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1

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report Herb G. Sutter Michael Poirier Art W. Etchells Gary Smith Kris Thomas Jim J. Davis Paul Macbeth November 16, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 16, 2009 ii Herbert G. Sutter, Team Lead Date Michael Poirier, Team Member Date Arthur W. Etchells, Team Member Date Gary Smith, Team Member Date Kris Thomas, Team Member Date Jim J. Davis, Team Member Date Paul Macbeth, Team Member Date Signatures 11/09/2009 11/09/2009 11/09/2009 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 16, 2009

2

HANFORD K BASINS SLUDGE RETREIVAL & TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect

This paper shows how Fluor Hanford and BNG America have combined nuclear plant skills from the US and the UK to devise methods to retrieve and treat the sludge that has accumulated in K Basins at the Hanford site over many years. Retrieving the sludge is the final stage in removing fuel and sludge from the basins to allow them to be decontaminated and decommissioned, thus removing the threat of contamination of the Columbia River. A description is given of sludge retrieval using vacuum lances and specially developed nozzles and pumps into Consolidation Containers within the basins. The special attention that had to be paid to the heat generation and potential criticality issues with the irradiated uranium-containing sludge is described. The processes developed to re-mobilize the sludge from the Consolidation Containers and pump it through flexible and transportable hose-in-hose piping to the treatment facility are explained with particular note made of dealing with the abrasive nature of the sludge. The treatment facility, housed in an existing Hanford building is described, and the uranium-corrosion and grout encapsulation processes explained. The uranium corrosion process is a robust, tempered process very suitable for dealing with a range of differing sludge compositions. The grout process to produce the final waste form is backed by BNG America's 20 years experience of grouting radioactive waste at Sellafield and elsewhere. The use of transportable and re-usable equipment is emphasized and its role noted in avoiding new plant build that itself will require cleanup. The processes and techniques described in the paper are shown to have wide applicability to nuclear cleanup worldwide.

VASQUEZ, D.A.

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

3

Maintenance and Operations study for K basins sludge treatment  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates maintenance and operating concepts for the chemical treatment of sludge from the 100 K Basins at Hanford. The sludge treatment equipment that will require remote operation or maintenance was identified. Then various maintenance and operating concepts used in the nuclear industry were evaluated for applicability to sludge treatment. A hot cell or cells is recommended as the best maintenance and operating concept for a sludge treatment facility.

WESTRA, A.G.

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

4

Summary - K Basins Sludge Treatment Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K Basin K Basin DOE is Proces the va at Han subsys oxidati objecti of-fact maturi Eleme Techn The as which seven * M * M * Pr * Pr * As The Ele Site: H roject: K P Report Date: A ited States Why DOE ns Sludge Treatme s constructing ss (STP) for re rious sludge st nford. The STP stems: sludge ion, assay, pac ive of the asse t" appraisal of t ty by first ident ents (CTEs) of t ology Readine What th ssessment team was further div CTEs and the Material Mobiliza Material Transfe rocess Chemis rocess Instrum ssay (TRL=2) To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Hanford/ORP K Basins Slud Process/STP August 2007 Departmen K Bas E-EM Did This ent Process Flow D a K Basins Slu trieving, treatin treams stored i P is comprised containerizatio ckaging, and dr ssment was to the project's ov

5

Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

6

K East basin sludge volume estimates for integrated water treatment system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides estimates of the volume of sludge expected from Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) processing of the fuel elements and in the fuel storage canisters in K East Basin. The original estimates were based on visual observations of fuel element condition in the basin and laboratory measurements of canister sludge density. Revision 1 revised the volume estimates of sludge from processing of the fuel elements based on additional data from evaluations of material from the KE Basin fuel subsurface examinations. A nominal Working Estimate and an upper level Working Bound is developed for the canister sludge and the fuel wash sludge components in the KE Basin.

Pearce, K.L.

1998-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

7

KE Basin Sludge Flocculant Testing  

SciTech Connect

In the revised path forward and schedule for the K Basins Sludge Retrieval and Disposal Project, the sludge in K East (KE) Basin will be moved from the floor and pits and transferred to large, free-standing containers located in the pits (so as to isolate the sludge from the basin). When the sludge is pumped into the containers, it must settle fast enough and clarify sufficiently that the overflow water returned to the basin pool will not cloud the water or significantly increase the radiological dose rate to the operations staff as a result of increased suspended radioactive material. The approach being evaluated to enhance sludge settling and speed the rate of clarification is to add a flocculant to the sludge while it is being transferred to the containers. In February 2004, seven commercial flocculants were tested with a specific K Basin sludge simulant to identify those agents that demonstrated good performance over a broad range of slurry solids concentrations. From this testing, a cationic polymer flocculant, Nalco Optimer 7194 Plus (7194+), was shown to exhibit superior performance. Related prior testing with K Basin sludge and simulant in 1994/1996 had also identified this agent as promising. In March 2004, four series of jar tests were conducted with 7194+ and actual KE Basin sludge (prepared by combining selected archived KE sludge samples). The results from these jar tests show that 7194+ greatly improves settling of the sludge slurries and clarification of the supernatant.

Schmidt, Andrew J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; Gano, Sue

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

8

Alkali Treatment of Acidic Solution from Hanford K Basin Sludge Dissolution  

SciTech Connect

Nitric acid solutions will be created from the dissolution of Hanford K Basin sludge. These acidic dissolver solutions must be made alkaline by treatment with NaOH solution before they are disposed to ~ the Tank Waste Remediation System on the Hanford Site. During the alkali treatments, sodium diuranate, hydroxides of iron and aluminum, and radioelements (uranium, plutonium, and americium) will precipitate from the dissolver solution. Laboratory tests, discussed here, were pefiormed to provide information on these precipitates and their precipitation behavior that is important in designing the engineering flowsheet for the treatment process. Specifically, experiments were conducted to determine the optimum precipitation conditions; the completeness of uranium, plutonium, and americium precipitation; the rate of sedimentation; and the physico-chemical characteristics of the solids formed by alkali treatment of simulated acidic dissolver solutions. These experiments also determined the redistribution of uranium, plutonium, and americium flom the sodium di~ate and iron and al&inurn hydroxide precipitates upon contact with carbonate- and EDTA-bearing simulated waste solutions. Note: EDTA is the tetrasodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetate.

AA Bessonov; AB Yusov; AM Fedoseev; AV Gelis; AY Garnov; CH Delegard; GM Plavnik; LN Astafurova; MS Grigoriev; NA Budantseva; NN Krot; SI Nikitenko; TP Puraeva; VP Perminov; VP Shilov

1998-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

9

Preparation and Characterization of Uranium Oxides in Support of the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uraninite (UO2) and metaschoepite (UO3·2H2O) are the uranium phases most frequently observed in K Basin sludge. Uraninite arises from the oxidation of uranium metal by anoxic water and metaschoepite arises from oxidation of uraninite by atmospheric or radiolytic oxygen. Studies of the oxidation of uraninite by oxygen to form metaschoepite were performed at 21°C and 50°C. A uranium oxide oxidation state characterization method based on spectrophotometry of the solution formed by dissolving aqueous slurries in phosphoric acid was developed to follow the extent of reaction. This method may be applied to determine uranium oxide oxidation state distribution in K Basin sludge. The uraninite produced by anoxic corrosion of uranium metal has exceedingly fine particle size (6 nm diameter), forms agglomerates, and has the formula UO2.004±0.007; i.e., is practically stoichiometric UO2. The metaschoepite particles are flatter and wider when prepared at 21°C than the particles prepared at 50°C. These particles are much smaller than the metaschoepite observed in prolonged exposure of actual K Basin sludge to warm moist oxidizing conditions. The uraninite produced by anoxic uranium metal corrosion and the metaschoepite produced by reaction of uraninite aqueous slurries with oxygen may be used in engineering and process development testing. A rapid alternative method to determine uranium metal concentrations in sludge also was identified.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

10

Sludge treatment facility preliminary siting study for the sludge treatment project (A-13B)  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates various sites in the 100 K area and 200 areas of Hanford for locating a treatment facility for sludge from the K Basins. Both existing facilities and a new standalone facility were evaluated. A standalone facility adjacent to the AW Tank Farm in the 200 East area of Hanford is recommended as the best location for a sludge treatment facility.

WESTRA, A.G.

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

11

Shear Strength Measurement Benchmarking Tests for K Basin Sludge Simulants  

SciTech Connect

Equipment development and demonstration testing for sludge retrieval is being conducted by the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP) at the MASF (Maintenance and Storage Facility) using sludge simulants. In testing performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (under contract with the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company), the performance of the Geovane instrument was successfully benchmarked against the M5 Haake rheometer using a series of simulants with shear strengths (?) ranging from about 700 to 22,000 Pa (shaft corrected). Operating steps for obtaining consistent shear strength measurements with the Geovane instrument during the benchmark testing were refined and documented.

Burns, Carolyn A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Luna, Maria; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

12

SLUDGE RETRIEVAL FROM HANFORD K WEST BASIN SETTLER TANKS  

SciTech Connect

In 2010, an innovative, remotely operated retrieval system was deployed to successfully retrieve over 99.7% of the radioactive sludge from ten submerged tanks in Hanford's K-West Basin. As part of K-West Basin cleanup, the accumulated sludge needed to be removed from the 0.5 meter diameter by 5 meter long settler tanks and transferred approximately 45 meters to an underwater container for sampling and waste treatment. The abrasive, dense, non-homogeneous sludge was the product of the washing process of corroded nuclear fuel. It consists of small (less than 600 micron) particles of uranium metal, uranium oxide, and various other constituents, potentially agglomerated or cohesive after 10 years of storage. The Settler Tank Retrieval System (STRS) was developed to access, mobilize and pump out the sludge from each tank using a standardized process of retrieval head insertion, periodic high pressure water spray, retraction, and continuous pumping of the sludge. Blind operations were guided by monitoring flow rate, radiation levels in the sludge stream, and solids concentration. The technology developed and employed in the STRS can potentially be adapted to similar problematic waste tanks or pipes that must be remotely accessed to achieve mobilization and retrieval of the sludge within.

ERPENBECK EG; LESHIKAR GA

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

13

Feasibility report on criticality issues associated with storage of K Basin sludge in tanks farms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This feasibility study provides the technical justification for conclusions about K Basin sludge storage options. The conclusions, solely based on criticality safety considerations, depend on the treatment of the sludge. The two primary conclusions are, (1) untreated sludge must be stored in a critically safe storage tank, and (2) treated sludge (dissolution, precipitation and added neutron absorbers) can be stored in a standard Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) or 241-AW-105 without future restrictions on tank operations from a criticality safety perspective.

Vail, T.S.

1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

14

Thermal Conductivity and Shear Strength of K Basin Sludge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hanford K Basin sludge contains metallic uranium and uranium oxides that will corrode, hydrate, and, consequently, generate heat and hydrogen gas during storage. Heat is generated within the K Basin sludge by radiolytic decay and the reaction of uranium metal with water. To maintain thermal stability, the sludge must be retrieved, staged, transported, and stored in systems designed to provide a rate of heat removal that prevents the temperature in the sludge from increasing beyond acceptable limits. To support the dispositioning of the sludge to T Plant, modeling and testing and analyses are being performed to predict the behavior of sludge when placed into the storage containers. Two physical properties of the sludge that are critical to the modeling and analyses efforts are thermal conductivity and the sludge shear strength (yield stress). This report provides the results of thermal conductivity and shear strength measurements performed on representative sludge samples from the K East Basin.

Poloski, Adam P. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Bredt, Paul R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schmidt, Andrew J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Swoboda, Robert G. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Chenault, Jeffrey W. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Gano, Sue (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

15

Hanford K-Basin Sludge Characterization Overview February 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hanford K-Basin Sludge Characterization Overview February 2005 1 Hanford K-Basin Sludge Characterization Overview February 2005 1. Summary The Hanford K-East and K-West Basins were used to store of the irradiated fuel reprocessing facility at Hanford (the PUREX facility) the N-Reactor irradiated fuel remained

16

K Basin sludge polychlorinated biphenyl removal technology assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The two Hanford K Basins are water-filled concrete pools that contain over 2,100 metric tons of N Reactor fuel elements stored in aluminum or stainless steel canisters. During the time the fuel has been stored, approximately 50 m3 of heterogeneous solid material have accumulated in the basins. This material, referred to as sludge, is a mixture of fuel corrosion products, metallic bits of spent fuel and zirconium clad iron and metal corrosion products and silica from migrating sands. Some of the sludges also contain PCBs. The congener group of PCBs was identified as Aroclor 1254. The maximum concentration of sludge PCBS was found to be 140 ppm (as settled wet basis). However, the distribution of the PCBs is non-uniform throughout the sludge (i.e., there are regions of high and low concentrations and places where no PCBs are present). Higher concentrations could be present at various locations. Aroclors 1016/1242, 1221, 1248, 1254, and 1260 were identified and quantified in K West (KW) Canister sludge. In some of these samples, the concentration of 1260 was higher than 1254. The sludge requires pre-treatment to meet tank farm waste acceptance criteria, Among the numerous requirements, the sludge should be retreated so that it does not contain regulated levels of Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) compounds. Because of their stable chemistry and relative insolubility in water, PCBs are difficult to treat. They also resist degradation from heat and electrical charges. This stability has resulted in environmental persistence which has prompted the development of a variety of new cleanup processes including supercritical processes, advanced oxidation, dehalogenation and others. Hopefully, most of the new processes are discussed herein. Information on new processes are being received and will be evaluated in a future revision.

Ashworth, S.C.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

17

Composition and Technical Basis for K Basin Settler Sludge Simulant for Inspection, Retrieval, and Pump Testing  

SciTech Connect

This report provides the formulation and technical basis for a K Basin Settler Tank Sludge simulant that will be used by the K Basin Closure Project (KBC) to test and develop equipment/approaches for Settler Tank sludge level measurement and retrieval in a mock-up test system of the actual Settler Tanks. The sludge simulant may also be used to demonstrate that the TOYO high pressure positive displacement pump design (reversing valves and hollow balls) is suitable for transfer of Settler Tank sludge from the K West (KW) Basin to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) (~500 ft). As requested the by the K Basins Sludge Treatment Project (STP) the simulant is comprised of non-radioactive (and non-uranium) constituents.

Schmidt, Andrew J.; Zacher, Alan H.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

18

Preparing T Plant to Store K-Basin Sludge  

SciTech Connect

This paper will explain the history and status of the modification of the Hanford T Plant facility for storage of K Basin sludge.

MCKENNEY, D.E.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Dissolution of Uranium Metal from Hanford K Basin Sludge Simulant ...  

Dissolution of Uranium Metal from Hanford K Basin Sludge Simulant, Without Producing Hydrogen Stephanie Bruffey and Paul Taylor Background About 2100 metric tons of ...

20

Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focused on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report will present results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Strength Measurements of Archive K Basin Sludge Using a Soil Penetrometer  

SciTech Connect

Spent fuel radioactive sludge present in the K East and K West spent nuclear fuel storage basins now resides in the KW Basin in six large underwater engineered containers. The sludge will be dispositioned in two phases under the Sludge Treatment Project: (1) hydraulic retrieval into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and transport to interim storage in Central Plateau and (2) retrieval from the STSCs, treatment, and packaging for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In the years the STSCs are stored, sludge strength is expected to increase through chemical reaction, intergrowth of sludge crystals, and compaction and dewatering by settling. Increased sludge strength can impact the type and operation of the retrieval equipment needed prior to final sludge treatment and packaging. It is important to determine whether water jetting, planned for sludge retrieval from STSCs, will be effective. Shear strength is a property known to correlate with the effectiveness of water jetting. Accordingly, the unconfined compressive strengths (UCS) of archive K Basin sludge samples and sludge blends were measured using a pocket penetrometer modified for hot cell use. Based on known correlations, UCS values can be converted to shear strengths. Twenty-six sludge samples, stored in hot cells for a number of years since last being disturbed, were identified as potential candidates for UCS measurement and valid UCS measurements were made for twelve, each of which was found as moist or water-immersed solids at least 1/2-inch deep. Ten of the twelve samples were relatively weak, having consistencies described as 'very soft' to 'soft'. Two of the twelve samples, KE Pit and KC-4 P250, were strong with 'very stiff' and 'stiff' consistencies described, respectively, as 'can be indented by a thumb nail' or 'can be indented by thumb'. Both of these sludge samples are composites collected from KE Basin floor and Weasel Pit locations. Despite both strong sludges having relatively high iron concentrations, attribution of their high strengths to this factor could not be made with confidence as other measured sludge samples, also from the KE Basin floor and of high iron concentration, were relatively weak. The observed UCS and shear strengths for the two strong sludges were greater than observed in any prior testing of K Basin sludge except for sludge processed at 185 C under hydrothermal conditions.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

22

Updated Volumetric Expansion Factors for K Basin Sludge During Storage  

SciTech Connect

Sludge has accumulated in the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins at the Hanford Site. This sludge contains metallic uranium and uranium oxides that will corrode, hydrate, and generate and consume gases during containerized storage. From these corrosion reactions, two sludge expansion mechanisms can be expected: 1) expansion of the volume of the sludge solids from the generation of corrosion oxidation products that occupy more space than the starting-state sludge; and 2) expansion of the bulk sludge volume from the retention of hydrogen gas bubbles. This report provides a review and updated projections of the volumetric expansion occurring due to corrosion and gas retention during the containerized storage of K Basin sludge. New design and safety basis volume expansion values are provided for the following sludge streams: KW Floor, KW North Loadout Pit, KW canister, and fuel piece sludge.

Schmidt, Andrew J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Delegard, Calvin H. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

23

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Basin Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Emergency Management program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

24

Disposition Options for Hanford Site K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel Sludge  

SciTech Connect

This report provides summary-level information about a group of options that have been identified for the disposition of spent-nuclear-fuel sludge in the K-Basins at the Hanford Site. These options are representative of the range of likely candidates that may be considered for disposition of the sludge. The product of each treatment option would be treated sludge that would meet waste acceptance requirements for disposal as transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP).

Mellinger, George B.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Gerber, Mark A.; Naft, Barry N.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Walton, Terry L.

2004-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

25

Test Plan for K Basin floor sludge consolidated sampling equipment  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide the test procedure for the function and acceptance testing of the K Basin Floor Sludge Consolidated Sampling Equipment. This equipment will be used to transfer K Basin floor sludge to a sludge sampling container for subsequent shipment to an analysis or testing facility. This equipment will provide sampling consistent with data quality objectives and sampling plans currently being developed.

OLIVER, J.W.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

26

Characteristics of KE Basin Sludge Samples Archived in the RPL - 2007  

SciTech Connect

Samples of sludge were collected from the K East fuel storage basin (KE Basin) floor, contiguous pits (Weasel Pit, North Load Out Pit, Dummy Elevator Pit, and Tech View Pit), and fuel storage canisters between 1995 and 2003 for chemical and radionuclide concentration analysis, physical property determination, and chemical process testing work. Because of the value of the sludge in this testing and because of the cost of obtaining additional fresh samples, an ongoing program of sludge preservation has taken place with the goals to track the sludge identities and preserve, as well as possible, the sludge composition by keeping the sludge in sealed jars and maintaining water coverage on the sludge consistent with the controlling Fluor Hanford (FH) Sampling and Analysis plans and FH contracts with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). This work was originally initiated to provide material for planned hydrothermal treatment testing in accordance with the test plan for the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) corrosion process chemistry follow on testing (Delegard et al. 2007). Although most of the planned hydrothermal testing was canceled in July 2007 (as described in the forward of Delegard et al. 2007), sample consolidation and characterization was continued to identify a set of well-characterized sludge samples that are suited to support evolving STP initiatives. The work described in the letter was performed by the PNNL under the direction of the Sludge Treatment Project, managed by Fluor Hanford.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

27

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT PHASE 1 SLUDGE STORAGE OPTIONS ASSESSMENT OF T PLANT VERSUS ALTERNATE STORAGE FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has recommended to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) a two phase approach for removal and storage (Phase 1) and treatment and packaging for offsite shipment (Phase 2) of the sludge currently stored within the 105-K West Basin. This two phased strategy enables early removal of sludge from the 105-K West Basin by 2015, allowing remediation of historical unplanned releases of waste and closure of the 100-K Area. In Phase 1, the sludge currently stored in the Engineered Containers and Settler Tanks within the 105-K West Basin will be transferred into sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs). The STSCs will be transported to an interim storage facility. In Phase 2, sludge will be processed (treated) to meet shipping and disposal requirements and the sludge will be packaged for final disposal at a geologic repository. The purpose of this study is to evaluate two alternatives for interim Phase 1 storage of K Basin sludge. The cost, schedule, and risks for sludge storage at a newly-constructed Alternate Storage Facility (ASF) are compared to those at T Plant, which has been used previously for sludge storage. Based on the results of the assessment, T Plant is recommended for Phase 1 interim storage of sludge. Key elements that support this recommendation are the following: (1) T Plant has a proven process for storing sludge; (2) T Plant storage can be implemented at a lower incremental cost than the ASF; and (3) T Plant storage has a more favorable schedule profile, which provides more float, than the ASF. Underpinning the recommendation of T Plant for sludge storage is the assumption that T Plant has a durable, extended mission independent of the K Basin sludge interim storage mission. If this assumption cannot be validated and the operating costs of T Plant are borne by the Sludge Treatment Project, the conclusions and recommendations of this study would change. The following decision-making strategy, which is dependent on the confidence that DOE has in the long term mission for T Plant, is proposed: (1) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is high, then the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) would continue to implement the path forward previously described in the Alternatives Report (HNF-39744). Risks to the sludge project can be minimized through the establishment of an Interface Control Document (ICD) defining agreed upon responsibilities for both the STP and T Plant Operations regarding the transfer and storage of sludge and ensuring that the T Plant upgrade and operational schedule is well integrated with the sludge storage activities. (2) If the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is uncertain, then the ASF conceptual design should be pursued on a parallel path with preparation of T Plant for sludge storage until those uncertainties are resolved. (3) Finally, if the confidence level in a durable, extended T Plant mission independent of sludge storage is low, then the ASF design should be selected to provide independence from the T Plant mission risk.

RUTHERFORD WW; GEUTHER WJ; STRANKMAN MR; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER DD; BLACK DM; POTTMEYER JA

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

28

PROGRESS WITH K BASINS SLUDGE RETRIEVAL STABILIZATION & PACKAGING AT THE HANFORD NUCLEAR SITE  

SciTech Connect

This paper shows how Fluor Hanford and BNG America have combined nuclear plant skills from the U.S. and the U.K. to devise methods to retrieve and treat the sludge that has accumulated in K Basins at the Hanford Site over many years. Retrieving the sludge is the final stage in removing fuel and sludge from the basins to allow them to be decontaminated and decommissioned, so as to remove the threat of contamination of the Columbia River. A description is given of sludge retrieval using vacuum lances and specially developed nozzles and pumps into Consolidation Containers within the basins. The special attention that had to be paid to the heat generation and potential criticality issues with the irradiated uranium-containing sludge is described. The processes developed to re-mobilize the sludge from the Consolidation Containers and pump it through flexible and transportable hose-in-hose piping to the treatment facility are explained with particular note made of dealing with the abrasive nature of the sludge. The treatment facility, housed in an existing Hanford building, is described, and the uranium-corrosion and grout packaging processes explained. The uranium corrosion process is a robust, tempered process very suitable for dealing with a range of differing sludge compositions. Optimization and simplification of the original sludge corrosion process design is described and the use of transportable and reusable equipment is indicated. The processes and techniques described in the paper are shown to have wide applicability to nuclear cleanup.

KNOLLMEYER, P.M.; PHILLIPS, C; TOWNSON, P.S.

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Effects of Time, Heat, and Oxygen on K Basin Sludge Agglomeration, Strength, and Solids Volume  

SciTech Connect

Sludge disposition will be managed in two phases under the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project. The first phase is to retrieve the sludge that currently resides in engineered containers in the K West (KW) Basin pool at ~10 to 18°C. The second phase is to retrieve the sludge from interim storage in the sludge transport and storage containers (STSCs) and treat and package it in preparation for eventual shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. The work described in this report was conducted to gain insight into how sludge may change during long-term containerized storage in the STSCs. To accelerate potential physical and chemical changes, the tests were performed at temperatures and oxygen partial pressures significantly greater than those expected in the T Plant canyon cells where the STSCs will be stored. Tests were conducted to determine the effects of 50°C oxygenated water exposure on settled quiescent uraninite (UO2) slurry and a full simulant of KW containerized sludge to determine the effects of oxygen and heat on the composition and mechanical properties of sludge. Shear-strength measurements by vane rheometry also were conducted for UO2 slurry, mixtures of UO2 and metaschoepite (UO3•2H2O), and for simulated KW containerized sludge. The results from these tests and related previous tests are compared to determine whether the settled solids in the K Basin sludge materials change in volume because of oxidation of UO2 by dissolved atmospheric oxygen to form metaschoepite. The test results also are compared to determine if heating or other factors alter sludge volumes and to determine the effects of sludge composition and settling times on sludge shear strength. It has been estimated that the sludge volume will increase with time because of a uranium metal ? uraninite ? metaschoepite oxidation sequence. This increase could increase the number of containers required for storage and increase overall costs of sludge management activities. However, the volume might decrease because of decreases in the water-volume fraction caused by sludge solid reactions, compaction, or intergrowth and recrystallization of metaschoepite. In that case, fewer STSCs may be needed, but the shear strength would increase, and this could challenge recovery by water jet erosion and require more aggressive retrieval methods. Overall, the tests described herein indicate that the settled solids volume remains the same or decreases with time. The only case for which the sludge solids volumes increase with time is for the expansion factor attendant upon the anoxic corrosion of uranium metal to produce UO2 and subsequent reaction with oxygen to form equimolar UO2.25 and UO3•2H2O.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

30

Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focuses on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report presents results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge. This report was originally published in March 2001. In January 2004, a transcription error was discovered in the value reported for the uranium metal content of KE North Loadout Pit sample FE-3. This revision of the report corrects the U metal content of FE-3 from 0.0013 wt% to 0.013 wt%.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

31

Site Visit Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 Site Visit Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW - August 2011 August 2011 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review This report documents the results of a review conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) of selected aspects of the 105-KW Basin Final Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Revision 14C) for the Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site. HSS's review of the K-West Basin FSAR found it to be generally adequate with respect to the scope of this review. However, some aspects of the FSAR accident analyses of two events may warrant further review: MCO transport cask drop into the K-Basin, and the fire accident event involving the cask

32

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project, August 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 08222011 - 08252011 Report Preparer: Jake...

33

Compilation and Integration of K Basin Sludge Particle Size Analysis Data  

SciTech Connect

This report consolidates and integrates all of the particle size analysis data generated during the Hanford K Basin sludge characterization campaigns. The provides the most representative particle size distribution curves for the various K Basin sludge types. Understanding the particle size distribution of the sludge is necessary to design sludge retrieval and processing systems and to address sludge transportation and storage safety issues due to the potential reactivity of sludge.

Bredt, Paul R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Tingey, Joel M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schmidt, Andrew J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2000-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

34

Sampling and analysis plan for sludge located on the floor and in the pits of the 105-K basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) provides direction for the sampling of the sludge found on the floor and in the remote pits of the 105-K Basins to provide: (1) basic data for the sludges that have not been characterized to-date and (2) representative Sludge material for process tests to be made by the SNF Project/K Basins sludge treatment process subproject. The sampling equipment developed will remove representative samples of the radioactive sludge from underwater at the K Basins, depositing them in shielded containers for transport to the Hanford Site laboratories. Included in the present document is the basic background logic for selection of the samples to meet the requirements established in the Data Quality Objectives (DQO), HNF-2033, for this sampling activity. The present document also includes the laboratory analyses, methods, procedures, and reporting that will be required to meet the DQO.

BAKER, R.B.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

35

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELMINARY DESIGN HAZARD AND OPERABILITY STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Hazard and Operability (HAZOP) study addresses the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) preliminary design for retrieving sludge from underwater engineered containers located in the 105-K West (KW) Basin, transferring the sludge as a sludge-water slurry (hereafter referred to as 'slurry') to a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) located in a Modified KW Basin Annex, and preparing the STSC for transport to T Plant using the Sludge Transport System (STS). There are six, underwater engineered containers located in the KW Basin that, at the time of sludge retrieval, will contain an estimated volume of 5.2 m{sup 3} of KW Basin floor and pit sludge, 18.4 m{sup 3} of 105-K East (KE) Basin floor, pit, and canister sludge, and 3.5 m{sup 3} of settler tank sludge. The KE and KW Basin sludge consists of fuel corrosion products (including metallic uranium, and fission and activation products), small fuel fragments, iron and aluminum oxide, sand, dirt, operational debris, and biological debris. The settler tank sludge consists of sludge generated by the washing of KE and KW Basin fuel in the Primary Clean Machine. A detailed description of the origin of sludge and its chemical and physical characteristics can be found in HNF-41051, Preliminary STP Container and Settler Sludge Process System Description and Material Balance. In summary, the ECRTS retrieves sludge from the engineered containers and hydraulically transfers it as a slurry into an STSC positioned within a trailer-mounted STS cask located in a Modified KW Basin Annex. The slurry is allowed to settle within the STSC to concentrate the solids and clarify the supernate. After a prescribed settling period the supernate is decanted. The decanted supernate is filtered through a sand filter and returned to the basin. Subsequent batches of slurry are added to the STSC, settled, and excess supernate removed until the prescribed quantity of sludge is collected. The sand filter is then backwashed into the STSC. The STSC and STS cask are then inerted and transported to T Plant.

CARRO CA

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Microsoft Word - 2010 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Visit...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the engineered containers presently containing the sludge in the K-West Basin, the underwater pump that will be used to move the sludge from the pool to the transport vessels,...

37

CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Management at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge

38

Microsoft Word - 2010 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Visit _May 17-19 2010_ _final_  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tour of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - May 17-19, 2010 Tour of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - May 17-19, 2010 The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an orientation visit to the Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington during the period May 17-19, with DOE-RL managers/staff and contractor managers and supporting staff responsible for the ongoing K-Basins Sludge Treatment Project. The purpose of the visit was to ascertain ways in which HSS would be able to carry out its independent oversight responsibilities with respect to this project in a method that encourages collaboration with DOE-RL. The K-Basin Sludge Treatment Project involves transferring sludge that has been recovered from

39

Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sludge Treatment Sludge Treatment Project - September 2013 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - September 2013 November 2013 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System Operational Awareness Review and Sludge Treatment Project Independent Project Review [HIAR-RL-2013-09-18] This Independent Oversight Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Health, Safety and Security's (HSS) Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations on September 17-18, 2013, at the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project. The activity consisted of HSS staff performing an operational awareness review of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System. An HSS

40

CRAD, Training - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Training - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Environment, Safety and Health program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Engineering program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge

42

Evaluation and Recommendation of Waste Form and Packaging for Disposition of the K East Basin North Loadout Pit Sludge  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the recommendation from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to Fluor Hanford regarding the treatment of the Hanford K East Basin North Loadout Pit (KE NLOP) sludge to produce contact handled transuranic waste (CH-TRU) for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The recommendation was supported in part by chemical and radiochemical characterization analyses (provided in this report) performed on a sample of KE NLOP sludge.

Mellinger, George B.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sevigny, Gary J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sludge Treatment Project - Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 February 2012 Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Operational Awareness Review [HIAR-RL-2012-02-27] The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Independent Activity Report, Hanford Sludge Treatment Project - February 2012 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - June 2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - April 2011 Independent Activity Report, Richland Operations Office - August 2011

44

Transportability Class of Americium in K Basin Sludge under Ambient and Hydrothermal Processing Conditions  

SciTech Connect

This report establishes the technical bases for using a ''slow uptake'' instead of a ''moderate uptake'' transportability class for americium-241 (241Am) for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP) dose consequence analysis. Slow uptake classes are used for most uranium and plutonium oxides. A moderate uptake class has been used in prior STP analyses for 241Am based on the properties of separated 241Am and its associated oxide. However, when 241Am exists as an ingrown progeny (and as a small mass fraction) within plutonium mixtures, it is appropriate to assign transportability factors of the predominant plutonium mixtures (typically slow) to the Am241. It is argued that the transportability factor for 241Am in sludge likewise should be slow because it exists as a small mass fraction as the ingrown progeny within the uranium oxide in sludge. In this report, the transportability class assignment for 241Am is underpinned with radiochemical characterization data on K Basin sludge and with studies conducted with other irradiated fuel exposed to elevated temperatures and conditions similar to the STP. Key findings and conclusions from evaluation of the characterization data and published literature are summarized here. Plutonium and 241Am make up very small fractions of the uranium within the K Basin sludge matrix. Plutonium is present at about 1 atom per 500 atoms of uranium and 241Am at about 1 atom per 19000 of uranium. Plutonium and americium are found to remain with uranium in the solid phase in all of the {approx}60 samples taken and analyzed from various sources of K Basin sludge. The uranium-specific concentrations of plutonium and americium also remain approximately constant over a uranium concentration range (in the dry sludge solids) from 0.2 to 94 wt%, a factor of {approx}460. This invariability demonstrates that 241Am does not partition from the uranium or plutonium fraction for any characterized sludge matrix. Most of the K Basin sludge characterization data is derived spent nuclear fuel corroded within the K Basins at 10-15?C. The STP process will place water-laden sludges from the K Basin in process vessels at {approx}150-180 C. Therefore, published studies with other irradiated (uranium oxide) fuel were examined. From these studies, the affinity of plutonium and americium for uranium in irradiated UO2 also was demonstrated at hydrothermal conditions (150 C anoxic liquid water) approaching those proposed for the STP process and even for hydrothermal conditions outside of the STP operating envelope (e.g., 150 C oxic and 100 C oxic and anoxic liquid water). In summary, by demonstrating that the chemical and physical behavior of 241Am in the sludge matrix is similar to that of the predominant species (uranium and for the plutonium from which it originates), a technical basis is provided for using the slow uptake transportability factor for 241Am that is currently used for plutonium and uranium oxides. The change from moderate to slow uptake for 241Am could reduce the overall analyzed dose consequences for the STP by more than 30%.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Transportability Class of Americium in K Basin Sludge under Ambient and Hydrothermal Processing Conditions  

SciTech Connect

This report establishes the technical bases for using a ''slow uptake'' instead of a ''moderate uptake'' transportability class for americium-241 (241Am) for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP) dose consequence analysis. Slow uptake classes are used for most uranium and plutonium oxides. A moderate uptake class has been used in prior STP analyses for 241Am based on the properties of separated 241Am and its associated oxide. However, when 241Am exists as an ingrown progeny (and as a small mass fraction) within plutonium mixtures, it is appropriate to assign transportability factors of the predominant plutonium mixtures (typically slow) to the Am241. It is argued that the transportability factor for 241Am in sludge likewise should be slow because it exists as a small mass fraction as the ingrown progeny within the uranium oxide in sludge. In this report, the transportability class assignment for 241Am is underpinned with radiochemical characterization data on K Basin sludge and with studies conducted with other irradiated fuel exposed to elevated temperatures and conditions similar to the STP. Key findings and conclusions from evaluation of the characterization data and published literature are summarized here. Plutonium and 241Am make up very small fractions of the uranium within the K Basin sludge matrix. Plutonium is present at about 1 atom per 500 atoms of uranium and 241Am at about 1 atom per 19000 of uranium. Plutonium and americium are found to remain with uranium in the solid phase in all of the {approx}60 samples taken and analyzed from various sources of K Basin sludge. The uranium-specific concentrations of plutonium and americium also remain approximately constant over a uranium concentration range (in the dry sludge solids) from 0.2 to 94 wt%, a factor of {approx}460. This invariability demonstrates that 241Am does not partition from the uranium or plutonium fraction for any characterized sludge matrix. Most of the K Basin sludge characterization data is derived spent nuclear fuel corroded within the K Basins at 10-15?C. The STP process will place water-laden sludges from the K Basin in process vessels at {approx}150-180 C. Therefore, published studies with other irradiated (uranium oxide) fuel were examined. From these studies, the affinity of plutonium and americium for uranium in irradiated UO2 also was demonstrated at hydrothermal conditions (150 C anoxic liquid water) approaching those proposed for the STP process and even for hydrothermal conditions outside of the STP operating envelope (e.g., 150 C oxic and 100 C oxic and anoxic liquid water). In summary, by demonstrating that the chemical and physical behavior of 241Am in the sludge matrix is similar to that of the predominant species (uranium and for the plutonium from which it originates), a technical basis is provided for using the slow uptake transportability factor for 241Am that is currently used for plutonium and uranium oxides. The change from moderate to slow uptake for 241Am could reduce the overall analyzed dose consequences for the STP by more than 30%.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

F/H seepage basin groundwater influent, effluent, precipitated sludge characterization task technical plan  

SciTech Connect

A treatability study to support the development of a remediation system which would reduce the contaminant levels in groundwater removed from the aquifers in the vicinity of the F/H seepage basins and southwest of the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF) at the Savannah River facility was conducted. Proposed changes in the remediation system require an additional study to determine whether precipitated sludge generated from the proposed remediation system will be hazardous as defined by RCRA. Several contaminants, such as lead and mercury, are above the groundwater protection standards. The presence of radionuclides and other contaminants in the sludge does not present a problem provided that the sludge can pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. The study has been developed in such a manner as to cover the possible range of treatment options that may be used.

Siler, J.L.

1993-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

47

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Revision 14C) for the Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site. 2.0 BACKGROUND The Sludge Treatment Project manages the removal of...

48

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Revision 14C) for the Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site. 2.0 BACKGROUND The Sludge Treatment Project manages the removal of radioactive...

49

Engineering evaluation of neutralization and precipitation processes applicable to sludge treatment project  

SciTech Connect

Engineering evaluations have been performed to determine likely unit operations and methods required to support the removal, storage, treatment and disposal of solids/sludges present in the K Basins at the Hanford Site. This evaluation was initiated to select a neutralization process for dissolver product solution resulting from nitric acid treatment of about 50 m{sup 3} of Hanford Site K Basins sludge. Neutralization is required to meet Tank Waste Remediation Waste System acceptance criteria for storage of the waste in the double shell tanks after neutralization, the supernate and precipitate will be transferred to the high level waste storage tanks in 200E Area. Non transuranic (TRU) solids residue will be transferred to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). This report presents an overview of neutralization and precipitation methods previously used and tested. This report also recommends a neutralization process to be used as part of the K Basins Sludge Treatment Project and identifies additional operations requiring further evaluation.

Klem, M.J.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

50

Analysis of sludge from K East basin floor and weasel pit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sludge samples from the floor of the Hanford K East Basin fuel storage pool have been retrieved and analyzed. Both chemical and physical properties have been determined. The results are to be used to determine the disposition of the bulk of the sludge and possibly assess the impact of residual sludge on dry storage of the associated intact metallic uranium fuel elements.

Makenas, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

51

Gas Generation Testing of Uranium Metal in Simulated K Basins Sludge and Grouted Sludge Waste Forms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The evolving plan for most of the KE and KW Basin sludges is disposition to WIPP as remote handled (RH) TRU. Because the hydrogen gas concentration in the sealed transportation cask destined for WIPP is limited by flammability safety, the number of containers and shipments to WIPP likely will be driven by the rate of hydrogen generated by the contained uranium metals reaction with water. Therefore, gas generation testing with uranium metal particles of known surface area and immobilized in candidate (grout) solidification matrices was used to identify the effectiveness of various candidate solidification matrices to inhibit the rate of the uranium metal-water reaction.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Bryan, Samuel A.

2004-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

52

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Basin Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Conduct of Operations program at the Office of River Protection, K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin

53

Design of a System to Retrieve Sludge from the K East Spent Fuel Basin at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the Sludge Retrieval System (SRS), which was designed to safely remove radioactive sludge from the K East spent fuel basin at the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. Basin water and sludge have the potential to leak to the environment due to the age and condition of the basins. Since the 100 K Area spent fuel basins are located next to the Columbia River, the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project mission includes the safe removal, containment, and transportation of sludge from the basins to a secure storage location. The scope of the SRS includes: (1) a system capable of retrieving sludge from the K East basin floor, pits, and fuel canisters; (2) separation of debris from sludge, where debris is defined as any material greater than 0.64 cm (0.25 in.) in diameter; (3) collection of sludge particles in a container that can be transported away from the basin; and (4) modifications to the K East basin to allow installation of the SRS. The SRS was designed by Fluor Federal Services. Changes to the designed system were made by Fluor Hanford as a result of full-scale testing performed after design. This paper discusses this testing, as well as operation and control of the system. Construction and startup testing was initially scheduled to be complete by the end of December 2002. Startup of the system is now expected in April 2003.

TWITCHELL, A.L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Vessel-Spanning Bubble Formation in K-Basin Sludge Stored in Large-Diameter Containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The K Basin sludge to be retrieved and stored in the large diameter containers (LDCs) contains some fraction of uranium metal that generates hydrogen gas, which introduces potential upset conditions. One postulated upset condition is a rising plug of sludge supported by a hydrogen bubble that is driven into the vent filters at the top of the container. In laboratory testing with actual K Basin sludge, vessel-spanning bubbles that lifted plugs of sludge were observed in 3-inch-diameter graduated cylinders. This report presents a series of analytical assessments performed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to address the potential for the generation of a vessel spanning bubble in the LDCs. The assessments included the development and evaluation of static and dynamic bubble formation models over the projected range of K Basin sludge physical properties. Additionally, the theory of circular plates was extrapolated to examine conditions under which a plug of sludge would collapse and release a spanning bubble.

Terrones, Guillermo; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Review, June 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1-06-17 1-06-17 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 06/13/2011 - 06/17/2011 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Result: During the period June 13-17, 2011, an HSS representative participated in tours of the STP test facility. The HSS representative was also briefed by the CHPRC STP Test Director and the DOE-Richland Operations Office principal support

56

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8-25 8-25 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 08/22/2011 - 08/25/2011 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Result: During the period August 22-25, 2011, an HSS representative attended the STP ECRTS Design Review, Value Engineering. The design review was attended by virtually all STP designated personnel, including managers and experts, representing

57

CONSOLIDATION OF K BASIN SLUDGE DATA AND EXPERIENCES ON AGGLOMERATE FORMATION  

SciTech Connect

The formation of high sludge strength agglomerates is a key concern to the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) to ensure the sludge can be retrieved after planned storage for up to 10 years in Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) at T Plant. This report addresses observations of agglomerate formation, conditions that the data shows lead to agglomeration, the frequency of agglomerate formation and postulated physiochemical mechanisms that may lead to agglomeration. Although the exact underlying chemistry of K Basin sludge agglomerate formation is not known, the factors that lead to agglomeration formation, based on observations, are as follows: (1) High Total Uranium Content (i.e., sample homogeneity and influence from other constituents); (2) Distribution of Uranium Phases (i.e., extent of conversion from uraninite to uranium oxide hydroxide compounds); (3) Sample Dry-out (loss of cover water); (4) Elevated temperature; (5) Solubility ofU(IV) phases vs. U(VI) phases; and (6) Long storage times. Agglomerated sludge has occurred infrequently and has only been observed in four laboratory samples, five samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (performed for 7 to 10 hours at {approx}185 C and 225 psig), and indirectly during six sampling events in the KE Basin. In the four laboratory samples where agglomerates were observed, the agglomerates exhibited high shear strength and the sample container typically had to be broken to remove the solids. The total uranium content (dry basis) for the four samples (KE Pit, KC-2/3 SS, KC-2/3 M250 and 96-13) were {approx}8 wt%, {approx}59.0 wt%, 68.3 wt% and 82 wt%. The agglomerates that were present during the six sampling events were undoubtedly disturbed and easily broken apart during sample collection, thus no agglomerates were observed in subsequent laboratory analyses. The highest shear strengths measured for K Basin sludge samples were obtained after hydrothermal treatment (7 to 10 hr at 185 C) of high-uranium-content KE canister sludge. The unconfined compressive strength of samples from this testing, measured by a pocket penetrometer, infers that their shear strength may be between 120 kPa and 170 kPa (PNNL-16496). These short-duration hydrothermal tests were conducted at temperatures much greater than the temperature of the T Plant canyon cells (-7 C to 33 C); however, the strength results provide an initial bounding target for sludge stored for many years, and an upper range for simulants (042910-53451-TP02 Rev 1). Sampling and characterization activities conducted in 2009 have measured the total uranium content and speciation for sludge stored in Engineered Containers SCS-CON-220, -240, -250, and -260 (PNNL-19035). Based on on-going testing that has measured the shear strength of uranium samples containing varying uranium (IV) to uranium (VI) ratios and the characterization of the Engineered Containers SCS-CON-220, -240, -250, and -260, it is unlikely that agglomerates will form on a large scale in this sludge. The highest measured total uranium concentration in the Engineered Container SCS-CON-220 sludge is 35.2 wt% and only 4 wt% to 6 wt% (dry) in Engineered Containers SCS-CON -240, -250, and -260. The uranium concentrations in Engineered Containers SCS-CON-220, -240, -250, and -260 sludge are below the threshold for agglomerate formation. Settler sludge however is estimated to contain {approx} 80 wt% (dry) total uranium, which could lead to the formation of high strength agglomerates depending on the relative concentrations of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds. One of the chief concerns of the STP is sludge dry-out. Samples archived in PNNL hot cells have been known to dry out and form hard clods of material, which are then difficult to reconstitute (HNF-6705). In 1996, all but one of the samples archived at the 222-S Laboratory dried out. These samples were composed of sludge collected from the KE Basin floor and Weasel Pit. However, in the STP's current design plans for sludge stored in STSCs at T Plant, there are provisions for continual water level observation and periodic

HILL SR

2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

58

CONSOLIDATION OF K BASIN SLUDGE DATA AND EXPERIENCES ON AGGLOMERATE FORMATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of high sludge strength agglomerates is a key concern to the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) to ensure the sludge can be retrieved after planned storage for up to 10 years in Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) at T Plant. This report addresses observations of agglomerate formation, conditions that the data shows lead to agglomeration, the frequency of agglomerate formation and postulated physiochemical mechanisms that may lead to agglomeration. Although the exact underlying chemistry of K Basin sludge agglomerate formation is not known, the factors that lead to agglomeration formation, based on observations, are as follows: (1) High Total Uranium Content (i.e., sample homogeneity and influence from other constituents); (2) Distribution of Uranium Phases (i.e., extent of conversion from uraninite to uranium oxide hydroxide compounds); (3) Sample Dry-out (loss of cover water); (4) Elevated temperature; (5) Solubility ofU(IV) phases vs. U(VI) phases; and (6) Long storage times. Agglomerated sludge has occurred infrequently and has only been observed in four laboratory samples, five samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (performed for 7 to 10 hours at {approx}185 C and 225 psig), and indirectly during six sampling events in the KE Basin. In the four laboratory samples where agglomerates were observed, the agglomerates exhibited high shear strength and the sample container typically had to be broken to remove the solids. The total uranium content (dry basis) for the four samples (KE Pit, KC-2/3 SS, KC-2/3 M250 and 96-13) were {approx}8 wt%, {approx}59.0 wt%, 68.3 wt% and 82 wt%. The agglomerates that were present during the six sampling events were undoubtedly disturbed and easily broken apart during sample collection, thus no agglomerates were observed in subsequent laboratory analyses. The highest shear strengths measured for K Basin sludge samples were obtained after hydrothermal treatment (7 to 10 hr at 185 C) of high-uranium-content KE canister sludge. The unconfined compressive strength of samples from this testing, measured by a pocket penetrometer, infers that their shear strength may be between 120 kPa and 170 kPa (PNNL-16496). These short-duration hydrothermal tests were conducted at temperatures much greater than the temperature of the T Plant canyon cells (-7 C to 33 C); however, the strength results provide an initial bounding target for sludge stored for many years, and an upper range for simulants (042910-53451-TP02 Rev 1). Sampling and characterization activities conducted in 2009 have measured the total uranium content and speciation for sludge stored in Engineered Containers SCS-CON-220, -240, -250, and -260 (PNNL-19035). Based on on-going testing that has measured the shear strength of uranium samples containing varying uranium (IV) to uranium (VI) ratios and the characterization of the Engineered Containers SCS-CON-220, -240, -250, and -260, it is unlikely that agglomerates will form on a large scale in this sludge. The highest measured total uranium concentration in the Engineered Container SCS-CON-220 sludge is 35.2 wt% and only 4 wt% to 6 wt% (dry) in Engineered Containers SCS-CON -240, -250, and -260. The uranium concentrations in Engineered Containers SCS-CON-220, -240, -250, and -260 sludge are below the threshold for agglomerate formation. Settler sludge however is estimated to contain {approx} 80 wt% (dry) total uranium, which could lead to the formation of high strength agglomerates depending on the relative concentrations of U(IV) and U(VI) compounds. One of the chief concerns of the STP is sludge dry-out. Samples archived in PNNL hot cells have been known to dry out and form hard clods of material, which are then difficult to reconstitute (HNF-6705). In 1996, all but one of the samples archived at the 222-S Laboratory dried out. These samples were composed of sludge collected from the KE Basin floor and Weasel Pit. However, in the STP's current design plans for sludge stored in STSCs at T Plant, there are provisions for continual water level observation and periodic

HILL SR

2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

59

Characterization of Compaction and Dryout Properties of KE Basin Sludge During Long-Term Storage  

SciTech Connect

The long-term behavior of Hanford Site K Basin sludge with respect to loss of supernatant water and solids compaction is important in designing sludge storage and handling systems. This report describes the results of laboratory tests performed to understand and predict K Basin sludge drying and compaction rates under extended (28-month) {approx}34 C hot cell storage. Tests were conducted with six K Basin sludge materials, a control sample of simulated K Basin sludge, and a control sample containing only K Basin supernatant liquid. All samples were held in graduated cylinders fitted with threaded plastic caps. Quantitative data were gathered on how the mass and volume of K Basin sludge, and its associated supernatant liquid, changed with respect to storage time. The tests showed that the K Basin sludge samples lost water unpredictably, depending on cap seal tightness, with projected dryout times for a 1-cm cover water depth ranging from 5 to 216 months. Though the ambient radiation field ({approx}5 Rad/hour) likely contributed to cap seal degradation, water evaporation rates were found to be independent of the contained material (water vs. sludge; radioactive vs. non-radioactive sludge). Although water was lost at variable rates from sludge samples during storage in the hot cell (and, presumably, in long-term containerized storage), the sludge itself had no intrinsic propensity to enhance or diminish the rate of water evaporation compared with that exhibited by water stored in the same environment. Most of the compaction of the six KE Basin sludges and the simulated sludge occurred in the first week. Subsequent compaction to 28-months time provided little additional increase in settled sludge density. Agitating the settled sludge likewise had little to no effect on the density. However, one tested sludge contained unreacted uranium metal that began to generate corrosion product hydrogen gas after 78 days of settling and strongly altered the apparent sludge density. T he lengthy induction time shows again that uranium metal-bearing sludge may lie quiescent for long periods, even at comparatively warm temperatures, before initiating gas generation. When the testing was completed, the sludge samples were removed from the graduated cylinders. Most sludge re-suspended readily but a canister sludge sample that had previously been allowed to dry out during storage self-cemented into a hard-cake monolith and could not be re-suspended. Settled sludge density and the concentrations of 154Eu, 241Am, and the plutonium isotopes were found to follow the dry basis uranium concentration in the sludge solids. These findings amplify observations made in prior characterization studies that showed that sludge density and radiolytic, fissile material, and TRU (primarily 241Am and 238,239,240Pu) concentrations are proportional to uranium concentration. The sludge pH, found to decrease from {approx}8 to {approx}5 with a dry basis uranium concentration increase from {approx}2.5 to 82 wt% , provides data useful in designing sludge storage and process equipment.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Poloski, Adam P.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

60

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT COST COMPARISON BETWEEN HYDRAULIC LOADING AND SMALL CANISTER LOADING CONCEPTS  

SciTech Connect

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is considering two different concepts for the retrieval, loading, transport and interim storage of the K Basin sludge. The two design concepts under consideration are: (1) Hydraulic Loading Concept - In the hydraulic loading concept, the sludge is retrieved from the Engineered Containers directly into the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) while located in the STS cask in the modified KW Basin Annex. The sludge is loaded via a series of transfer, settle, decant, and filtration return steps until the STSC sludge transportation limits are met. The STSC is then transported to T Plant and placed in storage arrays in the T Plant canyon cells for interim storage. (2) Small Canister Concept - In the small canister concept, the sludge is transferred from the Engineered Containers (ECs) into a settling vessel. After settling and decanting, the sludge is loaded underwater into small canisters. The small canisters are then transferred to the existing Fuel Transport System (FTS) where they are loaded underwater into the FTS Shielded Transfer Cask (STC). The STC is raised from the basin and placed into the Cask Transfer Overpack (CTO), loaded onto the trailer in the KW Basin Annex for transport to T Plant. At T Plant, the CTO is removed from the transport trailer and placed on the canyon deck. The CTO and STC are opened and the small canisters are removed using the canyon crane and placed into an STSC. The STSC is closed, and placed in storage arrays in the T Plant canyon cells for interim storage. The purpose of the cost estimate is to provide a comparison of the two concepts described.

GEUTHER J; CONRAD EA; RHOADARMER D

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ALTERNATIVES ANALYSIS SUMMARY REPORT [VOLUME 1  

SciTech Connect

Highly radioactive sludge (containing up to 300,000 curies of actinides and fission products) resulting from the storage of degraded spent nuclear fuel is currently stored in temporary containers located in the 105-K West storage basin near the Columbia River. The background, history, and known characteristics of this sludge are discussed in Section 2 of this report. There are many compelling reasons to remove this sludge from the K-Basin. These reasons are discussed in detail in Section1, and they include the following: (1) Reduce the risk to the public (from a potential release of highly radioactive material as fine respirable particles by airborne or waterborn pathways); (2) Reduce the risk overall to the Hanford worker; and (3) Reduce the risk to the environment (the K-Basin is situated above a hazardous chemical contaminant plume and hinders remediation of the plume until the sludge is removed). The DOE-RL has stated that a key DOE objective is to remove the sludge from the K-West Basin and River Corridor as soon as possible, which will reduce risks to the environment, allow for remediation of contaminated areas underlying the basins, and support closure of the 100-KR-4 operable unit. The environmental and nuclear safety risks associated with this sludge have resulted in multiple legal and regulatory remedial action decisions, plans,and commitments that are summarized in Table ES-1 and discussed in more detail in Volume 2, Section 9.

FREDERICKSON JR; ROURK RJ; HONEYMAN JO; JOHNSON ME; RAYMOND RE

2009-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

62

Operational Awareness Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 11172010 - 04072011 Report Preparer: Jake...

63

Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project, February 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 02272012 - 03012012 Report Preparer: Jake...

64

TCLP Preparation and Analysis of K East Basin Composite Sludge Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains results from TCLP preparation and analysis of K East Basin floor and canister composite sludge samples. Analyses were performed in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (PNNL, 325 Building).

Silvers, Kurt L.

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

65

Segregation of Uranium Metal from K Basin Sludge: Results from Vendor Testing  

SciTech Connect

Under contract to Fluor Hanford, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory directed laboratory, bench-scale, and pilot-scale vendor testing to evaluate the use of commercial gravity mineral concentration technology to remove and concentrate uranium metal from Hanford K Basin sludge. Uranium metal in the sludge corrodes by reacting with water to generate heat and hydrogen gas, and may constrain shipment and disposal of the sludge to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as remote-handled transuranic waste. Separating uranium metal from the K Basin sludge is expected to be similar to some gold recovery operations. Consequently, the capabilities of commercial gravity mineral concentration technologies were assessed for their applicability to K Basin sludge streams. Overall, the vendor testing demonstrated the technical feasibility of using gravity concentration equipment to separate the K Basin sludge into a high-volume uranium metal-depleted stream and a low-volume uranium metal-rich stream. I n test systems, more than 96% of the uranium metal surrogate was concentrated into 10 to 30% of the sludge mass (7 to 24% of the sludge volume). With more prototypical equipment and stream recycle, higher recoveries may be achieved.

Schmidt, Andrew J.; Elmore, Monte R.; Delegard, Calvin H.

2004-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

66

Sludge recycle and reuse in acid mine drainage treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutralization of acid mine drainage produces vast quantities of iron-rich sludge, and large quantities of unused lime remain in the sludge after treatment. In a study in which sludge was recycled to increase lime utilization, sludge was mixed with raw acid mine drainage and settled out in an intermediate clarifier. The clarifier supernatant was then treated by lime addition, aeration and sedimentation. The low-pH sludge was withdrawn from the intermediate clarifier. The iron was recovered by acidification and used as wastewater coagulant. The recycle scheme resulted in a 30% decrease in lime requirements, and the resultant coagulant performed well when compared with stock iron coagulant solutions.

Keefer, G.B.; Sack, W.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Criticality safety evaluation of disposing of K Basin sludge in double-shell tank AW-105  

SciTech Connect

A criticality safety evaluation is made of the disposal of K Basin sludge in double-shell tank (DST) AW-105 located in the 200 east area of Hanford Site. The technical basis is provided for limits and controls to be used in the development of a criticality prevention specification (CPS). A model of K Basin sludge is developed to account for fuel burnup. The iron/uranium mass ration required to ensure an acceptable magrin of subcriticality is determined.

ROGERS, C.A.

1999-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

68

Final Report - Gas Generation Testing of Uranium Metal in Simulated K Basin Sludge and in Grouted Sludge Waste Forms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is being considered for the disposal of K Basin sludge as RH-TRU. Because the hydrogen gas concentration in the 55-gallon RH-TRU sealed drums to be transported to WIPP is limited by flammability safety, the number of containers and shipments likely will be driven by the rate of hydrogen generated by the uranium metal-water reaction (U + 2 H{sub 2}O {yields} UO{sub 2} + 2 H{sub 2}) in combination with the hydrogen generated from water and organic radiolysis. Gas generation testing was conducted with uranium metal particles of known surface area, in simulated K West (KW) Basin canister sludge and immobilized in candidate grout solidification matrices. This study evaluated potential for Portland cement and magnesium phosphate grouts to inhibit the reaction of water with uranium metal in the sludge and thereby permit higher sludge loading to the disposed waste form. The best of the grouted waste forms decreased the uranium metal-water reaction by a factor of four.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Gano, Sue; Thornton, Brenda M.

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

69

Study of radionuclide leaching from the residues of K Basin sludge dissolution  

SciTech Connect

The sludges remaining in the K Basins after removal of the spent N Reactor nuclear fuel will be conditioned for disposal. After conditioning, an acid-insoluble residue will remain that may require further leaching to properly condition it for disposal. This document presents a literature study to identify and recommend one or more chemical leaching treatments for laboratory testing, based on the likely compositions of the residues. The processes identified are a nitric acid cerate leach, a silver-catalyzed persulfate leach, a nitric hydrofluoric acid leach, an oxalic citric acid reactor decontamination leach, a nitric hydrochloric acid leach, a ammonium fluoride nitrate leach, and a HEOPA formate dehydesulfoxylate leach. All processes except the last two are recommended for testing in that order.

Bechtold, D.B.

1998-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

70

Plan for characterization of K Basin spent nuclear fuel and sludge  

SciTech Connect

This plan outlines a characterization program that supports the accelerated Path Forward scope and schedules for the Spent Nuclear Fuel stored in the Hanford K Basins. This plan is driven by the schedule to begin fuel transfer by December 1997. The program is structured for 4 years and is limited to in-situ and laboratory examinations of the spent nuclear fuel and sludge in the K East and K West Basins. The program provides bounding behavior of the fuel, and verification and acceptability for three different sludge disposal pathways. Fuel examinations are based on two shipping campaigns for the K West Basin and one from the K East Basin. Laboratory examinations include physical condition, hydride and oxide content, conditioning testing, and dry storage behavior.

Lawrence, L.A.; Marschman, S.C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Safety-Basis Thermal Analysis for KE Basin Sludge Transport and Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of safety-basis thermal and gas generation analyses were completed and independently reviewed to assess the thermal performance of a large diameter container (LDC) containing KE Basin sludge. The results demonstrate: (1) the sludge transport system (STS) containing a LDC can safely transport a KE basin sludge payload up to 2.0 m{sup 3} and, (2) large diameter containers with sludge payloads up to 2.0 m{sup 3} can be safely stored in a process cell at T Plant. The transport and storage analyses are based on a conservative set of assumptions, including limiting environmental conditions. Conclusions drawn from the transport and storage results were not impacted by changes in the radial gap between the cask and LDC, purge gas (i.e., either helium or nitrogen), sludge porosity, or thermal conductivity. The design of the transport cask and large diameter container can accommodate reasonable changes in these values. Both transport from KE Basin and long-term storage at T Plant are addressed for sludge payloads up to 2.0 m{sup 3}. Additional analyses determined the expected range of T Plant environmental temperatures, the hydrogen and oxygen generation rate due to the radiolysis of water, and the maximum hydrogen concentration within a process cell due to chemical reactions and the radiolysis of water. All sludge temperature and hydrogen concentration criteria for transport and storage are met. The analyses assumed a safety-basis sludge mixture defined as 60% by volume floor and 40% by volume canister sludge with 35% retained gas, and a conservative segregated (axial) distribution of metallic uranium (resulting from particulate settling) with associated safety-basis properties. The analyses recognized that the retrieval process would produce non-uniform sludge distributions. Four batch process loadings of 0.5m{sup 3} each are assumed. Each process batch loading will settle and segregate (separate) into two layers: an active layer containing all the metallic uranium which is chemically active, and a non-active layer containing uranium oxide, non-uranium material, and no metallic uranium. This is a conservative representation of operational controls designed to limit the metallic uranium concentration. The sludge layers are assumed to remain intact during transport and storage.

HEARD, F.J.; SATHYANARAYANA, J.J.

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

72

Management Of Hanford KW Basin Knockout Pot Sludge As Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) and AREVA Federal Services, LLC (AFS) have been working collaboratively to develop and deploy technologies to remove, transport, and interim store remote-handled sludge from the 10S-K West Reactor Fuel Storage Basin on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, WA, USA. Two disposal paths exist for the different types of sludge found in the K West (KW) Basin. One path is to be managed as Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) with eventual disposal at an SNF at a yet to be licensed repository. The second path will be disposed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, NM. This paper describes the systems developed and executed by the Knockout Pot (KOP) Disposition Subproject for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as SNF, (i.e., KOP material).

Raymond, R. E. [CH2M HIll Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Evans, K. M. [AREVA, Avignon (France)

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

73

TCLP Preparation and Analysis of K East Basin Composite Sludge Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sludge samples from the Hanford K East Basin were analyzed by the Toxicity Characterization Leaching Procedure (TCLP) to assist in the appropriate Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCIL4) designation of this material. Sludge samples were collected by Fluor Hanford, Inc. using the consolidated sludge sampling system (system that allows collection of a single sample from multiple sample locations). These samples were shipped to the Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL, 327 Building) and then transferred to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL, 325 Building) for recovery and testing. Two sludge composites were prepared, using the consolidated sludge samples, to represent K East canister sludge (sample KC Can Comp) and K East floor sludge (sample KC Floor Comp). Each composite was extracted in duplicate and analyzed in duplicate following pre-approved(a) TCLP extraction and analyses procedures. In addition, these samples and duplicates were analyzed for total RCRA metals (via acid digestion preparation). The work was conducted in accordance with the requirements of the Hanford Analytical Quality Assurance Requirements Document (HASQARD). A PNNL Quality Assurance Program compliant with J HASQARD was implemented for this effort. The results from the TCLP analyses showed that all RCRA metal concentrations were less than the TCLP limits for both the canister and floor composite samples and their respective duplicates.

KL Silvers; JJ Wagner; RT Steele

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from the sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. The proposed testing builds on the approach and laboratory test findings for both K Basin sludge and simulated sludge garnered during prior testing from September 2006 to March 2007. The outlined testing in this plan is designed to yield further understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions, the effects of compositional and process variations and the effectiveness of various strategies to mitigate the observed high shear strength phenomenon observed during the prior testing. These tests are designed to provide process validation and refinement vs. process development and design input. The expected outcome is to establish a level of understanding of the chemistry such that successful operating strategies and parameters can be implemented within the confines of the existing STP corrosion vessel design. In July 2007, the DOE provided direction to FH regarding significant changes to the scope of the overall STP. As a result of the changes, FH directed PNNL to stop work on most of the planned activities covered in this test plan. Therefore, it is unlikely the testing described here will be performed. However, to preserve the test strategy and details developed to date, the test plan has been published.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Poloski, Adam P.

2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

75

K Basins floor sludge retrieval system knockout pot basket fuel burn accident  

SciTech Connect

The K Basins Sludge Retrieval System Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report (HNF-2676) identified and categorized a series of potential accidents associated with K Basins Sludge Retrieval System design and operation. The fuel burn accident was of concern with respect to the potential release of contamination resulting from a runaway chemical reaction of the uranium fuel in a knockout pot basket suspended in the air. The unmitigated radiological dose to an offsite receptor from this fuel burn accident is calculated to be much less than the offsite risk evaluation guidelines for anticipated events. However, because of potential radiation exposure to the facility worker, this accident is precluded with a safety significant lifting device that will prevent the monorail hoist from lifting the knockout pot basket out of the K Basin water pool.

HUNT, J.W.

1998-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

76

Assessment of Jet Erosion for Potential Post-Retrieval K-Basin Settled Sludge  

SciTech Connect

Packaged K-Basin sludge will be transported to the T Plant on the Hanford Site where it will be interim stored. The sludge will be retrieved from the storage containers and processed for disposal. A sample of high uranium content canister sludge, designated 96-13, "self-cemented" during laboratory storage. This sample was uncharacteristically strong compared to expected K-Basin material. The purpose for this work is to evaluate the potential retrieval of such sludge after storage at the T Plant via jet erosion. The specific objectives of this report are to determine the modes of erosion and the methods used to measure/assess the erodibility parameters of sludge and identify those parameters applicable to jet erosion. The erodibility parameters of sample 96-13 are characterized to the extent possible. These objectives have been met based on literature review, past experience at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and observation of sample 96-13 video during hot-cell activities.

Wells, Beric E.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Peterson, Reid A.

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

77

Acid-sludge characterization and remediation improve well productivity and save costs in the Permian Basin  

SciTech Connect

Many oil wells in the Permian Basin have reported sludging problems associated with acid stimulations. The acid sludge is similar among wells and was identified as a viscous emulsion stabilized by asphaltene-rich organic solids. The sludging tendency of the oil increased with the concentrations of asphaltenes and resins, base number of the oil, and ferric ion content in the acid. Only three out of nine commercial acid systems tested were effective in preventing acid-sludge formation; they all use the same novel iron control technology, i.e., catalytic reduction of ferric ions. Several commercial and generic solvent systems were effective in dissolving acid sludge, including mixtures of an aromatic solvent (e.g., xylene) with either isopropyl alcohol (2:1 volume ratio), or ethylene glycol-monobutylether (EGMBE) (2:1 to 3:1 volume ratios). Selection of acid formulations and solvent systems was based on cost effectiveness and operation safety. Field implementation proved successful. If the results of this study had been implemented earlier in the lives of some of the Permian Basin properties, the recovery of 574 BOPD of lost or deferred production from 99 wells could have been realized. This would have resulted in an estimated increased revenue of over US $3 million in 1 year.

Wong, T.C. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., Houston, TX (United States); Hwang, R.J.; Beaty, D.W. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States); Dolan, J.D.; McCarty, R.A.; Franzen, A.L. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., Midland, TX (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Physical Behavior of Uranium Metal Bearing Hanford K East Basin Sludge Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Uranium-metal-bearing sludge from the Hanford's K-East (KE) Basin is to be retrieved, loaded into large-diameter containers, and moved to interim storage in a dry cell at T Plant on the Hanford site. Physical behavior of this sludge during loading and subsequent storage in large-diameter containers is of interest to design and safety because oxidation of its uranium generates power and hydrogen gas, with resulting implications for flammability of the container and cell headspaces, potential retention of gas in the settled sludge and subsequent expansion of the sludge material in the large-diameter container, and the potential for local temperature escalation. Key aspects of experimental work and model development necessary to support a robust technical basis for design and safety analyses are reported here: (1) Experimental data supporting the distribution of uranium metal in the large-diameter container, (2) Experimental data defining sludge thermal conductivity and shear strength (or yield stress), and (3) Experimental data and models demonstrating sludge plug movement, breakup, and limited atomization caused by internal gas generation.

DUNCAN, D.R.

2003-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

79

Settling Test Using Simulants to Evaluate Uranium Metal Distribution in K Basin Sludge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a large-scale settling test conducted with a K Basin sludge simulant that included metallic tungsten/cobalt (W/Co) fragments (density {approx}14.5 g/cm3) as a surrogate for uranium metal (density 19 g/cm3). The objective of the testing was to gain insight into how uranium metal is likely to be distributed within the K Basin sludge loaded into the large-diameter containers (LDCs) that will be used for storage at T Plant. In the LDCs, uranium metal will react with water and generate heat and hydrogen gas. During loading, transportation, and storage operations, the uranium metal distribution in the LDCs will have an impact on the thermal stability. Approximately 50 m3 of K Basin sludge have accumulated during the storage of more than 2100 metric tons of N Reactor fuel elements in two water-filled concrete pools (K East and K West Basins) in the 100K Area of the Hanford Site.

Schmidt, Andrew J.; Elmore, Monte R.

2002-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

80

Thermal & Chemical Behavior of Uranium Metal Bearing Hanford K East Basin Sludge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Uranium-metal-bearing sludge from the Hanford site K East Basin is to be loaded into containers and moved to interim storage in a dry cell at T Plant on the Hanford site. Thermal and chemical behavior of this sludge in its storage container are of interest to design and safety, because oxidation of its uranium generates power and hydrogen gas, with resulting implications for flammability of the container and cell headspaces, and the potential for local temperature escalation. Key aspects of experimental work and model development necessary to support the technical basis for design and safety analyses are reported here: (1) Experimental data supporting the oxidation rate law, including reactive surface area depletion, (2) Experimental data defining the maximum allowable heat generation rate in wet sludge, the so-called dryout heat flux, and (3) Integral modeling of physical and chemical processes to predict temperature and hydrogen concentration histories during loading, shipping, handling, and storage.

DUNCAN, D.R.

2003-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal corrosion rates in water alone and in simulated sludge were near or slightly below the metal-in-water rate while nitrate-free sludge/Aquaset II decreased rates by about a factor of 3. Addition of 1 M nitrate to simulated sludge decreased the corrosion rate by a factor of ~5 while 1 M nitrate in sludge/Aquaset II mixtures decreased the corrosion rate by ~2.5 compared with the nitrate-free analogues. Mixtures of simulated sludge with Aquaset II treated with 1 M nitrate had uranium corrosion rates about a factor of 8 to 10 lower than the water-only rate law. Nitrate was found to provide substantial hydrogen mitigation for immobilized simulant sludge waste forms containing Aquaset II or Aquaset II G clay. Hydrogen attenuation factors of 1000 or greater were determined at 60°C for sludge-clay mixtures at 1 M nitrate. Hydrogen mitigation for tests with PC and Aquaset II H (which contains PC) were inconclusive because of suspected failure to overcome induction times and fully enter into anoxic corrosion. Lessening of hydrogen attenuation at ~80°C and ~95°C for simulated sludge and Aquaset II was observed with attenuation factors around 100 to 200 at 1 M nitrate. Valuable additional information has been obtained on the ability of nitrate to attenuate hydrogen gas generation from solution, simulant K Basin sludge, and simulant sludge with immobilization agents. Details on characteristics of the associated reactions were also obtained. The present testing confirms prior work which indicates that nitrate is an effective agent to attenuate hydrogen from uranium metal corrosion in water and simulated K Basin sludge to show that it is also effective in potential candidate solidified K Basin waste forms for WIPP disposal. The hydrogen mitigation afforded by nitrate appears to be sufficient to meet the hydrogen generation limits for shipping various sludge waste streams based on uranium metal concentrations and assumed waste form loadings.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

82

Technical Issues and Characterization for Fuel and Sludge in Hanford K Basins  

SciTech Connect

Technical Issues for the interim dry storage of N Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) are discussed. Characterization data from fuel, to support resolution of these issues, are reviewed and new results for the oxidation of fuel in a moist atmosphere and the drying of whole fuel elements are presented. Characterization of associated K basin sludge is also discussed in light of a newly adopted disposal pathway.

MAKENAS, B.J.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Estimated Maximum Gas Retention from Uniformly Dispersed Bubbles in K Basin Sludge Stored in Large-Diameter Containers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This letter report addresses the KE Basin sludge that will be retrieved and stored in large-diameter containers (LDCs.) A fraction of the hydrogen gas bubbles generated from the corrosion of uranium metal and oxides may be retained within the sludge matrix. Those entrapped bubbles will expand the sludge bed volume and, therefore, will affect how much sludge can be loaded into a container. The entrapped gas bubbles will also impact the overall thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the sludge bed. The evaluation summarized here was performed to estimate the maximum gas holdup (volume fraction gas) that could occur sludge stored in large-diameter containers, assuming uniform gas generation (i.e., uniform distribution of metallic uranium particles). This report represents an evaluation of the retention of uniformly distributed bubbles and an estimate of the maximum gas fraction that might be retained in K Basin LDCs based on existing literature data on bubble retention and Basin sludge characterization data. Existing data show that the maximum gas fraction varies, depending on physical properties and the configuration of the material or waste.

Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Terrones, Guillermo

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project, February 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-RL-2012-02-27 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 02/27/2012 - 03/01/2012 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Result: During the period February 27 - March 1, 2012, an HSS representative attended the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

85

Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project, February 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HSS Independent Activity Report - Rev. 0 Report Number: HIAR-RL-2012-02-27 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 02/27/2012 - 03/01/2012 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Result: During the period February 27 - March 1, 2012, an HSS representative attended the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

86

The Reactive Light Yellow Dye Wastewater Treatment by Sewage Sludge-Based Activated Carbon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper is aim to discuss the dye wastewater treatment by sewage sludge-based adsorbent. The adsorbent derived from sewage sludge, which produced through phosphoric acid-microwave method, and commercia activated carbon (ACC) were tested in the process ... Keywords: Sewage Sludge-based Activated Carbon (ACSS), the Reactive Light Yellow, Dye Wastewater, Adsorption

Yang Lijun; Dai Qunwei

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Sludge Treatment and Extraction Technology Development: Results of FY 1993 studies  

SciTech Connect

This report describes experimental results from work conducted in FY 1993 under the Sludge Treatment and Extraction Technology Development Task of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Technology Development Project at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Experiments were conducted in the following six general areas: (1) sludge washing, (2) sludge leaching, (3) sludge dissolution, (4) actinide separation by solvent extraction and extraction chromatography, (5) Sr separation by solvent extraction, and (6) extraction of Cs from acidic solution.

Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Barrington, R.J.; Rapko, B.M.; Carlson, C.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

LESSONS LEARNED FROM CLEANING OUT THE SLUDGE FROM THE SPENT FUEL STORAGE BASINS AT HANFORD ICEM-07  

SciTech Connect

Until 2004, the K Basins at Hanford, in southeastern Washington State, held the largest collection of spent nuclear fuel in the United States Department of Energy (DOE) complex. The K East and K West Basins are massive pools each holding more than 4 million liters of water - that sit less than 450 meters from the Columbia River. In a significant multi-year campaign that ended in 2004, Fluor Hanford removed all of the fuel from the two Basins, over 2,300 metric tons (4.6 million pounds), dried it, and then placed it into dry storage in a specially designed facility away from the River. Removing the fuel, however, did not finish the cleanup work at the K Basins. The years of underwater storage had corroded the metallic uranium fuel, leaving behind a thick and sometimes hard-packed layer of sludge that coated the walls, floors and equipment inside the Basins. In places, the depth of the sludge was measured in feet rather than inches, and its composition was definitely not uniform. Together the Basins held an estimated 50 cubic meters of sludge (42 cubic meters in K East and 8 cubic meters in K West). The K East sludge retrieval and transfer work was completed in May 2007. Vacuuming up the sludge into large underwater containers in each of the Basins and then consolidating it all in containers in the K West Basin have presented significant challenges, some unexpected. This paper documents some of those challenges and presents the lessons learned so that other nuclear cleanup projects can benefit from the experience at Hanford.

KNOLLMEYER PM

2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Properties and potential uses of water treatment sludge from the Neches River of southeast Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land application of water treatment plant (WTP) sludge has been an unsolved problem. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate characteristics of organic polymer sludge, and (2) to determine the effects of the sludge on soil properties that influence utilization of the sludge as a soil amendment. Water treatment sludges were obtained from water utilities along the Neches Rivet-near Beaumont, Texas. They were mostly coagulated with organic polymers. Mineralogical composition, cation exchange capacity (CEC), scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), aggregate stability, Atterberg limits, hydraulic conductivity, dispersion, crust strength, adsorption characteristics, nitrogen content and mineralization potential of the sludge or sludge-amended soil were determined in this study. Mineralogical composition of organic polymer sludge was similar to local Beaumont clay soil. The major fraction of the sludge, the coarse clay, was estimated to be 40% kaolinite, 32% smectite, 20% quartz and 8% mica. However, XRD patterns of the sludge indicated that expansion of the smectite was inhibited by organic polymer coagulant added during water clarification, which also was confirmed by aggregate stability of the sludge. Cation exchange capacity of the bulk sludge samples ranged from 8 to 28 cmol kg-1. Quantitative mineralogical analyses showed that CEC of the sludge was reduced by blockage of cation exchange sites with organic polymers. SEM and TEM results indicated that the sludge was mostly fine aggregates of clay particles. Dried sludge aggregates were not prone to swell, due to their resistance to rewetting. The aggregate stability of dried sludge was above 90% after a 24 hours soaking period in water, compared to 7% aggregate stability of local Beaumont clay soil. Addition of 0 to 10% sludge to Boonville sandy loam soil increased the aggregate stability of the soil from 4 to 13%. Atterberg limit showed that wet sludge had wide ranges of moisture contents in semi-solid and plastic states, and shrunk greatly during drying. Shrinkage limit of the sludges ranged from 16 to 66%; plastic limit from 111 to 138%; and liquid limit from 208 to 320%, which suggested that the sludge was highly plastic and compressible. Addition of 0 to 10% sludge into Boonville sandy loam soil increased the infiltration rate of the soil two orders of magnitudes from 1.4 x 10-4 to 1. I X 10-2 CM / S, and reduced the dispersion of the soil significantly. Moreover, addition of from 0 to 10% sludge into Boonville sandy loam soil greatly reduced the crusting produced by rainfall, and the penetration resistance of the crust decreased from 53.1 to 14.4 kg / cm. Metal adsorbing ability of the Boonville sandy loam soil was reduced by addition of the sludge. Adsorption of Zn+2 decreased from 19.7 to 17.7 ug / g when the sludge was amended from 0 to 10%. Total nitrogen and exchangeable ammonium nitrogen (NH4+) contents of the sludge were four times and twenty times as high, respectively, as those of local Beaumont clay and Lake Charles clay soils. Organic polymer coagulants added during water treatment apparently increased nitrogen content of the sludge. Although the sludge contained considerable total nitrogen, incubation experiment of sludge-amended Beaumont clay or Lake Charles clay soil showed that nitrogen mineralization rate was not affected by the sludge addition. This study indicated that the sludge can improve soil physical properties significantly, e.g. soil aggregation, infiltration, dispersion and crusting. The low nitrogen mineralization rate of the sludge showed that the sludge had little fertility and would not produce a groundwater contamination problem.

Kan, Weiqun

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Operational readiness review implementation plan for K Basin sludge water system  

SciTech Connect

This Implementation Plan (IP) has been prepared consistent with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 425.1B, ''Startup and Restart of Nuclear Facilities'', and DOE-STD-3006-2000, ''Planning and Conduct of Operational Readiness Reviews'' (ORR) (DOE 2002). The scope of the DOE ORR is described in the RL ''Plan of Action, K Basin Sludge Water System'' (Veitenheimer 2003), prepared by DOE project line management and approved by the RL Manager, the designated Approval Authority, on March 20, 2003. The scope of the contractor ORR is described in the contractor ''Plan of Action for the K Basins Sludge Water System Operational Readiness Review'' (FH 2002a) which was prepared by Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project line management and approved by the DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) Manager on December 19, 2002. DOE Order 425.1B indicates that the Secretarial Officer is the Authorization Authority when substantial modifications are made to a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility. This Authorization Authority has been delegated to the RL Manager by memorandum from Jessie Hill Roberson, dated February 5, 2003 (Roberson 2003). This IP provides the overall approach and guidelines for performance of the DOE ORR. Appendix A contains the Criteria and Review Approach Documents (CRAD), which define the review objectives and criteria as well as the approach for assessing each objective. ORR results will be published in a final report, as discussed in Section 9.4.

IRWIN, R.M.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

LESSONS LEARNED IN OPERATING THE HOSE-IN-HOSE SYSTEM FOR TRANSFSERRING SLUDGE AT HANFORDS K-BASINS  

SciTech Connect

In May 2007, the Department of Energy and the Fluor Hanford K Basin Closure Project completed transferring sludge from the K East Basin to new containers in the K West Basin using a Hose-in-Hose system. This project presented a number of complex and unique technical, operational, and management challenges that had to be resolved to complete the required transfers and satisfy project milestones. The project team (including DOE; regulators; and Fluor management, operations, maintenance, engineering and all other support organizations) found innovative solutions to each challenge. This paper records lessons learned during the operational phase of the sludge transfer via the Hose-In-Hose system. The subject is limited to the operational phase and does not cover design, development, testing or turnover. A discussion of the situation or problem encountered is provided, along with the lesson learned as applicable to a future program or project.

PERES MW

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

Liquidization of dewatered organic sludge and anaerobic treatment  

SciTech Connect

Dewatered sewage sludge was thermochemically liquidized at 175 {degrees}C and the liquidized sludge was separated by centrifugation to 58% (w/w) supernatant and 42% precipitate. The amount of proteins in the liquidized sludge slightly decreased through the liquidization process, however, that of lipids increased. The supernatant separated from the sludge liquidized with dewatered sewage sludge was successfully anaerobically digested. Biogas yield from the supernatant from dewatered sewage sludge at organic loading concentrations of 1.9-2.2 g VS/l during 9 days incubation was 440 ml/g-added VS and digestion ratio was 66% (w/w). Biogas yield in the case of dewatered sewage sludge was 257 ml/g-added VS and digestion ratio was 45%. Similar results were obtained in the case of the anaerobically digested with sewage sludge and dewatered sludge. Anaerobic digestion of the supernatants from the liquidized sludges resulted in high biogas productivity and high digestion ratio compared with these of the original sludges. Moreover, the precipitates contained lower moisture, therefore, they can be incinerated easier than the respective original sludges.

Sawayama, Shigeki; Inoue, Seiichi; Ogi, Tomoko [National Institute for Resources and Environment, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Proiject, September 17-28, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3-09-18 3-09-18 Site: DOE Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 09/17/2013 - 09/18/2013 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed an operational awareness review of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during this site visit. An HSS representative attended the Hanford K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Independent Project Review (IPR). Result: The purpose of the IPR was to validate the adequacy of preparations to execute construction and provide recommendations

94

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT ENGINEERED CONTAINER RETRIEVAL AND TRANSFER SYSTEM PRELIMINARY DESIGN HAZARD ANALYSIS SUPPLEMENT 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 'What/If' Hazards Analysis addresses hazards affecting the Sludge Treatment Project Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) NPH and external events at the preliminary design stage. In addition, the hazards of the operation sequence steps for the mechanical handling operations in preparation of Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC), disconnect STSC and prepare STSC and Sludge Transport System (STS) for shipping are addressed.

FRANZ GR; MEICHLE RH

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

95

Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen generation by no more than a factor of three while disodium phosphate increased the corrosion and hydrogen generation rates slightly. U(VI) showed some promise in attenuating hydrogen but only initial testing was completed. Uranium metal corrosion rates also were measured. Under many conditions showing high hydrogen gas attenuation, uranium metal continued to corrode at rates approaching those observed without additives. This combination of high hydrogen attenuation with relatively unabated uranium metal corrosion is significant as it provides a means to eliminate uranium metal by its corrosion in water without the accompanying hazards otherwise presented by hydrogen generation.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

96

Federal involvement in: municipal wastewater treatment plant sludge energy recovery and conservation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of a study concerning federal involvement in municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP) sludge energy recovery and conservation. The objectives of the study were to: determine and report the major agency programs and related MWWTP sludge energy recovery and conservation projects; determine and summarize the coordination efforts between federal agencies involved in MWWTP sludge; and recommend future U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) involvement in MWWTP sludge energy recovery and conservation projects. Specific federal agencies designated for surveying include ERDA, EPA, USDA, Bureau of Mines, National Science Foundation, and National Commission on Water Quality. Past (post-1966), present, and planned federal involvement in MWWTP sludge energy recovery and conservation, research and development, demonstration, and study projects were considered.

None

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Thermal sludge dryer demonstration: Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant, Buffalo, NY. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Buffalo Sewer Authority (BSA), in cooperation with the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (Energy Authority), commissioned a demonstration of a full scale indirect disk-type sludge dryer at the Bird Island Wastewater Treatment Plant (BIWWTP). The purpose of the project was to determine the effects of the sludge dryer on the sludge incineration process at the facility. Sludge incineration is traditionally the most expensive, energy-intensive unit process involving solids handling at wastewater treatment plants; costs for incineration at the BIWWTP have averaged $2.4 million per year. In the conventional method of processing solids, a series of volume reduction measures, which usually includes thickening, digestion, and mechanical dewatering, is employed prior to incineration. Usually, a high level of moisture is still present within sewage sludge following mechanical dewatering. The sludge dryer system thermally dewaters wastewater sludge to approximately 26%, (and as high as 38%) dry solids content prior to incineration. The thermal dewatering system at the BIWWTP has demonstrated that it meets its design requirements. It has the potential to provide significant energy and other cost savings by allowing the BSA to change from an operation employing two incinerators to a single incinerator mode. While the long-term reliability of the thermal dewatering system has yet to be established, this project has demonstrated that installation of such a system in an existing treatment plant can provide the owner with significant operating cost savings.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Anaerobic treatment of sludge from a nitrification-denitrification landfill leachate plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The viability of anaerobic digestion of sludge from a MSW landfill leachate treatment plant, with COD values ranging between 15,000 and 19,400 mg O{sub 2} dm{sup -3}, in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor was studied. The reactor employed had a useful capacity of 9 l, operating at mesophilic temperature. Start-up of the reactor was carried out in different steps, beginning with diluted sludge and progressively increasing the amount of sludge fed into the reactor. The study was carried out over a period of 7 months. Different amounts of methanol were added to the feed, ranging between 6.75 and 1 cm{sup 3} dm{sup -3} of feed in order to favour the growth of methanogenic flora. The achieved biodegradation of the sludge using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket Reactor was very high for an HRT of 9 days, obtaining decreases in COD of 84-87% by the end of the process. Purging of the digested sludge represented {approx}16% of the volume of the treated sludge.

Maranon, E. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain)]. E-mail: emara@uniovi.es; Castrillon, L. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain); Fernandez, Y. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department, Higher Polytechnic School of Engineering, University of Oviedo, Campus of Viesques, 33204 Gijon (Spain); Fernandez, E. [COGERSA, 33697 Serin, Gijon (Spain)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

K-Basin sludge treatment facility pump test report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests of a disc pump and a dual diaphragm pump are stymied by pumping a metal laden fluid. Auxiliary systems added to a diaphragm pump might enable the transfer of such fluids, but the additional system complexity is not desirable for remotely operated and maintained systems.

SQUIER, D.M.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

100

TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF SYSTEMS FOR THE RETRIEVAL AND PROCESSING OF REMOTE-HANDLED SLUDGE FROM HANFORD K-WEST FUEL STORAGE BASIN  

SciTech Connect

In 2011, significant progress was made in developing and deploying technologies to remove, transport, and interim store remote-handled sludge from the 105-K West Fuel Storage Basin on the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. The sludge in the 105-K West Basin is an accumulation of degraded spent nuclear fuel and other debris that collected during long-term underwater storage of the spent fuel. In 2010, an innovative, remotely operated retrieval system was used to successfully retrieve over 99.7% of the radioactive sludge from 10 submerged temporary storage containers in the K West Basin. In 2011, a full-scale prototype facility was completed for use in technology development, design qualification testing, and operator training on systems used to retrieve, transport, and store highly radioactive K Basin sludge. In this facility, three separate systems for characterizing, retrieving, pretreating, and processing remote-handled sludge were developed. Two of these systems were successfully deployed in 2011. One of these systems was used to pretreat knockout pot sludge as part of the 105-K West Basin cleanup. Knockout pot sludge contains pieces of degraded uranium fuel ranging in size from 600 {mu}m to 6350 {mu}m mixed with pieces of inert material, such as aluminum wire and graphite, in the same size range. The 2011 pretreatment campaign successfully removed most of the inert material from the sludge stream and significantly reduced the remaining volume of knockout pot product material. Removing the inert material significantly minimized the waste stream and reduced costs by reducing the number of transportation and storage containers. Removing the inert material also improved worker safety by reducing the number of remote-handled shipments. Also in 2011, technology development and final design were completed on the system to remove knockout pot material from the basin and transport the material to an onsite facility for interim storage. This system is scheduled for deployment in 2012. The prototype facility also was used to develop technology for systems to retrieve remote-handled transuranic sludge smaller than 6350 {mu}m being stored in underwater containers. After retrieving the sludge, the system will be used to load and transport the sludge for interim storage. During 2011, full-scale prototype systems were developed and tested to a Technology Readiness Level 6 as defined by U.S. Department of Energy standards. This system is scheduled for deployment in 2013. Operations also are scheduled for completion in 2014.

RAYMOND RE

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Evaluation of Shear Strength Threshold of Concern for Retrieval of Interim-Stored K-Basin Sludge in the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

K-Basin sludge will be recovered into the Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSCs) and will be stored in the T Plant for interim storage (at least 10 years). Long-term sludge storage tests conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory show that high uranium content K Basin sludge can self-cement and form a strong sludge with a bulk shear strength of up to 65 kPa. Some of this sludge has "paste" and "chunks" with shear strengths of approximately 3~5 kPa and 380 ~ 770 kPa, respectively. High uranium content sludge samples subjected to hydrothermal testing (e.g., 185°C, 10 h) have been observed to form agglomerates with a shear strength up to 170 kPa. After interim storage at T Plant, the sludge in the STSCs will be mobilized by water jets impinging the sludge. The objective of the evaluation was to determine the range of sludge shear strength for which there is high confidence that a water-jet retrieval system can mobilize stored K-Basin sludge from STSCs. The shear strength at which the sludge can be retrieved is defined as the "shear strength threshold of concern." If the sludge shear strength is greater than the value of the shear strength threshold of concern, a water-jet retrieval system will be unlikely to mobilize the sludge up to the container’s walls. The shear strength threshold of concern can be compared with the range of possible shear strengths of K-Basin stored sludge to determine if the current post interim-storage, water-jet retrieval method is adequate. Fourteen effective cleaning radius (ECR) models were reviewed, and their validity was examined by applying them to Hanford 241-SY-101 and 241-AZ-101 Tanks to reproduce the measured ECR produced by the mixer pumps. The validation test identified that the Powell-3 and Crowe-2 ECR models are more accurate than other ECR models reviewed. These ECR models were used to address a question as to whether the effective cleaning radius of a water jet is sufficient or if it can be readily expanded to cover the range of possible shear strengths. These results will assist CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) to establish the technical basis of the feasibility of the sludge retrieval and storage plan and to develop an adequate water jet system to retrieve the stored K-Basin sludge in the STSCs. The STSCs are 2:1 elliptical-head vessels, 58 inches in diameter and 105 inches tall. Each STSC will contain 0.5 to 2.1 m3 of settled sludge with the specific loading dependent upon sludge type.

Onishi, Yasuo; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Biogas Generation from a 2-Phase Sludge Treatment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The degradation of sewage sludge in single stage and 2 phase anaerobic systems was investigated in bench-scale batch reactors. Average COD reduction efficiency in 2 phase system in this initial phase of the study was 4.5% (30 days HRT) and 3.3% (20 days ... Keywords: dge digestion, 2-phase, single stage, qPCR, microbial communities

Taranveer Singh Mann, Terence Goh, William Phay

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT KOP DISPOSITION - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSIS FOR THE COLD VACUUM DRYING FACILITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to present conceptual design phase thermal process calculations that support the process design and process safety basis for the cold vacuum drying of K Basin KOP material. This document is intended to demonstrate that the conceptual approach: (1) Represents a workable process design that is suitable for development in preliminary design; and (2) Will support formal safety documentation to be prepared during the definitive design phase to establish an acceptable safety basis. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of Knock Out Pot (KOP) sludge within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. KOP sludge consists of size segregated material (primarily canister particulate) from the fuel and scrap cleaning process used in the Spent Nuclear Fuel process at K Basin. The KOP sludge will be pre-treated to remove fines and some of the constituents containing chemically bound water, after which it is referred to as KOP material. The KOP material will then be loaded into a Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO), dried at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and stored in the Canister Storage Building (CSB). This process is patterned after the successful drying of 2100 metric tons of spent fuel, and uses the same facilities and much of the same equipment that was used for drying fuel and scrap. Table ES-l present similarities and differences between KOP material and fuel and between MCOs loaded with these materials. The potential content of bound water bearing constituents limits the mass ofKOP material in an MCO load to a fraction of that in an MCO containing fuel and scrap; however, the small particle size of the KOP material causes the surface area to be significantly higher. This relatively large reactive surface area represents an input to the KOP thermal calculations that is significantly different from the calculations for fuel MCOs. The conceptual design provides for a copper insert block that limits the volume available to receive KOP material, enhances heat conduction, and functions as a heat source and sink during drying operations. This use of the copper insert represents a significant change to the thermal model compared to that used for the fuel calculations. A number of cases were run representing a spectrum of normal and upset conditions for the drying process. Dozens of cases have been run on cold vacuum drying of fuel MCOs. Analysis of these previous calculations identified four cases that provide a solid basis for judgments on the behavior of MCO in drying operations. These four cases are: (1) Normal Process; (2) Degraded vacuum pumping; (3) Open MCO with loss of annulus water; and (4) Cool down after vacuum drying. The four cases were run for two sets of input parameters for KOP MCOs: (1) a set of parameters drawn from safety basis values from the technical data book and (2) a sensitivity set using parameters selected to evaluate the impact of lower void volume and smaller particle size on MCO behavior. Results of the calculations for the drying phase cases are shown in Table ES-2. Cases using data book safety basis values showed dry out in 9.7 hours and heat rejection sufficient to hold temperature rise to less than 25 C. Sensitivity cases which included unrealistically small particle sizes and corresponding high reactive surface area showed higher temperature increases that were limited by water consumption. In this document and in the attachment (Apthorpe, R. and M.G. Plys, 2010) cases using Technical Databook safety basis values are referred to as nominal cases. In future calculations such cases will be called safety basis cases. Also in these documents cases using parameters that are less favorable to acceptable performance than databook safety values are referred to as safety cases. In future calculations such cases will be called sensitivity cases or sensitivity evaluations Calculations to be performed in support of the detailed design and formal safety basis documentation will expand the calculations presented in this document to include: additional features of th

SWENSON JA; CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; PLYS MG

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

104

Evaluation Of FWENC Process For Treatment Of MVST Sludges, Supernates, And Surrogates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1998, the Foster Wheeler Environmental Corporation (FWENC) was awarded an 11-year contract to treat transuranic waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, including Melton Valley Storage Tank (MVST) waste. Their baseline tank waste process consists of: (1) Separating the supernate from the sludge, (2) Washing the sludge with water and adding this wash water to the supernate, (3) Stabilizing the supernate/wash water or the washed sludge with additives if either are projected to fail Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) Toxic Characteristics Leaching Protocol (TCLP) criteria, and (4) Stabilizing both the washed sludge and supernate/wash water by vacuum evaporation. An ''Optimum'' treatment procedure consisted of adding a specified quantity of two stabilizers--ThioRed{reg_sign} and ET Soil Polymer{reg_sign}--and an ''Alternate'' treatment simply increased the amount of ThioRed{reg_sign} added. This report presents the results of a study funded by the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to provide Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) with independent laboratory data on the performance of the baseline process for treating the sludges, including washing the sludge and treating the wash water (although supernates were not included in the wash water tests). Two surrogate and seven actual tank wastes were used in this evaluation. Surrogate work, as well as the initial work with actual tank sludge, was based on an existing sludge sample from Bethel Valley Evaporator Storage Tank (BVEST) W23. One surrogate was required to be based on a surrogate previously developed to mimic the weighted average chemical composition of the MVST-BVEST using a simple mix of reagent grade chemicals and water, called the ''Quick and Dirty'' surrogate (QnD). The composition of this surrogate was adjusted toward the measured composition of W23 samples. The other surrogate was prepared to be more representative of the W23 sludge sample by precipitation of a nitrate solution at high pH, separating the solution from the solids, measuring the composition of the wet solids, and adding reagent grade chemicals to closely mimic the measured composition of the W23 sample.

Barton, JW

2003-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review, August 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Visit Report Site Visit Report Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review May 2011 August 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results .................................................................................................................................................... 2

106

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review, August 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Visit Report Site Visit Report Sludge Treatment Project 105-KW Final Safety Analysis Report Review May 2011 August 2011 Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................................ 1 3.0 Scope ...................................................................................................................................................... 1 4.0 Results .................................................................................................................................................... 2

107

MWIP: Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste. Part 4, Wastewater treatment sludges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The category of sludges, filter cakes, and other waste processing residuals represent the largest volume of low-level mixed (hazardous and radioactive) wastes within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Treatment of these wastes to minimize the mobility of contaminants, and to eliminate the presence of free water, is required under the Federal Facility Compliance Act agreements between DOE and the Environmental Protection Agency. In the text, we summarize the currently available data for several of the high priority mixed-waste sludge inventories within DOE. Los Alamos National Laboratory TA-50 Sludge and Rocky Flats Plant By-Pass Sludge are transuranic (TRU)-contaminated sludges that were isolated with the use of silica-based filter aids. The Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant West End Treatment Facility Sludge is predominantly calcium carbonate and biomass. The Oak Ridge K-25 Site Pond Waste is a large-volume waste stream, containing clay, silt, and other debris in addition to precipitated metal hydroxides. We formulate ``simulants`` for the waste streams described above, using cerium oxide as a surrogate for the uranium or plutonium present in the authentic material. Use of nonradiological surrogates greatly simplifies material handling requirements for initial treatability studies. The use of synthetic mixtures for initial treatability testing will facilitate compositional variation for use in conjunction with statistical design experiments; this approach may help to identify any ``operating window`` limitations. The initial treatability testing demonstrations utilizing these ``simulants`` will be based upon vitrification, although the materials are also amenable to testing grout-based and other stabilization procedures. After the feasibility of treatment and the initial evaluation of treatment performance has been demonstrated, performance must be verified using authentic samples of the candidate waste stream.

Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Stevenson, R.J.; Richmond, A.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bickford, D.F. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Treatment of biomass gasification wastewater using a combined wet air oxidation/activated sludge process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A lab-scale treatability study for using thermal and biological oxidation to treat a biomass gasification wastewater (BGW) having a chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 46,000 mg/l is described. Wet air oxidation (WA0) at 300/sup 0/C and 13.8 MPa (2000 psi) was used to initially treat the BGW and resulted in a COD reduction of 74%. This was followed by conventional activated sludge treatment using operating conditions typical of municipal sewage treatment plants. This resulted in an additional 95% COD removal. Overall COD reduction for the combined process was 99%. A detailed chemical analysis of the raw BGW and thermal and biological effluents was performed using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). These results showed a 97% decrease in total extractable organics with WA0 and a 99.6% decrease for combined WA0 and activated sludge treatment. Components of the treated waters tended to be fewer in number and more highly oxidized. An experiment was conducted to determine the amount of COD reduction caused by volatilization during biological treatment. Unfortunately, this did not yield conclusive results. Treatment of BGW using WA0 followed by activated sludge appears to be very effective and investigations at a larger scale are recommended.

English, C.J.; Petty, S.E.; Sklarew, D.S.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

STP-ECRTS - THERMAL AND GAS ANALYSES FOR SLUDGE TRANSPORT AND STORAGE CONTAINER (STSC) STORAGE AT T PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) is responsible for the disposition of sludge contained in the six engineered containers and Settler tank within the 105-K West (KW) Basin. The STP is retrieving and transferring sludge from the Settler tank into engineered container SCS-CON-230. Then, the STP will retrieve and transfer sludge from the six engineered containers in the KW Basin directly into a Sludge Transport and Storage Containers (STSC) contained in a Sludge Transport System (STS) cask. The STSC/STS cask will be transported to T Plant for interim storage of the STSC. The STS cask will be loaded with an empty STSC and returned to the KW Basin for loading of additional sludge for transportation and interim storage at T Plant. CH2MHILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) contracted with Fauske & Associates, LLC (FAI) to perform thermal and gas generation analyses for interim storage of STP sludge in the Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSCs) at T Plant. The sludge types considered are settler sludge and sludge originating from the floor of the KW Basin and stored in containers 210 and 220, which are bounding compositions. The conditions specified by CHPRC for analysis are provided in Section 5. The FAI report (FAI/10-83, Thermal and Gas Analyses for a Sludge Transport and Storage Container (STSC) at T Plant) (refer to Attachment 1) documents the analyses. The process considered was passive, interim storage of sludge in various cells at T Plant. The FATE{trademark} code is used for the calculation. The results are shown in terms of the peak sludge temperature and hydrogen concentrations in the STSC and the T Plant cell. In particular, the concerns addressed were the thermal stability of the sludge and the potential for flammable gas mixtures. This work was performed with preliminary design information and a preliminary software configuration.

CROWE RD; APTHORPE R; LEE SJ; PLYS MG

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

110

Remote Handled Transuranic Sludge Retrieval Transfer And Storage System At Hanford  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the systems developed for processing and interim storage of the sludge managed as remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU). An experienced, integrated CH2M HILL/AFS team was formed to design and build systems to retrieve, interim store, and treat for disposal the K West Basin sludge, namely the Sludge Treatment Project (STP). A system has been designed and is being constructed for retrieval and interim storage, namely the Engineered Container Retrieval, Transfer and Storage System (ECRTS).

Raymond, Rick E. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Frederickson, James R. [AREVA, Avignon (France); Criddle, James [AREVA, Avignon (France); Hamilton, Dennis [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Mike W. [CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Richland, WA (United States)

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

111

Operational Awareness Review of the Hanford Sludge Treatment Project, April 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HIAR-RL-2011-04-07 HIAR-RL-2011-04-07 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Sludge Treatment Project Dates of Activity : 11/17/2010 - 04/07/2011 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed operational awareness reviews of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP), Engineered Container Retrieval and Transfer System (ECRTS) during site visits. Result: On November 17, 2010, a HSS representative participated in a tour of the STP test facility. The HSS representative was also briefed by the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) Project Engineer, the CHPRC STP Design

112

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section...

113

Electrokinetic treatment of contaminated soils, sludges, and lagoons. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The electrokinetic process is an emerging technology for in-situ soil decontamination, in which chemical species, both ionic and nonionic are transported to an electrode site in soil. These products are subsequently removed from the ground via collection systems engineered for each specific application. Electrokinetics refer to movement of water, ions and charged particles relative to one another under the action of an applied direct current electric field. In a porous compact matrix of surface charged particles such as soil, the ion containing pore fluid may be made to flow to collection sites under the applied field. This report describes the effort undertaken to investigate electrokinetically enhanced transport of soil contaminants in synthetic systems. These systems consisted of clay or clay-sand mixtures containing known concentration of a selected heavy metal salt solution or an organic compound. Metals, surrogate radio nuclides and organic compounds evaluated in the program were representatives of those found at a majority of DOE sites. Degree of removal of these metals from soil by the electrokinetic treatment process was assessed through the metal concentration profiles generated across the soil between the electrodes. The best removals, from about 85 to 95% were achieved at the anode side of the soil specimens. Transient pH change had an effect on the metal movement via transient creation of different metal species with different ionic mobilities, as well as changing of the surface characteristics of the soil medium.

Wittle, J.K. [Electro-Petroleum, Inc., Wayne, PA (United States); Pamukcu, S. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Characteristics of STP Pre-2004 Archived KE Basin Sludge Samples Before and After Re-Jarring in the RPL - April 2012  

SciTech Connect

This report describes results of work performed in the Shielded Analytical Laboratory (SAL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s (PNNL) Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) with archive K East (KE) Basin sludge samples obtained before the year 2004, with some of them composited and initially characterized five years ago (Delegard et al. 2011). The previously performed testing included the physical properties determinations for selected samples (settled and particle densities, water and solids concentrations), the pH, as well as identification of crystalline phases by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) for selected samples. Another objective of the previous characterization and testing campaign was to transfer some sludge composites and individual samples into new storage containers to overcome the embrittlement effect which develops in original glass containers as a result of extended exposure to high radiation fields and which increases probability of sample loss.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

INTEC CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System Closure: Process Design  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the engineering activities that have been completed in support of the closure plan for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) CPP-603 Basin Water Treatment System. This effort includes detailed assessments of methods and equipment for performing work in four areas: 1. A cold (nonradioactive) mockup system for testing equipment and procedures for vessel cleanout and vessel demolition. 2. Cleanout of process vessels to meet standards identified in the closure plan. 3. Dismantlement and removal of vessels, should it not be possible to clean them to required standards in the closure plan. 4. Cleanout or removal of pipelines and pumps associated with the CPP-603 basin water treatment system. Cleanout standards for the pipes will be the same as those used for the process vessels.

Kimmitt, Raymond Rodney; Faultersack, Wendell Gale; Foster, Jonathan Kay; Berry, Stephen Michael

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

SLUDGE PARTICLE SEPAPATION EFFICIENCIES DURING SETTLER TANK RETRIEVAL INTO SCS-CON-230  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to release, into the Hanford Document Control System, FA1/0991, Sludge Particle Separation Efficiencies for the Rectangular SCS-CON-230 Container, by M. Epstein and M. G. Plys, Fauske & Associates, LLC, June 2009. The Sludge Treatment Project (STP) will retrieve sludge from the 105-K West Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) Settler Tanks and transfer it to container SCS-CON-230 using the Settler Tank Retrieval System (STRS). The sludge will enter the container through two distributors. The container will have a filtration system that is designed to minimize the overflow of sludge fines from the container to the basin. FAI/09-91 was performed to quantify the effect of the STRS on sludge distribution inside of and overflow out of SCS-CON-230. Selected results of the analysis and a system description are discussed. The principal result of the analysis is that the STRS filtration system reduces the overflow of sludge from SCS-CON-230 to the basin by roughly a factor of 10. Some turbidity can be expected in the center bay where the container is located. The exact amount of overflow and subsequent turbidity is dependent on the density of the sludge (which will vary with location in the Settler Tanks) and the thermal gradient between the SCS-CON-230 and the basin. Attachment A presents the full analytical results. These results are applicable specifically to SCS-CON-230 and the STRS filtration system's expected operating duty cycles.

DEARING JI; EPSTEIN M; PLYS MG

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

117

Research of sludge compost maturity degree modeling method based on wavelet neural network for sewage treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the complicated interaction of the sludge compost components, it makes the compost maturity degree judging system appear the nonlinearity and uncertainty. According to the physical circumstances of sludge compost, a compost maturity degree ...

Meijuan Gao; Jingwen Tian; Wei Jiang; Kai Li

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Treatment of municipal landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic digester and activated sludge system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this study was to assess the feasibility of treating sanitary landfill leachate using a combined anaerobic and activated sludge system. A high-strength leachate from Shiraz municipal landfill site was treated using this system. A two-stage laboratory-scale anaerobic digester under mesophilic conditions and an activated sludge unit were used. Landfill leachate composition and characteristics varied considerably during 8 months experiment (COD concentrations of 48,552-62,150 mg/L). It was found that the system could reduce the COD of the leachate by 94% at a loading rate of 2.25 g COD/L/d and 93% at loading rate of 3.37 g COD/L/d. The anaerobic digester treatment was quite effective in removing Fe, Cu, Mn, and Ni. However, in the case of Zn, removal efficiency was about 50%. For the rest of the HMs the removal efficiencies were in the range 88.8-99.9%. Ammonia reduction did not occur in anaerobic digesters. Anaerobic reactors increased alkalinity about 3.2-4.8% in the 1st digester and 1.8-7.9% in the 2nd digester. In activated sludge unit, alkalinity and ammonia removal efficiency were 49-60% and 48.6-64.7%, respectively. Methane production rate was in the range of 0.02-0.04, 0.04-0.07, and 0.02-0.04 L/g COD{sub rem} for the 1st digester, the 2nd digester, and combination of both digesters, respectively; the methane content of the biogas varied between 60% and 63%.

Kheradmand, S. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Shiraz, Shiraz 7134851156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi-Jashni, A., E-mail: akarimi@shirazu.ac.i [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Shiraz, Shiraz 7134851156 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sartaj, M. [Department of Civil Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 841568311 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Selenium Speciation in Biofilms from Granular Sludge Bed Reactors Used for Wastewater Treatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Se K-edge XAFS spectra were collected for various model compounds of Se as well as for 3 biofilm samples from bioreactors used for Se-contaminated wastewater treatment. In the biofilm samples, Se is dominantly as Se(0) despite Se K-edge XANES spectroscopy cannot easily distinguish between elemental Se and Se(-I)-bearing selenides. EXAFS spectra indicate that Se is located within aperiodic domains, markedly different to these known in monoclinic red selenium. However, Se can well occur within nanodivided domains related to monoclinic red Se, as this form was optically observed at the rim of some sludges. Aqueous selenate is then efficiently bioreduced, under sulfate reducing and methanogenic conditions.

van Hullenbusch, Eric; /Marne la Vallee U.; Farges, Francois; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /Museum Natl. Hist. Natur., Paris; Lenz, Markus; Lens, Piet; /Wageningen U.; Brown, Gordon E., Jr.; /Stanford U., Geo. Environ. Sci. /SLAC, SSRL

2006-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

120

Limitations for heavy metal release during thermo-chemical treatment of sewage sludge ash  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phosphate recycling from sewage sludge can be achieved by heavy metal removal from sewage sludge ash (SSA) producing a fertilizer product: mixing SSA with chloride and treating this mixture (eventually after granulation) in a rotary kiln at 1000 {+-} 100 deg. C leads to the formation of volatile heavy metal compounds that evaporate and to P-phases with high bio-availability. Due to economical and ecological reasons, it is necessary to reduce the energy consumption of this technology. Generally, fluidized bed reactors are characterized by high heat and mass transfer and thus promise the saving of energy. Therefore, a rotary reactor and a fluidized bed reactor (both laboratory-scale and operated in batch mode) are used for the treatment of granulates containing SSA and CaCl{sub 2}. Treatment temperature, residence time and - in case of the fluidized bed reactor - superficial velocity are varied between 800 and 900 deg. C, 10 and 30 min and 3.4 and 4.6 m s{sup -1}. Cd and Pb can be removed well (>95 %) in all experiments. Cu removal ranges from 25% to 84%, for Zn 75-90% are realized. The amount of heavy metals removed increases with increasing temperature and residence time which is most pronounced for Cu. In the pellet, three major reactions occur: formation of HCl and Cl{sub 2} from CaCl{sub 2}; diffusion and reaction of these gases with heavy metal compounds; side reactions from heavy metal compounds with matrix material. Although, heat and mass transfer are higher in the fluidized bed reactor, Pb and Zn removal is slightly better in the rotary reactor. This is due the accelerated migration of formed HCl and Cl{sub 2} out of the pellets into the reactor atmosphere. Cu is apparently limited by the diffusion of its chloride thus the removal is higher in the fluidized bed unit.

Nowak, Benedikt, E-mail: benedikt.nowak@tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/166, A-1060 Vienna (Austria); Perutka, Libor [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/166, A-1060 Vienna (Austria); Aschenbrenner, Philipp [Institute for Water Quality, Resource and Waste Management, Vienna University of Technology, Karlsplatz 13/226, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Kraus, Petra [ASH DEC Umwelt AG, Donaufelderstrasse 101/4/5, A-1210 Vienna (Austria); Rechberger, Helmut [Institute for Water Quality, Resource and Waste Management, Vienna University of Technology, Karlsplatz 13/226, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Winter, Franz, E-mail: franz.winter@tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Chemical Engineering, Vienna University of Technology, Getreidemarkt 9/166, A-1060 Vienna (Austria)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

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121

SEISMIC DESIGN REQUIREMENTS SELECTION METHODOLOGY FOR THE SLUDGE TREATMENT & M-91 SOLID WASTE PROCESSING FACILITIES PROJECTS  

SciTech Connect

In complying with direction from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL) (07-KBC-0055, 'Direction Associated with Implementation of DOE-STD-1189 for the Sludge Treatment Project,' and 08-SED-0063, 'RL Action on the Safety Design Strategy (SDS) for Obtaining Additional Solid Waste Processing Capabilities (M-91 Project) and Use of Draft DOE-STD-I 189-YR'), it has been determined that the seismic design requirements currently in the Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) will be modified by DOE-STD-1189, Integration of Safety into the Design Process (March 2007 draft), for these two key PHMC projects. Seismic design requirements for other PHMC facilities and projects will remain unchanged. Considering the current early Critical Decision (CD) phases of both the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and the Solid Waste Processing Facilities (M-91) Project and a strong intent to avoid potentially costly re-work of both engineering and nuclear safety analyses, this document describes how Fluor Hanford, Inc. (FH) will maintain compliance with the PHMC by considering both the current seismic standards referenced by DOE 0 420.1 B, Facility Safety, and draft DOE-STD-1189 (i.e., ASCE/SEI 43-05, Seismic Design Criteria for Structures, Systems, and Components in Nuclear Facilities, and ANSI!ANS 2.26-2004, Categorization of Nuclear Facility Structures, Systems and Components for Seismic Design, as modified by draft DOE-STD-1189) to choose the criteria that will result in the most conservative seismic design categorization and engineering design. Following the process described in this document will result in a conservative seismic design categorization and design products. This approach is expected to resolve discrepancies between the existing and new requirements and reduce the risk that project designs and analyses will require revision when the draft DOE-STD-1189 is finalized.

RYAN GW

2008-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

122

Sludge Mass Reduction Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preparations Preparations within the Tank Farm D. Bumgardner Liquid Waste Engineering Washington Savannah River Company 12 May 2009 2 Agenda Liquid Waste System Overview Sludge Characteristics Sludge Batch Planning Sludge Batch Preparation Sequence - Aluminum Dissolution - Sludge Washing - Sludge Batch Qualification/Acceptance Questions 3 Liquid Waste Processing at SRS ARP - Actinide Removal Process AFP - Actinide Finishing Process ASP - Actinide Strike Process CSS - Clarified Salt Solution CSSX - Caustic-side Solvent Extraction DDA - Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment DSS - Decontaminated Salt Solution DWPF - Defense Waste Processing Facility ETP - Effluent Treatment Project GWSB - Glass Waste Storage Building HLW - High-Level Waste LLW - Low-Level Waste MCU - Modular CSSX Unit

123

Fate of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles during Anaerobic Digestion of Wastewater and Post-Treatment Processing of Sewage Sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid development and commercialization of nanomaterials will inevitably result in the release of nanoparticles (NPs) to the environment. As NPs often exhibit physical and chemical properties significantly different from those of their molecular or macrosize analogs, concern has been growing regarding their fate and toxicity in environmental compartments. The wastewater-sewage sludge pathway has been identified as a key release pathway leading to environmental exposure to NPs. In this study, we investigated the chemical transformation of two ZnO-NPs and one hydrophobic ZnO-NP commercial formulation (used in personal care products), during anaerobic digestion of wastewater. Changes in Zn speciation as a result of postprocessing of the sewage sludge, mimicking composting/stockpiling, were also assessed. The results indicated that 'native' Zn and Zn added either as a soluble salt or as NPs was rapidly converted to sulfides in all treatments. The hydrophobicity of the commercial formulation retarded the conversion of ZnO-NP. However, at the end of the anaerobic digestion process and after postprocessing of the sewage sludge (which caused a significant change in Zn speciation), the speciation of Zn was similar across all treatments. This indicates that, at least for the material tested, the risk assessment of ZnO-NP through this exposure pathway can rely on the significant knowledge already available in regard to other 'conventional' forms of Zn present in sewage sludge.

Lombi, Enzo; Donner, Erica; Tavakkoli, Ehsan; Turney, Terence W.; Naidu, Ravi; Miller, Bradley W.; Scheckel, Kirk G. (U. South Australia); (EPA); (Monash)

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

124

Microbiological characterization and specific methanogenic activity of anaerobe sludges used in urban solid waste treatment  

SciTech Connect

This study presents the microbiological characterization of the anaerobic sludge used in a two-stage anaerobic reactor for the treatment of organic fraction of urban solid waste (OFUSW). This treatment is one alternative for reducing solid waste in landfills at the same time producing a biogas (CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}) and an effluent that can be used as biofertilizer. The system was inoculated with sludge from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) (Rio Frio Plant in Bucaramanga-Colombia) and a methanogenic anaerobic digester for the treatment of pig manure (Mesa de los Santos in Santander). Bacterial populations were evaluated by counting groups related to oxygen sensitivity, while metabolic groups were determined by most probable number (MPN) technique. Specific methanogenic activity (SMA) for acetate, formate, methanol and ethanol substrates was also determined. In the acidogenic reactor (R1), volatile fatty acids (VFA) reached values of 25,000 mg L{sup -1} and a concentration of CO{sub 2} of 90%. In this reactor, the fermentative population was predominant (10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} MPN mL{sup -1}). The acetogenic population was (10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) and the sulphate-reducing population was (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}). In the methanogenic reactor (R2), levels of CH{sub 4} (70%) were higher than CO{sub 2} (25%), whereas the VFA values were lower than 4000 mg L{sup -1}. Substrate competition between sulphate-reducing (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) and methanogenic bacteria (10{sup 5} MPN mL{sup -1}) was not detected. From the SMA results obtained, acetoclastic (2.39 g COD-CH{sub 4} g{sup -1} VSS{sup -1} day{sup -1}) and hydrogenophilic (0.94 g COD-CH{sub 4} g{sup -1} VSS{sup -1} day{sup -1}) transformations as possible metabolic pathways used by methanogenic bacteria is suggested from the SMA results obtained. Methanotrix sp., Methanosarcina sp., Methanoccocus sp. and Methanobacterium sp. were identified.

Sandoval Lozano, Claudia Johanna [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Ambientales, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9A Carrera 27, Aptdo Aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)], E-mail: ceiam@uis.edu.co; Vergara Mendoza, Marisol; Carreno de Arango, Mariela; Castillo Monroy, Edgar Fernando [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Ambientales, Universidad Industrial de Santander, Calle 9A Carrera 27, Aptdo Aereo 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Modeling of Sludge Compost Maturity Degree Based on Radial Basic Function Network for Sewage Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the complicated interaction of the sludge compost components, it makes the compost maturity degree judging system appear the non-linearity and uncertainty. According to the physical circumstances of sludge compost, a compost maturity degree ... Keywords: Compost, Maturity degree, Radial basic function network, Modeling

Jingwen Tian; Meijuan Gao; Yanxia Liu; Shiru Zhou; Fan Zhang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Uranium Metal Reaction Behavior in Water, Sludge, and Grout Matrices  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes information and data on the reaction behavior of uranium metal in water, in water-saturated simulated and genuine K Basin sludge, and in grout matrices. This information and data are used to establish the technical basis for metallic uranium reaction behavior for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP). The specific objective of this report is to consolidate the various sources of information into a concise document to serve as a high-level reference and road map for customers, regulators, and interested parties outside the STP (e.g., external reviewers, other DOE sites) to clearly understand the current basis for the corrosion of uranium metal in water, sludge, and grout.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

127

Uranium Metal Reaction Behavior in Water, Sludge, and Grout Matrices  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes information and data on the reaction behavior of uranium metal in water, in water-saturated simulated and genuine K Basin sludge, and in grout matrices. This information and data are used to establish the technical basis for metallic uranium reaction behavior for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP). The specific objective of this report is to consolidate the various sources of information into a concise document to serve as a high-level reference and road map for customers, regulators, and interested parties outside the STP (e.g., external reviewers, other DOE sites) to clearly understand the current basis for the corrosion of uranium metal in water, sludge, and grout.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

DEVELOPMENT OF EQUIPMENT FOR THE RETRIEVAL & STABILIZATION & ENCAPSULATION OF RADIOACTIVE SLUDGE AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

This poster presentation describes and illustrates some of the equipment and tools that Fluor Hanford and BNG America have developed and designed to remove, transport, stabilize and encapsulate radioactive sludge from the K Basins at the Hanford nuclear site in Washington State, U.S.A. K Basins were built in the early 1950s to temporarily store irradiated nuclear fuel prior to chemical processing to remove plutonium for nuclear weapons. The sludge is the result of corrosion of these fuel elements and its removal is the final stage before the basin water can be drained and the basins decommissioned. The sludge is hydrogen-generating because of its uranium metal content and account has to be taken also of its heat generating capacity and criticality potential as it is moved from one containment to another. The paper describes all stages of sludge treatment from the use of vacuum wands to suck up the sludge, through consolidating the sludge in temporary underwater containers, transporting it though flexible, temporary pipe systems, acceleration of the corrosion of uranium to reduce hydrogen generation, measuring the fissile content and finally encapsulation in a cement grout. Emphasis is placed on the use of existing, transportable and temporary equipment. This not only saves initial costs but it also reduces the total amount of equipment needed to be disposed of as radioactive waste at the end of the job. The processes, equipment and tools described potentially have a broad applicability to nuclear site decommissioning and cleanup worldwide.

ROOSENDAAL, G.D.

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

129

Brief paper: Fuzzy control of the activated sludge wastewater treatment process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activated sludge process is a commonly used method for treating sewage and waste waters. It is characterised by a lack of relevant instrumentation, control goals that are not always clearly stated, the use of qualitative information in decision making ... Keywords: Computer control, control system synthesis, controllers, fuzzy control, process control, water pollution, water resources

R. M. Tong; M. B. Beck; A. Latten

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

An Innovative Approach to Sludge Retrieval from Containers ...  

Objective of this work is to provide and demonstrate an alternate method of emptying the K- Basin Sludge from the ... Future work – Program plan

131

Wastewater sludge management options for Honduras  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sludge management is a fundamental area of concern across wastewater treatment systems in Honduras. The lack of timely sludge removal has led to declining plant performance in many facilities throughout the country. In ...

Bhattacharya, Mahua, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction debris removal 105-KE basin  

SciTech Connect

The 105-KE Basin contains 1,150 Metric Tonnes of Uranium (MTU) of N Reactor fuel, along with less than half a MTU of single pass reactor (SPR) fuel. In addition to the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the 105-KE Basin, extensive quantities of debris and a substantial amount of sludge have accumulated in the basin. The 105-KE Basin fuel and sludge are not encapsulated and, as a result, corroding fuel has produced contamination products that are deposited on the basin walls, floor, and equipment. contamination products produce radiation dose exposures to the workers. To decrease worker exposures, this Notice of Construction (NOC) describes dose reduction modifications under consideration to mitigate worker radiation exposure from the basin walls and exposed piping. The major equipment egress paths from the basin (the dummy elevator pit and the south loadout pit) are blocked completely with debris and/or empty canisters. Therefore in addition to dose reduction, this NOC also describes debris removal activities and equipment. Recently, the primary water treatment system has been without mechanical filtration capabilities. This NOC describes planned modifications to the primary water treatment system to restore mechanical filtration by restarting the cartridge filters. The proposed modifications described in this NOC are expected to commence in the Fall of 1995. Finally, the NOC describes two other basin activities, fuel and sludge movement, that are expected to be routine in the future.

HAYS, C.B.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

133

K West Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) E-F Annular Filter Vessel Accident Calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three bounding accidents postdated for the K West Basin integrated water treatment system are evaluated against applicable risk evaluation guidelines. The accidents are a spray leak during fuel retrieval, spray leak during backflushing, and a hydrogen explosion. Event trees and accident probabilities are estimated. In all cases, the unmitigated dose consequences are below the risk evaluation guidelines.

RITTMANN, P.D.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

K West Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) E-F Annular Filter Vessel Accident Calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Four bounding accidents postulated for the K West Basin integrated water treatment system are evaluated against applicable risk evaluation guidelines. The accidents are a spray leak during fuel retrieval, spray leak during backflushing a hydrogen explosion, and a fire breaching filter vessel and enclosure. Event trees and accident probabilities are estimated. In all cases, the unmitigated dose consequences are below the risk evaluation guidelines.

PIEPHO, M.G.

2000-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Criticality safety evaluation for K Area Disassembly Basin cleanup  

SciTech Connect

Preparations are currently being made to remove sludge from the Disassembly Basin in all reactor areas. Because this sludge contains fissile isotopes, it is necessary to perform a criticality safety evaluation for the planned activities. A previous evaluation examined the criticality safety aspects of the sludge removal process for L Area. This document addresses the criticality safety aspects of the K Area Disassembly Basin cleanup work. The K Area Disassembly Basin cleanup will involve, as a first step, pumping the basin sludge into the Monitor Basin portion of the Disassembly Basin. From the Monitor Basin, the sludge will be pumped into tanks or containers for permanent disposition. The criticality safety evaluation discussed in this document covers the transfer of the sludge to the Monitor Basin.

Rosser, M.A.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Assessment of sludge management options in a waste water treatment plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is part of a larger project which began in response to a request by the Spanish water agengy, Cadagua, for advice on life cycle assessment (LCA) and environmental impacts of Cadagua operated wastewater treatment ...

Lim, Jong hyun, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Sewage Sludge (Maryland) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sewage Sludge (Maryland) Sewage Sludge (Maryland) Sewage Sludge (Maryland) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maryland Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Maryland Department of the Environment Sewage sludge utilization permits are required prior to the use, processing, and disposal of sewage sludge in Maryland. Sewage sludge (also known as biosolids) is not sewage, but rather is one of the final products of treated sewage at a sewage (wastewater) treatment plant. Sewage sludge is the fine particulate matter remaining after treatment which breaks down organic matter and destroys disease organisms in sewage. A SSU Permit is required for any person who collects,

138

HWMA/RCRA Closure Plan for the Basin Facility Basin Water Treatment System - Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure plan for the Basin Water Treatment System located in the Basin Facility (CPP-603), Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Laboratory Site, was developed to meet future milestones established under the Voluntary Consent Order. The system to be closed includes units and associated ancillary equipment included in the Voluntary Consent Order NEW-CPP-016 Action Plan and Voluntary Consent Order SITE-TANK-005 Tank Systems INTEC-077 and INTEC-078 that were determined to have managed hazardous waste. The Basin Water Treatment System will be closed in accordance with the requirements of the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as implemented by the Idaho Administrative Procedures Act 58.01.05.009 and 40 Code of Federal Regulations 265, to achieve "clean closure" of the tank system. This closure plan presents the closure performance standards and methods of achieving those standards for the Basin Water Treatment Systems.

Evans, S. K.

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

139

EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge EM Employs Innovative Technology to Remove Radioactive Sludge September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. Testing and equipment simulations ensure first-of-a-kind technological processes for sludge removal can be conducted safely and efficiently. RICHLAND, Wash. - The Richland Operations Office and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company successfully removed a portion of a highly radioactive sludge from underwater storage in a large basin adjacent to the K West reactor at the Hanford site this month. In that milestone, workers removed sludge originating from knock-out pots,

140

The Removal Action Work Plan for CPP-603A Basin Facility  

SciTech Connect

This revised Removal Action Work Plan describes the actions to be taken under the non-time-critical removal action recommended in the Action Memorandum for the Non-Time Critical Removal Action at the CPP-603A Basins, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as evaluated in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the CPP-603A Basin Non-Time Critical Removal Action, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The regulatory framework outlined in this Removal Action Work Plan has been modified from the description provided in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (DOE/NE-ID-11140, Rev. 1, August 2004). The modification affects regulation of sludge removal, treatment, and disposal, but the end state and technical approaches have not changed. Revision of this document had been delayed until the basin sludge was successfully managed. This revision (Rev. 1) has been prepared to provide information that was not previously identified in Rev. 0 to describe the removal, treatment, and disposal of the basin water at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) CERCLA Disposal Facility evaporation ponds and fill the basins with grout/controlled low strength material (CLSM) was developed. The Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the CPP-603A Basin Non-Time Critical Removal Action, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center - conducted pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act - evaluated risks associated with deactivation of the basins and alternatives for addressing those risks. The decision to remove and dispose of the basin water debris not containing uranium grouted in place after the sludge has been removed and managed under the Hazardous Waste Management Act/Resource Conservation and Recovery Act has been documented in the Act Memorandum for the Non-Time Critical Removal Action at the CPP-603A Basins, Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center.

B. T. Richards

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Sludge digester  

SciTech Connect

A ballasted, gas-holding, liquid sludge digester is described comprising: a main liquid sludge tank having a bottom wall and upwardly projecting sidewall; a cover having a top and depending side skirt structure which telescopes with respect to the upwardly projecting sidewall of the main tank; ballast supported near the lower edge of said side skirt; a ballast-engaging, liquid-containing well joined to said sidewall of said main tank such that said cover provides a gas-tight seal when said ballast interacts with liquid in said well so as to be partially emerged or fully submerged in the liquid; liquid fill means interacting with said well to maintain a predetermined liquid level in the well when said ballast is at least partially emerged from the liquid in said well; and overflow means interacting with said well to maintain a predetermined liquid level in the well when said ballast is submerged in the liquid in the well.

Wight, J.L.; Cook, L.W.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

142

International Best Practices for Pre-Processing and Co-Processing Municipal Solid Waste and Sewage Sludge in the Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sludge treatment to increase biogas production. Available atal. , no date) Use of biogas from anaerobic sludge digestionsludge are mass reduction, biogas production, and improved

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Evaluation of Sludge Characteristics and Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Full-scale Wastewater Treatment Plants in China by Mass and Energy Balances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy balances were used to evaluate the characteristics of sludge and to calculate the carbon dioxide emissions in the WWTPs in this study. To avoid the errors, mass balances by TP have been used to calibrate the relating data before making energy ... Keywords: Sludge, CEP, mass balance, energy balance, carbon dioxide

Gan Wang; Yongzhen Peng; Shuying Wang; Gan Wang; Hongxun Hou

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Design and safety basis sludge characterization from exposure-adjusted radioisotopic source terms for N reactor fuel stored at K-East and K-West basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Safeguards and Accountability database was used as the primary source document for exposure data for spent N Reactor fuel stored at the K-East and K-West basins. This database is a listing of all keys (ie., groups of fuel discharged from the reactor at the same time), and the exposure for that key, mass of uranium in the key, fuel type (whether Mark IV or Mark IA), and several other parameters. There are nearly five hundred records (keys) in this database. Figure 1 illustrates an N Reactor Mark IV fuel assembly. The axial length of the endcap is approximately 0.19 inch. Mark IA and Mark IV fuel are low enriched zircalloy-2 clad metallic uranium tube-in-tube assemblies held together with spacers and clips. Unexposed Mark IV fuel assemblies have an enrichment of 0.947 wt% {sup 235}U in both inner and outer tubes. Unexposed Mark IA assemblies have an enrichment of 1.25 wt% {sup 235}U in the outer tube and 0.947 wt% {sup 235}U in the inner tube.

SCHWINKENDORF, K.N.

2001-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

145

Development of a Nitric/Formic Acid process to reduce hydrogen emissions during sludge treatment in the DWPF  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new Nitric/Formic Acid (N/FA) flowsheet was developed at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) for use in the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The flowsheet was successfully demonstrated with simulated sludge using a 2 L bench-scale experimental system and a one-fifth scale (4000 L) pilot facility, and with actual radioactive waste using a 0.1 L apparatus in one of the SRTC shielded cells. Overall, the new N/FA flowsheet compared to the original formic add flowsheet reduced the peak H{sub 2} generation rate by more than a factor of two and resulted in a more gradual rise in the H{sub 2} evolution. Therefore, implementation of the new N/FA flowsheet in the DWPF CPC would result in an increased margin of safety and possibly a reduction in the scope and cost of modifying the DWPF CPC vessel vent system. Also, the new N/FA flowsheet would be compatible with Tank Farm processes and other DWPF flowsheets, and with the implementation of the new Late Wash flowsheet in the DWPF, it would be key to maintaining a proper redox balance of the melter feed.

Hsu, C.W.; Ferrara, D.M.; Bibler, N.E.; Ha, B.C.; Ritter, J.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

K Basin safety analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

147

Evaluation of nitrogen availability in irradiated sewage sludge, sludge compost and manure compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field experiment was conducted during 2 yr to determine plant availability of organic N from organic wastes, and effects of gamma irradiation on organic N availability in sewage sludge. The wastes investigated were: digested, dewatered sewage sludge (DSS), irradiated sewage sludge (DISS), irradiated, composted sewage sludge (DICSS), and composted livestock manure (CLM). The annual application rates were: 10, 20, 30, and 40 Mg solids ha{sup {minus}1}. Fertilizer N was added to the control, to which no waste was applied, as well as to the waste applications to ensure approximately equal amounts of available N (110 kg N ha{sup {minus}1}) for all treatments. Lettuce, petunias, and beans were grown in 1990 and two cuts of lettuce were harvested in 1991. Crop yields and plant N concentrations were measured. Assuming that crop N harvested/available N applied would be approximately equal for the control and the waste treatments, the N from organic fraction of the wastes, which is as available as that in fertilizer, was estimated. With petunia in 1990 and the combination of first and second cut of lettuce in 1991, the percentage ranged from 11.2 to 29.7 in nonirradiated sludge, 10.1 to 14.0 in irradiated sludge, 10.5 to 32.1 in sludge compost and 10.0 to 19.7 in manure compost. Most often, the highest values were obtained with the lowest application rates. Yields of petunia and N concentrations in second cut lettuce in 1991 were lower with irradiated sludge than with nonirradiated sludge suggest that the availability of organic N in digested sludge may have been reduced after irradiation. Irradiation of sludge appears to have released NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N. The availability of organic N, however, appears to have been reduced by irradiation by greater amount than the increase in NH{sub 4}{sup +}-N. 41 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Wen, Guang; Bates, T.E.; Voroney, R.P. [Univ. of Guelph, Ontario (Canada)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Separation of organic ion exchange resins from sludge -- engineering study  

SciTech Connect

This engineering study evaluates the use of physical separation technologies to separate organic ion exchange resin from KE Basin sludge prior to nitric acid dissolution. This separation is necessitate to prevent nitration of the organics in the acid dissolver. The technologies under consideration are: screening, sedimentation, elutriation. The recommended approach is to first screen the Sludge and resin 300 microns then subject the 300 microns plus material to elutriation.

Duncan, J.B.

1998-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

149

First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from River |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from River First of Hanford's Highly Radioactive Sludge Moved Away from River July 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov 509-376-4171 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Dee_Millikin@rl.doe.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have started moving highly radioactive material, called sludge, away from the Columbia River, marking a significant milestone in the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s cleanup of the Hanford Site in Washington State. Today, DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) safely transferred the first large container of highly radioactive sludge from a basin next to a former plutonium production reactor to dry storage in the center of the site. Today's transfer is the first of six shipments

150

Pretreatment of microbial sludges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

Rivard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Louisville, CO)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Pretreatment of microbial sludges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods are described for pretreating microbial sludges to break cells and disrupt organic matter. One method involves the use of sonication, and another method involves the use of shear forces. The pretreatment of sludge enhances bioconversion of the organic fraction. This allows for efficient dewatering of the sludge and reduces the cost for final disposal of the waste.

Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

ALARA ASSESSMENT OF SETTLER SLUDGE SAMPLING METHODS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this assessment is to compare underwater and above water settler sludge sampling methods to determine if the added cost for underwater sampling for the sole purpose of worker dose reductions is justified. Initial planning for sludge sampling included container, settler and knock-out-pot (KOP) sampling. Due to the significantly higher dose consequence of KOP sludge, a decision was made to sample KOP underwater to achieve worker dose reductions. Additionally, initial plans were to utilize the underwater sampling apparatus for settler sludge. Since there are no longer plans to sample KOP sludge, the decision for underwater sampling for settler sludge needs to be revisited. The present sampling plan calls for spending an estimated $2,500,000 to design and construct a new underwater sampling system (per A21 C-PL-001 RevOE). This evaluation will compare and contrast the present method of above water sampling to the underwater method that is planned by the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) and determine if settler samples can be taken using the existing sampling cart (with potentially minor modifications) while maintaining doses to workers As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and eliminate the need for costly redesigns, testing and personnel retraining.

NELSEN LA

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

153

Land application systems for municipal sludge  

SciTech Connect

The production of treated municipal sludge requiring disposal or recycling has increased substantially in the last 10 years as a result of more stringent waste-water treatment requirements. In 1974, for example, there were 3.2 million dry tons of sludge requiring disposal. By 1982 that number had more than doubled to 6.5 million dry tons/year. Land application of municipal sludge is widely practiced in the United States as a method of handling these increasing tonnages. For wastewater treatment plants with less than 10 mgd capacity, 39 percent of the sludge produced is managed by land application. Currently, for all size treatment plants, about 25 percent of the nation's sludge is land applied. The experience with land application has shown it to be a safe and effective sludge management practice. In particular, research and studies of the practice over the past 10 years have produced new knowledge which allows the benefits of land application to be realized with minimal adverse impact. 11 references.

Crites, R.W.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Sludge storage lagoon biogas recovery and use  

SciTech Connect

The City of Memphis has two wastewater treatment plants. The SWTP employs two large anaerobic digestion sludge lagoons as part of the overall sludge treatment system. Although these lagoons are effective in concentrating and digesting sludge, they can generate offensive odors. The SWTP uses aerobic digesters to partially stabilize the sludge and help reduce objectionable odors before it enters the lagoons. The anaerobic digestion of sludge in the lagoons results in the dispersion of a large quantity of biogas into the atmosphere. The City realized that if the lagoons could be covered, the odor problem could be resolved, and at the same, time, biogas could be recovered and utilized as a source of energy. In 1987, the City commissioned ADI International to conduct a feasibility study to evaluate alternative methods of covering the lagoons and recovering and utilizing the biogas. The study recommended that the project be developed in two phases: (1) recovery of the biogas and (2) utilization of the biogas. Phase 1 consists of covering the two lagoons with an insulated membrane to control odor and temperature and collect the biogas. Phase 1 was found to be economically feasible and offered a unique opportunity for the City to save substantial operating costs at the treatment facility. The Memphis biogas recovery project is the only application in the world where a membrane cover has been used on a municipal wastewater sludge lagoon. It is also the largest lagoon cover system in the world.

Muller, D.; Norville, C. (Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Continuous Sludge Leaching  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous Sludge Leaching Reid Peterson and Renee Russell - Battelle Pacific Northwest Division Terry Sams and Bill Brasel - Parsons 2 What is CSL? * Process diagram * Full scale...

156

Disposal of Lead Sludge - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... Problems with this sludge were investigated and methods were tested with the aim of stabilizing the sludge so that is passes the EPD TCLP test ...

157

Integrating BES in the wastewater and sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, denitrification, and anaerobic digester treatment systems, while chemical methods include phosphate removal, dye of WAS, including treatment of influent or the accumulated sludge with anaerobic digesters (Rulkens 2008 bacterial metabolism even at conditions outside the optimum range for anaerobic digestion (Angenent et al

Angenent, Lars T.

158

Stabilization of Mercury in High pH Tank Sludges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE complex contains many tank sludges contaminated with mercury. The high pH of these tank sludges typically fails to stabilize the mercury, resulting in these radioactive wastes also being characteristically hazardous or mixed waste. The traditional treatment for soluble inorganic mercury species is precipitation as insoluble mercuric sulfide. Sulfide treatment and a commercial mercury-stabilizing product were tested on surrogate sludges at various alkaline pH values. Neither the sulfide nor the commercial product stabilized the mercury sufficiently at the high pH of the tank sludges to pass the Toxicity Characteristic Leach Procedure (TCLP) treatment standards of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The commercial product also failed to stabilize the mercury in samples of the actual tank sludges.

Spence, R.; Barton, J.

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

159

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Environment, Safety and Health program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

160

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the removal of the first phase of highly radioactive sludge from under water storage in the K West Basin about 400 yards away from the Columbia River. "This is a major step forward in protecting the river and a historic

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River Highly Radioactive Sludge Removal Complete: Historic Cleanup Effort Reduces the Risk along the Columbia River September 13, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Salony, DOE Cameron.Salony@rl.doe.gov 509-376-0402 Dee Millikin, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Dee_Millikin@rl.gov 509-376-1297 RICHLAND, WASH. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) announced today the removal of the first phase of highly radioactive sludge from under water storage in the K West Basin about 400 yards away from the Columbia River. "This is a major step forward in protecting the river and a historic

162

Energy recovery at Chi?in?u wastewater treatment plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Possibilities for energy recovery from sludge at Chi?in?u wastewater treatment plant have been investigated and evaluated. One way of recovering energy from sludge is… (more)

Graan, Daniel

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Microsoft Word - Sludge Test Area CX Determination Form12172012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sludge Test Facility at the Transuranic (TRU) Waste Processing Center (TWPC) [CX-TWPC-13-0001] Sludge Test Facility at the Transuranic (TRU) Waste Processing Center (TWPC) [CX-TWPC-13-0001] Program or Field Office: Environmental Management - Oak Ridge Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: The proposed action is to construct and operate a sludge test facility at the Transuranic (TRU) Waste Processing Center (TWPC) to conduct testing activities for sludge mobilization, mixing, and removal from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST). The testing is needed to develop appropriate, compliant treatment to a final waste form that will meet the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). This testing is needed for the mobilization, removal, and treatment of the sludge regardless of

164

Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation (DSGRE-AE) is to evaluate the postulated hypothesis that a hydrogen GRE may occur in Hanford tanks containing waste sludges at levels greater than previously experienced. There is a need to understand gas retention and release hazards in sludge beds which are 200 -300 inches deep. These sludge beds are deeper than historical Hanford sludge waste beds, and are created when waste is retrieved from older single-shell tanks (SST) and transferred to newer double-shell tanks (DST).Retrieval of waste from SSTs reduces the risk to the environment from leakage or potential leakage of waste into the ground from these tanks. However, the possibility of an energetic event (flammable gas accident) in the retrieval receiver DST is worse than slow leakage. Lines of inquiry, therefore, are (1) can sludge waste be stored safely in deep beds; (2) can gas release events (GRE) be prevented by periodically degassing the sludge (e.g., mixer pump); or (3) does the retrieval strategy need to be altered to limit sludge bed height by retrieving into additional DSTs? The scope of this effort is to provide expert advice on whether or not to move forward with the generation of deep beds of sludge through retrieval of C-Farm tanks. Evaluation of possible mitigation methods (e.g., using mixer pumps to release gas, retrieving into an additional DST) are being evaluated by a second team and are not discussed in this report. While available data and engineering judgment indicate that increased gas retention (retained gas fraction) in DST sludge at depths resulting from the completion of SST 241-C Tank Farm retrievals is not expected and, even if gas releases were to occur, they would be small and local, a positive USQ was declared (Occurrence Report EM-RP--WRPS-TANKFARM-2012-0014, "Potential Exists for a Large Spontaneous Gas Release Event in Deep Settled Waste Sludge"). The purpose of this technical report is to (1) present and discuss current understandings of gas retention and release mechanisms for deep sludge in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex waste storage tanks; and (2) to identify viable methods/criteria for demonstrating safety relative to deep sludge gas release events (DSGRE) in the near term to support the Hanford C-Farm retrieval mission. A secondary purpose is to identify viable methods/criteria for demonstrating safety relative to DSGREs in the longer term to support the mission to retrieve waste from the Hanford Tank Farms and deliver it to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The potential DSGRE issue resulted in the declaration of a positive Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ). C-Farm retrievals are currently proceeding under a Justification for Continued Operation (JCO) that only allows tanks 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106 sludge levels of 192 inches and 195 inches, respectively. C-Farm retrievals need deeper sludge levels (approximately 310 inches in 241-AN-101 and approximately 250 inches in 241-AN-106). This effort is to provide analytical data and justification to continue retrievals in a safe and efficient manner.

Sams, Terry L.

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Emissions of volatile and potentially toxic organic compounds from waste-water treatment plants and collection systems (Phase 2). Volume 3. Waste-water treatment-plant emissions. Experimental phase. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Volume 3 describes the measurements and experimental data obtained to assess emissions from various points within a POTW. Included are a discussion of sampling methods development, emissions studies of activated carbon bed odor control units located at various points of a large municipal wastewater treatment plant and its collection system, upwind/downwind sampling from an activated sludge aeration basins at a large municipal wastewater treatment plant, and preliminary studies of haloform formation as a result of chlorination of wastewater.

Chang, D.P.Y.; Guensler, R.; Kim, J.O.; Chou, T.L.; Uyeminami, D.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Sludge Mass Reduction Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the tank Designed to handle obstructions in the tank - Steel Tapes - Thermowells - Sludge mounds 11 Mechanical Cleaning of SRS Tanks 18 and 19 Hose-in-hose System Overview...

167

Composting Manure and Sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composted manure and sludge can be a valuable fertilizer, but special equipment is required. Composting can be done with windrow operations, aerated windrow operations or aerated bins. Factors that affect composting rates are included.

Sweeten, John M.

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

168

Removal of mercury from powder river basin coal by low-temperature thermal treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted at Western Research Institute (WRI) to remove mercury from Powder River Basin (PRB) coal as part of the research performed under Task 2.1, Development and Optimization of a Process for the Production of a Premium Solid Fuel from Western US Coals, of the 1993 Annual Project Plan. In the tests minus 16 mesh PRB coal was fed to a bench-scale fluidized-bed reactor where it was heated by contact with carbon dioxide fluidizing gas. A side stream of the gas from the reactor was passed through traps containing activated carbon where mercury driven from the coal was collected. The feed coal (which contains about 0.062 milligrams of mercury/kilogram of coal), the fines elutriated from the reactor, the activated carbon, and the condensed water from the reactor were analyzed for mercury. The solid products were analyzed using cold vapor atomic adsorption spectroscopy (ASTM D3684) while the water was analyzed using US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 245.1 which is based upon reduction of mercury to elemental form followed by adsorption at a wave length of 253.7 nanometers. The results of these tests show that about 70 to 80 wt % of the mercury is removed from the coal when the temperature is raised from about 300{degree}F (149{degree}C) to about 550{degree}F (288{degree}C). The remaining 20 wt % of the mercury remains in the char at temperatures up to about 1100{degree}F (593{degree}C). About 0.5 wt % of the mercury in the feed coal is condensed with water recovered from the coal. Nearly all of the mercury driven from the coal remains in the gas stream. Fines elutriated from the reactor contain about the same concentration of mercury as the feed coal.

Merriam, N.W.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Chemical and physical property of rice straw waste and hospital sewage sludge in turned windrow aeration system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most sewage sludge from hospital wastewater treatment plants in Northern Thailand are also being to incinerator and agricultural fields. Land application of hospital sewage sludge has serious effects on environmental. The main goal of this investigation ... Keywords: co-composting, hospital sewage sludge, rice straw waste, turned windrow aeration

Khajornsak Sopajaree; Apisit Sancom

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

NORDIC WASTE WATER TREATMENT SLUDGE TREATMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biogas, electricity and fertilizer from 30 000 tons of annually waste. The plant was opened in March 2008 together it an- nually produces 18,9 GWh biogas and around 10 GWh of elec- tricity. The Cambi THP ­process

171

Viscous sludge sample collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

Beitel, George A. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Sludge storage lagoon biogas recovery and use. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The City of Memphis has two wastewater treatment plants. The SWTP employs two large anaerobic digestion sludge lagoons as part of the overall sludge treatment system. Although these lagoons are effective in concentrating and digesting sludge, they can generate offensive odors. The SWTP uses aerobic digesters to partially stabilize the sludge and help reduce objectionable odors before it enters the lagoons. The anaerobic digestion of sludge in the lagoons results in the dispersion of a large quantity of biogas into the atmosphere. The City realized that if the lagoons could be covered, the odor problem could be resolved, and at the same, time, biogas could be recovered and utilized as a source of energy. In 1987, the City commissioned ADI International to conduct a feasibility study to evaluate alternative methods of covering the lagoons and recovering and utilizing the biogas. The study recommended that the project be developed in two phases: (1) recovery of the biogas and (2) utilization of the biogas. Phase 1 consists of covering the two lagoons with an insulated membrane to control odor and temperature and collect the biogas. Phase 1 was found to be economically feasible and offered a unique opportunity for the City to save substantial operating costs at the treatment facility. The Memphis biogas recovery project is the only application in the world where a membrane cover has been used on a municipal wastewater sludge lagoon. It is also the largest lagoon cover system in the world.

Muller, D.; Norville, C. [Memphis and Shelby County Div. of Planning and Development, TN (United States)

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Nitric acid requirement for treating sludge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) precipitate hydrolysis process produces sufficient oxidant (nitrate) such that the resulting blend of formic acid treated sludge and the aqueous product from hydrolysis (PHA) produces a melter feed of acceptable redox (i.e. Fe+2/Total Fe <0.33). With implementation of Late Washing (to reduce the nitrite content of the tetraphenyborate slurry produced during In-Tank Precipitation to 0.01M or less), HAN is no longer required during hydrolysis. As a result, the nitrate content of the melter feed will be reduced greater than an order-of-magnitude and the resulting melter feed produced will be too reducing. If formic acid treatment of the sludge is retained, it will be necessary to trim the melter feed with an oxidant to attain a proper redox. Rather than trimming the melter feed with an oxidant subsequent to the SRAT cycle in which formic acid is used to acidify the sludge, the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has recommended this be accomplished by conversion to nitric acid addition to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) in place of formic acid (1). This memorandum specifies the stoichiometric bases for determining the nitric acid requirement for the SRAT.

Hsu, C.W.

1992-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

174

Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge: Results of the second design basis experiment  

SciTech Connect

For several years, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been investigating methods to pretreat Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge. In the past, Zircaloy-clad metallic U fuel was chemically decladded using the Zirflex process; NCRW sludge was formed when the decladding solution was neutralized for storage in carbon-steel tanks. This sludge, which is currently stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW on the Hanford Site, primarily consists of insoluble Zr hydroxides and/or oxides and NaF. Significant quantities of Al, La, U, as well as other insoluble minor constituents are present in the sludge, along with sodium and potassium nitrates, nitrites, and hydroxides in the interstitial liquid. The sludge contains about 2,000 nCi of transuranic (TRU) material per gram of dry sludge, and mixed fission products. Therefore, the sludge must be handled as high-level waste (HLW). The NCRW sludge must be pretreated before treatment (e.g., vitrification) and disposal, so that the overall cost of disposal can be minimized. The NCRW pretreatment flowsheet was designed to achieve the following objectives: (a) to separate Am and Pu from the major sludge constituents (Na, Zr). (b) to separate Am and Pu from U. (c) to concentrate Am and Pu in a small volume for immobilization in borosilicate glass, based on Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP). The flowsheet involves: (1) sludge washing, (2) sludge dissolution, (3) extraction of U with tributyl phosphate (TBP), and (4) extraction of TRUs with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutlycarbamoylmethyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO). As presented in the flowsheet, the NCRW sludge is first washed with 0.I M NaOH to remove interstitial liquid and soluble salts from the sludge including sodium and potassium fluorides, carbonates, hydroxides, nitrates, and nitrites. The washed sludge is then subjected to two dissolution steps to achieve near complete dissolution of Zr.

Lumetta, G.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Geothermal brines and sludges: a new resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of cost efficient biochemical processes for the treatment of geothermal brines and sludges is the main thrust of a major R&D effort at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). This effort has led to the design of an environmentally acceptable, technically and economically feasible new technology which converts geothermal wastes into products with significant commercial potential. These include valuable metals recovery with a metal extraction and recovery efficiency of better then 80% over short periods of time (5-25 hours). The new technology also yields valuable salts, such as potassium chloride and generates high quality pigment free silica. The basic technology is versatile and can, with slight modifications, be used in the treatment of hypersaline as well as low salinity brines and sludges. Concurrently traces of toxic metals, including radium are removed to levels which are within regulatory limits. The current status of the new biochemical technology will be discussed in this paper.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.; Lian, H.; Miltenberger, R.P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

K-Basins design guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the design guidelines is to enable SNF and K Basin personnel to complete fuel and sludge removal, and basin water mitigation by providing engineering guidance for equipment design for the fuel basin, facility modifications (upgrades), remote tools, and new processes. It is not intended to be a purchase order reference for vendors. The document identifies materials, methods, and components that work at K Basins; it also Provides design input and a technical review process to facilitate project interfaces with operations in K Basins. This document is intended to compliment other engineering documentation used at K Basins and throughout the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. Significant provisions, which are incorporated, include portions of the following: General Design Criteria (DOE 1989), Standard Engineering Practices (WHC-CM-6-1), Engineering Practices Guidelines (WHC 1994b), Hanford Plant Standards (DOE-RL 1989), Safety Analysis Manual (WHC-CM-4-46), and Radiological Design Guide (WHC 1994f). Documents (requirements) essential to the engineering design projects at K Basins are referenced in the guidelines.

Roe, N.R.; Mills, W.C.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Waste Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...rates, and batch collection volume requirements Water conservation possibilities What is required to meet discharge limits Availability and type of treatment chemicals How sludge will be dewatered, dried, and disposed...

178

Sludge Mass Reduction Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Farm Mixing and Sampling to Support DWPF Operations Farm Mixing and Sampling to Support DWPF Operations David Larsen, PMP, PSP Hasmukh Shah Liquid Waste Engineering Washington Savannah River Company May 21, 2009 2 LWO-LWP-2009-00021 Overview Background Mixing - Historical - Criteria - Current Strategy Sampling Techniques and Procedure Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Requirements - Waste Acceptance Criteria - Tank Farm Compliance 3 LWO-LWP-2009-00021 Sludge Batch Preparation and Feed Tank 51 (Batch Tank) Sludge from one or more waste storage tanks *Mixing by Pumps *Wash *Settle *Decant *Sample Qualified Batch Transferred Forward *Mixing by Pumps *Sample Bulk Waste Removal Tank(s) Tank 40 (Blend Tank) *10,000 gal vessel *Mixing by Agitator *Sample *10,000 gal vessel *Mixing by Agitator *Sample *Wetting *Mixing by Pumps

179

Characterization of Settler Tank and KW Container Sludge Simulants  

SciTech Connect

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has specified base formulations for non-radioactive sludge simulants for use in the development and testing of equipment for sludge sampling, retrieval, transport, and processing. In general, the simulant formulations are based on the average or design-basis physical and chemical properties obtained by characterizing sludge samples. The simulants include surrogates for uranium metal, uranium oxides (agglomerates and fine particulate), and the predominant chemical phases (iron and aluminum hydroxides, sand). Specific surrogate components were selected to match the nominal particle-size distribution and particle-density data obtained from sludge sample analysis. Under contract to CHPRC, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has performed physical and rheological characterization of simulants, and the results are reported here. Two base simulant types (dry) were prepared by STP staff at the Maintenance and Storage Facility and received by PNNL on February 12, 2009: Settler Tank Simulant and KW Container Sludge Simulant. The objectives of this simulant characterization effort were to provide baseline characterization data on simulants being used by STP for process development and equipment testing and provide a high-level comparison of the simulant characteristics to the targets used to formulate the simulants.

Burns, Carolyn A.; Luna, Maria; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

180

Tank waste consolidation analysis for transfer of ORNL RH-TRU tank sludges to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to evaluate the schedule and technical issues associated with consolidation of Remote Handled Transuranic (RH-TRU) sludges in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs). This work supports the DOE Transuranic Waste (TRU) Program plans for private sector treatment of all ORNL TRU sludges for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Transfer of these sludges must be completed in FY 2000 to meet the required schedule for beginning shipment of treated sludges to the WIPP by 2002. This study was performed to (1) evaluate the sludge transfer schedule, (2) evaluate the ability of existing tank systems to contain and manage the sludges and liquids generated during the transfers, and (3) evaluate the costs and schedules of different solid/liquid separation and solids-monitoring methods used during sludge transfer for management of sluice waters.

Kent, T.E.; DePaoli, S.M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

INTEC SBW Solid Sludge Surrogate Recipe and Validation  

SciTech Connect

A nonhazardous INTEC tank farm sludge surrogate that incorporated metathesis reactions to generate solids from solutions of known elements present in the radioactive INTEC tank farm sodium-bearing waste sludges was formulated. Elemental analyses, physical property analyses, and filtration testing were performed on waste surrogate and tank farm waste samples, and the results were compared. For testing physical systems associated with moving the tank farm solids, the surrogate described in this report is the best currently available choice. No other available surrogate exhibits the noted similarities in behavior to the sludges. The chemical morphology, particle size distribution, and settling and flow characteristics of the surrogate were similar to those exhibited by the waste sludges. Nonetheless, there is a difference in chemical makeup of the surrogate and the tank farm waste. If a chemical treatment process were to be evaluated for final treatment and disposition of the waste sludges, the surrogate synthesis process would likely require modification to yield a surrogate with a closer matching chemical composition.

Maio, Vince; Janikowski, Stuart; Johnson, Jim; Maio, Vince; Pao, Jenn-Hai

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Grout and glass performance in support of stabilization/solidification of ORNL tank sludges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collected, evaporated, and stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) and Bethel Valley Evaporator Storage Tanks (BVEST) pending treatment for disposal. In addition, some sludges and supernatants also requiring treatment remain in two inactive tank systems: the gunite and associated tanks (GAAT) and the old hydrofracture (OHF) tank. The waste consists of two phases: sludge and supernatant. The sludges contain a high amount of radioactivity, and some are classified as TRU sludges. Some Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough to be defined as RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges are presumed to be mixed TRU waste. Grouting and vitrification are currently two likely stabilization/solidification alternatives for mixed wastes. Grouting has been used to stabilize/solidify hazardous and low-level radioactive waste for decades. Vitrification has been developed as a high-level radioactive alternative for decades and has been under development recently as an alternative disposal technology for mixed waste. The objective of this project is to define an envelope, or operating window, for grout and glass formulations for ORNL tank sludges. Formulations will be defined for the average composition of each of the major tank farms (BVEST/MVST, GAAT, and OHF) and for an overall average composition of all tank farms. This objective is to be accomplished using surrogates of the tank sludges with hot testing of actual tank sludges to check the efficacy of the surrogates.

Spence, R.D.; Mattus, C.H.; Mattus, A.J.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Toxicity of aqueous fullerene nC60 to activated sludge: nitrification inhibition and microtox test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing production and use of fullerene nanomaterials raised their exposure potential to the activated sludge during biological wastewater treatment process. In this study, the toxicity of aqueous nanoscaled C60 (nC60) to ...

Yongkui Yang; Norihide Nakada; Ryoji Nakajima; Chao Wang; Hiroaki Tanaka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Grout and Glass Performance in Support of Stabilization/Solidification of the MVST Tank Sludges  

SciTech Connect

Wastewater at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collected, evaporated, and stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) pending treatment for disposal. The waste separates into two phases: sludge and supematant. Some of the supematant from these tanks has been decanted, solidified into a grout, and stored for disposal as a solid low-level waste. The sludges in the tank bottoms have been accumulating ,for several years. Some of the sludges contain a high amount of gamma activity (e.g., `37CS concentration range of 0.01 3-11 MBq/g) and contain enough transuranic (TRU) radioisotopes to be classified as TRU wastes. Some Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metal concentrations are high enough in the available total constituent analysis for the MVST sludge to be classified as RCRA hazardous; therefore, these sludges are presumed to be mixed TRU waste.

Gilliam, T.M.; Spence, R.D.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Pretreatment of high solid microbial sludges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus for pretreating microbial sludges in order to enhance secondary anaerobic digestion. The pretreatment process involves disrupting the cellular integrity of municipal sewage sludge through a combination of thermal, explosive decompression and shear forces. The sludge is pressurized and pumped to a pretreatment reactor where it is mixed with steam to heat and soften the sludge. The pressure of the sludge is suddenly reduced and explosive decompression forces are imparted which partially disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Shear forces are then applied to the sludge to further disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Disrupting cellular integrity releases both soluble and insoluble organic constituents and thereby renders municipal sewage sludge more amenable to secondary anaerobic digestion.

Rivard, Christopher J. (Lakewood, CO); Nagle, Nicholas J. (Broomfield, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Pretreatment of high solid microbial sludges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process and apparatus are disclosed for pretreating microbial sludges in order to enhance secondary anaerobic digestion. The pretreatment process involves disrupting the cellular integrity of municipal sewage sludge through a combination of thermal, explosive decompression and shear forces. The sludge is pressurized and pumped to a pretreatment reactor where it is mixed with steam to heat and soften the sludge. The pressure of the sludge is suddenly reduced and explosive decompression forces are imparted which partially disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Shear forces are then applied to the sludge to further disrupt the cellular integrity of the sludge. Disrupting cellular integrity releases both soluble and insoluble organic constituents and thereby renders municipal sewage sludge more amenable to secondary anaerobic digestion. 1 fig.

Rivard, C.J.; Nagle, N.J.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

187

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction fuel removal for 105-KW Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document serves as a Notice of Construction (NOC), pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct, pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.96, for the modifications, installation of new equipment, and fuel removal and sludge relocation activities at 105-KW Basin. The purpose of the activities described in this NOC is to enable the eventual retrieval and transport of the fuel for processing. The fuel retrieval and transport will require an integrated water treatment system for which performance specifications have been developed. These specifications are currently in the procurement process. Following procurement (and before installation of this system and the handling of fuel) design details will be provided to Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The 105-K West Reactor (105-KW) and its associated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage basin were constructed in the early 1950s and are located on the Hanford Site in the 100-K Area about 1,400 feet from the Columbia River. The 105-KW Basin contains 964 Metric Tons of SNF stored under water in approximately 3,800 closed canisters. This SNF has been stored for varying periods of time ranging from 8 to 17 years. The 105-KW Basin is constructed of concrete with an epoxy coating and contains approximately 1.3 million gallons of water with an asphaltic membrane beneath the pool. Although the 105-KW Basin has not been known to leak, the discharge chute and associated construction joint have been isolated from the rest of the basin by metal isolation barriers. This was a precautionary measure, to mitigate the consequences of a seismic event. The proposed modifications described are scheduled to begin in calendar year 1997.

Hays, C.B.

1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

188

Biological Sludge Reduction and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes research sponsored by EPRI and Advanced Biological Services (ABS). A series of experiments focused on the reduction and analysis of biological sludge in pulp mill wastewater. The first experiment involved optimization of the milling process through the alteration of the grinding gap and the number of times sludge was passed through the colloid mill in order to affect fractionation, dispersion, and lysis. For the second experiment, tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of ble...

2001-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

189

Laser removal of sludge from steam generators  

SciTech Connect

A method of removing unwanted chemical deposits known as sludge from the metal surfaces of steam generators with laser energy is provided. Laser energy of a certain power density, of a critical wavelength and frequency, is intermittently focused on the sludge deposits to vaporize them so that the surfaces are cleaned without affecting the metal surface (sludge substrate). Fiberoptic tubes are utilized for laser beam transmission and beam direction. Fiberoptics are also utilized to monitor laser operation and sludge removal.

Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Solidification Tests for LLW Sludges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National laboratory has about 350,000 gallons of remote-handled (RH) sludge in ten liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks that must be solidified and stabilized for disposal at the Nevada Test Site. Samples of the waste sludge were collected from four tanks, and a total of 36 small-scale grouting tests were performed. The presence of free water during curing was evaluated, and the cured grouts were analyzed using the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) to determine if any of the hazardous metals in the sludge (Cd, Cr, Hg, Pb, etc.) would leach above the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) limits/ The grouting formulation used for these tests, with ratios of grout-forming additives weight to waste slurry weight ranging from 0.75:1 to 1.2:1, produced wet grout mixtures that were easy to stir and were self leveling. The grout mixtures cured with no free water visible at any time. The cured grout matrix was very effective at retaining the hazardous metals in the sludge, with TCLP leachate concentrations well below the RCRA limits. The addition of ferrous sulfide (FeS) to some of the sludge samples resulted in, at most, a minimal reduction in the amount of mercury that leached from the grout samples, and had no detectable impact on the other heavy metals present in the sludge (Cd, Cr, and Pb). The TCLP extraction was performed on three samples after 1 day and 7 days of curing, compared to the >28 days for the remaining samples. The metal concentrations for the short cure time samples were similar to the remaining samples, and were all well below the RCRA limits.

Taylor, Paul Allen [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Characterization of Actinides in Simulated Alkaline Tank Waste Sludges and Leachates  

SciTech Connect

Removal of waste-limiting components of sludge (Al, Cr, S, P) in underground tanks at Hanford by treatment with concentrated alkali has proven less efficacious for Al and Cr removal than had been hoped. More aggressive treatments of sludges, for example, contact with oxidants targeting Cr(III), have been tested in a limited number of samples and found to improve leaching efficiency for Cr. Oxidative alkaline leaching can be expected to have at best a secondary influence on the mobilization of Al. Our earlier explorations of Al leaching from sludge simulants indicated acidic and complexometric leaching can improve Al dissolution. Unfortunately, treatments of sludge samples with oxidative alkaline, acidic or complexing leachates produce conditions under which normally insoluble actinide ions (e.g., Am3+, Pu4+, Np4+) can be mobilized to the solution phase. Few experimental or meaningful theoretical studies of actinide chemistry in strongly alkaline, strongly oxidizing solutions have been completed. Unfortunately, extrapolation of the more abundant acid phase thermodynamic data to these radically different conditions provides limited reliable guidance for predicting actinide speciation in highly salted alkaline solutions. In this project, we are investigating the fundamental chemistry of actinides and important sludge components in sludge simulants and supernatants under representative oxidative leaching conditions. We are examining the potential impact of acidic or complexometric leaching with concurrent secondary separations on Al removal from sludges. Finally, a portion of our research is directed at the control of polyvalent anions (SO4=, CrO4=, PO43-) in waste streams destined for vitrification. Our primary objective is to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop. We expect to identify those components of sludges that are likely to be problematic in the application of oxidative, acidic, and complexometric leaching protocols.

Nash, Kenneth L.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Anaerobic digestion of industrial activated aerobic sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tennessee Eastman Company manufactures a variety of organic chemicals, plastics and fibers at their Kingsport Tennessee Facility. The wastewater generated during the manufacture of these compounds is currently treated using an activated sludge process. The objective of the project is to evaluate the economic potential of an anaerobic digestion process to convert industrial sludge at the Tennessee Eastman Company into biogas. The evaluation will require collection and analysis of experimental data on the anaerobic digestion of industrial sludge obtained from Kingsport. Although the experiments will be conducted using Tennessee Eastman sludge, these results should be also generally applicable to similar industrial sludge.

Goodloe, J.G.; Roberts, R.S.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Hanford Sludge Treatment Project Review, June 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of KOP material density with respect to possible uncertainties inherent in equipment and human factors. This analysis includes uncertainty in the volume measurements...

194

Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reduce volume, remove pathogens, and to gain energy. Anaerobic digestion is by far the most commonRemoval of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N treatment in a wastewater treatment plant. They therefore proceed directly to the anaerobic post treatment

195

Characterization of Settler Tank, KW Container and KE Container Sludge Simulants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has specified base formulations for non-radioactive sludge simulants for use in the development and testing of equipment for sludge sampling, retrieval, transport, and processing. In general, the simulant formulations are based on the average or design-basis physical and chemical properties obtained by characterizing sludge samples. The simulants include surrogates for uranium metal, uranium oxides (agglomerates and fine particulate), and the predominant chemical phases (iron and aluminum hydroxides, sand). Specific surrogate components were selected to match the nominal particle-size distribution and particle-density data obtained from sludge sample analysis. Under contract to CHPRC, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has performed physical and rheological characterization of simulants, and the results are reported here. Two base simulant types (dry) were prepared by STP staff at the Maintenance and Storage Facility and received by PNNL in February 2009: Settler Tank Simulant and KW Container Sludge Simulant. A third simulant, KE Container Sludge Simulant was received by PNNL in December 2010. The objectives of this simulant characterization effort were to provide baseline characterization data on simulants being used by STP for process development and equipment testing and provide a high-level comparison of the simulant characteristics to the targets used to formulate the simulants.

Burns, Carolyn A.; Luna, Maria L.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Multi-step process for concentrating magnetic particles in waste sludges  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention involves a multi-step, multi-force process for dewatering sludges which have high concentrations of magnetic particles, such as waste sludges generated during steelmaking. This series of processing steps involves (1) mixing a chemical flocculating agent with the sludge; (2) allowing the particles to aggregate under non-turbulent conditions; (3) subjecting the mixture to a magnetic field which will pull the magnetic aggregates in a selected direction, causing them to form a compacted sludge; (4) preferably, decanting the clarified liquid from the compacted sludge; and (5) using filtration to convert the compacted sludge into a cake having a very high solids content. Steps 2 and 3 should be performed simultaneously. This reduces the treatment time and increases the extent of flocculation and the effectiveness of the process. As partially formed aggregates with active flocculating groups are pulled through the mixture by the magnetic field, they will contact other particles and form larger aggregates. This process can increase the solids concentration of steelmaking sludges in an efficient and economic manner, thereby accomplishing either of two goals: (a) it can convert hazardous wastes into economic resources for recycling as furnace feed material, or (b) it can dramatically reduce the volume of waste material which must be disposed. 7 figs.

Watson, J.L.

1990-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

197

Characterization, Leaching, and Filtrations Testing of Ferrocyanide Tank sludge (Group 8) Actual Waste Composite  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report in a series of eight reports defining characterization, leach, and filtration testing of a wide variety of Hanford tank waste sludges. The information generated from this series is intended to supplement the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) project understanding of actual waste behaviors associated with tank waste sludge processing through the pretreatment portion of the WTP. The work described in this report presents information on a high-iron waste form, specifically the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge. Iron hydroxide has been shown to pose technical challenges during filtration processing; the ferrocyanide tank waste sludge represented a good source of the high-iron matrix to test the filtration processing.

Fiskum, Sandra K.; Billing, Justin M.; Crum, J. V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Peterson, Reid A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2009-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

198

SULFUR POLYMER STABILIZATION/SOLIDIFICATION (SPSS) TREATABILITY OF SIMULATED MIXED-WASTE MERCURY CONTAMINATED SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently evaluating alternative treatment standards for radioactively contaminated high mercury (Hg) subcategory wastes, which do not require the removal of mercury from the waste. The Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is one of several candidate technologies capable of successfully treating various Hg waste streams. To supplement previously supplied data on treatment of soils, EPA needed additional data concerning stabilization of high Hg subcategory waste sludges. To this end, a 5000 ppm sludge surrogate, containing approximately 50 wt% water, was successfully treated by pilot-scale SPSS processing. In two process runs, 85 and 95 wt% of water was recovered from the sludge during processing. At waste loadings of 46 wt% (30 wt% dry) sludge, the treated waste form had no detectable mercury (<10 ppb) in TCLP leachates. Data gathered from the demonstration of treatment of this sludge will provide the EPA with information to support revisions to current treatment requirements for high Hg subcategory wastes.

Adams, J. W.; Bowerman, B. S.; Kalb, P. D.

2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

199

Proceedings: Steam Generator Sludge Management Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A total of 151 individuals attended the Steam Generator Sludge Management Workshop. They represented domestic and foreign utilities, vendors, individuals from government laboratories, university members, EPRI employees. Presentations from utilities and vendors focused on overall control and management of generator sludge which covered several topics. A poster session included presentations on minimizing and characterizing sludge as well as a demonstration of a thermal hydraulic and fouling analysis works...

1995-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

200

Separating lignite hydrogenation sludge by vacuum distillation  

SciTech Connect

Vacuum distillation was studied as a means to separate coal hydrogenation sludge. Additives containing mainly aromatic hydrocarbons intensified the process. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Gorlov, E.G.; Grobanova, L.T.; Belyavtseva, N.V. [Rossiskaya Akademiya, Nauk (Russian Federation)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford tank sludge: Results of FY 1997 studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current plan for remediating the Hanford tank farms consists of waste retrieval, pretreatment, treatment (immobilization), and disposal. The tank wastes will be partitioned into high-level and low-level fractions. The HLW will be immobilized in a borosilicate glass matrix; the resulting glass canisters will then be disposed of in a geologic repository. Because of the expected high cost of HLW vitrification and geologic disposal, pretreatment processes will be implemented to reduce the volume of immobilized high-level waste (IHLW). Caustic leaching (sometimes referred to as enhanced sludge washing or ESW) represents the baseline method for pretreating Hanford tank sludges. Caustic leaching is expected to remove a large fraction of the Al, which is present in large quantities in Hanford tank sludges. A significant portion of the P is also expected to be removed from the sludge by metathesis of water-insoluble metal phosphates to insoluble hydroxides and soluble Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}. Similar metathesis reactions can occur for insoluble sulfate salts, allowing the removal of sulfate from the HLW stream. This report describes the sludge washing and caustic leaching tests performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in FY 1996. The sludges used in this study were taken from Hanford tanks AN-104, BY-108, S-101, and S-111.

Lumetta, G.J.; Burgeson, I.E.; Wagner, M.J.; Liu, J.; Chen, Y.L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Interim Storage of Hanford Spent Fuel & Associated Sludge  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford site is currently dealing with a number of types of Spent Nuclear Fuel. The route to interim dry storage for the various fuel types branches along two different paths. Fuel types such as metallic N reactor fuel and Shippingport Core 2 Blanket assemblies are being placed in approximately 4 m long canisters which are then stored in tubes below grade in a new canister storage building. Other fuels such as TRIGA{trademark} and Light Water Reactor fuel will be relocated and stored in stand-alone casks on a concrete pad. Varying degrees of sophistication are being applied with respect to the drying and/or evacuation of the fuel interim storage canisters depending on the reactivity of the fuel, the degree of damaged fuel and the previous storage environment. The characterization of sludge from the Hanford K Basins is nearly complete and canisters are being designed to store the sludge (including uranium particles from fuel element cleaning) on an interim basis.

MAKENAS, B.J.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

SULFUR POLYMER STABILIZATION/SOLIDIFICATION (SPSS) TREATABILITY OF SIMULATED MIXED-WASTE MERCURY CONTAMINATED SLUDGE.  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is currently seeking to validate technologies that can directly treat radioactively contaminated high mercury (Hg) subcategory wastes without removing the mercury from the waste. The Sulfur Polymer Stabilization/Solidification (SPSS) process developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory is one of several candidate technologies capable of successfully treating various Hg waste streams. To supplement previously supplied data on treatment of soils, EPA needs additional data concerning stabilization of high Hg subcategory waste sludges. To this end, a 5000 ppm sludge surrogate, containing approximately 50 wt% water, was successfully treated by pilot-scale SPSS processing. In two process runs, 85 and 95 wt% of water was recovered from the sludge during processing. At waste loadings of 30 wt% dry sludge, the treated waste form had no detectable mercury (<10 ppb) in TCLP leachates. Data gathered from the demonstration of treatment of this sludge will provide EPA with information to support revisions to current treatment requirements for high Hg subcategory wastes.

ADAMA, J.W.; BOWERMAN, B.S.; KALB, P.D.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Sewage sludge dewatering using flowing liquid metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the dewatering of sludge, and more particularly to the dewatering of a sewage sludge having a moisture content of about 50 to 80% in the form of small cellular micro-organism bodies having internally confined water.

Carlson, L.W.

1985-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

205

Disposable sludge dewatering container and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a device and method for preparing sludge for disposal comprising a box with a thin layer of gravel on the bottom and a thin layer of sand on the gravel layer, an array of perforated piping deployed throughout the gravel layer, and a sump in the gravel layer below the perforated piping array. Standpipes connect the array and sump to an external ion exchanger/fine particulate filter and a pump. Sludge is deposited on the sand layer and dewatered using a pump connected to the piping array, topping up with more sludge as the aqueous component of the sludge is extracted. When the box is full and the free standing water content of the sludge is acceptable, the standpipes are cut and sealed and the lid secured to the box.

Cole, C.M.

1990-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

206

Engineered nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge - Evidence and impacts  

SciTech Connect

Nanotechnology has widespread application in agricultural, environmental and industrial sectors ranging from fabrication of molecular assemblies to microbial array chips. Despite the booming application of nanotechnology, there have been serious implications which are coming into light in the recent years within different environmental compartments, namely air, water and soil and its likely impact on the human health. Health and environmental effects of common metals and materials are well-known, however, when the metals and materials take the form of nanoparticles - consequential hazards based on shape and size are yet to be explored. The nanoparticles released from different nanomaterials used in our household and industrial commodities find their way through waste disposal routes into the wastewater treatment facilities and end up in wastewater sludge. Further escape of these nanoparticles into the effluent will contaminate the aquatic and soil environment. Hence, an understanding of the presence, behavior and impact of these nanoparticles in wastewater and wastewater sludge is necessary and timely. Despite the lack of sufficient literature, the present review attempts to link various compartmentalization aspects of the nanoparticles, their physical properties and toxicity in wastewater and wastewater sludge through simile drawn from other environmental streams.

Brar, Satinder K., E-mail: satinder.brar@ete.inrs.c [INRS-ETE, Universite du Quebec, 490, Rue de la Couronne, Quebec, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Verma, Mausam [Department of Biological Engineering, Sexton Campus, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3J 2X4 (Canada); Tyagi, R.D. [INRS-ETE, Universite du Quebec, 490, Rue de la Couronne, Quebec, G1K 9A9 (Canada); Surampalli, R.Y. [US Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 17-2141, Kansas City, KS 66117 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction fuel removal for 105-KE basin  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC), pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to construct pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.96 for the modifications, installation of new equipment, and fuel removal and sludge relocation activities at 105-KE Basin. The 105-K east reactor and its associated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage basin (105-KE Basin) were constructed in the early 1950s and are located in the 100-K Area about 1,400 feet from the Columbia River. The 105-KE Basin contains 1,152 metric tons of SNF stored underwater in 3,673 open canisters. This SNF has been stored for varying periods of time ranging from 8 to 24 years. The 105-KE Basin is constructed of unlined concrete and contains approximately 1.3 million gallons of water with an asphaltic membrane beneath the pool. The fuel is corroding and an estimated 1,700 cubic feet of sludge, containing radionuclides and miscellaneous materials, have accumulated in the basin. The 105-KE Basin has leaked radiologically contaminated water to the soil beneath the basin in the past most likely at the construction joint between the foundation of the basin and the foundation of the reactor. The purpose of the activities described in this Notice of Construction (NOC) is to enable the retrieval and transport of the fuel to the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF). This NOC describes modifications, the installation of new equipment, and fuel removal and sludge relocation activities expected to be routine in the future. Debris removal activities described in this NOC will supersede the previously approved NOC (DOE/RL-95-65). The proposed modifications described are scheduled to begin in calendar year 1997.

Kamberg, L.D., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

208

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $28.49 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $38.51 $39.67 - 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $20.35 $16.14 $16.64 -9.6 3.1 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $19.64 $19.60 $20.41 1.9 4.2 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $14.02 $16.13 $16.23 7.6 0.6 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $43.43 $40.18 $39.62 -4.5 -1.4

209

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $26.24 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $35.10 $35.74 - 1.8 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $18.74 $14.70 $14.99 -10.6 1.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $18.09 $17.86 $18.39 0.8 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $12.91 $14.70 $14.63 6.4 -0.5 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $40.00 $36.62 $35.70 -5.5 -2.5

210

Modeling of the reburning process using sewage sludge-derived syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification provides an attractive method for sewage sludges treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Gasification generates a fuel gas (syngas) which can be used as a reburning fuel. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reburning potential of sewage sludge gasification gases was defined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Numerical simulation of co-combustion of syngases in coal fired boiler has been done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Calculation shows that analysed syngases can provide higher than 80% reduction of NO{sub x}. - Abstract: Gasification of sewage sludge can provide clean and effective reburning fuel for combustion applications. The motivation of this work was to define the reburning potential of the sewage sludge gasification gas (syngas). A numerical simulation of the co-combustion process of syngas in a hard coal-fired boiler was done. All calculations were performed using the Chemkin programme and a plug-flow reactor model was used. The calculations were modelled using the GRI-Mech 2.11 mechanism. The highest conversions for nitric oxide (NO) were obtained at temperatures of approximately 1000-1200 K. The combustion of hard coal with sewage sludge-derived syngas reduces NO emissions. The highest reduction efficiency (>90%) was achieved when the molar flow ratio of the syngas was 15%. Calculations show that the analysed syngas can provide better results than advanced reburning (connected with ammonia injection), which is more complicated process.

Werle, Sebastian, E-mail: sebastian.werle@polsl.pl [Institute of Thermal Technology, Silesian University of Technology at Gliwice, 44-100 Gliwice, Konarskiego 22 (Poland)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Aerobic composting of waste activated sludge: Kinetic analysis for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption  

SciTech Connect

In order to examine the optimal design and operating parameters, kinetics for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption in composting of waste activated sludge were quantitatively examined. A series of experiments was conducted to discuss the optimal operating parameters for aerobic composting of waste activated sludge obtained from Kawagoe City Wastewater Treatment Plant (Saitama, Japan) using 4 and 20 L laboratory scale bioreactors. Aeration rate, compositions of compost mixture and height of compost pile were investigated as main design and operating parameters. The optimal aerobic composting of waste activated sludge was found at the aeration rate of 2.0 L/min/kg (initial composting mixture dry weight). A compost pile up to 0.5 m could be operated effectively. A simple model for composting of waste activated sludge in a composting reactor was developed by assuming that a solid phase of compost mixture is well mixed and the kinetics for microbiological reaction is represented by a Monod-type equation. The model predictions could fit the experimental data for decomposition of waste activated sludge with an average deviation of 2.14%. Oxygen consumption during composting was also examined using a simplified model in which the oxygen consumption was represented by a Monod-type equation and the axial distribution of oxygen concentration in the composting pile was described by a plug-flow model. The predictions could satisfactorily simulate the experiment results for the average maximum oxygen consumption rate during aerobic composting with an average deviation of 7.4%.

Yamada, Y. [Research Center for Biochemical and Environmental Engineering, Department of Applied Chemistry, Toyo University, Kawagoe, Saitama, 350-8585 (Japan); Kawase, Y. [Research Center for Biochemical and Environmental Engineering, Department of Applied Chemistry, Toyo University, Kawagoe, Saitama, 350-8585 (Japan)]. E-mail: bckawase@mail.eng.toyo.ac.jp

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Environmental residuals and capital costs of energy recovery from municipal sludge and feedlot manure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The capital and environmental cost of energy recovery from municipal sludge and feedlot manure is analyzed. Literature on waste processing and energy conversion and interviews with manufacturers were used for baseline data for construction of theoretical models using three energy conversion processes: anaerobic digestion, incineration, and pyrolysis. Process characteristics, environmental impact data, and capital costs are presented in detail for each conversion system. The energy recovery systems described would probably be sited near large sources of sludge and manure, i.e., metropolitan sewage treatment plants and large feedlots in cattle-raising states. Although the systems would provide benefits in terms of waste disposal as well as energy production, they would also involve additional pollution of air and water. Analysis of potential siting patterns and pollution conflicts is needed before energy recovery systems using municipal sludge can be considered as feasible energy sources.

Ballou, S W; Dale, L; Johnson, R; Chambers, W; Mittelhauser, H

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Clean and Efficient Utilization of Sewage Sludge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the Final Report for the DOE SBIR Phase II project (Grant No. DE-FG03-98ER82573). This report summarizes accomplishments and results for the entire program. In this program an innovative technology has been devised for transforming sewage sludge into a high quality fuel and recovering its energy content. The technology being developed is generally applicable to nearly all municipal sewage sludge management facilities and coal-fired boilers. It will provide economic and environmental benefits.

Zamansky, Vladimir; Rizeq, George

2002-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

214

Reliability analysis of common hazardous waste treatment processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five hazardous waste treatment processes are analyzed probabilistically using Monte Carlo simulation to elucidate the relationships between process safety factors and reliability levels. The treatment processes evaluated are packed tower aeration, reverse osmosis, activated sludge, upflow anaerobic sludge blanket, and activated carbon adsorption.

Waters, R.D. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

INHIBITION OF WASHED SLUDGE WITH SODIUM NITRITE  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of electrochemical tests used to determine the relationship between the concentration of the aggressive anions in washed sludge and the minimum effective inhibitor concentration. Sodium nitrate was added as the inhibitor because of its compatibility with the DWPF process. A minimum of 0.05M nitrite is required to inhibit the washed sludge simulant solution used in this study. When the worst case compositions and safety margins are considered, it is expected that a minimum operating limit of nearly 0.1M nitrite will be specified. The validity of this limit is dependent on the accuracy of the concentrations and solubility splits previously reported. Sodium nitrite additions to obtain 0.1M nitrite concentrations in washed sludge will necessitate the additional washing of washed precipitate in order to decrease its sodium nitrite inhibitor requirements sufficiently to remain below the sodium limits in the feed to the DWPF. Nitrite will be the controlling anion in "fresh" washed sludge unless the soluble chloride concentration is about ten times higher than predicted by the solubility splits. Inhibition of "aged" washed sludge will not be a problem unless significant chloride dissolution occurs during storage. It will be very important tomonitor the composition of washed sludge during processing and storage.

Congdon, J.; Lozier, J.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

216

ACCIDENT ANALYSES & CONTROL OPTIONS IN SUPPORT OF THE SLUDGE WATER SYSTEM SAFETY ANALYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the accident analyses and nuclear safety control options for use in Revision 7 of HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, ''K Basins Safety Analysis Report'' and Revision 4 of HNF-SD-SNF-TSR-001, ''Technical Safety Requirements - 100 KE and 100 KW Fuel Storage Basins''. These documents will define the authorization basis for Sludge Water System (SWS) operations. This report follows the guidance of DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports'', for calculating onsite and offsite consequences. The accident analysis summary is shown in Table ES-1 below. While this document describes and discusses potential control options to either mitigate or prevent the accidents discussed herein, it should be made clear that the final control selection for any accident is determined and presented in HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062.

WILLIAMS, J.C.

2003-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Pretreatment of Pulp Mill Wastewater Treatment Residues to Improve Their Anaerobic Digestion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Anaerobic digestion of excess biological wastewater treatment sludge (WAS) from pulp mills has the potential to reduce disposal costs and to generate energy through biogas… (more)

Wood, Nicholas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Removal of nitrogen and phosphorus from reject water of municipal wastewater treatment plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Reject water, the liquid fraction produced after dewatering of anaerobically digested activated sludge on a municipal wastewater treatment plant (MWWTP), contains from 750 to 1500… (more)

Guo, Chenghong.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43 $0.0294 W - W W - - - 43 $0.0294 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $0.0161 W W W W $0.0216 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $0.0296 $0.0277 $0.0292 $0.0309 $0.0325 $0.0328 $0.0357 $0.0451 $0.0427 4.7 -5.3 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

220

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

$15.49 $13.83 W - W W - - - $15.49 $13.83 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $19.46 W W W W $29.49 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $10.33 $9.58 $10.68 $12.03 $13.69 $14.71 $16.11 $19.72 $20.69 9.1 4.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

$0.0323 $0.0284 W - W W - - - $0.0323 $0.0284 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $0.0146 W W W W $0.0223 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $0.0269 $0.0255 $0.0275 $0.0299 $0.0325 $0.0339 $0.0380 $0.0490 $0.0468 7.2 -4.3 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

222

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Basin Basin Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware W W $16.45 $14.29 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $21.45 W W W W $28.57 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $11.39 $10.39 $11.34 $12.43 $13.69 $14.25 $15.17 $18.16 $18.85 6.5 3.8

223

Characterization Data Package for Containerized Sludge Samples Collected from Engineered Container SCS-CON-210  

SciTech Connect

This data package contains the K Basin sludge characterization results obtained by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory during processing and analysis of four sludge core samples collected from Engineered Container SCS-CON-210 in 2010 as requested by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company. Sample processing requirements, analytes of interest, detection limits, and quality control sample requirements are defined in the KBC-33786, Rev. 2. The core processing scope included reconstitution of a sludge core sample distributed among four to six 4-L polypropylene bottles into a single container. The reconstituted core sample was then mixed and subsampled to support a variety of characterization activities. Additional core sludge subsamples were combined to prepare a container composite. The container composite was fractionated by wet sieving through a 2,000 micron mesh and a 500-micron mesh sieve. Each sieve fraction was sampled to support a suite of analyses. The core composite analysis scope included density determination, radioisotope analysis, and metals analysis, including the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Hazardous Waste Facility Permit metals (with the exception of mercury). The container composite analysis included most of the core composite analysis scope plus particle size distribution, particle density, rheology, and crystalline phase identification. A summary of the received samples, core sample reconstitution and subsampling activities, container composite preparation and subsampling activities, physical properties, and analytical results are presented. Supporting data and documentation are provided in the appendices. There were no cases of sample or data loss and all of the available samples and data are reported as required by the Quality Assurance Project Plan/Sampling and Analysis Plan.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Baldwin, David L.; Daniel, Richard C.; Bos, Stanley J.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Carlson, Clark D.; Coffey, Deborah S.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Neiner, Doinita; Oliver, Brian M.; Pool, Karl N.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Snow, Lanee A.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Trang-Le, Truc LT; Urie, Michael W.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

224

Solidifications/stabilization treatability study of a mixed waste sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Oak Ridge Operations Office signed a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement with the US Environmental Protection Agency Region IV regarding mixed wastes from the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) subject to the land disposal restriction provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). This agreement required treatability studies of solidification/stabilization (S/S) on mixed wastes from the ORR. This paper reports the results of the cementitious S/S studies conducted on a waste water treatment sludge generated from biodenitrification and heavy metals precipitation. For the cementitious waste forms, the additives tested were Portland cement, ground granulated blast furnace slag, Class F fly ash, and perlite. The properties measured on the treated waste were density, free-standing liquid, unconfined compressive strength, and TCLP performance. Spiking up to 10,000, 10,000, and 4,400 mg/kg of nickel, lead, and cadmium, respectively, was conducted to test waste composition variability and the stabilization limitations of the binding agents. The results indicated that nickel, lead and cadmium were stabilized fairly well in the high pH hydroxide-carbonate- ``bug bones`` sludge, but also clearly confirmed the established stabilization potential of cementitious S/S for these RCRA metals.

Spence, R.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Stine, E.F. [International Technologies Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States). Technology Development Lab.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) Residuals, Sludge, and Composting (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection The Maine Department of Environmental Protection's Residuals, Sludge, and Composting program regulates the land application and post-processing of organic wastes, including sewage sludge, septage, food waste, and wood

226

Greenhouse gases emissions accounting for typical sewage sludge digestion with energy utilization and residue land application in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GHGs emissions from sludge digestion + residue land use in China were calculated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The AD unit contributes more than 97% of total biogenic GHGs emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AD with methane recovery is attractive for sludge GHGs emissions reduction. - Abstract: About 20 million tonnes of sludge (with 80% moisture content) is discharged by the sewage treatment plants per year in China, which, if not treated properly, can be a significant source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions. Anaerobic digestion is a conventional sewage sludge treatment method and will continue to be one of the main technologies in the following years. This research has taken into consideration GHGs emissions from typical processes of sludge thickening + anaerobic digestion + dewatering + residue land application in China. Fossil CO{sub 2}, biogenic CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4,} and avoided CO{sub 2} as the main objects is discussed respectively. The results show that the total CO{sub 2}-eq is about 1133 kg/t DM (including the biogenic CO{sub 2}), while the net CO{sub 2}-eq is about 372 kg/t DM (excluding the biogenic CO{sub 2}). An anaerobic digestion unit as the main GHGs emission source occupies more than 91% CO{sub 2}-eq of the whole process. The use of biogas is important for achieving carbon dioxide emission reductions, which could reach about 24% of the total CO{sub 2}-eq reduction.

Niu Dongjie, E-mail: niudongjie@tongji.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); UNEP-Tongji Institute of Environment for Sustainable Development, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Huang Hui [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Dai Xiaohu [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Urban Pollution Control, Shanghai 200092 (China); Zhao Youcai [Key Laboratory of Yangtze Aquatic Environment, Ministry of Education, College of Environmental Science and Engineering of Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas-Louisiana- Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin Appalachian Basin Wind River Basin Eastern Shelf NW Shelf Abo Sussex-Shannon Muddy J Mesaverde- Lance-Lewis Medina/Clinton-Tuscarora Bradford-Venango-Elk Berea-Murrysville Piceance Basin Bossier Williston Basin Ft Worth Basin Davis Bighorn Basin Judith River- Eagle Permian Basin Anadarko Basin Denver Basin San Juan Basin North-Central Montana Area Uinta Basin Austin Chalk Codell-Niobrara Penn-Perm Carbonate Niobrara Chalk Dakota Morrow Mesaverde Thirty- One Cleveland Ozona Canyon Wasatch- Mesaverde Red Fork Mesaverde Granite Wash Stuart City-Edwards Bowdoin- Greenhorn Travis Peak Olmos Cotton Valley Vicksburg Wilcox Lobo Pictured Cliffs Cretaceous Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Mancos- Dakota Gilmer Lime Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States

228

CHARACTERIZATION OF ACTINIDES IN SIMULATED ALKALINE TANK WASTE SLUDGES AND LEACHATES  

SciTech Connect

In this project, both the fundamental chemistry of actinides in alkaline solutions (relevant to those present in Hanford-style waste storage tanks), and their dissolution from sludge simulants (and interactions with supernatants) have been investigated under representative sludge leaching procedures. The leaching protocols were designed to go beyond conventional alkaline sludge leaching limits, including the application of acidic leachants, oxidants and complexing agents. The simulant leaching studies confirm in most cases the basic premise that actinides will remain in the sludge during leaching with 2-3 M NaOH caustic leach solutions. However, they also confirm significant chances for increased mobility of actinides under oxidative leaching conditions. Thermodynamic data generated improves the general level of experiemental information available to predict actinide speciation in leach solutions. Additional information indicates that improved Al removal can be achieved with even dilute acid leaching and that acidic Al(NO3)3 solutions can be decontaminated of co-mobilized actinides using conventional separations methods. Both complexing agents and acidic leaching solutions have significant potential to improve the effectiveness of conventional alkaline leaching protocols. The prime objective of this program was to provide adequate insight into actinide behavior under these conditions to enable prudent decision making as tank waste treatment protocols develop.

Nash, Kenneth L.

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

229

Asbestos in sludge- a significant risk  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to consider the issue of asbestos in sludge applied to land, and to provide some perspective on the health risk conclusions drawn from research on which these stories were based. While this review cannot conclude there is no health risk due to the presence of asbestos in sludge, it does suggest that such risk is not appreciably greater than from the presence of asbestos in other environmental samples. As analytical techniques continue to improve, increasing numbers of potentially toxic chemicals will be found in all types of environmental samples, including sludge. However, it is essential that the mere presence of a chemical in such samples not be equated with toxicity, or a hazard to the general public. Although some of the contaminants that will be detected in sludges or other environmental samples will be new and exotic, many have been present in the environment for years, and, in the case of the asbestos, for millenia. Scientists and engineers must work vigorously to minimize such health risks due to environmental contamination. However, scientists have the responsibility to discuss risks within a framework that is understandable by the general public. To do otherwise so as to incite fear and apprehension borders on scientific irresponsibility, and neither solves the problem, nor does justice to the scientific method.

Naylor, L.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hydrogen Evolution and Sludge Suspension During the Preparation of the First Batch of Sludge at the Savannah River Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first batch of High Level Radioactive Sludge for the Defense Waste Processing Facility is being prepared in two 4.9 million liter waste tanks. The preparation involves removing water soluble salts by washing (water addition, sludge suspension, settling and decantation). Sludge suspension is accomplished using long shafted slurry pumps that are mounted on rotating turntables. During the sludge suspension runs in 1993 and 1994, the slurry pumps` cleaning radius was determined to be less than that expected from previous determinations using synthetic sludge in a full size waste tank mockup. Hydrogen concentrations in the tanks` vapor space were monitored during the sludge suspension activities. As expected, the initial agitation of the sludge increased the hydrogen concentration, however, with the controls in place the hydrogen concentration was maintained below seven percent of the lower flammability limit

Hay, M.S.; Lee, E.D.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Geothermal waste treatment biotechnology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Technical feasibility of a biotechnology based on biochemical reactions for detoxification of geothermal brines has been demonstrated. Laboratory-scale studies have shown that the emerging biotechnology is versatile and is applicable to a variety of geothermal sludges and materials with similar geochemical properties. Materials suitable for treatment are those which may contain few or many metals in concentrations exceeding those allowed by regulatory agencies. Comparison of several possible types of bioreactors and processes have led to the conclusion that a number of variables have to be considered in the design and development of a biochemical plant for the detoxification of geothermal type sludges. These include reactor size, effects of agitation, mixed cultures, state of the biomass, pH and dissolved oxygen, concentration of residual sludge, residence time, and temperature. Under optimum conditions, high rates of metal removal can be achieved. Some recent studies, dealing with the process variables and their optimization, will be discussed. 6 refs., 3 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Fiscal year 1994 1/25-scale sludge mobilization testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are 28 one-million-gallon double-shell radioactive waste tanks on the Hanford Reservation in southeastern Washington State. The waste in these tanks was generated during processing of nuclear materials. Solids-laden slurries were placed into many of the tanks. Over time, the waste solids have settled to form a layer of sludge in the bottom of these tanks. The sludge layer thickness varies from tank to tank with some having only a few centimeters or no sludge up to some tanks which have about 4.5 m (15 ft) of sludge. It is planned that the waste will be removed from these tanks as part of the overall Hanford site cleanup efforts. Jet mixer pumps are to be placed into the tanks to stir up (mobilize) the sludge and form a uniform slurry suitable for pumping to downstream processing facilities. These mixer pumps use powerful jets of tank fluid directed horizontally out of two, diametrically opposed nozzles near the tank bottom. These fluid jets impinge upon the sludge and stir it up. The amount of sludge mobilized by the mixer pump jets depends not only on the jet properties, but also on the ability of the sludge to resist the jets. It is the goal of the work described in this document to develop the ability to predict how much sludge will be mobilized by the mixer pumps based on the size and velocity of the mixer pump jets and the physical and chemical properties of the tank sludge.

Powell, M.R.; Gates, C.M.; Hymas, C.R.; Sprecher, M.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Morter, N.J. [Associated Western Universities, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Northwest Div.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

234

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

235

Ethanol production from paper sludge by simultaneous saccharification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ethanol Production From Paper Sludge by Simultaneous Saccharification and Co-Fermentation Using Recombinant Xylose-Fermenting Microorganisms Jiayi Zhang, 1 Lee R. Lynd 1,2 1...

236

ELECTROCHEMICAL CORROSION STUDY FOR TANK 241-AY-102 SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the analyses performed on core samples from the sludge region of the waste in Tank 241-AY-102 to determine the electrochemical corrosion potential.

DUNCAN JB

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

237

An evaluation of predictive environmental test procedures for sewage sludge.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research project aimed at evaluating four internationally accepted leachate extraction tests to determine their applicability on sewage sludge samples. Furthermore, the present analytical method… (more)

Kasselman, Graeme

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

SLUDGE BATCH 7B QUALIFICATION ACTIVITIES WITH SRS TANK FARM SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry - Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) - be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). With the tight schedule constraints for SB7b and the potential need for caustic addition to allow for an acceptable glass processing window, the qualification for SB7b was approached differently than past batches. For SB7b, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 and a Tank 40 sample for qualification. SRNL did not receive the qualification sample from Tank 51 nor did it simulate all of the Tank Farm washing and decanting operations. Instead, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 SB7b sample from samples of Tank 7 and Tank 51, along with a wash solution to adjust the supernatant composition to the final SB7b Tank 51 Tank Farm projections. SRNL then prepared a sample to represent SB7b in Tank 40 by combining portions of the SRNL-prepared Tank 51 SB7b sample and a Tank 40 Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) sample. The blended sample was 71% Tank 40 (SB7a) and 29% Tank 7/Tank 51 on an insoluble solids basis. This sample is referred to as the SB7b Qualification Sample. The blend represented the highest projected Tank 40 heel (as of May 25, 2011), and thus, the highest projected noble metals content for SB7b. Characterization was performed on the Tank 51 SB7b samples and SRNL performed DWPF simulations using the Tank 40 SB7b material. This report documents: (1) The preparation and characterization of the Tank 51 SB7b and Tank 40 SB7b samples. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the SB7b Tank 40 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a nonradioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the SRAT receipt, SRAT product, and SME product. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7b related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7b processing.

Pareizs, J.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.; Reboul, S.

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Oquirrh basin revisited  

SciTech Connect

The upper Paleozoic succession in the Oquirrh basin in unusually thick, up to 9300 m, and consists mainly of a Pennsylvanian-middle Permian miogeocline of northwestern Utah. Previous workers have suggested a tectonic origin for the Oquirrh basin that is incompatible with the basin location in both time and space. There is no evidence for Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian tectonism in the middle of the miogeocline. Thermal evidence from the Mississippian Mission Canyon shale does no support the implied deep burial of the crustal sag models of basin formation. Stratigraphic and facies evidence indicates a growth fault origin for the basin. Regional isopach maps and facies maps are powerful tools in interpreting depositional environments and in reconstructing fold-and-thrust belts. However, the location of measured sections relative to the location of the growth fault basin. The Charleston-Nebo thrust may have essentially reversed the movement on a growth fault. Thick Oquirrh basin sedimentary rocks may not be required to balance structural sections across this thrust fault. A thin-skinned, extensional growth fault origin for the Oquirrh basin implies that the Cordilleran miogeocline did not participate in the Pennsylvanian north-vergent uplifts of the Ancestral Rocky Mountains.

Erskine, M.C.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Corrosion in ICPP fuel storage basins  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant currently stores irradiated nuclear fuel in fuel storage basins. Historically, fuel has been stored for over 30 years. During the 1970`s, an algae problem occurred which required higher levels of chemical treatment of the basin water to maintain visibility for fuel storage operations. This treatment led to higher levels of chlorides than seen previously which cause increased corrosion of aluminum and carbon steel, but has had little effect on the stainless steel in the basin. Corrosion measurements of select aluminum fuel storage cans, aluminum fuel storage buckets, and operational support equipment have been completed. Aluminum has exhibited good general corrosion rates, but has shown accelerated preferential attack in the form of pitting. Hot dipped zinc coated carbon steel, which has been in the basin for approximately 40 years, has shown a general corrosion rate of 4 mpy, and there is evidence of large shallow pits on the surface. A welded Type 304 stainless steel corrosion coupon has shown no attack after 13 years exposure. Galvanic couples between carbon steel welded to Type 304 stainless steel occur in fuel storage yokes exposed to the basin water. These welded couples have shown galvanic attack as well as hot weld cracking and intergranular cracking. The intergranular stress corrosion cracking is attributed to crevices formed during fabrication which allowed chlorides to concentrate.

Dirk, W.J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

K-Basins.pub  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 AUDIT REPORT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES COMPLETION OF K BASINS MILESTONES APRIL 2002 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Completion of K Basins Milestones" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (Department) has been storing 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The fuel, used in support of Hanford's former mission, is currently stored in canisters that are kept in two enclosed water-filled pools known as the K Basins. The K Basins represent a significant risk to the environment due to their deteriorating condition. In fact, the K East Basin, which is near the Columbia River, has

242

Correlation between Organic Matter Degradation and the Rheological Performance of Waste Sludge During Anaerobic Digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anaerobic digestion has demonstrated to be a good possibility to reduce the organic matter contents in waste activated sludge resulting in the effluents treatment. An anaerobic digestion was carried out in a 3.5 L reactor at 35?°C for a period of 20 days. An electronic thermostat controlled the temperature. The reactor was agitated at a rate of 200 rpm. The study of the rheological behavior of the waste activated sludge was done with an Anton Paar™ rheometer model MCR301 with a peltier plate for temperature control. Four?blade vane geometry was used with samples of 37 mL for determining rheological properties. Sampling (two samples) was taken every four days of anaerobic digestion through a peristaltic pump. The samples behavior was characterized by the Herschel?Bulkley model

Evangelina S. Morel; José A. Hernández?Hernándes; Juan M. Méndez?Contreras; Denis Cantú?Lozano

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Filtration and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Sludge and REDOX Cladding Sludge Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan (Barnes and Voke 2006). The test program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Under test plan TP RPP WTP 467 (Fiskum et al. 2007), eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. Under this test plan, a waste testing program was implemented that included: • Homogenizing the archive samples by group as defined in the test plan. • Characterizing the homogenized sample groups. • Performing parametric leaching testing on each group for compounds of interest. • Performing bench-top filtration/leaching tests in the hot cell for each group to simulate filtration and leaching activities if they occurred in the UFP2 vessel of the WTP Pretreatment Facility. This report focuses on a filtration/leaching test performed using two of the eight waste composite samples. The sample groups examined in this report were the plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR). Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, thus requiring caustic leaching. WTP RPT 167 (Snow et al. 2008) describes the homogenization, characterization, and parametric leaching activities before benchtop filtration/leaching testing of these two waste groups. Characterization and initial parametric data in that report were used to plan a single filtration/leaching test using a blend of both wastes. The test focused on filtration testing of the waste and caustic leaching for aluminum, in the form of gibbsite, and its impact on filtration. The initial sample was diluted with a liquid simulant to simulate the receiving concentration of retrieved tank waste into the UFP2 vessel (< 10 wt% undissolved solids). Filtration testing was performed on the dilute waste sample and dewatered to a higher solids concentration. Filtration testing was then performed on the concentrated slurry. Afterwards, the slurry was caustic leached to remove aluminum present in the undissolved solid present in the waste. The leach was planned to simulate leaching conditions in the UFP2 vessel. During the leach, slurry supernate samples were collected to measure the dissolution rate of aluminum in the waste. After the slurry cooled down from the elevated leach temperature, the leach liquor was dewatered from the solids. The remaining slurry was rinsed and dewatered with caustic solutions to remove a majority of the dissolved aluminum from the leached slurry. The concentration of sodium hydroxide in the rinse solutions was high enough to maintain the solubility of the aluminum in the dewatered rinse solutions after dilution of the slurry supernate. Filtration tests were performed on the final slurry to compare to filtration performance before and after caustic leaching.

Shimskey, Rick W.; Billing, Justin M.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Hallen, Richard T.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

244

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

245

HYDROLASING OF CONTAMINATED UNDERWATER BASIN SURFACES AT THE HANFORD K-AREA  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses selecting and Implementing hydrolasing technology to reduce radioactive contamination in preparing to dispose of the K Basins; two highly contaminated concrete basins at the Hanford Site. A large collection of spent nuclear fuel stored for many years underwater at the K Basins has been removed to stable, dry, safe storage. Remediation activities have begun for the remaining highly contaminated water, sludge, and concrete basin structures. Hydrolasing will be used to decontaminate and prepare the basin structures for disposal. The U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is considered the world's largest environmental cleanup project. The site covers 1,517 Km{sup 2} (586 square miles) along the Columbia River in an arid region of the northwest United States (U.S.). Hanford is the largest of the US former nuclear defense production sites. From the World War II era of the mid-1940s until the late-1980s when production stopped, Hanford produced 60 percent of the plutonium for nuclear defense and, as a consequence, produced a significant amount of environmental pollution now being addressed. Spent nuclear fuel was among the major challenges for DOE's environmental cleanup mission at Hanford. The end of production left Hanford with about 105,000 irradiated, solid uranium metal fuel assemblies--representing approximately 2,100 metric tons (80 percent of DOE's spent nuclear fuel). The fuel was ultimately stored in the K Basins water-filled, concrete basins attached to Hanford's K East (KE) and K West (KW) reactors. K Basin's fuel accounted for 95 percent of the total radioactivity in Hanford's former reactor production areas. Located about 457 meters (500 yards) from the Columbia River, the K Basins are two indoor, rectangular structures of reinforced concrete; each filled with more than 3.8 million liters (one million gallons) of water that has become highly contaminated with long-lived radionuclides. At the KW Basin, fuel was packaged and sealed in canisters. At the KE Basin, fuel was stored in open canisters that were exposed to water in the basin. The irradiated spent nuclear fuel corroded during long-term, wet storage; resulting in thousands of fuel assemblies becoming severely corroded and/or damaged. Corrosion, especially in the KE Basin, contributed to the formation of a layer of radioactive sludge in the basins. Sludge removal is now progressing and will be followed by dewatering and dispositioning the concrete structures. The DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) has given Fluor Hanford Inc./Fluor Government Group (Fluor) the task of preparing Hanford's K Basins for decontamination and disposal. Prior to dewatering, hydrolasing will be used to decontaminate the basin surfaces to prepare them for disposal. By removing highly contaminated surface layers of concrete, hydrolasing will be used to meet the dose objectives for protecting workers and complying with regulations for transporting demolition debris. Fluor has innovated, tested, and planned the application of the hydrolasing technology to meet the challenge of decontaminating highly radioactive concrete surfaces underwater. Newly existing technology is being adapted to this unique challenge.

CHRONISTER, G.B.

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

246

Testing fluidized bed incinerators for energy-efficient operation for the Southtowns Sewage Treatment Agency. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two methods for improving the energy efficiency of fluidized bed sludge incinerators were evaluated. The first method used paper pulp and polymer as conditioning agents for municipal sludge instead of lime and ferric chloride. Automatic control of the incinerator was the second method evaluated for energy savings. To evaluate the use of paper pulp and polymer as conditioning agents, varying quantities of paper pulp were added to the liquid sludge to determine the optimal sludge-to-paper pulp ratio. The effect of the paper pulp and polymer-conditioned sludge on plant operations also was evaluated. When compared to sludge conditioned with lime and ferric chloride, the paper pulp and polymer-conditioned sludge had similar cake release and feed characteristics, higher BTU values for the dry sludge solids, required less auxiliary fuel for incineration, and generated less ash for disposal. The paper pulp and polymer did not have any appreciable negative effects on the operation of the wastewater treatment plant. It was estimated that processing and incinerating the sludge conditioned with paper pulp and polymer resulted in a cost savings of up to $91.73 per dry ton of activated sludge solids. To evaluate the effect of automatic control, all the incinerator operating parameters including air flow rates, fuel oil feed rates, and sludge feed rates, were automatically monitored and controlled to minimize auxiliary fuel oil use and to keep the incinerator running at optimal conditions. Although effective, the estimated cost savings for automatic control of the incinerator were small.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Caustic Leaching of Hanford Tank S-110 Sludge  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the Hanford Tank S-110 sludge caustic leaching test conducted in FY 2001 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The data presented here can be used to develop the baseline and alternative flowsheets for pretreating Hanford tank sludge. The U.S. Department of Energy funded the work through the Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program (ESP; EM?50).

Lumetta, Gregg J.; Carson, Katharine J.; Darnell, Lori P.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Hoopes, Francis V.; Sell, Richard L.; Sinkov, Sergey I.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Urie, Michael W.; Wagner, John J.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

248

Test procedure forms for sludge retrieval and packaging  

SciTech Connect

This document provides test procedure forms for sludge retrieval and packaging tests in the 305 Cold Test Facility. The completed and approved forms provide all descriptions, criteria and analysis to safely perform sludge equipment tests in the 305 Cold Test Facility.

Feigenbutz, L.V.

1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

249

High Level Waste System Impacts from Acid Dissolution of Sludge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research evaluates the ability of OLI{copyright} equilibrium based software to forecast Savannah River Site High Level Waste system impacts from oxalic acid dissolution of Tank 1-15 sludge heels. Without further laboratory and field testing, only the use of oxalic acid can be considered plausible to support sludge heel dissolution on multiple tanks. Using OLI{copyright} and available test results, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Material and energy balances, coupled with the model, identify potential safety concerns. Overpressurization and overheating are shown to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen could, however, overwhelm the tank ventilation. While pH adjustment can restore the minimal hydrogen generation, resultant precipitates will notably increase the sludge volume. OLI{copyright} is used to develop a flowsheet such that additional sludge vitrification canisters and other negative system impacts are minimized. Sensitivity analyses are used to assess the processability impacts from variations in the sludge/quantities of acids.

KETUSKY, EDWARD

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste sludge: Status Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the status of process development for pretreating Hanford neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge, of which [approximately] 3.3 [times] 10[sup 6] L is stored in Tanks 103-AW and 105-AW at the Hanford Site. The initial baseline process chosen for pretreating NCRW sludge is to dissolve the sludge in nitric acid and extract the -transuranic (MU) elements from the dissolved sludge solution with octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoyl methyl phosphine oxide (CNWO). This process converts the NCRW sludge into a relatively large volume of low-level waste (LLW) to be disposed of as grout, leaving only a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) requiring vitrification in the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP).

Lumetta, G J; Swanson, J L

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

SLUDGE TREATMENT PROJECT KOP CONCEPTUAL DESIGN CONTROL DECISION REPORT  

SciTech Connect

This control decision addresses the Knock-Out Pot (KOP) Disposition KOP Processing System (KPS) conceptual design. The KPS functions to (1) retrieve KOP material from canisters, (2) remove particles less than 600 {micro}m in size and low density materials from the KOP material, (3) load the KOP material into Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) baskets, and (4) stage the MCO baskets for subsequent loading into MCOs. Hazard and accident analyses of the KPS conceptual design have been performed to incorporate safety into the design process. The hazard analysis is documented in PRC-STP-00098, Knock-Out Pot Disposition Project Conceptual Design Hazard Analysis. The accident analysis is documented in PRC-STP-CN-N-00167, Knock-Out Pot Disposition Sub-Project Canister Over Lift Accident Analysis. Based on the results of these analyses, and analyses performed in support of MCO transportation and MCO processing and storage activities at the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF) and Canister Storage Building (CSB), control decision meetings were held to determine the controls required to protect onsite and offsite receptors and facility workers. At the conceptual design stage, these controls are primarily defined by their safety functions. Safety significant structures, systems, and components (SSCs) that could provide the identified safety functions have been selected for the conceptual design. It is anticipated that some safety SSCs identified herein will be reclassified based on hazard and accident analyses performed in support of preliminary and detailed design.

CARRO CA

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

252

SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, but were acceptable compared to the EA glass when tested. These glasses fell outside of the lower 95% confidence band, which demonstrates conservatism in the model. A few of the glasses fell outside of the upper 95% confidence band; however, these particular glasses have normalized release values that were much lower than the values of EA and should be of no practical concern. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable to the SB7b sludge system with a range of Na{sub 2}O concentrations blended with Frits 418 or 702. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable by the current DWPF PCCS models and/or acceptable with respect to the EA benchmark glass regardless of thermal history or compositional view.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

253

Poland petroleum refinery sludge lagoon demonstration project  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy and the Institute for Ecology of Industrial Area have been working together to develop mutually beneficial, cost-effective environmental remediation technologies such as the demonstration of bioremediation techniques for the clean up of acidic petroleum sludge impacted soils at an oil refinery in southern Poland. After an expedited site characterization, treatability study, and a risk assessment study, a remediation strategy was devised. The waste material was composed primarily of high molecular weight paraffinic and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. A biopile design which employed a combination of passive and active aeration in conjunction with nutrient and surfactant application as used to increase the biodegradation of the contaminants of concern.

Altman, D.J.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

254

K Basin Hazard Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

PECH, S.H.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

255

Confirmation Run of the DWPF SRAT Cycle Using the Sludge-Only Flowsheet with Tank 40 Radioactive Sludge and Frit 200 in the Shielded Cells Facility  

SciTech Connect

Several basic data reports have been issued concerning the recent demonstration of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Cycle and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Cycle, conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). The SRTC demonstration was completed using the DWPF ''Sludge-Only'' flowsheet with washed Tank 40 sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 2 or Macrobatch 3) in the Shielded Cells facility. The DWPF ''Sludge-Only'' flowsheet calls for processing radioactive sludge slurry using nitric acid, concentrated formic acid, and frit 200.

Fellinger, T.L.

2002-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

256

Tank 42 sludge-only process development for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF)  

SciTech Connect

Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) requested the development of a sludge-only process for Tank 42 sludge since at the current processing rate, the Tank 51 sludge has been projected to be depleted as early as August 1998. Testing was completed using a non-radioactive Tank 42 sludge simulant. The testing was completed under a range of operating conditions, including worst case conditions, to develop the processing conditions for radioactive Tank 42 sludge. The existing Tank 51 sludge-only process is adequate with the exception that 10 percent additional acid is recommended during sludge receipt and adjustment tank (SRAT) processing to ensure adequate destruction of nitrite during the SRAT cycle.

Lambert, D.P.

2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

257

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF.

Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

258

Hydrogen production during processing of radioactive sludge containing noble metals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen was produced when radioactive sludge from Savannah River Site radioactive waste containing noble metals was reacted with formic acid. This will occur in a process tank in the Defense Waste Facility at SRS when waste is vitrified. Radioactive sludges from four tanks were tested in a lab-scale apparatus. Maximum hydrogen generation rates varied from 5 {times}10{sup {minus}7} g H{sub 2}/hr/g of sludge from the least reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 51) to 2 {times}10{sup {minus}4} g H{sub 2}/hr/g of sludge from the most reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 11). The time required for the hydrogen generation to reach a maximum varied from 4.1 to 25 hours. In addition to hydrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were produced and the pH of the reaction slurry increased. In all cases, the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were generated before the hydrogen. The results are in agreement with large-scale studies using simulated sludges.

Ha, B.C.; Ferrara, D.M.; Bibler, N.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Hydrogen production during processing of radioactive sludge containing noble metals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen was produced when radioactive sludge from Savannah River Site radioactive waste containing noble metals was reacted with formic acid. This will occur in a process tank in the Defense Waste Facility at SRS when waste is vitrified. Radioactive sludges from four tanks were tested in a lab-scale apparatus. Maximum hydrogen generation rates varied from 5 {times}10{sup {minus}7} g H{sub 2}/hr/g of sludge from the least reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 51) to 2 {times}10{sup {minus}4} g H{sub 2}/hr/g of sludge from the most reactive sludge (from Waste Tank 11). The time required for the hydrogen generation to reach a maximum varied from 4.1 to 25 hours. In addition to hydrogen, carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were produced and the pH of the reaction slurry increased. In all cases, the carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide were generated before the hydrogen. The results are in agreement with large-scale studies using simulated sludges.

Ha, B.C.; Ferrara, D.M.; Bibler, N.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

FRIT DEVELOPMENT FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated a large number of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) composition projections to support frit optimization for SB6 vitrification at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The evaluations discussed in this report occurred over a period of about 4 months, and included about 40 composition projections, developed by both Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and SRNL. Paper study assessments were used to evaluate the sludge composition projections with arrays of potential frit compositions using the predictive models in the DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Both nominal sludge compositions and sludge compositions with anticipated compositional variation were considered. The model predictions were used to identify candidate frit compositions for each SB6 projection and to provide some guidance to SRR on washing and blending strategies for SB6 preparation. This report presents a chronological review of this process and summarizes the findings at each stage. Following initial feedback from this work, the number of washes in Tank 51 was reduced to increase the projected sodium concentration in SB6. Analyses of predicted frit performance before and after a potential decant of Tank 40 showed that the post-decant SB6 composition would be difficult to process with any frit composition and that this scenario should be avoided. Based on the most recent SB6 projections (February 2010 SB6 composition projections developed at SRNL using the measured SB6 qualification sample composition and the revised Tank Farm washing plan), Frit 418 appears to be viable for SB6 processing at a target waste loading of 36%. A Nominal Stage PCCS Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) assessment gave projected operating windows of 25-41% waste loading, limited by predictions of nepheline crystallization. The projected operating window is reduced to 25-38% waste loading when anticipated compositional variation is considered, again limited by predictions of nepheline crystallization. Blend points between 62 and 40 inches of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) heel in Tank 40 had no practical impact on the projected performance of Frit 418. This assessment is made from a paper study approach only and assumes that no decant of Tank 40 will occur during SB6 processing. A decant of Tank 40 would reduce the Na2O concentration in Tank 40 to a point where it would be very difficult to target a waste loading of 36% for SB6 with Frit 418. The performance of Frit 418 with SB6 is limited by predictions of nepheline crystallization, which is a durability limiting constraint. Alternatives to Frit 418 are available that can provide equivalent projected operating windows and are limited by process related constraints (i.e., liquidus temperature predictions) rather than durability limiting constraints. A separate memorandum has recently been issued that discusses the use of Frit 418 for SB6 vitrification.1 potential differences in melt rate among these alternative frits will be discussed in a forthcoming technical report.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Zamecnik, J.

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Data Quality Objectives Process for Designation of K Basins Debris  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy has developed a schedule and approach for the removal of spent fuels, sludge, and debris from the K East (KE) and K West (KW) Basins, located in the 100 Area at the Hanford Site. The project that is the subject of this data quality objective (DQO) process is focused on the removal of debris from the K Basins and onsite disposal of the debris at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). This material previously has been dispositioned at the Hanford Low-Level Burial Grounds (LLBGs) or Central Waste Complex (CWC). The goal of this DQO process and the resulting Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) is to provide the strategy for characterizing and designating the K-Basin debris to determine if it meets the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), Revision 3 (BHI 1998). A critical part of the DQO process is to agree on regulatory and WAC interpretation, to support preparation of the DQO workbook and SAP.

WESTCOTT, J.L.

2000-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

262

Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) Sewage Sludge Management Rule (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting This rule establishes requirements for the permitting siting, bonding, installation, establishment, construction, modification, and operation of any facility that generates, processes, recycles and/or disposes of sewage

263

Sludge Heel Removal Analysis for Slurry Pumps of Tank 11  

SciTech Connect

Computational fluid dynamics methods were used to develop and recommend a slurry pump operational strategy for sludge heel removal in Tank 11. Flow patterns calculated by the model were used to evaluate the performance of various combinations of operating pumps and their orientation. The models focused on removal of the sludge heel located at the edge of Tank 11 using the four existing slurry pumps. The models and calculations were based on prototypic tank geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Tank Closure Project (TCP) Engineering. Computational fluid dynamics models of Tank 11 with different operating conditions were developed using the FLUENT(tm) code. The modeling results were used to assess the efficiency of sludge suspension and removal operations in the 75-ft tank. The models employed a three-dimensional approach, a two-equation turbulence model, and an approximate representation of flow obstructions. The calculated local velocity was used as a measure of sludge removal and mixing capability. For the simulations, a series of the modeling calculations was performed with indexed pump orientations until an efficient flow pattern near the potential location of the sludge mound was established for sludge removal. The calculated results demonstrated that the existing slurry pumps running at 1600 rpm could remove the sludge mound from the tank with a 103 in. liquid level, based on a minimum sludge suspension velocity of 2.27 ft/sec. In this case, the only exception is the region within about 2 ft. from the tank wall. Further results showed that the capabilities of sludge removal were affected by the indexed pump orientation, the number of operating pumps, and the pump speed. A recommended operational strategy for an efficient flow pattern was developed to remove the sludge mound assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and removal. Sensitivity results showed that for a given pump speed, a higher tank level and a lower pump nozzle elevation would result in better performance in suspending and removing the sludge. The results also showed that the presence of flow obstructions such as valve housing structure were advantageous for certain pump orientations.

Lee, S.Y.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

THE NATIONAL BASIN DELINEATION PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Basin Delineation Project (NBDP) was undertaken by the National Severe Storms Laboratory to define flash-flood-scale basin boundaries for the country in support of the National Weather Service (NWS) Flash Flood Monitoring and ...

Ami T. Arthur; Gina M. Cox; Nathan R. Kuhnert; David L. Slayter; Kenneth W. Howard

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Rules and Regulations for Sewage Sludge Management (Rhode Island)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of these rules and regulations is to ensure that sewage sludge that is treated, land applied, disposed, distributed, stockpiled or transported in the State of Rhode Island is done so in...

266

Package Safety Analysis Assessment for Sludge Transportation System  

SciTech Connect

This package safety analysis assessment demonstrates that the Sludge Transportation System meets the acceptance criteria for an equivalent package as specified in DOE/RL-2001-36, Hanford Sitewide Transportation Safety Document for onsite shipment.

ROMANO, T.

2003-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

267

Novel Nanoscale Materials Reduce Electricity Needed for Sludge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sludge Digestion Dewatering (Centrifuge/ Belt Filter Press) Solids for Drying/Disposal Return Centrate. Finally, there will be a reduction of greenhouse gas emissions during shipment for disposal. Project

268

SLUDGE BATCH VARIABILITY STUDY WITH FRIT 418  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) initiated processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) in the summer of 2010. In support of processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 418 to process SB6. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB6 available at the time from the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) and SRNL (using a model-based approach). To support qualification of SB6, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB6. The durability models were assessed over the expected Frit 418-SB6 composition range. Seventeen glasses were selected for the variability study based on the sludge projections used in the frit recommendation. Five of the glasses are based on the centroid of the compositional region, spanning a waste loading (WL) range of 32 to 40%. The remaining twelve glasses are extreme vertices (EVs) of the sludge region of interest for SB6 combined with Frit 418 and are all at 36% WL. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). After initiating the SB6 variability study, the measured composition of the SB6 Tank 51 qualification glass produced at the SRNL Shielded Cells Facility indicated that thorium was present in the glass at an appreciable concentration (1.03 wt%), which made it a reportable element for SB6. This concentration of ThO{sub 2} resulted in a second phase of experimental studies. Five glasses were formulated that were based on the centroid of the new sludge compositional region combined with Frit 418, spanning a WL range of 32 to 40%. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis and the PCT. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses (with and without thorium) were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) reference glass regardless of thermal history. All of the normalized boron releases were less than 1 g/L. While all of the targeted glass compositions were predictable with respect to the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, a small number of the measured glass compositions were located outside of the lower prediction limit indicating poorer durability than what was actually measured. These unpredictable glasses were in the same lithium metaborate (LM) preparation block during the chemical analyses, which resulted in measured compositions that were not representative of the target compositions. A review of the data did not indicate a clear cause for the problem. Re-digestion and re-measurement of three glasses from this preparation block yielded glass compositions closer to the target values and predicted PCT responses within the PCCS model uncertainty. Therefore, it is believed that the glasses were correctly fabricated and the targeted compositions are closer representations of the true compositions. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable for the SB6/Frit 418 glass system. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable and/or acceptable with respect to the DWPF PCCS models. In addition, the inclusion of ThO{sub 2} was shown to have minimal impact on the acceptability and predictability of the variability study glasses.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

269

Marketing coal ash, slag, and sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increase in coal-fired power plants and tighter environmental problems have put utilities in the position of marketing coal ash, slag, and sludge by turning waste products into a resource. Many utilities are looking beyond road and structural fill uses in their marketing efforts. Slag can be made into sandblasting grit, aggregate, and roofing granules, or used for soil stabilization or the chemical fixation of municipal wastes. Composition and collection variations discourage many utilities from marketing their by-products, while availability can be a problem for customers if the power plant should shut down. Other problems include storage and transportation, competition, and institutional barriers. Documentation of the fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and scrubber waste markets by the Electric Power Research Institute considers these factors and develops a marketing method to help utilities evaluate and promote their product. (DCK)

Lihach, N.; Golden, D.; Komai, R.; Maulbetsch, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Biological treatment of refinery wastes  

SciTech Connect

A detailed study of the treatment situation at a Thai refinery that used an API separator with no equalization tank, followed by an activated-sludge system, showed that only 42% of the total COD and 57% of the soluble COD was degradable. In a study of the possibility of additional treatments, an aerated lagoon showed promising results. The wastewater composition of the three main Thai refineries was surveyed.

Mahmud, Z.; Thanh, N.C.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

SLUDGE HEEL REMOVAL BY ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE 12390  

SciTech Connect

High Level Waste (HLW) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is currently stored in aging underground storage tanks. This waste is a complex mixture of insoluble solids, referred to as sludge, and soluble salts. Continued long-term storage of these radioactive wastes poses an environmental risk. Operations are underway to remove and disposition the waste, clean the tanks and fill with grout for permanent closure. Heel removal is the intermediate phase of the waste retrieval and tank cleaning process at SRS, which is intended to reduce the volume of waste prior to treatment with oxalic acid. The goal of heel removal is to reduce the residual amount of radioactive sludge wastes to less than 37,900 liters (10,000 gallons) of wet solids. Reducing the quantity of residual waste solids in the tank prior to acid cleaning reduces the amount of acid required and reduces the amount of excess acid that could impact ongoing waste management processes. Mechanical heel removal campaigns in Tank 12 have relied solely on the use of mixing pumps that have not been effective at reducing the volume of remaining solids. The remaining waste in Tank 12 is known to have a high aluminum concentration. Aluminum dissolution by caustic leaching was identified as a treatment step to reduce the volume of remaining solids and prepare the tank for acid cleaning. Dissolution was performed in Tank 12 over a two month period in July and August, 2011. Sample results indicated that 16,440 kg of aluminum oxide (boehmite) had been dissolved representing 60% of the starting inventory. The evolution resulted in reducing the sludge solids volume by 22,300 liters (5900 gallons), preparing the tank for chemical cleaning with oxalic acid.

Keefer, M.

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

272

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

w-employee-orientation Download Audit Report: IG-0848 The Department of Energy's K Basins Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site http:energy.govigdownloads...

273

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

xclusion-determination Download Audit Report: IG-0848 The Department of Energy's K Basins Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site http:energy.govigdownloads...

274

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ergy-efficient-windows Download Audit Report: IG-0848 The Department of Energy's K Basins Sludge Treatment Project at the Hanford Site http:energy.govigdownloads...

275

Characterization and Leach Testing for PUREX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 3) and REDOX Cladding Waste Sludge (Group 4) Actual Waste Sample Composites  

SciTech Connect

A testing program evaluating actual tank waste was developed in response to Task 4 from the M-12 External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) issue response plan.(a) The testing program was subdivided into logical increments. The bulk water-insoluble solid wastes that are anticipated to be delivered to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) were identified according to type such that the actual waste testing could be targeted to the relevant categories. Eight broad waste groupings were defined. Samples available from the 222S archive were identified and obtained for testing. The actual wastetesting program included homogenizing the samples by group, characterizing the solids and aqueous phases, and performing parametric leaching tests. Two of the eight defined groups—plutonium-uranium extraction (PUREX) cladding waste sludge (Group 3, or CWP) and reduction-oxidation (REDOX) cladding waste sludge (Group 4, or CWR)—are the subjects of this report. Both the Group 3 and 4 waste composites were anticipated to be high in gibbsite, requiring caustic leaching. Characterization of the composite Group 3 and Group 4 waste samples confirmed them to be high in gibbsite. The focus of the Group 3 and 4 testing was on determining the behavior of gibbsite during caustic leaching. The waste-type definition, archived sample conditions, homogenization activities, characterization (physical, chemical, radioisotope, and crystal habit), and caustic leaching behavior as functions of time, temperature, and hydroxide concentration are discussed in this report. Testing was conducted according to TP-RPP-WTP-467.

Snow, Lanee A.; Buck, Edgar C.; Casella, Amanda J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Daniel, Richard C.; Draper, Kathryn E.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Fiskum, Sandra K.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Jenson, Evan D.; Kozelisky, Anne E.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Peterson, Reid A.; Swoboda, Robert G.

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

276

Data Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Basin Data Basin Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Data Basin Agency/Company /Organization: Conservation Biology Institute Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: databasin.org/ Data Basin Screenshot References: Data Basin [1] Overview "Data Basin is an innovative, online system that connects users with spatial datasets, tools, and expertise. Individuals and organization can explore and download a vast library of datasets, upload their own data, create and publish projects, form working groups, and produce customized maps that can be easily shared. The building blocks of Data Basin are: Datasets: A dataset is a spatially explicit file, currently Arcshape and ArcGrid files. These can be biological, physical, socioeconomic, (and

277

Sludge application and monitoring program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, 1986--1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Municipal sewage sludge has been applied to forests and pastures on the Oak Ridge Reservation since 1983 as a method of both disposal and beneficial reuse. Application was carried out under Tennessee permits issued to the city of Oak Ridge for land disposal of sewage sludge. In conjunction with these applications, information has been collected concerning sludge quantity and characteristics, soil parameters, soil water constituents, groundwater quality, surface runoff water quality, and various chemical constituents in vegetation on application sites. This information provides (1) a record of sludge application on the DOE reservations and (2) documentation of changes in soil parameters following sludge application. The information also provides a basis for evaluating the implications of the land application of municipal sewage sludge for soil and water quality and for evaluating the fate of sludge constituents when sludge is either sprayed or injected on pasture sites or surface applied in forested sites. This report covers in detail sludge applications conducted from 1986 through 1993, with some data from the period between 1983 and 1986. Anaerobically digested liquid sludge (2% to 4% solids) from the city of Oak Ridge had a relatively high nitrogen content (8% dry weight) and average to low concentrations of potentially problematic metals, compared with typical municipal sludges. Few potentially hazardous organic chemicals were detected in the sludge, and when found, these were at very low concentrations. Oak Ridge sludge is somewhat unique in that it contains radionuclides ({sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 131}I, uranium isotopes, {sup 90}Sr, and occasionally {sup 99}Tc) at concentrations much higher than typical municipal sludges. Land application of sewage sludge can dilute or destroy problematic sludge constituents while improving soil fertility. Correct management has made these sludge applications a model of environmentally responsible waste management.

Gunderson, C.A.; Larsen, I.L.; Boston, H.L.; Bradburn, D.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Van Miegroet, H. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Forest Resources; Morris, J.L. [Jaycor, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Walzer, A.E. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Central Environmental Compliance; Adler, T.C. [Bechtel National, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Huq, M. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 7a*) be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) is composed of portions of Tanks 4, 7, and 12; the Sludge Batch 6 heel in Tank 51; and a plutonium stream from H Canyon. SRNL received the Tank 51 qualification sample (sample ID HTF-51-10-125) following sludge additions to Tank 51. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernate) and concentration (decanting of supernate) of the SB7a - Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a non-radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7a related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7a processing.

Pareizs, J.; Billings, A.; Click, D.

2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

279

Cassava Stillage Treatment by Thermophilic Anaerobic Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper assesses the performance of a thermophilic anaerobic Continuously Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) in the treatment of cassava stillage under various organic loading rates (OLRs) without suspended solids (SS) separation. The reactor was seeded with mesophilic anaerobic granular sludge

Gang Luo; Li Xie; Zhonghai Zou; Qi Zhou

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basin Electric Power Cooperative EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Order authorizing Basin Electric Power Cooperative to export electric energy to Canada EA-64 Basin Electric...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EA-64-A Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-A Basin Electric Power Cooperative EA-64-A Basin Electric Power Cooperative Order authorizing Basin Electric Power Cooperative to export electric energy to Canada EA-64-A Basin...

282

Marketing coal ash, slag, and sludge  

SciTech Connect

Investigates the selling of by-products of coal-fired power generation--fly ash, bottom ash, boiler slag, and scrubber sludge--by utilities for use in highways, parking lots, cement, roofing, bricks, and blocks. Points out that the EPA has drafted tough new regulations for solid-waste storage, transportation, and disposal that may soon cost power plants $25-$40 a ton to dispose of wastes. Reports that the EPRI is studying high-volume by-product applications that have low technology requirements (e.g. fly ash for use in highways, parking lots, and utility construction) and medium-volume, medium-technology applications (e.g. by-products used for cement manufacture, asphalt, blocks, bricks, roofing granules, and wallboards). Reveals that EPRI plans to eventually identify a representative set of perhaps half a dozen basic fly ashes, characterize them, do proportion studies of existing concrete mixes (including those with fly ash in them), and then develop guidelines for fly ash proportions in concrete.

Lihach, N.; Golden, D.; Komai, R.; Maulbetsch, J.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

SLUDGE BATCH 4 SIMULANT FLOWSHEET STUDIES: PHASE II RESULTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) processing to Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) processing in early fiscal year 2007. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB4 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) process. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. Initial SB4 flowsheet studies were conducted to guide decisions during the sludge batch preparation process. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB4 composition at the time of the study. The composition has changed slightly since these studies were completed due to changes in the sludges blended to prepare SB4 and the estimated SB3 heel mass. The following TTR requirements were addressed in this testing: (1) Hydrogen and nitrous oxide generation rates as a function of acid stoichiometry; (2) Acid quantities and processing times required for mercury removal; (3) Acid quantities and processing times required for nitrite destruction; and (4) Impact of SB4 composition (in particular, oxalate, manganese, nickel, mercury, and aluminum) on DWPF processing (i.e. acid addition strategy, foaming, hydrogen generation, REDOX control, rheology, etc.).

Stone, M; David Best, D

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

284

Computational fluid dynamics modelling of sewage sludge mixing in an anaerobic digester  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to simulate the mechanical mixing of sewage sludge at laboratory scale is reported. The paper recommends a strategy for modelling mechanically mixed sewage sludge at laboratory ... Keywords: Biogas, CFD, Digestion, Energy, Non-Newtonian fluid, Sewage sludge, Turbulence

J. Bridgeman

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Laboratory development of sludge washing and alkaline leaching processes: Test plan for FY 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy plans to vitrify (as borosilicate glass) the large volumes of high-level radioactive wastes at the Hanford site. To reduce costs, pretreatment processes will be used to reduce the volume of borosilicate glass required for disposal. Several options are being considered for the pretreatment processes: (1) sludge washing with water or dilute hydroxide: designed to remove most of the Na from the sludge, thus significantly reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified; (2) sludge washing plus caustic leaching and/or metathesis (alkaline sludge leaching): designed to dissolve large quantities of certain nonradioactive elements, such as Al, Cr and P, thus reducing the volume of waste even more; (3) sludge washing, sludge dissolution, and separation of radionuclides from the dissolved sludge solutions (advanced processing): designed to remove all radionuclides for concentration into a minimum waste volume. This report describes a test plan for work that will be performed in FY 1994 under the Sludge Washing and Caustic Leaching Studies Task (WBS 0402) of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Pretreatment Project. The objectives of the work described here are to determine the effects of sludge washing and alkaline leaching on sludge composition and the physical properties of the washed sludge and to evaluate alkaline leaching methods for their impact on the volume of borosilicate glass required to dispose of certain Hanford tank sludges.

Rapko, B.M.; Lumetta, G.J.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING -10499  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the 105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate it from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,384 cubic meters or 31,894 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were designed and tested for the reactor ISD project, and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and material flow considerations, maximum lift heights and differential height requirements were determined. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and approximately 3,900 cubic yards (2,989 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over about an eighteen month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

287

Solidification/stabilization of simulated uranium and nickel contaminated sludges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research missions in nuclear energy conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy facilities have generated large volumes of mixed wastes with hazardous and radioactive components. Uranium and nickel are the primary contaminants of concern in this research which focused on better understanding the Solidification/Stabilization (S/S) chemistry, complex waste-binder interactions, and the suitability and effectiveness of additives in the Portland cement based treatment systems. The treatability was investigated with a simulated waste representative of the actual Oak Ridge K-25 pond waste. Screening tools such as the short term slurry tests were used to ascertain the behavior of the contaminants in the cement based systems for a range of binder-to-waste ratios, and optimal substitutions of cement with additives. This was used in combination with the Acid Neutralizing Capacity of the S/S system components to design solid waste form mixes to be evaluated over long curing periods. Attempts at estimating the extent of sorption and other immobilization mechanisms were made using dry and hydrated cement matrices. Portland cement based systems with flyash, silica fume and sodium sulfide as additives were studied. Porewater uranium and nickel concentrations, leachability, physical immobilization in terms Of MacMullin number and Unconfined Compressive Strength, regulatory compliance, and risk reduction were evaluated in the solid waste forms ranging over three binder-to-waste ratios. The 900 mg/L uranium and 3,000 mg/L nickel in the untreated sludge were reduced to less than 10 mg/L uranium and 30 mg /L nickel in the TCLP extract of the solidified waste form.

Ramabhadran, Sanjay

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Sludge Washing And Demonstration Of The DWPF Flowsheet In The SRNL Shielded Cells For Sludge Batch 8 Qualification  

SciTech Connect

The current Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks to Tank 51. Tank 51 sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes using a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). WSE requested the SRNL to perform characterization on a Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) sample and demonstrate the DWPF flowsheet in the SRNL shielded cells for SB8 as the final qualification process required prior to SB8 transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40. A 3-L sample from Tank 51 (the SB8 qualification sample; Tank Farm sample HTF-51-12-80) was received by SRNL on September 20, 2012. The as-received sample was characterized prior to being washed. The washed material was further characterized and used as the material for the DWPF process simulation including a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, and glass fabrication and chemical durability measurements.

Pareizs, J. M.; Crawford, C. L.

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

289

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

290

Hanford Sludge Simulant Selection for Soil Mechanics Property Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current System Plan for the Hanford Tank Farms uses relaxed buoyant displacement gas release event (BDGRE) controls for deep sludge (i.e., high level waste [HLW]) tanks, which allows the tank farms to use more storage space, i.e., increase the sediment depth, in some of the double-shell tanks (DSTs). The relaxed BDGRE controls are based on preliminary analysis of a gas release model from van Kessel and van Kesteren. Application of the van Kessel and van Kesteren model requires parametric information for the sediment, including the lateral earth pressure at rest and shear modulus. No lateral earth pressure at rest and shear modulus in situ measurements for Hanford sludge are currently available. The two chemical sludge simulants will be used in follow-on work to experimentally measure the van Kessel and van Kesteren model parameters, lateral earth pressure at rest, and shear modulus.

Wells, Beric E.; Russell, Renee L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Brown, Garrett N.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Crum, Jarrod V.

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

291

Principles of biotechnological treatment of industrial wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This review includes current information on biodegradation processes of pollutants, digestor biocenosis and bioadditives, sludge production, measurement of pollution, and advances regarding biotechnological treatment of a series of specific industrial effluents. It was foreseen in 1980 that biotechnology would foster the creation of new industries with low energy requirements. This is because the growth of microorganisms provides a renewable source of energy.

Roig, M.G.; Martin Rodriguez, M.J.M.; Cachaza, J.M. (Univ. de Salamanca, Salamanca (Spain). Dept. de Quimica Fisica); Mendoza Sanchez, L. (C/Sol Oriente, Salamanca (Spain). Estudios y Proyectos); Kennedy, J.F. (Univ. of Birmingham, Birmingham (United Kingdom). Research Lab. for the Chemistry of Bioactive Carbohydrates and Proteins)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Abyssal Mixing in the Brazil Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the major objectives of the Deep Basin Experiment, a component of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment, was to quantify the intensity and spatial distribution of deep vertical mixing within the Brazil Basin. In this study, basin-averaged ...

Michele Y. Morris; Melinda M. Hall; Louis C. St. Laurent; Nelson G. Hogg

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Computer modeling of ORNL storage tank sludge mobilization and mixing  

SciTech Connect

This report presents and analyzes the results of the computer modeling of mixing and mobilization of sludge in horizontal, cylindrical storage tanks using submerged liquid jets. The computer modeling uses the TEMPEST computational fluid dynamics computer program. The horizontal, cylindrical storage tank configuration is similar to the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) at Oak Ridge National (ORNL). The MVST tank contents exhibit non-homogeneous, non-Newtonian rheology characteristics. The eventual goals of the simulations are to determine under what conditions sludge mobilization using submerged liquid jets is feasible in tanks of this configuration, and to estimate mixing times required to approach homogeneity of the contents of the tanks.

Terrones, G.; Eyler, L.L.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Co-digestion of sewage sludge with glycerol to boost biogas production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of adding crude glycerol from the biodiesel industry to the anaerobic digesters treating sewage sludge in wastewater treatment plants was studied in both batch and continuous experiments at 35 {sup o}C. Glycerol addition can boost biogas yields, if it does not exceed a limiting 1% (v/v) concentration in the feed. Any further increase of glycerol causes a high imbalance in the anaerobic digestion process. The reactor treating the sewage sludge produced 1106 {+-} 36 ml CH{sub 4}/d before the addition of glycerol and 2353 {+-} 94 ml CH{sub 4}/d after the addition of glycerol (1% v/v in the feed). The extra glycerol-COD added to the feed did not have a negative effect on reactor performance, but seemed to increase the active biomass (volatile solids) concentration in the system. Batch kinetic experiments showed that the maximum specific utilization rate ({mu}{sub max}) and the saturation constant (K{sub S}) of glycerol were 0.149 {+-} 0.015 h{sup -1} and 0.276 {+-} 0.095 g/l, respectively. Comparing the estimated values with the kinetics constants for propionate reported in the literature, it can be concluded that glycerol uptake is not the rate-limiting step during the process.

Fountoulakis, M.S., E-mail: mfountoul@steg.teiher.g [School of Agricultural Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece); Petousi, I.; Manios, T. [School of Agricultural Technology, Technological Educational Institute of Crete, Heraklion (Greece)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Mechanism of Phosphorus Removal from Hanford Tank Sludge by Caustic Leaching  

SciTech Connect

Two experiments were conducted to explore the mechanism by which phosphorus is removed from Hanford tank sludge by caustic leaching. In the first experiment, a series of phosphate salts were treated with 3 M NaOH under conditions prototypic of the actual leaching process to be performed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The phosphates used were aluminum phosphate, bismuth phosphate, chromium(III) phosphate, and ?-tri-calcium phosphate; all of these phases have previously been determined to exist in Hanford tank sludge. The leachate solution was sampled at selected time intervals and analyzed for the specific metal ion involved (Al, Bi, Ca, or Cr) and for P (total and as phosphate). The solids remaining after completion of the caustic leaching step were analyzed to determine the reaction product. In the second experiment, the dependence of P removal from bismuth phosphate was examined as a function of the hydroxide ion concentration. It was anticipated that a plot of log[phosphate] versus log[hydroxide] would provide insight into the phosphorus-removal mechanism. This report describes the test activities outlined in Section 6.3.2.1, Preliminary Investigation of Phosphate Dissolution, in Test Plan TP-RPP-WTP-467, Rev.1. The objectives, success criteria, and test conditions of Section 6.3.2.1 are summarized here.

Lumetta, Gregg J.

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

296

Enhanced sludge processing of HLW: Hydrothermal oxidation of chromium, technetium, and complexants by nitrate. 1997 mid-year progress report  

SciTech Connect

'Treatment of High Level Waste (HLW) is the second most costly problem identified by OEM. In order to minimize costs of disposal, the volume of HLW requiring vitrification and long term storage must be reduced. Methods for efficient separation of chromium from waste sludges, such as the Hanford Tank Wastes (HTW), are key to achieving this goal since the allowed level of chromium in high level glass controls waste loading. At concentrations above 0.5 to 1.0 wt.% chromium prevents proper vitrification of the waste. Chromium in sludges most likely exists as extremely insoluble oxides and minerals, with chromium in the plus III oxidation state [1]. In order to solubilize and separate it from other sludge components, Cr(III) must be oxidized to the more soluble Cr(VI) state. Efficient separation of chromium from HLW could produce an estimated savings of $3.4B[2]. Additionally, the efficient separation of technetium [3], TRU, and other metals may require the reformulation of solids to free trapped species as well as the destruction of organic complexants. New chemical processes are needed to separate chromium and other metals from tank wastes. Ideally they should not utilize additional reagents which would increase waste volume or require subsequent removal. The goal of this project is to apply hydrothermal processing for enhanced chromium separation from HLW sludges. Initially, the authors seek to develop a fundamental understanding of chromium speciation, oxidation/reduction and dissolution kinetics, reaction mechanisms, and transport properties under hydrothermal conditions in both simple and complex salt solutions. The authors also wish to evaluate the potential of hydrothermal processing for enhanced separations of technetium and TRU by examining technetium and TRU speciation at hydrothermal conditions optimal for chromium dissolution.'

Buelow, S.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

GLYCOLIC-FORMIC ACID FLOWSHEET SLUDGE MATRIX STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing was completed to demonstrate the viability of the newly developed glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet on processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) initiated a sludge matrix study to evaluate the impact of changing insoluble solid composition on the processing characteristics of slurries in DWPF. Four sludge simulants were prepared to cover two compositional ranges in the waste. The first was high iron/low aluminum versus low iron/high aluminum (referred to as HiFe or LoFe in this report). The second was high calcium-manganese/low nickel, chromium, and magnesium versus low calcium-manganese/high nickel, chromium, and magnesium (referred to as HiMn or LoMn in this report). These two options can be combined to form four distinct sludge compositions. The sludge matrix study called for testing each of these four simulants near the minimum acid required for nitrite destruction (100% acid stoichiometry) and at a second acid level that produced significant hydrogen by noble metal catalyzed decomposition of formic acid (150% acid stoichiometry). Four simulants were prepared based on the four possible combinations of the Al/Fe and Mn-Ca/Mg-Ni-Cr options. Preliminary simulant preparation work has already been documented. The four simulants were used for high and low acid testing. Eight planned experiments (GF26 to GF33) were completed to demonstrate the viability of the glycolic-formic flowsheet. Composition and physical property measurements were made on the SRAT product. Composition measurements were made on the condensate from the Mercury Water Wash Tank (MWWT), Formic Acid Vent Condenser (FAVC), ammonia scrubber and on SRAT samples pulled throughout the SRAT cycle. Updated values for formate loss and nitrite-tonitrate conversion were found that can be used in the acid calculations for future sludge matrix process simulations with the glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet. Preliminary results of the initial testing indicate: (1) Hydrogen generation rate was very low throughout all SRAT cycles. (2) The mercury concentration of the SRAT product was below the 0.8 wt% limit in all runs. (3) Nitrite in the SRAT product was aluminum sludges (LoFe, HM type sludges) were much more viscous than the Hi Fe sludges. At 100% acid stoichiometry, the SRAT products from the high aluminum sludges were very viscous but at 150% acid stoichiometry, the SRAT products from the high aluminum sludges were very thin. This makes the glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet an improvement for processing more viscous sludges. (6) The pH of the SRAT products was from 2.7-3.1 for the 150% acid stoichiometry runs and 5.1-6.1 for the 100% acid stoichiometry runs, significantly lower than is typical of the baseline nitric acid/formic acid flowsheet.

Lambert, D.; Koopman, D.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

GLYCOLIC-FORMIC ACID FLOWSHEET SLUDGE MATRIX STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Testing was completed to demonstrate the viability of the newly developed glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet on processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) initiated a sludge matrix study to evaluate the impact of changing insoluble solid composition on the processing characteristics of slurries in DWPF. Four sludge simulants were prepared to cover two compositional ranges in the waste. The first was high iron/low aluminum versus low iron/high aluminum (referred to as HiFe or LoFe in this report). The second was high calcium-manganese/low nickel, chromium, and magnesium versus low calcium-manganese/high nickel, chromium, and magnesium (referred to as HiMn or LoMn in this report). These two options can be combined to form four distinct sludge compositions. The sludge matrix study called for testing each of these four simulants near the minimum acid required for nitrite destruction (100% acid stoichiometry) and at a second acid level that produced significant hydrogen by noble metal catalyzed decomposition of formic acid (150% acid stoichiometry). Four simulants were prepared based on the four possible combinations of the Al/Fe and Mn-Ca/Mg-Ni-Cr options. Preliminary simulant preparation work has already been documented. The four simulants were used for high and low acid testing. Eight planned experiments (GF26 to GF33) were completed to demonstrate the viability of the glycolic-formic flowsheet. Composition and physical property measurements were made on the SRAT product. Composition measurements were made on the condensate from the Mercury Water Wash Tank (MWWT), Formic Acid Vent Condenser (FAVC), ammonia scrubber and on SRAT samples pulled throughout the SRAT cycle. Updated values for formate loss and nitrite-tonitrate conversion were found that can be used in the acid calculations for future sludge matrix process simulations with the glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet. Preliminary results of the initial testing indicate: (1) Hydrogen generation rate was very low throughout all SRAT cycles. (2) The mercury concentration of the SRAT product was below the 0.8 wt% limit in all runs. (3) Nitrite in the SRAT product was <100 mg/kg for all runs. (4) Foaminess was not an issue using the nominal antifoam addition strategy in these tests. (5) The high aluminum sludges (LoFe, HM type sludges) were much more viscous than the Hi Fe sludges. At 100% acid stoichiometry, the SRAT products from the high aluminum sludges were very viscous but at 150% acid stoichiometry, the SRAT products from the high aluminum sludges were very thin. This makes the glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet an improvement for processing more viscous sludges. (6) The pH of the SRAT products was from 2.7-3.1 for the 150% acid stoichiometry runs and 5.1-6.1 for the 100% acid stoichiometry runs, significantly lower than is typical of the baseline nitric acid/formic acid flowsheet.

Lambert, D.; Koopman, D.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

299

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

300

Enhanced integrated nonthermal treatment system study  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Enhanced Nonthermal Treatment Systems (ENTS) study is to evaluate alternative configurations of one of the five systems evaluated in the Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) study. Five alternative configurations are evaluated. Each is designed to enhance the final waste form performance by replacing grout with improved stabilization technologies, or to improve system performance by improving the destruction efficiency for organic contaminants. AU enhanced systems are alternative configurations of System NT-5, which has the following characteristics: Nonthermal System NT-5: (1) catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) to treat organic material including organic liquids, sludges, and soft (or combustible) debris, (2) thermal desorption of inorganic sludge and process residue, (3) washing of soil and inorganic debris with treatment by CWO of removed organic material, (4) metal decontamination by abrasive blasting, (5) stabilization of treated sludge, soil, debris, and untreated debris with entrained contamination in grout, and (6) stabilization of inorganic sludge, salts and secondary waste in polymer. System NT-5 was chosen because it was designed to treat combustible debris thereby minimizing the final waste form volume, and because it uses grout for primary stabilization. The enhanced nonthermal systems were studied to determine the cost and performance impact of replacing grout (a commonly used stabilization agent in the DOE complex) with improved waste stabilization methods such as vitrification and polymer.

Biagi, C.; Schwinkendorf, B.; Teheranian, B.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ORIGINAL PAPER Bioremediation of oily sludge-contaminated soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

materials in crude-oil storage tanks also causes problems to the environment (Mrayyan and Battikhi 2005 of oily sludge generated in water­oil separation systems at oilfields and accumulation of waste oily as priority environmental pollutants by the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA 1986) and are also

Ma, Lena

302

Monitoring the Fixed FGD Sludge Landfill--Conesville, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three years of extensive monitoring of the first full-scale application of the fixed flue gas desulfurization sludge process proved it technically sound. This new disposal method offers utilities leachate control in a landfill that allows diverse use of disposal sites in the future.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect

Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

Robert Caldwell

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved aluminum will be stored in Tank 8 and 21,000 kg will be stored in saltcake via evaporation. Up to 77% of the total aluminum planned for SB6 may be removed via aluminum dissolution. Storage of the aluminum-laden supernate in Tank 8 will require routine evaluation of the free hydroxide concentration in order to maintain aluminum in solution. Periodic evaluation will be established on concurrent frequency with corrosion program samples as previously established for aluminum-laden supernate from SB5 that is stored in Tank 11.

Pike, J; Jeffrey Gillam, J

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

305

HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH 4 VARIABILITY STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing for vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) in early FY2007. To support this process, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 503 for vitrifying this sludge batch, based on the composition projection provided by the Liquid Waste Organization on June 22, 2006. Frit 418 was also recommended for possible use during the transition from SB3 to SB4. A critical step in the SB4 qualification process is to demonstrate the applicability of the durability models, which are used as part of the DWPF's process control strategy, to the glass system of interest via a variability study. A variability study is an experimentally-driven assessment of the predictability and acceptability of the quality of the vitrified waste product that is anticipated from the processing of a sludge batch. At the DWPF, the durability of the vitrified waste product is not directly measured. Instead, the durability is predicted using a set of models that relate the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response of a glass to the chemical composition of that glass. In addition, a glass sample is taken during the processing of that sludge batch, the sample is transmitted to SRNL, and the durability is measured to confirm acceptance. The objective of a variability study is to demonstrate that these models are applicable to the glass composition region anticipated during the processing of the sludge batch - in this case the Frit 503 - SB4 compositional region. The success of this demonstration allows the DWPF to confidently rely on the predictions of the durability/composition models as they are used in the control of the DWPF process.

Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

306

Effect of Antifoam Agent on Oxidative Leaching of Hanford Tank Sludge Simulants  

SciTech Connect

Oxidative leaching of simulant tank waste containing an antifoam agent (AFA) to reduce the chromium content of the sludge was tested using permanganate as the oxidant in 0.25 M NaOH solutions. AFA is added to the waste treatment process to prevent foaming. The AFA, Dow Corning Q2-3183A, is a surface-active polymer that consists of polypropylene glycol, polydimethylsiloxane, octylphenoxy polyethoxy ethanol, treated silica, and polyether polyol. Some of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste slurries contain high concentrations of undissolved solids that would exhibit undesirable behavior without AFA addition. These tests were conducted to determine the effect of the AFA on oxidative leaching of Cr(III) in waste by permanganate. It has not previously been determined what effect AFA has on the permanganate reaction. This study was conducted to determine the effect AFA has on the oxidation of the chromium, plus plutonium and other criticality-related elements, specifically Fe, Ni and Mn. During the oxidative leaching process, Mn is added as liquid permanganate solution and is converted to an insoluble solid that precipitates as MnO2 and becomes part of the solid waste. Caustic leaching was performed followed by an oxidative leach at either 25°C or 45°C. Samples of the leachate and solids were collected at each step of the process. Initially, Battelle-Pacific Northwest Division (PNWD) was contracted by Bechtel National, Inc. to perform these further scoping studies on oxidative alkaline leaching. The data obtained from the testing will be used by the WTP operations to develop procedures for permanganate dosing of Hanford tank sludge solids during oxidative leaching. Work was initially conducted under contract number 24590-101-TSA-W000-00004. In February 2007, the contract mechanism was switched to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operating Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830. In summary, this report describes work focused on determining the effect of AFA on chromium oxidation by permanganate with Hanford sludge simulant.

Rapko, Brian M.; Jones, Susan A.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Peterson, Reid A.

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

307

Molybdenum uptake by forage crops grown on sewage sludge -- Amended soils in the field and greenhouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molybdenum (Mo) is a plant-available element in soils that can adversely affect the health of farm animals. There is a need for more information on its uptake into forage crops from waste materials, such as sewage sludge, applied to agricultural land. Field and greenhouse experiments with several crops grown on long-term sewage sludge-amended soils as well as soils recently amended with dewatered (DW) and alkaline-stabilized (ALK) sludges indicated that Mo supplied from sludge is readily taken up by legumes in particular. Excessive uptake into red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) was seen in a soil that had been heavily amended with sewage sludge 20 yr earlier, where the soil contained about 3 mg Mo/kg soil, three times the background soil concentration. The greenhouse and field studies indicated that Mo can have a long residual availability in sludge-amended soils. The effect of sludge application was to decrease Cu to Mo ratios in legume forages, canola (Brassica napus var. napus) and soybeans [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] below the recommended limit of 2:1 for ruminant diets, a consequence of high bioavailability of Mo and low uptake of Cu added in sludge. Molybdenum uptake coefficients (UCs) for ALK sludge were higher than for DW sludge, presumably due to the greater solubility of Mo measured in the more alkaline sludges and soils. Based on these UCs, it is tentatively recommended that cumulative Mo loadings on forages grown on nonacid soils should not exceed 1.0 kg/ha from ALK sludge or 4.0 kg/ha from DW sludge.

McBride, M.B.; Richards, B.K.; Steenhuis, T.; Spiers, G.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Multiple Oscillatory Modes of the Argentine Basin. Part II: The Spectral Origin of Basin Modes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the spectrum of barotropic basin modes of the Argentine Basin is shown to be connected to the classical Rossby basin modes of a flat-bottom (constant depth), rectangular basin. First, the spectrum of basin modes is calculated for ...

Wilbert Weijer; Frédéric Vivier; Sarah T. Gille; Henk A. Dijkstra

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

SLUDGE CHARACTERIZATION AND SRAT SIMULATIONS USING A NITRITE-FREE SLUDGE SIMULANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Understanding catalytic hydrogen generation is fundamental to the safe operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). Two Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) simulations were completed at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a nitrite-free starting simulant. One simulation was trimmed with Rh and Hg and the other with Ru and Hg. The two noble metals were trimmed at the upper end of the recent Rh-Ru-Hg study. Mercury was trimmed at 1.5 wt% in the total solids. Excess acid comparable in quantity to that in the recent Rh-Ru-Hg matrix study was used. In spite of the favorable conditions for hydrogen generation, virtually no hydrogen production was observed during either SRAT simulation. The Rh test result confirmed the postulated significance of nitrite ion to the catalytic reactions producing hydrogen in CPC testing with normal DWPF sludge simulants. As for Ru, however, previous testing has shown that Ru activated for hydrogen generation only after nitrite destruction. Therefore, Ru could have potentially been catalytically active from the start of the nitrite-free SRAT test, but no such activity was seen. The nitrite-free Ru test result suggests that the intermediate form detected in the bead-frit melter feed preparation Ru solubility profiles was some form of nitro-Ru complex. The nitro-Ru complex is apparently not catalytically active for hydrogen generation but is a precursor to the catalytically active form (presumably a different complex not involving nitrite ligands). Removing nitrite ion from the system prevented the Ru catalyst precursor from forming and consequently blocked formation of the catalytically active form. These results, along with the results of a simulation in which sodium nitrite was metered into the SRAT to prevent ligand substitution reactions that occur during nitrite destruction from occurring in order to reduce hydrogen generation, have greatly clarified the role of the nitrite ion in SRAT hydrogen generation. The new findings add to the overall fundamental understanding of catalytic hydrogen generation during waste processing in the DWPF. These findings also address one of the issues raised in the Future Work section of the recent summary document concerning catalytic hydrogen generation in the CPC. The knowledge gained should facilitate planning future experiments.

Koopman, D.

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

310

USE OF AN EQUILIBRIUM MODEL TO FORECAST DISSOLUTION EFFECTIVENESS, SAFETY IMPACTS, AND DOWNSTREAM PROCESSABILITY FROM OXALIC ACID AIDED SLUDGE REMOVAL IN SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE TANKS 1-15  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This thesis details a graduate research effort written to fulfill the Magister of Technologiae in Chemical Engineering requirements at the University of South Africa. The research evaluates the ability of equilibrium based software to forecast dissolution, evaluate safety impacts, and determine downstream processability changes associated with using oxalic acid solutions to dissolve sludge heels in Savannah River Site High Level Waste (HLW) Tanks 1-15. First, a dissolution model is constructed and validated. Coupled with a model, a material balance determines the fate of hypothetical worst-case sludge in the treatment and neutralization tanks during each chemical adjustment. Although sludge is dissolved, after neutralization more is created within HLW. An energy balance determines overpressurization and overheating to be unlikely. Corrosion induced hydrogen may overwhelm the purge ventilation. Limiting the heel volume treated/acid added and processing the solids through vitrification is preferred and should not significantly increase the number of glass canisters.

KETUSKY, EDWARD

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report  

SciTech Connect

A summation of information is presented on geology and drilling activity in the four primary study areas of the Western Gas Sands Project. The areas of interest are the Greater Green River Basin, the Piceance Basin, the Uinta Basin, and the Northern Great Plains Province. Drilling activity is discussed for the months of October, November, and December, 1977, with the major emphasis on wells located in low permeability sandstone areas, having significant gas production and utilizing hydraulic fracturing treatments. The drilling information was obtained primarily from ''The Rocky Mountain Region Report'' published by Petroleum Information Corporation on a daily basis. Another source of information was the ''Montana Oil and Gas Journal'' which is released weekly.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

313

Colorado River Basin Hydroclimatic Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of annual hydroclimatic variability in the Upper Colorado River basin (UCRB) for the period of 1906–2006 was performed to understand the dominant modes of multidecadal variability. First, wavelet-based spectral analysis was employed ...

Kenneth Nowak; Martin Hoerling; Balaji Rajagopalan; Edith Zagona

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

EA-1042: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Sludge Land Application Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

042: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Sludge Land Application 042: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Sludge Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennesee EA-1042: Proposed Changes to the Sanitary Sludge Land Application Program on the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennesee SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to raise the sludge land application loading limits from the current, self-imposed conservative 48 metric tons/ha lifetime loading to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation-permitted level of 110 metric tons/ha. The U.S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory also proposes to add its K-25 Site pretreated sewage sludge to the existing sewage sludge land application program on the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

315

GRR/Section 19-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process 9-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Ground Water Commission Colorado Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies CRS 37-90-107 Application for Use of Ground Water 2 CCR 410-1 Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf

316

Application of microwave energy for in-drum solidification of simulated precipitation sludge  

SciTech Connect

The application of microwave energy for in-container solidification of simulated transuranic contaminated precipitation sludges has been tested. Results indicate volume reductions to 83% are achievable by the continuous feeding of pre-dried sludge into a waste container while applying microwave energy. An economic evaluation was completed showing achievable volume and weight reductions to 87% compared with a current immobilization process for wet sludge. 7 refs., 15 figs., 16 tabs.

Petersen, R.D.; Johnson, A.J.; Swanson, S.D.; Thomas, R.L. (ed.)

1987-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

317

Conditions of utilization of coal mining and processing sludges as slurry fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of this study have shown that coal sludge can be used as slurry fuel (like coal-water fuel (CWF)) providing that its ash content does not exceed 30% and the amount in the fuel is at least 55%. The conventional CWF preparation technologies are inapplicable to the fabrication of water-sludge fuel; therefore, special technologies with allowance for the ash content, the particle size, and the water content of coal sludge are demanded.

E.G. Gorlov; A.I. Seregin; G.S. Khodakov [Institute for Fossil Fuels, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

318

Microwave Thermal Hydrolysis Of Sewage Sludge As A Pretreatment Stage For Anaerobic Digestion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article focuses on the effects of microwave thermal hydrolysis on sewage sludge anaerobic digestion. Volatile suspended solid (VSS) and COD solubilization of treated sludge were investigated. It was found that the microwave hydrolysis provided a rapid and efficient process to release organics from sludge. The increase of organic dissolution ratio was not obvious when holding time was over 5 min. The effect of the VSS solubilization was mainly dependent on temperature. The highest value of VSS dissolving ratio

W. Qiao; W. Wang; R. Xun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal regulations banning ocean dumping of sewage sludge coupled with stricter regulations on the disposal of sewage sludge in landfills have forced municipalities, especially those in the northeast United States, to consider alternate methods for disposal of this solid waste. Coincineration of municipal solid waste (MSW) and sludge has proven to be economically attractive for both Europe and Japan, but has not yet proven to be a viable sludge disposal technology in the United States because of a history of operational problems in existing facilities. The most prevalent problem in coincinerating MSW and a dewatered sewage sludge (15 to 25% solids) is incomplete sludge combustion. Incomplete sludge combustion is primarily a function of sludge particle size, occurring when the surface of the sludge particle dries and hardens, while the inner mass is unaffected. This phenomenon is commonly referred to in the industry as the {open_quotes}hamburger effect.{close_quotes} In an effort to promote technology development in this area, Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. teamed with the US Department of Energy (DOE) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to evaluate a new process being developed for the disposal of a dewatered sewage sludge, {open_quotes}Oxygen-Enriched Coincineration of MSW and Sewage Sludge.{close_quotes} This report provides a comprehensive summary of the pilot demonstration test program for oxygen-enriched coincineration of MSW and sewage sludge. This report describes the pilot test facility, instrumentation, and methods of data collection and data analyses; describes how the tests were executed; and discusses the test results. Recommendations for the future development of this technology in the current marketplace are also provided.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

PP-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Basin Electric Power Cooperative PP-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Presidential Permit Authorizing Basin Electric Power Cooperative to construct, operate, and maintain...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Washing and caustic leaching of Hanford Tank C-106 sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a laboratory-scale washing and caustic leaching test performed on sludge from Hanford Tank C-106. The purpose of this test was to determine the behavior of important sludge components when subjected to washing with dilute or concentrated sodium hydroxide solutions. The results of this laboratory-scale test were used to support the design of a bench-scale washing and leaching process used to prepare several hundred grams of high-level waste solids for vitrification tests to be done by private contractors. The laboratory-scale test was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory in FY 1996 as part of the Hanford privatization effort. The work was funded by the US Department of Energy through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS; EM-30).

Lumetta, G.J.; Wagner, M.J.; Hoopes, F.V.; Steele, R.T.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

In-Situ Characterization of Underwater Radioactive Sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fundamental requirement underpinning safe clean-up technologies for legacy spent nuclear fuel (SNF) ponds, pools and wet silos is the ability to characterize the radioactive waste form prior to retrieval. The corrosion products resulting from the long term underwater storage of spent nuclear fuel, reactor components and reprocessing debris present a major hazard to facility decontamination and decommissioning in terms of their radioactive content and physical / chemical reactivity. The ability to perform in-situ underwater non-destructive characterization of sludge and debris in a safe and cost-effective manner offers significant benefits over traditional destructive sampling methods. Several techniques are available for underwater measurements including (i) Gross gamma counting, (ii) Low-, Medium- and High- Resolution Gamma Spectroscopy, (iii) Passive neutron counting and (iv) Active Neutron Interrogation. The optimum technique depends on (i) the radioactive inventory (ii) mechanical access restrictions for deployment of the detection equipment, interrogation sources etc. (iii) the integrity of plant records and (iv) the extent to which Acceptable Knowledge which may be used for 'fingerprinting' the radioactive contents to a marker nuclide. Prior deployments of underwater SNF characterization equipment around the world have been reviewed with respect to recent developments in gamma and neutron detection technologies, digital electronics advancements, data transfer techniques, remote operation capabilities and improved field ruggedization. Modeling and experimental work has been performed to determine the capabilities, performance envelope and operational limitations of the future generation of non-destructive underwater sludge characterization techniques. Recommendations are given on the optimal design of systems and procedures to provide an acceptable level of confidence in the characterization of residual sludge content of legacy wet storage facilities such that retrieval and repackaging of SNF sludges may proceed safely and efficiently with support of the regulators and the public. (author)

Simpson, A.P.; Clapham, M.J.; Swinson, B. [Pajarito Scientific Corp., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Effects of Sludge Particle Size and Density on Hanford Waste Processing  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection's Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Piping and pumps have been selected to transport the high-level waste (HLW) slurries in the WTP. Pipeline critical-velocity calculations for these systems require the input of a bounding particle size and density. Various approaches based on statistical analyses have been used in the past to provide an estimate of this bounding size and density. In this paper, representative particle size and density distributions (PSDDs) of Hanford waste insoluble solids have been developed based on the new approach that relates measured particle size distributions (PSDs) to solid-phase compounds. This work was achieved through extensive review of available Hanford waste PSDs and solid-phase compound data. Composite PSDs representing the waste in up to 19 Hanford waste tanks were developed, and the insoluble solid phase compounds for the 177 Hanford waste tanks, their relative fractions, crystal densities, and particle size and shape were developed. With such a large combination of particle sizes and particle densities, a Monte Carlo simulation approach was used to model the PSDDs. Further detail was added by including an agglomeration of these compounds where the agglomerate density was modeled with a fractal dimension relation. The Monte Carlo simulations were constrained to hold the following relationships: 1) the composite PSDs are reproduced, 2) the solid-phase compound mass fractions are reproduced, 3) the expected in situ bulk-solids density is qualitatively reproduced, and 4) a representative fraction of the sludge volume comprising agglomerates is qualitatively reproduced to typical Hanford waste values. Four PSDDs were developed and evaluated. These four PSDD scenarios correspond to permutations where the master PSD was sonicated or not-sonicated before being analyzed and whether agglomerates existed or not in the PSD samples. When critical pipeline velocity calculations are applied to these results, several percent of Hanford tank waste sludge are expected to exceed pipeline velocities of 4 ft/sec. Operation and waste processing at pipeline velocities in the >4 to 6 ft/sec range appear to be compatible with the Hanford sludge in 3-inch pipes. (authors)

Poloski, A.P.; Wells, B.E.; Mahoney, L.A.; Daniel, R.C.; Tingey, J.M.; Cooley, S.K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Effects of Sludge Particle Size and Density on Hanford Waste Processing  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Piping and pumps have been selected to transport the high-level waste (HLW) slurries in the WTP. Pipeline critical-velocity calculations for these systems require the input of a bounding particle size and density. Various approaches based on statistical analyses have been used in the past to provide an estimate of this bounding size and density. In this paper, representative particle size and density distributions (PSDDs) of Hanford waste insoluble solids have been developed based on a new approach that relates measured particle-size distributions (PSDs) to solid-phase compounds. This work was achieved through extensive review of available Hanford waste PSDs and solid-phase compound data. Composite PSDs representing the waste in up to 19 Hanford waste tanks were developed, and the insoluble solid-phase compounds for the 177 Hanford waste tanks, their relative fractions, crystal densities, and particle size and shape were developed. With such a large combination of particle sizes and particle densities, a Monte Carlo simulation approach was used to model the PSDDs. Further detail was added by including an agglomeration of these compounds where the agglomerate density was modeled with a fractal dimension relation. The Monte Carlo simulations were constrained to hold the following relationships: 1) the composite PSDs are reproduced, 2) the solid-phase compound mass fractions are reproduced, 3) the expected in situ bulk-solids density is qualitatively reproduced, and 4) a representative fraction of the sludge volume comprising agglomerates is qualitatively reproduced to typical Hanford waste values. Four PSDDs were developed and evaluated. These four PSDD scenarios correspond to permutations where the master PSD was sonicated or not-sonicated before being analyzed and whether agglomerates existed or not in the PSD samples. When critical pipeline velocity calculations are applied to these results, several percent of Hanford tank waste sludge are expected to exceed pipeline velocities of <3 to 4 ft/sec. Operation and waste processing at pipeline velocities in the >4 to 6 ft/sec range appear to be compatible with the Hanford sludge in 3-inch pipes.

Poloski, Adam P.; Wells, Beric E.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Daniel, Richard C.; Tingey, Joel M.; Cooley, Scott K.

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

325

Caustic leaching of high-level radioactive tank sludge: A critical literature review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) must treat and safely dispose of its radioactive tank contents, which can be separated into high-level waste (HLW) and low-level waste (LLW) fractions. Since the unit costs of treatment and disposal are much higher for HLW than for LLW, technologies to reduce the amount of HLW are being developed. A key process currently being studied to reduce the volume of HLW sludges is called enhanced sludge washing (ESW). This process removes, by water washes, soluble constituents such as sodium salts, and the washed sludge is then leached with 2--3 M NaOH at 60--100 C to remove nonradioactive metals such as aluminum. The remaining solids are considered to be HLW while the solutions are LLW after radionuclides such as {sup 137}Cs have been removed. Results of bench-scale tests have shown that the ESW will probably remove the required amounts of inert constituents. While both experimental and theoretical results have shown that leaching efficiency increases as the time and temperature of the leach are increased, increases in the caustic concentration above 2--3 M will only marginally improve the leach factors. However, these tests were not designed to validate the assumption that the caustic used in the ESW process will generate only a small increase (10 Mkg) in the amount of LLW; instead the test conditions were selected to maximize leaching in a short period and used more water and caustic than is planned during full-scale operations. Even though calculations indicate that the estimate for the amount of LLW generated by the ESW process appears to be reasonable, a detailed study of the amount of LLW from the ESW process is still required. If the LLW analysis indicates that sodium management is critical, then a more comprehensive evaluation of the clean salt process or caustic recycle would be needed. Finally, experimental and theoretical studies have clearly demonstrated the need for the control of solids formation during and after leaching.

McGinnis, C.P.; Welch, T.D.; Hunt, R.D.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Renovation of a pear orchard site with sludge compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A lime-stabilized sewage sludge compost was used as a surface amendment to improve the soil and nutritional status of a number of established pear cultivars grown on an acidic, low fertility soil site. Leaf Ca status was significantly increased while trace metals were not elevated and in most cases decreased by sludge compost over the course of the study. Soil chemical properties were modified in a manner similar to liming. Addition of sludge composts, particularly low metal containing materials, appears to represent an acceptable aid in renovating established pear orchards located on poor soil sites. Leaf, fruit flesh or peel Cd were not significantly effected by the compost addition. The compost added twice the recommended level of available N the first year and sub-optimum N the following two years. Leaf N, although significantly increased in the composted versus non-composted controls, was below sufficiency levels by the third year after addition. This indicates that compost cannot fully supply required N from a one time application even over the short term.

Korcak, R.F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Simulation of substrate degradation in composting of sewage sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To simulate the substrate degradation kinetics of the composting process, this paper develops a mathematical model with a first-order reaction assumption and heat/mass balance equations. A pilot-scale composting test with a mixture of sewage sludge and wheat straw was conducted in an insulated reactor. The BVS (biodegradable volatile solids) degradation process, matrix mass, MC (moisture content), DM (dry matter) and VS (volatile solid) were simulated numerically by the model and experimental data. The numerical simulation offered a method for simulating k (the first-order rate constant) and estimating k{sub 20} (the first-order rate constant at 20 {sup o}C). After comparison with experimental values, the relative error of the simulation value of the mass of the compost at maturity was 0.22%, MC 2.9%, DM 4.9% and VS 5.2%, which mean that the simulation is a good fit. The k of sewage sludge was simulated, and k{sub 20}, k{sub 20s} (first-order rate coefficient of slow fraction of BVS at 20 {sup o}C) of the sewage sludge were estimated as 0.082 and 0.015 d{sup -1}, respectively.

Zhang Jun [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Gao Ding, E-mail: gaod@igsnrr.ac.c [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Chen Tongbin; Zheng Guodi; Chen Jun; Ma Chuang; Guo Songlin [Center for Environmental Remediation, Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 11A Datun Road, Beijing 100101 (China); Du Wei [Beijing GreenTech Environmental Engineering Company, Beijing 100080 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Sludge mobilization with submerged nozzles in horizontal cylindrical tanks  

SciTech Connect

The Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVSTs) and the evaporator service tanks at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) are used for the collection and storage of liquid low-level waste (LLLW). Wastes collected in these tanks are typically acidic when generated and are neutralized with sodium hydroxide to protect the tanks from corrosion; however, the high pH of the solution causes the formation of insoluble compounds that precipitate. These precipitates formed a sludge layer approximately 0.6 to 1.2 m (2 to 4 ft) deep in the bottom of the tanks. The sludge in the MVSTs and the evaporator service tanks will eventually need to be removed from the tanks and treated for final disposal or transferred to another storage facility. The primary options for removing the sludge include single-point sluicing, use of a floating pump, robotic sluicing, and submerged-nozzle sluicing. The objectives of this study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of submerged-nozzle sluicing in horizontal cylindrical tanks and (2) obtain experimental data to validate the TEMPEST (time-dependent, energy, momentun, pressure, equation solution in three dimensions) computer code.

Hylton, T.D.; Cummins, R.L.; Youngblood, E.L.; Perona, J.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Tank 12 Sludge Characterization and Aluminum Dissolution Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3-L sludge slurry sample from Tank 12 was characterized and then processed through an aluminum dissolution demonstration. The dominant constituent of the sludge was found to be aluminum in the form of boehmite. The iron content was minor, about one-tenth that of the aluminum. The salt content of the supernatant was relatively high, with a sodium concentration of {approx}7 M. Due to these characteristics, the yield stress and plastic viscosity of the unprocessed slurry were relatively high (19 Pa and 27 cP), and the settling rate of the sludge was relatively low ({approx}20% settling over a two and a half week period). Prior to performing aluminum dissolution, plutonium and gadolinium were added to the slurry to simulate receipt of plutonium waste from H-Canyon. Aluminum dissolution was performed over a 26 day period at a temperature of 65 C. Approximately 60% of the insoluble aluminum dissolved during the demonstration, with the rate of dissolution slowing significantly by the end of the demonstration period. In contrast, approximately 20% of the plutonium and less than 1% of the gadolinium partitioned to the liquid phase. However, about a third of the liquid phase plutonium became solubilized prior to the dissolution period, when the H-Canyon plutonium/gadolinium simulant was added to the Tank 12 slurry. Quantification of iron dissolution was less clear, but appeared to be on the order of 1% based on the majority of data (a minor portion of the data suggested iron dissolution could be as high as 10%). The yield stress of the post-dissolution slurry (2.5 Pa) was an order of magnitude lower than the initial slurry, due most likely to the reduced insoluble solids content caused by aluminum dissolution. In contrast, the plastic viscosity remained unchanged (27 cP). The settling rate of the post-dissolution slurry was higher than the initial slurry, but still relatively low compared to settling of typical high iron content/low salt content sludges. Approximately 40% of the post-dissolution sludge settled over a three week period. The corresponding volume of supernatant that was decanted from the waste was approximately 35% of the total waste volume. The decanted supernatant contained approximately one-third of the dissolved aluminum and exhibited a mild greenish-grey hue.

Reboul, S.; Hay, M.; Zeigler, K; Stone, M.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

331

TANK 12 SLUDGE CHARACTERIZATION AND ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION DEMONSTRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3-L sludge slurry sample from Tank 12 was characterized and then processed through an aluminum dissolution demonstration. The dominant constituent of the sludge was found to be aluminum in the form of boehmite. The iron content was minor, about one-tenth that of the aluminum. The salt content of the supernatant was relatively high, with a sodium concentration of {approx}7 M. Due to these characteristics, the yield stress and plastic viscosity of the unprocessed slurry were relatively high (19 Pa and 27 cP), and the settling rate of the sludge was relatively low ({approx}20% settling over a two and a half week period). Prior to performing aluminum dissolution, plutonium and gadolinium were added to the slurry to simulate receipt of plutonium waste from H-Canyon. Aluminum dissolution was performed over a 26 day period at a temperature of 65 C. Approximately 60% of the insoluble aluminum dissolved during the demonstration, with the rate of dissolution slowing significantly by the end of the demonstration period. In contrast, approximately 20% of the plutonium and less than 1% of the gadolinium partitioned to the liquid phase. However, about a third of the liquid phase plutonium became solubilized prior to the dissolution period, when the H-Canyon plutonium/gadolinium simulant was added to the Tank 12 slurry. Quantification of iron dissolution was less clear, but appeared to be on the order of 1% based on the majority of data (a minor portion of the data suggested iron dissolution could be as high as 10%). The yield stress of the post-dissolution slurry (2.5 Pa) was an order of magnitude lower than the initial slurry, due most likely to the reduced insoluble solids content caused by aluminum dissolution. In contrast, the plastic viscosity remained unchanged (27 cP). The settling rate of the post-dissolution slurry was higher than the initial slurry, but still relatively low compared to settling of typical high iron content/low salt content sludges. Approximately 40% of the post-dissolution sludge settled over a three week period. The corresponding volume of supernatant that was decanted from the waste was approximately 35% of the total waste volume. The decanted supernatant contained approximately one-third of the dissolved aluminum and exhibited a mild greenish-grey hue.

Reboul, S; Michael Hay, M; Kristine Zeigler, K; Michael Stone, M

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

332

Ferrocyanide safety program: An assessment of the possibility of ferrocyanide sludge dryout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much attention has been focused on the Hanford Site radioactive waste storage tanks as a results of problems that have been envisioned for them. One problem is the potential chemical reaction between ferrocyanide precipitate particles and nitrates in the absence of water. This report addresses the question of whether dryout of a portion of ferrocyanide sludge would render it potentially reactive. Various sludge dryout mechanisms were examined to determine if any of them could occur. The mechanisms are: (1) bulk heating of the entire sludge inventory to its boiling point; (2) loss of liquid to the atmosphere via sludge surface evaporation; (3) local drying by boiling in a hot spot region; (4) sludge drainage through a leak in the tank wall; and (5) local drying by evaporation from a warm segment of surface sludge. From the simple analyses presented in this report and more detailed published analyses, it is evident that global loss of water from bulk heating of the sludge to its boiling point or from surface evaporation and vapor transport to the outside air is not credible. Also, from the analyses presented in this report and experimental and analytical work presented elsewhere, it is evident that formation of a dry local or global region of sludge as a result of tank leakage (draining of interstitial liquid) is not possible. Finally, and most importantly, it is concluded that formation of dry local regions in the ferrocyanide sludge by local hot spots or warm surface regions is not possible. The conclusion that local or global dryout is incredible is consistent with four decades of waste storage history, during which sludge temperature have gradually decreased or remained constant and the sludge moisture content has been retained. 54 refs.

Epstein, M.; Fauske, H.K. [Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Dickinson, D.R.; Crippen, M.D.; McCormack, J.D.; Cash, R.J.; Meacham, J.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Simmons, C.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Great Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Great Basin Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Great Basin Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.609920257001,"lon":-114.0380859375,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

334

Thermally Driven Circulations in Small Oceanic Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear, steady model of the circulation of a small (f plane) oceanic basin driven by heating or cooling at the surface is considered in order to examine the partition of upwelling (heating) or downwelling (cooling) between the basin's interior ...

Joseph Pedlosky

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

San Juan Basin C e n t r a l A p p a l a c h i a n B a s i n Michigan Basin Greater Green River Basin Black Warrior Basin North Central Coal Region Arkoma Basin Denver Basin...

336

Impact of EPS on Digestion of Waste Activate Sludge Thomas Gostanian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is by either aerobic or anaerobic self-digestion, in which the bacteria consume their own mass. Currently are particular in their assistance of either aerobic or anaerobic digestion. Direct samples of activated sludgeImpact of EPS on Digestion of Waste Activate Sludge Thomas Gostanian Faculty Mentor: Professor Chul

Mountziaris, T. J.

337

Investigation of EPS Characteristics and their Effects on Waste Activated Sludge Digestion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be accomplished through use of aerobic or anaerobic self digestion, but choice of digestion type in practice to predict aerobic and anaerobic digestion potential. Future Work: · The anaerobic reactors are still running sludge. It performs only slightly better than the unsonicated sludge in anaerobic digestion

Mountziaris, T. J.

338

Characteristics of Dewatered Sewage Sludge and Green Waste Co-composting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to study the characteristics of the co-composting of sewage sludge and green waste (weight ratio 8:1). The indexes such as temperature, total nitrogen and total organic carbon contents, germination index, were analyzed to ... Keywords: sewage sludge, Composting, Maturity index

Hua Zhang; Delong Lv; Leilei Wei

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A Collaborative Effort to Address the Distribution of Plutonium-Contaminated Sludge in Livermore, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For over a half-century, the U.S. Department of Energy nuclear weapons laboratory in Livermore, California has worked with plutonium in the course of its mission to research and develop nuclear weapons. Plutonium releases via the Laboratory’s sewer system resulted in the contamination of sewage sludge that was distributed and used widely as soil conditioner in parks, landscaping around public buildings, and in home lawns and gardens. The amount of sludge distributed and the concentration of the radioactivity in the sludge are uncertain. In 1999, research was undertaken to investigate the historic distribution of sewage sludge (1958-1976) in Livermore. Navigating the uncertainties surrounding the sludge distribution more than forty years after it began presented an enormous ethical challenge. Community members who received the sludge at no cost were not told that the sludge they received may have been contaminated with plutonium, and the log-book that had recorded the names and addresses of sludge recipients had disappeared. The half-life of weapons-grade plutonium is about 24,000 years. Therefore, former, current, and future Livermore residents are at potential increased risk of cancer and other health impacts from their largely unrecognized and therefore unavoidable

Patrice Sutton; A Jacqueline Cabasso; A Tracy Barreau; B Marylia Kelley C

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

TEMPEST code modifications and testing for erosion-resisting sludge simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TEMPEST computer code has been used to address many waste retrieval operational and safety questions regarding waste mobilization, mixing, and gas retention. Because the amount of sludge retrieved from the tank is directly related to the sludge yield strength and the shear stress acting upon it, it is important to incorporate the sludge yield strength into simulations of erosion-resisting tank waste retrieval operations. This report describes current efforts to modify the TEMPEST code to simulate pump jet mixing of erosion-resisting tank wastes and the models used to test for erosion of waste sludge with yield strength. Test results for solid deposition and diluent/slurry jet injection into sludge layers in simplified tank conditions show that the modified TEMPEST code has a basic ability to simulate both the mobility and immobility of the sludges with yield strength. Further testing, modification, calibration, and verification of the sludge mobilization/immobilization model are planned using erosion data as they apply to waste tank sludges.

Onishi, Y.; Trent, D.S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DETERMINATION OF THE FRACTION OF GIBBSITE AND BOEHMITE FORMS OF ALUMINUM IN TANK 51H SLUDGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with developing a test to determine the fraction of the gibbsite and boehmite forms of aluminum in the sludge solids. Knowledge of the fractions of gibbsite and boehmite in the sludge contained in various waste tanks would facilitate better sludge mass reduction estimates and allow better planning/scheduling for sludge batch preparation. The composite sludge sample prepared for use in the test from several small samples remaining from the original 3-L sample appears to be representative of the original sample based on the characterization data. A Gibbsite/Boehmite Test was developed that uses 8 M NaOH and a temperature of 65 C to dissolve aluminum. The soluble aluminum concentration data collected during the test indicates that, for the three standards containing gibbsite, all of the gibbsite dissolved in approximately 2 hours. Under the test conditions boehmite dissolved at more than an order of magnitude more slowly than gibbsite. An estimate based on the soluble aluminum concentration from the sludge sample at two hours into the test indicates the sludge solids contain a form of aluminum that dissolves at a rate similar to the 100% Boehmite standard. Combined with the XRD data from the original 3-L sample, these results provide substantial evidence that the boehmite form of aluminum predominates in the sludge. A calculation from the results of the Gibbsite/Boehmite test indicates the sludge contains {approx}3% gibbsite and {approx}97% boehmite. The sludge waste in Tank 51H was recently treated under Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD) conditions and a substantial fraction of aluminum (i.e., sludge mass) was removed, avoiding production of over 100 glass canisters in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Results of the Gibbsite/Boehmite test indicate that the aluminum in this sludge was in the form of the more difficult to dissolve boehmite form of aluminum. Since boehmite may be the dominant form of aluminum in Savannah River Site (SRS) waste tank sludge, this result suggests that the conditions of the LTAD process can be used to dissolve both the gibbsite and boehmite forms of aluminum in tank sludge and costly tank infrastructure upgrades required for the higher temperature baseline process can be avoided. However, this conclusion should be confirmed by testing additional waste tank samples.

Hay, M; Kofi Adu-Wusu, K; Daniel McCabe, D

2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Applicability of the sludge processing technical standard to type IV waste tanks with high fluoride concentration  

SciTech Connect

Type IV waste tanks at the Savannah River Plant which contain ballast water (tanks 17, 18, 19, 20, and 24) have solution compositions that are generally within the database developed for corrosion protection of the sludge processing tanks. Therefore the technical standard covering tank chemistry limits during sludge processing is applicable to the Type TV tanks. However, Tank 20 contains levels of fluoride higher than those treated in the sludge processing database. To confirm the applicability of the sludge processing technical standard, cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans for pitting susceptibility were run in a simulant of the Tank 20 contents. The nitrite inhibitor level specified by the standards did inhibit pitting corrosion in the simulant. Pitting was inhibited also at the same nitrite level but with 30 percent higher concentrations of chloride, fluoride, and sulfate. Thus the sludge processing technical standard has been shown to provide corrosion protection to type IV tanks containing ballast water.

Zapp, P.E.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

343

Progress in geothermal waste treatment biotechnology  

SciTech Connect

Studies directed at the development of an environmentally acceptable technology for the treatment and disposal of geothermal sludges have shown that a biotechnology based on microbial biochemical processes is technically and economically feasible. Process designs for the emerging biotechnology have to take several variables into consideration. In the present paper some of these variables will be discussed in terms of their effect on the cost and efficiency of potential processes. 7 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Kang, Sun Ki (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES IN DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that the waste producer 'shall report the curie inventory of radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115.' As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type all radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and contribute greater than 0.01 percent of the total curie inventory from the time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial list of radionuclides to be reported is based on the design-basis glass identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report. However, it is required that the list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the 'greater than 0.01% of the curie inventory' criterion. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, and U-238; and Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete list of reportable radionuclides must also include these sets of U and Pu isotopes - and the U and Pu isotopic mass distributions must be identified. The DWPF receives HLW sludge slurry from Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 40. For Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), the waste in Tank 40 contained a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) material transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. This sludge blend is also referred to as Macrobatch 8. Laboratory analyses of a Tank 40 sludge sample were performed to quantify the concentrations of pertinent radionuclides in the SB7a waste. Subsequently, radiological decay and in-growth were calculated over the time period from 2015 to 3115. This provided a basis for characterizing the radionuclide content of SB7a over time and for identifying the 'reportable radionuclides.' Details of the characterization methodology and the analytical results are the focus of this report. This work was performed at the request of the Waste Solidification Engineering Department of Savannah River Remediation, initiated via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. A minor revision in the reporting requirements was requested via a subsequent email communication. The work was conducted in accordance with the protocols identified in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01218 and Analytical Study Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01219. All of the raw data related to this scope have been recorded in laboratory notebook SRNL-NB-2011-00061. The overall goal of this task was to characterize the radionuclide content of the SB7a waste sufficiently to meet the WAPS and DWPF reporting requirements. The specific objectives were: (1) Quantify the current concentrations of all radionuclides impacting (or potentially-impacting) the total curie content between calendar years 2011 and 3115. Also quantify the current concentrations of other radionuclides specifically requested in the TTR or required by the WAPS. (2) Calculate future concentrations of decayed and in-grown radionuclides impacting the total curie content between calendar years 2015 and 3115; (3) Identify as 'reportable' all radionuclides contributing {ge} 0.01% of the total curie content from 2015 to 3115 and having half-lives {ge} 10 years.

Reboul, S.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.; Bannochie, C.

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

345

Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge: Results of FY 1991 studies  

SciTech Connect

Neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge is a unique waste material that is stored in two underground double-shell tanks at the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. The NCRW sludge was formed by neutralization of the solution resulting from the chemical decladding of Zircaloy-clad metallic uranium fuel by the Zirflex process. The sludge consists of zirconium and sodium hydroxides and fluorides, with small amounts of potassium, nitrite, and other nonradioactive materials. The sludge also contains uranium, transuranic (TRU) elements, and mixed fission products typical of the nonvolatiles present in irradiated fuel. The NCRW sludge is considered a TRU waste, which must be vitrified for ultimate disposal in a geologic repository. The TRU portion of the waste may be separated from the larger amount of bulk waste material so only the TRU portion would require vitrification and geologic disposal. Separation would significantly reduce waste disposal costs. Work is underway to develop the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process. This solvent extraction process has been demonstrated to separate a large percentage of the TRU elements from the bulk components of NCRW sludge. Earlier studies identified potential problems in the TRUEX processing of NCRW sludge: potential corrosion of imbedded piping in the facility initially planned for the process, instability of dissolved NCRW solutions towards precipitation, formation of interfacial crud during the TRUEX solvent extraction step, and the amount of phosphorus in the TRU product stream. These four problems were studied in FY 1991 and the results indicate that: a solution of 2 M HNO{sub 3} at a F/(Zr + Al) ratio of about 2 adequately dissolves washed NCRW sludge; such solutions should not be corrosive towards stainless steel materials; dissolved NCRW sludge solutions obtained by dissolution of washed sludge at low F/(Zr + Al) ratios (about 2) are much more stable with respect to precipitation.

Lumetta, G.J.; Swanson, J.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Pretreatment of neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge - results of FY 1991 studies  

SciTech Connect

Neutralized cladding removal waste (NCRW) sludge is a unique waste material that is stored in two underground double-shell tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. The NCRW sludge was formed by neutralization of the solution resulting from the chemical decladding of Zircaloy-clad metallic uranium fuel by the Zirflex process. The sludge consists of zirconium and sodium hydroxides and fluorides, with small amounts of potassium, nitrite, and other nonradioactive materials. The sludge also contains uranium, transuranic (TRU) elements, and mixed fission products typical of the nonvolatiles present in irradiated fuel. The NCRW sludge is considered a TRU waste, which must be vitrified for ultimate disposal in a geologic repository. The TRU portion of the waste may be separated from the larger amount of bulk waste material so only the TRU portion would require vitrification and geologic disposal. Separation would significantly reduce waste disposal costs. Work is underway to develop the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process. This solvent extraction process has been demonstrated to separate a large percentage of the TRU elements from the bulk components of NCRW sludge. Earlier studies identified potential problems in the TRUEX processing of NCRW sludge: potential corrosion of imbedded piping in the facility initially planned for the process, instability of dissolved NCRW solutions towards precipitation, formation of interfacial crud during the TRUEX solvent extraction step, and the amount of phosphorus in the TRU product stream. These four problems were studied in FY 1991 and the results indicate that: a solution of 2 M HNO[sub 3] at a F/(Zr + Al) ratio of about 2 adequately dissolves washed NCRW sludge; such solutions should not be corrosive towards stainless steel materials; dissolved NCRW sludge solutions obtained by dissolution of washed sludge at low F/(Zr + Al) ratios (about 2) are much more stable with respect to precipitation.

Lumetta, G.J.; Swanson, J.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Correlation models for waste tank sludges and slurries  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of work conducted to support the TEMPEST computer modeling under the Flammable Gas Program (FGP) and to further the comprehension of the physical processes occurring in the Hanford waste tanks. The end products of this task are correlation models (sets of algorithms) that can be added to the TEMPEST computer code to improve the reliability of its simulation of the physical processes that occur in Hanford tanks. The correlation models can be used to augment, not only the TEMPEST code, but other computer codes that can simulate sludge motion and flammable gas retention. This report presents the correlation models, also termed submodels, that have been developed to date. The submodel-development process is an ongoing effort designed to increase our understanding of sludge behavior and improve our ability to realistically simulate the sludge fluid characteristics that have an impact on safety analysis. The effort has employed both literature searches and data correlation to provide an encyclopedia of tank waste properties in forms that are relatively easy to use in modeling waste behavior. These properties submodels will be used in other tasks to simulate waste behavior in the tanks. Density, viscosity, yield strength, surface tension, heat capacity, thermal conductivity, salt solubility, and ammonia and water vapor pressures were compiled for solutions and suspensions of sodium nitrate and other salts (where data were available), and the data were correlated by linear regression. In addition, data for simulated Hanford waste tank supernatant were correlated to provide density, solubility, surface tension, and vapor pressure submodels for multi-component solutions containing sodium hydroxide, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, and sodium aluminate.

Mahoney, L.A.; Trent, D.S.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Kinetics and advanced digester design for anaerobic digestion of water hyacinth and primary sludge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research program centered around a facility located at Walt Disney World (WDW) is in progress to evaluate the use of water hyacinth (WH) for secondary and tertiary wastewater treatment, to optimize growth of WH under these conditions, and to convert the resultant primary sludge (PS) and WH to methane via anaerobic digestion. This article describes the status of the biogasification component of this program, which includes baseline and advanced digestion experiments with individual feeds and blends and the design of an experimental test unit (ETU) to be installed at WDW. Experiments with several blends demonstrated that methane yields can be predicted from the fractional content and methane yield of each component. The process was found to adhere to the Monod kinetic model for microbial growth, and associated kinetic parameters were developed for various feed combinations. A novel upflow digester is achieving significantly higher conversion than a stirred-tank digester. Of several pretreatment techniques used, only alkaline treatment resulted in increased biodegradability. A larger scale (4.5 m/sup 3/) experimental test unit is being designed for installation at WDW in 1982. 13 figures, 4 tables.

Chynoweth, D.P.; Dolenc, D.A.; Ghosh, S.; Henry, M.P.; Jerger, D.E.; Srivastava, V.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Simultaneous Biohydrogen Production and Wastewater Treatment in Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (CSTR) Using Beet Sugar Wastewater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biohydrogen production with simultaneous wastewater treatment was studied in continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) using beet sugar wastewater as substrate. Aerobic activated sludge was used as parent inoculum to startup the bioreactor. The reactor ... Keywords: bio-hydrogen production, environmental pollution, Treatment, beet sugar wastewater

Gefu Zhu; Chaoxiang Liu; Guihua Xu; Jianzheng Li; Yanli Gao; Lijun Chen; Haichen Liu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

THE TREATMENT OF LOW ACTIVITY AQUEOUS WASTES  

SciTech Connect

The equipment and treatment methods for processing low-activity aqueous wastes at the Latina nuclear power station are discussed. The effluent treatment plant serves two purposes: purification of cooling pond water and decontamination of aqueous wastes from such outlets as regenerant solutions, active laundry and change houses, decontamination center, coffin washing, and charge machine washing. The treatment process consists of chemical precipitation followed by filtration of the sludges thus produced. The process is then followed by ion exchange on a natural inorganic material such as vermiculite and evaporation. This process produces a decontamination factor of l0/sup 3/ to 10/ sup 4/. (N.W.R.)

Cartwright, A.C.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Status and progress in sludge washing: A pivotal pretreatment method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Separation of the bulk soluble chemical salts from the insoluble metal hydroxides and radionuclides is central to the strategy of disposing Hanford tank waste. Sludge washing and caustic leaching have been selected as the primary methods for processing the 230 million L (61,000,000 gal) of Hanford tank waste. These processes are very similar to those selected for processing waste at the West Valley Site in New York and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The purpose of sludge washing is to dissolve and remove the soluble salts in the waste. Leaching of the insoluble solids with caustic will be used to dissolve aluminum hydroxide and chromium hydroxide, and convert insoluble bismuth phosphate to soluble phosphate. The waste will be separated into a high-level solids fraction and a liquid fraction that can be disposed of as low-level waste after cesium removal. The washing and leaching operations involve batchwise mixing, settling, and decanting within the existing underground storage tanks.

Barton, W.B.; MacLean, G.T.; Meng, C.D.; Winkler, C.M.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Soil bioassays as tools for sludge compost quality assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Composting is a waste management technology that is becoming more widespread as a response to the increasing production of sewage sludge and the pressure for its reuse in soil. In this study, different bioassays (plant germination, earthworm survival, biomass and reproduction, and collembolan survival and reproduction) were assessed for their usefulness in the compost quality assessment. Compost samples, from two different composting plants, were taken along the composting process, which were characterized and submitted to bioassays (plant germination and collembolan and earthworm performance). Results from our study indicate that the noxious effects of some of the compost samples observed in bioassays are related to the low organic matter stability of composts and the enhanced release of decomposition endproducts, with the exception of earthworms, which are favored. Plant germination and collembolan reproduction inhibition was generally associated with uncomposted sludge, while earthworm total biomass and reproduction were enhanced by these materials. On the other hand, earthworm and collembolan survival were unaffected by the degree of composting of the wastes. However, this pattern was clear in one of the composting procedures assessed, but less in the other, where the release of decomposition endproducts was lower due to its higher stability, indicating the sensitivity and usefulness of bioassays for the quality assessment of composts.

Domene, Xavier, E-mail: x.domene@creaf.uab.es [Center for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications (CREAF), Facultat de Ciencies i Biociencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Valles, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Sola, Laura; Ramirez, Wilson; Alcaniz, Josep M.; Andres, Pilar [Center for Ecological Research and Forestry Applications (CREAF), Facultat de Ciencies i Biociencies, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Cerdanyola del Valles, 08193 Barcelona (Spain)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Characteristics of carbonized sludge for co-combustion in pulverized coal power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Co-combustion of sewage sludge can destabilize its combustion profile due to high volatility, which results in unstable flame. We carried out fuel reforming for sewage sludge by way of carbonization at pyrolysis temperature of 300-500 deg. C. Fuel characteristics of carbonized sludge at each temperature were analyzed. As carbonization temperature increased, fuel ratio increased, volatile content reduced, and atomic ratio relation of H/C and O/C was similar to that of lignite. The analysis result of FT-IR showed the decrease of aliphatic C-H bond and O-C bond in carbonization. In the analysis result of TG-DTG, the thermogravimetry reduction temperature of carbonized sludge (CS400) was proven to be higher than that of dried sludge, but lower than that of sub-bituminous coal. Hardgrove grindability index increased in proportion to fuel ratio increase, where the carbonized sludge value of 43-110 was similar or higher than the coal value of 49-63. As for ash deposits, slagging and fouling index were higher than that of coal. When carbonized sludge (CS400) and coal were co-combusted in 1-10% according to calorific value, slagging tendency was low in all conditions, and fouling tendency was medium or high according to the compositions of coal.

Park, Sang-Woo [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Cheol-Hyeon, E-mail: jangch@hanbat.ac.kr [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hanbat National University, Daejeon 305-719 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Hanford Tanks 241-AY-102 and 241-BX-101: Sludge Composition and Contaminant Release Data  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of testing sludge samples from Hanford tanks 241-AY-102 (AY-102) and 241-BX-101 (BX-101). These tests were conducted to characterize the sludge and assess the water leachability of contaminants from the solids. This work is being conducted to support the tank closure risk assessments being performed by CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. for the U.S. Department of Energy. This is the first report of testing of BX-101 sludge and the second report of testing of AY-102. Lindberg and Deutsch (2003) described the first phase of testing on AY-102 material.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Deutsch, William J.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Hess, Nancy J.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Arey, Bruce W.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Geochemistry of Delaware Basin groundwaters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fluids from various formations were sampled and analyzed in order to characterize groundwaters in the Delaware Basin. Waters were analyzed for solute content and/or stable isotope ratios (D/H and /sup 18/O//sup 16/O). Three lines of geochemical arguments are summarized, in order to present the natures and probable origins of analyzed fluids: solute chemistry, thermodynamic modelling of low-temperature aqueous species, and stable isotope ratios. (JGB)

Lambert, S.J.

1977-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

356

Integrated nonthermal treatment system study  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a study of nonthermal treatment technologies. The study consisted of a systematic assessment of five nonthermal treatment alternatives. The treatment alternatives consist of widely varying technologies for safely destroying the hazardous organic components, reducing the volume, and preparing for final disposal of the contact-handled mixed low-level waste (MLLW) currently stored in the US Department of Energy complex. The alternatives considered were innovative nonthermal treatments for organic liquids and sludges, process residue, soil and debris. Vacuum desorption or various washing approaches are considered for treatment of soil, residue and debris. Organic destruction methods include mediated electrochemical oxidation, catalytic wet oxidation, and acid digestion. Other methods studied included stabilization technologies and mercury separation of treatment residues. This study is a companion to the integrated thermal treatment study which examined 19 alternatives for thermal treatment of MLLW waste. The quantities and physical and chemical compositions of the input waste are based on the inventory database developed by the US Department of Energy. The Integrated Nonthermal Treatment Systems (INTS) systems were evaluated using the same waste input (2,927 pounds per hour) as the Integrated Thermal Treatment Systems (ITTS). 48 refs., 68 figs., 37 tabs.

Biagi, C.; Bahar, D.; Teheranian, B.; Vetromile, J. [Morrison Knudsen Corp. (United States); Quapp, W.J. [Nuclear Metals (United States); Bechtold, T.; Brown, B.; Schwinkendorf, W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Swartz, G. [Swartz and Associates (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Comparison of inorganic ion exchange materials for removing cesium, strontium, and transuranic elements from K-basin water  

SciTech Connect

The work presented in this report was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the Efficient Separations and Crosscutting Program (ESP), Office of Science and Technology, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The objective of this work was to investigate radionuclide uptake by several newly produced ion exchange materials under actual waste conditions, and to compare the performance of those materials with that of commercially available ion exchangers. The equilibrium uptake data presented in this report are useful for identifying potential materials that are capable of removing cesium and strontium from 105-KE Basin water. The data show the relative selectivities of the ion exchange materials under similar operating conditions. Additional flow studies are needed to predict material capacities and to develop complete ion exchange process flow sheets. The materials investigated in this study include commercially available ion exchangers such as IONSIV{reg_sign} IE-911 (manufactured by UOP), clinoptilolite (a naturally occurring zeolite), and materials produced on an experimental basis by AlliedSignal (biotites and nonatitanates), 3M (hexacyanoferrates), Selion Technologies, Inc. (hexacyanoferrates and titanates), and Texas A&M University (pharmacosiderites, biotites, and nonatitanates). In all, the performance of 14 ion exchange materials was evaluated at two solution-to-exchanger mass ratios (i.e., 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 5}) using actual 105-KE Basin water. Evaluation consisted of determining cesium and strontium batch distribution coefficients, loading, and decontamination factors. Actual 105-KE Basin water was obtained from a sample collected during the sludge dissolution work conducted by PNNL in FY 1996. This sample was taken from the bottom of the basin and contained significantly higher concentrations of the radioactive constituents than do samples taken from the top of the basin.

Brown, G.N.; Bontha, J.R.; Carson, K.J.; Elovich, R.J.; DesChane, J.R.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Plant for the treatment of waste  

SciTech Connect

A plant is described that is comprised of a post combustion chamber connected to the combustion chamber of a household rubbish incineration furnace whose hot gases it uses in order, by means of suitable berners to heat sewage sludges and industrial liquids and a circuit for the treatment of the smoke and residues coming from the post combustion. This circuit, which is held under vacuum by a blower, comprises a dry cooling tower employing semi-liquid sludges as cooling agent, an absorption tower employing a solution adapted to ombine the predominantly acid gases of the smoke, and a separating tower in which the liquids in suspension are removed. A recycle circuit for the solution and liquid separated and means of recovering metallic particles and compounds complete this plant.

Barkhuus, P.W.; Faldt, I.

1980-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

DOWNSTREAM IMPACTS OF SLUDGE MASS REDUCTION VIA ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION ON DWPF PROCESSING OF SAVANNAH RIVER SITE HIGH LEVEL WASTE - 9382  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SRS sludge that was to become a major fraction of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) contained a large fraction of H-Modified PUREX (HM) sludge, containing a large fraction of aluminum compounds that could adversely impact the processing and increase the vitrified waste volume. It is beneficial to reduce the non-radioactive fraction of the sludge to minimize the number of glass waste canisters that must be sent to a Federal Repository. Removal of aluminum compounds, such as boehmite and gibbsite, from sludge can be performed with the addition of NaOH solution and heating the sludge for several days. Preparation of SB5 involved adding sodium hydroxide directly to the waste tank and heating the contents to a moderate temperature through slurry pump operation to remove a fraction of this aluminum. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was tasked with demonstrating this process on actual tank waste sludge in our Shielded Cells Facility. This paper evaluates some of the impacts of aluminum dissolution on sludge washing and DWPF processing by comparing sludge processing with and without aluminum dissolution. It was necessary to demonstrate these steps to ensure that the aluminum removal process would not adversely impact the chemical and physical properties of the sludge which could result in slower processing or process upsets in the DWPF.

Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Hay, M; Daniel McCabe, D

2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

360

A Numerical Study of the Thermally Driven Plain-to-Basin Wind over Idealized Basin Topographies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical experiments have been carried out with a two-dimensional nonhydrostatic mesoscale model to investigate the diurnal temperature range in a basin and the thermally driven plain-to-basin winds. Under clear-sky conditions, the diurnal ...

Stephan F. J. de Wekker; Shiyuan Zhong; Jerome D. Fast; C. David Whiteman

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

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361

Organic and nitrogen removal from landfill leachate in aerobic granular sludge sequencing batch reactors  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aerobic granular sludge SBR was used to treat real landfill leachate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COD removal was analyzed kinetically using a modified model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristics of nitrogen removal at different ammonium inputs were explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DO variations were consistent with the GSBR performances at low ammonium inputs. - Abstract: Granule sequencing batch reactors (GSBR) were established for landfill leachate treatment, and the COD removal was analyzed kinetically using a modified model. Results showed that COD removal rate decreased as influent ammonium concentration increasing. Characteristics of nitrogen removal at different influent ammonium levels were also studied. When the ammonium concentration in the landfill leachate was 366 mg L{sup -1}, the dominant nitrogen removal process in the GSBR was simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND). Under the ammonium concentration of 788 mg L{sup -1}, nitrite accumulation occurred and the accumulated nitrite was reduced to nitrogen gas by the shortcut denitrification process. When the influent ammonium increased to a higher level of 1105 mg L{sup -1}, accumulation of nitrite and nitrate lasted in the whole cycle, and the removal efficiencies of total nitrogen and ammonium decreased to only 35.0% and 39.3%, respectively. Results also showed that DO was a useful process controlling parameter for the organics and nitrogen removal at low ammonium input.

Wei Yanjie [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection in Water Transport Engineering Ministry of Communications, Tianjin Research Institute of Water Transport Engineering, Tianjin 300456 (China); Ji Min, E-mail: jmtju@yahoo.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li Ruying [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qin Feifei [Tianjin Tanggu Sino French Water Supply Co. Ltd., Tianjin 300450 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Processing of Oak Ridge B&C pond sludge surrogate in the transportable vitrification system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) developed at the Savannah River Site is designed to process low-level and mixed radioactive wastes into a stable glass product. The TVS consists of a feed preparation and delivery system, a joule-heated melter, and an offgas treatment system. Surrogate Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) B&C pond sludge was treated in a demonstration of the TVS system at Clemson University and at ORR. After initial tests with soda-lime-silica (SLS) feed, three melter volumes of glass were produced from the surrogate feed. A forthcoming report will describe glass characterization; and melter feeding, operation, and glass pouring. Melter operations described will include slurry characterization and feeding, factors affecting feed melt rates, glass pouring and pour rate constraints, and melter operating temperatures. Residence time modeling of the melter will also be discussed. Characterization of glass; including composition, predicted liquidity and viscosity, Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and devitrification will be covered. Devitrification was a concern in glass container tests and was found to be mostly dependent on the cooling rate. Crucible tests indicated that melter shutdown with glass containing Fe and Li was also a devitrification concern, so the melter was flushed with SLS glass before cooldown.

Zamecnik, J.R.; Young, S.R.; Peeler, D.K.; Smith, M.E.

1997-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

363

Microsoft PowerPoint - 3-07_Williams_Mobilization of High Yield Sludges.pptm  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage, Mobilization, And Retrieval Of Storage, Mobilization, And Retrieval Of Very High Yield Strength Sludges EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange Atlanta November 16-18 2010 Martin Williams Vice President Advanced Process Systems NuVision Engineering 184B Rolling Hill Rd Mooresville NC 28117 USA Print Close 2 Storage, Mobilization, and Retrieval of Very High Yield Strength Sludges Sellafield Site in the UK Magnox Storage Pond *Constructed in 1940's *Major D&D project Print Close 3 Storage, Mobilization, and Retrieval of Very High Yield Strength Sludges Magnox Sludge *Up to 1200m3 arising from the corrosion of magnesium alloy clad Magnox reactor fuel in storage primarily magnesium and uranium corrosion products *small percentage of un-corroded Magnox metal *fission and activation products and their corrosion products

364

F- and H-area Sewage Sludge Application Sites: Groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Tritium and aluminum have been the primary nonpermit constituents exceeding standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. Other constituents also have exceeded standards at this site, but only sporadically, and none of those were analyzed second quarter 1993.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1992, the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) of Savannah River Plant were sampled and analyzed for constituents required quarterly by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. None of these analytes exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria at either sewage sludge site. The F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Of these constituents, tritium exceeded the PDWS in wells FSS 2D and 3D. Lead exceeded the PDWS in well FSS 3D. Iron exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well FSS 4D, and manganese exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 2D and 3D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report, fourth quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect

Eleven sewage sludge application sites at the Savannah River Site (SRS) were originally the subject of a research program, begun in 1980, using domestic sewage sludge to reclaim borrow pits and to enhance forest productivity at SRS. Currently, the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites are the only remaining active sludge application sites. During fourth quarter 1991, samples from the four monitoring wells at the F-Area site (FSS series) and three monitoring wells at the H-Area site (HSS series) were analyzed for specific conductance, pH, and certain pesticides, herbicides, toxic metals, water quality indicators, and radionuclides. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards (PDWS) and the SRS flagging criteria.

Thompson, C.Y.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Historically and currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites except iron, lead, and manganese, which occur in elevated concentrations frequently in FSS wells and occasionally in HSS wells. Tritium and aluminum are the primary nonpermit constituents that exceed standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. Other constituents also exceed standards at this site but only sporadically.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1992, the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) of Savannah River Plant were sampled and analyzed for constituents required quarterly by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. None of these analytes exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria at either sewage sludge site. The F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Of these constituents, tritium exceeded the PDWS in wells FSS 2D and 3D. Lead exceeded the PDWS in well FSS 3D. Iron exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well FSS 4D, and manganese exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 2D and 3D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Sewage waste enriches city parks: forced aeration allows sludge cake to be used as compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of managing sewage wastes in the City of Windsor shows that composting of sludges is practical in most urbanized areas in Canada. Composting is a method to treat waste (or recycling of waste) and at this point is not a signficant moneymaker. By composting sewage sludge cake, the odors are alleviated and a stable humus-like organic material is produced. The exothermic proces generates temperatures within the pile that effectively destroy many of the human pathogens. While composting is more labor intensive than some of the other systems of sludge cake disposal, it is not capital intensive. The composting of sewage sludge is a conserver of energy when compared to other methods of disposal. The end product can be utilized as a soil conditioner safety.

Romano, L.S.; Faust, J.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

The Black Shale Basin of West Texas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Black Shale Basin of West Texas covers an area in excess of 21,000 square miles and includes the region from Terrell and Pecos Counties… (more)

Cole, Charles Taylor, 1913-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Illinois coal production pushes Illinois Basin production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal production in the Illinois Basin during the first half of 2012 (64.4 million short tons) was 13% higher than the same period in 2011. This ...

372

California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,...

373

,"California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,...

374

,"California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Nonassociated Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,...

375

Wetland loss dynamics in southwestern Barataria basin ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ABSTRACT We determined spatial associations of wetland loss rates in a 950-km2 study area in the southwestern Barataria basin of Louisiana's ...

376

DOE/EA-0978 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT SLUDGE STABILIZATION AT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

78 78 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT SLUDGE STABILIZATION AT THE PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT HANFORD SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OCTOBER 1994 T h i s page intentionally left blank. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

377

PRODUCTION OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATES FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SLUDGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The three main conclusions of this report are: (1) The pilot plant successfully demonstrated the continuous, fully-integrated, long-term process operation, including the mixing, pelletizing, and curing steps for aggregate production. The curing vessel, which was designed for the pilot plant test, was operated in a mass flow mode and performed well during pilot plant operation. (2) The pilot plant test demonstrated process flexibility. The same equipment was used to produce lightweight, medium-weight, and road aggregates. The only change was the mix formulation. Aggregates were produced from a variety of mix designs and from FGD sludge with solids concentrations between 45.0% and 56.7% and moisture contents between 55.0% and 43.3%. (3) The pilot plant provided operating data and experience to design and cost a commercial plant, which was not part of the cooperative agreement.

M.M. Wu; D.C. McCoy; R.O. Scandrol; M.L. Fenger; J.A. Withum; R.M. Statnick

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

SLUDGE BATCH 6/TANK 51 SIMULANT CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL SIMULATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Qualification simulant testing was completed to determine appropriate processing conditions and assumptions for the Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) Shielded Cells demonstration of the DWPF flowsheet using the qualification sample from Tank 51 for SB6 after SRNL washing. It was found that an acid addition window of 105-139% of the DWPF acid equation (100-133% of the Koopman minimum acid equation) gave acceptable Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) results for nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation occurred continuously after acid addition in three of the four tests. The three runs at 117%, 133%, and 150% stoichiometry (Koopman) were all still producing around 0.1 lb hydrogen/hr at DWPF scale after 42 hours of boiling in the SRAT. The 150% acid run reached 110% of the DWPF SRAT limit of 0.65 lb H{sub 2}/hr, and the 133% acid run reached 75% of the DWPF SME limit of 0.223 lb H{sub 2}/hr. Conversely, nitrous oxide generation was subdued compared to previous sludge batches, staying below 25 lb/hr in all four tests or about a fourth as much as in comparable SB4 testing. Two other processing issues were noted. First, incomplete mercury suspension impacted mercury stripping from the SRAT slurry. This led to higher SRAT product mercury concentrations than targeted (>0.45 wt% in the total solids). Associated with this issue was a general difficulty in quantifying the mass of mercury in the SRAT vessel as a function of time, especially as acid stoichiometry increased. About ten times more mercury was found after drying the 150% acid SME product to powder than was indicated by the SME product sample results. Significantly more mercury was also found in the 133% acid SME product samples than was found during the SRAT cycle sampling. It appears that mercury is segregating from the bulk slurry in the SRAT vessel, as mercury amalgam deposits for example, and is not being resuspended by the agitators. The second processing issue was significant ammonium ion formation as the acid stoichiometry was increased due to the high noble metal-high mercury feed conditions. Ammonium ion was found partitioned between the SRAT product slurry and the condensate from the lab-scale off-gas chiller downstream of the SRAT condenser. The ammonium ion was produced from nitrate ion by formic acid. Formate losses increased with increasing acid stoichiometry reaching 40% at the highest stoichiometry tested. About a third of the formate loss at higher acid stoichiometries appeared to be due to ammonia formation. The full extent of ammonia formation was not determined in these tests, since uncondensed ammonia vapor was not quantified; but total formation was bounded by the combined loss of nitrite and nitrate. Nitrate losses during ammonia formation led to nitrite-to-nitrate conversion values that were negative in three of the four tests. The negative results were an artifact of the calculation that assumes negligible SRAT nitrate losses. The sample data after acid addition indicated that some of the initial nitrite was converted to nitrate, so the amount of nitrate destroyed included nitrite converted to nitrate plus some of the added nitrate from the sludge and nitric acid. It is recommended that DWPF investigate the impact of SME product ammonium salts on melter performance (hydrogen, redox). It was recommended that the SB6 Shielded Cells qualification run be performed at 115% acid stoichiometry and allow about 35 hours of boiling for mercury stripping at the equivalent of a 5,000 lb/hr boil-up rate.

Koopman, David; Best, David

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

379

Basin evolution, diagenesis and uranium mineralization in the PaleoproterozicThelon Basin,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basin evolution, diagenesis and uranium mineralization in the PaleoproterozicThelon Basin, Nunavut18 O values near 0% (Vienna Standard Mean OceanWater). Uranium-rich apatite cement (P1) also formed during diagenetic stage1indicating that oxygenated, uranium- bearing pore water was present in the basin

Hiatt, Eric E.

380

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE INCIPIENT SLUDGE MIXING IN RADIOACTIVE LIQUID WASTE STORAGE TANKS DURING SALT SOLUTION BLENDING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is the second in a series of four publications to document ongoing pilot scale testing and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of mixing processes in 85 foot diameter, 1.3 million gallon, radioactive liquid waste, storage tanks at Savannah River Site (SRS). Homogeneous blending of salt solutions is required in waste tanks. Settled solids (i.e., sludge) are required to remain undisturbed on the bottom of waste tanks during blending. Suspension of sludge during blending may potentially release radiolytically generated hydrogen trapped in the sludge, which is a safety concern. The first paper (Leishear, et. al. [1]) presented pilot scale blending experiments of miscible fluids to provide initial design requirements for a full scale blending pump. Scaling techniques for an 8 foot diameter pilot scale tank were also justified in that work. This second paper describes the overall reasons to perform tests, and documents pilot scale experiments performed to investigate disturbance of sludge, using non-radioactive sludge simulants. A third paper will document pilot scale CFD modeling for comparison to experimental pilot scale test results for both blending tests and sludge disturbance tests. That paper will also describe full scale CFD results. The final paper will document additional blending test results for stratified layers in salt solutions, scale up techniques, final full scale pump design recommendations, and operational recommendations. Specifically, this paper documents a series of pilot scale tests, where sludge simulant disturbance due to a blending pump or transfer pump are investigated. A principle design requirement for a blending pump is UoD, where Uo is the pump discharge nozzle velocity, and D is the nozzle diameter. Pilot scale test results showed that sludge was undisturbed below UoD = 0.47 ft{sup 2}/s, and that below UoD = 0.58 ft{sup 2}/s minimal sludge disturbance was observed. If sludge is minimally disturbed, hydrogen will not be released. Installation requirements were also determined for a transfer pump which will remove tank contents, and which is also required to not disturb sludge. Testing techniques and test results for both types of pumps are presented.

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Steeper, T.; Fowley, M.; Parkinson, K.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins sludge treatment" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

PRODUCTION OF CONSTRUCTION AGGREGATES FROM FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

Through a cooperative agreement with DOE, the Research and Development Department of CONSOL Inc. (CONSOL R and D) is teaming with SynAggs, Inc. and Duquesne Light to design, construct, and operate a 500 lb/h continuous pilot plant to produce road construction aggregate from a mixture of wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) sludge, fly ash, and other components. The proposed project is divided into six tasks: (1) Project Management; (2) Mix Design Evaluation; (3) Process Design; (4) Construction; (5) Start-Up and Operation; and (6) Reporting. In this quarter, Tasks 1 and 2 were completed. A project management plan (Task 1) was issued to DOE on October 22, 1998 . The mix design evaluation (Task 2) with Duquesne Light Elrama Station FGD sludge and Allegheny Power Hatfields Ferry Station fly ash was completed. Eight semi-continuous bench-scale tests were conducted to examine the effects of mix formulation on aggregate properties. A suitable mix formulation was identified to produce aggregates that meet specifications of the American Association of State High Transport Officials (AASHTO) as Class A aggregate for use in highway construction. The mix formulation was used in designing the flow sheet of the pilot plant. The process design (Task 3) is approximately 80% completed. Equipment was evaluated to comply with design requirements. The design for the curing vessel was completed by an outside engineering firm. All major equipment items for the pilot plant, except the curing vessel, were ordered. Pilot plant construction (Task 4) was begun in October. The Hazardous Substance Plan was issued to DOE. The Allegheny County (PA) Heat Department determined that an air emission permit is not required for operation of the pilot plant.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Dissolution of ORNL HLW sludge and partitioning of the actinides using the TRUEX process  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were conducted to evaluate the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for partitioning actinides from actual dissolved high-level radioactive waste (HLW) sludge. Samples of sludge from melton Valley Storage Tank W-25 were rinsed with mild caustic (0.2 M NaOH) to reduce the concentrations of nitrates and fission products associated with the interstitial liquid. In one campaign the rinsed sludge was leached in nitric acid, and about 50% of the dry mass of the sludge was dissolved. The resulting solution contained total metal concentrations of {approximately} 1.8 M with a nitric acid concentration of 2.9 M. In the other campaign the sludge was neutralized with nitric acid to destroy the carbonates, then leached with 2.6 M NaOH for {approximately} 6 h before rinsing with the mild caustic. The sludge was then leached in nitric acid, and about 80% of the sludge dissolved. The resulting solution contained total metal concentrations of {approximately} 0.6 M with a nitric acid concentration of 1.7 M. Chemical analyses of both phases were used to evaluate the process. Evaluation was based on two metrics: the fraction of TRU elements removed from the dissolved sludge and comparison of the results with predictions made with the Generic TRUEX Model (GTM). The fractions of Eu, Pu, Cm, Th and U species removed from aqueous solution in only one extraction stage were > 95% and were close to the values predicted by the GTM. Mercury was also found to be strongly extracted, with a one-stage removal of > 92%. In one test, vanadium appeared to be moderately extracted.

Spencer, B.B.; Egan, B.Z.; Beahm, E.C.; Chase, C.W.; Dillow, T.A.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Tank 48 Treatment Process  

-Reduce elutriation of particulates containing coal System planning: Sludge batch planning/DWPF WAC-Evaluate Tank Farm and DWPF coal capability

384

K Basins Field Verification Program  

SciTech Connect

The Field Verification Program establishes a uniform and systematic process to ensure that technical information depicted on selected engineering drawings accurately reflects the actual existing physical configuration. This document defines the Field Verification Program necessary to perform the field walkdown and inspection process that identifies the physical configuration of the systems required to support the mission objectives of K Basins. This program is intended to provide an accurate accounting of the actual field configuration by documenting the as-found information on a controlled drawing.

Booth, H.W.

1994-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

385

HIGH LEVEL WASTE MECHANCIAL SLUDGE REMOVAL AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE F TANK FARM CLOSURE PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site F-Tank Farm Closure project has successfully performed Mechanical Sludge Removal (MSR) using the Waste on Wheels (WOW) system for the first time within one of its storage tanks. The WOW system is designed to be relatively mobile with the ability for many components to be redeployed to multiple waste tanks. It is primarily comprised of Submersible Mixer Pumps (SMPs), Submersible Transfer Pumps (STPs), and a mobile control room with a control panel and variable speed drives. In addition, the project is currently preparing another waste tank for MSR utilizing lessons learned from this previous operational activity. These tanks, designated as Tank 6 and Tank 5 respectively, are Type I waste tanks located in F-Tank Farm (FTF) with a capacity of 2,840 cubic meters (750,000 gallons) each. The construction of these tanks was completed in 1953, and they were placed into waste storage service in 1959. The tank's primary shell is 23 meters (75 feet) in diameter, and 7.5 meters (24.5 feet) in height. Type I tanks have 34 vertically oriented cooling coils and two horizontal cooling coil circuits along the tank floor. Both Tank 5 and Tank 6 received and stored F-PUREX waste during their operating service time before sludge removal was performed. DOE intends to remove from service and operationally close (fill with grout) Tank 5 and Tank 6 and other HLW tanks that do not meet current containment standards. Mechanical Sludge Removal, the first step in the tank closure process, will be followed by chemical cleaning. After obtaining regulatory approval, the tanks will be isolated and filled with grout for long-term stabilization. Mechanical Sludge Removal operations within Tank 6 removed approximately 75% of the original 95,000 liters (25,000 gallons). This sludge material was transferred in batches to an interim storage tank to prepare for vitrification. This operation consisted of eleven (11) Submersible Mixer Pump(s) mixing campaigns and multiple intraarea transfers utilizing STPs from July 2006 to August 2007. This operation and successful removal of sludge material meets requirement of approximately 19,000 to 28,000 liters (5,000 to 7,500 gallons) remaining prior to the Chemical Cleaning process. Removal of the last 35% of sludge was exponentially more difficult, as less and less sludge was available to mobilize and the lighter sludge particles were likely removed during the early mixing campaigns. The removal of the 72,000 liters (19,000 gallons) of sludge was challenging due to a number factors. One primary factor was the complex internal cooling coil array within Tank 6 that obstructed mixer discharge jets and impacted the Effective Cleaning Radius (ECR) of the Submersible Mixer Pumps. Minimal access locations into the tank through tank openings (risers) presented a challenge because the available options for equipment locations were very limited. Mechanical Sludge Removal activities using SMPs caused the sludge to migrate to areas of the tank that were outside of the SMP ECR. Various SMP operational strategies were used to address the challenge of moving sludge from remote areas of the tank to the transfer pump. This paper describes in detail the Mechanical Sludge Removal activities and mitigative solutions to cooling coil obstructions and other challenges. The performance of the WOW system and SMP operational strategies were evaluated and the resulting lessons learned are described for application to future Mechanical Sludge Removal operations.

Jolly, R; Bruce Martin, B

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Alsco Anaconda, OH. (First remedial action), September 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Alsco Anaconda site is a 4.8-acre former sludge disposal area in Gnadenhutten, Tuscarawas County, Ohio. Contamination at the site occurred from 1965 to 1978 when wastewater and wastewater treatment sludge from the plant, containing hazardous aluminum processing wastes (FO19), was disposed of in an unlined settling basin and a sludge pit. In 1978 the plant owners began dewatering the treatment sludge prior to disposal of sludge offsite in the settling basin and a former swamp area. Because leachate from the sludge may have contaminated the ground water and surface water, a subsequent ROD will address the appropriate remedial action for those media. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and sludge are organics including PCBs, and metals including chromium, cyanide, and arsenic.

Not Available

1989-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

387

Basin analog approach answers characterization challenges of unconventional gas potential in frontier basins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To continue increasing the energy supply to meet global demand in the coming decades, the energy industry needs creative thinking that leads to the development of new energy sources. Unconventional gas resources, especially those in frontier basins, will play an important role in fulfilling future world energy needs. We must identify and quantify potential unconventional gas resources in basins around the world to plan for their development. Basin analog assessment is one technique that can be used to identify and quantify unconventional gas resources that is less expensive and less time consuming. We have developed a basin analog methodology that is useful for rapidly and consistently evaluating the unconventional hydrocarbon resource potential in exploratory basins. We developed software, Basin Analog System (BAS), to perform and accelerate the process of identifying analog basins. Also, we built a database that includes geologic and petroleum systems information of intensely studied North America basins that contain well characterized conventional and unconventional hydrocarbon resources. We have selected 25 basins in North America that have a history of producing unconventional gas resources. These are �reference� basins that are used to predict resources in frontier or exploratory basins. The software assists us in ranking reference basins that are most analogous to the target basin for the primary purpose of evaluating the potential unconventional resources in the target basin. The methodology allows us to numerically rank all the reference basins relative to the target basin. The accuracy of the results depends on the descriptions of geologic and petroleum systems. We validated the software to make sure it is functioning correctly and to test the validity of the process and the database. Finding a reference basin that is analogous to a frontier basin can provide insights into potential unconventional gas resources of the frontier basin. Our method will help industry predict the unconventional hydrocarbon resource potential of frontier basins, guide exploration strategy, infer reservoir characte