and infrastructures. (author)

  6. Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid System Economic Basis for Electricity, Fuel, and Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Forsberg; Steven Aumeier

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Concerns about climate change and altering the ocean chemistry are likely to limit the use of fossil fuels. That implies a transition to a low-carbon nuclear-renewable electricity grid. Historically variable electricity demand was met using fossil plants with low capital costs, high operating costs, and substantial greenhouse gas emissions. However, the most easily scalable very-low-emissions generating options, nuclear and non-dispatchable renewables (solar and wind), are capital-intensive technologies with low operating costs that should operate at full capacities to minimize costs. No combination of fully-utilized nuclear and renewables can meet the variable electricity demand. This implies large quantities of expensive excess generating capacity much of the time. In a free market this results in near-zero electricity prices at times of high nuclear renewables output and low electricity demand with electricity revenue collapse. Capital deployment efficiency—the economic benefit derived from energy systems capital investment at a societal level—strongly favors high utilization of these capital-intensive systems, especially if low-carbon nuclear renewables are to replace fossil fuels. Hybrid energy systems are one option for better utilization of these systems that consumes excess energy at times of low prices to make some useful product.The economic basis for development of hybrid energy systems is described for a low-carbon nuclear renewable world where much of the time there are massivequantities of excess energy available from the electric sector.Examples include (1) high-temperature electrolysis to generate hydrogen for non-fossil liquid fuels, direct use as a transport fuel, metal reduction, etc. and (2) biorefineries.Nuclear energy with its concentrated constant heat output may become the enabling technology for economically-viable low-carbon electricity grids because hybrid nuclear systems may provide an economic way to produce dispatachable variable electricity with economic base-load operation of the reactor.

  7. drinking water. On the basis of the volume of ZnS precipitated in the biofilm, we estimate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    drinking water. On the basis of the volume of ZnS precipitated in the biofilm, we estimate, 647 (1964). 6. W. J. Drury, Water Environ. Res. 71, 1244 (1999). 7. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, Current Drinking Water Standards (2000). 8

  8. 10-Dim Einstein spaces made up on basis of 6-Dim Ricci-flat spaces and 4-Dim Einstein spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valery Dryuma

    2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Some examples of ten-dimensional vacuum Einstein spaces made up on basis of four-dimensional Ricci-flat spaces and six-dimensional Ricci-flat spaces defined by solutions of the Sin-Gordon equation are constructed. The properties of geodesics for such type of the spaces are discussed

  9. THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 139, 224102 (2013) Approaching the complete-basis limit with a truncated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, John

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy in Eq. (1.1). a)herbert@chemistry.ohio-state.edu BSSE and BSIE are intimately related,2,3 which and Biochemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA (Received 10 October 2013; accepted 15 examine the convergence towards the basis-set limit of two- and three-body expansions of the energy

  10. KELP VERSUS CORALLINE: CELLULAR BASIS FOR MECHANICAL STRENGTH IN THE WAVE-SWEPT SEAWEED CALLIARTHRON (CORALLINACEAE, RHODOPHYTA)1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martone, Patrick T.

    KELP VERSUS CORALLINE: CELLULAR BASIS FOR MECHANICAL STRENGTH IN THE WAVE-SWEPT SEAWEED- ing in girth versus growing strong tissues. Brown macroalgae, such as kelps, grow thick stipes an order of magnitude stronger than some kelp tissues, but genicula rarely exceed 1 mm in diameter

  11. A non-volatile-memory device on the basis of engineered anisotropies in (Ga,Mn)As

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    ARTICLES A non-volatile-memory device on the basis of engineered anisotropies in (Ga,Mn)As KATRIN by Moore's law, the semiconductor industry will need to develop novel device concepts that go beyond simple Hall effect6 , tunnelling AMR (TAMR)7­9 and Coulomb blockade AMR10 . These previous demonstrations have

  12. High Performance Computing in the U.S. in An Analysis on the Basis of the TOP500 List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongarra, Jack

    . Dongarra Computer Science Department University of Tennessee Knoxville, TN 37996-1301 and MathematicalHigh Performance Computing in the U.S. in 1995 An Analysis on the Basis of the TOP500 List Jack J Science Section Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6367 dongarra@cs.utk.edu and Horst D

  13. High integrity software for nuclear power plants: Candidate guidelines, technical basis and research needs. Main report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seth, S.; Bail, W.; Cleaves, D.; Cohen, H.; Hybertson, D.; Schaefer, C.; Stark, G.; Ta, A.; Ulery, B. [Mitre Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work documented in this report was performed in support of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to examine the technical basis for candidate guidelines that could be considered in reviewing and evaluating high integrity computer e following software development and assurance activities: Requirements specification; design; coding; verification and validation, inclukding static analysis and dynamic testing; safety analysis; operation and maintenance; configuration management; quality assurance; and planning and management. Each activity (framework element) was subdivided into technical areas (framework subelements). The report describes the development of approximately 200 candidate guidelines that span the entire ran e identification, categorization and prioritization of technical basis for those candidate guidelines; and the identification, categorization and prioritization of research needs for improving the technical basis. The report has two volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary includes an overview of the framwork and of each framework element, the complete set of candidate guidelines, the results of the assessment of the technical basis for each candidate guideline, and a discussion of research needs that support the regulatory function; this document, Volume 2, is the main report.

  14. Quantum criticality at the infinite complete basis set limit: A thermodynamic analog of the Yang and Lee theorem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kais, Sabre

    length for one- electron screened Coulomb potentials, the critical nuclear charges for twoQuantum criticality at the infinite complete basis set limit: A thermodynamic analog of the Yang Abstract Finite size scaling for calculations of the critical parameters of the few-body Schro

  15. Structural basis of double-stranded RNA recognition by the RIG-I like receptor MDA5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Roland K.

    Structural basis of double-stranded RNA recognition by the RIG-I like receptor MDA5 Xiaojun Li online 14 June 2009 Keywords: Innate immunity Nucleic acid receptor MDA5 CTD Crystal structure a b s t r a c t RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2 are cytosolic pattern recognition receptors detecting single

  16. PRL_2nd_revise_3 -WWW--07/06/021 Improving the performance of radial basis function classifiers in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pont, Michael J.

    PRL_2nd_revise_3 - WWW--07/06/021 Improving the performance of radial basis function classifiers, 23: 569-577. 1 To whom correspondence should be addressed. #12;PRL_2nd_revise_3 - WWW--07/06/022 1 and other application areas, methods for identifying the optimal threshold values are required. #12;PRL_2nd

  17. Assessment of Heliosat-4 surface solar irradiance derived on the basis of SEVIRI-APOLLO cloud products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Assessment of Heliosat-4 surface solar irradiance derived on the basis of SEVIRI-APOLLO cloud are crucial for the assessment of SSI. The APOLLO cloud product provided by DLR includes abundant information about the cloud physical and optical properties. The performances of Heliosat-4 when using APOLLO

  18. Drain Tank Information for Developing Design Basis of the Preliminary Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrada, Juan J [ORNL

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tokamak Cooling Water System (TCWS) drain tanks (DTs) serve two functions: normal operation and safety operation. Normal DTs are used for regular maintenance operations when draining is necessary. Safety DTs are used to receive the water leaked into the Vacuum Vessel (VV) after an in-vessel loss of coolant accident (LOCA) event. The preliminary design of the DTs shall be based on the information provided by this document. The capacity of the normal DTs is estimated based on the internal volume of in-vessel components [e.g., First Wall/Blanket (FW/BLK) and Divertor (DIV)]; Neutral Beam Injector (NBI) components; and TCWS piping, heat exchangers, electric heaters, pump casing, pressurizers, and valves. Water volumes have been updated based on 2004-design information, changes adopted because of approved Project Change Requests (PCRs), and data verification by US ITER and AREVA Federal Services, the US ITER A and E Company. Two tanks will store water from normal draining operations of the FW/BLK and DIV Primary Heat Transfer Systems (PHTSs). One tank will store water from normal draining operations of the NBI PHTS. The capacity of the safety DTs is based on analysis of a design basis accident: a large leak from in-vessel components. There are two safety DTs that will receive water from a VV LOCA event and drainage from the VV, as needed. In addition, there is one sump tank for the DIV that will be used for collecting drain water from the draining and drying processes and specifically for draining the DIV system as the DIV cassette lines are at a lower elevation than the DT connection point. Information documented in this report must be refined and verified during the preliminary design of the DTs, and there are several aspects to be considered to complete the preliminary design. Input to these design considerations is discussed in this report and includes, but is not limited to, water inventory; operating procedures/maintenance; Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA); tank layout and dimensions, including design margin; classification under French Nuclear Pressure Directives, Equipements Sous Pression Nucleaires (ESPN); and adaptations for construction.

  19. Potential variations around grain boundaries in impurity-doped BaSi? epitaxial films evaluated by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsukahara, D.; Baba, M.; Honda, S.; Toko, K. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Imai, Y. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); AIST, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Hara, K. O.; Usami, N. [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Werner, J. H. [Institute for Photovoltaics, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart 70569 (Germany); Suemasu, T. [Institute of Applied Physics, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8573 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Institute for Photovoltaics, University of Stuttgart, Stuttgart 70569 (Germany)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential variations around the grain boundaries (GBs) in antimony (Sb)-doped n-type and boron (B)-doped p-type BaSi? epitaxial films on Si(111) were evaluated by Kelvin probe force microscopy. Sb-doped n-BaSi? films exhibited positively charged GBs with a downward band bending at the GBs. The average barrier height for holes was approximately 10 meV for an electron concentration n ? 10ą? cm?ł. This downward band bending changed to upward band bending when n was increased to n = 1.8 × 10ą?cm?ł. In the B-doped p-BaSi? films, the upward band bending was observed for a hole concentration p ? 10ą?cm?ł. The average barrier height for electrons decreased from approximately 25 to 15 meV when p was increased from p = 2.7 × 10ą? to p = 4.0 × 10ą? cm?ł. These results are explained under the assumption that the position of the Fermi level E{sub f} at GBs depends on the degree of occupancy of defect states at the GBs, while E{sub f} approached the bottom of the conduction band or the top of the valence band in the BaSi? grain interiors with increasing impurity concentrations. In both cases, such small barrier heights may not deteriorate the carrier transport properties. The electronic structures of impurity-doped BaSi? are also discussed using first-principles pseudopotential method to discuss the insertion sites of impurity atoms and clarify the reason for the observed n-type conduction in the Sb-doped BaSi? and p-type conduction in the B-doped BaSi?.

  20. Request to the Finance Committee to adjudicate a contract for the supply of electricity on a best-value-for-money basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Request to the Finance Committee to adjudicate a contract for the supply of electricity on a best-value-for-money basis

  1. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)Water Cherenkov Detector Basis of Estimate Forms and Backup Documentation LBNE Far Site Internal Review (December 6-9, 2011)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart J.; Diwan, M.; Dolph, J.; Novakova, P.; Sharma, R.; Stewart, J.; Viren, B.; Russo, T.; Kaducak, M.; Mantsch, P.; Paulos, B.; Feyzi, F.; Sullivan, G.; Bionta, R.; Fowler, J.; Warner, D.; Bahowick, S.; Van Berg, R.; Kearns, E.; Hazen, E.; Sinnis, G.; Sanchez, M.

    2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Basis of Estimate (BOE) forms and backup documentation developed for the Water Cherenkov Detector (WCD) option for the far detector of the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE)

  2. Probabilistic risk assessment for the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility worst-case design-basis accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharirli, M.; Butner, J.M.; Rand, J.L.; Macek, R.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); McKinney, S.J. [Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roush, M.L. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Center for Reliability Engineering

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results from a Los Alamos National Laboratory Engineering and Safety Analysis Group assessment of the worse-case design-basis accident associated with the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF)/Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility. The primary goal of the analysis was to quantify the accident sequences that result in personnel radiation exposure in the WNR Experimental Hall following the worst-case design-basis accident, a complete spill of the LAMPF accelerator 1L beam. This study also provides information regarding the roles of hardware systems and operators in these sequences, and insights regarding the areas where improvements can increase facility-operation safety. Results also include confidence ranges to incorporate combined effects of uncertainties in probability estimates and importance measures to determine how variations in individual events affect the frequencies in accident sequences.

  3. Probabilistic risk assessment for the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility worst-case design-basis accident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharirli, M.; Butner, J.M.; Rand, J.L.; Macek, R.J. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); McKinney, S.J. (Technadyne Engineering Consultants, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Roush, M.L. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Center for Reliability Engineering)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents results from a Los Alamos National Laboratory Engineering and Safety Analysis Group assessment of the worse-case design-basis accident associated with the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF)/Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility. The primary goal of the analysis was to quantify the accident sequences that result in personnel radiation exposure in the WNR Experimental Hall following the worst-case design-basis accident, a complete spill of the LAMPF accelerator 1L beam. This study also provides information regarding the roles of hardware systems and operators in these sequences, and insights regarding the areas where improvements can increase facility-operation safety. Results also include confidence ranges to incorporate combined effects of uncertainties in probability estimates and importance measures to determine how variations in individual events affect the frequencies in accident sequences.

  4. Technical basis for environmental qualification of microprocessor-based safety-related equipment in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korsah, K.; Wood, R.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hassan, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Tanaka, T.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of studies sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to provide the technical basis for environmental qualification of computer-based safety equipment in nuclear power plants. The studies were conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The studies address the following: (1) adequacy of the present test methods for qualification of digital I and C systems; (2) preferred (i.e., Regulatory Guide-endorsed) standards; (3) recommended stressors to be included in the qualification process during type testing; (4) resolution of need for accelerated aging for equipment to be located in a benign environment; and (5) determination of an appropriate approach for addressing the impact of smoke in digital equipment qualification programs. Significant findings from the studies form the technical basis for a recommended approach to the environmental qualification of microprocessor-based safety-related equipment in nuclear power plants.

  5. A Hybrid approach to molecular continuum processes combiningGaussian basis functions and the discrete variable representation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rescigno, Thomas N.; Horner, Daniel A.; Yip, Frank L.; McCurdy,C. William

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Gaussian basis functions, routinely employed in molecular electronic structure calculations, can be combined with numerical grid-based functions in a discrete variable representation to provide an efficient method for computing molecular continuum wave functions. This approach, combined with exterior complex scaling, obviates the need for slowly convergent single-center expansions, and allows one to study a variety of electron-molecule collision problems. The method is illustrated by computation of various bound and continuum properties of H2+.

  6. National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center for e-Design! SEEK: Semantic Extraction of Engineering Knowledge from a Functional Basis Perspective!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    : Semantic Extraction of Engineering Knowledge from a Functional Basis Perspective! REU Student: Leo Xuzhang these documents for them to be useful.! Represent Engineering Knowledge in a Semantic Framework using Ontology engineering knowledge such as functional basis or materials used! v Extracted knowledge is added as semantic

  7. Inclusion of Building Envelope Thermal Lag Effects in Linear Regression Models of Daily Basis Building Energy Use Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masuda, H.; Claridge, D. E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusion?of?Building?Envelope?Thermal?Lag? Effects?in?Linear?Regression?Models?of?Daily? Basis?Building?Energy?Use?Data The?12th International?Conference?for?Enhanced?Building?Operations October?22nd?26th,?2012 Manchester,?UK Hiroko...?enhanced?building?operations. October?18?20,?2011,? Brooklyn,?NY. Rabl,?A.?and?Rialhe,?A.?(1992).?Energy?Signature?Models?for?Commercial?Buildings:?Test?with?Measured?Data?and?Interpretation. Energy?and?Buildings,?19,?143?154. Shao,?X.?and?Claridge,?D.E.?(2006).?Use?of?first?law...

  8. Inclusion of Building Envelope Thermal Lag Effects in Linear Regression Models of Daily Basis Building Energy Use Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masuda, H.; Claridge, D. E.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inclusion?of?Building?Envelope?Thermal?Lag? Effects?in?Linear?Regression?Models?of?Daily? Basis?Building?Energy?Use?Data The?12th International?Conference?for?Enhanced?Building?Operations October?22nd?26th,?2012 Manchester,?UK Hiroko...?enhanced?building?operations. October?18?20,?2011,? Brooklyn,?NY. Rabl,?A.?and?Rialhe,?A.?(1992).?Energy?Signature?Models?for?Commercial?Buildings:?Test?with?Measured?Data?and?Interpretation. Energy?and?Buildings,?19,?143?154. Shao,?X.?and?Claridge,?D.E.?(2006).?Use?of?first?law?energy?balance?as?a?screening?tool?for?building?energy...

  9. Charge shelving and bias spectroscopy for the readout of a charge-qubit on the basis of superposition states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew D. Greentree; A. R. Hamilton; F. Green

    2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Charge-based qubits have been proposed as fundamental elements for quantum computers. One commonly proposed readout device is the single-electron transistor (SET). SETs can distinguish between localized charge states, but lack the sensitivity to directly distinguish superposition states, which have greatly enhanced coherence times compared with position states. We propose introducing a third dot, and exploiting energy dependent tunnelling from the qubit into this dot (bias spectroscopy) for pseudo-spin to charge conversion and superposition basis readout. We introduce an adiabatic fast passage-style charge pumping technique which enables efficient and robust readout via charge shelving, avoiding problems due to finite SET measurement time.

  10. Structural basis of error-prone replication and stalling at a thymine base by human DNA polymerase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirouac, Kevin N.; Ling, Hong; (UWO)

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Human DNA polymerase iota (pol iota) is a unique member of Y-family polymerases, which preferentially misincorporates nucleotides opposite thymines (T) and halts replication at T bases. The structural basis of the high error rates remains elusive. We present three crystal structures of pol complexed with DNA containing a thymine base, paired with correct or incorrect incoming nucleotides. A narrowed active site supports a pyrimidine to pyrimidine mismatch and excludes Watson-Crick base pairing by pol. The template thymine remains in an anti conformation irrespective of incoming nucleotides. Incoming ddATP adopts a syn conformation with reduced base stacking, whereas incorrect dGTP and dTTP maintain anti conformations with normal base stacking. Further stabilization of dGTP by H-bonding with Gln59 of the finger domain explains the preferential T to G mismatch. A template 'U-turn' is stabilized by pol and the methyl group of the thymine template, revealing the structural basis of T stalling. Our structural and domain-swapping experiments indicate that the finger domain is responsible for pol's high error rates on pyrimidines and determines the incorporation specificity.

  11. Double-pole nature of $?(1405)$ studied with coupled-channel complex scaling method using complex-range Gaussian basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akinobu Dote; Takayuki Myo

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The excited hyperon $\\Lambda(1405)$ is the important building block for kaonic nuclei which are nuclear many-body system with anti-kaons. We have been investigating the $\\Lambda(1405)$ resonance with the coupled-channel Complex Scaling Method (ccCSM) in which the $\\Lambda(1405)$ is treated as a hadron-molecular state of a $\\bar{K}N$-$\\pi\\Sigma$ coupled system. We use a $\\bar{K}N$(-$\\pi Y$) potential based on the chiral SU(3) theory. In this article, we report the double-pole nature of the $\\Lambda(1405)$, which is a characteristic property predicted by many studies with chiral SU(3)-based models. With the help of the complex-range Gaussian basis in ccCSM, we have found successfully another pole besides a pole near the $\\bar{K}N$ threshold (called higher pole) which was found in our previous work with the real-range Gaussian basis. The new pole (called lower pole) is found far below $\\bar{K}N$ threshold: $(M, -\\Gamma/2)=(1395, -138)$ MeV when $f_\\pi=110$ MeV. In spite of so broad width of the lower-pole state, the state is clearly identified with good separation from continuum states, since the oscillatory behavior of the continuum states is improved owing to the complex-range Gaussian basis. Analyzing the ccCSM wave function of the lower pole, we have revealed explicitly that the lower-pole state is dominated by the $\\pi\\Sigma$ component rather than the $\\bar{K}N$ component. We have confirmed that the ccCSM wave function is correctly connected to the asymptotic form of the resonance wave function. We have estimated the meson-baryon mean distance for the lower-pole state as well as for the higher-pole state. In addition, we have investigated the origin of the appearance of the lower pole. The lower pole is confirmed to be generated by the energy dependence attributed to the chiral dynamics, by comparing the result of an energy-independent potential.

  12. Radial-Basis-Function-Network-Based Prediction of Performance and Emission Characteristics in a Bio Diesel Engine Run on WCO Ester

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Shiva

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radial basis function neural networks (RBFNNs), which is a relatively new class of neural networks, have been investigated for their applicability for prediction of performance and emission characteristics of a diesel ...

  13. Novel Technique of Sizing the Stand-Alone Photovoltaic Systems Using the Radial Basis Function Neural Networks: Application in Isolated Sites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellit, A.; Benghanme, M.; Arab, A. H.; Guessoum, A.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is to investigate the Radial Basis Function Neural Networks (RBFN) to identifying and modeling the optimal sizing couples of stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) system using a minimum of input data, These optimal couples allow...

  14. Novel Technique of Sizing the Stand-Alone Photovoltaic Systems Using the Radial Basis Function Neural Networks: Application in Isolated Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mellit, A.; Benghanme, M.; Arab, A. H.; Guessoum, A.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is to investigate the Radial Basis Function Neural Networks (RBFN) to identifying and modeling the optimal sizing couples of stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) system using a minimum of input data, These optimal couples allow...

  15. Basis behavior and hedging risk under cash versus physical delivery settlement of the feeder cattle futures contract for selected Texas markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond, Petrina Lea

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BASIS BEHAVIOR AND HEDGING RISK UNDER CASH VERSUS PHYSICAL DELIVERY SETTLEMENT OF THE FEEDER CATTLE FUTURES CONTRACT FOR SELECTED TEXAS MARKETS A Thesis by PETRINA LEA DIAMOND Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1989 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics BASIS BEHAVIOR AND HEDGING RISK UNDER CASH VERSUS PHYSICAL DELIVERY SETTLEMENT OF THE FEEDER CATTLE FUTURES...

  16. Determination of power distribution in the VVER-440 core on the basis of data from in-core monitors by means of a metric analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kryanev, A. V.; Udumyan, D. K. [National Research Nuclear University “MEPHI,” (Russian Federation); Kurchenkov, A. Yu., E-mail: s327@vver.kiae.ru; Gagarinskiy, A. A. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems associated with determining the power distribution in the VVER-440 core on the basis of a neutron-physics calculation and data from in-core monitors are considered. A new mathematical scheme is proposed for this on the basis of a metric analysis. In relation to the existing mathematical schemes, the scheme in question improves the accuracy and reliability of the resulting power distribution.

  17. Crystal Structures of Glycosyltransferase UGT78G1 Reveal the Molecular Basis for Glycosylation and Deglycosylation of (Iso)flavonoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modolo, Luzia V.; Li, Lenong; Pan, Haiyun; Blount, Jack W.; Dixon, Richard A.; Wang, Xiaoqiang; (SRNF)

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The glycosyltransferase UGT78G1 from Medicago truncatula catalyzes the glycosylation of various (iso)flavonoids such as the flavonols kaempferol and myricetin, the isoflavone formononetin, and the anthocyanidins pelargonidin and cyanidin. It also catalyzes a reverse reaction to remove the sugar moiety from glycosides. The structures of UGT78G1 bound with uridine diphosphate or with both uridine diphosphate and myricetin were determined at 2.1 {angstrom} resolution, revealing detailed interactions between the enzyme and substrates/products and suggesting a distinct binding mode for the acceptor/product. Comparative structural analysis and mutagenesis identify glutamate 192 as a key amino acid for the reverse reaction. This information provides a basis for enzyme engineering to manipulate substrate specificity and to design effective biocatalysts with glycosylation and/or deglycosylation activity.

  18. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Technical Basis Guide Describing How to Perform Safety Margin Configuration Risk Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis Smith; James Knudsen; Bentley Harwood

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL has carried out a demonstration of the RISMC approach for the purpose of configuration risk management. We have shown how improved accuracy and realism can be achieved by simulating changes in risk – as a function of different configurations – in order to determine safety margins as the plant is modified. We described the various technical issues that play a role in these configuration-based calculations with the intent that future applications can take advantage of the analysis benefits while avoiding some of the technical pitfalls that are found for these types of calculations. Specific recommendations have been provided on a variety of topics aimed at improving the safety margin analysis and strengthening the technical basis behind the analysis process.

  19. Development of Site-Specific Soil Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) Parameters for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, Suzette

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal and vertical PC 3 (2,500 yr) Soil Design Basis Earthquake (DBE) 5% damped spectra, corresponding time histories, and strain-compatible soil properties were developed for the Integrated Waste Treatment Unit (IWTU). The IWTU is located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Mean and 84th percentile horizontal DBE spectra derived from site-specific site response analyses were evaluated for the IWTU. The horizontal and vertical PC 3 (2,500 yr) Soil DBE 5% damped spectra at the 84th percentile were selected for Soil Structure Interaction (SSI) analyses at IWTU. The site response analyses were performed consistent with applicable Department of Energy (DOE) Standards, recommended guidance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Standards, and recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Panel (BRP) and Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB).

  20. After Action Report:Idaho National Laboratory (INL) 2014 Multiple Facility Beyond Design Basis (BDBE) Evaluated Drill October 21, 2014

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. Scott Barnes

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On October 21, 2014, Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in coordination with local jurisdictions, and Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office (DOE ID) conducted an evaluated drill to demonstrate the ability to implement the requirements of DOE O 151.1C, “Comprehensive Emergency Management System” when responding to a beyond design basis event (BDBE) scenario as outlined in the Office of Health, Safety, and Security Operating Experience Level 1 letter (OE-1: 2013-01). The INL contractor, Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA), in coordination with CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI), and Idaho Treatment Group LLC (ITG), successfully demonstrated appropriate response measures to mitigate a BDBE event that would impact multiple facilities across the INL while protecting the health and safety of personnel, the environment, and property. Offsite response organizations participated to demonstrate appropriate response measures.

  1. Tight bounds on the eavesdropping of a continuous-variable quantum cryptographic protocol with no basis switching

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudjana, J.; Magnin, L.; Garcia-Patron, R.; Cerf, N. J. [QuIC, Ecole Polytechnique, CP 165, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gaussian continuous-variable quantum key distribution protocol based on coherent states and heterodyne detection [Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 170504 (2004)] has the advantage that no active random basis switching is needed on the receiver's side. Its security is, however, not very satisfyingly understood today because the bounds on the secret key rate that have been derived from Heisenberg relations are not attained by any known scheme. Here, we address the problem of the optimal Gaussian individual attack against this protocol, and derive tight upper bounds on the information accessible to an eavesdropper. Interestingly, this protocol is proven to be even more resistant to individual attacks than originally thought. Optical schemes achieving these bounds are also exhibited, which concludes the security analysis of Gaussian protocols against individual attacks.

  2. Technical basis for evaluating electromagnetic and radio-frequency interference in safety-related I&C systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, P.D.; Korsah, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the development of the technical basis for the control of upsets and malfunctions in safety-related instrumentation and control (I&C) systems caused by electromagnetic and radio-frequency interference (EMI/RFI) and power surges. The research was performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and was sponsored by the USNRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research (RES). The motivation for research stems from the safety-related issues that need to be addressed with the application of advanced I&C systems to nuclear power plants. Development of the technical basis centered around establishing good engineering practices to ensure that sufficient levels of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) are maintained between the nuclear power plant`s electronic and electromechanical systems known to be the source(s) of EMI/RFI and power surges. First, good EMC design and installation practices need to be established to control the impact of interference sources on nearby circuits and systems. These EMC good practices include circuit layouts, terminations, filtering, grounding, bonding, shielding, and adequate physical separation. Second, an EMI/RFI test and evaluation program needs to be established to outline the tests to be performed, the associated test methods to be followed, and carefully formulated acceptance criteria based on the intended environment to ensure that the circuit or system under test meets the recommended guidelines. Third, a program needs to be developed to perform confirmatory tests and evaluate the surge withstand capability (SWC) and of I&C equipment connected to or installed in the vicinity of power circuits within the nuclear power plant. By following these three steps, the design and operability of safety-related I&C systems against EMI/RFI and power surges can be evaluated, acceptance criteria can be developed, and appropriate regulatory guidance can be provided.

  3. 105-K Basin Material Design Basis Feed Description for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Facilities VOL 1 Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PACKER, M.J.

    1999-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Metallic uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) is currently stored within two water filled pools, 105-KE Basin (KE Basin) and 105-KW Basin (KW Basin), at the United States Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. The Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNF Project) is responsible to DOE for operation of these fuel storage pools and for the 2100 metric tons of SNF materials that they contain. The SNF Project mission includes safe removal and transportation of all SNF from these storage basins to a new storage facility in the 200 East Area. To accomplish this mission, the SNF Project modifies the existing KE Basin and KW Basin facilities and constructs two new facilities: the 100 K Area Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF), which drains and dries the SNF; and the 200 East Area Canister Storage Building (CSB), which stores the SNF. The purpose of this document is to describe the design basis feed compositions for materials stored or processed by SNF Project facilities and activities. This document is not intended to replace the Hanford Spent Fuel Inventory Baseline (WHC 1994b), but only to supplement it by providing more detail on the chemical and radiological inventories in the fuel (this volume) and sludge. A variety of feed definitions is required to support evaluation of specific facility and process considerations during the development of these new facilities. Six separate feed types have been identified for development of new storage or processing facilities. The approach for using each feed during design evaluations is to calculate the proposed facility flowsheet assuming each feed. The process flowsheet would then provide a basis for material compositions and quantities which are used in follow-on calculations.

  4. Technical Basis for Safe Operations with Pu-239 in NMS and S Facilities (F and H Areas)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronikowski, M.G.

    1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Plutonium-239 is now being processed in HB-Line and H-Canyon as well as FB-Line and F-Canyon. As part of the effort to upgrade the Authorization Basis for H Area facilities relative to nuclear criticality, a literature review of Pu polymer characteristics was conducted to establish a more quantitative vs. qualitative technical basis for safe operations. The results are also applicable to processing in F Area facilities.The chemistry of Pu polymer formation, precipitation, and depolymerization is complex. Establishing limits on acid concentrations of solutions or changing the valence to Pu(III) or Pu(VI) can prevent plutonium polymer formation in tanks in the B lines and canyons. For Pu(IV) solutions of 7 g/L or less, 0.22 M HNO3 prevents polymer formation at ambient temperature. This concentration should remain the minimum acid limit for the canyons and B lines when processing Pu-239 solutions. If the minimum acid concentration is compromised, the solution may need to be sampled and tested for the presence of polymer. If polymer is not detected, processing may proceed. If polymer is detected, adding HNO3 to a final concentration above 4 M is the safest method for handling the solution. The solution could also be heated to speed up the depolymerization process. Heating with > 4 M HNO3 will depolymerize the solution for further processing.Adsorption of Pu(IV) polymer onto the steel walls of canyon and B line tanks is likely to be 11 mg/cm2, a literature value for unpolished steel. This value will be confirmed by experimental work. Tank-to-tank transfers via steam jets are not expected to produce Pu(IV) polymer unless a larger than normal dilution occurs (e.g., >3 percent) at acidities below 0.4 M.

  5. design basis threat

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A en6/%2A

  6. Testing Basis of Design

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed Donat About Us TedJ.LCommerce |330 Final

  7. Excitation of helium Rydberg states and doubly excited resonances in strong extreme ultraviolet fields: Full-dimensional quantum dynamics using exponentially tempered Gaussian basis sets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaprálová-Ž?ánská, Petra Ruth; Šmydke, Jan [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejškova 3, 182 23 Prague 8 (Czech Republic) [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejškova 3, 182 23 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Department of Radiation and Chemical Physics, Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Civiš, Svatopluk [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejškova 3, 182 23 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)] [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejškova 3, 182 23 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2013-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently optimized exponentially tempered Gaussian basis sets [P. R. Kapralova-Zdanska and J. Smydke, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 024105 (2013)] are employed in quantitative simulations of helium absorption cross-sections and two-photon excitation yields of doubly excited resonances. Linearly polarized half-infinite and Gaussian laser pulses at wavelengths 38–58 nm and large intensities up to 100 TW/cm{sup 2} are considered. The emphasis is laid on convergence of the results with respect to the quality of the Gaussian basis sets (typically limited by a number of partial waves, density, and spatial extent of the basis functions) as well as to the quality of the basis set of field-free states (typically limited by the maximum rotational quantum number and maximum excitation of the lower electron). Particular attention is paid to stability of the results with respect to varying complex scaling parameter. Moreover, the study of the dynamics is preceded by a thorough check of helium energies and oscillator strengths as they are obtained with the exponentially tempered Gaussian basis sets, being also compared with yet unpublished emission wavelengths measured in electric discharge experiments.

  8. Possible Methods to Estimate Core Location in a Beyond-Design-Basis Accident at a GE BWR with a Mark I Containment Stucture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walston, S; Rowland, M; Campbell, K

    2011-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    It is difficult to track to the location of a melted core in a GE BWR with Mark I containment during a beyond-design-basis accident. The Cooper Nuclear Station provided a baseline of normal material distributions and shielding configurations for the GE BWR with Mark I containment. Starting with source terms for a design-basis accident, methods and remote observation points were investigated to allow tracking of a melted core during a beyond-design-basis accident. The design of the GE BWR with Mark-I containment highlights an amazing poverty of expectations regarding a common mode failure of all reactor core cooling systems resulting in a beyond-design-basis accident from the simple loss of electric power. This design is shown in Figure 1. The station blackout accident scenario has been consistently identified as the leading contributor to calculated probabilities for core damage. While NRC-approved models and calculations provide guidance for indirect methods to assess core damage during a beyond-design-basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), there appears to be no established method to track the location of the core directly should the LOCA include a degree of fuel melt. We came to the conclusion that - starting with detailed calculations which estimate the release and movement of gaseous and soluble fission products from the fuel - selected dose readings in specific rooms of the reactor building should allow the location of the core to be verified.

  9. Magnetic-dipole transitions in highly-charged ions as a basis of ultra-precise optical clocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. I. Yudin; A. V. Taichenachev; A. Derevianko

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate the feasibility of using magnetic-dipole (M1) transitions in highly-charged ions as a basis of an optical atomic clockwork of exceptional accuracy. We consider a range of possibilities, including M1 transitions between clock levels of the same fine-structure and hyperfine-structure manifolds. In highly charged ions these transitions lie in the optical part of the spectra and can be probed with lasers. The most direct advantage of our proposal comes from the low degeneracy of clock levels and the simplicity of atomic structure in combination with negligible quadrupolar shift. We demonstrate that such clocks can have projected fractional accuracies below the $10^{-20}-10^{-21}$ level for all common systematic effects, such as black-body radiation, Zeeman, AC-Stark and quadrupolar shifts. Notice that usually-employed hyperfine clock transitions lie in the microwave spectral region. Our proposal moves such transitions to the optical domain. As the hyperfine transition frequencies depend on the fine-structure constant, electron-to-proton mass ratio, and nuclear magnetic moment, our proposal expands the range of experimental schemes for probing space and time variations of fundamental constants.

  10. Workshop proceedings: Developing the scientific basis for long-term land management of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sperber, T.D.; Reynolds, T.D. [eds.] [Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Breckenridge, R.P. [ed.] [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Responses to a survey on the INEEL Comprehensive Facility and Land Use Plan (US DOE 1996a) indicated the need for additional discussion on environmental resources, disturbance, and land use issues on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). As a result, in September 1997, a workshop evaluated the existing scientific basis and determined future data needs for long-term land management on the INEEL. This INEEL Long-Term Land Management Workshop examined existing data on biotic, abiotic, and heritage resources and how these resources have been impacted by disturbance activities of the INEEL. Information gained from this workshop will help guide land and facility use decisions, identify data gaps, and focus future research efforts. This report summarizes background information on the INEEL and its long-term land use planning efforts, presentations and discussions at the workshop, and the existing data available at the INEEL. In this document, recommendations for future INEEL land use planning, research efforts, and future workshops are presented. The authors emphasize these are not policy statements, but comments and suggestions made by scientists and others participating in the workshop. Several appendices covering land use disturbance, legal drivers, land use assumptions and workshop participant comments, workshop participants and contributors, and the workshop agenda are also included.

  11. Algebraic and group structure for bipartite three dimensional anisotropic Ising model on a non-local basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco Delgado

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Entanglement is considered as a basic physical resource for modern quantum applications in Quantum Information and Quantum Computation theories. Interactions able to generate and sustain entanglement are subject to deep research in order to have understanding and control on it, based on specific physical systems. Atoms, ions or quantum dots are considered a key piece in quantum applications because is a basic piece of developments towards a scalable spin-based quantum computer through universal and basic quantum operations. Ising model is a type of interaction which generates and modi?es entanglement properties of quantum systems based on matter. In this work, a general anisotropic three dimensional Ising model including an inhomogeneous magnetic field is analyzed to obtain their evolution and then, their algebraic properties which are controlled through a set of physical parameters. Evolution denote remarkable group properties when is analyzed in a non local basis, in particular those related with entanglement. These properties give a fruitful arena for further quantum applications and their control.

  12. Establishing a Cost Basis for Converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from High Enriched to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the auspices of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, the National Nuclear Security Administration /Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE) has, as a goal, to convert research reactors worldwide from weapons grade to non-weapons grade uranium. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is one of the candidates for conversion of fuel from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). A well documented business model, including tasks, costs, and schedules was developed to plan the conversion of HFIR. Using Microsoft Project, a detailed outline of the conversion program was established and consists of LEU fuel design activities, a fresh fuel shipping cask, improvements to the HFIR reactor building, and spent fuel operations. Current-value costs total $76 million dollars, include over 100 subtasks, and will take over 10 years to complete. The model and schedule follows the path of the fuel from receipt from fuel fabricator to delivery to spent fuel storage and illustrates the duration, start, and completion dates of each subtask to be completed. Assumptions that form the basis of the cost estimate have significant impact on cost and schedule.

  13. Emission reduction strategies for countries in transition and small countries as a basis for internationally harmonized energy policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lueth, O.A.; Jattke, A.; Rentz, O.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from energy-environment models, such as national emission reduction strategies and related costs, not only have an influence on national policy but are also used as a basis for international commitments with the objective of emission limitation. In recent years, there has been a great interest in a growing number of countries, for instance of ex-Yugoslavia or of the former Soviet Union, in models and methodologies that are internationally accepted. But, whereas the general methodologies can be transferred easily, modifications are necessary to take into account the specific situation of countries with economies in transition and small countries in particular. In this paper, improvements of the internationally accepted energy-emission model EFOM-ENV are described that make it possible to consider issues like a limited availability of hard currency and liquid capital as well as the uncertainty about the future economic development. For small countries, a mixed integer approach is pursued which permits to consider: (1) political trends, for instance striving for more independence from energy imports; (2) economical effects like economies of scale; and (3) technical aspects such as the impossibility of decreasing or increasing the capacity of an existing plant by any small quantity.

  14. The structural basis for partitioning of the XRCC1/DNA ligase III-[alpha] BRCT-mediated dimer complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Gabel, Scott A.; Krahn, Joseph M.; Ricker, Melissa A.; London, Robert E. (NIH)

    2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate step common to almost all DNA repair pathways is the ligation of the nicked intermediate to form contiguous double-stranded DNA. In the mammalian nucleotide and base excision repair pathways, the ligation step is carried out by ligase III-{alpha}. For efficient ligation, ligase III-{alpha} is constitutively bound to the scaffolding protein XRCC1 through interactions between the C-terminal BRCT domains of each protein. Although structural data for the individual domains has been available, no structure of the complex has been determined and several alternative proposals for this interaction have been advanced. Interpretation of the models is complicated by the formation of homodimers that, depending on the model, may either contribute to, or compete with heterodimer formation. We report here the structures of both homodimer complexes as well as the heterodimer complex. Structural characterization of the heterodimer formed from a longer XRCC1 BRCT domain construct, including residues comprising the interdomain linker region, revealed an expanded heterodimer interface with the ligase III-{alpha} BRCT domain. This enhanced linker-mediated binding interface plays a significant role in the determination of heterodimer/homodimer selectivity. These data provide fundamental insights into the structural basis of BRCT-mediated dimerization, and resolve questions related to the organization of this important repair complex.

  15. The Structural Basis for Partitioning of the XRCC1/DNA Ligase III-alpha BRCT-mediated Dimer Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M Cuneo; S Gabel; J Krahn; M Ricker; R London

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate step common to almost all DNA repair pathways is the ligation of the nicked intermediate to form contiguous double-stranded DNA. In the mammalian nucleotide and base excision repair pathways, the ligation step is carried out by ligase III-{alpha}. For efficient ligation, ligase III-{alpha} is constitutively bound to the scaffolding protein XRCC1 through interactions between the C-terminal BRCT domains of each protein. Although structural data for the individual domains has been available, no structure of the complex has been determined and several alternative proposals for this interaction have been advanced. Interpretation of the models is complicated by the formation of homodimers that, depending on the model, may either contribute to, or compete with heterodimer formation. We report here the structures of both homodimer complexes as well as the heterodimer complex. Structural characterization of the heterodimer formed from a longer XRCC1 BRCT domain construct, including residues comprising the interdomain linker region, revealed an expanded heterodimer interface with the ligase III-{alpha} BRCT domain. This enhanced linker-mediated binding interface plays a significant role in the determination of heterodimer/homodimer selectivity. These data provide fundamental insights into the structural basis of BRCT-mediated dimerization, and resolve questions related to the organization of this important repair complex.

  16. Thermodynamic Theory of Epitaxial Alloys: First-Principles Mixed-Basis Cluster Expansion of (In,Ga)N Alloy Film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J. Z.; Zunger, A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Epitaxial growth of semiconductor alloys onto a fixed substrate has become the method of choice to make high quality crystals. In the coherent epitaxial growth, the lattice mismatch between the alloy film and the substrate induces a particular form of strain, adding a strain energy term into the free energy of the alloy system. Such epitaxial strain energy can alter the thermodynamics of the alloy, leading to a different phase diagram and different atomic microstructures. In this paper, we present a general-purpose mixed-basis cluster expansion method to describe the thermodynamics of an epitaxial alloy, where the formation energy of a structure is expressed in terms of pair and many-body interactions. With a finite number of first-principles calculation inputs, our method can predict the energies of various atomic structures with an accuracy comparable to that of first-principles calculations themselves. Epitaxial (In, Ga)N zinc-blende alloy grown on GaN(001) substrate is taken as an example to demonstrate the details of the method. Two (210) superlattice structures, (InN){sub 2}/(GaN){sub 2} (at x = 0.50) and (InN){sub 4}/(GaN){sub 1} (at x = 0.80), are identified as the ground state structures, in contrast to the phase-separation behavior of the bulk alloy.

  17. Dirac-Fock calculation for H, H2+ and H2 in a strong magnetic field by the Hermitian basis of B-splines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. B. Deineka

    1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-dimensional, fully numerical approach to the solution of four-component Dirac-Fock equation using the moderately long Hermitian basis of B-splines is applied to H, H2+ and H2 in a strong magnetic field. The geometric parameters, including different behavior of wave-functions relativistic components are analyzed. The accuracy of the solutions as a function of the basis lenght is estimated. The relativistic corrections are calculated by transformation of the matrix equations to the equations for large relativistic components. Application of the finite-element method to solution of the Dirac-Fock equation without supplementary assumption about exchange in case of the H2 excited states is discussed. The maximum localization of the basis functions provides applicability of the quadrature formulae for five-dimensional two-electron integral calculations within reasonable period.

  18. Gel'fand-Zetlin Basis and Clebsch-Gordan Coefficients for Covariant Representations of the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. I. Stoilova; J. Van der Jeugt

    2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A Gel'fand-Zetlin basis is introduced for the irreducible covariant tensor representations of the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n). Explicit expressions for the generators of the Lie superalgebra acting on this basis are determined. Furthermore, Clebsch-Gordan coefficients corresponding to the tensor product of any covariant tensor representation of gl(m|n) with the natural representation V ([1,0,...,0]) of gl(m|n) with highest weight (1,0,. . . ,0) are computed. Both results are steps for the explicit construction of the parastatistics Fock space.

  19. Analysis of main steam isolation valve leakage in design basis accidents using MELCOR 1.8.6 and RADTRAD.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salay, Michael (United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Kalinich, Donald A.; Gauntt, Randall O.; Radel, Tracy E.

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyses were performed using MELCOR and RADTRAD to investigate main steam isolation valve (MSIV) leakage behavior under design basis accident (DBA) loss-of-coolant (LOCA) conditions that are presumed to have led to a significant core melt accident. Dose to the control room, site boundary and LPZ are examined using both approaches described in current regulatory guidelines as well as analyses based on best estimate source term and system response. At issue is the current practice of using containment airborne aerosol concentrations as a surrogate for the in-vessel aerosol concentration that exists in the near vicinity of the MSIVs. This study finds current practice using the AST-based containment aerosol concentrations for assessing MSIV leakage is non-conservative and conceptually in error. A methodology is proposed that scales the containment aerosol concentration to the expected vessel concentration in order to preserve the simplified use of the AST in assessing containment performance under assumed DBA conditions. This correction is required during the first two hours of the accident while the gap and early in-vessel source terms are present. It is general practice to assume that at {approx}2hrs, recovery actions to reflood the core will have been successful and that further core damage can be avoided. The analyses performed in this study determine that, after two hours, assuming vessel reflooding has taken place, the containment aerosol concentration can then conservatively be used as the effective source to the leaking MSIV's. Recommendations are provided concerning typical aerosol removal coefficients that can be used in the RADTRAD code to predict source attenuation in the steam lines, and on robust methods of predicting MSIV leakage flows based on measured MSIV leakage performance.

  20. Technical basis for flawed cylinder test specification to assure adequate fracture resistance of ISO high-strength steel cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States); Smith, J.H. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Metallurgy Div.; Tribolet, R.O. [Tribolet (R.O.), Van Wert, OH (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-pressure industrial gases (such as oxygen, nitrogen, argon, hydrogen, etc.) are stored and transported in portable cylinders. ISO TC58 SC3 has developed a draft specification 9809 for design and fabrication of high-pressure cylinders with maximum tensile strength limitation of 1,100 N/mm{sup 2}. In order to extend the ISO 9809 rules for higher than 1,100 N/mm{sup 2} strength level cylinders, a working group WG14 was formed in 1989 to develop new rules to assure adequate fracture resistance. In 1994, WG14 recommended a simple, but unique flawed cylinder test method for design qualification of the cylinder and acceptance criteria to assure adequate fracture resistance. WG14 also recommended Charpy-V-notch impact tests to control the required fracture resistance on production cylinders. This paper presents the technical basis that was employed in developing the flawed cylinder test method and acceptance criteria. The specification was developed for seamless steel cylinders having actual strength in the range of 1,100 to 1,400 N/mm{sup 2} and cylindrical section wall thickness in the range of 3 to 10 mm. Flawed cylinder tests were conducted on several hundred cylinders of varying sizes and strength levels. The specification requires to demonstrate LEAK-BEFORE-BREAK performance of the cylinder having flaw length equal to 1.6 (o.d. {times} t{sub design}){sup 0.5} at failure pressure = (t{sub design}/t{sub actual}) x Design Pressure.

  1. Technical basis for flawed cylinder test specification to assure adequate fracture resistance of ISO high strength steel cylinder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, M.D. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Process and Systems R and D; Smith, J.H. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Metallurgy Div.; Tribolet, R.O.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High pressure industrial gases (such as oxygen, nitrogen, argon, hydrogen, etc.) are stored and transported in portable cylinders. ISO TC58 SC3 has developed a draft specification 9809 for design and fabrication of high pressure cylinders with maximum tensile strength limitation of 1,100 N/mm{sup 2}. In order to extend the ISO 9809 rules for higher than 1,100 N/mm{sup 2} strength level cylinders, a working group WG14 was formed in 1989 to develop new rules to assure adequate fracture resistance. In 1994, WG14 recommended a simple, but unique flawed cylinder test method for design qualification of the cylinder and acceptance criteria to assure adequate fracture resistance. WG14 also recommended Charpy-V-Notch impact tests to control the required fracture resistance on production cylinders. This paper presents the technical basis that was employed in developing the flawed cylinder test method and acceptance criteria. The specification was developed for seamless steel cylinders having actual strength in the range of 1,100 to 1,400 N/mm{sup 2} and cylindrical section wall thickness in the range of 3mm to 10mm. Flawed cylinder tests were conducted on several hundred cylinders of varying sizes and strength levels. The specification requires to demonstrate LEAK-BEFORE-BREAK performance of the cylinder having flaw length equal to 1.6(O.D. {times} t{sub design}){sup 0.5} at failure pressure = (t{sub design}/t{sub actual}) {times} Design Pressure.

  2. Structural Basis for Catalysis of a Tetrameric Class IIa Fructose 1,6-Bisphosphate Aldolase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pegan, Scott D.; Ruskseree, Kamolchanok; Franzblau, Scott G.; Mesecar, Andrew D. ((NSTDC)); ((UIC))

    2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), currently infects one-third of the world's population in its latent form. The emergence of multidrug-resistant and extensive drug-resistant strains has highlighted the need for new pharmacological targets within M. tuberculosis. The class IIa fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase (FBA) enzyme from M. tuberculosis (MtFBA) has been proposed as one such target since it is upregulated in latent TB. Since the structure of MtFBA has not been determined and there is little information available on its reaction mechanism, we sought to determine the X-ray structure of MtFBA in complex with its substrates. By lowering the pH of the enzyme in the crystalline state, we were able to determine a series of high-resolution X-ray structures of MtFBA bound to dihydroxyacetone phosphate, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, and fructose 1,6-bisphosphate at 1.5, 2.1, and 1.3 {angstrom}, respectively. Through these structures, it was discovered that MtFBA belongs to a novel tetrameric class of type IIa FBAs. The molecular details at the interface of the tetramer revealed important information for better predictability of the quaternary structures among the FBAs based on their primary sequences. These X-ray structures also provide interesting and new details on the reaction mechanism of class II FBAs. Substrates and products were observed in geometries poised for catalysis; in addition, unexpectedly, the hydroxyl-enolate intermediate of dihydroxyacetone phosphate was also captured and resolved structurally. These concise new details offer a better understanding of the reaction mechanisms for FBAs in general and provide a structural basis for inhibitor design efforts aimed at this class of enzymes.

  3. 231A. Hernndez-Sols et al. / Annals of Nuclear Energy 57 (2013) 230245 Lattice calculations use nuclear libraries as input basis data,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    #12;231A. Hernández-Solís et al. / Annals of Nuclear Energy 57 (2013) 230­245 Lattice calculations use nuclear libraries as input basis data, describing the properties of nuclei and the fundamental/or estimated values from nuclear physics models are the source of information of these libraries. Because

  4. J. H. Scofield and D. M. Fleetwood, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science NS-38, 1567-77 (December 1991). PHYSICAL BASIS FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTS OF MOS RADIATION HARDNESS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scofield, John H.

    J. H. Scofield and D. M. Fleetwood, IEEE Transactions on Nuclear Science NS-38, 1567-77 (December 1991). PHYSICAL BASIS FOR NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTS OF MOS RADIATION HARDNESS* John H. Scofield Department techniques that improve the radiation hardness of MOS devices at room temperature can greatly reduce the 1/f

  5. Formaldehyde as a Basis for Residential Ventilation Rates1 M.H. Sherman (MHSherman@lbl.gov) and A.T. Hodgson (ATHodgson@lbl.gov)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-49577 Formaldehyde as a Basis for Residential Ventilation Rates1 M.H. Sherman (MHSherman, houses in the U.S. have been ventilated by passive infiltration in combination with active window opening to reduce infiltration, and the use of windows for ventilation also may have decreased due to a number

  6. Finite-Hilbert-basis-set calculations for the angular distribution of ionized electrons produced in p+H impact at 20 keV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, John F.; Fu, J.; Fitzpatrick, M. J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a different method of extracting the angular distribution of ejected electrons in an ion-atom collision from a two-centered finite Hilbert basis-set calculation. We obtain good agreement with experiment for a p+H collision at 20 keV if we...

  7. The phenomenon of ion migration in solids forms the basis for a wide variety of electrochemical applications, ranging from power generators and chemical sensors to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliott, James

    of electrochemical applications, ranging from power generators and chemical sensors to ionic switches. SolidAbstract The phenomenon of ion migration in solids forms the basis for a wide variety-state ionics (SSI) is the field of research concerning ionic motions in solids and the materials properties

  8. How Believable Are Real Faces? Towards a Perceptual Basis for Conversational Douglas W. Cunningham, Martin Breidt, Mario Kleiner, Christian Wallraven, Heinrich H. Blthoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and conversational agents, virtual humans and avatars, behavioral animation, vision techniques in animation 1 of whether the humans involved are virtual or real, well-developed conversational skills are a necessityHow Believable Are Real Faces? Towards a Perceptual Basis for Conversational Animation Douglas W

  9. Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Temporal...

  10. Calculation of exact vibrational spectra for P{sub 2}O and CH{sub 2}NH using a phase space wavelet basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halverson, Thomas, E-mail: tom.halverson@ttu.edu; Poirier, Bill [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, P.O. Box 41061, Lubbock, Texas 79409-1061 (United States)

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    ‘‘Exact” quantum dynamics calculations of vibrational spectra are performed for two molecular systems of widely varying dimensionality (P{sub 2}O and CH{sub 2}NH), using a momentum-symmetrized Gaussian basis. This basis has been previously shown to defeat exponential scaling of computational cost with system dimensionality. The calculations were performed using the new “SWITCHBLADE” black-box code, which utilizes both dimensionally independent algorithms and massive parallelization to compute very large numbers of eigenstates for any fourth-order force field potential, in a single calculation. For both molecules considered here, many thousands of vibrationally excited states were computed, to at least an “intermediate” level of accuracy (tens of wavenumbers). Future modifications to increase the accuracy to “spectroscopic” levels, along with other potential future improvements of the new code, are also discussed.

  11. Analytic eigenenergies of the Dirac equation with finite degrees of freedom under a confining linear potential using basis functions localized in spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimichika Fukushima; Hikaru Sato

    2015-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Considering the propagation of fields in the spacetime continuum and the well-defined features of fields with finite degrees of freedom, the wave function is expanded in terms of a finite set of basis functions localized in spacetime. This paper presents the analytic eigenenergies derived for a confined fundamental fermion-antifermion pair under a linear potential obtained from the Wilson loop for the non-Abelian Yang-Mills field. The Hamiltonian matrix of the Dirac equation is analytically diagonalized using basis functions localized in spacetime. The squared system eigenenergies are proportional to the string tension and the absolute value of the Dirac's relativistic quantum number related to the total angular momentum, consistent with the expectation.

  12. A computational method for solving stochastic Itô–Volterra integral equations based on stochastic operational matrix for generalized hat basis functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heydari, M.H., E-mail: heydari@stu.yazd.ac.ir [Faculty of Mathematics, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); The Laboratory of Quantum Information Processing, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hooshmandasl, M.R., E-mail: hooshmandasl@yazd.ac.ir [Faculty of Mathematics, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); The Laboratory of Quantum Information Processing, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Maalek Ghaini, F.M., E-mail: maalek@yazd.ac.ir [Faculty of Mathematics, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); The Laboratory of Quantum Information Processing, Yazd University, Yazd (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Cattani, C., E-mail: ccattani@unisa.it [Department of Mathematics, University of Salerno, Fisciano (Italy)

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a new computational method based on the generalized hat basis functions is proposed for solving stochastic Itô–Volterra integral equations. In this way, a new stochastic operational matrix for generalized hat functions on the finite interval [0,T] is obtained. By using these basis functions and their stochastic operational matrix, such problems can be transformed into linear lower triangular systems of algebraic equations which can be directly solved by forward substitution. Also, the rate of convergence of the proposed method is considered and it has been shown that it is O(1/(n{sup 2}) ). Further, in order to show the accuracy and reliability of the proposed method, the new approach is compared with the block pulse functions method by some examples. The obtained results reveal that the proposed method is more accurate and efficient in comparison with the block pule functions method.

  13. Analytic eigenenergies of the Dirac equation with finite degrees of freedom under a confining linear potential using basis functions localized in spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimichika Fukushima; Hikaru Sato

    2015-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Considering the propagation of fields in the spacetime continuum and the well-defined features of fields with finite degrees of freedom, the wave function is expanded in terms of a finite set of basis functions localized in spacetime. This paper presents the analytic eigenenergies derived for a confined fundamental fermion-antifermion pair under a linear potential obtained from the Wilson loop for the non-Abelian Yang-Mills field. The Hamiltonian matrix of the Dirac equation is analytically diagonalized using basis functions localized in spacetime. The squared system eigenenergies are proportional to the string tension and the absolute value of the Dirac's relativistic quantum number related to the total angular momentum, consistent with the expectation.

  14. On the representation of the diffracted field of Hermite-Gaussian modes in an alien basis and the young diffraction principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smirnov, V.N.; Strokovskii, G.A. [St. Petersburg State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytical form of expansion coefficients of a diffracted field for an arbitrary Hermite-Gaussian beam in an alien Hermite-Gaussian basis is obtained. A possible physical interpretation of the well-known Young phenomenological diffraction principle and experiments on diffraction of Hermite-Gaussian beams of the lowest types (n = 0 - 5) from half-plane are discussed. The case of nearly homogenous expansion corresponding to misalignment and mismatch of optical systems is also analyzed. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  15. On the ground state calculation of a many-body system using a self-consistent basis and quasi-Monte Carlo: An application to water hexamer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Georgescu, Ionu?, E-mail: ionutg@gmail.com; Mandelshtam, Vladimir A. [Chemistry Department, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)] [Chemistry Department, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Jitomirskaya, Svetlana [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Given a quantum many-body system, the Self-Consistent Phonons (SCP) method provides an optimal harmonic approximation by minimizing the free energy. In particular, the SCP estimate for the vibrational ground state (zero temperature) appears to be surprisingly accurate. We explore the possibility of going beyond the SCP approximation by considering the system Hamiltonian evaluated in the harmonic eigenbasis of the SCP Hamiltonian. It appears that the SCP ground state is already uncoupled to all singly- and doubly-excited basis functions. So, in order to improve the SCP result at least triply-excited states must be included, which then reduces the error in the ground state estimate substantially. For a multidimensional system two numerical challenges arise, namely, evaluation of the potential energy matrix elements in the harmonic basis, and handling and diagonalizing the resulting Hamiltonian matrix, whose size grows rapidly with the dimensionality of the system. Using the example of water hexamer we demonstrate that such calculation is feasible, i.e., constructing and diagonalizing the Hamiltonian matrix in a triply-excited SCP basis, without any additional assumptions or approximations. Our results indicate particularly that the ground state energy differences between different isomers (e.g., cage and prism) of water hexamer are already quite accurate within the SCP approximation.

  16. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR DOE STANDARD 3013 EQUIVALENCY SUPPORTING REDUCED TEMPERATURE STABILIZATION OF OXALATE-DERIVED PLUTONIUM DIOXIDE PRODUCED BY THE HB-LINE FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, J. M.; Livingston, R. R.; Berg, J. M.; Veirs, D. K.

    2013-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the technical basis for determining that stabilizing highpurity PuO{sub 2} derived from oxalate precipitation at the SRS HB-Line facility at a minimum of 625 {degree}C for at least four hours in an oxidizing atmosphere is equivalent to stabilizing at a minimum of 950 {degree}C for at least two hours as regards meeting the objectives of stabilization defined by DOE-STD-3013 if the material is handled in a way to prevent excessive absorption of water.

  17. Supercontinuum generation and filamentation of ultrashort laser pulses in hybrid silicate nanocomposite materials on the basis of polysaccharides and hyperbranched polyglycidols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kul'chin, Yurii N; Golik, S S; Proshenko, D Yu; Chekhlenok, A A; Postnova, I V; Maior, A Yu; Shchipunov, Yurii A

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The possibility of using hybrid silicate nanocomposite materials on the basis of polysaccharides and hyperbranched polyglycidols for efficient conversion of pulsed radiation of a femtosecond Ti : sapphire laser at the wavelength 800 nm into supercontinuum in the range from 400 to 1000 nm is experimentally demonstrated. It is established that the addition of a small concentration of Au and CdS nanoparticles to the studied materials essentially affects the efficiency of conversion of the laser radiation energy into the supercontinuum spectrum. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  18. Comparison between two common collocation approaches based on radial basis functions for the case of heat transfer equations arising in porous medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Parand; S. Abbasbandy; S. Kazem; A. R. Rezaei

    2010-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper two common collocation approaches based on radial basis functions have been considered; one be computed through the integration process (IRBF) and one be computed through the differentiation process (DRBF). We investigated the two approaches on natural convection heat transfer equations embedded in porous medium which are of great importance in the design of canisters for nuclear wastes disposal. Numerical results show that the IRBF be performed much better than the common DRBF, and show good accuracy and high rate of convergence of IRBF process.

  19. Comparison between two common collocation approaches based on radial basis functions for the case of heat transfer equations arising in porous medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parand, K; Kazem, S; Rezaei, A R; 10.1016/j.cnsns.2010.07.011

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper two common collocation approaches based on radial basis functions have been considered; one be computed through the integration process (IRBF) and one be computed through the differentiation process (DRBF). We investigated the two approaches on natural convection heat transfer equations embedded in porous medium which are of great importance in the design of canisters for nuclear wastes disposal. Numerical results show that the IRBF be performed much better than the common DRBF, and show good accuracy and high rate of convergence of IRBF process.

  20. Molecular properties by Quantum Monte Carlo: an investigation on the role of the wave function ansatz and the basis set in the water molecule

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Zen; Ye Luo; Sandro Sorella; Leonardo Guidoni

    2013-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods are accurate and promising many body techniques for electronic structure calculations which, in the last years, are encountering a growing interest thanks to their favorable scaling with the system size and their efficient parallelization, particularly suited for the modern high performance computing facilities. The ansatz of the wave function and its variational flexibility are crucial points for both the accurate description of molecular properties and the capabilities of the method to tackle large systems. In this paper, we extensively analyze, using different variational ansatzes, several properties of the water molecule, namely: the total energy, the dipole and quadrupole momenta, the ionization and atomization energies, the equilibrium configuration, and the harmonic and fundamental frequencies of vibration. The investigation mainly focuses on variational Monte Carlo calculations, although several lattice regularized diffusion Monte Carlo calculations are also reported. Through a systematic study, we provide a useful guide to the choice of the wave function, the pseudo potential, and the basis set for QMC calculations. We also introduce a new strategy for the definition of the atomic orbitals involved in the Jastrow - Antisymmetrised Geminal power wave function, in order to drastically reduce the number of variational parameters. This scheme significantly improves the efficiency of QMC energy minimization in case of large basis sets.

  1. Optimal basis set for ab-initio calculations of energy levels in tunneling structures, using the covariance matrix of the wave functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sever Spanulescu

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper proposes a method to obtain the optimal basis set for solving the self consistent field (SCF) equations for large atomic systems in order to calculate the energy barriers in tunneling structures, with higher accuracy and speed. Taking into account the stochastic-like nature of the samples of all the involved wave functions for many body problems, a statistical optimization is made by considering the covariance matrix of these samples. An eigenvalues system is obtained and solved for the optimal basis set and by inspecting the rapidly decreasing eigenvalues one may seriously reduce the necessary number of vectors that insures an imposed precision. This leads to a potentially significant improvement in the speed of the SCF calculations and accuracy, as the statistical properties of a large number of wave functions in an large spatial domain may be considered. The eigenvalue problem has to be solved only few times, so that the amount of time added may be much smaller that the overall iterating SCF calculations. A simple implementation of the method is presented for a situation where the analytical solution is known, and the results are encouraging.

  2. Chern-Simons gravity with (curvature){sup 2} and (torsion){sup 2} terms and a basis of degree-of-freedom projection operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helayeel-Neto, J. A.; Hernaski, C. A.; Pereira-Dias, B.; Vargas-Paredes, A. A.; Vasquez-Otoya, V. J. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, CEP 22290-180 (Brazil)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of (curvature){sup 2}- and (torsion){sup 2}-terms in the Einstein-Hilbert-Chern-Simons Lagrangian are investigated. The purposes are two-fold: (i) to show the efficacy of an orthogonal basis of degree-of-freedom projection operators recently proposed and to ascertain its adequacy for obtaining propagators of general parity-breaking gravity models in three dimensions; (ii) to analyze the role of the topological Chern-Simons term for the unitarity and the particle spectrum of the model squared-curvature terms in connection with dynamical torsion. Our conclusion is that the Chern-Simons term does not influence the unitarity conditions imposed on the parameters of the Lagrangian but significantly modifies the particle spectrum.

  3. Technical basis for dose reconstruction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anspaugh, L.R.

    1996-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to consider two general topics: technical considerations of why dose-reconstruction studies should or should not be performed and methods of dose reconstruction. The first topic is of general and growing interest as the number of dose-reconstruction studies increases, and one asks the question whether it is necessary to perform a dose reconstruction for virtually every site at which, for example, the Department of Energy (DOE) has operated a nuclear-related facility. And there is the broader question of how one might logically draw the line at performing or not performing dose-reconstruction (radiological and chemical) studies for virtually every industrial complex in the entire country. The second question is also of general interest. There is no single correct way to perform a dose-reconstruction study, and it is important not to follow blindly a single method to the point that cheaper, faster, more accurate, and more transparent methods might not be developed and applied.

  4. Design Basis Threat Policy (U)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order is classified and will not be available on the Directives Portal. For distribution, contact John Fitzgibbons, 301-903-1361, john.fitzgibbons@hq.doe.gov. Cancels: DOE O 470.3

  5. Design Basis Threat Policy (U)

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order is classified and will not be available on the Directives Portal. For distribution, NA employees should contact Jon Todd, 202-586-2579; all other DOE employees should contact Ron Francis, 301-903-6874. Does not cancel other directives.

  6. Must Dispositions Have A Basis?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Joshua

    that even if one grants the possibilities on which these three objections to ET are based, it does not follow that ET is false. Hence, none of these objections are sufficient to refute ET. In the first section of this paper I shall explicate ET... some IC or set of ICs b is consistent with glass b's having Ł and not having d. Hence, unless NNLs are impossible, (ii) is false. In other words, the possibility of SI does not by itself entail the falsity of ET; instead, the possibility of SI...

  7. Appendices for the Basis Document

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s Reply Comments AT&T,FACT SAmesEnergyAnnualAnsweringAntoinetteA-1

  8. Determination of Low-Energy Parameters of Neutron--Proton Scattering on the Basis of Modern Experimental Data from Partial-Wave Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. A. Babenko; N. M. Petrov

    2007-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The triplet and singlet low-energy parameters in the effective-range expansion for neutron--proton scattering are determined by using the latest experimental data on respective phase shifts from the SAID nucleon--nucleon database. The results differ markedly from the analogous parameters obtained on the basis of the phase shifts of the Nijmegen group and contradict the parameter values that are presently used as experimental ones. The values found with the aid of the phase shifts from the SAID nucleon--nucleon database for the total cross section for the scattering of zero-energy neutrons by protons, $\\sigma_{0}=20.426 $b, and the neutron--proton coherent scattering length, $f=-3.755 $fm, agree perfectly with the experimental cross-section values obtained by Houk, $\\sigma_{0}=20.436\\pm 0.023 $b, and experimental scattering-length values obtained by Houk and Wilson, $f=-3.756\\pm 0.009 $fm, but they contradict cross-section values of $\\sigma_{0}=20.491\\pm 0.014 $b according to Dilg and coherent-scattering-length values of $f=-3.7409\\pm 0.0011 $fm according to Koester and Nistler.

  9. Structural Basis for Recognition of H3T3ph and Smac/DIABLO N-terminal Peptides by Human Survivin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Jiamu; Kelly, Alexander E.; Funabiki, Hironori; Patel, Dinshaw J. (MSKCC); (Rockefeller)

    2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Survivin is an inhibitor of apoptosis family protein implicated in apoptosis and mitosis. In apoptosis, it has been shown to recognize the Smac/DIABLO protein. It is also a component of the chromosomal passenger complex, a key player during mitosis. Recently, Survivin was identified in vitro and in vivo as the direct binding partner for phosphorylated Thr3 on histone H3 (H3T3ph). We have undertaken structural and binding studies to investigate the molecular basis underlying recognition of H3T3ph and Smac/DIABLO N-terminal peptides by Survivin. Our crystallographic studies establish recognition of N-terminal Ala in both complexes and identify intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions in the Survivin phosphate-binding pocket that contribute to H3T3ph mark recognition. In addition, our calorimetric data establish that Survivin binds tighter to the H3T3ph-containing peptide relative to the N-terminal Smac/DIABLO peptide, and this preference can be reversed through structure-guided mutations that increase the hydrophobicity of the phosphate-binding pocket.

  10. Structural Basis of Neutralization of the Major Toxic Component from the Scorpion Centruroides noxius Hoffmann by a Human-derived Single-chain Antibody Fragment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canul-Tec, Juan Carlos; Riańo-Umbarila, Lidia; Rudińo-Pińera, Enrique; Becerril, Baltazar; Possani, Lourival D.; Torres-Larios, Alfredo (U. NAM)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    It has previously been reported that several single-chain antibody fragments of human origin (scFv) neutralize the effects of two different scorpion venoms through interactions with the primary toxins of Centruroides noxius Hoffmann (Cn2) and Centruroides suffusus suffusus (Css2). Here we present the crystal structure of the complex formed between one scFv (9004G) and the Cn2 toxin, determined in two crystal forms at 2.5 and 1.9 {angstrom} resolution. A 15-residue span of the toxin is recognized by the antibody through a cleft formed by residues from five of the complementarity-determining regions of the scFv. Analysis of the interface of the complex reveals three features. First, the epitope of toxin Cn2 overlaps with essential residues for the binding of {beta}-toxins to its Na+ channel receptor site. Second, the putative recognition of Css2 involves mainly residues that are present in both Cn2 and Css2 toxins. Finally, the effect on the increase of affinity of previously reported key residues during the maturation process of different scFvs can be inferred from the structure. Taken together, these results provide the structural basis that explain the mechanism of the 9004G neutralizing activity and give insight into the process of directed evolution that gave rise to this family of neutralizing scFvs.

  11. TECHNICAL BASIS DOCUMENT OF MARSSIM FIELD CALIBRATION FOR QUANTIFICATION OF CS-137 VOLUMETRICALLY CONTAMINATED SOILS IN THE BC CONTROLLED AREA USING 2 BY 2 SODIUM IODIDE DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAPPIN JL

    2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to provide the Technical Basis and Documentation for Field Calibrations of radiation measurement equipment for use in the MARSSIM Seeping Surveys of the BC Controlled Area (BCCA). The Be Controlled Area is bounded on tt1e north by (but does not include) the BCCribs & Trenches and is bounded on the south by Army Loop Road. Parts of the BC Controlled Area are posted as a Contamination Area and the remainder is posted as a Soil Contamination Area. The area is approximately 13 square miles and divided into three zones (Zone A , Zone B. and Zone C). A map from reference 1 which shows the 3 zones is attached. The MARSSIM Scoping Surveys are intended 10 better identify the boundaries of the three zones based on the volumetric (pCi/g) contamination levels in the soil. The MARSSIM Field Calibration. reference 2. of radiation survey instrumentation will determine the Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) and an algorithm for converting counts to pCi/g. The instrumentation and corresponding results are not intended for occupational radiation protection decisions or for the release of property per DOE Order 5400.5.

  12. Effects of non-latching blast valves on the source term and consequences of the design-basis accidents in the Device Assembly Facility (DAF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, D.H.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of the Design-Basis Accidents (DBA) involving high explosives (HE) and Plutonium (Pu) in the assembly cell of the Device Assembly Facility (DAF), which was completed earlier, assumed latching blast valves in the ventilation system of the assembly cell. Latching valves effectively sealed a release path through the ventilation duct system. However, the blast valves in the assembly cell, as constructed are actually non-latching valves, and would reopen when the gas pressure drops to 0.5 psi above one atmosphere. Because the reopening of the blast valves provides an additional release path to the environment, and affects the material transport from the assembly cell to other DAF buildings, the DOE/NV DAF management has decided to support an additional analysis of the DAF`s DBA to account for the effects of non-latching valves. Three cases were considered in the DAF`s DBA, depending on the amount of HE and Pu involved, as follows: Case 1 -- 423 {number_sign}HE, 16 kg Pu; Case 2 -- 150 {number_sign}HE 10 kg Pu; Case 3 -- 55 {number_sign}HE 5 kg Pu. The results of the analysis with non-latching valves are summarized.

  13. Technical Basis for the Determination that Current Characterization Data and Processes are Sufficient to Ensure Safe Storage and to Design Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIMPSON, B.C.

    1999-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the technical basis for closure of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 93-5 Implementation Plan milestone 5.6.3.13, ''Core sample all tanks by 2002'' (DOE-RL 1996). The milestone was based on the need for characterization data to ensure safe storage of the waste, to operate the tanks safely, and to plan and implement retrieval and processing of the waste. Sufficient tank characterization data have been obtained to ensure that existing controls are adequate for safe storage of the waste in the 177 waste tanks at the Hanford Site. In addition, a process has been developed, executed, and institutionalized to systemically identify information needs, to integrate and prioritize the needs, and to reliably obtain and analyze the associated samples. This document provides a technical case that the remaining 45 incompletely sampled tanks no longer require sampling to support the intent of the Implementation Plan milestone. Sufficient data have been obtained to close the Unreviewed Safety Questions (USQs), and to ensure that existing hazard controls are adequate and appropriately applied. However, in the future, additional characterization of tanks at the site will be required to support identified information needs. Closure of this milestone allows sampling and analytical data to be obtained in a manner that is consistent with the integrated priority process.

  14. Structural Basis for the Sequence-specific Recognition of Human ISG15 by the NS1 Protein of Influenza B Virus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R Guan; L Ma; P Leonard; B Amer; H Sridharan; C Zhao; R Krug; G Montelione

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Interferon-induced ISG15 conjugation plays an important antiviral role against several viruses, including influenza viruses. The NS1 protein of influenza B virus (NS1B) specifically binds only human and nonhuman primate ISG15s and inhibits their conjugation. To elucidate the structural basis for the sequence-specific recognition of human ISG15, we determined the crystal structure of the complex formed between human ISG15 and the N-terminal region of NS1B (NS1B-NTR). The NS1B-NTR homodimer interacts with two ISG15 molecules in the crystal and also in solution. The two ISG15-binding sites on the NS1B-NTR dimer are composed of residues from both chains, namely residues in the RNA-binding domain (RBD) from one chain, and residues in the linker between the RBD and the effector domain from the other chain. The primary contact region of NS1B-NTR on ISG15 is composed of residues at the junction of the N-terminal ubiquitin-like (Ubl) domain and the short linker region between the two Ubl domains, explaining why the sequence of the short linker in human and nonhuman primate ISG15s is essential for the species-specific binding of these ISG15s. In addition, the crystal structure identifies NS1B-NTR binding sites in the N-terminal Ubl domain of ISG15, and shows that there are essentially no contacts with the C-terminal Ubl domain of ISG15. Consequently, NS1B-NTR binding to ISG15 would not occlude access of the C-terminal Ubl domain of ISG15 to its conjugating enzymes. Nonetheless, transfection assays show that NS1B-NTR binding of ISG15 is responsible for the inhibition of interferon-induced ISG15 conjugation in cells.

  15. Comparative genomics of the white-rot fungi, Phanerochaete carnosa and P. chrysosporium, to elucidate the genetic basis of the distinct wood types they colonize

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; MacDonald, Jacqueline; Syed, Khajamohiddin; Salamov, Asaf; Hori, Chiaki; Aerts, Andrea; Henrissat, Bernard; Wiebenga, Ad; vanKuyk, Patricia A.; Barry, Kerrie; Lindquist, Erika; LaButti, Kurt; Lapidus, Alla; Lucas, Susan; Coutinho, Pedro; Gong, Yunchen; Samejima, Masahiro; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Abou-Zaid, Mamdouh; de Vries, Ronald P.; Igarashi, Kiyohiko; Yadav, Jagit S.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Master, Emma R.

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Background Softwood is the predominant form of land plant biomass in the Northern hemisphere, and is among the most recalcitrant biomass resources to bioprocess technologies. The white rot fungus, Phanerochaete carnosa, has been isolated almost exclusively from softwoods, while most other known white-rot species, including Phanerochaete chrysosporium, were mainly isolated from hardwoods. Accordingly, it is anticipated that P. carnosa encodes a distinct set of enzymes and proteins that promote softwood decomposition. To elucidate the genetic basis of softwood bioconversion by a white-rot fungus, the present study reports the P. carnosa genome sequence and its comparative analysis with the previously reported P. chrysosporium genome. Results P. carnosa encodes a complete set of lignocellulose-active enzymes. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that P. carnosa is enriched with genes encoding manganese peroxidase, and that the most divergent glycoside hydrolase families were predicted to encode hemicellulases and glycoprotein degrading enzymes. Most remarkably, P. carnosa possesses one of the largest P450 contingents (266 P450s) among the sequenced and annotated wood-rotting basidiomycetes, nearly double that of P. chrysosporium. Along with metabolic pathway modeling, comparative growth studies on model compounds and chemical analyses of decomposed wood components showed greater tolerance of P. carnosa to various substrates including coniferous heartwood. Conclusions The P. carnosa genome is enriched with genes that encode P450 monooxygenases that can participate in extractives degradation, and manganese peroxidases involved in lignin degradation. The significant expansion of P450s in P. carnosa, along with differences in carbohydrate- and lignin-degrading enzymes, could be correlated to the utilization of heartwood and sapwood preparations from both coniferous and hardwood species.

  16. The Effects of Degraded Digital Instrumentation and Control Systems on Human-system Interfaces and Operator Performance: HFE Review Guidance and Technical Basis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Hara, J.M.; W. Gunther, G. Martinez-Guridi

    2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    New and advanced reactors will use integrated digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems to support operators in their monitoring and control functions. Even though digital systems are typically highly reliable, their potential for degradation or failure could significantly affect operator performance and, consequently, impact plant safety. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) supported this research project to investigate the effects of degraded I&C systems on human performance and plant operations. The objective was to develop human factors engineering (HFE) review guidance addressing the detection and management of degraded digital I&C conditions by plant operators. We reviewed pertinent standards and guidelines, empirical studies, and plant operating experience. In addition, we conducted an evaluation of the potential effects of selected failure modes of the digital feedwater system on human-system interfaces (HSIs) and operator performance. The results indicated that I&C degradations are prevalent in plants employing digital systems and the overall effects on plant behavior can be significant, such as causing a reactor trip or causing equipment to operate unexpectedly. I&C degradations can impact the HSIs used by operators to monitor and control the plant. For example, sensor degradations can make displays difficult to interpret and can sometimes mislead operators by making it appear that a process disturbance has occurred. We used the information obtained as the technical basis upon which to develop HFE review guidance. The guidance addresses the treatment of degraded I&C conditions as part of the design process and the HSI features and functions that support operators to monitor I&C performance and manage I&C degradations when they occur. In addition, we identified topics for future research.

  17. Variation in Mutation Rates Caused by RB69pol Fidelity Mutants Can Be Rationalized on the Basis of Their Kinetic Behavior and Crystal Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S Xia; M Wang; H Lee; A Sinha; G Blaha; T Christian; J Wang; W Konigsberg

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We have previously observed that stepwise replacement of amino acid residues in the nascent base-pair binding pocket of RB69 DNA polymerase (RB69pol) with Ala or Gly expanded the space in this pocket, resulting in a progressive increase in misincorporation. However, in vivo results with similar RB69pol nascent base-pair binding pocket mutants showed that mutation rates, as determined by the T4 phage rI forward assay and rII reversion assay, were significantly lower for the RB69pol S565G/Y567A double mutant than for the Y567A single mutant, the opposite of what we would have predicted. To investigate the reasons for this unexpected result, we have determined the pre-steady-state kinetic parameters and crystal structures of relevant ternary complexes. We found that the S565G/Y567A mutant generally had greater base selectivity than the Y567A mutant and that the kinetic parameters for dNMP insertion, excision of the 3'-terminal nucleotide residue, and primer extension beyond a mispair differed not only between these two mutants but also between the two highly mutable sequences in the T4 rI complementary strand. Comparison of the crystal structures of these two mutants with correct and incorrect incoming dNTPs provides insight into the unexpected increase in the fidelity of the S565G/Y567A double mutant. Taken together, the kinetic and structural results provide a basis for integrating and interpreting in vivo and in vitro observations.

  18. Physics Basis for High-Beta, Low-Aspect-Ratio Stellarator Experiments G. H. Neilson, A. H. Reiman, M. C. Zarnstorff, A. Brooks, G.-Y. Fu, R. J. Goldston, L.-P. Ku,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physics Basis for High-Beta, Low-Aspect-Ratio Stellarator Experiments G. H. Neilson, A. H. Reiman, C. Nuehrenberg Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, D-17491 Greifswald, Germany High-beta, low and are insensitive to changes in beta. Coil configurations have been calculated that reconstruct these plasma

  19. As technology advances, the need for electricity increases, and as a result, more energy is being consumed on a daily basis. Consequently, the strain on energy and economic resources becomes more evident. Currently, the average energy consumer can see his

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebling, Michael

    , Branton Horsley PowWow Energy Groups Users and companies will be able to create a sense of community amongOverview As technology advances, the need for electricity increases, and as a result, more energy is being consumed on a daily basis. Consequently, the strain on energy and economic resources becomes more

  20. Information basis for developing comprehensive waste management system-US-Japan joint nuclear energy action plan waste management working group phase I report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, M.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity of Phase I of the Waste Management Working Group under the United States - Japan Joint Nuclear Energy Action Plan started in 2007. The US-Japan JNEAP is a bilateral collaborative framework to support the global implementation of safe, secure, and sustainable, nuclear fuel cycles (referred to in this document as fuel cycles). The Waste Management Working Group was established by strong interest of both parties, which arise from the recognition that development and optimization of waste management and disposal system(s) are central issues of the present and future nuclear fuel cycles. This report summarizes the activity of the Waste Management Working Group that focused on consolidation of the existing technical basis between the U.S. and Japan and the joint development of a plan for future collaborative activities. Firstly, the political/regulatory frameworks related to nuclear fuel cycles in both countries were reviewed. The various advanced fuel cycle scenarios that have been considered in both countries were then surveyed and summarized. The working group established the working reference scenario for the future cooperative activity that corresponds to a fuel cycle scenario being considered both in Japan and the U.S. This working scenario involves transitioning from a once-through fuel cycle utilizing light water reactors to a one-pass uranium-plutonium fuel recycle in light water reactors to a combination of light water reactors and fast reactors with plutonium, uranium, and minor actinide recycle, ultimately concluding with multiple recycle passes primarily using fast reactors. Considering the scenario, current and future expected waste streams, treatment and inventory were discussed, and the relevant information was summarized. Second, the waste management/disposal system optimization was discussed. Repository system concepts were reviewed, repository design concepts for the various classifications of nuclear waste were summarized, and the factors to consider in repository design and optimization were then discussed. Japan is considering various alternatives and options for the geologic disposal facility and the framework for future analysis of repository concepts was discussed. Regarding the advanced waste and storage form development, waste form technologies developed in both countries were surveyed and compared. Potential collaboration areas and activities were next identified. Disposal system optimization processes and techniques were reviewed, and factors to consider in future repository design optimization activities were also discussed. Then the potential collaboration areas and activities related to the optimization problem were extracted.

  1. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR DOE STANDARD 3013 EQUIVALENCY SUPPORTING REDUCED TEMPERATURE STABILIZATION OF OXALATE-DERIVED PLUTONIUM OXIDE PRODUCED BY THE HB-LINE FACILITY AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Berg, J.; Veirs, D.

    2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The HB-Line (HBL) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is designed to produce high-purity plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) which is suitable for future use in production of Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel. The MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) requires PuO{sub 2} feed to be packaged per the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Standard 3013 (DOE-STD-3013) to comply with the facility's safety basis. The stabilization conditions imposed by DOE-STD-3013 for PuO{sub 2} (i.e., 950 C for 2 hours) preclude use of the HBL PuO{sub 2} in direct fuel fabrication and reduce the value of the HBL product as MFFF feedstock. Consequently, HBL initiated a technical evaluation to define acceptable operating conditions for production of high-purity PuO{sub 2} that fulfills the DOE-STD-3013 criteria for safe storage. The purpose of this document is to demonstrate that within the defined operating conditions, the HBL process will be equivalent for meeting the requirements of the DOE-STD-3013 stabilization process for plutonium-bearing materials from the DOE complex. The proposed 3013 equivalency reduces the prescribed stabilization temperature for high-purity PuO{sub 2} from oxalate precipitation processes from 950 C to 640 C and places a limit of 60% on the relative humidity (RH) at the lowest material temperature. The equivalency is limited to material produced using the HBL established flow sheet, for example, nitric acid anion exchange and Pu(IV) direct strike oxalate precipitation with stabilization at a minimum temperature of 640 C for four hours (h). The product purity must meet the MFFF acceptance criteria of 23,600 {micro}g/g Pu (i.e., 2.1 wt %) total impurities and chloride content less than 250 {micro}g/g of Pu. All other stabilization and packaging criteria identified by DOE-STD-3013-2012 or earlier revisions of the standard apply. Based on the evaluation of test data discussed in this document, the expert judgment of the authors supports packaging the HBL product under a 3013 equivalency. Under the defined process conditions and associated material specifications, the high-purity PuO{sub 2} produced in HBL presents no unique safety concerns for packaging or storage in the 3013 required configuration. The PuO{sub 2} produced using the HBL flow sheet conditions will have a higher specific surface area (SSA) than PuO{sub 2} stabilized at 950 C and, consequently, under identical conditions will adsorb more water from the atmosphere. The greatest challenge to HBL operators will be controlling moisture content below 0.5 wt %. However, even at the 0.5 wt % moisture limit, the maximum acceptable pressure of a stoichiometric mixture of hydrogen and oxygen in the 3013 container is greater than the maximum possible pressure for the HBL PuO{sub 2} product.

  2. 3.System Design Basis 2) MODELING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    was added to the heat gain of the each tank, because propane circulation system does not affect the propane

  3. The Structural Basis of 50 Triphosphate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Roland K.

    RNA with 50 triphosphate (ppp). However, the mechanism of viral RNA recogni- tion by RIG-I is still not fully understood. Here, we show that RIG-I CTD binds 50 ppp dsRNA or ssRNA, as well as blunt-ended dsRNA, and exhibits the highest affinity for 50 ppp dsRNA. Crystal structures of RIG-I CTD bound to 50 ppp ds

  4. Technology: basis, gaps, risks and facility needs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    " lifetime dose =12-50 dpa ( M. Abdou's talk) FS irradiation data base from fission reactors extends to ~80 up to ~ 300 appm He at irrad. temp. > 350°C. (M.Abdou's) RAFM is the ref. structural material

  5. Lawrence Livermore National Laborotory Safety Basis Assessment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * ITS (Event Occurrence) 19362, USQ of ES&H Manual Documents, 605 * ITS (External - LSO PIRMAR) 30457, Periodic Issues Report (PIR), February 2010 * ITS (External - MAR) 25648.1,...

  6. Stochastic Reduced Basis Methods for Uncertainty Quantification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Turbine Blades In general, stochastic analysis (using SRBM) of any physical system involves two main steps the variability in the performance of a turbine blade in the presence of uncertainty. These blades operate variability in material properties and boundary condi- tions. Given a numerical solution of the set of SPDEs

  7. The Scientific Basis of Tobacco Product Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    World Health Organization

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cyanide Mercury Lead Cadmium Nitric oxide NOx NNN NNK Ncyanide Mercury Lead Cadmium Nitrogen oxides Nirogen oxidescyanide Mercury Lead Cadmium Nitrogen oxides Nirogen oxides

  8. The Physiological Basis of BOLD Functional MRI /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffeth, Valerie Ewing McClintock

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    metabolism Detailed biophysical model of the BOLD response Functional magnetic resonance imaging Generalized calibration model General linear model Gradient

  9. Molecular basis for amyloid-[beta] polymorphism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Laganowsky, Arthur; Landau, Meytal; Zhao, Minglei; Soriaga, Angela B.; Goldschmidt, Lukasz; Flot, David; Cascio, Duilio; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberga, David (UCLA); (ESRF)

    2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Amyloid-beta (A{beta}) aggregates are the main constituent of senile plaques, the histological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. A{beta} molecules form {beta}-sheet containing structures that assemble into a variety of polymorphic oligomers, protofibers, and fibers that exhibit a range of lifetimes and cellular toxicities. This polymorphic nature of A{beta} has frustrated its biophysical characterization, its structural determination, and our understanding of its pathological mechanism. To elucidate A{beta} polymorphism in atomic detail, we determined eight new microcrystal structures of fiber-forming segments of A{beta}. These structures, all of short, self-complementing pairs of {beta}-sheets termed steric zippers, reveal a variety of modes of self-association of A{beta}. Combining these atomic structures with previous NMR studies allows us to propose several fiber models, offering molecular models for some of the repertoire of polydisperse structures accessible to A{beta}. These structures and molecular models contribute fundamental information for understanding A{beta} polymorphic nature and pathogenesis.

  10. Structural Basis for Activation of Cholera Toxin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be traced to a single source of contaminated water. From this simple insight flowed many advances in medicine and improvements in public health. In the 21st century, the world is...

  11. ORBIT: OPTIMIZATION BY RADIAL BASIS FUNCTION ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    [27] B. Tolson and C. Shoemaker, Cannonsville reservoir watershed swat2000 model develop- ment, calibration and validation, J. of Hydrology, 337 (2007), pp.

  12. The Scientific Basis of Tobacco Product Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    World Health Organization

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cohen SM et al. (1992) Acrolein intiates rat urinary bladderselec- tive removal of acrolein. Bates No: 80600686.selective re- moval of acrolein. Bates No: 01409538. Irwin

  13. The Scientific Basis of Tobacco Product Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    World Health Organization

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Public Health, Oslo, Norway Dr N. Gray, Scientist,the mouth or chewed Sweden, Norway, USA Moist, finely groundthan 20% of young men in Norway, which is not a member of

  14. Technical Basis for Assessing Uranium Bioremediation Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PE Long; SB Yabusaki; PD Meyer; CJ Murray; AL N’Guessan

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ bioremediation of uranium holds significant promise for effective stabilization of U(VI) from groundwater at reduced cost compared to conventional pump and treat. This promise is unlikely to be realized unless researchers and practitioners successfully predict and demonstrate the long-term effectiveness of uranium bioremediation protocols. Field research to date has focused on both proof of principle and a mechanistic level of understanding. Current practice typically involves an engineering approach using proprietary amendments that focuses mainly on monitoring U(VI) concentration for a limited time period. Given the complexity of uranium biogeochemistry and uranium secondary minerals, and the lack of documented case studies, a systematic monitoring approach using multiple performance indicators is needed. This document provides an overview of uranium bioremediation, summarizes design considerations, and identifies and prioritizes field performance indicators for the application of uranium bioremediation. The performance indicators provided as part of this document are based on current biogeochemical understanding of uranium and will enable practitioners to monitor the performance of their system and make a strong case to clients, regulators, and the public that the future performance of the system can be assured and changes in performance addressed as needed. The performance indicators established by this document and the information gained by using these indicators do add to the cost of uranium bioremediation. However, they are vital to the long-term success of the application of uranium bioremediation and provide a significant assurance that regulatory goals will be met. The document also emphasizes the need for systematic development of key information from bench scale tests and pilot scales tests prior to full-scale implementation.

  15. The Scientific Basis of Tobacco Product Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    World Health Organization

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    copolymers and in synthetic rubber production. 1,3-Butadienesynthetic fibres, resins, plastics, elastomers and rubber (

  16. The Scientific Basis of Tobacco Product Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    World Health Organization

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RJ Reynolds (1994) Carbon scrubber. Bates No: 514723150.product concept: carbon scrubber filter attach- ment. Bateswith and without carbon scrubber filters. Bates No:

  17. Basis adaptation in homogeneous chaos spaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tipireddy, Ramakrishna, E-mail: tipiredd@usc.edu [Computational Mathematics Department, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Computational Mathematics Department, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Ghanem, Roger, E-mail: ghanem@usc.edu [210 KAP Hall, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States)] [210 KAP Hall, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new method for the characterization of subspaces associated with low-dimensional quantities of interest (QoI). The probability density function of these QoI is found to be concentrated around one-dimensional subspaces for which we develop projection operators. Our approach builds on the properties of Gaussian Hilbert spaces and associated tensor product spaces.

  18. GRAVER BASIS AND PROXIMITY TECHNIQUES FOR BLOCK ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 4, 2012 ... minimizing a general separable convex function over network flow ...... B A ) (N), we can control the size of l using Proposition 3.11 or Propo-.

  19. EFFICIENT BASIS CHANGE AND REGULARIZATION FOR SPARSE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    measurement error and noise. Let x? denote the minimizer of (17). Theo- .... [4] S. Becker, J. Bobin, and E.J. Cand`es. Nesta: A fast and accurate first-order ...

  20. Modular HTGR Safety Basis and Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Hicks

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) capable of producing electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) process, as recommended in the NGNP Licensing Strategy - A Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy [DOE/NRC 2008]. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy for licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This information paper is one in a series of submittals that address key generic issues of the priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements. This information paper provides a summary level introduction to HTGR history, public safety objectives, inherent and passive safety features, radionuclide release barriers, functional safety approach, and risk-informed safety approach. The information in this paper is intended to further the understanding of the modular HTGR safety approach with the NRC staff and public stakeholders. The NGNP project does not expect to receive comments on this information paper because other white papers are addressing key generic issues of the priority licensing topics in greater detail.

  1. DEF: The Physical Basis of Electromagnetic Propulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinheiro, Mario J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The very existence of the physical vacuum provides a framework to propose a general mechanism for propelling bodies through an agency of electromagnetic fields, that seat in that medium. When two sub-systems of a general closed device interact via nonlocal and retarded electromagnetic pulses, it is easily shown that they give a nonzero force, and that only tend to comply with the action-to-reaction force in the limit of instantaneous interactions. The arrangement of sub-systems provide a handy way to optimize the unbalanced EM force with the concept of impedance matching. The general properties of the differential electromagnetic force (DEF) are the following: i) it is proportional to the square of the intensity and to the angular wave frequency $\\omega$; ii) to the space between the sub-systems (although in a non-linear manner); iii) it is inversely proportional to the speed of interaction; iv) when the two sub-systems are out-of-phase, DEF is null. The approach is of interest to practical engineering princi...

  2. The Cellular Basis for Animal Regeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanaka, Elly M.

    The ability of animals to regenerate missing parts is a dramatic and poorly understood aspect of biology. The sources of new cells for these regenerative phenomena have been sought for decades. Recent advances involving ...

  3. Marketing Texas Wool on a Quality Basis.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooten, Alvin B.; Gabbard, L. P.; Davis, Stanley P.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fleeces properly can market just as high quality wool as the grower of large c!ips and increase his income without changing the size of his operation. Clean Content The clean content of wool is the weight re- maining after the raw wool has been... wool at the high- 1 est possible price. I [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Location of field research units in Texas main- tained by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station and cooperating agencies State-wide Research The Texas Agricultural...

  4. Statistical Basis for Predicting Technological Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Bela

    Forecasting technological progress is of great interest to engineers, policy makers, and private investors. Several models have been proposed for predicting technological improvement, but how well do these models perform? ...

  5. Setting clear expectations for safety basis development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORENO, M.R.

    2003-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE-RL has set clear expectations for a cost-effective approach for achieving compliance with the Nuclear Safety Management requirements (10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Rule) which will ensure long-term benefit to Hanford. To facilitate implementation of these expectations, tools were developed to streamline and standardize safety analysis and safety document development resulting in a shorter and more predictable DOE approval cycle. A Hanford Safety Analysis and Risk Assessment Handbook (SARAH) was issued to standardized methodologies for development of safety analyses. A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet (RADIDOSE) was issued for the evaluation of radiological consequences for accident scenarios often postulated for Hanford. A standard Site Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) detailing the safety management programs was issued for use as a means of compliance with a majority of 3009 Standard chapters. An in-process review was developed between DOE and the Contractor to facilitate DOE approval and provide early course correction. As a result of setting expectations and providing safety analysis tools, the four Hanford Site waste management nuclear facilities were able to integrate into one Master Waste Management Documented Safety Analysis (WM-DSA).

  6. Events Beyond Design Safety Basis Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Safety Alert provides information on a safety concern related to the identification and mitigation of events that may fall outside those analyzed in the documented safety analysis. [Safety Bulletin 2011-01

  7. FB Line Basis for Interim Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shedrow, B.

    1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety analysis of the FB-Line Facility indicates that the operation of FB-Line to support the current mission does not present undue risk to the facility and co-located workers, general public, or the environment.

  8. Basis for OUO | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:WhetherNovember 13, 2009Oak Ridge NationalBackgroundDr. Richardpolicy

  9. Basis for UCNI | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:WhetherNovember 13, 2009Oak Ridge NationalBackgroundDr.

  10. Beyond Design Basis Events | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 RussianBy:WhetherNovember 13, 2009OakDepartment ofTheDepartment

  11. Design Basis Threat | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavid Turner David3Depth Profile RECORD

  12. Safety Basis Information System | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSARDevelopmental AssignmentAprilAND POWERADVANCEDSafeguardsSafety

  13. Property:ExplorationBasis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationTypeEstimatedCostMedianUSD JumpExpActivityDateEnd Jump

  14. Structural Basis for Activation of Cholera Toxin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900SteepStrengthening northern New

  15. Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 Clean Energy Technologies A! CJ M6.

  16. Climate Change 2001: The Scientific Basis

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 Clean Energy Technologies A! CJ M6.4.

  17. design basis threat | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved: 5-13-14Russian NuclearNational5/%2A en Office| National Nucleardesign

  18. Structural Basis for Activation of Cholera Toxin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ... Strengthening a solid partnership

  19. EEG's Preliminary Comments on Basis of Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA :Work with E=mc2 - What's the Speed ofEnergyCool Down

  20. The LLNL Heavy Element Facility -- Facility Management, Authorization Basis, and Readiness Assessment Lessons Learned in the Heavy Element Facility (B251) Transition from Category II Nuclear Facility to Radiological Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, M; Anderson, B; Brown, E; Gray, L

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents Facility Management, Readiness Assessment, and Authorization Basis experience gained and lessons learned during the Heavy Element Facility Risk Reduction Program (RRP). The RRP was tasked with removing contaminated glove boxes, radioactive inventory, and contaminated ventilation systems from the Heavy Element Facility (B251) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The RRP was successful in its goal in April 2005 with the successful downgrade of B251 from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. The expertise gained and the lessons learned during the planning and conduct of the RRP included development of unique approaches in work planning/work control (''Expect the unexpected and confirm the expected'') and facility management. These approaches minimized worker dose and resulted in significant safety improvements and operational efficiencies. These lessons learned can help similar operational and management activities at other sites, including facilities restarting operations or new facility startup. B251 was constructed at LLNL to provide research areas for conducting experiments in radiochemistry using transuranic elements. Activities at B251 once included the preparation of tracer sets associated with the underground testing of nuclear devices and basic research devoted to a better understanding of the chemical and nuclear behavior of the transuranic elements. Due to the age of the facility, even with preventative maintenance, facility safety and experimental systems were deteriorating. A variety of seismic standards were used in the facility design and construction, which encompassed eight building increments constructed over a period of 26 years. The cost to bring the facility into compliance with the current seismic and other requirements was prohibitive, and simply maintaining B251 as a Category II nuclear facility posed serious cost considerations under a changing regulatory environment. Considering the high cost of maintenance and seismic upgrades, the RRP was created to mitigate the risk of dispersal of radioactive material during an earthquake by removing the radioactive materials inventory and glove box contamination. LLNL adopted the goal of reducing the hazard categorization of the Facility from a Category II Nuclear Facility to a Radiological Facility. To support the RRP, B251 transitioned from a standby to a fully operational Category II Nuclear Facility, compliant with current regulations. A work control process was developed, procedures were developed, Authorization Basis Documents were created, work plans were written, off-normal drills practiced, a large number of USQ reviews were conducted, and a ''Type II'' Readiness Assessment (RA) was conducted to restart operations. Subsequent RA's focused on specific operations. Finally, a four-step process was followed to reach Radiological Status: (1) Inventory Reduction and D&D activities reduced the inventory and radiological contamination of the facility below the Category III threshold (DOE-STD-1027), (2) Radiological Safety Basis Document (SBD aka HAR) was approved by NNSA, (3) the inventory control system for a Radiological Facility was implemented, and (4) verification by NNSA of radiological status was completed.

  1. Accurate ab initio-based adiabatic global potential energy surface for the 2{sup 2}A? state of NH{sub 2} by extrapolation to the complete basis set limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Y. Q.; Ma, F. C. [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China)] [Department of Physics, Liaoning University, Shenyang 110036 (China); Sun, M. T. [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A full three-dimensional global potential energy surface is reported first time for the title system, which is important for the photodissociation processes. It is obtained using double many-body expansion theory and an extensive set of accurate ab initio energies extrapolated to the complete basis set limit. Such a work can be recommended for dynamics studies of the N({sup 2}D) + H{sub 2} reaction, a reliable theoretical treatment of the photodissociation dynamics and as building blocks for constructing the double many-body expansion potential energy surface of larger nitrogen/hydrogen containing systems. In turn, a preliminary theoretical study of the reaction N({sup 2}D)+H{sub 2}(X{sup 1}?{sub g}{sup +})(?=0,j=0)?NH(a{sup 1}?)+H({sup 2}S) has been carried out with the method of quasi-classical trajectory on the new potential energy surface. Integral cross sections and thermal rate constants have been calculated, providing perhaps the most reliable estimate of the integral cross sections and the rate constants known thus far for such a reaction.

  2. Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility Safety Basis and Safety Design Basis Documents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingofRetrofitting Doors onNovember 14, DOE-STD-1104-96

  3. Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility Safety Basis and Safety Design Basis Documents

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingofRetrofitting Doors onNovember 14, DOE-STD-1104-96

  4. Properties of infrared extrapolations in a harmonic oscillator basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidney A. Coon; Michael K. G. Kruse

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We continue our studies of infrared (ir) and ultraviolet (uv) regulators of no-core shell model calculations. We extend our results that an extrapolation in the ir cutoff with the uv cutoff above the intrinsic uv scale of the interaction is quite successful, not only for the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian but also for expectation values of operators considered long range. The latter results are obtained with Hamiltonians transformed by the similarity renormalization group (SRG) evolution. On the other hand, a suggested extrapolation in the uv cutoff when the ir cutoff is below the intrinsic ir scale is neither robust nor reliable.

  5. Lawrence Livermore Site Office Safety Basis Self-Assessment Final...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of lower tier facility procedures for USQ implementation. The currently approved revision of the LLNL USQ procedure is Document 51.3 of the Laboratory's Environment,...

  6. Structural basis for alginate secretion across the bacterial outer membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, J.C.; Robinson, H.; Hay, I. D.; Li, C.; Eckford, P. D. W.; Amaya, M. F.; Wood, L. F.; Ohman, D. E.; Bear, C. E.; Rehm, B. H.; Howell, P. L.

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the predominant pathogen associated with chronic lung infection among cystic fibrosis patients. During colonization of the lung, P. aeruginosa converts to a mucoid phenotype characterized by the overproduction of the exopolysaccharide alginate. Secretion of newly synthesized alginate across the outer membrane is believed to occur through the outer membrane protein AlgE. Here we report the 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of AlgE, which reveals a monomeric 18-stranded {beta}-barrel characterized by a highly electropositive pore constriction formed by an arginine-rich conduit that likely acts as a selectivity filter for the negatively charged alginate polymer. Interestingly, the pore constriction is occluded on either side by extracellular loop L2 and an unusually long periplasmic loop, T8. In halide efflux assays, deletion of loop T8 ({Delta}T8-AlgE) resulted in a threefold increase in anion flux compared to the wild-type or {Delta}L2-AlgE supporting the idea that AlgE forms a transport pathway through the membrane and suggesting that transport is regulated by T8. This model is further supported by in vivo experiments showing that complementation of an algE deletion mutant with {Delta}T8-AlgE impairs alginate production. Taken together, these studies support a mechanism for exopolysaccharide export across the outer membrane that is distinct from the Wza-mediated translocation observed in canonical capsular polysaccharide export systems.

  7. Spent nuclear fuel project design basis capacity study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleveland, K.J.

    1996-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A parametric study of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project system capacity is presented. The study was completed using a commercially available software package to develop a summary level model of the major project systems. Alternative configurations, sub-system cycle times, and operating scenarios were tested to identify their impact on total project duration and equipment requirements.

  8. Basis for the US Modern Grid Strategy - A Changing World

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Metering Infrastructure, distributed generation, wind turbine farms, and a few Demand Response programs. Value of the Electricity Grid The electric grid plays an...

  9. Spent nuclear fuel project design basis capacity study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleveland, K.J.

    1998-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A parametric study of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project system capacity is presented. The study was completed using a commercially available software package to develop a summary level model of the major project systems. A base case, reflecting the Fiscal Year 1998 process configuration, is evaluated. Parametric evaluations are also considered, investigating the impact of higher fuel retrieval system productivity and reduced shift operations at the canister storage building on total project duration.

  10. Spectroscopic Detection of Cervical Pre-Cancer through Radial Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Joydeep

    , fail to achieve a concurrently high sensitivity and speci city. In vivo uorescence spectroscopy., 1994). In a Pap test, a large number of cells obtained by scraping the cervical epithelium are smeared to achieve a concurrently high sensitivity1 and high speci city2 due to both sampling and reading errors

  11. The neurocognitive basis of preparing to stop action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenhouse, Ian; Greenhouse, Ian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bercken JH, Horstink MW, van Spaendonck KP, Berger HJ (1984)Bercken JH, Horstink MW, van Spaendonck KP, Berger HJ (1984)

  12. Famous Trademarks and the Rational Basis for Protecting "Irrational Beliefs"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dilbary, Shahar

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    did in 1961 when it hung Rembrandt’s Aristotle ContemplatingGolden Helmet was not by Rembrandt as had been thought and

  13. The Three-Dimensional Structural Basis of Type II Hyperprolinemia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, Dhiraj; Singh, Ranjan K.; Moxley, Michael A.; Henzl, Michael T.; Becker, Donald F.; Tanner, John J. (UNL); (UMC)

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Type II hyperprolinemia is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency in {Delta}{sup 1}-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH; also known as ALDH4A1), the aldehyde dehydrogenase that catalyzes the oxidation of glutamate semialdehyde to glutamate. Here, we report the first structure of human P5CDH (HsP5CDH) and investigate the impact of the hyperprolinemia-associated mutation of Ser352 to Leu on the structure and catalytic properties of the enzyme. The 2. 5-{angstrom}-resolution crystal structure of HsP5CDH was determined using experimental phasing. Structures of the mutant enzymes S352A (2.4 {angstrom}) and S352L (2.85 {angstrom}) were determined to elucidate the structural consequences of altering Ser352. Structures of the 93% identical mouse P5CDH complexed with sulfate ion (1.3 {angstrom} resolution), glutamate (1.5 {angstrom}), and NAD{sup +} (1.5 {angstrom}) were determined to obtain high-resolution views of the active site. Together, the structures show that Ser352 occupies a hydrophilic pocket and is connected via water-mediated hydrogen bonds to catalytic Cys348. Mutation of Ser352 to Leu is shown to abolish catalytic activity and eliminate NAD{sup +} binding. Analysis of the S352A mutant shows that these functional defects are caused by the introduction of the nonpolar Leu352 side chain rather than the removal of the Ser352 hydroxyl. The S352L structure shows that the mutation induces a dramatic 8-{angstrom} rearrangement of the catalytic loop. Because of this conformational change, Ser349 is not positioned to interact with the aldehyde substrate, conserved Glu447 is no longer poised to bind NAD{sup +}, and Cys348 faces the wrong direction for nucleophilic attack. These structural alterations render the enzyme inactive.

  14. The neurological basis of visual neglect A. David Milnera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIntosh, Rob

    :000­000 Abbreviations LED light emitting diode PPC posterior parietal cortex STG superior temporal gyrus SWM spatial

  15. Refined error estimates for matrix-valued radial basis functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuselier, Edward J., Jr.

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    -independent functionals f igNi=1 and data fdigNi=1, one can nd an interpolant s of the form s ( ) = NX j=1 cj yj ( y) such that ks ( ) = NX j=1 cj k yj ( y) = dk 8k = 1;:::;N: 31 Thus matrix-valued RBFs can be used not only to interpolate point evaluations, but data..., =2 2N Thin Plate Splines ( 1)k+1kxk2k2 log(kxk2), k 2 N Wendland Functions n;k (see Table II) Although RBFs were initially studied to solve the interpolation problem, it turns out their applications are much more broad. RBFs can also t data coming...

  16. authorization basis requirements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bennett; Gary Y. Gao; David L; Clement; Ethel Dutky; Michael A; Dirr; Charles W; Fred Hower; Alison; Michael A; Of Woody Plant; Of North 318 Multivariate Interpolation and...

  17. authorization basis amendment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bennett; Gary Y. Gao; David L; Clement; Ethel Dutky; Michael A; Dirr; Charles W; Fred Hower; Alison; Michael A; Of Woody Plant; Of North 494 Multivariate Interpolation and...

  18. A Note Basis Properties for Fractional Hydrogen Atom Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bas; F. Metin

    2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, spectral analysis of fractional Sturm Liouville problem defined on (0,1], having the singularity of type at zero and research the fundamental properties of the eigenfunctions and eigenvalues for the operator. We show that the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the problem are real and orthogonal, respectively. Furthermore,we give some important theorems and lemmas for fractional hydrogen atom equation.

  19. Evaluation of the Technical Basis for Extended Dry Storage and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- Executive Summary U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board December 2010 #12;U.S.U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board Authors This report was prepared for the U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board.NWTRB.GOV ii #12;Extended Dry Storage and Transportation of Used Nuclear Fuel U.S. Nuclear Waste Technical

  20. Calibration Trumps Confidence as a Basis for Witness Credibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenney, Elizabeth R.; MacCoun, Robert J.; Spellman, Barbara A.; Hastie, Reid

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human Behavior, 4, Calibration Trumps Confidence Hatvany,Applied Psychology, 66, Calibration Trumps Confidence Wells,Calibration Trumps Confidence Calibration Trumps Confidence

  1. Molecular Design Basis for Hydrogen Storage in Clathrate Hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, Vijay T [Tulane University] [Tulane University; McPherson, Gary L [Tulane University] [Tulane University; Ashbaugh, Hank [Tulane University] [Tulane University; Johnes, Camille Y [Columbia University] [Columbia University

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We attach a final technical report for the project. The report contains the list of all peer reviewed publications that have resulted from the contract. I will be happy to send the pdf files of the papers.

  2. Evaluation of Authorization Basis Management Systems and Processes...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    iterative process with the laboratories, MHC analyzes the responses and modifies the tooling or the procedure to eliminate hazards or reduce them to acceptable levels. The HAR...

  3. The articulatory basis of positional asymmetries in phonological acquisition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McAllister, Tara Kathleen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Child phonological processes that lack counterparts in adult phonological typology have long posed a problem for formal modeling of phonological acquisition. This dissertation investigates child-specific processes with a ...

  4. Model Order Reduction Techniques I: The Reduced Basis Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the thermal fin is initially at zero (non-dimensionalized) temperature and a heat flux is then applied for g(tk) = 1 - cos(tk) and µ = 0.05 (see slide 60 for the definition of the energy norm). Part 2 thus introduce a dual problem as defined in the lecture notes (see slide 75-79). Q2. Prove the output

  5. Global Convergence of Radial Basis Function Trust - Optimization ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to minimize the cost of the pumping strategy (the electricity needed to run the pumps) plus a ..... Facilities Engineering Service Center, Port Hueneme, California, January 2004. ... publicly, by or on behalf of the Government.

  6. The biological versus psychological basis of fatigue in depression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coscio, Stacey Aileen

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to attempt to determine if the symptom of fatigue represents a metabolically induced or a perceived component in depressed individuals. Dietary intake patterns were analyzed for 20 depressed individuals to identify...

  7. The genomic basis of adaptive evolution in threespine sticklebacks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lander, Eric S.

    Marine stickleback fish have colonized and adapted to thousands of streams and lakes formed since the last ice age, providing an exceptional opportunity to characterize genomic mechanisms underlying repeated ecological ...

  8. REVIEW / SYNTHSE Structural basis for phosphorylation-dependent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glover, Mark

    , Michael Weinfeld, and J.N. Mark Glover Abstract: The response of eukaryotic cells to DNA damage requires.L. Rakovszky, D. Cui, R. Green, and J.N.M. Glover.2 Department of Biochemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton

  9. Electromagnetic Potentials Basis for Energy Density and Power Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. E. Puthoff

    2010-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well understood that various alternatives are available within EM theory for the definitions of energy density, momentum transfer, EM stress-energy tensor, and so forth. Although the various options are all compatible with the basic equations of electrodynamics (e.g., Maxwell's equations, Lorentz force law, gauge invariance), nonetheless certain alternative formulations lend themselves to being seen as preferable to others with regard to the transparency of their application to physical problems of interest. Here we argue for the transparency of an option based on use of the EM potentials alone.

  10. Towards radio astronomical imaging using an arbitrary basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petschow, Matthias

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new generation of radio telescopes, such as the Square Kilometer Array (SKA), requires dramatic advances in computer hardware and software, in order to process the large amounts of produced data efficiently. In this document, we explore a new approach to wide-field imaging. By generalizing the image reconstruction, which is performed by an inverse Fourier transform, to arbitrary transformations, we gain enormous new possibilities. In particular, we outline an approach that might allow to obtain a sky image of size P times Q in (optimal) O(PQ) time. This could be a step in the direction of real-time, wide-field sky imaging for future telescopes.

  11. Structural basis for glucose-6-phosphate activation of glycogen synthase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Roach, Peter J.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Hurley, Thomas D. (Indiana-Med)

    2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Regulation of the storage of glycogen, one of the major energy reserves, is of utmost metabolic importance. In eukaryotes, this regulation is accomplished through glucose-6-phosphate levels and protein phosphorylation. Glycogen synthase homologs in bacteria and archaea lack regulation, while the eukaryotic enzymes are inhibited by protein kinase mediated phosphorylation and activated by protein phosphatases and glucose-6-phosphate binding. We determined the crystal structures corresponding to the basal activity state and glucose-6-phosphate activated state of yeast glycogen synthase-2. The enzyme is assembled into an unusual tetramer by an insertion unique to the eukaryotic enzymes, and this subunit interface is rearranged by the binding of glucose-6-phosphate, which frees the active site cleft and facilitates catalysis. Using both mutagenesis and intein-mediated phospho-peptide ligation experiments, we demonstrate that the enzyme's response to glucose-6-phosphate is controlled by Arg583 and Arg587, while four additional arginine residues present within the same regulatory helix regulate the response to phosphorylation.

  12. Famous Trademarks and the Rational Basis for Protecting "Irrational Beliefs"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dilbary, Shahar

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    C.C.A 1 st Cit. 1925). Coca-Cola Co. v. Procter & Gamblesoft drink manufacturer’s “Coca-Cola” mark). See for example5 th Cir. , 1962); The Coca-Cola Company v. Gemini Rising

  13. Verbs and Adverbs: Multidimensional Motion Interpolation Using Radial Basis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodenheimer, Bobby

    behavior. 1 Introduction Creating believable animated human figures is a difficult task, even with the most environment. Research into controllable human figure animation can be divided into three major groupings. Dynamically simulated figure animation uses controllers together with a simulated human to generate motion

  14. The Structural Basis of Cholesterol Activity in Membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Brett N.; Bielska, Agata; Lee, Tiffany; Daily, Michael D.; Covey, Douglas F.; Schlesinger, Paul H.; Baker, Nathan A.; Ory, Daniel S.

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the majority of free cellular cholesterol is present in the plasma membrane, cholesterol homeostasis is principally regulated through sterol-sensing proteins that reside in the cholesterol-poor endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In response to acute cholesterol loading or depletion, there is rapid equilibration between the ER and plasma membrane cholesterol pools, suggesting a biophysical model in which the availability of plasma membrane cholesterol for trafficking to internal membranes modulates ER membrane behavior. Previous studies have predominantly examined cholesterol availability in terms of binding to extramembrane acceptors, but have provided limited insight into the structural changes underlying cholesterol activation. In this study, we use both molecular dynamics simulations and experimental membrane systems to examine the behavior of cholesterol in membrane bilayers. We find that cholesterol depth within the bilayer provides a reasonable structural metric for cholesterol availability and that this is correlated with cholesterol-acceptor binding. Further, the distribution of cholesterol availability in our simulations is continuous rather than divided into distinct available and unavailable pools. This data provide support for a revised cholesterol activation model in which activation is driven not by saturation of membrane-cholesterol interactions but rather by bulk membrane remodeling that reduces membrane-cholesterol affinity.

  15. Squatter settlements in Latin America: the basis of social integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanint, Zaida Castellanos

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the social, cultural, economic and political factors influencing the participat1on of squatters in the urban social system. ~Meth e t The methodological procedure of this research is the following: ~tht th t . A th ?h tt pt te y th t t knowledge about... migrat1on. This explanation seems to be supported by the trend toward 1llegal urban settlements occurring in Latin American cities in recent decades as shown 1n Table 5 (p. IE ). The squatter phenomenon 1s by no means simple. The literature suggests...

  16. Reduced-order modeling of MEMS using modal basis functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varghese, Mathew, 1973-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of MEMS has matured significantly over the last two decades increasing in both complexity and level of integration. To keep up with the demands placed by these changes requires the development of computer-aided ...

  17. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1600 1800 Baseline 50% Body and Chassis Wt. Redn. Scenario Weight (kg) Other PolymerComposite Magnesium Aluminum Low Carbon Steel HiMed Steel 1180 1525 8 Managed by UT-Battelle...

  18. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Canada * VEHMA International * Ford Motor CO. Barriers * High cost of lightweight materials solutions supported by Materials Technology Program to meet national objectives for...

  19. Perspective on Beyond Design Basis Event Analysis and Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: John Schwenker, Nuclear Safety Manager for Liquid Operations, Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site

  20. Nonlinear adaptive control using radial basis function approximants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petersen, Jerry Lee

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for answering my constant barrage of questions, as well as Ayman Farahat and Bryan Milligan for their knowledge of mathematics and computer systems, respectively. Finally, I am eternally grateful to my parents for teaching the value of a good education... Response for rt = 54 Figure 9: Tracking Control Response for q = 54. 2 Figure 10: Tracking Control Response for rt = 54. 4 Figure 11: Tracking Control Response for q = 56 29 30 30 31 Figure 12: Trajectory History and Constant Center Grid 1 Figure...

  1. Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking as a Basis of Particle Mass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab /CERN

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electroweak theory joins electromagnetism with the weak force in a single quantum field theory, ascribing the two fundamental interactions--so different in their manifestations--to a common symmetry principle. How the electroweak gauge symmetry is hidden is one of the most urgent and challenging questions facing particle physics. The provisional answer incorporated in the ''standard model'' of particle physics was formulated in the 1960s by Higgs, by Brout & Englert, and by Guralnik, Hagen, & Kibble: The agent of electroweak symmetry breaking is an elementary scalar field whose self-interactions select a vacuum state in which the full electroweak symmetry is hidden, leaving a residual phase symmetry of electromagnetism. By analogy with the Meissner effect of the superconducting phase transition, the Higgs mechanism, as it is commonly known, confers masses on the weak force carriers W{sup {+-}} and Z. It also opens the door to masses for the quarks and leptons, and shapes the world around us. It is a good story--though an incomplete story--and we do not know how much of the story is true. Experiments that explore the Fermi scale (the energy regime around 1 TeV) during the next decade will put the electroweak theory to decisive test, and may uncover new elements needed to construct a more satisfying completion of the electroweak theory. The aim of this article is to set the stage by reporting what we know and what we need to know, and to set some ''Big Questions'' that will guide our explorations.

  2. Basis for radiation protection of the nuclear worker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guevara, F.A.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A description is given of the standards for protection of persons who work in areas that have a potential for radiation exposure. A review is given of the units of radiation exposure and dose equivalent and of the value of the maximum permissible dose limits for occupational exposure. Federal Regulations and Regulatory Guides for radiation protection are discussed. Average occupational equivalent doses experienced in several operations typical of the United States Nuclear Industry are presented and shown to be significantly lower than the maximum permissible. The concept of maintaining radiation doses to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable is discussed and the practice of imposing engineering and administrative controls to provide effective radiation protection for the nuclear worker is described.

  3. A BASIS FOR MODIFYING THE TANK 12 COMPOSITE SAMPLING DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, G.

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The SRR sampling campaign to obtain residual solids material from the Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank Farm Tank 12 primary vessel resulted in obtaining appreciable material in all 6 planned source samples from the mound strata but only in 5 of the 6 planned source samples from the floor stratum. Consequently, the design of the compositing scheme presented in the Tank 12 Sampling and Analysis Plan, Pavletich (2014a), must be revised. Analytical Development of SRNL statistically evaluated the sampling uncertainty associated with using various compositing arrays and splitting one or more samples for compositing. The variance of the simple mean of composite sample concentrations is a reasonable standard to investigate the impact of the following sampling options. Composite Sample Design Option (a). Assign only 1 source sample from the floor stratum and 1 source sample from each of the mound strata to each of the composite samples. Each source sample contributes material to only 1 composite sample. Two source samples from the floor stratum would not be used. Composite Sample Design Option (b). Assign 2 source samples from the floor stratum and 1 source sample from each of the mound strata to each composite sample. This infers that one source sample from the floor must be used twice, with 2 composite samples sharing material from this particular source sample. All five source samples from the floor would be used. Composite Sample Design Option (c). Assign 3 source samples from the floor stratum and 1 source sample from each of the mound strata to each composite sample. This infers that several of the source samples from the floor stratum must be assigned to more than one composite sample. All 5 source samples from the floor would be used. Using fewer than 12 source samples will increase the sampling variability over that of the Basic Composite Sample Design, Pavletich (2013). Considering the impact to the variance of the simple mean of the composite sample concentrations, the recommendation is to construct each sample composite using four or five source samples. Although the variance using 5 source samples per composite sample (Composite Sample Design Option (c)) was slightly less than the variance using 4 source samples per composite sample (Composite Sample Design Option (b)), there is no practical difference between those variances. This does not consider that the measurement error variance, which is the same for all composite sample design options considered in this report, will further dilute any differences. Composite Sample Design Option (a) had the largest variance for the mean concentration in the three composite samples and should be avoided. These results are consistent with Pavletich (2014b) which utilizes a low elevation and a high elevation mound source sample and two floor source samples for each composite sample. Utilizing the four source samples per composite design, Pavletich (2014b) utilizes aliquots of Floor Sample 4 for two composite samples.

  4. Structural Basis for Enzyme I Inhibition by Ketoglutarate Vincenzo Venditti,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clore, G. Marius

    pathways can be exploited to produce valuable products, including biodegradable plastics3 and biofuels.4-protein interactions is coupled to active transport of sugars across the membrane.9 Inhibition of EI by KG therefore the transport of one elemental nutrient in response to the availability of another. Thus, obtaining structural

  5. Technical Basis of Scaling Relationships for the Pretreatment Engineering Platform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhn, William L.; Arm, Stuart T.; Huckaby, James L.; Kurath, Dean E.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) project to perform research and development activities. The Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP) is being designed and constructed as part of a plan to respond to an issue raised by the WTP External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) entitled “Undemonstrated Leaching Processes” and numbered M12. The PEP replicates the WTP leaching process using prototypic equipment and control strategies. The approach for scaling PEP performance data to predict WTP performance is critical to the successful resolution of the EFRT issue. This report describes the recommended PEP scaling approach, PEP data interpretation and provides recommendations on test conduct and data requirements.

  6. NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT LICENSING BASIS EVENT SELECTION WHITE PAPER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Holbrook

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a licensed commercial high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) plant capable of producing the electricity and high temperature process heat for industrial markets supporting a range of end-user applications. The NGNP Project has adopted the 10 CFR 52 Combined License (COL) application process, as recommended in the Report to Congress, dated August 2008, as the foundation for the NGNP licensing strategy. NRC licensing of the NGNP plant utilizing this process will demonstrate the efficacy of licensing future HTGRs for commercial industrial applications. This white paper is one in a series of submittals that will address key generic issues of the COL priority licensing topics as part of the process for establishing HTGR regulatory requirements.

  7. The Molecular Basis for Recognition of Oomycete Effectors in Arabidopsis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasileva, Ksenia V.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    48]. The rest of the protein lacks sequence similarity toalleles was not due to lack of protein expression. All ATR1W-motif proteins in the Hpa genome lack typical signatures

  8. Neurophysiologic Basis for Cochlear and Auditory Brainstem Implants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Toole, Alice J.

    subjected 13 individuals with the House type of cochlear implants to an extensive battery of audiologic (Michelson, 1971) and W. House (House & Ur- ban, 1973). But before that, other investigators had shown (Simmons, 1966). It was, however, Dr. William House who intro- duced cochlear implants as a means

  9. Updated Costs (June 2011 Basis) for Selected Bituminous Baseline...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Date:2011-Oct-17 Project: Bituminous Baseline Study Case: Case 1 GEE Radiant IGCC wo CO2 Plant Size: 622.1 MW,net Estimate Type: Conceptual Cost Base (Jun) 2011 (x1000) Acct...

  10. L^p Bernstein Inequalities and Radial Basis Function Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, John P.

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    proving Bernstein inequalites for the RBF approximants, we will be able to use them to derive corresponding inverse theorems. Direct theorems concerning approximation by RBFs will be the focus of Section 4 3. The abilty of Green’s functions to invert di...

  11. Logic Programs as a Basis for Machine Learning Claude Sammut

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sammut, Claude

    the scenes of battles between rival factions convinced that their approach to learning is the better one

  12. adapted gaussian basis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: Metadynamics is an established sampling method aimed at reconstructing the free-energy surface relative to a set of appropriately chosen collective variables. In...

  13. Ein Berechtigungsmodell fr Benutzerprofildaten auf Basis von RDF mit Vererbungsmechanismen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appelrath, Hans-JĂĽrgen

    Teilinformationen aus einem Profil problemlos her- auslösen, autark betrachten und wieder zusammenfügen, immer

  14. Theoretical Basis for the Design of a DWPF Evacuated Canister

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Routt, K.R.

    2001-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides the theoretical bases for use of an evacuated canister for draining a glass melter. Design recommendations are also presented to ensure satisfactory performance in future tests of the concept.

  15. Architecture synthesis basis for the Hanford Cleanup system: First issue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, J.J. [comp.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a set of candidate alternatives proposed to accomplish the Hanford Cleanup system functions defined in a previous work. Development of alternatives is part of a sequence of system engineering activities which lead to definition of all the products which, when completed, accomplish the cleanup mission. The alternative set is developed to functional level four or higher depending on need.

  16. Quantum key distribution with key extracted from basis information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiongfeng Ma

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In conventional quantum key distribution protocols, the secure key is normally extracted from the measurement outcomes of the system. Here, a different approach is proposed, where the secure key is extracted from the measurement bases, rather than outcomes. Compared to the original Bennett-Brassard-1984 protocol, the proposed protocol involves no hardware change but modifications in data postprocessing. We show that this protocol is more robust against detector efficiency attacks and photon-number-splitting attacks when practical detectors and photon sources are used.

  17. Reduced basis method for quantum models of crystalline solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pau, George Shu Heng

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electronic structure problems in solids usually involve repetitive determination of quantities of interest, evaluation of which requires the solution of an underlying partial differential equation. We present in this thesis ...

  18. Contributed Paper Identifying Conservation Areas on the Basis of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Leah R.

    regionales de biodiversidad en el estado de Arizona (E.U.A.). Con los resultados de estas simulaciones

  19. Scientists Model the Molecular Basis of Parkinson's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jinchao

    A Billion-Particle Simulation of the Dark Matter Halo of the Milky Way Exploring the Mysteries of Water

  20. Structural Basis for Activation of Class Ib Ribonucleotide Reductase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boal, Amie K.; Cotruvo, Jr., Joseph A.; Stubbe, JoAnne; Rosenzweig, Amy C. (MIT); (NWU)

    2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The class Ib ribonucleotide reductase of Escherichia coli can initiate reduction of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides with either a Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-tyrosyl radical (Y{sm_bullet}) or a Fe{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor in the NrdF subunit. Whereas Fe{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} can self-assemble from Fe{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF and O{sub 2}, activation of Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF requires a reduced flavoprotein, NrdI, proposed to form the oxidant for cofactor assembly by reduction of O{sub 2}. The crystal structures reported here of E. coli Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF and Fe{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF reveal different coordination environments, suggesting distinct initial binding sites for the oxidants during cofactor activation. In the structures of Mn{sub 2}{sup II}-NrdF in complex with reduced and oxidized NrdI, a continuous channel connects the NrdI flavin cofactor to the NrdF Mn{sub 2}{sup II} active site. Crystallographic detection of a putative peroxide in this channel supports the proposed mechanism of Mn{sub 2}{sup III}-Y{sm_bullet} cofactor assembly.

  1. Structural basis for an inositol pyrophosphate kinase surmounting phosphate crowding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Huanchen; Falck, J.R.; Hall, Traci M. Tanaka; Shears, Stephen B. (NIH); (UTSMC)

    2012-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Inositol pyrophosphates (such as IP7 and IP8) are multifunctional signaling molecules that regulate diverse cellular activities. Inositol pyrophosphates have 'high-energy' phosphoanhydride bonds, so their enzymatic synthesis requires that a substantial energy barrier to the transition state be overcome. Additionally, inositol pyrophosphate kinases can show stringent ligand specificity, despite the need to accommodate the steric bulk and intense electronegativity of nature's most concentrated three-dimensional array of phosphate groups. Here we examine how these catalytic challenges are met by describing the structure and reaction cycle of an inositol pyrophosphate kinase at the atomic level. We obtained crystal structures of the kinase domain of human PPIP5K2 complexed with nucleotide cofactors and either substrates, product or a MgF{sub 3}{sup -} transition-state mimic. We describe the enzyme's conformational dynamics, its unprecedented topological presentation of nucleotide and inositol phosphate, and the charge balance that facilitates partly associative in-line phosphoryl transfer.

  2. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    185 HP, Port Fuel Injected, V6 Aluminum, 4 Valves per Cylinder, Naturally aspirated (No Turbo)) - Transmission (Front Wheel Drive, Locking Automatic) - Fuel Economy and...

  3. An Acoustical Basis for Universal Constraints on Sound Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawasaki, Haruko

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M S E C ) T IM E (M S E C ) [BWE] [BWA] N X prohibited u z zbri bwi bji bi ib ble bre bwe bje be eb bla bra bwa bja ba

  4. Solano and Yolo County Agriculture Current Basis for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    and production ­ What counties can do to support agriculture in Solano and Yolo Counties · Climate Change Change Project Title: Agricultural Mitigation and Adaptation to Climate Change in Yolo County, CA · Agricultural profiles of Yolo County and Solano Counties ­ Trends and anticipated changes in land use

  5. Consistent cloud computing storage as the basis for distributed applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, James William

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Messaging in Cloud Computing . . . . . . . . . .7 1.4Eucalyptus Open—Source Cloud—Computing System. In C'C&#http://www.eweek.com/c/a/Cloud-Computing/Amazons—Head—Start—

  6. auxiliary basis expansions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    work by estimating a novel algorithm for extracting atrial activity from single lead electrocardiogram (ECG) signal sustained subtraction (ABS) method using synthetic AF...

  7. Development of Guidance for Analysis of Beyond Design Basis Events

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presenter: Dr. James O'Brien, Director, Office of Nuclear Safety, Office of Health, Safety and Security, US Department of Energy

  8. Choosing Power Cables on the Basis of Energy Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimachkieh, S.; Brown, D. R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 13-16, 1980 class. CABLE LOSSES AND OPERATING TEMPERATURE If copper losses predominate total losses per unit length are given by q = 3I2r (1) for a three conductor cable where q is cable loss in watts per unit... The parameters r and r 2 are resistances per unit l length at temperatures t l and t z respectively. T is a constant determined by the conductor material. Assuming we know r at temperature t equation (2) l l can be rewritten as r = mt + b (3) where r...

  9. Studies into the Molecular Basis of Chloroplast Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Aaron Gene

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    proteins have been identified that are negative regulators of cell division under certain conditions. UgtP acts as an inhibitor of cell division in nutrient rich media by destabilizing interactions between FtsZ protofilaments and is downregulated under... non-nutrient rich media conditions (50). During DNA damage in E. coli, SulA is expressed as part of the SOS response and inhibits assembly of new Z- rings and promotes disassembly of active Z-rings (51-54). The critical concentration of Fts...

  10. Low level mixed waste thermal treatment technical basis report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Place, B.G.

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed characterization of the existing and projected Hanford Site Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) inventory was initiated in 1993 (Place 1993). This report presents an analysis of the existing and projected RMW inventory. The subject characterization effort continues to be in support of the following engineering activities related to thermal treatment of Hanford Site RMW: (1) Contracting for commercial thermal treatment; (2) Installation and operation of an onsite thermal treatment facility (Project W-242); (3) Treatment at another Department of Energy (DOE) site. The collation of this characterization information (data) has emphasized the establishment of a common data base for the entire existing RMW inventory so that the specification of feed streams destined for different treatment facilities can be coordinated.

  11. Online Monitoring Technical Basis and Analysis Framework for Emergency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergy Online Classified or ControlledDiesel

  12. Online Monitoring Technical Basis and Analysis Framework for Large Power

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2:Introduction toManagementOPAM PolicyOfEnergy Online Classified or

  13. CRAD, Integrated Safety Basis and Engineering Design Review - August 20,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSidingState6Report,COMMENTS ONPRGMofRev.AofTo2014

  14. Basis for the US Modern Grid Strategy - A Changing World

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade5-F,INITIALoperator bispectral

  15. Beyond Design Basis Event Pilot Evaluations | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand Sustained CoordinationWater PilotBeverlyBeyond

  16. Beyond Design Basis Events Analysis and Response Information | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The FutureCommentsEnergyand Sustained CoordinationWater PilotBeverlyBeyondof

  17. Calibration Trumps Confidence as a Basis for Witness Credibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tenney, Elizabeth R.; MacCoun, Robert J.; Spellman, Barbara A.; Hastie, Reid

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a 2x2 between-subject factorial design with two levels ofin a 2x2 within-subject factorial design, with two levels of

  18. Model Order Reduction Techniques I: The Reduced Basis Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conductivity k0 1); and Bi is the Biot number, a nondimensional heat transfer coefficient reflecting convective transport to the air at the fin surfaces (larger Bi means better heat transfer). For example root is of length unity). Note that (v) = O(v) for this problem. Part 1 - Finite Element Approximation

  19. Structural Basis for Catalytic Activation of a Serine Recombinase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keenholtz, Ross A.; Rowland, Sally-J.; Boocock, Martin R.; Stark, W. Marshall; Rice, Phoebe A. (Glasgow); (UC)

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Sin resolvase is a site-specific serine recombinase that is normally controlled by a complex regulatory mechanism. A single mutation, Q115R, allows the enzyme to bypass the entire regulatory apparatus, such that no accessory proteins or DNA sites are required. Here, we present a 1.86 {angstrom} crystal structure of the Sin Q115R catalytic domain, in a tetrameric arrangement stabilized by an interaction between Arg115 residues on neighboring subunits. The subunits have undergone significant conformational changes from the inactive dimeric state previously reported. The structure provides a new high-resolution view of a serine recombinase active site that is apparently fully assembled, suggesting roles for the conserved active site residues. The structure also suggests how the dimer-tetramer transition is coupled to assembly of the active site. The tetramer is captured in a different rotational substate than that seen in previous hyperactive serine recombinase structures, and unbroken crossover site DNA can be readily modeled into its active sites.

  20. The biomechanical basis of DNA breakage in chronic myelogenous leukemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Chi-Chiang

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3. The (H3-H4) 2 tetramer dissociates. Transcription inducedassembly: 1. The (H3H4) 2 tetramer binds to DNA. 2. One H2A-by the (H3- H4) 2 tetramer. ” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA.

  1. Guidance For Preparatioon of Basis For Interim Operation (BIO) Documents

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneral GuidanceEnergy LaunchingGrowing

  2. Preparation of Safety Basis Documents for Transuranic (TRU) Waste Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR - T enAmountCammie CroftPRELIMINARYPreparation for

  3. Nuclear Safety Basis Program Review Overview and Management Oversight

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,39732onMake YourDepartment of EnergyNoticeFacility

  4. Updated Costs (June 2011 Basis) for Selected Bituminous Baseline Cases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrinceton PlasmaAfternoon TalksDigitalRevision

  5. Structural Basis for the Promiscuous Biosynthetic Prenylation of Aromatic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900SteepStrengthening northern NewStructural

  6. ORISE: The Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident Preparedness: Medical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOENurseResources

  7. WIPP - Passive Institutional Controls (PICs) Technical and Conceptual Basis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulenceUtilizeRural

  8. Protocol for Enhanced Evaluations of Beyond Design Basis Events Supporting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 |of EnergySelectedofGeothermalImplementation of

  9. Assessing Beyond Design Basis Seismic Events and Implications on Seismic

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'s ReplyApplication of Training April 30,Wind ProgramRisk | Department of

  10. CRAD, Safety Basis - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergy Bush HydrogenEmissions andDepartment of2014

  11. Appendices for the Basis Document | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613Portsmouth SitePresentations |StateNuclearWith allAnnual NEPA Planning1Antonio

  12. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| Department ofGeneralWind »Assistance: Increasing

  13. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| Department ofGeneralWind »Assistance: IncreasingDepartment of

  14. Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| Department ofGeneralWind »Assistance: IncreasingDepartment

  15. F tank draft basis determination press release 092910 _2_....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  16. Microsoft Word - Final_SRS_FTF_WD_Basis_March_2012

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your1 SECTION A. Project0 FOIA Request

  17. Order Module--DOE-STD-1104-2009, REVIEW AND APPROVAL OF NUCLEAR FACILITY SAFETY BASIS AND SAFETY DESIGN BASIS DOCUMENTS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The familiar level of this module is divided into two sections that are intended to provide only an overview of the material contained in DOE-STD-1104-2009, which should be consulted for complete...

  18. Use of Structure as a Basis for Abstraction in Air Traffic Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davison, H. J.

    The safety and efficiency of the air traffic control domain is highly dependent on the capabilities and limitations of its human controllers. Past research has indicated that structure provided by the airspace and procedures ...

  19. Native language experience shapes neural basis of addressed and assembled phonologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    words in the addressed group; TW_ASSE = trained words inthe assembled group; UTW_ASSE = untrained words in the

  20. Visual Recognition and Categorization on the Basis of Similarities to Multiple Class Prototypes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edelman, Shimon

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To recognize a previously seen object, the visual system must overcome the variability in the object's appearance caused by factors such as illumination and pose. Developments in computer vision suggest that it may be ...