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1

CO2 Saline Storage Demonstration in Colorado Sedimentary Basins: Applied Studies in Reservoir Assessment and Dynamic Processes Affecting Industrial Operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This multitask research project was conducted in anticipation of a possible future increase in industrial efforts at CO2 storage in Colorado sedimentary basins. Colorado is already the home to the oldest Rocky Mountain CO2 storage site, the Rangely Oil Field, where CO2-EOR has been underway since the 1980s. The Colorado Geological Survey has evaluated storage options statewide, and as part of the SW Carbon Sequestration Partnership the Survey, is deeply engaged in and committed to suitable underground CO2 storage. As a more sustainable energy industry is becoming a global priority, it is imperative to explore the range of technical options available to reduce emissions from fossil fuels. One such option is to store at least some emitted CO2 underground. In this NETL-sponsored CO2 sequestration project, the Colorado School of Mines and our partners at the University of Colorado have focused on a set of the major fundamental science and engineering issues surrounding geomechanics, mineralogy, geochemistry and reservoir architecture of possible CO2 storage sites (not limited to Colorado). Those are the central themes of this final report and reported below in Tasks 2, 3, 4, and 6. Closely related to these reservoir geoscience issues are also legal, environmental and public acceptance concerns about pore space accessibility—as a precondition for CO2 storage. These are addressed in Tasks 1, 5 and 7. Some debates about the future course of the energy industry can become acrimonius. It is true that the physics of combustion of hydrocarbons makes it impossible for fossil energy to attain a carbon footprint anywhere nearly as low as that of renewables. However, there are many offsetting benefits, not the least that fossil energy is still plentiful, it has a global and highly advanced distribution system in place, and the footprint that the fossil energy infrastructure occupies is orders of magnitude smaller than renewable energy facilities with equivalent energy capacity. Finally, inexpensive natural gas here in North America is pushing coal for electricity generation off the market, thus reducing US CO2 emissions faster than any other large industrialized nation. These two big factors argue for renewed efforts to find technology solutions to reduce the carbon footprint (carbon dioxide as well as methane and trace gases) of conventional and unconventional oil and gas. One major such technology component is likely to be carbon capture, utilization and storage.

Nummedal, Dag; Sitchler, Alexis; McCray, John; Mouzakis, Katherine; Glossner, Andy; Mandernack, Kevin; Gutierrez, Marte; Doran, Kevin; Pranter, Matthew; Rybowiak, Chris

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

Williston basin Seislog study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of Seislog (trade name) processing and interpretation of an east-west line in the North Dakota region of the Williston basin. Seislog processing involves inversion of the seismic trace data to produce a set of synthetic sonic logs. These resulting traces, which incorporate low-frequency velocity information, are displayed in terms of depth and isotransit times. These values are contoured and colored, based on a standard stratigraphic color scheme. The section studied is located just north of a dual producing oil pool from zones in the Ordovician Red River and Devonian Duperow Formations. A sonic log from the Long Creek 1 discovery well was digitized and filtered to match the frequency content of the original seismic data. This allows direct comparison between units in the well and the pseudosonic log (Seislog) trace nearest the well. Porosity development and lithologic units within the lower Paleozoic stratigraphic section can be correlated readily between the well and Seislog traces. Anomalous velocity zones within the Duperow and Red River Formations can be observed and correlated to producing intervals in the nearby wells. These results emphasize the importance of displaying inversion products that incorporate low-frequency data in the search for hydrocarbons in the Williston basin. The accumulations in this region are local in extent and are difficult to pinpoint by using conventional seismic data or displays. Seislog processing and displays provide a tested method for identification and delineation of interval velocity anomalies in the Red River and Duperow stratigraphic sections. These techniques can significantly reduce risks in both exploration and delineation drilling of these types of targets.

Mummery, R.C.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Applying clean coal technologies in the Asian Pacific Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States is well positioned to play an expanding role in meeting the energy-technology demands of the Asian Pacific Basin (APB). The US Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Demonstration Program, spearheaded, stewarded, and managed by the US Department of Energy in full partnership with US industry, provides a proving ground for innovative coal-related technologies. Its precombustion, combustion, postcombustion, and conversion technologies, once tested and proven at the demonstration level, are expected to be applicable to coal-burning facilities in the APB (and elsewhere), in both the utility and industrial sectors. These technologies and concepts are expected to allow for increased utilization of the vast coal and lignite resources in the APB in an efficient, economic, and environmentally acceptable manner. They also could provide the opportunity for increased sales of US coals. Specific, potential applications in the APB will be presented, highlighting possibilities in Indonesia, Japan, the Peoples' Republic of China, South Korea, Taiwan, and Thailand. 4 refs., 1 tab.

Gillette, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.; Surles, T.G.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

California Basin Studies (CaBS). Final contract report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Continental Borderland`s present configuration dates from about 4 to 5 X 10{sup 6} years Before Present (B.P.) and is the most recent of several configurations of the southern California margin that have evolved after the North America Plate over-rode the East Pacific Rise about 30 X 10{sup 6} years ago. The present morphology is a series of two to three northwest-southeast trending rows of depressions separated by banks and insular ridges. Two inner basins, Santa Monica and San Pedro, have been the site for the Department of Energy-funded California Basin Study (CaBS) Santa Monica and San Pedro Basins contain post-Miocene sediment thicknesses of about 2.5 and 1.5 km respectively. During the Holocene (past 10,000 years) about 10-12 m have accumulated. The sediment entered the basin by one or a combination of processes including particle infall (mainly as bioaggregates) from surface waters, from nepheloid plumes (surface, mid-depths and near-bottom), from turbidity currents, mass movements, and to a very minor degree direct precipitation. In Santa Monica Basin, during the last century, particle infall and nepheloid plume transport have been the most common processes. The former dominates in the central basin floor in water depths from 900 to 945 m. where a characteristic silt-clay with a typical mean diameter of about 0.006 mm, phi standard deviation.

Gorsline, D.S.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

5

Stochastic Models Applied to Operation of Reservoirs in the Upper Colorado River Basin in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

river basin. The model is entitled "Monthly Operational Hydrometeorological Simulator (MOHS)." Use of the 30-day meteorological forecast categories of light, moderate, or heavy precipitation and below normal, near normal, or above normal temperature...

Clark, R. A.; O'Connor, G. E.; Curry, G. L.; Helm, J. C.

6

488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies NonprofitHuman Services Bachelor of Technical and Applied Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies ­ Nonprofit­Human Services ­ Bachelor of Technical-Aug-12/TET This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major. However / SOC 32570 COMM 35864, COMT 36318 or Visit www.kent.edu/catalog/elr 2.000 2.000 #12;Roadmap: Technical

Sheridan, Scott

8

Phosphorus Fate and Transport in Wastewater Applied to Rapid Infiltration Basins.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Water reuse is one answer to the problem of water scarcity that present and future generations will face. Wastewater applied to land can intentionally recharge… (more)

Moura, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development and Produced Water Management Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane resources throughout the entire Powder River Basin were reviewed in this analysis. The study was conducted at the township level, and as with all assessments conducted at such a broad level, readers must recognize and understand the limitations and appropriate use of the results. Raw and derived data provided in this report will not generally apply to any specific location. The coal geology in the basin is complex, which makes correlation with individual seams difficult at times. Although more than 12,000 wells have been drilled to date, large areas of the Powder River Basin remain relatively undeveloped. The lack of data obviously introduces uncertainty and increases variability. Proxies and analogs were used in the analysis out of necessity, though these were always based on sound reasoning. Future development in the basin will make new data and interpretations available, which will lead to a more complete description of the coals and their fluid flow properties, and refined estimates of natural gas and water production rates and cumulative recoveries. Throughout the course of the study, critical data assumptions and relationships regarding gas content, methane adsorption isotherms, and reservoir pressure were the topics of much discussion with reviewers. A summary of these discussion topics is provided as an appendix. Water influx was not modeled although it is acknowledged that this phenomenon may occur in some settings. As with any resource assessment, technical and economic results are the product of the assumptions and methodology used. In this study, key assumptions as well as cost and price data, and economic parameters are presented to fully inform readers. Note that many quantities shown in various tables have been subject to rounding; therefore, aggregation of basic and intermediate quantities may differ from the values shown.

Advanced Resources International

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

A gravity study of the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition zone, Basin and Range province, western United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chairman, Neville Carter approved funding for me to attend a GSA field trip in the Great Basin-Sonoran Desert transition area for an initial look at the rocks. As I wrote computer programs and ran models, it really helped me to remember..., they did not use a modeling technique; instead, Bancroft's method (1960) was used to determine the maximum possible depth to an assumed step-source. SEISMIC STUDIES Because of the basin and range physiography, and the generally north-south orientation...

Brooks, Debra Ann

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Frequencies Studies Applied to Photovoltaic Modules.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This master thesis proposes to study applications of frequencies studies to the case of photovoltaic modules and photovoltaic plants. Such studies are little used… (more)

Miquel, Clément

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Description of the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Technical Report is to provide background information about the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES). This study, which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program, was conducted from 16 November 2010 through 21 March 2012 at a field site in northeastern Oregon. The primary goal of the study was to provide profiles of wind speed and wind direction over the depth of the boundary layer in an operating wind farm located in an area of complex terrain. Measurements from propeller and vane anemometers mounted on a 62 m tall tower, Doppler Sodar, and Radar Wind Profiler were combined into a single data product to provide the best estimate of the winds above the site during the first part of CBWES. An additional goal of the study was to provide measurements of Turbulence Kinetic Energy (TKE) near the surface. To address this specific goal, sonic anemometers were mounted at two heights on the 62 m tower on 23 April 2011. Prior to the deployment of the sonic anemometers on the tall tower, a single sonic anemometer was deployed on a short tower 3.1 m tall that was located just to the south of the radar wind profiler. Data from the radar wind profiler, as well as the wind profile data product are available from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Data Archive (http://www.arm.gov/data/campaigns). Data from the sonic anemometers are available from the authors.

Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Nelson, Danny A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

A Case Study of the Applied Learning Academy: Reconceptualized Quantum Design of Applied Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the Applied Learning Academy (ALA) and allow the lessons learned from this public school to emerge from the narrative stories of past students, parents, teachers, administrators, and local...

Gordon, Denise

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

14

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies Fire and Emergency Services Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies ­ Fire and Emergency Services Administration ­ Bachelor Updated: 5-Apr-13/LNHD This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major;Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies ­ Fire and Emergency Services Administration ­ Bachelor

Sheridan, Scott

15

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies Computer Technology Internet/Multimedia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies ­ Computer Technology Internet/Multimedia ­ Bachelor Updated: 22-Aug-12/TET This roadmap is a recommended semester-by-semester plan of study for this major and minimum 39 upper-division credit hours #12;Roadmap: Technical and Applied Studies ­ Computer Technology

Sheridan, Scott

16

A Case Study applying Process and Project Alignment Methodology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Case Study applying Process and Project Alignment Methodology Paula Ventura Martins1 & Alberto process and (2) analyze projects, starting an SPI effort. In order to evaluate ProPAM, a study case Martins A Case Study Applying & Alberto Rodrigues da Silva Process and Project Alignment Methodology 64

da Silva, Alberto Rodrigues

17

Strontium isotopic study of subsurface brines from Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The abundance of the radiogenic isotope /sup 87/Sr in a subsurface brine can be used as a tracer of brine origin, evolution, and diagenetic effects. The authors have determined the /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of over 60 oil-field waters from the Illinois basin, where brine origin is perplexing because of the absence of any significant evaporite strata. Initially, they analyzed brines from 15 petroleum-producing sandstone and carbonate units; waters from Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian strata have /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios in the range 0.7079-0.7108. All but those from the Ste. Genevieve Limestone (middle Mississippian) are more radiogenic in /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr than seawater values for this interval of geologic time. The detrital source of the more radiogenic /sup 87/Sr may be the New Albany Shale group, considered to be a major petroleum source rock in the basin. The /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of Ste. Genevieve brines apparently evolved without a contribution from fluid-shale interaction.

hetherington, E.A.; Stueber, A.M.; Pushkar, P.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Retrocommissioning Case Study - Applying Building Selection Criteria for Maximum Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RETROCOMMISSIONING CASE STUDY ?Applying Building Selection Criteria for Maximum Results? Larry Luskay, Tudi Haasl, Linda Irvine Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Portland, Oregon Donald Frey Architectural Energy Corporation Boulder.... The building was retrocommissioned by Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. (PECI), in conjunction with Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The building-specific goals were: 1) Obtain cost-effective energy savings from optimizing operation...

Luskay, L.; Haasl, T.; Irvine, L.; Frey, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Riacho Fundo water basin: a case study for qualitative modelling sustainable development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of sustainable development related problems. The models aim at supporting stakeholders to understand the systemsThe Riacho Fundo water basin: a case study for qualitative modelling sustainable development Paulo presents a working plan for modelling relevant aspects of sustainability issues in the Riacho Fundo water

Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

20

Integrated study of Mississippian Lodgepole Waulsortian Mounds, Williston Basin, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waulsortian-type carbonate buildups in the Mississippian Lodgepole Formation, Williston Basin, constitute prolific oil reservoirs. Since the initial discovery in 1993, five fields have been discovered: Dickinson Field (Lodgepole pool); Eland Field; Duck Creek Field, Versippi Field; and Hiline Field. Cumulative production (October, 1995) is 2.32 million barrels of oil and 1.34 BCF gas, with only 69,000 barrels of water. Oil gravity ranges from 41.4 to 45.3 API. Both subsurface cores from these fields as well as outcrop (Bridget Range, Big Snowy and Little Belt Mountains, Montana) are composed of facies representing deposition in mound, reworked mound, distal reworked mound, proximal flank, distal flank, and intermound settings. Porosity values within the mound and reworked mound facies are up to 15%; permeability values (in places fracture-enhanced) are up to tens of Darcies. Geometries of the mounds are variable. Mound thicknesses in the subsurface range from approximately 130-325 feet (40-100 meters); in outcrop thicknesses range from less than 30 ft (9 m) to over 250 ft (76 m). Subsurface areal dimensions range from approximately 0.5 x 1.0 mi (0.8 x 1.6 km) to 3.5 x 5.5 mi (5.6 x 8.8 km). Integration of seismic data with core and well-log models sheds light on the exploration for Lodgepole mounds. Seismic modeling of productive mounds in the Dickinson and Eland fields identifies characteristics useful for exploration, such as local thickening of the Lodgepole to Three Forks interval. These observations are confirmed in reprocessed seismic data across Eland field and on regional seismic data. Importantly, amplitude versus offset modeling identifies problems with directly detecting and identifying porosity within these features with amplitude analyses. In contrast, multicomponent seismic data has great potential for imaging these features and quantifying porous zones within them.

Kupecz, J.A.; Arestad, J.F.; Blott, J. E. [Kupecz and Associates, Ltd., Denver, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Effect of the thermal gradient variation through geological time on basin modeling; a case study: The Paris basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Toarcian black shales well known as source rocks for oil (Poulet and Espitalie, 1987, Bessereau et al basin. The numerical results were calibrated with organic matter maturity data. TherMO's simulates

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

22

Study of gas production potential of New Albany Shale (group) in the Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) is recognized as both a source rock and gas-producing reservoir in the Illinois basin. The first gas discovery was made in 1885, and was followed by the development of several small fields in Harrison County, Indiana, and Meade County, Kentucky. Recently, exploration for and production of New Albany gas has been encouraged by the IRS Section 29 tax credit. To identify technology gaps that have restricted the development of gas production form the shale gas resource in the basin, the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC), composed of the Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky geological surveys, is conducting a cooperative research project with the Gas Research Institute (GRI). An earlier study of the geological and geochemical aspects of the New Albany was conducted during 1976-1978 as part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The current IBC/GRI study is designed to update and reinterpret EGSP data and incorporate new data obtained since 1978. During the project, relationships between gas production and basement structures are being emphasized by constructing cross sections and maps showing thickness, structure, basement features, and thermal maturity. The results of the project will be published in a comprehensive final report in 1992. The information will provide a sound geological basis for ongoing shale-gas research, exploration, and development in the basin.

Hasenmueller, N.R.; Boberg, W.S.; Comer, J.; Smidchens, Z. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (United States)); Frankie, W.T.; Lumm, D.K. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, J.D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Geostatistical Inversion for the Lateral Delineation of Thin-Layer Hydrocarbon Reservoirs: A Case Study in San Jorge Basin, Argentina.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Study in San Jorge Basin, Argentina. Germán Merletti, and Julio Hlebszevitsch, Repsol-YPF, and Carlos, Argentina, is the Bajo Barreal formation and its equivalents, which to date have supplied more than 90 in La Itala field, San Jorge Basin, Argentina Statistically, hydrocarbon production originates not only

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

24

Phase I Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (904-83G)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the completed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Focused Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study (CMS/FS) for the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (LAOCB)/L-Area Acid Caustic Basin (9LAACB) Solid Waste Management Unit/Operable Unit (SWMU/OU) at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Coordinated study of the Devonian black shale in the Illinois Basin: Illinois, Indiana, and western Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the resource potential of the Devonian shales, called the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) was begun. A study of the stratigraphy, structure, composition, and gas content of the Devonian shale in the Illinois Basin was undertaken by the State Geological Surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, under contract to the U.S. DOE as a part of the EGSP. Certain additional data were also developed by other research organizations (including Monsanto Research Corporation-Mound Facility and Battelle-Columbus Laboratory) on cores taken from the Illinois Basin. This report, an overview of geological data on the Illinois basin and interpretations of this data resulting from the EGSP, highlights areas of potential interest as exploration targets for possible natural gas resources in the Devonian shale of the basin. The information in this report was compiled during the EGSP from open file data available at the three State Geological surveys and from new data developed on cores taken by the DOE from the basin specifically for the EGSP. The organically richest shale is found in southeastern Illinois and in most of the Indiana and Kentucky portions of the Illinois Basin. The organic-rich shales in the New Albany are thickest near the center of the basin in southeastern Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and adjacent parts of Kentucky portions of the Illinois Basin. The organic-rich shales in the New Albany are thickest near the center of the basin in southeastern Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and adjacent parts of Kentucky. Natural fractures in the shale may aid in collecting gas from a large volume of shale. These fractures may be more abundant and interconnected to a greater degree in the vicinity of major faults. Major faults along the Rough Creek Lineament and Wabash Valley Fault System cross the deeper part of the basin.

Lineback, J.A.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

A Hydrometeorological Study Related to the Distribution of Precipitation and Runoff over Small Drainage Basins -- Urban Versus Rural Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-28 1970 A Hydrometeorological Study Related to the Distribution of Precipitation and Runoff over Small Drainage Basins?Urban Versus Rural Areas R.G. Feddes R.A. Clark R.C. Runnels Texas Water...

Feddes, R. G.; Clark, R.A.; Runnels, R. C.

27

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

28

Geology and geohydrology of the east Texas Basin. Report on the progress of nuclear waste isolation feasibility studies (1979)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program to investigate the suitability of salt domes in the east Texas Basin for long-term nuclear waste repositories addresses the stability of specific domes for potential repositories and evaluates generically the geologic and hydrogeologic stability of all the domes in the region. Analysis during the second year was highlighted by a historical characterization of East Texas Basin infilling, the development of a model to explain the growth history of the domes, the continued studies of the Quaternary in East Texas, and a better understanding of the near-dome and regional hydrology of the basin. Each advancement represents a part of the larger integrated program addressing the critical problems of geologic and hydrologic stabilities of salt domes in the East Texas Basin.

Kreitler, C.W.; Agagu, O.K.; Basciano, J.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Supporting Communities of Practice in Applied Computer Science Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Information Technology (FhG-FIT), Schloss Birlinghoven, 53754 Sankt Augustin between academia and industry is too low. The innovation potential and the needs of the companies

30

Study of the geothermal production potential in the Williston Basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary studies of geothermal production potential for the North Dakota portion of the Williston Basin have been carried out. Reservoir data such as formation depth, subsurface temperatures, and water quality were reviewed for geothermal brine production predictions. This study, in addition, provides important information about net pay thickness, porosity, volume of geothermal water available, and productivity index for future geothermal direct-use development. Preliminary results show that the Inyan Kara Formation of the Dakota Group is the most favorable geothermal resource in terms of water quality and productivity. The Madison, Duperow, and Red River Formations are deeper formations but because of their low permeability and great depth, the potential flow rates from these three formations are considerably less than those of the Inyan Kara Formation. Also, poor water quality and low porosity will make those formations less favorable for geothermal direct-use development.

Chu, Min H.

1991-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

31

CSP 581: Applied AI Programming Peter Norvig, Paradigms of AI Programming: Case Studies in Common Lisp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSP 581: Applied AI Programming Texts Peter Norvig, Paradigms of AI Programming: Case Studies LISP Programs 4 hours Total 42 hours CSP 581: Applied AI Programming - CS Dept, Illinois Insti... 1

Heller, Barbara

32

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10`` to 20`` API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A geological and geophysical study of the Sergipe-Alagoas Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................................... 29 Reservoir Rocks Within the Basin ..................................................... 30 Probable Source and Migration Paths................................................. 31 METHODS AND MATERIALS... the evaporite layer, some basins register a substantial thickness of Aptian siliclastic and carbonate rocks. This sequence also marks the first marine incursion and could contain hydrocarbon source rocks. Sedimentation was predominantly carbonitic...

Melton, Bradley Douglas

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

34

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Wind extremes in the North Sea Basin under climate change: An ensemble study of 12 CMIP5 GCMs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind extremes in the North Sea Basin under climate change: An ensemble study of 12 CMIP5 GCMs R. C levels and waves are generated by low atmospheric pressure and severe wind speeds during storm events. As a result of the geometry of the North Sea, not only the maximum wind speed is relevant, but also wind

Haak, Hein

36

The Lago Cardiel Basin, Argentina (49S): Origin and evolution revealed by high-resolution multichannel seismic reflection studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Lago Cardiel Basin, Argentina (49°S): Origin and evolution revealed by high source in the closed lake system of Lago Cardiel, Argentina (49°S). As part of an ongoing study reflection surveys in the closed lake system of Lago Cardiel, Argentina (Fig. 1), with 3.5-kHz and boomer

Gilli, Adrian

37

Towards application of a climate-index for Case study in the Citarum upper river basin Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indonesia Ramon van Bruggen De Bilt, 2013 | Internal report; IR-2013-06 #12;#12;Towards application of a climate-index for dengue incidence Case study in the Citarum upper river basin Indonesia Master Thesis during this work and for their warm welcome during my stay in Indonesia. At last my thanks go

Haak, Hein

38

Complexity measures applied to an applications case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maintenance of large applications programs has become the most costly function of many Management Information Systems. As a result, recent research has attempted to objectively determine the qualities of low maintenance software. Related research has been directed toward quantifying the complexity, or unmaintainability of existing software. This paper will reference a case study of a large MIS software application and will discuss current maintenance problems and associated costs. A mathematical model will then be presented which correlates quantifiable complexity measures with actual maintenance costs. Finally, a method for projecting cost savings from the reduced complexity of software will be suggested.

Brice, L.; Connell, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

TRUEX partitioning studies applied to ICPP sodium-bearing waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located in southeast Idaho at the USDOE Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, formerly reprocessed highly enriched spent nuclear fuel to recover fissionable uranium. The HLW raffinates from the combined PUREX/REDOX type uranium recovery process were converted to solid oxides (calcine) in a high temperature fluidized bed. Liquid effluents from the calcination process were combined with liquid sodium bearing waste (SBW) generated primarily in conjunction with decontamination activities. Due to the high sodium content in the SBW, this secondary waste stream is not directly amenable to solidification via calcination. Currently, approximately 1.5 millon gallons of liquid SBW are stored at the ICPP in large tanks. Several treatment options for the SBW are currently being considered, including the TRansUranic EXtraction (TRUEX) process developed by Horwitz and co-workers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), in preparation for the final disposition of SBW. Herein described are experimental results of radionuclide tracer studies with simulated SBW using the TRUEX process solvent.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Law, J.D.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

New life for the 555' Pool, San Joaquin basin, California: A study in synergy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 555' Pool, discovered in 1957 and unitized in 1961, is located on the northwestern nose of the Buena Vista Hills anticline in the western San Joaquin basin, Kern County, California. The trap is a combination of stratigraphic pinch-out and anticlinal rollover with approximately 750 ft of closure. Two distinct productive intervals in the upper Miocene Stevens Sand are present, namely, the massive sand zone, comprising thick (< 1,000 ft) turbidite channel sands, and the Interbeds zone, comprising interbedded sands and shales about 500 ft thick. Cumulative oil production for the Massive and Interbeds zones is 44.9 MMBO (44% recovery of OOIP) and 4.2 MMBO (35% recovery of OOIP), respectively. Workover results in the middle to late 1980s led to incremental improvement in production rates and the realization that substantially more reserves may be located behind pipe within the field limits. A multidisciplinary task-force reviewed all available historical core, log, drill-stem test, and production data in addition to workover results and gas identification logs. This review resulted in an improved reservoir description, better geological reservoir characterization, and the identification of possible reserves not accessed by then-current completions. Reserve estimates were made by simultaneous solution using material balance and volumetric methods. This study projected a significant increase in the remaining recoverable reserves. New workover wells have resulted in substantial improvement in production rates and an amended interpretation of the location of the oil band.

Gaynor, G.C. (Reservoir Geosystems, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)); Anderson, M.; Moorefield, T. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Sills, S.; Wydrinski, R. (ARCO Oil and Gas Co., Plano, TX (United States))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Diverting a Portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River Basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-1 1967 A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Diverting a Portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River Basins J.H. Cook Texas Water Resources Institute Texas A...

Cook, John Henry

44

A numerical study of horizontal dispersion in a macro tidal basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Cobscook Bay, a macro tidal basin, is simulated using the three-dimensional, nonlinear, finite element regimes in different parts of Cobscook Bay. It is found that the effective Lagrangian dispersion ocean model, QUODDY_dry. Numerical particles are released from various transects in the bay at different

Maine, University of

45

K Basin sludge treatment project chemical procesing baseline time diagram study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides an initial basis for determining the duration of operating steps and the required resources for chemically treating K Basin sludge before transporting it to Tank Farms. It was assumed that all operations would take place within a TPA specified 13-month timeframe.

KLIMPER, S.C.

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

46

Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study of the solar interior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying petroleum geophysics to astrophysics: Quantitative 4D seismic study of another new branch of seismology recently developed in petroleum reservoir seismology is commonly known in the petroleum industry, differs from earlier

Crawford, Ian

47

A study of the point reactor dynamics equations as applied to large nuclear excursions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STUDY OF THE POINT REACTOR DYNAMICS EQUATIONS AS APPLIED TO LARGE NUCLEAR EXCURSIONS A Thesis By ROBERT TERRELL PERRY, JR, Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University xn partial fulfillment of the requirements i...' or the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1967 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering A STUDY OF THE POINT REACTOR DYNAMICS EQUATIONS AS APPLIED TO LARGE NUCLEAR EXCURSIONS A Thesis By ROBERT TERRELL PERRY, JR. Approved as to style and content by...

Perry, Robert Terrell

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Characterization of bedded salt for storage caverns -- A case study from the Midland Basin, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geometry of Permian bedding salt in the Midland Basin is a product of interaction between depositional facies and postdepositional modification by salt dissolution. Mapping high-frequency cycle patterns in cross section and map view using wireline logs documents the salt geometry. Geologically based interpretation of depositional and dissolution processes provides a powerful tool for mapping and geometry of salt to assess the suitability of sites for development of solution-mined storage caverns. In addition, this process-based description of salt geometry complements existing data about the evolution of one of the best-known sedimentary basins in the world, and can serve as a genetic model to assist in interpreting other salts.

Hovorka, Susan D.; Nava, Robin

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

49

Towards a chronology of brownware pottery in the western Great Basin: A case study from owens valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Revisions in Archaeological Sequences of the Great Basin in Interior Southern California, Nevada Archaeological Survey Research Papers, 5,

Eerkens, J W

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Roadmap: Communication Studies -Applied Communication -Bachelor of Arts [CI-BA-COMM-APCO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Roadmap: Communication Studies - Applied Communication - Bachelor of Arts [CI-BA-COMM-APCO] College of Communication and Information School of Communication Studies Catalog Year: 2012­2013 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated Major GPA Important Notes Semester One: [16 Credit Hours] COMM 15000 Introduction to Human Communication

Sheridan, Scott

51

Finding Hidden Geothermal Resources in the Basin and Range Using Electrical Survey Techniques: A Computational Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For many years, there has been speculation about "hidden" or "blind" geothermal systems—reservoirs that lack an obvious overlying surface fluid outlet. At present, it is simply not known whether "hidden" geothermal reservoirs are rare or common. An approach to identifying promising drilling targets using methods that are cheaper than drilling is needed. These methods should be regarded as reconnaissance tools, whose primary purpose is to locate high-probability targets for subsequent deep confirmation drilling. The purpose of this study was to appraise the feasibility of finding "hidden" geothermal reservoirs in the Basin and Range using electrical survey techniques, and of adequately locating promising targets for deep exploratory drilling based on the survey results. The approach was purely theoretical. A geothermal reservoir simulator was used to carry out a lengthy calculation of the evolution of a synthetic but generic Great Basin-type geothermal reservoir to a quasi-steady "natural state". Postprocessors were used to try to estimate what a suite of geophysical surveys of the prospect would see. Based on these results, the different survey techniques were compared and evaluated in terms of their ability to identify suitable drilling targets. This process was completed for eight different "reservoir models". Of the eight cases considered, four were "hidden" systems, so that the survey techniques could be appraised in terms of their ability to detect and characterize such resources and to distinguish them from more conventionally situated geothermal reservoirs. It is concluded that the best way to find "hidden" basin and range geothermal resources of this general type is to carry out simultaneous SP and low-frequency MT surveys, and then to combine the results of both surveys with other pertinent information using mathematical "inversion" techniques to characterize the subsurface quantitatively. Many such surveys and accompanying analyses can be carried out for the cost of a single unsuccessful deep "discovery well".

J. W. Pritchett; not used on publication

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Applying Scaled Vegetation Greenness Metrics to Constrain Simulated Transpiration Anomalies: A Study over Australia*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Climate Change Research Centre, Level 4 Mathews Building, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052: A Study over Australia* MARK DECKER, ANDY J. PITMAN, AND JASON EVANS Climate Change Research CentreApplying Scaled Vegetation Greenness Metrics to Constrain Simulated Transpiration Anomalies

Evans, Jason

53

A Key Technology Evaluation Case Study: Applying a New Middleware Architecture on the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Key Technology Evaluation Case Study: Applying a New Middleware Architecture on the Enterprise, fgoedickejuzdung@informatik.uni-essen.de Abstract Decisions for key technologies, like middleware, for large scale projects are hard, because the impact and relevance of key technologies go beyond their core technological

Zdun, Uwe

54

Refracted x-ray fluorescence (RXF) applied to the study of thermally grown oxide scales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

RXF is a new technique for studying thin films. Here, it is applied to study of thermally grown oxide scales. Evolution of chromia scales on Fe-25Cr-20Ni-0.3Y alloys and the evolution of alumina scales on {beta}-NiAl are investigated. The technique provides scale composition and depth profile information, scale thicknesses and growth rates, and information about transient phase evolution.

Koshelev, I.; Paulikas, A.P.; Veal, B.W.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

55

A study to determine the feasibility of diverting a portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STUDY TO DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF DIVERTING A PORTION OF THE RED RIVER INTO THE TRINITY, NECHES AND SABINE RIVER BASINS A Thesis by JOHN HENRY COOK Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A6, M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1967 Major Subject: Civil Engineering A STUDY TO DETERMINE THE FEASIBILITY OF DIVERTING A PORTION OF THE RED RIVER INTO THE TRINITY, NECHES AND SABINE RIVER BASINS A Thesis by JOHN HENRY COOK...

Cook, John Henry

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Planning Model as Applied to Supplementation : Model Description, User Guide, and Theoretical Documentation for the Model Introduced in the Summary Report Series on Supplementation in the Columbia Basin.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the formulation and operation of a model designed to assist in planning supplementation projects. It also has application in examining a broader array of questions related to natural fish production and stock restoration. The model is referred to as the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) Model because of its utility in helping to diagnose and identify possible treatments to be applied to natural production problems for salmonids. It was developed through the Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP), which was an initiative to help coordinate supplementation planning in the Columbia Basin. The model is operated within the spreadsheet environment of Quattro Pro using a system of customized menus. No experience with spreadsheet macros is required to operate it. As currently configured, the model should only be applied to spring chinook; modifications are required to apply it to fall chinook and other species. The purpose of the model is to enable managers to consider possible outcomes of supplementation under different sets of assumptions about the natural production system and the integration of supplementation fish into that system. It was designed to help assess uncertainty and the relative risks and benefits of alternative supplementation strategies. The model is a tool to facilitate both planning and learning; it is not a predictive model. This document consists of three principal parts. Part I provides a description of the model. Part II is a guide to running the model. Part III provides theoretical documentation. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of many of the model's parameters is provided in the appendix. This analysis was used to test whether the model produces consistent and reasonable results and to assess the relative effects of specific parameter inputs on outcome.

Lestelle, Lawrence C.; Lichatowich, James A.; Mobrand, Lars E.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

An applied study using systems engineering methods to prioritize green systems options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For many years, there have been questions about the effectiveness of applying different green solutions. If you're building a home and wish to use green technologies, where do you start? While all technologies sound promising, which will perform the best over time? All this has to be considered within the cost and schedule of the project. The amount of information available on the topic can be overwhelming. We seek to examine if Systems Engineering methods can be used to help people choose and prioritize technologies that fit within their project and budget. Several methods are used to gain perspective into how to select the green technologies, such as the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) and Kepner-Tregoe. In our study, subjects applied these methods to analyze cost, schedule, and trade-offs. Results will document whether the experimental approach is applicable to defining system priorities for green technologies.

Lee, Sonya M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macdonald, John M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Geohydrologic feasibility study of the greater Green River Basin for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc, of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Greater Green River Basin through literature surveys.

Reed, P.D.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

K Basin Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K East (KE)/K West (KW) Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site have been used for storage of irradiated N Reactor and single-pass reactor fuel. Remaining spent fuel is continuing to be stored underwater in racks and canisters in the basins while fuel retrieval activities proceed to remove the fuel from the basins. The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project is adding equipment to the facility in preparation for removing the fuel and sludge from the basins In preparing this hazard analysis, a variety of hazard analysis techniques were used by the K Basins hazard analysis team, including hazard and operability studies, preliminary hazard analyses, and ''what if'' analyses (WHC-SD-SNF-PHA-001, HNF-2032, HNF-2456, and HNF-SD-SNF-SAD-002). This document summarizes the hazard analyses performed as part of the safety evaluations for the various modification projects and combines them with the original hazard analyses to create a living hazard analysis document. As additional operational activities and modifications are developed, this document will be updated as needed to ensure it covers all the hazards at the K Basins in a summary form and to ensure the subsequent safety analysis is bounding. This hazard analysis also identifies the preliminary set of design features and controls that the facility could rely on to prevent or reduce the frequency or mitigate consequences of identified accident conditions based on their importance and significance to safety. The operational controls and institutional programs relied on for prevention or mitigation of an uncontrolled release are identified as potential technical safety requirements. All operational activities and energy sources at the K Basins are evaluated in this hazard analysis. Using a systematic approach, this document identifies hazards created by abnormal operating conditions and external events (e.g., earthquakes) that have the potential for causing undesirable consequences to the facility worker, the onsite individual, or the public. This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and complies with the requirements of 10 CFR 830.

SEMMENS, L.S.

2001-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

60

Analysis of ancient-river systems by 3D seismic time-slice technique: A case study in northeast Malay Basin, offshore Terengganu, Malaysia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fluvial sandstones constitute one of the major clastic petroleum reservoir types in many sedimentary basins around the world. This study is based on the analysis of high-resolution, shallow (seabed to 500 m depth) 3D seismic data which generated three-dimensional (3D) time slices that provide exceptional imaging of the geometry, dimension and temporal and spatial distribution of fluvial channels. The study area is in the northeast of Malay Basin about 280 km to the east of Terengganu offshore. The Malay Basin comprises a thick (> 8 km), rift to post-rift Oligo-Miocene to Pliocene basin-fill. The youngest (Miocene to Pliocene), post-rift succession is dominated by a thick (1–5 km), cyclic succession of coastal plain and coastal deposits, which accumulated in a humid-tropical climatic setting. This study focuses on the Pleistocene to Recent (500 m thick) succession, which comprises a range of seismic facies analysis of the two-dimensional (2D) seismic sections, mainly reflecting changes in fluvial channel style and river architecture. The succession has been divided into four seismic units (Unit S1-S4), bounded by basin-wide strata surfaces. Two types of boundaries have been identified: 1) a boundary that is defined by a regionally-extensive erosion surface at the base of a prominent incised valley (S3 and S4); 2) a sequence boundary that is defined by more weakly-incised, straight and low-sinuosity channels which is interpreted as low-stand alluvial bypass channel systems (S1 and S2). Each unit displays a predictable vertical change of the channel pattern and scale, with wide low-sinuosity channels at the base passing gradationally upwards into narrow high-sinuosity channels at the top. The wide variation in channel style and size is interpreted to be controlled mainly by the sea-level fluctuations on the widely flat Sunda land Platform.

Sulaiman, Noorzamzarina; Hamzah, Umar; Samsudin, Abdul Rahim [Geology Programme, School of Environmental and Natural Resource Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

APPLIED PHYSICS APPLIED PHYSICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MSc APPLIED PHYSICS #12;MSc APPLIED PHYSICS This taught Masters course is based on the strong research in Applied Physics in the University's Department of Physics. The department has an impressive photonics and quantum optics, Physics and the Life Sciences, and solid state physics. The knowledge gained

Mottram, Nigel

62

Comprehensive Mechanisms for Combustion Chemistry: An Experimental and Numerical Study with Emphasis on Applied Sensitivity Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was an integrated experimental/numerical effort to study pyrolysis and oxidation reactions and mechanisms for small-molecule hydrocarbon structures under conditions representative of combustion environments. The experimental aspects of the work were conducted in large-diameter flow reactors, at 0.3 to 18 atm pressure, 500 to 1100 K temperature, and 10-2 to 2 seconds reaction time. Experiments were also conducted to determine reference laminar flame speeds using a premixed laminar stagnation flame experiment and particle image velocimetry, as well as pressurized bomb experiments. Flow reactor data for oxidation experiments include: (1)adiabatic/isothermal species time-histories of a reaction under fixed initial pressure, temperature, and composition; to determine the species present after a fixed reaction time, initial pressure; (2)species distributions with varying initial reaction temperature; (3)perturbations of a well-defined reaction systems (e.g. CO/H2/O2 or H2/O2)by the addition of small amounts of an additive species. Radical scavenging techniques are applied to determine unimolecular decomposition rates from pyrolysis experiments. Laminar flame speed measurements are determined as a function of equivalence ratio, dilution, and unburned gas temperature at 1 atm pressure. Hierarchical, comprehensive mechanistic construction methods were applied to develop detailed kinetic mechanisms which describe the measurements and literature kinetic data. Modeling using well-defined and validated mechanisms for the CO/H2/Oxidant systems and perturbations of oxidation experiments by small amounts of additives were also used to derive absolute reaction rates and to investigate the compatibility of published elementary kinetic and thermochemical information. Numerical tools were developed and applied to assess the importance of individual elementary reactions to the predictive performance of the developed mechanisms and to assess the uncertainties in elementary rate constant evaluations.

Dryer, Frederick L.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

63

RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

Robert Caldwell

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! ! Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah By Peter Gregory Lippert Submitted to the graduate degree program in Geology and the Graduate Faculty... i Acceptance Page ii Abstract iii-iv Table of contents v-viii List of figures and tables ix-x Chapter 1. Introduction 11-16 Chapter 2. Geologic History...

Lippert, Peter Gregory

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Seismic attribute studies, Mississippian Frobisher-Alida oil fields, northeast Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subtle Mississippian stratigraphic traps of the Wiley and Glenburn fields of North Dakota and the Creelman field of southeast Saskatchewan illustrate similar seismic response to distinctly different geologic settings. Shoreline facies change, thick supratidal salt pans, carbonate porosity zones, buried hills, and structure on the top of the Mississippian unconformity can all cause similar seismic response (seismic facies). In each instance, vertical and lateral thickness and lithologic changes are the dominant influence on the seismic response. In addition, pitfalls due to tuning, multiples, and other causes can make it difficult, if not impossible, to differentiate these anomalies based on seismic response alone. Careful attribute studies must be coordinated with sound geologic control and models to explore effectively for these subtle stratigraphic traps.

Davis, T.L.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Application of the ELOHA Framework to Regulated Rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin: A Case Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order for habitat restoration in regulated rivers to be effective at large scales, broadly applicable frameworks are needed that provide measurable objectives and contexts for management. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework was created as a template to assess hydrologic alterations, develop relationships between altered streamflow and ecology, and establish environmental flow standards. We tested the utility of ELOHA in informing flow restoration applications for fish and riparian communities in regulated rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin (UTRB). We followed the steps of ELOHA to generate flow alteration-ecological response relationships and then determined whether those relationships could predict fish and riparian responses to flow restoration in the Cheoah River, a regulated system within the UTRB. Although ELOHA provided a robust template to construct hydrologic information and predict hydrology for ungaged locations, our results do not support the assertion that over-generalized univariate relationships between flow and ecology can produce results sufficient to guide management in regulated rivers. After constructing multivariate models, we successfully developed predictive relationships between flow alterations and fish/riparian responses. In accordance with model predictions, riparian encroachment displayed consistent decreases with increases in flow magnitude in the Cheoah River; however, fish richness did not increase as predicted four years post- restoration. Our results suggest that altered temperature and substrate and the current disturbance regime may have reduced opportunities for fish species colonization. Our case study highlights the need for interdisciplinary science in defining environmental flows for regulated rivers and the need for adaptive management approaches once flows are restored.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dolloff, Dr. Charles A [USDA Forest Service, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Tech; Mathews, David C [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Miocene fluvial-tidal sedimentation in a residual forearc basin of the Northeastern Pacific Rim: Cook Inlet, Alaska case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cook Inlet in southern Alaska represents a Cenozoic residual forearc basin in a convergent continental margin, where the Pacific Plate is being subducted beneath the North American Plate. This basin accumulated the >6,700-m-thick, mainly nonmarine, Eocene-Pliocene Kenai Group. These rocks contain biogenic coal-bed methane estimated to be as high as 245 TCF. Lignites to subbituminous coals with subsurface R{sub o} ranging from 0.38 to 0.73 percent and the stage of clay-mineral diagenesis and expandibility indicate a thermally {open_quotes}cool{close_quotes} basin. Miocene Tyonek and Beluga Formations compose 65 percent (>4,300 m thick) of the Kenai Group. The Tyonek includes conglomeratic sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, coals, and carbonaceous shales, interpreted as braided- stream deposits. These fluvial deposits are interbecided with burrowed, lenticular, and flaser-bedded sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones, interpreted as tidal deposits. Tyonek framework conglomerates formed in wet alluvial fans incised on paleovalleys of the Chugach terrane. Coal-forming mires are well developed on abandoned braided-stream deposits. Tyonek drainages formed in high-gradient alluvial plains inundated by tides similar to environments in the modern upper Cook Inlet. The upper Miocene Beluga consists of sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, carbonaceous shales, and coals deposited in meandering (low sinuosity) and anastomosed fluvial systems. These fluvial deposits alternated vertically with deposits of coal-forming mires. The Beluga drainages formed in low-gradient alluvial plains. The high-gradient Tyonek alluvial plain was probably controlled by provenance uplift and eustatic change, whereas the low-gradient Beluga alluvial plain was influenced by subdued provenance uplift and rapid basin subsidence. Rapid sedimentation on both these low- and high-gradient alluvial plains, which kept up with subsidence, produced a thermally {open_quotes}cool{close_quotes} basin.

Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

Miocene fluvial-tidal sedimentation in a residual forearc basin of the Northeastern Pacific Rim: Cook Inlet, Alaska case study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cook Inlet in southern Alaska represents a Cenozoic residual forearc basin in a convergent continental margin, where the Pacific Plate is being subducted beneath the North American Plate. This basin accumulated the >6,700-m-thick, mainly nonmarine, Eocene-Pliocene Kenai Group. These rocks contain biogenic coal-bed methane estimated to be as high as 245 TCF. Lignites to subbituminous coals with subsurface R[sub o] ranging from 0.38 to 0.73 percent and the stage of clay-mineral diagenesis and expandibility indicate a thermally [open quotes]cool[close quotes] basin. Miocene Tyonek and Beluga Formations compose 65 percent (>4,300 m thick) of the Kenai Group. The Tyonek includes conglomeratic sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, coals, and carbonaceous shales, interpreted as braided- stream deposits. These fluvial deposits are interbecided with burrowed, lenticular, and flaser-bedded sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones, interpreted as tidal deposits. Tyonek framework conglomerates formed in wet alluvial fans incised on paleovalleys of the Chugach terrane. Coal-forming mires are well developed on abandoned braided-stream deposits. Tyonek drainages formed in high-gradient alluvial plains inundated by tides similar to environments in the modern upper Cook Inlet. The upper Miocene Beluga consists of sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, carbonaceous shales, and coals deposited in meandering (low sinuosity) and anastomosed fluvial systems. These fluvial deposits alternated vertically with deposits of coal-forming mires. The Beluga drainages formed in low-gradient alluvial plains. The high-gradient Tyonek alluvial plain was probably controlled by provenance uplift and eustatic change, whereas the low-gradient Beluga alluvial plain was influenced by subdued provenance uplift and rapid basin subsidence. Rapid sedimentation on both these low- and high-gradient alluvial plains, which kept up with subsidence, produced a thermally [open quotes]cool[close quotes] basin.

Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Application page 1 Majors/Programs of StudyYou can apply using the common application or online: www.uml.edu/apply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applied/Computational Mathematics Bioinformatics Business Applications Computer Science Probability/Statistics: www.uml.edu/apply FRANCIS COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Chemical Engineering* General Biological Engineering Nanomaterials Engineering Nuclear Engineering Paper Engineering Civil Engineering* Computer Engineering

Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

70

Regional correlations and reservoir characterization studies of the Pennsylvanian system in the Anadarko Basin area of Western Oklahoma and the Panhandle of Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Correlations problems have long existed between the Pennsylvanian marine clastics of the northeastern half of the Anadarko Basin and Shelf and the Pennsylvanian terrigenous washes of the extreme southwestern portion of the Anadarko Basin. These correlation problems have created nomenclature problems resulting in thousands of feet of washes often referred to on completion reports and production records as {open_quotes}granite wash{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Atoka Wash{close_quotes} when much greater accuracy and specificity is both needed and possible. Few detailed cross-sections are available. Regional and field scale cross-sections were constructed which have been correlated well by well and field by field using nearly every deep well drilled in the basin. This process has provided for a high degree of consistency. These cross-sections have greatly diminished the correlation and nomenclature problems within the Anadarko Basin. Certain markers proved to be regionally persistent from the marine clastics into the terrigenous washes making the subdivision of thousands of feet of washes possible. Those of greatest importance were the top of the Marmaton, the Cherokee Marker, the Pink {open_quotes}Limestone{close_quotes} Interval, the top of the Atoka and the top of the Morrow. Once these and other subdivisions were made, production was allocated on a much more definitive basis. Additionally, detailed reservoir characterization of the reservoirs was conducted to include geologic and engineering data. Finally, a {open_quotes}field-specific{close_quotes} reservoir type log was chosen. A series of regional cross-sections will be presented along with the results of reservoir characterization studies conducted on reservoirs within the fields located along the cross-sections. A type log for each reservoir will also be illustrated.

Hendrickson, W.J.; Smith, P.W.; Williams, C.M. [Dwights Energydata Inc., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Screening model optimization for Panay River Basin planning in the Philippines .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The state of the water resources of the Panay River Basin have motivated studies and initial basin planning to mitigate flood damages, to produce hydroelectricity,… (more)

Millspaugh, John Henry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Detailed geochemical study of the Dan River-Danville Triassic Basin, North Carolina and Virginia. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This abbreviated data report presents results of surface geochemical reconnaissance in the Dan River-Danville Triassic Basin of north-central North Carolina and south-central Virginia. Unweathered rock samples were collected at 380 sites within the basin at a nominal sampling density of one site per square mile. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site; analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. A detailed four-channel spectrometric survey was conducted, and the results are presented as a series of symbol plot maps for eU, eTh, and eU/eTh. Data from rock sample sites (on microfiche in pocket) include rock type and color and elemental analyses for U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Na, Sc, Sm, Ti, V, and Yb. Elemental uranium in 362 sedimentary rock samples from the Dan River-Danville Basin ranges from a low of 0.1 to a maximum of 13.3 parts per million (ppM). The log mean uranium concentration for these same samples is 0.37 ppM, and the log standard deviation is 0.24 ppM. Elemental uranium in 10 diabase dike samples from within the basin is in the range 0.1 to 0.7 ppM. The log mean uranium concentration for diabase samples is -.65 ppM, and the log standard deviation is 0.27. This report is issued in draft form, without detailed technical and copy editing. This was done to make the report available to the public before the end of the NURE program.

Thayer, P. A.; Cook, J. R.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Applied Radiation and Isotopes 58 (2003) 333338 Study of air pollutants in Hong Kong using energy dispersive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applied Radiation and Isotopes 58 (2003) 333­338 Study of air pollutants in Hong Kong using energy were located within the area defined by vehicular emissions. As such, the main air pollutant monitoring site also fell into this same identified area, so the main air pollutant could also be vehicular

Yu, K.N.

74

IRRADIANCE MAPS APPLIED FOR THE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PV SYSTEMS -A CASE STUDY FOR THE GERMAN FEDERAL STATE OF SAXONY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

services, both general or dedicated to solar energy application, are in use. Examples for these typesIRRADIANCE MAPS APPLIED FOR THE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PV SYSTEMS - A CASE STUDY FOR THE GERMAN, D-01314 Dresden, Germany ABSTRACT: For the estimation of the expected annual energy yield

Heinemann, Detlev

75

Experimental study of turbulent supercritical open channel water flow as applied to the CLiFF concept  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Liquid wall; Low conductivity fluid; Turbulence; Surface waves; Heat transfer 1. Introduction In fusion not experience strong MHD forces and to a large extent remain turbulent, but their heat transfer capabilitiesExperimental study of turbulent supercritical open channel water flow as applied to the CLi

Abdou, Mohamed

76

A study of the relationship between applied and effective torque on screw fastenings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from a nutrunner oould be very small and still result in a muoh larger variation of effeotive torque due to the other factors. This is ths problem which manufacturers of these types of air tools face and this research is devoted toward developing... the effeotive torque, Kany applied torque measuring instruments are some form of a transmission dynamometer (5) (6) (7) (8). This type of measuring devioe "may be desoribed as an instrument which is interposed between a prime mover and the apparatus which...

Lewis, Robert Miller

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques applied to the study of an HPGe detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Doppler Broadening Spectroscopy of the large Ge crystal of an HPGe detector was performed using positrons from pair production of 6.13 MeV {gamma}-rays from the {sup 19}F(p,{alpha}{gamma}){sup 16}O reaction. Two HPGe detectors facing opposite sides of the Ge crystal acting as target provided both coincidence and singles spectra. Changes in the shape of the annihilation peak were observed when the high voltage applied to the target detector was switched on or off, amounting to somewhat less than 20% when the areas of equivalent energy intervals in the corresponding normalized spectra are compared.

Nascimento, E. do; Vanin, V. R.; Maidana, N. L.; Silva, T. F.; Rizzutto, M. A. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fernandez-Varea, J. M. [Facultat de Fisica (ECM), Universitat de Barcelona, Diagonal 645, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hardgrove grindability study of Powder River Basin and Appalachian coal components in the blend to a midwestern power station  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five coals representing four distinct coal sources blended at a midwestern power station were subjected to detailed analysis of their Hardgrove grindability. The coals are: a low-sulfur, high volatile A bituminous Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal (Pike County, KY); a medium-sulfur, high volatile A bituminous Pittsburgh coal (southwestern PA); a low-sulfur, subbituminous Wyodak coal from two mines in the eastern Powder River Basin (Campbell County, WY). The feed and all samples processed in the Hardgrove grindability test procedure were analyzed for their maceral and microlithotype content. The high-vitrinite Pittsburgh coal and the relatively more petrographically complex Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal exhibit differing behavior in grindability. The Pittsburgh raw feed, 16x30 mesh fraction (HGI test fraction), and the {minus}30 mesh fraction (HGI reject) are relatively similar petrographically, suggesting that the HGI test fraction is reasonably representative of the whole feed. The eastern Kentucky coal is not as representative of the whole feed, the HGI test fraction having lower vitrinite than the rejected {minus}30 mesh fraction. The Powder River Basin coals are high vitrinite and show behavior similar to the Pittsburgh coal.

Padgett, P.L.; Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

MS in Energy Studies Division of University Interdisciplinary Programs (DUIP) Apply Now  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economics ENST 320 Energy Law and Case Studies ECON 337 Economic Development ECON 338 Economics of Natural faculties. MS in Energy Studies The Master of Energy Studies program is planned to consolidate and build of the region in areas such as energy science and technology, economics, public policy, and energy management

Shihadeh, Alan

80

A multiscale study of atomic interactions in the electrochemical double layer applied to electrocatalysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work is an integrated study of chemical and electrostatic interactions in the electrochemical double layer, and their significance for accurate prediction of reaction kinetics in electrocatalysis. First, a kinetic ...

Bonnet, Nicéphore

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Long-term Variations of CO2 Trapped in Different Mechanisms in Deep Saline Formations: A Case Study of the Songliao Basin, China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 – Location of Xinli oilfield in central Songliao Basin.a sandstone formation of Xinli oilfield in central Songliaothan 20 Members. Xinli oilfield is located in Xinmiao town,

Zhang, Wei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Coupled thermal analysis applied to the study of the rod ejection accident  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An advanced methodology for the assessment of fuel-rod thermal margins under RIA conditions has been developed by AREVA NP SAS. With the emergence of RIA analytical criteria, the study of the Rod Ejection Accident (REA) would normally require the analysis of each fuel rod, slice by slice, over the whole core. Up to now the strategy used to overcome this difficulty has been to perform separate analyses of sampled fuel pins with conservative hypotheses for thermal properties and boundary conditions. In the advanced methodology, the evaluation model for the Rod Ejection Accident (REA) integrates the node average fuel and coolant properties calculation for neutron feedback purpose as well as the peak fuel and coolant time-dependent properties for criteria checking. The calculation grid for peak fuel and coolant properties can be specified from the assembly pitch down to the cell pitch. The comparative analysis of methodologies shows that coupled methodology allows reducing excessive conservatism of the uncoupled approach. (authors)

Gonnet, M. [AREVA NP, TOUR AREVA - 1 Place Jean MILLIER, 92084 Paris La Defense Cedex (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Study on space charge effect in an electrostatic ion analyzer applied to measure laser produced ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The abundance of different ions produced by laser ion sources is usually analyzed by an electrostatic ion analyzer (EIA). Ion current intensities in the range of several mA/cm{sup 2} at the position of the EIA have been achieved from the laser ion source developed by the Institute of Modern Physics; this indicates that a noticeable influence of space charge effect during the ion transmission will occur. Hence, while the parameters of the EIA or the beams are changed, such as ion species, current intensity, the ions’ transmission efficiency through the EIA is different, which will result in an uncertainty in the estimation of the ions’ yields. Special attention is focused on this issue in this paper. Ion's transmissions through the EIA under different circumstances are studied with simulations and experiments, the results of which are consistent with each other.

Jin, Q. Y.; Li, Zh. M.; Liu, W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China) [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhao, H. Y., E-mail: zhaohy@impcas.ac.cn; Sha, S.; Zhang, J. J.; Zhang, X. Zh.; Sun, L. T.; Zhao, H. W. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)] [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

ENVIRONMENTAL HOSTILITY, INDIVIDUAL LEARNING, AND INTRAPRENEURSHIP AS PREDICTORS OF ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING: A STUDY APPLIED TO TWO SELECTED MINING COMPANIES IN CHILE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENVIRONMENTAL HOSTILITY, INDIVIDUAL LEARNING, AND INTRAPRENEURSHIP AS PREDICTORS OF ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING: A STUDY APPLIED TO TWO SELECTED MINING COMPANIES IN CHILE A Dissertation by CARLOS EDUARDO MOLINA OYARCE Submitted... LEARNING, AND INTRAPRENEURSHIP AS PREDICTORS OF ORGANIZATIONAL LEARNING: A STUDY APPLIED TO TWO SELECTED MINING COMPANIES IN CHILE A Dissertation by CARLOS EDUARDO MOLINA OYARCE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

Molina Oyarce, Carlos E.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

85

Noise study of the digital seismic system amplifiers applied to earth noise measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some major noise problems afflicting the Digital Seismic System are briefly examined for the purpose of improving the signal-to-noise ratio for earth noise measurements. After concluding that the Tustin Electronics Co. 1560 instrumentation amplifiers presently being used in the system obscure the earth noise data, a comprehensive study (part experimental and part theoretical) of amplifier noise is performed. Noise curves in the approximate frequency range of 0.01 to 50 Hz for the Tustin amplifiers as well as for a new design based on the PMI SSS725 operational amplifier are experimentally determined. The curves, which include noise current and noise voltage densities as well as total noise, are compared to each other, and to the Peterson low earth noise curve. The comparisons are done with amplifier inputs shorted, connected to one and then two 500-..cap omega.. seismometer data coils, and connected to one 20-k..cap omega.. seismometer data coil. The total noise curve of the new amplifier is found to shift further below that of the Tustin amplifier as data coil resistance is increased. A goal of lowering amplifier noise 10 dB or more below the Peterson earth noise power density curve for frequencies greater than .03 Hz is desired. The new amplifier design, used in conjunction with a 20-k..cap omega.. data coil, is found to satisfy this 10 dB or more signal-to-noise ratio for earth noise measurements. It is also found that the difference between earth noise and new amplifier noise magnitudes is increased as data coil resistance is increased.

Valk, D.

1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK at BINGHAMTON research programs in geochemistry, sedimentary geology, or Earth surface processes with the potential the position, visit the Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies website (www.geology

Suzuki, Masatsugu

87

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

88

Origin of cratonic basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tectonic subsidence curves show that the Illinois, Michigan, and Williston basins formed by initial fault-controlled mechanical subsidence during rifting and by subsequent thermal subsidence. Thermal subsidence began around 525 Ma in the Illinois Basin, 520-460 Ma in the Michigan Basin, and 530-500 Ma in the Williston Basin. In the Illinois Basin, a second subsidence episode (middle Mississippian through Early Permian) was caused by flexural foreland subsidence in response to the Alleghanian-Hercynian orogeny. Past workers have suggested mantle phase changes at the base of the crust, mechanical subsidence in response to isostatically uncompensated excess mass following igneous intrusions, intrusion of mantle plumes into the crust, or regional thermal metamorphic events as causes of basin initiation. Cratonic basins of North America, Europe, Africa, and South America share common ages of formation, histories of sediment accumulation, temporal volume changes of sediment fills, and common dates of interregional unconformities. Their common date of formation suggests initiation of cratonic basins in response to breakup of a late Precambrian supercontinent. This supercontinent acted as a heat lens that caused partial melting of the lower crust and upper mantle followed by emplacement of anorogenic granites during extensional tectonics in response to supercontinent breakup. Intrusion of anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks weakened continental lithosphere, thus providing a zone of localized regional stretching and permitting formation of cratonic basins almost simultaneously over sites of intrusion of these anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks.

de V. Klein, G.; Hsui, A.T.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Determining erodibility, critical shear stress, and allowable discharge estimates for cohesive channels: case study in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continuous discharge of coalbed natural gas-produced (CBNG-produced) water within ephemeral, cohesive channels in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming can result in significant erosion. A study was completed to investigate channel stability in an attempt to correlate cohesive soil properties to critical shear stress. An in situ jet device was used to determine critical shear stress (tau{sub c}) and erodibility (k{sub d}); cohesive soil properties were determined following ASTM procedures for 25 reaches. The study sites were comprised of erodible to moderately resistant clays with tau{sub c} ranging from 0.11 to 15.35 Pa and k{sub d} ranging from 0.27 to 2.38 cm{sup 3}/N s. A relationship between five cohesive soil characteristics and tau{sub c} was developed and presented for use in deriving tau{sub c} for similar sites. Allowable discharges for CBNG-produced water were also derived using tau{sub c} and the tractive force method. An increase in the allowable discharge was found for channels in which vegetation was maintained. The information from this case study is critical to the development of a conservative methodology to establish allowable discharges while minimizing flow-induced instability.

Thoman, R.W.; Niezgoda, S.L. [Lowham Engineering LLC, Lander, WY (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

K Basin safety analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

91

Seismic interpretation, distribution, and basin modelling of natural gas leakage in block 2 of the Orange Basin, offshore South Africa.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Includes abstract. The aims of this study are to: (1) characterize different natural gas leakage features present throughout the basin, and (2) understand the relationship… (more)

Boyd, Donna Louise.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Petroleum potential of the Libyan sedimentary basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contrary to prevailing opinion, all Libyan sedimentary basins and the Al-Jabal Al-Akhdar platform contain prolific petroleum accumulations with very high prospectivity. A systematic review of the types of traps and pays in this central part of the southern Mediterranean province reveals great variability in reservoir and source rock characteristics. The reservoir rocks are of almost all geologic ages. The thick source rock sequences also vary in nature and organic content. The organic-rich facies have accumulated in intracratonic and passive margin basins or in marginal seas. Most of the oil discovered thus far in these basins is found in large structural traps. Future discoveries of stratigraphic traps or small structural traps will require intensified efforts and detailed studies using up-to-date multidisciplinary techniques in sedimentary tectonics, biostratigraphic facies analysis, and geochemical prospecting in order to develop a better understanding of these basins, thus improving their prospectivity.

Hammuda, O.S.; Sbeta, A.M.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Evaluation of carbon fluxes and trends (2000e2008) in the Greater Platte River Basin: A sustainability study for potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

world food shortages, livestock and food price increases, and negative environmental effects: A sustainability study for potential biofuel feedstock development, Biomass and Bioenergy (2012), http

94

Natural Tracers and Multi-Scale Assessment of Caprock Sealing Behavior: A Case Study of the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The assessment of caprocks for geologic CO{sub 2} storage is a multi-scale endeavor. Investigation of a regional caprock - the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin, USA - at the pore-network scale indicates high capillary sealing capacity and low permeabilities. Core and wellscale data, however, indicate a potential seal bypass system as evidenced by multiple mineralized fractures and methane gas saturations within the caprock. Our interpretation of {sup 4}He concentrations, measured at the top and bottom of the caprock, suggests low fluid fluxes through the caprock: (1) Of the total {sup 4}He produced in situ (i.e., at the locations of sampling) by uranium and thorium decay since deposition of the Kirtland Formation, a large portion still resides in the pore fluids. (2) Simple advection-only and advection-diffusion models, using the measured {sup 4}He concentrations, indicate low permeability ({approx}10-20 m{sup 2} or lower) for the thickness of the Kirtland Formation. These findings, however, do not guarantee the lack of a large-scale bypass system. The measured data, located near the boundary conditions of the models (i.e., the overlying and underlying aquifers), limit our testing of conceptual models and the sensitivity of model parameterization. Thus, we suggest approaches for future studies to better assess the presence or lack of a seal bypass system at this particular site and for other sites in general.

Jason Heath; Brian McPherson; Thomas Dewers

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin for the applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented process for simultaneous gas recovery and water disposal in production wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geraghty & Miller, Inc. of Midland, Texas conducted a geohydrologic study of the Michigan Basin to evaluate the applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented process for gas recovery and water disposal in production wells. A review of available publications was conducted to identify, (1) natural gas reservoirs which generate large quantities of gas and water, and (2) underground injection zones for produced water. Research efforts were focused on unconventional natural gas formations. The Antrim Shale is a Devonian gas shale which produces gas and large quantities of water. Total 1992 production from 2,626 wells was 74,209,916 Mcf of gas and 25,795,334 bbl of water. The Middle Devonian Dundee Limestone is a major injection zone for produced water. ``Waterless completion`` wells have been completed in the Antrim Shale for gas recovery and in the Dundee Limestone for water disposal. Jack McIntyre`s patented process has potential application for the recovery of gas from the Antrim Shale and simultaneous injection of produced water into the Dundee Limestone.

Maryn, S.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

K Basins Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

WEBB, R.H.

1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

97

K Basin Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

PECH, S.H.

2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

98

Florence, 28/02/2011: Two applied inverse problems: Introduction 1 -Problem #1: Studying the protein fold via NMR constraints.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the protein fold via NMR constraints. In collaboration with the CERM (Centre for Magnetic Resonance problems. #12;Florence, 28/02/2011: Two applied inverse problems: The problem of protein folding 2 H CCN) Backbone #12;Florence, 28/02/2011: Two applied inverse problems: The problem of protein folding 3 Genoma

Pedicini, Marco

99

Groundwater recharge estimates for the Powder River and Williston structural basins Katherine R. Aurand and Andrew J. Long  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater recharge estimates for the Powder River and Williston structural basins Katherine R Cretaceous aquifer system in the Powder River and Williston structural basins. The study area covers about 75 production in the Powder River structural basin and oil production in the Williston structural basin

Torgersen, Christian

100

Screening model optimization for Panay River Basin planning in the Philippines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The state of the water resources of the Panay River Basin have motivated studies and initial basin planning to mitigate flood damages, to produce hydroelectricity, and to increase irrigated rice areas. The goal of this ...

Millspaugh, John Henry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The use of turbulent jets to destratify the Charles River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study examines the feasibility of using turbulent jets to destratify the Lower Charles River Basin between the Longfellow and Craigie Bridges between Boston and Cambridge. The basin is currently filled with salt water ...

Church, Jeffrey H. (Jeffrey Harrison)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

SWAT TO IDENTIFY WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTIONS: (ANJENI WATERSHED, BLUE NILE BASIN, ETHIOPIA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SWAT TO IDENTIFY WATERSHED MANAGEMENT OPTIONS: (ANJENI WATERSHED, BLUE NILE BASIN, ETHIOPIA Biniam Biruk Ashagre #12;ABSTRACT Ethiopia is known for its wealth of natural resources. These result Basin, Ethiopia) #12;iv This study is dedicated to my

Walter, M.Todd

103

GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

104

Applied Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication Acceleration onto MeasurementsApplied

105

Original article On the Late Miocene continentalization of the Guadix Basin: More evidence for a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

connection existed through the Guadix-Baza, Fortuna and Lorca basins during the Messinian (Mu¨ ller and Hsu of the sedimentary fill of the Fortuna (Garce´s et al., 1998, 2001) and Lorca Basins (Krijgsman et al., 2000). These studies revealed that the marine-continental transition in the Fortuna and Lorca basins occurred

Utrecht, Universiteit

106

Fluids in sedimentary basins: an introduction Kurt Kysera,*, Eric E. Hiattb,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to document significant fluid events in basins and how this information can be used in some cases to evaluate the economic potential of basins. The focus of these studies deals with the interaction between basinal fluids significant sources of the energy-related commodities, such as petroleum, natural gas, coal, uranium and many

Hiatt, Eric E.

107

Williston in the family of cratonic basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Williston basin is one of a clan of subcircular to elliptical elements in the interiors of all cratons; such basins are distinguished by characteristics common to all. In each, the basement consists of continental crust and each basin is surrounded by areas of continental crust. Subsidence rates are typically low, so that conditions near depositional base level prevailed during much of the history of sediment accumulation. Episodic subsidence occurred over time spans of 10/sup 7/-10/sup 8/ years; major episodes of subsidence are broadly concurrent on all cratons. Tectonic tempo and mode of subsidence evolved synchronously on all cratons; therefore, similar isopach and facies patterns (and similar oil or gas maturation, migration, and trap potentials) occur on all cratons. All members of the clan exhibit a range of individual variations imposed by latitude and climate. Intraplate tectonism and volcanism, approach to or distance from source areas, and distribution paths of detrital sediment. Nevertheless, facts and concepts developed by intensive study of basins with high-density documentation (outcrop and subsurface) are commonly applicable to basins such as the Williston, which is in a less mature stage of exploration.

Sloss, L.L.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Provenance study and environments of deposition of the Pennslyvanian-Permian Wood River Formation, south-central Idaho, and the paleotectonic character of the Wood River basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and provenance of the conglomerates in the Big Wood River and Fish Creek Reservoir regions of south-central Idaho is needed. Distinguishing between marine and non-marine strata and determining source terranes will aid in reconstructing Wood River basin... paleogeography and paleo- tectonics. Three source areas have been postulated in recent years: 1, The Antler highland to the west, containing volcanics and low grade metamorphic rocks (Bissell, 1960; Churkin, 1962; Roberts and Thomasson, 1964). 2. The stable...

Dean, Christopher William

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Long-term Variations of CO2 Trapped in Different Mechanisms in Deep Saline Formations: A Case Study of the Songliao Basin, China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geological storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is increasing seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. There are numerous sedimentary basins in China, in which a number of suitable CO{sub 2} geologic reservoirs are potentially available. To identify the multi-phase processes, geochemical changes and mineral alteration, and CO{sub 2} trapping mechanisms after CO{sub 2} injection, reactive geochemical transport simulations using a simple 2D model were performed. Mineralogical composition and water chemistry from a deep saline formation of Songliao Basin were used. Results indicate that different storage forms of CO{sub 2} vary with time. In the CO{sub 2} injection period, a large amount of CO{sub 2} remains as a free supercritical phase (gas trapping), and the amount dissolved in the formation water (solubility trapping) gradually increases. Later, gas trapping decreases, solubility trapping increases significantly due to migration and diffusion of the CO{sub 2} plume, and the amount trapped by carbonate minerals increases gradually with time. The residual CO{sub 2} gas keeps dissolving into groundwater and precipitating carbonate minerals. For the Songliao Basin sandstone, variations in the reaction rate and abundance of chlorite, and plagioclase composition affect significantly the estimates of mineral alteration and CO{sub 2} storage in different trapping mechanisms. The effect of vertical permeability and residual gas saturation on the overall storage is smaller compared to the geochemical factors. However, they can affect the spatial distribution of the injected CO{sub 2} in the formations. The CO{sub 2} mineral trapping capacity could be in the order of ten kilogram per cubic meter medium for the Songliao Basin sandstone, and may be higher depending on the composition of primary aluminosilicate minerals especially the content of Ca, Mg, and Fe.

Zhang, Wei; Li, Yilian; Xu, Tianfu; Cheng, Huilin; Zheng, Yan; Xiong, Peng

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

A systematic approach for characterizing waves in a model basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research study focused upon the development of a general methodology to characterize regular and random waves in a large model basin. The objectives of the study were to both identify and quantify the various nonlinearities associated with wave...

Sarat, Andrew Charles

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advanced Chemistry Basin Model project has been operative for 48 months. During this period, about half the project tasks are on projected schedule. On average the project is somewhat behind schedule (90%). Unanticipated issues are causing model integration to take longer then scheduled, delaying final debugging and manual development. It is anticipated that a short extension will be required to fulfill all contract obligations.

William Goddard III; Lawrence Cathles III; Mario Blanco; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2002-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

113

Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (?7?min) and with similar thermal expansion (?12??strain/?°C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 ?m thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) ?m, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) ?l. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 ± 3.6) × 10{sup ?3} cm{sup 2}/s, for thermal conductivity (228 ± 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 ± 0.06) W s{sup 0.5}/cm{sup 2} K and volume heat capacity (5.2 ± 0.7) J/cm{sup 3} K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 ?m using 57 ?l of distilled water)

Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Bento, A. C., E-mail: acbento@uem.br [Departamento de Física, Grupo de Espectroscopia Fotoacústica e Fototérmica, Universidade Estadual de Maringá – UEM, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maringá, Paraná (Brazil); Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S. [Departamento de Física e Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista Júlio de Mesquita Filho – UNESP, Av. Brasil 56, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil)

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

114

Linking Water Conservation and Natural Resource Stewardship in the Trinity River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water conservation is a critical issue in Texas today. This publication explores the relationship between ecosystem health and land stewardship in the Trinity River Basin. It also describes how responsible land stewardship can be applied in urban...

Cathey, James; Locke, Shawn; Feldpausch, A.M.; Parker, I.D.; Frentress, C.; Whiteside, J.; Mason, C.; Wagner, M.

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

115

Gravity modeling of Cenozoic extensional basins, offshore Vietnam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Yinggehai) basins. Gravity modeling results provide important clues to the controversial tectonic development of Southeast Asia during the Tertiary. Combined Bouguer and free-air gravity maps and residual gravity anomaly maps were generated for the study...

Mauri, Steven Joseph

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

117

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

118

Bibliography, geophysical data locations, and well core listings for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To date, comprehensive basin analysis and petroleum system modeling studies have not been performed on any of the basins in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. Of these basins, the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been selected for study because it is the most petroliferous basin in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico, small- and medium-size companies are drilling the majority of the exploration wells. These companies do not have the resources to perform basin analysis or petroleum system modeling research studies nor do they have the resources to undertake elaborate information searches through the volumes of publicly available data at the universities, geological surveys, and regulatory agencies in the region. The Advanced Geologic Basin Analysis Program of the US Department of Energy provides an avenue for studying and evaluating sedimentary basins. This program is designed to improve the efficiency of the discovery of the nation`s remaining undiscovered oil resources by providing improved access to information available in the public domain and by increasing the amount of public information on domestic basins. This report provides the information obtained from Year 1 of this study of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin. The work during Year 1 focused on inventorying the data files and records of the major information repositories in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico and making these inventories easily accessible in an electronic format.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS Spring Semester 2009-10 Dierential Equations: Case Studies in Applied Mathematics Two hours  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the species y into extinction; (ii) the species y forces the species x into extinction? (9 marks) (iii into extinction. Use the result of this study to nd the condition when (i) the species x forces the species y into extinction; (ii) the species y forces the species x into extinction. (12 marks) AMA329 2 Continued #12;AMA329

120

SCHOOL OF MATHEMATICS AND STATISTICS Spring Semester 2009-10 Dierential Equations: Case Studies in Applied Mathematics Two hours  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the species y into extinction; (ii) the species y forces the species x into extinction? (9 marks) (iii into extinction. Use the result of this study to nd the condition when (i) the species x forces the species y into extinction; (ii) the species y forces the species x into extinction. (12 marks) AMA406 2 Continued #12;AMA406

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

3192 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON APPLIED SUPERCONDUCTIVITY, VOL. 13, NO. 2, JUNE 2003 Raman-Study of Photoinduced Chain-Oxygen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Study of Photoinduced Chain-Oxygen Ordering in RBa2Cu3O7 S. Bahrs, A. R. Goñi, B. Maiorov, G. Nieva, A. Fainstein intensity under illumination at low temperatures. These defect-induced peaks are only visible in oxygen-deficient material and for light polarized parallel to the copper-oxygen chains along the material's -axis

Nabben, Reinhard

122

D-ERDWZLG ETH Certificate of Advanced Studies (CAS) in Applied Earth Sciences Eidgenssische Technische Hochschule Zrich  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and shale gas exploitation. Selected case studies will provide an insight to the various practical and physical characteristics of deep rock masses, and the processes that underpin the operations performed as to assure proper design and sustainable operation of geological storage facilities. The announced course

Picasso, Marco

123

Preparation and Characterization of Uranium Oxides in Support of the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uraninite (UO2) and metaschoepite (UO3·2H2O) are the uranium phases most frequently observed in K Basin sludge. Uraninite arises from the oxidation of uranium metal by anoxic water and metaschoepite arises from oxidation of uraninite by atmospheric or radiolytic oxygen. Studies of the oxidation of uraninite by oxygen to form metaschoepite were performed at 21°C and 50°C. A uranium oxide oxidation state characterization method based on spectrophotometry of the solution formed by dissolving aqueous slurries in phosphoric acid was developed to follow the extent of reaction. This method may be applied to determine uranium oxide oxidation state distribution in K Basin sludge. The uraninite produced by anoxic corrosion of uranium metal has exceedingly fine particle size (6 nm diameter), forms agglomerates, and has the formula UO2.004±0.007; i.e., is practically stoichiometric UO2. The metaschoepite particles are flatter and wider when prepared at 21°C than the particles prepared at 50°C. These particles are much smaller than the metaschoepite observed in prolonged exposure of actual K Basin sludge to warm moist oxidizing conditions. The uraninite produced by anoxic uranium metal corrosion and the metaschoepite produced by reaction of uraninite aqueous slurries with oxygen may be used in engineering and process development testing. A rapid alternative method to determine uranium metal concentrations in sludge also was identified.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

124

E-Print Network 3.0 - alluvial basin numerical Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Great Britain. Palaeocurrents and provenance of the Mae Rim Formation, Northern Thailand Summary: as alluvial fans along the basin's edge. The main goals for this study...

125

E-Print Network 3.0 - alluvial basins in-depth Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in Great Britain. Palaeocurrents and provenance of the Mae Rim Formation, Northern Thailand Summary: as alluvial fans along the basin's edge. The main goals for this study...

126

Crustal rifting and subsidence of Sirte basin, Libya: a mature hydrocarbon Province  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The complex rifting and subsidence history of the Sirte basin serves as an instructive case study of the tectonic evolution of an intercratonic extensional basin. The Sirte basin formed by collapse of the Sirte arch in the mid-Cretaceous. Marine sediments accumulated following initial crustal arching and rifting as the basin was flooded from the north. Upper Cretaceous strata lie unconformably on igneous and metamorphic rocks of the Precambrian basement complex, Cambrian-Ordovician Gargaf Group, or the pre-Cretaceous continental Nubian Sandstone. The most rapid subsidence and accumulation of basinal strata occurred in the early Cenozoic; however, the basin has been relatively stable since the Oligocene. The basin is floored by a northwest-southeast-trending mosaic of narrow horsts and grabens, an important structural characteristic that distinguishes it from the adjacent intracratonic Kufra, Murzuk, and Ghadames basins. The details of basin subsidence, sediment accumulation rates, and facies variations have been reconstructed for the northern Sirte basin from a suite of approximately 100 well logs and numerous seismic lines. Subsidence-rate maps for short time intervals from the mid-Cretaceous through the Eocene show a continual shifting of the loci of maximum and minimum subsidence. The nonsteady character of basin subsidence may reflect a periodicity of movement on the major basement-rooted growth faults bounding the underlying horsts and grabens.

Gumati, Y.; Schamel, S.; Nairn, A.E.M.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

128

A study of the source materials, depositional environments, mechanisms of generation and migration of oils in the Anadarko and Cherokee Basins, Oklahoma. Quarterly technical progress report, September 15, 1989--September 14, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The geochemical characterization of petroleum and source rocks from the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma, has continued. Major emphasis has seen on geochemistry of the Woodford shale.

Philp, R.P.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Geothermal fluid genesis in the Great Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Early theories concerning geothermal recharge in the Great Basin implied recharge was by recent precipitation. Physical, chemical, and isotopic differences between thermal and non-thermal fluids and global paleoclimatic indicators suggest that recharge occurred during the late Pleistocene. Polar region isotopic studies demonstrate that a depletion in stable light-isotopes of precipitation existed during the late Pleistocene due to the colder, wetter climate. Isotopic analysis of calcite veins and packrat midden megafossils confirm the depletion event occurred in the Great Basin. Isotopic analysis of non-thermal springs is utilized as a proxy for local recent precipitation. Contoured plots of deuterium concentrations from non-thermal and thermal water show a regional, systematic variation. Subtracting contoured plots of non-thermal water from plots of thermal water reveals that thermal waters on a regional scale are generally isotopically more depleted. Isolated areas where thermal water is more enriched than non-thermal water correspond to locations of pluvial Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, suggesting isotopically enriched lake water contributed to fluid recharge. These anomalous waters also contain high concentrations of sodium chloride, boron, and other dissolved species suggestive of evaporative enrichment. Carbon-age date and isotopic data from Great Basin thermal waters correlate with the polar paleoclimate studies. Recharge occurred along range bounding faults. 151 refs., 62 figs., 15 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Understanding Long-Term Solute Transport in Sedimentary Basins: Simulating Brine Migration in the Alberta Basin. Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mass transport in deep sedimentary basins places important controls on ore formation, petroleum migration, CO2 sequestration, and geochemical reactions that affect petroleum reservoir quality, but large-scale transport in this type of setting remains poorly understood. This lack of knowledge is highlighted in the resource-rich Alberta Basin, where geochemical and hydrogeologic studies have suggested residence times ranging from hundreds of millions of years to less than 5 My, respectively. Here we developed new hydrogeologic models that were constrained by geochemical observations to reconcile these two very different estimates. The models account for variable-density fluid flow, heat transport, solute transport, sediment deposition and erosion, sediment compressibility, and dissolution of salt deposits, including Cl/Br systematics. Prior interpretations of Cl/Br ratios in the Alberta Basin concluded that the brines were derived from evaporatively-concentrated brines that were subsequently diluted by seawater and freshwater; models presented here show that halite dissolution must have contributed strongly as well, which implies significantly greater rates of mass transport. This result confirms that Cl/Br ratios are subject to significant non-uniqueness and thus do not provide good independent indicators of the origin of brines. Salinity and Cl/Br ratios provided valuable new constraints for basin-scale models, however. Sensitivity studies revealed that permeabilities obtained from core- and field-scale tests were appropriate for basin-scale models, despite the differences in scale between the tests and the models. Simulations of groundwater age show that the residence time of porefluids in much of the basin is less than 100 My. Groundwater age increases with depth and approaches 200 My in the deepest part of the basin, but brines are significantly younger than their host rocks throughout the basin.

Alicia M. Wilson

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

132

Advanced Characterization of Fractured Reservoirs in Carbonate Rocks: The Michigan Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was to collect and analyze existing data on the Michigan Basin for fracture patterns on scales ranging form thin section to basin. The data acquisition phase has been successfully concluded with the compilation of several large digital databases containing nearly all the existing information on formation tops, lithology and hydrocarbon production over the entire Michigan Basin. These databases represent the cumulative result of over 80 years of drilling and exploration.

Wood, James R.; Harrison, William B.

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

133

Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential benefits of applying multiseam [well] completion (MSC) technology to the massive stack of low-rank coals in the Powder River Basin. As part of this, the study objectives are: Estimate how much additional CBM resource would become accessible and technically recoverable--compared to the current practice of drilling one well to drain a single coal seam; Determine whether there are economic benefits associated with MSC technology utilization (assuming its widespread, successful application) and if so, quantify the gains; Briefly examine why past attempts by Powder River Basin CBM operators to use MSC technology have been relatively unsuccessful; Provide the underpinnings to a decision whether a MSC technology development and/or demonstration effort is warranted by DOE. To a great extent, this assessment builds on the previously published study (DOE, 2002), which contains many of the key references that underlie this analysis. It is available on the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy technology Laboratory, Strategic Center for Natural Gas website (www.netl.doe.gov/scng). It is suggested that readers obtain a copy of the original study to complement the current report.

Office of Fossil Energy; National Energy Technology Laboratory

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

K Basin sludge treatment process description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The K East (KE) and K West (KW) fuel storage basins at the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site contain sludge on the floor, in pits, and inside fuel storage canisters. The major sources of the sludge are corrosion of the fuel elements and steel structures in the basin, sand intrusion from outside the buildings, and degradation of the structural concrete that forms the basins. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be treated so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the double-shell waste tanks. The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office accepted a recommendation by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., to chemically treat the sludge. Sludge treatment will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. A truck will transport the resulting slurry to an underground storage tank (most likely tank 241-AW-105). The undissolved solids will be treated to reduce the transuranic (TRU) and content, stabilized in grout, and transferred to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) for disposal. This document describes a process for dissolving the sludge to produce waste streams that meet the TWRS acceptance criteria for disposal to an underground waste tank and the ERDF acceptance criteria for disposal of solid waste. The process described is based on a series of engineering studies and laboratory tests outlined in the testing strategy document (Flament 1998).

Westra, A.G.

1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

135

Geologic and production characteristics of the Tight Mesaverde Group: Piceance Basin, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mesaverde Group of the Piceance Basin in western Colorado has been a pilot study area for government-sponsored tight gas sand research for over 20 years. This study provides a critical comparison of the geologic, production and reservoir characteristics of existing Mesaverde gas producing areas within the basin to those same characteristics at the MWX site near Rifle, Colorado. As will be discussed, the basin has been partitioned into three areas having similar geologic and production characteristics. Stimulation techniques have been reviewed for each partitioned area to determine the most effective stimulation technique currently used in the Mesaverde. This study emphasizes predominantly the southern Piceance Basin because of the much greater production and geologic data there. There may be Mesaverde gas production in northern areas but because of the lack of production and relatively few penetrations, the northern Piceance Basin was not included in the detailed parts of this study. 54 refs., 31 figs., 7 tabs.

Myal, F.R.; Price, E.H.; Hill, R.E.; Kukal, G.C.; Abadie, P.A.; Riecken, C.C.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

theoretical and applied fracture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

theoretical and applied fracture mechanics ELSEVIER Theoretical and Applied Fracture Mechanics 00 and Applied Fracture Mechanics 00 (1995) 000-000 Recently, some European countries developed defect specific. A suitable probabilistic fracture mechanic

Cizelj, Leon

137

Minimum 186 Basin levels required for operation of ECS and CWS pumps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Operation of K Reactor with a cooling tower requires that 186 Basin loss of inventory transients be considered during Design Basis Accident analyses requiring ECS injection, such as the LOCA and LOPA. Since the cooling tower systems are not considered safety systems, credit is not taken for their continued operation during a LOPA or LOCA even though they would likely continue to operate as designed. Without the continued circulation of cooling water to the 186 Basin by the cooling tower pumps, the 186 Basin will lose inventory until additional make-up can be obtained from the river water supply system. Increasing the make-up to the 186 Basin from the river water system may require the opening of manually operated valves, the starting of additional river water pumps, and adjustments of the flow to L Area. In the time required for these actions a loss of basin inventory could occur. The ECS and CWS pumps are supplied by the 186 Basin. A reduction in the basin level will result in decreased pump suction head. This reduction in suction head will result in decreased output from the pumps and, if severe enough, could lead to pump cavitation for some configurations. The subject of this report is the minimum 186 Basin level required to prevent ECS and CWS pump cavitation. The reduction in ECS flow due to a reduced 186 Basin level without cavitation is part of a separate study.

Reeves, K.K.; Barbour, K.L.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Applied Computer Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computing CCS Division Applied Computer Science Applied Computer Science Innovative co-design of applications, algorithms, and architectures in order to enable scientific...

139

Dynamics of quantum spin liquid and spin solid phases in IPA-CuCl3 under an applied magnetic field studied with neutron scattering  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inelastic and elastic neutron scattering is used to study spin correlations in the quasi-one-dimensional quantum antiferromagnet IPA-CuCl3 in strong applied magnetic fields. A condensation of magnons and commensurate transverse long-range ordering is observe at a critical field Hc=9.5 T. The field dependencies of the energies and polarizations of all magnon branches are investigated both below and above the transition point. Their dispersion is measured across the entire one-dimensional Brillouin zone in magnetic fields up to 14 T. The critical wave vector of magnon spectrum truncation Masuda et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 047210 2006 is found to shift from hc0,35 at HHC to hc=0.25 for HHC. A drastic reduction of magnon bandwidths in the ordered phase Garlea et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 167202 2007 is observed and studied in detail. New features of the spectrum, presumably related to this bandwidth collapse, are observed just above the transition field.

Zheludev, Andrey I [ORNL; Garlea, Vasile O [ORNL; Masuda, T. [Yokohama City University, Japan; Manaka, H. [Kagoshima University, Kagoshima JAPAN; Regnault, L.-P. [CEA, Grenoble, France; Ressouche, E. [CEA, Grenoble, France; Grenier, B. [CEA, Grenoble, France; Chung, J.-H. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Qiu, Y. [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Habicht, Klaus [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Berlin, Germany; Kiefer, K. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Berlin, Germany; Boehm, Martin [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Equivalent hydraulic conductivity of an experimental stratigraphy: Implications for basin-scale flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Equivalent hydraulic conductivity of an experimental stratigraphy: Implications for basin-scale groundwater flow models are the estimation of representative hydraulic conductivity for the model units. In this study, high-resolution, fully heterogeneous basin-scale hydraulic conductivity map is generated

Gable, Carl W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT OF WATER RESOURCES SYSTEMS IN THE EASTERN NILE BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT OF WATER RESOURCES SYSTEMS IN THE EASTERN NILE BASIN TO ENVIRONMENTAL Resources VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT OF WATER RESOURCES SYSTEMS IN THE EASTERN NILE BASIN TO ENVIRONMENTAL Resources Institute of African Research and Studies, Cairo University For the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE

Richner, Heinz

142

Deep temperatures in the Paris Basin using tectonic Damien Bonte1,3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Claude Keywords: Temperature, Modelling, Paris Basin, geothermal energy. ABSTRACT The determination of deep temperatures in a basin is one of the key parameters in the exploration of geothermal energy parameters in the exploration of geothermal energy. This study, carried out as part of 2 project, presents

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

143

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

144

Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

- The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

Faulds, James E.

145

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

146

Supplementary information on K-Basin sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three previous documents in this series have been published covering the analysis of: K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludge, K East Basin Canister Sludge, and K West Basin Canister Sludge. Since their publication, additional data have been acquired and analyses performed. It is the purpose of this volume to summarize the additional insights gained in the interim time period.

MAKENAS, B.J.

1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Atlas of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Atlas of the Columbia River Basin Oregon State University Computer-Assisted Cartography Course & GEOVISUALIZATION GROUP UNIVERSITY #12;2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin FOREWORDAtlas, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. 2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin

Jenny, Bernhard

148

LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter WM LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN By T.T. Taber and S.A. Kinney In U.S. Geological........................................WM-1 Map Information for the Williston Basin Land Use And Land Cover Map.........................................................WM-2 Map Information for the Williston Basin Subsurface Ownership map

149

NILE BASIN INITIATIVE Claire Stodola  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Climate Change #12;Upstream states · Low water needs Downstream states · High water needs #12;Historical #12;Research Question How has the Nile Basin Initiative influenced the riparian states' management states 1959 ­ Still only BILATERAL 1960s to 1990s - Increasing frustration by upstream states #12;What

New Hampshire, University of

150

Genetic classification of petroleum basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rather than relying on a descriptive geologic approach, this genetic classification is based on the universal laws that control processes of petroleum formation, migration, and entrapment. Petroleum basins or systems are defined as dynamic petroleum-generating and concentrating physico-chemical systems functioning on a geologic space and time scale. A petroleum system results from the combination of a generative subsystem (or hydrocarbon kitchen), essentially controlled by chemical processes, and a migration-entrapment subsystem, controlled by physical processes. The generative subsystem provides a certain supply of petroleum to the basin during a given geologic time span. The migration-entrapment subsystem receives petroleum and distributes it in a manner that can lead either to dispersion and loss or to concentration of the regional charge into economic accumulations. The authors classification scheme for petroleum basins rests on a simple working nomenclature consisting of the following qualifiers: (1) charge factor: undercharged, normally charged, or supercharged, (2) migration drainage factor: vertically drained or laterally drained, and (3) entrapment factor: low impedance or high impedance. Examples chosen from an extensive roster of documented petroleum basins are reviewed to explain the proposed classification.

Demaison, G.; Huizinga, B.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

GOLF COURSES FRASER RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practices (BMP's) for golf courses, entitled Greening your BC Golf Course. A Guide to Environmental. It also summarizes conditions and practices in the Fraser Basin, reviews best management practices.C. Prepared by: UMA ENVIRONMENTAL A Division of UMA Engineering Ltd. Burnaby, B.C. March 1996 #12;THIRD PARTY

152

Economic appraisal of oil potential of Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An economic appraisal was made of the potential of more than 80 producing fields in the Williston basin of Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota. The major oil producing formations investigated were in the Mississippian, Devonian, Silurian and Ordovician. Data for the study came from field production and drilling statistics. An extrapolated oil production decline curve for a theoretical average producing well first was made for each field. The value of the total extrapolated amount of producible oil for the average well was then calculated, discounted for royalty, taxes, etc., and divided by the estimated cost for a completed producing well. This gave an estimate of the return per dollar invested. No considerations were given for exploration and land acquisition costs. The estimated return per dollar values, after posting on Williston basin geologic maps, show relative economic comparisons of producing formations and where within the basin the best economic returns can be expected.

Jennings, A.H.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Estimate of the Geothermal Energy Resource in the Major Sedimentary Basins in the United States (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because most sedimentary basins have been explored for oil and gas, well logs, temperatures at depth, and reservoir properties such as depth to basement and formation thickness are well known. The availability of this data reduces exploration risk and allows development of geologic exploration models for each basin. This study estimates the magnitude of recoverable geothermal energy from 15 major known U.S. sedimentary basins and ranks these basins relative to their potential. The total available thermal resource for each basin was estimated using the volumetric heat-in-place method originally proposed by (Muffler, 1979). A qualitative recovery factor was determined for each basin based on data on flow volume, hydrothermal recharge, and vertical and horizontal permeability. Total sedimentary thickness maps, stratigraphic columns, cross sections, and temperature gradient information was gathered for each basin from published articles, USGS reports, and state geological survey reports. When published data were insufficient, thermal gradients and reservoir properties were derived from oil and gas well logs obtained on oil and gas commission databases. Basin stratigraphy, structural history, and groundwater circulation patterns were studied in order to develop a model that estimates resource size, temperature distribution, and a probable quantitative recovery factor.

Esposito, A.; Porro, C.; Augustine, C.; Roberts, B.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Oil and gas resources of the Fergana Basin (Uzbekistan, Tadzhikistan, and Kyrgyzstan)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis is part of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA`s) Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP). This one for the Fergana Basin is an EIA first for republics of the former Soviet Union (FSU). This was a trial study of data availability and methodology, resulting in a reservoir-level assessment of ultimate recovery for both oil and gas. Ultimate recovery, as used here, is the sum of cumulative production and remaining Proved plus Probable reserves as of the end of 1987. Reasonable results were obtained when aggregating reservoir-level values to the basin level, and in determining general but important distributions of across-basin reservoir and fluid parameters. Currently, this report represents the most comprehensive assessment publicly available for oil and gas in the Fergana Basin. This full report provides additional descriptions, discussions and analysis illustrations that are beneficial to those considering oil and gas investments in the Fergana Basin. 57 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

156

POSITION OPENING APPLIED STATISTICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Assistant or Associate Professor of Applied Statistics. Employment Beginning: September 16, 2012 DescriptionPOSITION OPENING APPLIED STATISTICS Department of Decision Sciences Charles H. Lundquist College at the University of Oregon is seeking to fill one tenure-track faculty position in Applied Statistics. Rank

Shepp, Larry

157

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. One the reservoir-characterization study of both field is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to: (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area; (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments; and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill well will be drilled and cored. Technical progress is summarized for: geophysical characterization; reservoir characterization; outcrop characterization; and producibility problem characterization.

Dutton, S.P.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

158

Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

Onjukka, Sam T. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR); Harbeck, Jim (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Enterprise, OR)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

Onjukka, Sam T. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR); Harbeck, Jim (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Enterprise, OR)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Geology of interior cratonic sag basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interior cratonic sag basins are thick accumulations of sediment, generally more or less oval in shape, located entirely in the interiors of continental masses. Some are single-cycle basins and others are characterized by repeated sag cycles or are complex polyhistory basins. Many appear to have developed over ancient rift systems. Interior cratonic sag basins are typified by a dominance of flexural over fault-controlled subsidence, and a low ratio of sediment volume to surface area of the basin. The Baltic, Carpentaria, Illinois, Michigan, Parana, Paris, and Williston basins are examples of interior cratonic sag basins. Tectonics played a dominant role in controlling the shapes and the geometries of the juxtaposed packets of sedimentary sequences. While the mechanics of tectonic control are not clear, evidence suggests that the movements are apparently related to convergence of lithospheric plates and collision and breakup of continents. Whatever the cause, tectonic movements controlled the freeboard of continents, altering base level and initiating new tectono-sedimentologic regimes. Sag basins situated in low latitudes during their development commonly were sites of thick carbonates (e.g., Illinois, Michigan, Williston, and Paris basins). In contrast, siliciclastic sedimentation characterized basins that formed in higher latitudes (e.g., Parana and Carpentaria basins). Highly productive sag basins are characterized by widespread, mature, organic-rich source rocks, large structures, and good seals. Nonproductive basins have one or more of the following characteristics: immature source rocks, leaky plumbing, freshwater flushing, and/or complex geology due to numerous intrusions that inhibit mapping of plays.

Leighton, M.W.; Eidel, J.J.; Kolata, D.R.; Oltz, D.F. (Illinois Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Applied quantum mechanics 1 Applied Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that describe the time-dependent state . If can be expressed as a power series in the perturbing potential of a one dimensional har- monic oscillator. At time t = 0 a perturbation is applied where V0-dimensional rectangular potential well for which in the range and elsewhere. It is decided to control the state

Levi, Anthony F. J.

162

CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in-field habitats: a case study from the Pevensey Levels, UK Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 4355 (2003) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(1), 43­55 (2003) © EGU Applying MODFLOW to wet grassland in and Hydrology, Wallingford, OX10 8BB, UK Email for corresponding author: rbb@ceh.ac.uk Abstract Historical drainage improvements have created complex hydrological regimes in many low-lying, wet coastal grassland

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

164

Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, mule, Blue Hogan, heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The reservoir engineering component of the work completed to date included analysis of production data and well tests, comprehensive laboratory programs, and preliminary mechanistic reservoir simulation studies. A comprehensive fluid property characterization program was completed. Mechanistic reservoir production performance simulation studies were also completed.

Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Apply early! Limited enrollment.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

volcano. Experience the culture and history of Hawaii, and the impact of human activitiesApply early! Limited enrollment. Environmental Science in the Hawaiian Islands Observe, research

166

Applied Computer Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science and Innovation Computing CCS Division CCS-7 Applied Computer Science Innovative co-design of applications, algorithms, and architectures in order to enable...

167

Analytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical Chemistry Applied Mathematics Architectural Engineering Architecture Architecture Electricity Markets Environmental Engineering Food Process Engineering Food Safety & Technology Architecture Information Technology & Management Integrated Building Delivery Landscape Architecture Management

Heller, Barbara

168

How To Apply  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CSCEEE undergraduate students are encouraged to apply. Required Materials Current Resume Official University Transcript (with spring courses posted andor a copy of Spring...

169

Applied Geosciences Links  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Applied Geosciencs Links USGS Mercury Research Uniteds States Geological Survey (USGS) investigations provide information to guide environmental planning and management. This...

170

Geothermal systems of the Mono Basin-Long Valley region, eastern California and western Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The region that includes Mono Basin, Long Valley, the Bridgeport-Bodie Hills area, and Aurora, in eastern California and western Nevada was studied to determine the possible causes and interactions of the geothermal anomalies in the Mono Basin-Long Valley region as a whole. A special goal of the study was to locate possible shallow bodies of magma and to determine their influence on the hydrothermal systems in the region. (ACR)

Higgins, C.T.; Flynn, T.; Chapman, R.H.; Trexler, D.T.; Chase, G.R.; Bacon, C.F.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Estimate of Geothermal Energy Resource in Major U.S. Sedimentary Basins (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study estimates the magnitude of geothermal energy from fifteen major known US sedimentary basins and ranks these basins relative to their potential. Because most sedimentary basins have been explored for oil and gas, well logs, temperatures at depth, and reservoir properties are known. This reduces exploration risk and allows development of geologic exploration models for each basin as well as a relative assessment of geologic risk elements for each play. The total available thermal resource for each basin was estimated using the volumetric heat-in-place method originally proposed by Muffler (USGS). Total sedimentary thickness maps, stratigraphic columns, cross sections, and temperature gradient Information were gathered for each basin from published articles, USGS reports, and state geological survey reports. When published data was insufficient, thermal gradients and reservoir properties were derived from oil and gas well logs obtained on oil and gas commission websites. Basin stratigraphy, structural history, and groundwater circulation patterns were studied in order to develop a model that estimates resource size and temperature distribution, and to qualitatively assess reservoir productivity.

Porro, C.; Augustine, C.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Numerical study of the influence of applied voltage on the current balance factor of single layer organic light-emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current balance factor (CBF) value, the ratio of the recombination current density and the total current density of a device, has an important function in fluorescence-based organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), as well as in the performance of the organic electrophosphorescent devices. This paper investigates the influence of the applied voltage of a device on the CBF value of single layer OLED based on the numerical model of a bipolar single layer OLED with organic layer trap free and without doping. Results show that the largest CBF value can be achieved when the electron injection barrier (?{sub n}) is equal to the hole injection barrier (?{sub p}) in the lower voltage region at any instance. The largest CBF in the higher voltage region can be achieved in the case of ?{sub n}?>??{sub p} under the condition of electron mobility (?{sub 0n}) > hole mobility (?{sub 0p}), whereas the result for the case of ?{sub 0n}?applied voltage. In addition, the CBF value of the device increases with increasing applied voltage. The results obtained in this paper can present an in-depth understanding of the OLED working mechanism and help in the future fabrication of high efficiency OLEDs.

Lu, Fei-ping, E-mail: lufp-sysu@163.com; Liu, Xiao-bin; Xing, Yong-zhong [College of Physics and Information Science, Tianshui Normal University, Tianshui 741001 (China)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

173

Transient hydrodynamics within intercratonic sedimentary basins during glacial cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ka B.P.), such as the Williston, Michigan, and Illinois basins. We show that in such basins fluid of the Williston and Alberta basins. Under such con- ditions fluid fluxes in aquifers can be expected

Bense, Victor

174

Improved Recovery Demonstration for Williston Basin Carbonates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in- place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3-D) and multi- component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with short- lateral and horizontal drilling technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimate of oil-in-place will result in additional oil production by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Improved Recovery Demonstration for Williston Basin Carbonates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing three-dimensional is being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil-in-place will result in additional oil production by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

Larry A. Carrell

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

176

Improved Recovery Demonstration for Williston Basin Carbonates.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in- place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3-D) and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimate of oil-in-place will result in additional oil production by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

177

Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in- place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and multi- component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with short- lateral and horizontal drilling technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil-in-place will result in additional oil production by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

Carrell, L. A., Luff Exploration Co., Denver, CO

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determination of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) is being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with short lateral and horizontal drilling technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil-in- place will result in additional oil production by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

Carrell, L. A., Luff Exploration Co., Denver, CO

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

UWMadison undergraduates in a variety of disciplines such as international studies, social work, political science, education or economics (and others) are welcome to apply to the La Follette accelerated program.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, political science, education or economics (and others) are welcome to apply to the La Follette accelerated after a fifth year of study. Admission Procedures: Application to the Accelerated Program must can register for appropriate fall courses. Students who enroll in the public affairs accelerated

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

180

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. EPA requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard and must consider inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report, February 9, 1996--February 8, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The Anasazi field was selected for the initial geostatistical modeling and reservoir simulation. A compositional simulation approach is being used to model primary depletion, waterflood, and CO{sub 2}-flood processes. During this second year of the project, team members performed the following reservoir-engineering analysis of Anasazi field: (1) relative permeability measurements of the supra-mound and mound-core intervals, (2) completion of geologic model development of the Anasazi reservoir units for use in reservoir simulation studies including completion of a series of one-dimensional, carbon dioxide-displacement simulations to analyze the carbon dioxide-displacement mechanism that could operate in the Paradox basin system of reservoirs, and (3) completion of the first phase of the full-field, three-dimensional Anasazi reservoir simulation model, and the start of the history matching and reservoir performance prediction phase of the simulation study.

Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Timing and Tectonic implications of basin inversion in the Nam Con Son Basin and adjacent areas, southern South China Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Nam Con Son (NCS) Basin, located offshore of SE Vietnam, is one of several Tertiary rift basins that formed during initial Eocene(?)-Oligocene rifting. Following cessation of rifting at the end of Oligocene time, these basins were subjected...

Olson, Christopher Charles

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Oils and source rocks from the Anadarko Basin: Final report, March 1, 1985-March 15, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research project investigated various geochemical aspects of oils, suspected source rocks, and tar sands collected from the Anadarko Basin, Oklahoma. The information has been used, in general, to investigate possible sources for the oils in the basin, to study mechanisms of oil generation and migration, and characterization of depositional environments. The major thrust of the recent work involved characterization of potential source formations in the Basin in addition to the Woodford shale. The formations evaluated included the Morrow, Springer, Viola, Arbuckle, Oil Creek, and Sylvan shales. A good distribution of these samples was obtained from throughout the basin and were evaluated in terms of source potential and thermal maturity based on geochemical characteristics. The data were incorporated into a basin modelling program aimed at predicting the quantities of oil that could, potentially, have been generated from each formation. The study of crude oils was extended from our earlier work to cover a much wider area of the basin to determine the distribution of genetically-related oils, and whether or not they were derived from single or multiple sources, as well as attempting to correlate them with their suspected source formations. Recent studies in our laboratory also demonstrated the presence of high molecular weight components(C{sub 4}-C{sub 80}) in oils and waxes from drill pipes of various wells in the region. Results from such a study will have possible ramifications for enhanced oil recovery and reservoir engineering studies.

Philp, R. P. [School of Geology and Geophysics, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System...

185

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

186

CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD,...

187

Refraction Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Northern Basin &...

188

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal...

189

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

190

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

191

Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility - August 2012 August 2012 Review of Hanford K...

192

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

193

OligoceneMiocene tectonic evolution of the South Fiji Basin and Northland Plateau, SW Pacific Ocean: Evidence from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

investigated parts of the southwest Pacific Ocean. It is a region of remnant volcanic arcs, plateaus and basins of the study area in the SW Pacific Ocean, showing geographic names and dredge locations from ChurkinOligocene­Miocene tectonic evolution of the South Fiji Basin and Northland Plateau, SW Pacific

Demouchy, Sylvie

194

ELSEVIER Journal of Hydrology180(1996)31-53 Groundwater recharge in the Victoria Nile basin of east  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Victoria Nile basin of east Africa: support for the soil moisture balance approach using stable isotope;revisionaccepted24 August 1995 Abstract Across equatorial Africa, increasing demand for groundwater has raised. In recent studies undertaken in the Aroca catchment of the Victoria Nile basin in central Uganda, the timing

Jones, Peter JS

195

Oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sirte Basin is an asymmetrical cratonic basin, situated in the north-central part of Libya. It covers an area of over 350,000km{sup 2} and is one of the most prolific oil-producing basins in the world. Sirte Basin is divided into large NW-SE trending sub-parallel platforms and troughs bounded by deep seated syndepositional normal faults. A very unique combination of thick sediments with rich source rocks in the troughs vs. thinner sediments with prolific reservoir rocks on the platforms accounts for the productivity of the basin. Analysis of oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin will certainly help to discover the remaining reserves, and this can only be achieved if the important parameter of structural configuration of the basin at the time of oil migration is known. The present paper is an attempt to analyse the time of oil migration, to define the structural picture of the 4 Basin during the time of migration and to delineate the most probable connecting routes between the hydrocarbon kitchens and the oil fields.

Roohi, M.; Aburawi, R.M. [Waha Oil Co., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

6, 839877, 2006 Mexico City basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emitters of air pollutants leading to negative health effects and environmental degradation. The rate altitude basin with air pollutant concentrations above the health limits most days of the year. A mesoscale-dimensional wind patterns in25 the basin and found that the sea-breeze transports the polluted air mass up the moun

Boyer, Edmond

197

AEROSPACE SCIENCES Applied aerodynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AEROSPACE SCIENCES Applied aerodynamics This year saw significant progress in industry, research labs, and academia in the development of flow-control concepts, novel configuration aerodynamic concepts, and aerodynamic im- provement technologies for enhancing the fuel efficiency and performance

Xu, Kun

198

Engineering and Applied  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

> Computer Science > Electrical, Computer, and Energy Engineering > Mechanical Engineering 11, Computational Science and Engineering, Energy Systems and Environmental Sustainability, Materials ScienceCollege of Engineering and Applied Science Contact Robert H. Davis, Engineering Dean 303

Stowell, Michael

199

GEOHYDROLOGICAL STUDIES FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION -- Vol. I: Executive Summary; Vol. II: Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Previous Groundwater Chemistry Studies 1978 Activities Conclusions and Recommendations Pasco Basin Modeling

Apps, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Structural and depositional evolution, KH field, West Natuna Basin, offshore Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STRUCTURAL AND DEPOSITIONAL EVOLUTION, KH FIELD, WEST NATUNA BASIN, OFFSHORE INDONESIA A Thesis by MARIA FRANSISCA MEIRITA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2003 Major Subject: Geophysics STRUCTURAL AND DEPOSITIONAL EVOLUTION, KH FIELD, WEST NATUNA BASIN, OFFSHORE INDONESIA A Thesis by MARIA FRANSISCA MEIRITA...

Meirita, Maria Fransisca

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Linear depressions and collapse features in the Northwest Hueco Basin, West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LINEAR DEPRESSIONS AND COLLAPSE FEATURES IN THE NORTHWEST HUECO BASIN, WEST TEXAS A Thesis by SCOTT D. HENDERSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1997 Major Subject: Geology LINEAR DEPRESSIONS AND COLLAPSE FEATURES IN THE NORTHVKST HUECO BASIN, WEST TEXAS A Thesis by SCOTT D. HENDERSON Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fultlllment of the requirements...

Henderson, Scott D

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

applying psychological theories: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of continued study of the same material Wixted, John T. 19 Applied Game Theory Syllabus Instructors Engineering Websites Summary: Applied Game Theory Syllabus Instructors...

203

Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin, Volume XI; Recommendations on the Design and Analysis of Radiotelemetry Studies of Salmonid Smolts to Estimate Survival and Passage Efficiencies, 1991-1998 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this investigation was to determine the feasibility of extracting detailed survival and passage efficiency estimates from a properly designed smolt radiotelemetry study.

Skalski, John R. (University of Washington, School of Fisheries, Fisheries Research Institute, Seattle, WA); Giorgi, Albert E.; Stevenson, John R. (BioAnalysts, Inc., Redmond, WA)

1998-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Terriary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO -) 2 flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of productive carbonate buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) diagenetic characterization of project field reservoirs, and (2) technology transfer.

David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

205

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

207

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2002-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

208

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

209

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Journal of Educational Psychology Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Educational Psychology Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete Learning, M. I. (2013, August 19). Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete Learning Materials.1037/a0034098 #12;Applying Grounded Coordination Challenges to Concrete Learning Materials: A Study

211

Apply for Beamtime  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mailRadioimmunotherapy ofevolvedAppliedApply for Beam

212

K Basins isolation barriers summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 105-K East and 105-K West fuel storage basins (105-K Basins) were designed and constructed in the early 1950`s for interim storage of irradiated fuel following its discharge from the reactors. The 105-K- East and 105-K West reactor buildings were constructed first, and the associated storage basins were added about a year later. The construction joint between each reactor building structure and the basin structure included a flexible membrane waterstop to prevent leakage. Water in the storage basins provided both radiation shielding and cooling to remove decay heat from stored fuel until its transfer to the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility for chemical processing. The 105-K West Reactor was permanently shut down in February 1970; the 105-K East Reactor was permanently shut down in February 1971. Except for a few loose pieces, fuel stored in the basins at that time was shipped to the PUREX Facility for processing. The basins were then left idle but were kept filled with water. The PUREX Facility was shut down and placed on wet standby in 1972 while N Reactor continued to operate. When the N Reactor fuel storage basin began to approach storage capacity, the decision was made to modify the fuel storage basins at 105-K East and 105-K West to provide additional storage capacity. Both basins were subsequently modified (105-K East in 1975 and 105-K West in 1981) to provide for the interim handling and storage of irradiated N Reactor fuel. The PUREX Facility was restarted in November 1983 to provide 1698 additional weapons-grade plutonium for the United States defense mission. The facility was shut down and deactivated in December 1992 when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the plant was no longer needed to support weapons-grade plutonium production. When the PUREX Facility was shut down, approximately 2.1 x 1 06 kg (2,100 metric tons) of irradiated fuel aged 7 to 23 years was left in storage in the 105-K Basins pending a decision on final disposition of the material. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1994), also known as the Tri-Party Agreement, commits to the removal of all fuel and sludge from the 105-K Basins by the year 2002.

Strickland, G.C., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

SUSTAINABILITY WHO CAN APPLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FUNDED BY CALL FOR SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH STUDENT WHO CAN APPLY Undergraduate and graduate Participate in the Global Change & Sustainability Center's Research Symposium; attend workshops with faculty or publish in the U's student-run sustainability publication to be released in May 2014. Are you conducting

214

Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 Mark Person*1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Mount Simon, Illinois Basin, CO2, earthquakes, pressure, brine transport69 #12;Page | 3 1. IntroductionPage | 1 Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 2 3 4 sharp-interface models of CO2 injection were constructed for the Illinois49 Basin in which porosity

Gable, Carl W.

215

Modeling and Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Sequestration at the Geologic-basin Scale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objectives. The overall objective of this proposal was to develop tools for better understanding, modeling and risk assessment of CO{sub 2} permanence in geologic formations at the geologic basin scale. The main motivation was that carbon capture and storage (CCS) will play an important role as a climate change mitigation technology only if it is deployed at scale of gigatonne per year injections over a period of decades. Continuous injection of this magnitude must be understood at the scale of a geologic basin. Specifically, the technical objectives of this project were: (1) to develop mathematical models of capacity and injectivity at the basin scale; (2) to apply quantitative risk assessment methodologies that will inform on CO{sub 2} permanence; (3) to apply the models to geologic basins across the continental United States. These technical objectives go hand-in-hand with the overarching goals of: (1) advancing the science for deployment of CCS at scale; and (2) contributing to training the next generation of scientists and engineers that will implement and deploy CCS in the United States and elsewhere. Methods. The differentiating factor of this proposal was to perform fundamental research on migration and fate of CO{sub 2} and displaced brine at the geologic basin scale. We developed analytical sharp-interface models of the evolution of CO{sub 2} plumes over the duration of injection (decades) and after injection (centuries). We applied the analytical solutions of CO{sub 2} plume migration and pressure evolution to specific geologic basins, to estimate the maximum footprint of the plume, and the maximum injection rate that can be sustained during a certain injection period without fracturing the caprock. These results have led to more accurate capacity estimates, based on fluid flow dynamics, rather than ad hoc assumptions of an overall “efficiency factor.” We also applied risk assessment methodologies to evaluate the uncertainty in our predictions of storage capacity and leakage rates. This was possible because the analytical mathematical models provide ultrafast forward simulation and they contain few parameters. Impact. The project has been enormously successful both in terms of its scientific output (journal publications) as well as impact in the government and industry. The mathematical models and uncertainty quantification methodologies developed here o?er a physically-based approach for estimating capacity and leakage risk at the basin scale. Our approach may also facilitate deployment of CCS by providing the basis for a simpler and more coherent regulatory structure than an “individual-point-of-injection” permitting approach. It may also lead to better science-based policy for post-closure design and transfer of responsibility to the State.

Juanes, Ruben

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

General syllabus for third-cycle studies in Applied Nutrition TEKNLF00 This syllabus has been adopted by the Board of LTH, 11 October 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

education leading to a PhD or licentiate in the fields of LTH's professional degrees. The programmes for third-cycle studies are given in the Higher Education Ordinance. 3.1 Licentiate Knowledge and understanding For a Licentiate the third-cycle student shall: - demonstrate knowledge and understanding

217

Flathead Basin Commission Act of 1983 (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act establishes the Flathead Basin Commission, the purpose of which is to protect the Flathead Lake aquatic environment, its waters, and surrounding lands and natural resources. The Commission...

218

River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Catawba/Wateree and Yadkin/Pee Dee River Basins Advisory Commissions are permanent public bodies jointly established by North and South Carolina. The commissions are responsible for assessing...

219

Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

220

The Uinta Basin Case Robert J. Bayer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Overburden Tailings Oil Shale Mining Open Pit Underground Ex situ extraction Ex situ thermal conversion EIS for Oil Sands and Oil Shale Ongoing concerns with Basin-wide air quality Wildlife and wildlife

Utah, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

K-Basins S/RIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is a list of the Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES{ampersand}H) and Safeguards and Security (SAS) standards/requirements applicable to the K Basins facility.

Watson, D.J.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

K-Basins S/RIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Standards/Requirements Identification Document(S/RID) is a list of the Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) and Safeguards and Security (SAS) standards/requirements applicable to the K Basins facility

Watson, D.J.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

223

Assessment of undiscovered carboniferous coal-bed gas resources of the Appalachian Basin and Black Warrior Basin Provinces, 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) occurs in coal beds of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) age in the Appalachian basin, which extends almost continuously from New York to Alabama. In general, the basin includes three structural subbasins: the Dunkard basin in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and northern West Virginia; the Pocahontas basin in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia; and the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi. For assessment purposes, the Appalachian basin was divided into two assessment provinces: the Appalachian Basin Province from New York to Alabama, and the Black Warrior Basin Province in Alabama and Mississippi. By far, most of the coalbed methane produced in the entire Appalachian basin has come from the Black Warrior Basin Province. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Milici, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Stratigraphy and depositional environments of Cherokee group (Desmoinesian, middle Pennsylvanian), Central Cherokee basin, southeast Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Correlation from geophysical well logs of radioactive black shales, which extend throughout the basin and into the Sedgwick and Forest City basins, provided the basis for division of the Cherokee Group into 11 stratigraphic intervals. Black shale units below the Fort Scott Limestone and Verdigris Limestone, and above the Tebo coal are the most extensive and easily recognizable markers. The Tebo marker might be considered as a possible boundary between the Krebs and Cabaniss Formations owing to lateral extensiveness, mappability, and stratigraphic location near a distinct lithologic change. Cross sections indicate that the basin subsided during deposition of the Krebs Formation. Stratigraphic intervals in the overlying Cabaniss formation are relatively uniform in thickness, suggesting little or no subsidence during deposition. Onlap upon the Nemaha ridge occurred during Krebs and much of Cabaniss deposition. Stratigraphic markers that overlap the ridge and extend into the Sedgwick basin indicate one depositional province. Core, well-log, and well-sample studies show that lithologic characteristics within the basin appear similar to outcrop features. Basin strata are dominated by shales and sandstones with interbedded coals and thin limestones. Net-sandstone isolith maps reveal the presence of a deltaic complex characterized by both stacking and offset of major sandstone bodies. The amount of limestone significantly increases along the eastern flank of the Nemaha ridge.

Staton, M.D.; Brady, L.L.; Walton, A.W.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Mineralogy and organic petrology of oil shales in the Sangkarewang formation, Ombilin Basin, West Sumatra, Indonesia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Ombilin Basin, which lies in Sumatra Island, is one of the Tertiary basins in Indonesia. This basin contains a wide variety of rock units,… (more)

Fatimah, Fatimah

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Late devonian carbon isotope stratigraphy and sea level fluctuations, Canning Basin, Western Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reef, Canning Basin, Western Australia. Palaeontology 43,the Canning Basin, Western Australia. In: Loucks, R.G. ,Canning Basin, Western Australia. Ph.D Thesis, University of

Stephens, N P; Sumner, Dawn Y.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

ARCHAEOLOGY, LATE-QUATERNARY LANDSCAPE EVOLUTION, AND ENVIRONMENTAL CHANGE IN THE UPPER DRIFTWOOD CREEK BASIN, BARBER COUNTY, KANSAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study focused on valley fills in the upper Driftwood Creek basin, a 3rd order drainage network in south-central Kansas to determine the geologic potential for stratified cultural material and to reconstruct a record of Late...

Kessler, Nicholas Victor

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

228

Basin evolution, diagenesis and uranium mineralization in the PaleoproterozicThelon Basin,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin evolution, diagenesis and uranium mineralization in the PaleoproterozicThelon Basin, Nunavut,Canada Eric E. Hiatt,n Sarah E. Palmer,w1 T. Kurt Kyserw and Terrence K. O'Connorz n Geology Department, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Oshkosh,Wisconsin, USA wDepartment of Geological Sciences and Engineering

Hiatt, Eric E.

229

Characterization of the chemical variation of feed coal and coal combustion products from a power plant utilizing low sulfur Powder River Basin coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey and the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, in collaboration with an Indiana utility, are studying a coal-fired power plant burning Powder River Basin coal. This investigation involves a systematic study of the chemical and mineralogical characteristics of feed coal and coal combustion products (CCPs) from a 1,300-megawatt (MW) power unit. The main goal of this study is to characterize the temporal chemical variability of the feed coal, fly ash, and bottom ash by looking at the major-, minor-, and trace-element compositions and their associations with the feed coal mineralogy. Emphasis is also placed on the abundance and modes of occurrence of elements of potential environmental concern that may affect the utilization of these CCPs and coals.

Affolter, R.H.; Brownfield, M.E.; Cathcart, J.D.; Brownfield, I.K.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

An experimental set-up to apply polarization modulation to infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy for improved in situ studies of atmospheric corrosion processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new set-up for improved monitoring of atmospheric corrosion processes in situ and in real-time is presented. To characterize chemical structures of thin films on metal surfaces surface sensitive analytical techniques are required. One possible technique is Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (IRRAS) which has become an established method to investigate surface corrosion films of thicknesses less than 200 nm. However, there are limitations related to the sensitivity of these measurements, in case of investigating ultrathin films or absorption bands of interest, surface species are superimposed by atmospheric background absorption, which changes during in situ measurements in ambient atmospheres. These difficulties of in situ surface reflection measurements can be eliminated by availing the polarization selectivity of adsorbed surface species. At grazing angles of incidence the absorption of p-polarized infrared radiation by thin surface films on metals is enhanced, while the absorption of s-polarized light by this film is nearly zero. This different behavior of the polarization properties leads to strong selection rules at the surface and can therefore be used to identify molecules adsorbed on metal surfaces. Polarization Modulation (PM) of the infrared (IR) light takes advantage of this disparity of polarization on sample surfaces and in combination with IRRAS yielding a very sensitive and surface-selective method for obtaining IR spectra of ultra-thin films on metal surfaces. An already existing in situ IRRAS/Quartz Crystal Microbalance weathering cell was combined with PM and evaluated according to its applicability to study in situ atmospheric corrosion processes. First real-time measurements on silver samples exposed to different atmospheres were performed showing the advantage of PM-IRRAS compared to conventional IRRAS for such investigations.

Wiesinger, R. [Institute of Science and Technology in Art, Academy of Fine Arts, 1010 Vienna (Austria); Schade, U. [Helmholtz-Zentrum für Materialien und Energy GmbH, Elektronenspeicherring BESSY II, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Kleber, Ch. [Centre for Electrochemical Surface Technology, 2700 Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Schreiner, M. [Institute of Science and Technology in Art, Academy of Fine Arts, 1010 Vienna (Austria); Institute for Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna University of Technology, 1060 Vienna (Austria)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Apply for Beamtime  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICEAmesApplication Acceleration ontoInstrumentationApply for

232

Applied Science/Techniques  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mailRadioimmunotherapy ofevolvedApplied Science/Techniques

233

Three-dimensional fluvial-deltaic sequence stratigraphy Pliocene-Recent Muda Formation, Belida Field, West Natuna Basin, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THREE-DIMENSIONAL FLUVIAL-DELTAIC SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHY PLIOCENE-RECENT MUDA FORMATION, BELIDA FIELD, WEST NATUNA BASIN, INDONESIA A Thesis by YAN DARMADI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University..., WEST NATUNA BASIN, INDONESIA A Thesis by YAN DARMADI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair...

Darmadi, Yan

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

234

Evaluation of injection well risk management potential in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UIC regulations promulgated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA) provide the EPA, or an EPA approved state agency, with authority to regulate subsurface injection of fluids to protect USDWs. Oil and gas producing industry interests are concerned primarily with Class 2 wells whose uses as defined by UIC regulations are: disposal of fluids brought to the surface and liquids generated in connection with oil and gas production (SWD); injection of fluids for enhanced oil recovery (EOR); and storage of liquid hydrocarbons. The Williston Basin was chosen for the pilot study of the feasibility of using the risk approach in managing Class 2 injection operations for the following reasons: it is one of the nine geologic basins which was classified as having a significant potential for external casing corrosion, which permitted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the injection well corrosion control measures used by industry; there are 731 active, 22 shut in and 203 temporarily abandoned SWD and water injection wells in the basin; and the basin covers three states. The broad objective of the Williston Basin study is to define requirements and to investigate the feasibility of incorporating risk management into administration of the UIC program. The study does not address the reporting aspects of UIC regulatory and compliance activities but the data base does contain essentially all the information required to develop the reports needed to monitor those activities. 16 refs., 10 figs., 11 tabs.

none,

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Local amplification of deep mining induced vibrations - Part.2: Simulation of the ground motion in a coal basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work investigates the impact of deep coal mining induced vibrations on surface constructions using numerical tools. An experimental study of the geological site amplification and of its influence on mining induced vibrations has already been published in a previous paper (Part 1: Experimental evidence for site effects in a coal basin). Measurements have shown the existence of an amplification area in the southern part of the basin where drilling data have shown the presence of particularly fractured and soft stratigraphic units. The present study, using the Boundary Element Method (BEM) in the frequency domain, first investigates canonical geological structures in order to get general results for various sites. The amplification level at the surface is given as a function of the shape of the basin and of the velocity contrast with the bedrock. Next, the particular coal basin previously studied experimentally (Driad-Lebeau et al., 2009) is modeled numerically by BEM. The amplification phenomena characteri...

Semblat, Jean-François; Driad-Lebeau, L; Bonnet, Guy; 10.1016/j.soildyn.2010.04.006

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Modified Streamflows 1990 Level of Irrigation : Missouri, Colorado, Peace and Slave River Basin, 1928-1989.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data for monthly mean streamflows adjusted for storage change, evaporation, and irrigation, for the years 1928-1990, for the Colorado River Basin, the Missouri River Basin, the Peace River Basin, and the Slave River Basin.

A.G. Crook Company; United States. Bonneville Power Administration

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

E-Print Network 3.0 - athabasca basin western Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thelon Basin Boomerang Lake Western Thelon Basin Eastern Thelon... to the world-class uranium-producing Athabasca basin. At present, the Thelon basin is only known to host......

238

Essays in Applied Microeconomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy sources, such as wind and solar energy. Studies haveenergy sources, such as wind and solar energy. Also, my

Severnini, Edson Roberto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Geochemical Prospecting of Hydrocarbons in Frontier Basins of India* By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

India has 26 sedimentary basins with a basinal area of approximately 1.8x 10 6 km 2 (excluding deep waters), out of which seven are producing basins and two have proven potential. Exploration efforts in other basins, called “frontier basins ” are in progress. These basins are characterized by varied geology, age, tectonics, and depositional environments. Hydrocarbon shows in many of these basins are known, and in few basins oil and gas have flowed in commercial /non-commercial quantities. Within the framework of India Hydrocarbon Vision – 2025 and New Exploration Licensing Policy, there is a continuous increase in area under active exploration. The asset management concept with multi-disciplinary teams has created a demand for synergic application of risk-reduction technologies, including surface geochemical surveys. National Geophysical Research Institute (NGRI), Hyderabad, India has initiated/planned surface geochemical surveys composed of gas chromatographic and carbon isotopic analyses in few of the frontier basins of India. The adsorbed soil gas data in one of the basins (Saurashtra basin, Gujarat) has shown varied concentrations of CH4 to C4H10. The C1 concentration varies between 3 to 766 ppb and ??C2+, 1 to 543 ppb. This basin has thin soil cover and the Mesozoic sediments (probable source rocks) are overlain by thick cover of Deccan Traps. The scope and perspective of geochemical surveys in frontier basins of India are presented here.

B. Kumar; D. J. Patil; G. Kalpana; C. Vishnu Vardhan

240

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir- characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced-recovery program (CO{sup 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored. Accomplishments for this past quarter are discussed.

Dutton, S.P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Shaping Environmental Justice: Applying Science, Technology, and Society Boundary Work  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Applying Science, Technology and Society Boundary Work Chih-the STS (Science, Technology and Society) study as boundary-

Huang, Chih-Tung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Synthetic studies applied to polyketide natural products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1) (BnO) 2 P-N( i Pr) 2 tetrazole, CH 2 Cl 2 OH Ph OBn O OBna stirred suspension of tetrazole (27 mg, 0.38 mmol) in CH 2mg, 2.10 mmol), 1- phenyl-1H-tetrazole thiol (748 mg, 4.20

Mandel, Alexander

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Applied Studies and Technology Stakeholder Outreach: Helping...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ceramic-blue sky. Across a dune ridge, Quentin Benally wipes his brow, adjusts his camo sun hat, and for the umpteenth time, leans over a 25-meter tape measure stretched across...

244

Ground-water hydraulics of the deep-basin brine aquifer, Palo Duro Basin, Texas panhandle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Deep-Basin Brine aquifer of the Palo Duro Basin (Texas Panhandle) underlies thick Permian bedded evaporites that are being evaluated as a potential high-level nuclear waste isolation repository. Potentiometric surface maps of 5 units of the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer were drawn using drill-stem test (DST) pressure data, which were analyzed by a geostatistical technique (kriging) to smooth the large variation in the data. The potentiometric surface maps indicate that the Deep-Basin Brine aquifer could be conceptually modeled as 5 aquifer units; a Lower Permian (Wolfcamp) aquifer, upper and lower Pennsylvanian aquifers, a pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer, and a Pennsylvanian to Wolfcampian granite-wash aquifer. The hydraulic head maps indicate that ground-water flow in each of the units is west to east with a minor northerly component near the Amarillo Uplift, the northern structural boundary of the basin. The Wolfcamp potentiometric surface indicates the strongest component of northerly flow. Inferred flow direction in Pennsylvanian aquifers is easterly, and in the pre-Pennsylvanian aquifer near its pinch-out in the basin center, flow is inferred to be to the north. In the granite-wash aquifer the inferred flow direction is east across the northern edge of the basin and southeast along the Amarillo Uplift.

Smith, D.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Sediment Problems and Sediment Management in Asian River Basins (Proceedings of the ICCE Workshop held at Hyderabad, India, September 2009). IAHS Publ. 349, 2011.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sediment Problems and Sediment Management in Asian River Basins (Proceedings of the ICCE Workshop Sedimentation of reservoirs in Uzbekistan: a case study of the Akdarya Reservoir, Zerafshan River Basin SHAVKAT-made water reservoirs are affected by high sedimentation rates. It is of strategic importance to rationally

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

246

annapolis basin area: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

geology of the Bengal Basin in relation to the regional tectonic framework and basin-fill history Geosciences Websites Summary: ; and this was followed by an increase in the...

247

XXI Century Climatology of Snow Cover for the Western River Basins of the Indus River System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under changing climate, freshwater resources of Hindu Kush-Karakoram-Himalaya (HKH) region can be affected by changes in temperature and in amount, type and distribution of precipitation. This can have serious implications for the water supply and in turn threaten the food security and economic wellbeing of Indus basin. Using MODIS daily snow products (Terra & Aqua), this study focuses on the assessment of the 2000-2010 snow cover dynamics on seasonal/annual basis against geophysical parameters (aspect, elevation and slope) for the so called western river basins of Indus River System (IRS), namely Indus, Kabul, Jhelum, Astore, Gilgit, Hunza, Swat, Shigar and Shyok basins. Results show that inputs from MODIS instrument provide unprecedented better opportunity to study by using GIS techniques the snow cover dynamics in the remote areas like HKH region at such hyper-temporal and finer planar resolution. Adapted non-spectral cloud filtering techniques have significantly reduced cloud coverage and improved sno...

Hasson, Shabeh ul; Lucarini, Valerio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Evidence of late Quaternary wet/dry climate episodes derived from paleoclimatic proxy data recovered from the paleoenvironmental record of the Great Basin of western North America: Paleobotanical studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through the integration of several avenues of paleoclimatic proxy data, the authors intend to arrive a definite conclusions regarding the frequency of periods of wetter climate, and to drive information regarding the magnitudes of these episodes, rates of their onset and demise, and the climatic conditions under which wetter climate can occur. These will in turn lead to rough estimates of: (1) the amounts of rainfall available for recharge during past periods of effectively wetter climate; and (2) the durations and spacing of such events that provide an indication of the amount of time that the area was subjected to these inputs. To accomplish these goals the paleobotanical record over a broad region is being examined to identify periods of greater effective precipitation. Although the project focus is on a region a of about 200 km around Yucca Mountain, they have collected data in other areas of the Great Basin in order to be able to identify large-scale climatic patterns. Once identified and described these climatic patterns can be separated from purely local climatic phenomena that might hinder the understanding of the Pliestocene climates of southern Nevada and the Yucca Mountain area in particular.

NONE

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Modeling overpressures in sedimentary basins: Consequences for permeability and rheology of shales, and petroleum expulsion efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prediction of overpressures using Institut Francais du Petrole's 2-D numerical model TEMISPACK is applied to several provinces of the world. In the Paris basin, France, normally pressured Liassic shales are shown to have permeabilities around a microdarcy, independently confirmed by laboratory measurements. In contrast, in the Norway section of the North Sea, Williston Basin, Canada, Gulf Coast, and in the Mahakam delta, observed overpressures of 10-50 MPa are consistently modeled with shale permeabilities around 1-10 nanodarcys. This theoretical value fits well with the lowest permeability measured in compacted shales. For these basins, compaction disequilibrium was found to explain most (>85%) of the overpressures. The only exception was the Williston basin in which overpressures observed in the organic-rich Bakken shales are entirely due to hydrocarbon generation. In Mahakam delta, the rheology of shales is nonlinear, i.e., the strength of shales increases rapidly with death. Consequently, shale compaction cannot be described by the linear behavior often assumed in hydrology. In the absence of fault barriers, numerical simulations and geological evidence suggest that overpressured source rocks have low or very low expulsion efficiency, irrespective of their organic content. However, shales with a permeability on the order of a microdarcy do not hinder petroleum migration.

Burrus, J.; Schneider, F.; Wolf, S. (Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison (France))

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

K West basin isolation barrier leak rate test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the procedure for performing the acceptance test on the two isolation barriers being installed in K West basin. This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals.

Whitehurst, R.; McCracken, K.; Papenfuss, J.N.

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

251

Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway A. SOUCHE*, M. DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological Processes (PGP), University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway basins of western Norway are examples of supradetachment basins that formed in the hanging wall

Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

252

Lithosphere structure beneath the Phanerozoic intracratonic basins of North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Four intracratonic basins of North America, the Hudson Bay, Michigan, Illinois and Williston. The Williston and Illinois basins are associated with wide (V200 km) and thin anomalies (V100 km), whereas basin and 270 km beneath the Williston [4,6]. For two ba- sins of similar age located on the same Precam

Kaminski, Edouard

253

BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, WILLISTON BASIN By D.J. Nichols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter WB BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, WILLISTON BASIN By D.J. Nichols in U.S. Geological Survey Professional .........................................................................................................WB-3 Figures WB-1. Biostratigraphic reference sections in the Williston Basin. WB-2. Occurrences. Palynostratigraphic zones of the Paleocene in the Williston Basin composite reference section. WB-4. Distribution

254

NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

255

Role of the basin boundary conditions in gravity wave turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravity wave turbulence is studied experimentally in a large wave basin where irregular waves are generated unidirectionally. The role of the basin boundary conditions (absorbing or reflecting) and of the forcing properties are investigated. To that purpose, an absorbing sloping beach opposite to the wavemaker can be replaced by a reflecting vertical wall. We observe that the wave field properties depend strongly on these boundary conditions. Quasi-one dimensional field of nonlinear waves propagate before to be damped by the beach whereas a more multidirectional wave field is observed with the wall. In both cases, the wave spectrum scales as a frequency-power law with an exponent that increases continuously with the forcing amplitude up to a value close to -4, which is the value predicted by the weak turbulence theory. The physical mechanisms involved are probably different according to the boundary condition used, but cannot be easily discriminated with only temporal measurements. We have also studied freely decaying gravity wave turbulence in the closed basin. No self-similar decay of the spectrum is observed, whereas its Fourier modes decay first as a time power law due to nonlinear mechanisms, and then exponentially due to linear viscous damping. We estimate the linear, nonlinear and dissipative time scales to test the time scale separation that highlights the important role of a large scale Fourier mode. By estimation of the mean energy flux from the initial decay of wave energy, the Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant is evaluated and found to be compatible with a recent theoretical value.

Luc Deike; Benjamin Miquel; Pablo Gutiérrez-Matus; Timothée Jamin; Benoit Semin; Sébastien Aumaitre; Michael Berhanu; Eric Falcon; Félicien BONNEFOY

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

256

School of Applied Technology School of Applied Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Applied Technology School of Applied Technology Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Campus Illinois Institute of Technology 201 E. Loop Road Wheaton, IL 60187 630.682.6000 www.iit.edu/applied tech/ Dean Technology and Management Programs: Mazin Safar Director, Marketing & Development: Scott Pfeiffer Director

Heller, Barbara

257

School of Applied Technology School of Applied Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

School of Applied Technology School of Applied Technology Daniel F. and Ada L. Rice Campus Illinois Institute of Technology 201 E. Loop Road Wheaton, IL 60187 630.682.6000 www.iit.edu/applied tech/ Dean and Academic Director, Information Technology and Management Programs: C. Robert Carlson Director of Operations

Heller, Barbara

258

Energy efficiency and the environment: Innovative ways to improve air quality in the Los Angeles Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on novel, innovative approaches for reducing or delaying the production of photochemical smog in the Los Angeles Basin. These approaches include modifying the surface characteristics of the basin by increasing surface albedo and an extensive tree-planting program. The changes in surface conditions are designed to reduce the basin air temperatures, especially during the summer months, which will result in two possible effects. First, a decrease in temperature would lead to a reduction in energy use with an associated decline in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and a lowering of evaporative emission of reactive organic gases. Reductions in these smog precursors could improve the air quality of the basin without imposing additional emissions regulations. The second effect is associated with the possible causal relationship between air temperature and smog formation (i.e., lower temperatures and lower incidence of smog). Since this approach to mitigating air emissions is broad, the studies to date have concentrated on how changes in surface characteristics affect the meteorological conditions of the basin and on how these meteorological changes subsequently affect smog production. A geographic information system database of key surface characteristics (i.e., vegetative cover, albedo, moisture availability, and roughness) was compiled, and these characteristics were evaluated using prognostic meteorological models. The results of two- and three-dimensional meteorological simulations will be presented and discussed in this paper.

Ritschard, R.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Energy efficiency and the environment: Innovative ways to improve air quality in the Los Angeles Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper focuses on novel, innovative approaches for reducing or delaying the production of photochemical smog in the Los Angeles Basin. These approaches include modifying the surface characteristics of the basin by increasing surface albedo and an extensive tree-planting program. The changes in surface conditions are designed to reduce the basin air temperatures, especially during the summer months, which will result in two possible effects. First, a decrease in temperature would lead to a reduction in energy use with an associated decline in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO[sub x]) and a lowering of evaporative emission of reactive organic gases. Reductions in these smog precursors could improve the air quality of the basin without imposing additional emissions regulations. The second effect is associated with the possible causal relationship between air temperature and smog formation (i.e., lower temperatures and lower incidence of smog). Since this approach to mitigating air emissions is broad, the studies to date have concentrated on how changes in surface characteristics affect the meteorological conditions of the basin and on how these meteorological changes subsequently affect smog production. A geographic information system database of key surface characteristics (i.e., vegetative cover, albedo, moisture availability, and roughness) was compiled, and these characteristics were evaluated using prognostic meteorological models. The results of two- and three-dimensional meteorological simulations will be presented and discussed in this paper.

Ritschard, R.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Washington. The Act authorized the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish Overview 11 Sixth Northwest Power Plan boosts energy efficiency, renewable energy, Energy efficiency

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

GUNNISON BASIN CLIMATE CHANGE VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change is already changing ecosystems and affecting people in the southwestern United States, as well as ecosystem services, e.g., water supply. The climate of the Gunnison Basin, Colorado Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest Service, Upper Gunnison River Water Conservancy District, Western

Neff, Jason

262

Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

Allwine, K.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

Allwine, K.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Oil shale in the Piceance Basin: an analysis of land use issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to contribute to a framework for establishing policies to promote efficient use of the nation's oil shale resources. A methodology was developed to explain the effects of federal leasing policies on resource recovery, extraction costs, and development times associated with oil shale surface mines. This report investigates the effects of lease size, industrial development patterns, waste disposal policies, and lease boundaries on the potential of Piceance Basin oil shale resource. This approach should aid in understanding the relationship between federal leasing policies and requirements for developing Piceance Basin oil shale. 16 refs., 46 figs. (DMC)

Rubenson, D.; Pei, R.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

MACHINE LEARNING AND MAPPING ALGORITHMS APPLIED TO PROTEOMICS PROBLEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MACHINE LEARNING AND MAPPING ALGORITHMS APPLIED TO PROTEOMICS PROBLEMS By William Shane Sanders;MACHINE LEARNING AND MAPPING ALGORITHMS APPLIED TO PROTEOMICS PROBLEMS By William Shane Sanders Approved Title of Study: MACHINE LEARNING AND MAPPING ALGORITHMS APPLIED TO PROTEOMICS PROBLEMS Pages in Study

Ray, David

266

Hydrotreating Uinta Basin bitumen-derived heavy oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy oils derived from Uinta Basin bitumens have been hydrotreated under varying conditions. The process variables investigated included total reactor pressure (11.0-16.9 MPa), reactor temperature (616-711 K), feed rate (0.29-1.38 WHSV), and catalyst composition. The extent of heteroatom removal and residuum conversion were determined by the feed molecular weight and catalyst selection. Catalytic activity for heteroatom conversion removal was primarily influenced by metal loading. The heteroatom removal activity of the catalysts studied were ranked HDN catalysts > HDM catalysts > HDN-support. Catalytic activity for residuum conversion was influenced by both metal loading and catalyst surface area. The residuum conversion activity of HDN catalysts were always higher than the activity of HDM catalysts and HDN supports. The residuum conversion activity of HDN-supports surpassed the activity of HDM catalyst at higher temperatures. The conversions achieved with HDN catalysts relative to the HDM catalysts indicated that the low metals contents of the Uinta Basin bitumens obviate the need for hydrodemetallation as an initial upgrading step with these bitumens. The upgrading of Uinta Basin bitumens for integration into refinery feed slates should emphasize molecular weight and boiling range reduction first, followed by hydrotreating of the total liquid product produced in the pyrolysis process. Kinetics of residuum conversion can be modeled by invoking a consecutive-parallel mechanism in which native residuum in the feed is rapidly converted to volatile products and to product residuum. Deep conversion of residuum is only achieved when the more refractory product residuum is converted to volatile products.

Longstaff, D.C.; Balaji, G.V.; Kim, J.W. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

New oilfield air bit improves drilling economics in Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Petroleum exploration in the Appalachian Basin of the northeastern United States has traditionally relied on compressed air, rather than drilling fluid, for its circulating medium. When compared to drilling mud, compressed air provides such advantages as increased rates of penetration, longer bit life, decreased formation damage, no lost circulation and saves the expense associated with mud handling equipment. Throughout the 1970s and early 1980s, roller cone mining bits and surplus oilfield bits were used to drill these wells. While the cutting structures of mining bits were well-suited for air drilling, the open roller bearings invariably shortened the useful life of the bit, particularly when water was present in the hole. This paper will highlight the development of a new IADC Class 539Y oilfield roller cone bit that is establishing performance records in air drilling applications throughout the Appalachian Basin. Essentially, the latest generation evolved from a roller cone bit successfully introduced in 1985 that combined a specialized non-offset cutting structure with a premium oilfield journal bearing package. Since its introduction, several sizes and types of oilfield air bits have been developed that have continually decreased drilling costs through enhanced performance and reliability. The design and evolution of rock bit cutting structures and bearing packages for high-performance oilfield air drilling applications will be detailed. Laboratory drilling test data will demonstrate the difference in drilling efficiencies between air drilling and conventional fluid drilling. Case studies taken from throughout the Appalachian Basin will be presented to illustrate the improvements in cost per foot, penetration rate, total footage drilled, drilling hours, and bit dull grades.

Brannon, K.C.; Grimes, R.E. [Hughes Christensen Co., Houston, TX (United States); Vietmeier, W.R. [Hughes Christensen Co., Imperial, PA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Modeling basin- and plume-scale processes of CO2 storage for full-scale deployment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated modeling of basin- and plume-scale processes induced by full-scale deployment of CO{sub 2} storage was applied to the Mt. Simon Aquifer in the Illinois Basin. A three-dimensional mesh was generated with local refinement around 20 injection sites, with approximately 30 km spacing. A total annual injection rate of 100 Mt CO{sub 2} over 50 years was used. The CO{sub 2}-brine flow at the plume scale and the single-phase flow at the basin scale were simulated. Simulation results show the overall shape of a CO{sub 2} plume consisting of a typical gravity-override subplume in the bottom injection zone of high injectivity and a pyramid-shaped subplume in the overlying multilayered Mt. Simon, indicating the important role of a secondary seal with relatively low-permeability and high-entry capillary pressure. The secondary-seal effect is manifested by retarded upward CO{sub 2} migration as a result of multiple secondary seals, coupled with lateral preferential CO{sub 2} viscous fingering through high-permeability layers. The plume width varies from 9.0 to 13.5 km at 200 years, indicating the slow CO{sub 2} migration and no plume interference between storage sites. On the basin scale, pressure perturbations propagate quickly away from injection centers, interfere after less than 1 year, and eventually reach basin margins. The simulated pressure buildup of 35 bar in the injection area is not expected to affect caprock geomechanical integrity. Moderate pressure buildup is observed in Mt. Simon in northern Illinois. However, its impact on groundwater resources is less than the hydraulic drawdown induced by long-term extensive pumping from overlying freshwater aquifers.

Zhou, Q.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Mehnert, E.; Lin, Y.-F.; Zhang, K.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Sediment budget of the Napo River, Amazon basin, Ecuador and Peru A., Laraque1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sediment budget of the Napo River, Amazon basin, Ecuador and Peru A., Laraque1 , C., Bernal2 , J-downstream sediment budget along the Napo River (100,520 km2 , 6,300 m3 s-1 ) was studied in the Andean Foothill an unusual increase in the concentration of suspended sediment recorded for the western part of the Amazon

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

270

Basins of attraction in quadratic dynamical systems with a Jordan fixed point Marco Abate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basins of attraction in quadratic dynamical systems with a Jordan fixed point Marco Abate Fax: +39/06/7259­4699 e­mail: abate@mat.uniroma2.it Abstract In this note we study the dynamics to the exceptional divisor and thus it can be projected down #12; 2 Marco Abate producing a parabolic curve

Roma Tor Vergata, Università di

271

Author's personal copy The Lago Cardiel Basin, Argentina (49S): Origin and evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy The Lago Cardiel Basin, Argentina (49°S): Origin and evolution revealed with an airgun source in the closed lake system of Lago Cardiel, Argentina (49°S). As part of an ongoing study reflection surveys in the closed lake system of Lago Cardiel, Argentina (Fig. 1), with 3.5-kHz and boomer

Gilli, Adrian

272

Source and mobility of Rare Earth Elements in a sedimentary aquifer system: Aquitaine basin (Southern France)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Source and mobility of Rare Earth Elements in a sedimentary aquifer system: Aquitaine basin Geological Survey Service, Bordeaux, France, e.malcuit@brgm.fr The study of rare earth elements (REEs such as rivers and lakes and groundwaters. Rare earth elements) are of great interest because of their unique

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

273

Environmental isotope investigation of groundwater flow in the Honey Lake Basin, California and Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrology of Honey Lake Basin was studied using environmental isotope measurements of approximately 130 water samples collected during 1995 and 1996. The principal analytical methods included hydrogen, oxygen and carbon stable isotope ratio measurements, radiocarbon and tritium dating, and measurements of dissolved noble gas abundances.

Rose, T.P.; Davisson, M.L.; Hudson, G.B.; Varian, A.R.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Interaction of Groundwater and Surface Water in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Rapid City, SD 57702, email: jbednar@usgs.gov Groundwater availability in the Lower Tertiary and Upper in parts of Montana and Wyoming. Both structural basins are in the forefront of energy development associated with measuring streamflow, only fall estimates of base flow were used in the study. A net balance

Torgersen, Christian

275

Erosion potential from Missoula floods in the Pasco Basin, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Localities within the Pasco Basin preserve evidence of Missoula floods. Deposits are 46% sand-sized, 36% gravel-sized, and 18% finer than sand-sized. Mean thickness is 39 meters. High water marks at Wallula Gap require a discharge of approximately 12.5 Mcms. At Sentinel Gap, the slope-area method shows that the high water marks require a discharge of 34.6 Mcms. Since this discharge greatly exceeds any estimated for Missoula floods, there must have been backwater ponding from Wallula Gap. Projecting the slope of the water surface at the upper end of Wallula Gap to the downstream cross section at Gable Mountain leads to a discharge of 9.5 Mcms at Sentinel Gap. The HEC-6 steady state code and four sediment transport equations were applied. Assuming sand-sized particles, DuBoys function estimated 4 to 9 meters of scour. Yang's equation estimated 3 to 4 meters of scour. These are a minimum. A hydrograph synthesized for the boundaries of the Pasco Basin shows the maxima of the flood would occur after 90 h at Sentinel Gap, and at 114 h at Wallula Gap. The 200 areas will remain inundated for four days and six hours. With a quasi-dynamic sediment transport computation, HEC-6 scour estimates range from 0.61 meters to 0.915 meters. This is a minimum amount and erosion is highly variable suggesting reworking of sediment. The Meyer-Peter Meuller equations show less than 1 meter of net scour in the 200 areas. More extensive erosion was achieved during particular time steps of this analysis suggesting that sediment re-working would occur.

Craig, R.G.; Hanson, J.P.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Modeling of gas generation from the Cameo coal zone in the Piceance Basin Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas generative potential of the Cretaceous Cameo coal in the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado, was evaluated quantitatively by sealed gold tube pyrolysis. The H/C and O/C elemental ratios show that pyrolyzed Cameo coal samples follow the Van Krevelen humic coal evolution pathway, reasonably simulating natural coal maturation. Kinetic parameters (activation energy and frequency factor) for gas generation and vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) changes were calculated from pyrolysis data. Experimental R{sub o} results from this study are not adequately predicted by published R{sub o} kinetics and indicate the necessity of deriving basin-specific kinetic parameters when building predictive basin models. Using derived kinetics for R{sub o}, evolution and gas generation, basin modeling was completed for 57 wells across the Piceance Basin, which enabled the mapping of coal-rank and coalbed gas potential. Quantities of methane generated at approximately 1.2% R{sub o} are about 300 standard cubic feet per ton (scf/ton) and more than 2500 scf/ton (in-situ dry-ash-free coal) at R{sub o}, values reaching 1.9%. Gases generated in both low- and high-maturity coals are less wet, whereas the wetter gas is expected where R{sub o} is approximately 1.4-1.5%. As controlled by regional coal rank and net coal thickness, the largest in-place coalbed gas resources are located in the central part of the basin, where predicted volumes exceed 150 bcf/mi, excluding gases in tight sands.

Zhang, E.; Hill, R.J.; Katz, B.J.; Tang, Y.C. [Shell Exploration and Production Co., BTC, Houston, TX (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Water balance in the Amazon basin from a land surface model ensemble  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite recent advances in modeling and remote sensing of land surfaces, estimates of the global water budget are still fairly uncertain. The objective of this study is to evaluate the water budget of the Amazon basin based on several state-of-the-art land surface model (LSM) outputs. Water budget variables [total water storage (TWS), evapotranspiration (ET), surface runoff (R) and baseflow (B)] are evaluated at the basin scale using both remote sensing and in situ data. Fourteen LSMs were run using meteorological forcings at a 3-hourly time step and 1-degree spatial resolution. Three experiments are performed using precipitation which has been rescaled to match monthly global GPCP and GPCC datasets and the daily HYBAM dataset for the Amazon basin. R and B are used to force the Hydrological Modeling and Analysis Platform (HyMAP) river routing scheme and simulated discharges are compared against observations at 165 gauges. Simulated ET and TWS are compared against FLUXNET and MOD16A2 evapotranspiration, and GRACE TWS estimates in different catchments. At the basin scale, simulated ET ranges from 2.39mm.d-1 to 3.26mm.d-1 and a low spatial correlation between ET and P indicates that evapotranspiration does not depend on water availability over most of the basin. Results also show that other simulated water budget variables vary significantly as a function of both the LSM and precipitation used, but simulated TWS generally agree at the basin scale. The best water budget simulations resulted from experiments using the HYBAM dataset, mostly explained by a denser rainfall gauge network the daily rescaling.

Getirana, Augusto; Dutra, Emanuel; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Kam, Jonghun; Li, Hongyi; Decharme, Bertrand; Zhang, Zhengqiu J.; Ducharne, Agnes; Boone, Aaron; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Rodell, Matthew; Mounirou Toure, Ally; Xue, Yongkang; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Arsenault, Kristi Rae; Drapeau, Guillaume; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ronchail, Josyane; Sheffield, Justin

2014-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

278

Numerical modeling of deep groundwater flow and heat transport in the Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A numerical modeling approach has been used to evaluate quantitatively the effects of fluid flow on contemporary heat flow in an intracratonic basin. The authors have selected the Williston basin for this hydrodynamic study because of the opportunity it presents to assess the relation of deep groundwater flow to basin geothermics and the associated features of diagenesis and petroleum accumulation. The finite element method is used to solve the coupled equations of fluid flow and heat transport in two-dimensional sections of the basin. Both the fluid- and heat-flow regime are assumed to be at steady state, and the fluid flow is driven primarily by the water-table relief which is taken to be a subdued replica of land-surface topography. Buoyancy forces may also affect flow through fluid density gradients created by temperature and salinity effects. Three southwest-northwest oriented sections across the basin were modeled using available and estimated parameter data. The predicted flow patterns are most strongly affected by the topography, but the Devonian salt unit and Cretaceous shale unit exert some control. Cross-formational flow is especially important near the downdip, solution edge of the salt beds. Flow rates rarely exceed 0.5 m/year in the deep-central part of the basin, yet there does exist a marked effect on heat flow, albeit subdued by the blanket effect of the low-permeability Cretaceous shales. The regional effect of the topography-driven flow system is reflected in present-day salinity patterns and heat-flow data.

Garven, G.; Vigrass, L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Mississippian Lodgepole Play, Williston Basin: A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waulsortian-type carbonate mud mounds in the lower Mississippian Lodgepole formation (Bottineau interval, Madison Group) comprise an important new oil play in the Williston basin with strong regional potential. The play is typified by wells capable of producing 1000-2500 bbl of oil per day and by reserves that have as much as 0.5-3.0 million bbl of oil per well. Currently centered in Stark County, North Dakota, along the southern flank of the basin, the play includes 38 wells, with 21 producers and 6 new fields. Initial discovery was made at a Silurian test in Dickinson field, traditionally productive from Pennsylvanian sands. The largest pool discovered to date is Eland field, which has 15 producers and estimated total reserves of 12-15 million bbl. This report summarizes geologic, well-log, seismic, and production data for this play, which promises to expand considerably in the years to come.

Montgomery, S.L. [Petroleum Consultant, Seattle, WA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Transportation Options in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture options from large stationary emission sources in the Illinois Basin, primarily focusing on coal-fired utility power plants. The CO{sub 2} emissions data were collected for utility power plants and industrial facilities over most of Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and western Kentucky. Coal-fired power plants are by far the largest CO{sub 2} emission sources in the Illinois Basin. The data revealed that sources within the Illinois Basin emit about 276 million tonnes of CO2 annually from 122 utility power plants and industrial facilities. Industrial facilities include 48 emission sources and contribute about 10% of total emissions. A process analysis study was conducted to review the suitability of various CO{sub 2} capture technologies for large stationary sources. The advantages and disadvantages of each class of technology were investigated. Based on these analyses, a suitable CO{sub 2} capture technology was assigned to each type of emission source in the Illinois Basin. Techno-economic studies were then conducted to evaluate the energy and economic performances of three coal-based power generation plants with CO{sub 2} capture facilities. The three plants considered were (1) pulverized coal (PC) + post combustion chemical absorption (monoethanolamine, or MEA), (2) integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) + pre-combustion physical absorption (Selexol), and (3) oxygen-enriched coal combustion plants. A conventional PC power plant without CO2 capture was also investigated as a baseline plant for comparison. Gross capacities of 266, 533, and 1,054 MW were investigated at each power plant. The economic study considered the burning of both Illinois No. 6 coal and Powder River Basin (PRB) coal. The cost estimation included the cost for compressing the CO{sub 2} stream to pipeline pressure. A process simulation software, CHEMCAD, was employed to perform steady-state simulations of power generation systems and CO{sub 2} capture processes. Financial models were developed to estimate the capital cost, operations and maintenance cost, cost of electricity, and CO{sub 2} avoidance cost. Results showed that, depending on the plant size and the type of coal burned, CO{sub 2} avoidance cost is between $47/t to $67/t for a PC +MEA plant, between $22.03/t to $32.05/t for an oxygen combustion plant, and between $13.58/t to $26.78/t for an IGCC + Selexol plant. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to evaluate the impact on the CO2 avoidance cost of the heat of absorption of solvent in an MEA plant and energy consumption of the ASU in an oxy-coal combustion plant. An economic analysis of CO{sub 2} capture from an ethanol plant was also conducted. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture from an ethanol plant with a production capacity of 100 million gallons/year was estimated to be about $13.92/t.

M. Rostam-Abadi; S. S. Chen; Y. Lu

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Isotope hydrology of catchment basins: lithogenic and cosmogenic isotopic systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A variety of physical processes affect solute concentrations within catchment waters. The isotopic compositions of the solutes can indicate which processes have determined the observed concentrations. These processes together constitute the physical history of the water. Many solutes in natural waters are derived from the interaction between the water and the rock and/or soil within the system - these are termed `lithogenic` solutes. The isotopic compositions of these solutes provide information regarding rock-water interactions. Many other solutes have their isotopic compositions determined both within and outside of the catchment - i.e., in addition to being derived from catchment rock and soil, they are solutes that are also transported into the catchment. Important members of this group include solutes that have isotopic compositions produced by atomic particle interactions with other nuclides. The source of the atomic particles can be cosmic radiation (producing `cosmogenic` nuclides in the atmosphere and land surface), anthropogenic nuclear reactions (producing `thermonuclear` nuclides), or radioactive and fission decay of naturally-occurring elements, principally {sup 238}U (producing `in-situ` lithogenic nuclides in the deep subsurface). Current language usage often combines all of the atomic particle-produced nuclides under the heading `cosmogenic nuclides`, and for simplicity we will often follow that usage here, although always indicating which variety is being discussed. This paper addresses the processes that affect the lithogenic and cosmogenic solute concentrations in catchment waters, and how the isotopic compositions of the solutes can be used in integrative ways to identify these processes, thereby revealing the physical history of the water within a catchment system. The concept of a `system` is important in catchment hydrology. A catchment is the smallest landscape unit that can both participate in all of the aspects of the hydrologic cycle and also be treated as a mostly closed system for mass balance considerations. It is the near closure of the system that permits well- constrained chemical mass balance calculations to be made. These calculations generally focus of lithogenic solutes, and therefore in our discussions of lithogenic nuclides in the paper, the concept of chemical mass balance in a nearly dosed system will play an important role. Examination of the isotopic compositions of solutes provides a better understanding of the variety of processes controlling mass balance. It is with this approach that we examined the variety of processes occurring within the catchment system, such as weathering and soil production, generation of stormflow and streamflow (hydrograph separation), movement of soil pore water, groundwater flow, and the overall processes involved with basinal water balance. In this paper, the term `nuclide` will be used when referring to a nuclear species that contains a particular number of protons and neutrons. The term is not specific to any element. The term `isotope` will be used to distinguish nuclear species of a given element (atoms with the same number of protons). That is to say, there are many nuclides in nature - for example, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 87}Sr, {sup 238}U; the element has four naturally-occurring isotopes - {sup 87}Sr, and {sup 88}Sr. This paper will first discuss the general principles that underlie the study of lithogenic and cosmogenic nuclides in hydrology, and provide references to some of the more important studies applying these principles and nuclides. We then turn in the second section to a discussion of their specific applications in catchment- scale systems. The final section of this paper discusses new directions in the application of lithogenic and cosmogenic nuclides to catchment hydrology, with some thoughts concerning possible applications that still remain unexplored.

Nimz, G. J., LLNL

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Romanian sources on applied mechanics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This note provides a list of journals and recent books published in Romania covering topics in applied mechanics, with information on bow to obtain them.

Popescu, M.E. [Civil Engineering Inst., Bucharest (Romania)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Water Management Strategies for Improved Coalbed Methane Production in the Black Warrior Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The modern coalbed methane industry was born in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama and has to date produced more than 2.6 trillion cubic feet of gas and 1.6 billion barrels of water. The coalbed gas industry in this area is dependent on instream disposal of co-produced water, which ranges from nearly potable sodium-bicarbonate water to hypersaline sodium-chloride water. This study employed diverse analytical methods to characterize water chemistry in light of the regional geologic framework and to evaluate the full range of water management options for the Black Warrior coalbed methane industry. Results reveal strong interrelationships among regional geology, water chemistry, and gas chemistry. Coalbed methane is produced from multiple coal seams in Pennsylvanian-age strata of the Pottsville Coal Interval, in which water chemistry is influenced by a structurally controlled meteoric recharge area along the southeastern margin of the basin. The most important constituents of concern in the produced water include chlorides, ammonia compounds, and organic substances. Regional mapping and statistical analysis indicate that the concentrations of most ionic compounds, metallic substances, and nonmetallic substances correlate with total dissolved solids and chlorides. Gas is effectively produced at pipeline quality, and the only significant impurity is N{sub 2}. Geochemical analysis indicates that the gas is of mixed thermogenic-biogenic origin. Stable isotopic analysis of produced gas and calcite vein fills indicates that widespread late-stage microbial methanogenesis occurred primarily along a CO{sub 2} reduction metabolic pathway. Organic compounds in the produced water appear to have helped sustain microbial communities. Ammonia and ammonium levels increase with total dissolved solids content and appear to have played a role in late-stage microbial methanogenesis and the generation of N{sub 2}. Gas production tends to decline exponentially, whereas water production tends to decline hyperbolically. Hyperbolic decline indicates that water volume is of greatest concern early in the life of a coalbed methane project. Regional mapping indicates that gas production is controlled primarily by the ability to depressurize permeable coal seams that are natively within the steep part of the adsorption isotherm. Water production is greatest within the freshwater intrusion and below thick Cretaceous cover strata and is least in areas of underpressure. Water management strategies include instream disposal, which can be applied effectively in most parts of the basin. Deep disposal may be applicable locally, particularly where high salinity limits the ability to dispose into streams. Artificial wetlands show promise for the management of saline water, especially where the reservoir yield is limited. Beneficial use options include municipal water supply, agricultural use, and industrial use. The water may be of use to an inland shrimp farming industry, which is active around the southwestern coalbed methane fields. The best opportunities for beneficial use are reuse of water by the coalbed methane industry for drilling and hydraulic fracturing. This research has further highlighted opportunities for additional research on treatment efficiency, the origin of nitrogen compounds, organic geochemistry, biogenic gas generation, flow modeling, and computer simulation. Results of this study are being disseminated through a vigorous technology transfer program that includes web resources, numerous presentations to stakeholders, and a variety of technical publications.

Pashin, Jack; McIntyre-Redden, Marcella; Mann, Steven; Merkel, David

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Geological Modeling of Dahomey and Liberian Basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eastern Ivory Coast, off Benin and western Nigeria, and off the Brazilian conjugates of these areas), while large areas were subjected to transform rifting (northern Sierra Leone, southern Liberia, Ghana and the Brazilian conjugates of these areas...). The future Demerara-Guinea marginal plateaus were also progressively subjected to this new rifting event. Stage 2: In Aptian times, the progress of rifting resulted in the creation of small divergent Basins (off northern Liberia, eastern Ivory Coast, Benin...

Gbadamosi, Hakeem B.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

285

The Climate of the South Platte Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://climate.atmos.colostate.edu #12;Key Features of the Climate of the South Platte Basin #12;Temperature Cold winters Hot summers of Rockies Daily Temperatures - Denver, CO Water Year 2001 -20 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Temperature(degF) High Low Ave High Ave Low #12;Humidity Low humidity

286

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Apr. 2008, p. 24242432 Vol. 74, No. 8 0099-2240/08/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.02341-07  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Methane-Producing Microbial Community in a Coal Bed of the Illinois Basin Dariusz Strapoc´,1 * Flynn W were performed to study microbial, coal bed methane formation in the eastern Illinois Basin. Results methanogenesis and the generation of large coal bed methane reserves. Small-subunit rRNA analysis of both

Macalady, Jenn

287

Exploration trends of the Sirte Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wave of intense exploration activity in the Sirte Basin began after the discovery of oil in 1958, and an enormous quantity of hydrocarbon was found in less than ten years. The oil discovery rate has been gradually declining since its peak in the 1960`s, and it is now becoming increasingly difficult and more expensive to find a new reserve. This paper is an attempt to discuss briefly the past exploration cycle, to indicate the present position and to predict the future trend of our activities in the Sirte Basin. The past exploration activities in the Sirte Basin were concentrated along the particular geological trends where the possibilities of finding more reserves are now drastically reduced. Therefore, for the future healthy exploration activities, new ideas are needed to bring about some new favourable areas under further investigation. A new cycle of exploration success will emerge if our exploratory efforts are purposely directed towards the stratigraphic, stratrigraphic/structural traps and subtle type traps, along the migrational pathways and deep plays in the potential oil generative areas.

Aburawi, R.M. [Waha Oil Co., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The Foundations of Applied Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Foundations of Applied Mathematics John Baez Category-Theoretic Foundations of Mathematics Workshop May 5, 2013 #12;We often picture the flow of information about mathematics a bit like this: SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING APPLIED MATHEMATICS PURE MATHEMATICS FOUNDATIONS OF MATHEMATICS #12;Of course

Baez, John

289

Journal of Applied Ecology 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Applied Ecology 2004 41, 922­933 © 2004 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing that might guide management decisions. We tested whether ideas from landscape ecology (local vs. landscape-scale, Sacramento River, succession, vegetation Journal of Applied Ecology (2004) 41, 922­933 Introduction More than

Holl, Karen

290

Detrital thermochronology of the Alpine foreland basin in Central Switzerland: Insights into tectonic and erosion history of the North Central Alps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study systematically integrates zircon U-Pb geochronology and (U-Th)/He low-temperature thermochronology to correlate the Northern Alpine Foreland Basin (NAFB) sediment provenance and the tectonic and thermal evolution of the thrust stack...

Miller, Joseph Christopher

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

Abdelghani, A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Seismic stratigraphy and structure of the Progreso Basin, Ecuador  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background Geologic Setting and Location Previous Work Stratigraphy of the Progreso Basin and Vicinity . . II METHODS Seismic Stratigraphic Analysis Magnetic Source Depth Determination III SEISMIC STRATIGRAPHY . Seismic Depositional Sequences Seismic... proliferation of names and e. ges for the same rocks and formations complicates correlation between basins. The origin of the basins is not clear and the previous concepts of the evolution of the region h''s tsesis ol ows the style and format of the Bulletin...

Goyes Arroyo, Patricio

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The geochemistry of uranium in the Orca Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

no uranium enrichment, with concentrations ranging from 2. 1 to 4. gppm, reflective of normal Gulf of Mexico sediments. This is the result of two dominant processes operating within the basin. First, the sharp pycnocline at the brine/seawater interface... . . . . . . . . , . . . , 37 xi Figure Page 16 Ores Basin Seismic Reflection Profile A 40 17 Ores Basin Seismic Reflection Profile B 42 18 Proposed Mechanism of Uranium Uptake in the Atlantis II Deep 59 INTRODUCTION Economic Status of Uranium in the United States...

Weber, Frederick Fewell

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Water Clarity Simulant for K East Basin Filtration Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a simulant formulation intended to mimic the behavior of the suspended solids in the K East (KE) Basin fuel storage pool. The simulant will be used to evaluate alternative filtration apparatus to improve Basin water clarity and to possibly replace the existing sandfilter. The simulant was formulated based on the simulant objectives, the key identified parameters important to filtration, the composition and character of the KE Basin suspended sludge particles, and consideration of properties of surrogate materials.

Schmidt, Andrew J.

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

295

Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Quarterly report, June 1--September 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil in place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. The majority of technical efforts during the first quarter have been concentrated on the Ordovician Red River formation in Bowman and Harding counties of North and South Dakota. The Cold Turkey Creek field area has been identified as the most suitable candidate for a 3-D seismic survey. Approximately 145 km of 1970`s and 1980`s vintage 2-D seismic data in Bowman county, N.D. have been cataloged for possible reprocessing. Reprocessing of these older data has been successful for 14 lines over 56 km. A 2-D seismic line has been shot over the SW Amor field area. This high-fold line is a prelude to 3-D survey design parameters and better understanding of a candidate Red River reservoir for testing water injectivity and possible unitization for secondary recovery by waterflooding. Seismic modeling of seismic shear response has begun for the Ratcliffe study area in Richland county, Montana. Secondary recovery operations by water injection and reservoir parameters have been studied by history matching using computer simulation at the West Buffalo Red River B Unit, Harding county, S.D. Results obtained from the West Buffalo history match were applied to a waterflood prediction by computer simulation for the SW Amor field. Reservoir performance parameters for volumetric drainage, transmissibility and water-drive index have been evaluated using Fetkovitch production type-curves for a sampling of Red River wells in N.D.

Not Available

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Identifying and Remediating High Water Production Problems in Basin-Centered Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through geochemical analyses of produced waters, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation we developed concepts and approaches for mitigating unwanted water production in tight gas reservoirs and for increasing recovery of gas resources presently considered noncommercial. Only new completion research (outside the scope of this study) will validate our hypothesis. The first task was assembling and interpreting a robust regional database of historical produced-water analyses to address the production of excessive water in basin-centered tight gas fields in the Greater Green (GGRB ) and Wind River basins (WRB), Wyoming. The database is supplemented with a sampling program in currently active areas. Interpretation of the regional water chemistry data indicates most produced waters reflect their original depositional environments and helps identify local anomalies related to basement faulting. After the assembly and evaluation phases of this project, we generated a working model of tight formation reservoir development, based on the regional nature and occurrence of the formation waters. Through an integrative approach to numerous existing reservoir concepts, we synthesized a generalized development scheme organized around reservoir confining stress cycles. This single overarching scheme accommodates a spectrum of outcomes from the GGRB and Wind River basins. Burial and tectonic processes destroy much of the depositional intergranular fabric of the reservoir, generate gas, and create a rock volume marked by extremely low permeabilities to gas and fluids. Stress release associated with uplift regenerates reservoir permeability through the development of a penetrative grain bounding natural fracture fabric. Reservoir mineral composition, magnitude of the stress cycle and local tectonics govern the degree, scale and exact mechanism of permeability development. We applied the reservoir working model to an area of perceived anomalous water production. Detailed water analyses, seismic mapping, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation indicate a lithologic and structural component to excessive in situ water permeability. Higher formation water salinity was found to be a good pay indicator. Thus spontaneous potential (SP) and resistivity ratio approaches combined with accurate formation water resistivity (Rw) information may be underutilized tools. Reservoir simulation indicates significant infill potential in the demonstration area. Macro natural fracture permeability was determined to be a key element affecting both gas and water production. Using the reservoir characterization results, we generated strategies for avoidance and mitigation of unwanted water production in the field. These strategies include (1) more selective perforation by improved pay determination, (2) using seismic attributes to avoid small-scale fault zones, and (3) utilizing detailed subsurface information to deliberately target optimally located small scale fault zones high in the reservoir gas column. Tapping into the existing natural fracture network represents opportunity for generating dynamic value. Recognizing the crucial role of stress release in the natural generation of permeability within tight reservoirs raises the possibility of manmade generation of permeability through local confining stress release. To the extent that relative permeabilities prevent gas and water movement in the deep subsurface a reduction in stress around a wellbore has the potential to increase the relative permeability conditions, allowing gas to flow. For this reason, future research into cavitation completion methods for deep geopressured reservoirs is recommended.

R.L. Billingsley

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

298

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2)...

299

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2)...

300

atacama basin northern: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tucker 2007-02-02 44 BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: of selected Tertiary coal beds...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Regional And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Range Province, Western North America- Evidence For Deep Permeable Pathways Abstract Fluids from the western margin of the Basin and Range have helium isotope ratios as high as...

302

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

303

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

304

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. W. Pritchett...

305

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

306

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

307

ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

Luther, Douglas S.

308

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

309

Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

310

M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The dynamics and physical processes of the Comoros Basin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Includes abstract. The main objective of this thesis was to investigate the circulation in the ComorosBasin using observed and model datasets. These data were used… (more)

Collins, Charine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Cold test data for equipment acceptance into 105-KE Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides acceptance testing of equipment to be installed in the 105-KE Basin for pumping sludge to support the discharge chute barrier doors installation.

Packer, M.J.

1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

314

atlantic basin etude: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rifian Corridor Utrecht, Universiteit 7 Prediction of Seasonal Atlantic Basin Accumulated Cyclone Energy from 1 July PHILIP J. KLOTZBACH Geosciences Websites Summary: Prediction of...

315

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

316

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin...

317

Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unknown References Glenn Biasi, Leiph Preston, Ileana Tibuleac (2009) Body Wave Tomography For Regional Scale Assessment Of Geothermal Indicators In The Western Great Basin...

318

Groundwater Availability Within the Salton Sea Basin Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that increasing demands for water in Southern California are being affected by actions to reduce and redirect the amount of water imported from the Colorado River. In the Imperial Valley region, for example, import reductions will not only affect agricultural users but also could produce significant collateral impacts on the level and quality of water in the Salton Sea, its regional ecology, or even the long term air quality in the greater basin. The notion of using groundwater in the Imperial Valley as an additional source for agricultural or domestic needs, energy production, or Salton Sea restoration efforts, so as to offset reductions in imported water, is not a new concept. Even though it has been discussed recently (e.g., LLNL, 2002), the idea goes back, in part, to several studies performed by the US Department of Interior and other agencies that have indicated that there may be substantial, usable amounts of groundwater in some portions of the Imperial Valley. It has been estimated, for example, that between 1.1 and 3 billion acre-feet (AF) of groundwater lie within the extended, deep basin underlying the valley and Salton Sea region, even though much of it may be unrecoverable or too poor in its quality (Imperial County, 1997). This is a significant volume with respect to the total annual precipitation volume received in California, whose average is close to 200 million (or 0.2 billion) AF per year (DWR, 1998), and especially with respect to the total annual precipitation received in the Salton Sea watershed itself, which we estimate (Appendix A) to be approximately 2.5 million acre feet (MAF) per year. Clearly, a thorough appraisal of the groundwater resources in the Imperial Valley and Salton Sea region--i.e., an assessment of their overall physical availability--will be needed to determine how they can be used and managed to suit new or redirected demands in the region. Development of an improved or updated groundwater assessment in the Salton Sea Basin is the subject of the project described in this report. Much of the project work was done in cooperation with the US Bureau of Reclamation, Lower Colorado Region Office ('Reclamation'), which manages the Salton Sea Restoration project for the US Department of the Interior, and complements other recent assessment efforts (e.g., Imperial County, 1995). In this context, the notion of groundwater availability is defined by four separate, but interrelated concepts or components: (1) Volume and Capacity--This refers to the volume of groundwater available in storage in (or the related storage capacity of) the sediments and geologic media that comprise a groundwater basin. The volume of groundwater in a basin will vary in time as a function of recharge, well production, and land subsidence. (2) Producibility--This refers to the ease or difficulty of extracting groundwater in a basin from wells. Groundwater producibility will be affected by well depth and the formation permeability surrounding the open intervals in wells. (3) Quality--This refers to the extent that water produced from wells is potable or otherwise suitable for domestic or other uses. It may also refer to the chemical compositions of groundwater that are unrelated to potability or suitability issues. Groundwater quality will be affected by its residence time and flow pathway in the formation and will also be influenced by the quality of its original source before entering the groundwater regime. (4) Renewability and Recharge--This refers to the extent that groundwater is recharged to the basin as part of the natural hydrologic cycle or other artificial means. Groundwater renewability is normally a function of recharge derived from precipitation (and thus a function of regional climate), but may also be affected in local areas by irrigation, leaking canals, aquifer storage and recovery operations, and so forth. Along with the other factors, renewability will strongly affect how much water can be safely produced from a basin from one year to the next. In this report, we specificall

Tompson, A; Demir, Z; Moran, J; Mason, D; Wagoner, J; Kollet, S; Mansoor, K; McKereghan, P

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

319

RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new exploration technology for basin center gas accumulations developed by R.C. Surdam and Associates at the Institute for Energy Research, University of Wyoming, was applied to the Riverton Dome 3-D seismic area. Application of the technology resulted in the development of important new exploration leads in the Frontier, Muddy, and Nugget formations. The new leads are adjacent to a major north-south trending fault, which is downdip from the crest of the major structure in the area. In a blind test, the drilling results from six new Muddy test wells were accurately predicted. The initial production values, IP, for the six test wells ranged from < one mmcf/day to four mmcf/day. The three wells with the highest IP values (i.e., three to four mmcf/day) were drilled into an intense velocity anomaly (i.e., anomalously slow velocities). The well drilled at the end of the velocity anomaly had an IP value of one mmcf/day, and the two wells drilled outside of the velocity anomaly had IP values of < one mmcf/day and are presently shut in. Based on these test results, it is concluded that the new IER exploration strategy for detecting and delineating commercial, anomalously pressured gas accumulation is valid in the southwestern portions of the Wind River Basin, and can be utilized to significantly reduce exploration risk and to increase profitability of so-called basin center gas accumulations.

Ronald C. Surdam; Zunsheng Jiao; Nicholas K. Boyd

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

E-Print Network 3.0 - austrian molasse basin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

basin Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stuwe a,*, H. Fritz a Summary: The El Mayah molasse basin in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the summer and fall of 2001 the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year study for the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Based on our studies in 2001, we concluded that: in general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set forth by the NMFS; most facilities efficiently protected juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, or migration delay; automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were well greased and operative; and removal of sediment build-up and accumulated leafy and woody debris are areas that continue to improve. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices. Continued periodic screen evaluations will increase the effectiveness of screen operation and maintenance practices by confirming the effectiveness (or ineffectiveness) of screen operating procedures at individual sites. Where procedures are being followed and problems still occur, evaluation results can be used to suggest means to better protect fish at screening facilities. There has been a progressive improvement in the maintenance and effectiveness of fish screen facilities in the Yakima River Basin during the last several years, in part, as a result of regular screen evaluations and the rapid feedback of information necessary to improve operations and design of these important fish protection devices.

Carter, J.A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Petrographic, geochemical, and paleohydrologic evidence of nature of petroleum migration in Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed studies of the petrography and geochemistry of petroleum source rocks, the geochemistry of petroleum accumulations, and the paleohydrology of the Illinois basin suggest an episode of long-range migration of Devonian-sourced petroleum during a period of regional ground water flow. Petrographic analyses of samples of the New Albany Shale group (Devonian/Mississippian) were used to define lateral and vertical variation in composition and thermal maturity of organic matter within the basin. These data delineate likely New Albany Shale group petroleum source areas. GC, GCMS, and carbon isotopic analyses of thermally mature New Albany Shale in southeastern Illinois and Silurian-reservoired petroleum samples from central Illinois were used in making oil-oil and oil-source rock correlations. These correlations indicate long-range lateral and downward cross-stratigraphic net migration. Compaction-driven and elevation head-driven ground-water flows within the basin were numerically modeled using available stratigraphic, structural, and hydrologic data. Calculations based on compaction-driven flow show the possibility of down-stratigraphic migration. Compaction-driven flow, however, cannot explain the amount of lateral transport inferred. Regional ground-water flow due to the uplift of the Pascola arch could explain the long-range lateral migration. Calculations of the effects of advective heat transport by elevation head-driven flow agree with estimates of temperatures made from fluid inclusions in basin mineralization.

Bethke, C.M.; Pruitt, J.D.; Barrows, M.H.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Volatile abundances in submarine glasses from the North Fiji and Lau back-arc basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Glasses from submarine lavas of the North Fiji and lau back-arc basins were analyzed by high-temperature mass spectrometry for volatiles. Abundances for H{sub 2}O, Cl, F, S and CO{sub 2} in glasses ranging in composition from depleted, primitive MORB to enriched, transitional tholeiites are reported. The samples divide into three groups based on K{sub 2}O vs. H{sub 2}O, Ba/Zr vs. H{sub 2}O and K{sub 2}O/H{sub 2}O vs. P{sub 2}O{sub 5}/H{sub 2}O variation diagrams. At similar Mg No., the least evolved samples studied are nearly identical to N-type MORB in H{sub 2}O abundances but show Cl contents enriched by a factor of 5. More enriched samples, classified as back-arc basin basalts (BABB) on the basis of major/trace elements and isotopes, are not as hydrous (at similar Mg No.) as those from the Mariana and East Scotia Sea back-arc basins. The data indicate that not all back-arc basins erupt lavas with the distinct volatile and other elemental characteristics of lavas from the Mariana Trough and Scotia Sea.

Aggrey, K.E.; Muenow, D.W.; Sinton, J.M. (Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu (USA))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Economic Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Powder River Basin Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unminable coalbeds are potentially large storage reservoirs for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and offer the benefit of enhanced methane production, which can offset some of the costs associated with CO2 sequestration. The objective of this paper is to study the economic feasibility of CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. Economic analyses of CO2 injection options are compared. Results show that injecting flue gas to recover methane from CBM fields is marginally economical; however, this method will not significantly contribute to the need to sequester large quantities of CO2. Separating CO2 from flue gas and injecting it into the unminable coal zones of the Powder River Basin seam is currently uneconomical, but can effectively sequester over 86,000 tons (78,200 tonne) of CO2 per acre while recovering methane to offset costs. The cost to separate CO2 from flue gas was identified as the major cost driver associated with CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams. Improvements in separations technology alone are unlikely to drive costs low enough for CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin to become economically viable. Breakthroughs in separations technology could aid the economics, but in the Powder River Basin they cannot achieve the necessary cost reductions for breakeven economics without incentives.

Eric P. Robertson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE 105K EAST BASIN ION EXCHANGE COLUMN MONOLITH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 105-K East (KE) Basin Ion Exchange Column (IXC) cells, lead caves, and the surrounding vault are to be removed as necessary components in implementing ''Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consert Order'' (Ecology et al. 2003) milestone M-034-32 (Complete Removal of the K East Basin Structure). The IXCs consist of six units located in the KE Basin, three in operating positions in cells and three stored in a lead cave. Methods to remove the IXCs from the KE Basin were evaluated in KBC-28343, ''Disposal of K East Basin Ion Exchange Column Evaluation''. The method selected for removal was grouting of the six IXCs into a single monolith for disposal at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). Grout will be added to the IXC cells, IXC lead caves containing spent IXCs, and in the spaces between to immobilize the contaminants, provide self-shielding, minimize void space, and provide a structurally stable waste form. The waste to be offered for disposal is the encapsulated monolith defined by the exterior surfaces of the vault and the lower surface of the underlying slab. This document presents a summary of the data quality objective (DQO) process establishing the decisions and data required to support decision-making activities for disposition of the IXC monolith. The DQO process is completed in accordance with the seven-step planning process described in EPA QA/G-4, ''Guidance for the Data Quality Objectives Process'', which is used to clarify and study objectives; define the appropriate type, quantity, and quality of data; and support defensible decision-making. The DQO process involves the following steps: (1) state the problem; (2) identify the decision; (3) identify the inputs to the decision; (4) define the boundaries of the study; (5) develop a decision rule (DR); (6) specify tolerable limits on decision errors; and (7) optimize the design for obtaining data.

JOCHEN, R.M.

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

Reservoir Characterization of the Lower Green River Formation, Southwest Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the study were to increase both primary and secondary hydrocarbon recovery through improved characterization (at the regional, unit, interwell, well, and microscopic scale) of fluvial-deltaic lacustrine reservoirs, thereby preventing premature abandonment of producing wells. The study will encourage exploration and establishment of additional water-flood units throughout the southwest region of the Uinta Basin, and other areas with production from fluvial-deltaic reservoirs.

Morgan, Craig D.; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; McClure, Kevin P.; Bereskin, S. Robert; Deo, Milind D.

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

328

Sustainable FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Working Together Towards a Sustainable Energy Future FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE Clean Energy aspects of sustainable energy solutions, and is committed to using its extensive expertise to serve, Electrical & Computer, Materials, Mechanical, Mining), the School of Architecture & Landscape Architecture

Michelson, David G.

329

temperature heat pumps applied to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very high- temperature heat pumps applied to energy efficiency in industry Application June 21th 2012 Energy efficiency : A contribution to environmental protection Kyoto Copenhage Emission, plastics Partnership : EDF R&D Bil

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

330

IIT SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT IIT SCHOOL OF APPLIED TECHNOLOGY PREPARING SKILLED INDIVIDUALS, INDUSTRIAL FACILITIES, SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT, SUSTAINABILITY AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY. #12;BE ONE to assess, implement, and utilize current technologies, and to learn how to manage industrial operations

Heller, Barbara

331

Modeling applied to problem solving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a modeling approach to help students learn expert problem solving. Models are used to present and hierarchically organize the syllabus content and apply it to problem solving, but students do not develop and ...

Pawl, Andrew

332

8 River Basin Closure and Institutional Change in Mexico's LermaChapala Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for irrigation expansion, and the drilling of new wells and the construction of new dams has been prohibited. Moreover, water pollution is serious, with significant wastewater reuse for irrigation within the basin. Lastly, water is being transferred from agriculture to the urban and industrial sectors, without due

Scott, Christopher

333

Basin analog approach answers characterization challenges of unconventional gas potential in frontier basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

…………………………………………………. 7.2 Conclusions ………………………………………………. 7.3 Recommendations ………………………………………... REFERENCES …………………………………………………………………… APPENDICES A DATABASE TABLES AND FIELDS AND THEIR DEFINITIONS…… B ANALOG PARAMETERS AND THEIR CLASSES ……..…………….. C VALIDATION... ………………………………………………………… LIST OF FIGURES ……………………………………………………………… LIST OF TABLES ……………………………………………………………….. CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION ……………………………………………….. 1.1 Unconventional Resources ……………………………….. 1.2 The Basin Analog Method of Evaluation ……….……….. 1.3...

Singh, Kalwant

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

334

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r{sup 2}=0.95) and gas content (r{sup 2}=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. [Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r[sup 2]=0.95) and gas content (r[sup 2]=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. (Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Baroclinic tides in an axially symmetric basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energetics Returning to the governing equations (66) through (6&7) and multiplving (66) by phu?, (66) by phv?, and (67) by php?gives the result; phu?? f v?~ ? ~ ~ p S? m=O 0(, = phu?g h?o, c3 T f&hv?g o'j r SH (96) (96) aud ap? 1 a I au? I ~ ah.... Rowe (Head of Department) December 1989 ABSTRACT Baroclinic Tides in an Axially Symmetric Basin. (December 1989) Edward Paul Dever. B. S. , Texas Ag-XI University Chair ol' Advisory Committee: Prof. Robert 0. Reid A. coupled normal mode model...

Dever, Edward Paul

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

337

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHi Gtel Jump to:County,1143807°,Hilltop,Hinsdale Wave Basin 1

338

Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHi Gtel Jump to:County,1143807°,Hilltop,Hinsdale Wave Basin 1

339

Sediment Basin Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton AbbeyA JumpSeagoville,Secret EnergySediment Basin

340

Sheets Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd Jump to: navigation, search|Sewaren,ShanghaiSheets Wave Basin Jump to:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Great Basin Consortium | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCostAnalysisTweet us! | Department ofas a FeedstockGreat Basin

342

Basin Scale Opportunity Assessment | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope ChangeL-01-06Hot-Humid-Basic Energy SciencesBasicBasin

343

Summary - K Basins Sludge Treatment Process  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational EnergyCommittee onGASRainey STAR Center | ETR-19 UnitedK Basin

344

Hydrological cycle in the Danube basin in present-day and XXII century simulations by IPCCAR4 global climate models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the highest annual precipitation (1000­3200 mm per year) while the Vienna basin, the Pannonian basin, Romanian

Lucarini, Valerio

345

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

E-Print Network 3.0 - araripe basin north-eastern Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- cantly to our understanding of the structural geology, basin evolution, and tectonic history... our structural and tectonic database. It is now clear that these basins are...

347

Famennian microbial reef facies, Napier and Oscar Ranges, Canning Basin, western Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geol. Rundsch. , Western Australia: Geologic Maps of theof the Canning basin, Western Australia. West. Aust. Geol.the Canning Basin, Western Australia. In: Stromatolites (Ed.

Stephens, N P; Sumner, Dawn Y.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

E-Print Network 3.0 - area tarim basin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and evolution of the basin. Xinjiang... the western Tarim Basin and implications for inclination shallowing and absolute dating of the M-0 (ISEA... of shortening taken up...

349

E-Print Network 3.0 - artesian basins Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Station 3 - The Fall Line... . open space mineral resource operations (flooded quarries or pits) ost recharge area groundwater basins... , interbasin, groundwater basins VI....

350

National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants application for approval to stabilize the 105N Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces-to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin is a reinforced unlined concrete structure 150 feet long, 50 feet wide, and 24 feet deep. The basin is segregated into seven areas sharing a common pool of water; the Discharge/Viewing (``D``) Pit, the fuel segregation pit (including a water tunnel that connects the ``D`` pit and segregation pit), two storage basins designated as North Basin and South Basin, two cask load-out pits, and a fuel examination area. The North Basin floor is entirely covered and the South Basin is partly covered by a modular array of cubicles formed by boron concrete posts and boron concrete panels.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

E-Print Network 3.0 - active single basin Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

basins... ) existed during the Late Oligocene and Miocene when the rift basins of Thailand were active because active... into three main areas and tec- tonic provinces: 1)...

352

Evaluation of Ion Exchange Materials in K Basin Floor Sludge and Potential Solvents for PCB Extraction from Ion Exchange Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 73 m{sup 3} of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. These small amounts are significant from a regulatory standpoint. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). Chemical pretreatment is required to address criticality issues and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Eleven technologies have been evaluated (Papp 1997) as potential pretreatment methods. Based on the evaluations and engineering studies and limited testing, Fluor Daniel Hanford recommended solvent washing of the K Basin sludge, followed by nitric acid dissolution and, potentially, peroxide addition (FDH 1997). The solvent washing (extraction) and peroxide addition would be used to facilitate PCB removal and destruction. Following solvent extraction, the PCBs could be distilled and concentrated for disposal as a low-level waste. The purpose of the work reported here was to continue investigating solvent extraction, first by better identifying the ion exchange materials in the actual sludge samples and then evaluating various solvents for removing the PCBs or possibly dissolving the resins. This report documents some of the process knowledge on ion exchange materials used and spilled in the K Basins and describes the materials identified from wet sieving KE Basin floor and canister sludge and the results of other analyses. Several photographs are included to compare materials and illustrate material behavior. A summary of previous tests on solvent extraction of PCB surrogates from simulant K Basin sludge is also given.

Schmidt, A.J.; Klinger, G.S.; Bredt, P.R.

1999-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

353

PALEOZOIC TRACE FOSSILS FROM THE KUFRA BASIN, LIBYA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PALEOZOIC TRACE FOSSILS FROM THE KUFRA BASIN, LIBYA BRIAN R. TURNER AND MICHAEL J. BENTONPaleozoicsuccessionin the southeastern part ofthe Kufra Basin, Libya, comprises a sequence of sedimentary facies up to 250 m thick THEK u m BASINin southeast Libya (Figure 1)occupiesan area of about 400,000km2and is filled

Benton, Michael

354

Economic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Petroleum Evaluation Engineers (SPEE) parameters for evaluating Resource Plays 53 Appendix C: Detailed Play to traditional economic impacts, this report includes a petroleum engineering-based analysis that providesEconomic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry #12;The Economic Impact of the Permian Basin's Oil

Zhang, Yuanlin

355

Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

- W - W W W - W Central Appalachian Basin Alabama 26.18 26.10 -0.3% 118.06 22.1% 930 37.4% 100.0% Central Appalachian Basin Delaware 23.73 15.12 -36.3% 88.59 17.1%...

356

Structural evolution and petroleum productivity of the Baltic basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Baltic basin is an oval depression located in the western part of the Russian craton; it occupies the eastern Baltic Sea and adjacent onshore areas. The basin contains more than 5,000 m of sedimentary rocks ranging from latest Proterozoic to Tertiary in age. These rocks consist of four tectonostratigraphic sequences deposited during major tectonic episodes of basin evolution. Principal unconformities separate the sequences. The basin is underlain by a rift probably filled with Upper Proterozoic rocks. Vendian and Lower Cambrian rocks (Baikalian sequence) form two northeast-trending depressions. The principal stage of the basin development was during deposition of a thick Middle Cambrian-Lower Devonian (Caledonian) sequence. This stage was terminated by the most intense deformations in the basin history. The Middle Devonian-Carboniferous (Hercynian) and Permian-Tertiary (Kimmerian-Alpine) tectonic and depositional cycles only slightly modified the basin geometry and left intact the main structural framework of underlying rocks. The petroleum productivity of the basin is related to the Caledonian tectonostratigraphic sequence that contains both source rocks and reservoirs. However, maturation of source rocks, migration of oil, and formation of fields took place mostly during deposition of the Hercynian sequence.

Ulmishek, G.F. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

THE HISTORICAL YOLO BASIN What parts make the whole?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE HISTORICAL YOLO BASIN LANDSCAPE What parts make the whole? Alison Whipple San Francisco Estuary The spatial and temporal variability of the Delta reflected fluvial-tidal interaction #12;YOLO BASIN NORTHEAST prevalent at the north end and along Miner Slough..." - Mellin 1918 North End Liberty Island Yolo By Pass

358

Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins Francisco Cabo Katrin cause environmental damage in the donor basin. The recipient faces a trade-off between paying the price of the irrigated soil, or demand for water for highly productive activities like tourism), then the existence

Boyer, Edmond

359

INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Gas potential of new Albany shale (Devonian-Mississippian) in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study to update and evaluate publicly available data relating to present and potential gas production from New Albany Shale in the Illinois basin was conducted cooperatively by the Indiana. Illinois, and Kentucky geological surveys (Illinois Basin Consortium), and was partially funded by the Gas Research Institute. Deliverables included a plate of stratigraphic cross sections and six basin-wide maps at a scale of 1:1,000,000. The New Albany Shale is an organic-rich brownish black shale present throughout the Illinois basin. Gas potential of the New Albany Shale may be great because it contains an estimated 86 tcf of natural gas and has produced modest volumes since 1858 from more than 60 fields, mostly in the southeastern part of the basin. Reservoir beds include organic-rich shales of the Grassy Creek (Shale), Clegg Creek, and Blocher (Shale) members. Limited geologic and carbon isotope data indicate that the gas is indigenous and thermogenic. T[sub max] data suggest that the gas generation begins at R[sub o] values of 0.53% and may begin at R[sub 0] values as low as 0.41% in some beds. New Albany Shale reservoirs contain both free gas in open-pore space and gas adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces. Natural fracturing is essential for effective reservoir permeability. Fractures are most common near structures such as faults, flexures, and buried carbonate banks. Based on limited data, fractures and joints have preferred orientations of 45-225[degrees] and 135-315[degrees]. Commercial production requires well stimulation to connect the well bore with the natural fracture system and to prop open pressure-sensitive near-borehole fractures. Current stimulations employ hydraulic fracture treatments using nitrogen and foam, with sand as a propping agent.

Comer, J.B.; Hasenmueller, N.R. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington, IN (United States)); Frankie, W.T. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington, KY (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Regional-scale flow of formation waters in the Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Williston basin is a structurally simple intracratonic sedimentary basin that straddles the United States-Canada border east of the Rocky Mountains and that contains an almost continuous stratigraphic record since the Middle Cambrian. Based on the wealth of data generated by the oil industry, the regional-scale characteristics of the flow of formation waters were analyzed for the Canadian side of the basin, and integrated with previous studies performed on the American side. Several aquifers and aquifer systems identified in the basin were separated by intervening aquitards and aquicludes. The Basal, Devonian, and Mannville (Dakota) aquifers are open systems, being exposed at the land surface in both recharge and discharge areas. Recharge takes place in the west-southwest at relatively high altitude in the Bighorn and Big Snowy mountains and at the Black Hills and Central Montana uplifts, whereas discharge takes place in the east and northeast at outcrop along the Canadian Precambrian shield in Manitoba and the Dakotas. The Mississippian and Pennsylvanian aquifer systems are semi-open, cropping out only in the west-southwest where they recharge, but discharging in the northeast into adjacent aquifers through confining aquitards. On regional and geological scales, the entire system seems to be at steady-state, although locally transient flow is present in places due to water use and hydrocarbon exploitation, and to some erosional rebound in the uppermost confining shales. On the western flank of the basin, the interplay between the northeastward structural downdip direction and the northeastward flow of formation waters creates conditions favorable for hydrodynamic oil entrapment.

Bachu, S. [Alberta Department of Energy, Edmonton (Canada); Hitchon, B. [Hitchion Geochemical Services Ltd., Alberta (Canada)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing, vertical, field wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the third project year (April 6 through October 5, 2002). This work included capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and pore casting on selected samples from Cherokee and Bug fields, Utah. The diagenetic fabrics and porosity types found at these fields are indicators of reservoir flow capacity, storage capacity, and potential for enhanced oil recovery via horizontal drilling. The reservoir quality of Cherokee and Bug fields has been affected by multiple generations of dissolution, anhydrite plugging, and various types of cementation which act as barriers or baffles to fluid flow. The most significant diagenetic characteristics are microporosity (Cherokee field) and micro-boxwork porosity (Bug field), as shown from porethroat radii histograms, and saturation profiles generated from the capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, and identified by scanning electron microscopy and pore casting. These porosity types represent important sites for untapped hydrocarbons and primary targets for horizontal drilling. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the Rocky Mountain Section meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, and publications. The project home page was updated for the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Depositional and dissolutional processes and their resulting thinning patterns within the Middle Devonian Prairie Formation, Williston basin, North Dakota and Montana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the Williston basin, thickness variations of the Prairie Formation are common and are interpreted to originate by two processes: differential accumulation of salt during deposition and differential removal of salt by dissolution. Unambiguous evidence for each process is rare because the Prairie/Winnipegosis interval is seldom cored within the US portion of the basin. Therefore, indirect methods, using well logs, provide the principal method for identifying characteristics of the two processes. The results of this study indicate that the two processes can be distinguished using correlations within the Prairie Formation. Several regionally correlative brining-upward and probably shoaling-upward sequences occur within the Prairie Formation. Near the basin center, the lowermost sequence is transitional with the underlying Winnipegosis Formation. This transition is characterized by thinly laminated basal carbonates that become increasingly interbedded with anhydrites of the basin-centered Ratner member. The remainder of the sequence progresses up through halite and culminates in the halite-dominated Esterhazy potash beds. Two overlying sequences also brine upward; however, these sequences lack the basal anhydrite and instead begin with halite and culminate in the Belle Plaine and Mountrail potash members, respectively. A fourth sequence is indicated by several feet of halite capping the Mountrail member in some parts of the basin. Subsequent erosion or dissolution prior to burial may have removed the upper portion of this sequence. Cross sections show that the lower Prairie gradually decreases in thickness from the basin to its margins. This thickens variation is most simply explained by decreasing accommodation potential due to decreased basin topography away from the basin depocenter and by depositional onlap of the Prairie toward the basin margins.

Oglesby, C.A.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Corrosion of aluminum alloys in a reactor disassembly basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document discusses storage of aluminum clad fuel and target tubes of the Mark 22 assembly takes place in the concrete-lined, light-water-filled, disassembly basins located within each reactor area at the Savannah River Site (SRS). A corrosion test program has been conducted in the K-Reactor disassembly basin to assess the storage performance of the assemblies and other aluminum clad components in the current basin environment. Aluminum clad alloys cut from the ends of actual fuel and target tubes were originally placed in the disassembly water basin in December 1991. After time intervals varying from 45--182 days, the components were removed from the basin, photographed, and evaluated metallographically for corrosion performance. Results indicated that pitting of the 8001 aluminum fuel clad alloy exceeded the 30-mil (0.076 cm) cladding thickness within the 45-day exposure period. Pitting of the 1100 aluminum target clad alloy exceeded the 30-mil (0.076 cm) clad thickness in 107--182 days exposure. The existing basin water chemistry is within limits established during early site operations. Impurities such as Cl{sup {minus}}, NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and SO{sub 4}{sup {minus}} are controlled to the parts per million level and basin water conductivity is currently 170--190 {mu}mho/cm. The test program has demonstrated that the basin water is aggressive to the aluminum components at these levels. Other storage basins at SRS and around the US have successfully stored aluminum components for greater than ten years without pitting corrosion. These basins have impurity levels controlled to the parts per billion level (1000X lower) and conductivity less than 1.0 {mu}mho/cm.

Howell, J.P.; Zapp, P.E.; Nelson, D.Z.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for the 105N Basin Stabilization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations.

Coenenberg, E.T. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Basin configuration and depositional trends in the Mission Canyon and Ratcliffe beds, U.S. portion of the Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Construction of Mission Canyon and Ratcliffe depositional trends utilizing shoreline models and anhydrite edge maps shows a significant change in basin configuration associated with regional sea level changes. Sea level highstand, which began during deposition of the Scallion member of the Lodgepole Formation, was punctuated by two lowstand events. The first occurred during deposition of the MC-2 anhydrite (Tilston). During this lowstand event, the width of the carbonate basin decreased significantly. With sea level rise, a broad basin formed with carbonate and evaporate ramp deposition (Lands, Wayne, Glenburn and Mohall members). The top of the Mohall contains evidence of the second lowstand event. This event introduced quartz sand detritus into the basin (Kisbey Sandstone). Because of sea level lowstand, Sherwood and younger Mission Canyon beds were deposited during highstand in a narrower carbonate basin. Funneling of marine currents and tides in this basin created higher energy shoreline and shoal deposits than those commonly found in older Mission Canyon sediments. The top of the Mission Canyon (Rival) was capped by a deepening event or transgression which enlarged the basin and created broad Ratcliffe ramp systems similar to those that existed during Glenburn and Mohall deposition. By utilizing sequence stratigraphy and mapping shoreline trends and basin configuration, reservoir and trap geometries are identified, and exploration success is improved.

Hendricks, M.L. [Hendricks and Associates, Inc., Englewood, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Evaluating Wetland Restoration Projects in the Columbia River Estuary using Hydroacoustic Telemetry Arrays to Estimate Movement, Survival, and Residence Times of Juvenile Salmonids, Volume XXII (22).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wetlands in the Columbia River estuary are actively being restored by reconnecting these habitats to the estuary, making more wetland habitats available to rearing and migrating juvenile salmon. Concurrently, thousands of acoustically tagged juvenile salmonids are released into the Columbia River to estimate their survival as they migrate through the estuary. Here, we develop a release-recapture model that makes use of these tagged fish to measure the success of wetland restoration projects in terms of their contribution to populations of juvenile salmon. Specifically, our model estimates the fraction of the population that enter the wetland, survival within the wetland, and the mean residence time of fish within the wetland. Furthermore, survival in mainstem Columbia River downstream of the wetland can be compared between fish that remained the mainstem and entered the wetland. These conditional survival estimates provide a means of testing whether the wetland improves the subsequent survival of juvenile salmon by fostering growth or improving their condition. Implementing such a study requires little additional cost because it takes advantage of fish already released to estimate survival through the estuary. Thus, such a study extracts the maximum information at minimum cost from research projects that typically cost millions of dollars annually.

Perry, Russell W.; Skalski, John R.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

The Landscape of Klamath Basin Rock Art  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Lines: Ethnographic Sources and Rock Art Interpretationwhen applying these sources toward rock art interpretation.information source for developing rock art interpretations.

David, Robert James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

apply skills & experience build skills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

senior apply skills & experience junior build skills sophomore research & execute freshman explore options1 2 3 4 s u p p o r t4-year career action plan parent about the center for career development Remind your student that it is never too soon or too late to seek an internship or summer job. build

Alvarez, Pedro J.

370

APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLIED MATHEMATICS AND SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING Brijuni, Croatia June 23{27, 2003. y x Runge's example; Organized by: Department of Mathematics, Unversity of Zagreb, Croatia. Miljenko Maru#20;si#19;c, chairman;simir Veseli#19;c Andro Mikeli#19;c Sponsors: Ministry of Science and Technology, Croatia, CV Sistemi d

Rogina, Mladen

371

California Energy Commission Apply Today!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Flyer Public Programs Office (916) 654-4147 pubprog@energy.state.ca.us June 2006 #12;DON'T MISS electricity usage by about 30 percent. Electricity Savings: 2,262,207 kWh Demand Savings: 575 kW EnergyCalifornia Energy Commission Apply Today! "The college is using cutting edge on- site generation

372

APPLIED THERMAL ENGINEERING Manuscript Draft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the heat pump from the grid during the two hours of electrical peak power · Design of a new heat exchangerAPPLIED THERMAL ENGINEERING Manuscript Draft TITLE: Experimental assessment of a PCM to air heat This paper presents a heat exchanger prototype containing PCM material designed to provide a 1kW heating

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

373

Journal of Applied Ecology 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

herbivores provide goods and income to rural communities, have major impacts on land use and habitats-Bianchet REVIEW The management of wild large herbivores to meet economic, conservation and environmental is applied to their management across the globe. To be effective, however, management has to be science

Festa-Bianchet, Marco

374

Journal of Applied Ecology 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Applied Ecology 2006 43, 377­384 © 2006 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2006 British Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd METHODOLOGICAL INSIGHTS Point transect sampling with traps, Etive House, Beechwood Park, Inverness IV2 3BW, UK Summary 1. The ability to monitor abundance of animal

Thomas, Len

375

Applied Sustainability Political Science 319  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Applied Sustainability Political Science 319 College of Charleston Spring 2013 Day/Time: TH 1 Address: fisherb@cofc.edu Office: 284 King Street, #206 (Office of Sustainability) Office Hours: by appt sustainability. It will focus on the development of semester-long sustainability projects, from conception

Young, Paul Thomas

376

The ending of an era: After more than 10 years, the Rio Grande Basin Initiative concludes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: #29;) irrigation district studies; #31;) irrigation education and training; #28;) institutional incentives for e#23;cient water use; #25;) on-farm irrigation system management; #26;) urban water conservation; #14;) environment, ecology and water... and predicted population growth will continue to strain limited water supplies both for agricultural irrigation and urban water consumption. In #31;#30;#30;#29; the E#28;cient Irrigation for Water Conservation in the Rio Grande Basin initiative, also known...

Kalisek, Danielle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Feasibility report on criticality issues associated with storage of K Basin sludge in tanks farms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This feasibility study provides the technical justification for conclusions about K Basin sludge storage options. The conclusions, solely based on criticality safety considerations, depend on the treatment of the sludge. The two primary conclusions are, (1) untreated sludge must be stored in a critically safe storage tank, and (2) treated sludge (dissolution, precipitation and added neutron absorbers) can be stored in a standard Double Contained Receiver Tank (DCRT) or 241-AW-105 without future restrictions on tank operations from a criticality safety perspective.

Vail, T.S.

1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

378

Tectonostratigraphic evolution of the Late Cretaceous Middle Eocene Haymana sedimentary Basin, Central Anatolia, Turkey.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Central Anatolia, Turkey. S Nairn1 , A H F Robertson1 , M Hempton2 and UC �nlügenç3 1 Grant Institute Shell UK 3 �ukurova Universitesi, Jeoloji Mühendisii Bölümü, Balcali, Adana, Turkey Steve of a study of the Late Cretaceous-Middle Eocene Haymana Basin in central Turkey. Based on detailed logging

379

Characterization of Miocene-Pliocene carbonate platforms, southern Southwest Palawan Basin, Philippines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possible without this program. I am indebted to the Philippine Department of Energy, its management and staff, for their approval and support to the CCOP-TAMU Fellowship Program. I also thank Shell Philippines Exploration B.V. for their cooperation. I... ??????????? 6 3 Location map of wells used in this study ?????????????? 7 4 Summary of the extrusion model?????????????..???? 14 5 South China Sea basin and surrounding areas ???????????? 17 6 Structural and tectonic framework of Southwest Palawan...

Sta. Ana, Ma. Corazon Victor

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

380

Hydrogeologic investigations based on drill-stem test data: Palo Duro Basin Area, Texas and New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Drill-stem test (DST) data were compiled from wildcat wells and DOE-sponsored wells in the Palo Duro Basin area of Texas and New Mexico. The data were used to construct pressure-depth diagrams and to map regional potentiometric surfaces, based on equivalent freshwater heads calculated from initial shut-in pressures of the Wolfcamp and Pennsylvanian brine aquifers, the two regionally important deep-basin aquifers downgradient of the proposed repository host rock. Eighty percent of the 5502 DSTs were screened from the data base containing DST data from various deep-basin geologic units because they did not comply with shut-in time and shut-in pressure agreement criteria. After screening, three sets of pressure-depth diagrams and potentiometric surfaces were constructed, corresponding to three levels of data refinement. These results indicate the possible need for more data from an areally extended study area.

Bair, E.S.; O'Donnell, T.P.; Picking, L.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Variability of geochemical properties in a microbially dominated coalbed gas system from the eastern margin of the Illinois Basin, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study outlines gas characteristics along the southeastern margins of the Illinois Basin and evaluates regional versus local gas variations in Seelyville and Springfield coal beds. Our findings suggest that high permeability and shallow (100–250 m) depths of these Indiana coals allowed inoculation with methanogenic microbial consortia, thus leading to widespread microbial methane generation along the eastern marginal part of the Illinois Basin. Low maturity coals in the Illinois Basin with a vitrinite reflectance Ro~0.6% contain significant amounts of coal gas (~3 m3/t, 96 scf/t) with ?97 vol.% microbial methane. The amount of coal gas can vary significantly within a coal seam both in a vertical seam section as well as laterally from location to location. Therefore sampling of an entire core section is required for accurate estimates of coal gas reserves.

Strapoc, D.; Mastalerz, M.; Schimmelmann, A.; Drobniak, A.; Hedges, S.W.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

382

Particle Size (Sieving) and Enthalpy (Acid Calorimetry) Analysis of Single-Pull K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses particle size and calorimetry analyses performed on single-pull sludge samples collected from the Hanford K East Basin floor and pits. This study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of the baseline sludge management plan, which calls for the sludge to be packaged, shipped and stored at T Plant in the Hanford 200 West Area until final processing as a future date. These analyses were needed to better understand the K Basin sludge inventory and chemical reactivity.

Bredt, Paul R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Delegard, Calvin H. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Schmidt, Andrew J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Silvers, Kurt L. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Thornton, Brenda M. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Gano, Sue (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

BASIN-CENTERED GAS SYSTEMS OF THE U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The USGS is re-evaluating the resource potential of basin-centered gas accumulations in the U.S. because of changing perceptions of the geology of these accumulations, and the availability of new data since the USGS 1995 National Assessment of United States oil and gas resources (Gautier et al., 1996). To attain these objectives, this project used knowledge of basin-centered gas systems and procedures such as stratigraphic analysis, organic geochemistry, modeling of basin thermal dynamics, reservoir characterization, and pressure analysis. This project proceeded in two phases which had the following objectives: Phase I (4/1998 through 5/1999): Identify and describe the geologic and geographic distribution of potential basin-centered gas systems, and Phase II (6/1999 through 11/2000): For selected systems, estimate the location of those basin-centered gas resources that are likely to be produced over the next 30 years. In Phase I, we characterize thirty-three (33) potential basin-centered gas systems (or accumulations) based on information published in the literature or acquired from internal computerized well and reservoir data files. These newly defined potential accumulations vary from low to high risk and may or may not survive the rigorous geologic scrutiny leading towards full assessment by the USGS. For logistical reasons, not all basins received the level of detail desired or required.

Marin A. Popov; Vito F. Nuccio; Thaddeus S. Dyman; Timothy A. Gognat; Ronald C. Johnson; James W. Schmoker; Michael S. Wilson; Charles Bartberger

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The geohistory of the North Louisiana Salt Basin is comparable to the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin with the major difference being the elevated heat flow the strata in the North Louisiana Salt Basin experienced in the Cretaceous due primarily to reactivation of upward movement, igneous activity, and erosion associated with the Monroe and Sabine Uplifts. Potential undiscovered reservoirs in the North Louisiana Salt Basin are Triassic Eagle Mills sandstone and deeply buried Upper Jurassic sandstone and limestone. Potential underdeveloped reservoirs include Lower Cretaceous sandstone and limestone and Upper Cretaceous sandstone.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

385

Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

386

Petroleum systems of the Southwest Caspian Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southwest Caspian Basin, located in offshore Azerbaijan, contains significant accumulations of oil and gas in Upper Tertiary siliciclastic sediments. The central basin contains up to 25 km of sediments. The relatively low geothermal gradients and low degree of compaction from rapid burial provide favorable conditions or the retention of hydrocarbons at relatively great depths. A variety of structural styles occur, ranging from anticlinal folds to monoclines, with various degrees of reverse faulting and brecciation. Molecular characterization of selected oil samples indicate most of the oils have been sourced form the same or similar facies; a Tertiary Type II, slightly calcareous, marine clastic facies. Insufficient organic-rich rocks are available for a reliable oil-source correlation. Examination of oil molecular characteristics, oil-oil correlations, molecular characteristics of key stratigraphic horizons, paleofacies maps, maturation, and potential migration pathways suggest the oil was not syngenetic but most likely sourced from deeper Oligo-Miocene or older marine shales. Compositional data for a single offshore gas sample suggest the gas is a mixture of low maturity Type III and biogenic. A multi-stage model of hydrocarbon emplacement for evolving structural traps has been postulated. The first phase of emplacement occurred in the Middle Pliocene when tectonic movement and significant subsidence initiated early trap/reservoir formation, migration, and hydrocarbon generation. Late Quaternary tectonic activity lead to the replenishment of older depleted traps, additional hydrocarbons for enhanced traps, and charging of new traps. In addition, late tectonic activity caused extensive redistribution of hydrocarbon accumulations, degassing due to breached faults, and destruction of selected oil pools.

Abrams, M.A.; Narimanov, A.A. [State Oil Company of Azerbaijan, Baku (Azerbaijan)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

sRecovery Act: Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO2 Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on evaluating the feasibility and suitability of using the Jurassic/Triassic (J/TR) sediments of the South Georgia Rift basin (SGR) for CO2 storage in southern South Carolina and southern Georgia The SGR basin in South Carolina (SC), prior to this project, was one of the least understood rift basin along the east coast of the U.S. In the SC part of the basin there was only one well (Norris Lightsey #1) the penetrated into J/TR. Because of the scarcity of data, a scaled approach used to evaluate the feasibility of storing CO2 in the SGR basin. In the SGR basin, 240 km (~149 mi) of 2-D seismic and 2.6 km2 3-D (1 mi2) seismic data was collected, process, and interpreted in SC. In southern Georgia 81.3 km (~50.5 mi) consisting of two 2-D seismic lines were acquired, process, and interpreted. Seismic analysis revealed that the SGR basin in SC has had a very complex structural history resulting the J/TR section being highly faulted. The seismic data is southern Georgia suggest SGR basin has not gone through a complex structural history as the study area in SC. The project drilled one characterization borehole (Rizer # 1) in SC. The Rizer #1 was drilled but due to geologic problems, the project team was only able to drill to 1890 meters (6200 feet) instead of the proposed final depth 2744 meters (9002 feet). The drilling goals outlined in the original scope of work were not met. The project was only able to obtain 18 meters (59 feet) of conventional core and 106 rotary sidewall cores. All the conventional core and sidewall cores were in sandstone. We were unable to core any potential igneous caprock. Petrographic analysis of the conventional core and sidewall cores determined that the average porosity of the sedimentary material was 3.4% and the average permeability was 0.065 millidarcy. Compaction and diagenetic studies of the samples determined there would not be any porosity or permeability at depth in SC. In Georgia there appears to be porosity in the J/TR section based on neutron log porosity values. The only zones in Rizer #1 that appear to be porous were fractured diabase units where saline formation water was flowing into the borehole. Two geocellular models were created for the SC and GA study area. Flow simulation modeling was performed on the SC data set. The injection simulation used the newly acquired basin data as well as the Petrel 3-D geologic model that included geologic structure. Due to the new basin findings as a result of the newly acquired data, during phase two of the modeling the diabase unit was used as reservoir and the sandstone units were used as caprock. Conclusion are: 1) the SGR basin is composed of numerous sub-basins, 2) this study only looked at portions of two sub-basins, 3) in SC, 30 million tonnes of CO2 can be injected into the diabase units if the fracture network is continuous through the units, 4) due to the severity of the faulting there is no way of assuring the injected CO2 will not migrate upward into the overlying Coastal Plain aquifers, 5) in Georgia there appears to porous zones in the J/TR sandstones, 6) as in SC there is faulting in the sub-basin and the seismic suggest the faulting extends upward into the Coastal Plain making that area not suitable for CO2 sequestration, 7) the complex faulting observed at both study areas appear to be associated with transfer fault zones (Heffner 2013), if sub-basins in the Georgia portion of the SGR basin can be located that are far away from the transfer fault zones there is a strong possibility of sequestering CO2 in these areas, and 9) the SGR basin covers area in three states and this project only studied two small areas so there is enormous potential for CO2 sequestration in other portions the basin and further research needs to be done to find these areas.

Waddell, Michael

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Regional aquifers and petroleum in Williston Basin region of US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At least five major aquifers underlie the northern Great Plains of the US, which includes parts of the Williston basin in Montana and North Dakota. These aquifers form a hydrologic system that extends more than 960 km from recharge areas in the Rocky Mountains to discharge areas in eastern North Dakota and the Canadian Provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. The regional flow system in the aquifers has had a major effect on the chemical composition of ground water within the Williston basin. Hydrodynamic forces may contribute to the accumulation of petroleum within the basin.

Downey, J.S.; Busby, J.F.; Dinwiddie, G.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

390

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox Basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

Chidsey Jr., Thomas C.

2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

391

Geologic Analysis of Priority Basins for Exploration and Drilling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There has been a substantial decline in both exploratory drilling and seismic field crew activity in the United States over the last 10 years, due primarily to the declining price of oil. To reverse this trend and to preserve the entrepreneurial independent operator, the U.S. DOE is attempting to encourage hydrocarbon exploration activities in some of the under exploited regions of the United States. This goal is being accomplished by conducting broad regional reviews of potentially prospective areas within the lower 48 states. Data are being collected on selected areas, and studies are being done on a regional scale generally unavailable to the smaller independent. The results of this work will be made available to the public to encourage the undertaking of operations in areas which have been overlooked until this project. Fifteen criteria have been developed for the selection of study areas. Eight regions have been identified where regional geologic analysis will be performed. This report discusses preliminary findings concerning the geology, early tectonic history, structure and potential unconventional source rocks for the Black Mesa basin and South Central states region, the two highest priority study areas.

Carroll, H.B.; Reeves, T.K.

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

392

Late-Quaternary Stratigraphy and Geoarchaeology of the Upper Neosho River Basin, East-Central Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C o. L yo n C o. C of fe y C o. 15 0 22 5 30 0 km 75 0 20 30 40 k m 10 0 N K an sa s U pp er N eo sh o R iv er B as in Cr F ig ur e 1. 1. U pp er N eo sh o R iv er b as in in K an sa s, U SA 2 3 settlement patterns” (Mandel, 2006a: 28... Arkansas River Basin Upper Neosho River Basin (Study Area) Gulf of Mexico M ississippi R i ver 6 S m ok y H il ls B lu e H il ls C ha lk B ut te s H ig h P la in s A rk an sa s R iv er L ow la nd s F li nt H il ls O sa ge...

Gottsfield, Andrew Stefan

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

393

Evaluation of injection-well risk management in the Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on a study of subsurface water-injection operations in the Williston geologic basin which demonstrated the practicality of incorporating risk management procedures into the regulation of underground injection control (UIC) programs. A realistic model of a computerized data base was developed to assess the maximum quantifiable risk that water from injection wells would reach an underground source of drinking water (USDW). In the Williston basin, the upper-bound probability of injection water escaping the wellbore and reaching a USDW is seven chances in 1 million well-years where surface casings cover the drinking-water aquifers. Where surface casings do not cover the USDW's, the probability is six chances in 1,000 well-years.

Michie, T.W. (Michie and Associates, Inc. (US)); Koch, C.A. (North Dakota Industrial Commission (US))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Koch`s experience with deep in situ combustion in Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Koch Exploration Company has been active with the combustion process in the Williston basin of North and South Dakota since 1979. Koch has three ongoing combustion projects in the basin. The Medicine Pole Hills Unit (MPHU) and the Capa Madison Unit (CMU) are located in the North Dakota, while the Buffalo Unit is situated in South Dakota. Because of low primary recovery from these deep carbonate reservoirs, studies were conducted to determine how the large volume of remaining oil could be recovered, and decisions were made to initiate an in situ combustion by air injection, pressure maintenance project in these reservoirs. The principal objective of this talk is to review the past performance of these combustion projects and discuss some of the operating problems we encountered. The other objectives are to outline the economics of the projects and to speculate on the future of in situ combustion technology as Koch sees it.

Miller, R.J. [Koch Exploration Co., Wichita, KS (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring mainly during the Late Cretaceous.

Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

396

CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Private- and public-sector stakeholders formed the new ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' and began a two-year research effort that will lead to a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration throughout the Appalachian basin. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 gas exploration companies and 6 research team members, including the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks are being conducted by basin-wide research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. More than 3400 miles of Appalachian basin digital seismic data have been quality checked. In addition, inquiries have been made regarding the availability of additional seismic data from government and industry partners in the consortium. Interpretations of the seismic data have begun. Error checking is being performed by mapping the time to various prominent reflecting horizons, and analyzing for any anomalies. A regional geological velocity model is being created to make time-to-depth conversions. Members of the stratigraphy task team compiled a generalized, basin-wide correlation chart, began the process of scanning geophysical logs and laid out lines for 16 regional cross sections. Two preliminary cross sections were constructed, a database of all available Trenton-Black River cores was created, and a basin-wide map showing these core locations was produced. Two cores were examined, described and photographed in detail, and were correlated to the network of geophysical logs. Members of the petrology team began the process of determining the original distribution of porous and permeable facies within a sequence stratigraphic framework. A detailed sedimentologic and petrographic study of the Union Furnace road cut in central Pennsylvania was completed. This effort will facilitate the calibration of subsurface core and log data. A core-sampling plan was developed cooperatively with members of the isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion task team. One hundred thirty (130) samples were prepared for trace element and stable isotope analysis, and six samples were submitted for strontium isotope analysis. It was learned that there is a good possibility that carbon isotope stratigraphy may be a useful tool to locate the top of the Black River Formation in state-to-state correlations. Gas samples were collected from wells in Kentucky, New York and West Virginia. These were sent to a laboratory for compositional, stable isotope and hydrogen and radiogenic helium isotope analysis. Decisions concerning necessary project hardware, software and configuration of the website and database were made by the data, GIS and website task team. A file transfer protocol server was established for project use. The project website is being upgraded in terms of security.

Douglas G. Patchen; James Drahovzal; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Chris Laughery; Katharine Lee Avary

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

A dispersion curve study of dredged spoil basin inlets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are 12 to 20 ft/sec (3. 65 to 6. 1 m/s). Common dis- 3 charges can then be estimated at 17, 000 gpm (38 cfs, 1 m /s) to 36, 000 gpm (80 cfs, 2. 24 m /s) with an extreme low at 4, 200 gpm 3 (9, 4 cfs, 0. 26 m /s) and an extreme high at 65, 000 gpm (140... the variable skew functions of the log normal and gamma distributions are good prospects. These functions are used in statistics for the same reasons, plus the academic justification that the gamma 90 80 O 70 Laj LL- 60 D M 50 LJJ j 40 Lat 50 O 20...

Male, Robert

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elaine J. Bell, Lawrence T. Larson and Russell W. Juncal Published U.S. Department of Energy, 1980 Report Number GLO2386 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:...

399

The Niobrara River Basin Study: Using Various Models to Assess  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seminar Series Brandi Flyr, Ph.D. Integrated Water Management Division Nebraska Department of Natural;#12;Integrated Water Management Identify Management Setting Assess Water Resources Understand & Predict Set effects of various water management strategies in order to develop water management tools #12;Goals

Farritor, Shane

400

Burialand exhumation historyof Pennsylvanian strata, central Appalachian basin: anintegrated study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

£ectance(e.g.Chyietal.,1987;Hower&Rimmer, 1991; Zhang & Davis, 1993), £uid inclusion microthermo- metry (e.g. Burruss, 1989

Bodnar, Robert J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Geothermal Reservoir Assessment Case Study, Northern Basin and Range  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIOpen EnergyRecoveryType Term

402

Observation Targeting for the Tehachapi Pass and Mid-Columbia Basin: WindSENSE Phase III Project Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In Phase III of the project, the focus was on the Mid-Columbia Basin region which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area shown in Figure 1 that includes Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. The typical hub height of a wind turbine is approximately 80-m above ground level (AGL). So it would seem that building meteorological towers in the region upwind of a wind generation facility would provide data necessary to improve the short-term forecasts for the 80-m AGL wind speed. However, this additional meteorological information typically does not significantly improve the accuracy of the 0- to 6-hour ahead wind power forecasts because processes controlling wind variability change from day-to-day and, at times, from hour-to-hour. It is also important to note that some processes causing significant changes in wind power production function principally in the vertical direction. These processes will not be detected by meteorological towers at off-site locations. For these reasons, it is quite challenging to determine the best type of sensors and deployment locations. To address the measurement deployment problem, Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) was applied in the Phase I portion of the WindSENSE project. The ESA approach was initially designed to produce spatial fields that depict the sensitivity of a forecast metric to a set of prior state variables selected by the user. The best combination of variables and locations to improve the forecast was determined using the Multiple Observation Optimization Algorithm (MOOA) developed in Phase I. In Zack et al. (2010a), the ESA-MOOA approach was applied and evaluated for the wind plants in the Tehachapi Pass region for a period during the warm season. That research demonstrated that forecast sensitivity derived from the dataset was characterized by well-defined, localized patterns for a number of state variables such as the 80-m wind and the 25-m to 1-km temperature difference prior to the forecast time. The sensitivity patterns produced as part of the Tehachapi Pass study were coherent and consistent with the basic physical processes that drive wind patterns in the Tehachapi area. In Phase II of the WindSENSE project, the ESA-MOOA approach was extended and applied to the wind plants located in the Mid-Columbia Basin wind generation area of Washington-Oregon during the summer and to the Tehachapi Pass region during the winter. The objective of this study was to identify measurement locations and variables that have the greatest positive impact on the accuracy of wind forecasts in the 0- to 6-hour look-ahead periods for the two regions and to establish a higher level of confidence in ESA-MOOA for mesoscale applications. The detailed methodology and results are provided in separate technical reports listed in the publications section below. Ideally, the data assimilation scheme used in the Phase III experiments would have been based upon an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) that was similar to the ESA method used to diagnose the Mid-Columbia Basin sensitivity patterns in the previous studies. However, running an EnKF system at high resolution is impractical because of the very high computational cost. Thus, it was decided to use a three-dimensional variational (3DVAR) analysis scheme that is less computationally intensive. The objective of this task is to develop an observation system deployment strategy for the mid Columbia Basin (i.e. the BPA wind generation region) that is designed to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of hub-height ({approx}80 m) wind speed with a focus on periods of large changes in wind speed. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate

Hanley, D

2011-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

403

Coal Pile Basin Project (4595), 5/31/2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Coal Pile Basin Project (4595) Program or Field Office: Y-12 Site Office Location(s) (CityCountyState): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: Submit...

404

Cenozoic volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

volcanic geology of the Basin and Range province in Hidalgo County, southwestern New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

405

Negotiating nature : expertise and environment in the Klamath River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Negotiating Nature" explores resource management in action and the intertwined roles of law and science in environmental conflicts in the Upper Klamath River Basin in southern Oregon. I follow disputes over the management ...

Buchanan, Nicholas Seong Chul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Improved Basin Analog System to Characterize Unconventional Gas Resource  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they have yet to serve as a major contributor to the energy supply, partly due to the scarcity of information about the exploration and development technologies required to produce them. Basin analogy can be used to estimate the undiscovered petroleum...

Wu, Wenyan 1983-

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

407

Exploration limited since '70s in Libya's Sirte basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Esso Standard made the first Libyan oil discovery in the western Ghadames basin in 1957. The Atshan-2 well tested oil from Devonian sandstones, and the play was a continuation of the Paleozoic trend found productive in the neighboring Edjeleh region of eastern Algeria. Exploration in the Sirte basin began in earnest in 1958. Within the next 10 years, 16 major oil fields had been discovered, each with recoverable reserves greater than 500 million bbl of oil. Libya currently produces under OPEC quota approximately 1.4 million b/d of oil, with discovered in-place reserves of 130 billion bbl of oil. The paper describes the structural framework, sedimentary basins of Libya, the Sirte basin, petroleum geology, play types, source rocks, generation and migration of hydrocarbons, oil reserves, potential, and acreage availability.

Thomas, D. (Thomas and Associates, Hastings (United Kingdom))

1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

408

Hydrology and Glaciers in the Upper Indus Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Examines the state of the science associated with the snow and ice hydrology in the Upper Indus Basin (IUB), reviewing the literature and data available on the present and projected role of glaciers, snow fields, and stream ...

Yu, Winston

409

Hydrologic and Institutional Water Availability in the Brazos River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been constructed to facilitate management of the water resources of the various river basins of the state. Effective control and utilization of the water resource supplied by a stream/reservoir system requires an understanding of the amount of water...

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Bergman, Carla E.; Carriere, Patrick E.; Walls, W. Brian

410

amazon river basin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Postal 70-153, CP 04510, Mexico D. F Mercado-Silva, Norman 149 Instream Flows in the San Antonio River Basin From Science to Environmental flow Standards Geosciences Websites...

411

arkansas river basin: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Postal 70-153, CP 04510, Mexico D. F Mercado-Silva, Norman 191 Instream Flows in the San Antonio River Basin From Science to Environmental flow Standards Geosciences Websites...

412

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Hydropower development in the lower Mekong basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Hydropower development in the lower Mekong basin: alternative approaches to deal hydropower generation and potentially irreversible negative impacts on the ecosystems that provide hydropower generation and potentially irreversible negative impacts on the ecosystems that provide

Vermont, University of

413

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through...

414

Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission (Multiple States)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission was established as a bi-state commission composed of members from the Commonwealth of Virginia and the State of North Carolina. The purpose of the...

415

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Supply Basins...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Major Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors, 2008 U.S. Natural Gas Transporation Corridors out of Major...

416

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

417

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

systems References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

418

The Nile Basin Initiative in Ethiopia: Voices from Addis Ababa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

agreements will give Ethiopia more negotiating power. Egypt,WaterAid, and PANOS Ethiopia. 7 I interviewed stafT at theNUe Basin Initiative in Ethiopia: Voices from Addis Ababa'

Foulds, Kim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

INTER-MOUNTAIN BASINS SHALE BADLAND extent exaggerated for display  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTER-MOUNTAIN BASINS SHALE BADLAND R.Rondeau extent exaggerated for display ACHNATHERUM HYMENOIDES HERBACEOUS ALLIANCE Achnatherum hymenoides Shale Barren Herbaceous Vegetation ARTEMISIA BIGELOVII SHRUBLAND ALLIANCE Leymus salinus Shale Sparse Vegetation Overview: This widespread ecological system

420

Oil shale and coal in intermontane basins of Thailand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mae Tip intermontane basin contains Cenozoic oil shales in beds up to 1 m (3.3 ft) thick interbedded with coal and mudstone. The oil shales contain lamosite-type alginite, and give a maximum oil yield of 122 L/MT (29.3 gal/ton). The beds are laterally continuous for at least 1.5 km (1.0 mi), but pass into mudstones toward the basin margin. The oil shales originated when peat swamps close to a steep basin margin were flooded by shallow lakes, allowing algae to replace rooted vegetation. This distinctive oil shale-coal assemblage is known from many small intermontane basins in Thailand, where locally high geothermal gradients suggest potential for hydrocarbons.

Gibling, M.R.; Srisuk, S.; Ukakimaphan, Y.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

alfonso basin gulf: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Louann Salt and overlying sediments, De Soto Canyon Salt Basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: diapirs in the De Soto Canyon area, and a...

422

Lessons Learned in Applying Formal Concept Analysis to Reverse Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lessons Learned in Applying Formal Concept Analysis to Reverse Engineering Gabriela Ar´evalo, St in "International Conference on Formal Concept Analysis (ICFCA '05) (2005)" #12;Lessons Learned in Applying Formal artifacts. In this paper we describe our approach, outline three case studies, and draw various lessons from

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

423

Basin-Scale Opportunity Assessment Initiative Background Literature Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As called for in the March 24, 2010, Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) for Hydropower, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), environmental stakeholders, and the hydropower industry are collaborating to identify opportunities to simultaneously increase electricity generation and improve environmental services in river basins of the United States. New analytical tools provide an improved ability to understand, model, and visualize environmental and hydropower systems. Efficiencies and opportunities that might not be apparent in site-by-site analyses can be revealed through assessments at the river-basin scale. Information from basin-scale assessments could lead to better coordination of existing hydropower projects, or to inform siting decisions (e.g., balancing the removal of some dams with the construction of others), in order to meet renewable energy production and environmental goals. Basin-scale opportunity assessments would inform energy and environmental planning and address the cumulative effects of hydropower development and operations on river basin environmental quality in a way that quantifies energy-environment tradeoffs. Opportunity assessments would create information products, develop scenarios, and identify specific actions that agencies, developers, and stakeholders can take to locate new sustainable hydropower projects, increase the efficiency and environmental performance of existing projects, and restore and protect environmental quality in our nation's river basins. Government agencies and non-governmental organizations (NGO) have done significant work to understand and assess opportunities for both hydropower and environmental protection at the basin scale. Some initiatives have been successful, others less so, and there is a need to better understand the legacy of work on which this current project can build. This background literature review is intended to promote that understanding. The literature review begins with a discussion in Section 2.0 of the Federal regulatory processes and mission areas pertaining to hydropower siting and licensing at the basin scale. This discussion of regulatory processes and mission areas sets the context for the next topic in Section 3.0, past and ongoing basin-scale hydropower planning and assessment activities. The final sections of the literature review provide some conclusions about past and ongoing basin-scale activities and their relevance to the current basin-scale opportunity assessment (Section 4.0), and a bibliography of existing planning and assessment documents (Section 5.0).

Saulsbury, Bo [ORNL; Geerlofs, Simon H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Cada, Glenn F [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs and testing, and fill placement strategy. This information is applicable to decommissioning both the 105-P and 105-R facilities. The ISD process for the entire 105-P and 105-R reactor facilities will require approximately 250,000 cubic yards (191,140 cubic meters) of grout and 2,400 cubic yards (1,840 cubic meters) of structural concrete which will be placed over a twelve month period to meet the accelerated schedule ISD schedule. The status and lessons learned in the SRS Reactor Facility ISD process will be described.

Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

425

Structural analysis of the Sheep Mountain anticline, Bighorn Basin, Wyoming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE SHEEP MOUNTAIN ANTICLINE, BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING A Thesis by JEFFREY HUGH HENNIER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Geology STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS OF THE SHEEP MOUNTAIN ANTICLINE, BIGHORN BASIN, WYOMING A Thesis by JEFFREY HUGH HENNIER Approved as to style and content by: o n . pan (Chairman of Committee) Ear R. os sn (Member...

Hennier, Jeffrey Hugh

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Paleotopography and hydrocarbon accumulation: Williston, Powder River, and Denver basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent geomorphic analyses of 1:24,000 scale topographic maps in the three major basins of the northern Great Plains have disclosed a persistent system of basement paleotopographic features that trend north-northeast throughout the region. Superimposed across this system and subtly influenced by it, are the northwesterly trending Laramide structural features. Paleozoic depositional patterns have been strongly influenced by the paleoridge and trough system formed by the north-northeast features. Mesozoic deposition has also been affected by the ancient subsurface system but in a more subtle manner. Many of the Paleozoic and Mezoxoic hydrocarbon locations in the three basins appear to be the results of paleotopographic control on hydrocarbon accumulation sites. This affect ranges from Paleozoic reef sites in the Williston basin through paleotrough localization of Pennsylvanian Minnelusa production in the Powder River basin to fractured Cretaceous Niobrara production at the Silo field in the Denver basin. Basement paleotopography is the underlying factor in all deposition and subsequent hydrocarbon migration in any basin. As such, it should be considered a major factor in the exploration for oil and gas.

Thomas, G.E. (Thomas and Associates, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Evolutionary sequences and hydrocarbon potential of Kenya sedimentary basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Kenya basins have evolved primarily through extension related to episodic continental rifting. In eastern Kenya, thick accumulations of sediments formed within grabens during the prerift phase (Precambrian to Carboniferous) of the Gondwana breakup. Synrift sedimentation (Late Carboniferous to Middle Jurassic) occurred within a north-south rift system, which included the Mandera basin, South Anza basin, and Lamu embayment. During the Early Jurassic, a marine transgression invaded the margins of the eastern Kenya rift basins, resulting in the deposition of platform carbonates and shales. A Callovian-aged salt basin formed in the offshore regions of the Lamu embayment. Intermittent tectonic activity and eustatic sea-level changes controlled sedimentation, which produced marine shales, carbonates or evaporites, and fluvio-deltaic to lacustrine sandstones. From the Early Cretaceous to recent, continental sediments were deposited within the North Anza and Turkana basins. These fluvial-lacustrine sediments are similar to the Lower Cretaceous sequences that have produced oil in the Mesozoic Sudanese Abu Gabra rift. Although exploration activities began in the early 1950s, significant occurrences of potential reservoir, source, and seal lithologies as well as trapping configurations remain in many areas. Favorable structures and sequences of reservoir sandstones and carbonates overlain by potentially sealing lacustrine or marine shales, evaporites, or volcanics have been noted. Potential source beds are believed to be present within shales of the lacustrine or marine depositional environments.

Cregg, A.K. (Western Atlas International, Inc., Carrollton, TX (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Applying to Teacher Education Program at Purdue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apply to the Teacher Education Program (TEP). Please remember to apply to the TEP(Gate A) if you wish to officially enroll in the. Professional Education ...

David Drasin

2012-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

429

Elevated thermal maturation in Pennsylvanian rocks, Cherokee basin, southeastern Kansas: Importance of regional fluid flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal history of sedimentary basins is commonly assumed to be dominated by burial heating. Marked contrast between reconstructed burial temperatures and other temperature determinations would suggest alternative processes. In the Cherokee basin of southeastern Kansas, reconstruction of burial and thermal history indicates that basal Pennsylvanian strata were not buried more than 1.8 km, and should have reached only about 90C. However, the study of Pennsylvanian rocks of the Cherokee basin indicates that higher temperatures were reached and that the pattern of thermal maturation is inconsistent with simple burial heating. Regional pattern of vitrinite reflectance reveals several warm spots' where thermal maturation is elevated above the regional background. Primary fluid inclusions in late Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate cements yield homogenization-temperature modes or petrographically consistent populations ranging from 100 to 150C. These data suggest that the samples experienced at least those temperatures, hence fluid inclusions closely agree with vitrinite and Rock-Eval. Elevated temperatures, warm spots, confined thermal spikes, a low R{sub m} gradient argue against simple burial heating. These observations are consistent with regional invasion of warm fluids, probably from the Ouachita-Arkoma system, and their subsequent upward migration into Pennsylvanian strata through faults and fractures. Petroleum exploration should consider the possibility of regionally elevated thermal maturation levels with even more elevated local maxima. Consequences may include local generation of hydrocarbons or local changes in diagenetic patterns.

Wojcik, K.M.; Goldstein, R.H.; Walton, A.W. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (United States)); Barker, C.E. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Reservoir heterogeneity in Carter Sandstone, North Blowhorn Creek oil unit and vicinity, Black Warrior Basin, Alabama  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents accomplishments made in completing Task 3 of this project which involves development of criteria for recognizing reservoir heterogeneity in the Black Warrior basin. The report focuses on characterization of the Upper Mississippian Carter sandstone reservoir in North Blowhorn Creek and adjacent oil units in Lamar County, Alabama. This oil unit has produced more than 60 percent of total oil extracted from the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The Carter sandstone in North Blowhorn Creek oil unit is typical of the most productive Carter oil reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report synthesizes data derived from geophysical well logs and cores from North Blowhorn Creek oil unit to develop a depositional model for the Carter sandstone reservoir. The second part of the report describes the detrital and diagenetic character of Carter sandstone utilizing data from petrographic and scanning electron microscopes and the electron microprobe. The third part synthesizes porosity and pore-throat-size-distribution data determined by high-pressure mercury porosimetry and commercial core analyses with results of the sedimentologic and petrographic studies. The final section of the report discusses reservoir heterogeneity within the context of the five-fold classification of Moore and Kugler (1990).

Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Williston Basin subsidence and sea level history: Chronological and lithofacies constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent is to use lithofacies information to identify the top-driven components of sediment accumulation-depositional environments, sediments supply, compaction, sediment and water load. Physical carbonate stratigraphy is used to determine sediment accumulation corrections. Physical stratigraphic geometric patterns are used to estimate the original thicknesses of dissolved salts and to determine absolute water depth. Seawater strontium chronostratigraphy constrains the ages and paleo-oceanographic setting of Devonian-Mississippian strata. The measured strontium stratigraphy can be used for correlation, age assignment and diagentic study. Removing sediment compaction, sediment/water load effects and using the newly derived Devonian-Mississippian chronostratigraphy to examine the behavior of the Williston Basin reveals a number of facts. (1) Temporal and spatial variation in the surficial components of sediment accumulation is significant and, unless removed, obscures tectonic subsidence and sea-level change patterns. (2) Both the corrected tectonic subsidence/sea level record and lithofacies patterns of the Devonian Williston Basin show flexural or in-plane stress interference reflecting plate boundary reorganization along the near edge of the Paleozoic North American craton, culminating the Antler orogeny. (3) The tectonic subsidence and sea level change record of the Williston Basin which has been corrected for sediment compaction, water and sediment load, has extremely linear subsidence through time. This is interrupted by changes in global sea level of 100-140 m over 25-35 my and apparent sea level change of 35-60 m over 2-4 my.

Lee Roark, C.K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

Chen, K.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

433

Dispersion by chemical reaction of Rocky Mountain Arsenal Basin F waste soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many military installations have soil contamination problems that range from heavy metals to petroleum products. Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) Basin F contains high concentrations of salts, heavy metals, ammonia, urea, and organics. The Dispersion by Chemical Reaction (DCR) process leads to a reduction in the mobility of the organic and inorganic constituents by first removing volatile constituents via steam stripping and volatilization, then trapping the nonvolatile contaminants in a nonmobile phase (microencapsulation), and finally compacting the treated material into large soil bodies (macroencapsulation). This report summarizes the results of the DCR testing of soil-amended Basin F sludge from RMA. The primary focus of this study is on pesticide leachability. The DCR process used to treat the Basin F waste soil produced a dry, homogeneous, soil-like material with desirable physical properties that on compaction achieved the following remediation goals: reduction of all leachable volatiles to nondetectable levels, confinement of all metals to below RCRA TCLP levels, and a decrease in pesticide leachability to levels approaching RCRA standards. For example, endrin TCLP concentration was reduced from 74 microgram/L to 20-28 microgram/L (regulatory limit = 20 ug/L). In several cases, reductions in pesticide leachability could be attributed to simple dilution with the calcium oxide (CaO) reagent. However in other cases, microencapsulation and/or macroencapsulation also played a role in reducing pesticide leachability. Additional work is necessary to optimize the amounts of lime-milk, hydrophobic CaO, and benign oil used in the processing of RMA Basin F waste soils. Ideally, the optimum design should achieve the regulatory and client goals, while minimizing materials handling, energy, and reagent inputs.

Payne, J.R.; Marion, G.M.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS IN CARBONATE ROCKS: THE MICHIGAN BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress in year 2 of this project is highlighted by the completing of the writing and testing of the project database, ''Atlas'', and populating it with all the project data gathered to date. This includes digitization of 17,000+ original Scout Tickets for the Michigan Basin. Work continues on the Driller's Reports, where they have scanned about 50,000 pages out of an estimated 300,000 pages. All of the scanned images have been attached to ''Atlas'', the visual database viewer developed for this project. A complete set of the 1/24,000 USGS DEM (Digital Elevation Models) for the State of Michigan has been downloaded from the USGS Web sites, decompressed and converted to ArcView Grid files. A large-scale map (48 inches x 84 inches) has been constructed by mosaicking of the high-resolution files. This map shows excellent ground surface detail and has drawn much comment and requests for copies at the venues where it has been displayed. Although it was generated for mapping of surface lineations the map has other uses, particularly analysis of the glacial drift in Michigan. It presents unusual problems due to its size and they are working with vendors on compression and display algorithms (e.g. MrSID{copyright}) in an attempt to make it available over the Internet, both for viewing and download. A set of aeromagnetic data for the Michigan Basin has been acquired and is being incorporated into the study. As reported previously, the general fracture picture in the Michigan Basin is a dominant NW-SE trend with a conjugate NE-SW trend. Subsurface, DEM and gravity data support the interpretation of a graben-type deep basement structural trend coincident with the Michigan Basin Gravity High. They plan to incorporate the aeromagnetic data into this interpretation as well.

James R. Wood; William B. Harrison

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Thioulouse, J., J. Devillers, D. Chessel, and Y. Auda. 1991. Graphical techniques for multidimensional data analysis. Pages 153-205 in J. Devillers and W. Karcher, editors. Applied Multivariate Analysis in SAR and Environmental Studies. Kluwer Academic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis in SAR and Environmental Studies. Kluwer Academic Publishers. http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/R/articles Analysis in SAR and Environmental Studies. Kluwer Academic Publishers. http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/R/articles Analysis in SAR and Environmental Studies. Kluwer Academic Publishers. http://pbil.univ-lyon1.fr/R/articles

Thioulouse, Jean

436

Geological/geophysical study progresses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robertson Research (U.S.) Inc. of Houston is working on the second of a planned three-phase regional geological and geochemical study of Paleozoic rocks in the Williston Basin. The studies cover the entire Williston Basin in North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Saskatchewan and Manitoba. Each report is based largely on original petrographic, well log, and geochemical data that were developed by Robertson.

Savage, D.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

438

FY2004 CORROSION SURVEILLANCE RESULTS FOR L-BASIN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the results of the L-Basin Corrosion Surveillance Program for the fiscal year 2004. Test coupons were removed from the basin on February 12, 2004, shipped to Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and visually examined in a contaminated laboratory hood. Selected coupons were metallurgically characterized to establish the extent of general corrosion and pitting. Pitting was observed on galvanically coupled and on intentionally creviced coupons, thus demonstrating that localized concentration cells were formed during the exposure period. In these cases, the susceptibility to pitting was not attributed to aggressive basin water chemistry but to localized conditions (intentional crevices and galvanic coupling) that allowed the development of oxygen and/or metal ion concentration cells that produced locally aggressive waters. General oxidation was also observed on all of the coupons with localized corrosion observed on some of the coupons. These coupons were not pretreated to produce a protective oxide layer prior to exposure in the basin water. Non-protected coupons are more susceptible to corrosion than fuel cladding which has developed a protective oxide layer from high temperature reactor operations. However, the oxide on spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stored in L-Basin is not necessarily in pristine condition. Some of the oxide may have spalled off or been mechanically damaged prior to arrival at SRS. These areas on the fuel cladding would have the same susceptibility to corrosion as the coupons. Current observations from the test coupons demonstrate that, even with rigorously controlled basin water chemistry, localized aggressive conditions can develop in intentional crevice and galvanic samples. These results do illustrate the potential for corrosion induced degradation and thus the importance of a routine surveillance program similar to that conducted on the Uruguay fuel and on the surveillance coupons stored in L-Basin and future in-service inspections proposed for additional SNF in L-Basin. The 2004 results are compared to previous results on coupons removed from SRS basins in fiscal years 2001, 2002 and 2003. The extent of corrosion is correlated with sample and storage conditions as well as the water chemistry during the storage period. Coupon weight gains from 2004 coupons are similar to those from 2003. Oxides were removed from furniture rack coupons from 2003 and 2004 and comparable pit depths were found in the filler metal. Corrosion induced-degradation of the spent nuclear fuels stored in L-Basin could potentially impact the storage process by causing cladding penetration, exposing fuel core material, and allowing release of radionuclides to the basin waters. Such releases could potentially lead to high water activity levels which could impact fuel integrity and present problems in future fuel handling and transfer operations. However, the collective results (to date) of the coupon and water chemistry evaluations and Uruguay spent fuel inspections indicate that the fuel in the SRS storage basins has not experienced corrosion-induced degradation that will limit the time for interim storage in the basin waters. Continued surveillance and inspection is essential due to the potential for corrosion induced degradation. The next withdrawal of surveillance coupons from L-Basin occurred on March 29, 2005.

VORMELKER, P

2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

439

Thermal modeling of Bakken Formation of Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic geochemical analyses provide a quantitative basis on which conceptual models of thermal maturation may be built. Contour maps of maturation indices of the Mississippian-Devonian Bakken Formation of the Williston basin show anomalous patterns that are not dependent on burial depth. One such area is on the western side of the Nesson anticline. One-dimensional modeling incorporating a uniform, constant heat flow, lithology-dependent thermal conductivities, and decompaction factors indicates that these areas are less mature than surrounding regions. This is due primarily to decreasing burial depth and thinning of low-thermal-conductivity Tertiary and Cretaceous shales. Additional heat transfer to these regions may be due in part to heat transfer by fluid movement through aquifers or vertical fractures. The influence of these fluid systems is simulated through the use of a two-dimensional finite difference program. Basic assumptions are made concerning heat flow, thermal properties, and ground-water flow rates through time. Modeling of the time-temperature history is simplified by restricting the study to the time of greatest maturation, the post-Jurassic.

Anderson, D.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

A two-dimensional regional basin model of Williston basin hydrocarbon systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Institut Francais du Petrole`s two-dimensional model, TEMISPACK, is used to discuss the functioning of petroleum systems in the Williston basin along a 330-km-long section, focusing on four regional source intervals: Ordovician Yeoman formation, Lower Devonian Winnipegosis Formation, Upper Devonian-Lower Mississippian Bakken Formation, and Mississippian Lodgepole formation. Thermal history calibration against present temperature and source rock maturity profiles suggests that the Williston basin can be divided into a region of constant heat flow of about 55 mW/m{sup 2} away from the Nesson anticline, and a region of higher heat flow and enhanced thermal maturity in the vicinity of the Nesson anticline. Original kinetic parameters used in the calibration were derived for each of the four source rocks from Rock-Eval yield curves. Bakken overpressures are entirely due to oil generation, not compaction disequilibrium. Very low Bakken vertical permeabilities range from 0.01 to 0.001 and are matched against observed overpressures, whereas Bakken porosities based on the model and confirmed by measurements are inferred to be also unusually low, around 3%.

Burrus, J.; Wolf, S.; Doligez, B. [Institut Francais due Petrole, Rueil-Malmaison (France)] [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basins applied studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

South Atlantic sag basins: new petroleum system components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Newly discovered pre-salt source rocks, reservoirs and seals need to be included as components to the petroleum systems of both sides of the South Atlantic. These new components lie between the pre-salt rift strata and the Aptian salt layers, forming large, post-rift, thermal subsidence sag basins. These are differentiated from the older rift basins by the lack of syn-rift faulting and a reflector geometry that is parallel to the base salt regional unconformity rather than to the Precambrian basement. These basins are observed in deep water regions overlying areas where both the mantle and the crust have been involved in the extension. This mantle involvement creates post-rift subsiding depocenters in which deposition is continuous while proximal rift-phase troughs with little or no mantle involvement are bypassed and failed to accumulate potential source rocks during anoxic times. These features have been recognized in both West African Kwanza Basin and in the East Brasil Rift systems. The pre-salt source rocks that are in the West African sag basins were deposited in lacustrine brackish to saline water environment and are geochemically distinct from the older, syn-rift fresh to brackish water lakes, as well as from younger, post-salt marine anoxic environments of the drift phase. Geochemical analyses of the source rocks and their oils have shown a developing source rock system evolving from isolated deep rift lakes to shallow saline lakes, and culminating with the infill of the sag basin by large saline lakes to a marginally marine restricted gulf. Sag basin source rocks may be important in the South Atlantic petroleum system by charging deep-water prospects where syn-rift source rocks are overmature and the post-salt sequences are immature.

Henry, S.G. [GeoLearn, Houston, TX (United States)] Mohriak, W.U. [Petroleo Brasileiro, S.A., Exploration and Production, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Mello, M.R. [Petroleo Brasieiro, S.A., Research Center, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Appalachian basin coal-bed methane: Elephant or flea  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically, interest in the Appalachian basin coal-bed methane resource extends at least over the last 50 years. The Northern and Central Appalachian basins are estimated to contain 61 tcf and 5 tcf of coal-bed methane gas, respectively. Development of this resource has not kept pace with that of other basins, such as the Black Warrior basin of Alabama of the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico and Colorado. Without the benefit of modern completion, stimulation, and production technology, some older Appalachian basin coal-bed methane wells were reported to have produced in excess of 150 used here to characterize some past projects and their results. This work is not intended to comprise a comprehensive survey of all Appalachian basin projects, but rather to provide background information from which to proceed for those who may be interested in doing so. Several constraints to the development of this resource have been identified, including conflicting legal rights of ownership of the gas produced from the coal seams when coal and conventional oil and gas rights are controlled by separate parties. In addition, large leaseholds have been difficult to acquire and finding costs have been high. However, the threshold of minimum economic production may be relatively low when compared with other areas, because low-pressures pipelines are available and gas prices are among the highest in the nation. Interest in the commercial development of the resource seems to be on the increase with several projects currently active and more reported to be planned for the near future.

Hunt, A.M. (Dames and Moore, Cincinnati, OH (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Utilizing Divers in Support of Spent Fuel Basin Closure Subproject  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of nuclear facilities in the world are aging and with this comes the fact that we have to either keep repairing them or decommission them. At the Department of Energy Idaho Site (DOEID) there are a number of facilities that are being decommissioned, but the facilities that pose the highest risk to the large aquifer that flows under the site are given highest priorities. Aging spent nuclear fuel pools at DOE-ID are among the facilities that pose the highest risk, therefore four pools were targeted for decommissioning in Fiscal Year 2004. To accomplish this task the Idaho Completion Project (ICP) of Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, put together an integrated Basin Closure Subproject team. The team was assigned a goal to look beyond traditional practices at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to find ways to get the basin closure work done safer and more efficiently. The Idaho Completion Project (ICP) was faced with a major challenge – cleaning and preparing aging spent nuclear fuel basins for closure by removing sludge and debris, as necessary, and removing water to eliminate a potential risk to the Snake River Plain Aquifer. The project included cleaning and removing water from four basins. Two of the main challenges to a project like this is the risk of contamination from the basin walls and floors becoming airborne as the water is removed and keeping personnel exposures ALARA. ICP’s baseline plan had workers standing at the edges of the basins and on rafts or bridge cranes and then using long-handled tools to manually scrub the walls of basin surfaces. This plan had significant risk of skin contamination events, workers falling into the water, or workers sustaining injuries from the awkward working position. Analysis of the safety and radiation dose risks presented by this approach drove the team to look for smarter ways to get the work done.

Allen Nellesen

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide- (CO{sub 2}-) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Lorenz, D.M.; Culham, W.E.

1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million bbl of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO-) flood 2 project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

Allison, M. Lee; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

446

A numerical treatment of steady, frictional boundary currents in a homogeneous ocean applied to a semi-enclosed basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characterizing the models Page 27 Effects of pararnetcrs o" and y on reduction rate of residuals for the bottona-friction model 55 Effects of parameters o and y or reduction rate of res iduals for the lateral-friction naodcl 58 IV. Effects of parameters v.... E I Variable parameters characterizing the models Par a!net e r Description Order ? of-Magnitude Estimate Units the length ot a grid square the coefficient of botto!rI frictior the horizortal-cdd y vis cos ity 10 6 -6 10 C 111 ? 1 sec...

Jacobs, Clifford Albert

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Transportability Class of Americium in K Basin Sludge under Ambient and Hydrothermal Processing Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report establishes the technical bases for using a ''slow uptake'' instead of a ''moderate uptake'' transportability class for americium-241 (241Am) for the K Basin Sludge Treatment Project (STP) dose consequence analysis. Slow uptake classes are used for most uranium and plutonium oxides. A moderate uptake class has been used in prior STP analyses for 241Am based on the properties of separated 241Am and its associated oxide. However, when 241Am exists as an ingrown progeny (and as a small mass fraction) within plutonium mixtures, it is appropriate to assign transportability factors of the predominant plutonium mixtures (typically slow) to the Am241. It is argued that the transportability factor for 241Am in sludge likewise should be slow because it exists as a small mass fraction as the ingrown progeny within the uranium oxide in sludge. In this report, the transportability class assignment for 241Am is underpinned with radiochemical characterization data on K Basin sludge and with studies conducted with other irradiated fuel exposed to elevated temperatures and conditions similar to the STP. Key findings and conclusions from evaluation of the characterization data and published literature are summarized here. Plutonium and 241Am make up very small fractions of the uranium within the K Basin sludge matrix. Plutonium is present at about 1 atom per 500 atoms of uranium and 241Am at about 1 atom per 19000 of uranium. Plutonium and americium are found to remain with uranium in the solid phase in all of the {approx}60 samples taken and analyzed from various sources of K Basin sludge. The uranium-specific concentrations of plutonium and americium also remain approximately constant over a uranium concentration range (in the dry sludge solids) from 0.2 to 94 wt%, a factor of {approx}460. This invariability demonstrates that 241Am does not partition from the uranium or plutonium fraction for any characterized sludge matrix. Most of the K Basin sludge characterization data is derived spent nuclear fuel corroded within the K Basins at 10-15?C. The STP process will place water-laden sludges from the K Basin in process vessels at {approx}150-180 C. Therefore, published studies with other irradiated (uranium oxide) fuel were examined. From these studies, the affinity of plutonium and americium for uranium in irradiated UO2 also was demonstrated at hydrothermal conditions (150 C anoxic liquid water) approaching those proposed for the STP process and even for hydrothermal conditions outside of the STP operating envelope (e.g., 150 C oxic and 100 C oxic and anoxic liquid water). In summary, by demonstrating that the chemical and physical behavior of 241Am in the sludge matrix is similar to that of the predominant species (uranium and for the plutonium from which it originates), a technical basis is provided for using the slow uptake transportability factor for 241Am that is currently used for plutonium and uranium oxides. The change from moderate to slow uptake for 241Am could reduce the overall analyzed dose consequences for the STP by more than 30%.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmitt, Bruce E.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Little Knife field - US Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Little Knife field is a combination structural and stratigraphic trap located near the structural center of the Williston basin, North Dakota. The field is approximately 12 mi (19.3 km) long and 2.5 to 5.5 mi (4 to 8.9 km) wide. Little Knife was discovered by Gulf Oil in 1976 as part of a regional exploration play involving a transition from impermeable to porous carbonate rocks. In 1987, ultimate recovery from the Mission Canyon (Mississippian) reservoir was estimated to be 97.5 MMBO. This included 57.5 MMBO primary, 27 MMBO secondary, and 13 MMBO tertiary (CO{sub 2}) oil. At present the field is still under primary recovery, since utilization efforts have not been successful. Approximately one-third of Little Knife's 130 ft (39.6 m) oil column is trapped by structural closure beneath a regional anhydrite seal in a north-south-trending anticline. The remaining two-thirds of the oil column is trapped where the reservoir beds change facies from porous dolostones and dolomitic limestones to nonporous limestones. Structural entrapment accounts for approximately 50% (127 MMBO) of the OOIP, but covers only 30% of the producing area. Production is from the upper portions of the Mission Canyon Formation, a regressive, shoaling-upward carbonate-anhydrite sequence deposited in a slowly shrinking epeiric sea. The Mission Canyon in the Little Knife area is divided into six zones that record predominantly cyclic, subtidal deposition. These are overlain by prograding lagoonal, tidal flat, and sabkha beds. The source of Mission Canyon oil is thought to be the Bakken Formation, an organic-rich shale at the base of the Mississippian.

Wittstrom, M.D.; Lindsay, R.F. (Chevron USA, Inc., Midland, TX (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Fractal and Wada exit basin boundaries in tokamaks Jefferson S. E. Portela, Iber^e L. Caldas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fractal and Wada exit basin boundaries in tokamaks Jefferson S. E. Portela, Iber^e L. Caldas an involved fractal structure. If three or more exit basins are considered, the respective basins exhibit

Rey Juan Carlos, Universidad

450

Statistical model for source rock maturity and organic richness using well-log data, Bakken Formation, Williston basin, United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the Bakken Formation, the proposed source rock for much of the hydrocarbons generated in the Williston basin, was done using bulk density, neutron porosity, and resistivity logs, and formation temperatures. Principal components, cluster, and discriminant analyses indicate that the present-day distribution of organic matter controls much of the variability in the log values. Present-day total organic carbon values are high in the central part of the basin near northeastern Montana and along the east edge of the basin, and low in the area of the Nesson anticline and along the southwest edge of the basin. Using a regression of density on temperature and the analysis of residuals from this regression, hydrocarbon maturity effects were partially separated from depositional effects. These analyses suggest that original concentrations of organic matter were low near the limits of the Bakken and increased to a high in northeastern Montana. The pre-maturation distribution of total organic carbon and the present-day total organic carbon distribution, as determined by statistical analyses of well-log data, agree with the results of geochemical analyses. The distributions can be explained by a relatively simple depositional pattern and thermal history for the Bakken. 6 figures, 3 tables.

Krystinik, K.B.; Charpentier, R.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

452

Assessment and Forecasting Natural Gas Reserve Appreciation in the Gulf Coast Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reserve appreciation, also called reserve growth, is the increase in the estimated ultimate recovery (the sum of year end reserves and cumulative production) from fields subsequent to discovery from extensions, infield drilling, improved recovery of in-place resources, new pools, and intrapool completions. In recent years, reserve appreciation has become a major component of total U.S. annual natural gas reserve additions. Over the past 15 years, reserve appreciation has accounted for more than 80 percent of all annual natural gas reserve additions in the U.S. lower 48 states (Figure 1). The rise of natural gas reserve appreciation basically came with the judgment that reservoirs were much more geologically complex than generally thought, and they hold substantial quantities of natural gas in conventionally movable states that are not recovered by typical well spacing and vertical completion practices. Considerable evidence indicates that many reservoirs show significant geological variations and compartmentalization, and that uniform spacing, unless very dense, does not efficiently tap and drain a sizable volume of the reservoir (Figure 2). Further, by adding reserves within existing infrastructure and commonly by inexpensive recompletion technology in existing wells, reserve appreciation has become the dominant factor in ample, low-cost natural gas supply. Although there is a wide range in natural gas reserve appreciation potential by play and that potential is a function of drilling and technology applied, current natural gas reserve appreciation studies are gross, averaging wide ranges, disaggregated by broad natural gas provinces, and calculated mainly as a function of time. A much more detailed analysis of natural gas reserve appreciation aimed at assessing long-term sustainability, technological amenability, and economic factors, however, is necessary. The key to such analysis is a disaggregation to the play level. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of hydrocarbon pools within a basin. Typically, fields within a play share common hydrocarbon type, reservoir genesis, trapping mechanism, and source. Plays provide the comprehensive reference needed to more efficiently develop reservoirs, to extend field limits, and to better assess opportunities for intrafield exploration and development in mature natural gas provinces. Play disaggregation reveals current production trends and highlights areas for further exploration by identifying and emphasizing areas for potential reserve appreciation.

Kim, E.M.; Fisher, W.L.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Williston basin oil exploration: Past, present, and future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past: In 1951, modern oil exploration came to the Williston basin with the discovery of Paleozoic oil on the large Nesson anticline. This was quickly followed by similar discoveries on Cedar Creek and Poplar anticlines. To the north, the Canadians, lacking large structures, concentrated on Paleozoic stratigraphic traps and were highly successful. US explorationists quickly followed, finding similar traps on the basin's northeastern flank and center. The 1960s saw multiple Devonian salt dissolution structures produce on the western flank. To the northwest, shallow Mississippian and deeper Ordovician pays were found on small structural closures. These later were combined with pays in the Devonian and Silurian to give multiple pay potential. In the basin center large buried structures, visible only to seismic, were located. The 1970s revealed an Ordovician subcrop trap on the southeast flank. Centrally, a Jurassic astrobleme with Mississippian oil caused a flurry of leasing and deep drilling. The 1982 collapse of oil prices essentially halted exploration. 1987 saw a revival when horizontal drilling for the Mississippian Bakken fractured shale promised viable economics. Present: Today, emphasis is on Bakken horizontal drilling in the deeper portion of the basin. Next in importance is shallow drilling such as on the northeastern flank. Future: An estimated on billion barrels of new oil awaits discovery in the Williston basin. Additional exploration in already established production trends will find some of this oil. Most of this oil, however, will almost certainly be found by following up the numerous geological leads hinted at by past drilling.

Jennings, A.H.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Basinwide fold evolution and geometric development of cratonic - foreland basin interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Latest results of the Williston Basin Project incorporate a north-south regional seismic line, which is crossing the deepest part of the Williston Basin from Saskatchewan to South Dakota. The integration of this new profile to the two, existing east-west regional seismic sections, gives a quasi-3D image of the basin. The combined seismic data illustrate alternating extensive and compressive phases during basin development, marked by basinwide circular and radial folds. This alternating pattern of basin subsidence is the very nature of crotonic basin evolution. The structural necessity for compressive phases during crotonic basin subsidence, is shown in a regional scale interpretation that has undergone an Earth-curvature correction. The geometrical evolution of the neighboring foreland basin is also interpreted from data that has been corrected with the Earth-curvature function. It shows that basinwide folds sub-parallel and perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the basin are analogous to the circular and radial folds of the crotonic basins. These folds, in the foreland belt, are less pronounced because larger scale structural elements can overprint them. Where the crotonic and foreland basins overlap, a complex, deformed zone is present, and contains late stage volcanism, in this area. The geometry of the Williston Basin can be modeled by the Sloss-type [open quote]inverted Gaussian function[close quote] that is modified by the periodic westward tilting of the basin and the Earth-curvature function.

Redly, P.; Hajnal, Z. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Basinwide fold evolution and geometric development of cratonic - foreland basin interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Latest results of the Williston Basin Project incorporate a north-south regional seismic line, which is crossing the deepest part of the Williston Basin from Saskatchewan to South Dakota. The integration of this new profile to the two, existing east-west regional seismic sections, gives a quasi-3D image of the basin. The combined seismic data illustrate alternating extensive and compressive phases during basin development, marked by basinwide circular and radial folds. This alternating pattern of basin subsidence is the very nature of crotonic basin evolution. The structural necessity for compressive phases during crotonic basin subsidence, is shown in a regional scale interpretation that has undergone an Earth-curvature correction. The geometrical evolution of the neighboring foreland basin is also interpreted from data that has been corrected with the Earth-curvature function. It shows that basinwide folds sub-parallel and perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the basin are analogous to the circular and radial folds of the crotonic basins. These folds, in the foreland belt, are less pronounced because larger scale structural elements can overprint them. Where the crotonic and foreland basins overlap, a complex, deformed zone is present, and contains late stage volcanism, in this area. The geometry of the Williston Basin can be modeled by the Sloss-type {open_quote}inverted Gaussian function{close_quote} that is modified by the periodic westward tilting of the basin and the Earth-curvature function.

Redly, P.; Hajnal, Z. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Preliminary results on the characterization of Cretaceous and lower Tertiary low-permeability (tight) gas-bearing rocks in the Wind River Basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Wind River Basin is a structural and sedimentary basin in central Wyoming (Figure 1) that was created during the Laramide orogeny from Late Cretaceous through Eocene time. The objectives of the Wind River Basin tight gas sandstone project are to define the limits of the tight gas accumulation in the basin and to estimate in-place and recoverable gas resources. The approximate limits of the tight gas accumulation are defined from available drillhole information. Geologic parameters, which controlled the development of the accumulation, are studied in order to better understand the origins of tight gas accumulations, and to predict the limits of the accumulation in areas where little drillhole information is available. The architecture of sandstone reservoirs are studied in outcrop to predict production characteristics of similar reservoirs within the tight gas accumulation. Core and cuttings are used to determine thermal maturities, quality of source rocks, and diagenetic histories. Our work thus far has concentrated in the Wind River Indian Reservation in the western part of the basin.

Fouch, T.D.; Keefer, W.R.; Finn, T.M. [and others

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

Geologic evaluation of critical production parameters for coalbed methane resources. Part 1. San Juan Basin. Annual report, August 1988-July 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the San Juan Basin, Fruitland Formation coal seams contain an estimated 43 to 49 Tcf of methane. With more than 500 producing coalbed methane wells and approximately 1,000 wells scheduled for drilling in 1990, the basin is one of the most active areas of coalbed methane exploration and production in the United States. Among the most important geologic factors affecting the occurrence and producibility of coalbed methane are depositional setting, structural attitude and fracturing of the coal, and regional hydraulic setting. In the second year of the study, the Bureau of Economic Geology evaluated the depositional setting and structure of Fruitland coal seams, which are both source rocks and reservoirs for coalbed methane, throughout the basin. The report summarizes the regional tectonic setting of the San Juan Basin; describes the Cretaceous stratigraphy, structure, and basin evolution; relates these factors to Fruitland coal and coalbed methane occurrence; describes studies of lineaments, fractures, and cleats; presents hydrodynamic controls on the producibility of coalbed methane from the Fruitland Formation; summarizes production from the Fruitland Formation; and evaluates geologic and hydrologic controls on coalbed methane producibility.

Ayers, W.B.; Kaiser, W.R.; Ambrose, W.A.; Swartz, T.E.; Laubach, S.E.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Sedimentology, Stratigraphy and Petrography of the Permian-Triassic Coal-bearing New Lenton Deposit, Bowen Basin, Australia .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Bowen Basin is one of the most intensely explored sedimentary basins in Australia and hosts one of the world’s largest coking coal deposits. This… (more)

Coffin, Lindsay M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Coalbed methane potential assessed in Forest City basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that the Forest City basin is a shallow cratonic depression located in northeastern Kansas, southeastern Nebraska, southern Iowa and northern Missouri. Historically, the Forest City basin in northeastern Kansas has been a shallow oil and gas province with minor coal production. The Iowa and Missouri portion has had minor oil production and moderate coal mining. In recent years there has been little coal mining in the Forest City in Iowa and Kansas and only minor production in Missouri. Before 1940, gas was produced from coal beds and shales in the Kansas portion of the Forest City basin. The Cherokee group (Altokan and Desmoinesian age) includes section containing the largest number of actively mined coals and has the greatest available data for coalbed methane evaluation.

Tedesco, S.A. (CST Oil and Gas Corp., Denver, CO (US))

1992-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

460

Mississippian ''Warsaw'' play makes waves in Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent completions of relatively prolific wells in the mid-Missippian Ullin limestone have generated considerable excitement about this Illinois basin play. Reservoirs found within this limestone, commonly referred to by industry as the Warsaw, are scattered and are prolific oil producers in some areas of the basin. The widespread development of reservoir quality facies at depths ranging from 2,400--4,400 ft and the stratigraphic proximity of thermally mature New Albany shale, the primary Illinois basin source rock are factors that make the Warsaw an excellent exploration target. The paper discusses a depositional model, reservoir development, reservoir facies of the upper and lower Warsaw, factors controlling porosity and permeability, and regional and structural considerations.

Lasemi, Z.; Grube, J.P. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1995-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Zuni sequence in Williston basin - evidence for Mesozoic paleotectonism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Zuni sequence in the Williston basin is a largescale lithogenetic package bounded by interregional unconformities. Within the sequence, three major subdivisions are separated by unconformities or marker beds and correspond with chronostratigraphic units: (1) Middle and Upper Jurassic, (2) Lower Cretaceous, and (3) Upper Cretaceous and Paleocene. The basin has clear expression in the Jurassic subdivision, poor expression in the Lower Cretaceous, and good expression in the Upper Cretaceous. A series of seven marginal paleotectonic elements surround the basin center on the west, south, and east in the US. Five more marginal elements have been described in Canada. Occurrences of oil in the Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous and of natural gas in the Upper Cretaceous are broadly related to the pattern of marginal paleotectonic elements. 14 figures, 1 table.

Shurr, G.W.; Anna, L.O.; Peterson, J.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focused on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report will present results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z