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1

Depositional systems and petroleum potential, Mesaverde Formation southeastern Wind River basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Depositional environments and systems of the Wind River basin Mesaverde Formation were interpreted from an analysis of outcrops along the Casper arch and Rattlesnake Hills anticline and cores and wireline logs from the adjacent subsurface. The Fales Sandstone and Parkman Sandstone/unnamed middle member are deposits of eastward progradational, wave-dominated strand-plain and deltaic complexes. Basal portions of the Fales Sandstone and the Parkman Sandstone are composed of a thickening- and coarsening-upward sandstone sequence whose facies represent storm-dominated inner-shelf and wave-dominated shore-zone environments. Facies sequences in the upper Fales Sandstone interval and the unnamed middle member are interpreted as deposits of lower coastal plain (marshes, bay fills, distributary channels, and crevasse splays) and upper coastal plain (alluvial channels, crevasse splays and fine-grained flood basin) sequences. The Teapot Sandstone is interpreted as an alluvial deposit. Analysis of facies sequences in the Teapot suggests a change in fluvial style, from braided-belt deposits along the southwest flank to meander-belt deposits along the northeast flank of the basin. These fluvial systems fed the Teapot deltas to the east. Stratigraphic plays for oil and gas include alluvial valley fills and point-bar deposits in the Teapot Sandstone, storm-dominated shelf sands in the upper Cody Shale and the Fales and Parkman Sandstones, and a transgressive barrier-bar sequence in the upper Fales Sandstone. Laterally continuous shore-zone sandstones may form combination traps where pinch-outs occur on structure.

Hippe, D.J.; Needham, D.W.; Ethridge, F.G.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

3

Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas-Louisiana- Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin Appalachian Basin Wind River Basin Eastern Shelf NW Shelf Abo Sussex-Shannon Muddy J Mesaverde- Lance-Lewis Medina/Clinton-Tuscarora Bradford-Venango-Elk Berea-Murrysville Piceance Basin Bossier Williston Basin Ft Worth Basin Davis Bighorn Basin Judith River- Eagle Permian Basin Anadarko Basin Denver Basin San Juan Basin North-Central Montana Area Uinta Basin Austin Chalk Codell-Niobrara Penn-Perm Carbonate Niobrara Chalk Dakota Morrow Mesaverde Thirty- One Cleveland Ozona Canyon Wasatch- Mesaverde Red Fork Mesaverde Granite Wash Stuart City-Edwards Bowdoin- Greenhorn Travis Peak Olmos Cotton Valley Vicksburg Wilcox Lobo Pictured Cliffs Cretaceous Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Mancos- Dakota Gilmer Lime Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States

4

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Rappahannock River Basin Commission The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity

5

Council Document ISRP 98-1A Review of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Council Document ISRP 98-1A Review of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program for Fiscal .......................................................................... 23 Umbrella Wildlife Proposals .................................................................................................. 31 WIND RIVER SUBBASIN ....................................................

6

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

7

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

8

River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State South Carolina Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Catawba Wateree River Basin Advisory Commission

9

Atlas of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Atlas of the Columbia River Basin Oregon State University Computer-Assisted Cartography Course & GEOVISUALIZATION GROUP UNIVERSITY #12;2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin FOREWORDAtlas, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. 2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin

Jenny, Bernhard

10

Anisotropy and spatial variation of relative permeability and lithologic character of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. Quarterly report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Work in conjunction with Marathon Oil Company in the Oregon Basin field utilizing Formation MicroImager and Formation MicroScanner logs has been completed. Tensleep outcrops on the western side of the Bighorn Basin are not of the quality necessary to do detailed study of stratification. This made the use of borehole imaging logs, in which stratification can be recognized, particularly attractive for the western side of the Bighorn Basin. The borehole imaging logs were used to determine the dip angle and dip direction of stratification as well as to distinguish different lithologies. It is also possible to recognize erosional bounding surfaces and classify them according to a process-oriented hierarchy. Foreset and bounding surface orientation data was utilized to create bedform reconstructions in order to simulate the distribution of flow-units bounded by erosional surfaces. The bedform reconstructions indicate that the bedforms on the western side of the basin are somewhat different from those on the eastern side of the Bighorn Basin. A report has been submitted to Marathon Oil Company, the principal cost-share subcontractor. Marine dolomitic units initially identified and correlated in the Bighorn Basin have been correlated into the Wind River Basin. Gross and net sand maps have been produced for the entire upper Tensleep in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins, as well as for each of the eolian units identified in the study. These maps indicate an overall thickening of the Tensleep to the west and south. This thickening is a result of both greater subsidence to the west and south and greater differential erosion to the north and east. An article documenting the North Oregon Basin field study will appear in the Gulf Coast Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists Foundation Conference volume entitled {open_quotes}Stratigraphic Analysis Utilizing Advanced Geophysical, Wireline and Borehole Technology for Petroleum Exploration and Production{close_quotes}.

Dunn, T.L.

1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

11

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System...

12

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

13

CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD,...

14

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section...

15

Wing River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Wind Farm River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wing River Wind Farm Facility Wing River Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wing River Wind Farm Developer Wing River Wind Farm Location Hewitt MN Coordinates 46.3254°, -95.0864° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.3254,"lon":-95.0864,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

16

Wind River Conference on Prokaryotic Biology2002  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...as propionate and acetate as carbon and energy sources. Sirtuin-deficient strains lack...of Wisconsin) (2). CONCLUSIONS The Wind River Conference on Prokaryotic Biology...directly to their own research. The 47th Wind River Conference will be 4 to 8 June 2003...

Kenneth W. Bayles; Neil E. Welker; Malcolm E. Winkler; Uldis N. Streips

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Elk River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Wind Farm River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Elk River Wind Farm Facility Elk River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser Empire District Electric Co. Location Butler County KS Coordinates 37.586575°, -96.547093° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.586575,"lon":-96.547093,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

18

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through regional and interstate

19

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The State of the Columbia River Basin in 2012 07 Northwest Energy Efficiency Achievements, 1978-2011 10 Council undertakes mid-term review of Sixth Power Plan 11 Energy Efficiency met most of the new and Commerce United states House of representatives and Committee on Natural resources United states House

20

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Washington. The Act authorized the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish Overview 11 Sixth Northwest Power Plan boosts energy efficiency, renewable energy, Energy efficiency

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Sky River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky River Wind Farm Sky River Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Sky River Wind Farm Facility Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Zond Systems Energy Purchaser Southern California Edison Co Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.07665°, -118.25529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.07665,"lon":-118.25529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

GOLF COURSES FRASER RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

practices (BMP's) for golf courses, entitled Greening your BC Golf Course. A Guide to Environmental. It also summarizes conditions and practices in the Fraser Basin, reviews best management practices.C. Prepared by: UMA ENVIRONMENTAL A Division of UMA Engineering Ltd. Burnaby, B.C. March 1996 #12;THIRD PARTY

23

Rock River Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rock River Wind Farm Facility Rock River Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Shell Wind Energy Developer SeaWest Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Arlington and Carbon Counties WY Coordinates 41.6996°, -107.003° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6996,"lon":-107.003,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

24

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Systems Integrator Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 1961 State Delaware Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Project Review Section The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states (Pennsylvania, New York, New

25

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Basin Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Emergency Management program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

26

Sources of Atmospheric Moisture for the La Plata River Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The La Plata River basin (LPRB) is the second largest basin of South America and extends over a highly populated and socioeconomically active region. In this study, the spatiotemporal variability of sources of moisture for the LPRB are quantified ...

J. Alejandro Martinez; Francina Dominguez

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Oregon Willamette River Basin Mitigation Agreement | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Willamette River Basin Mitigation Agreement Author State of Oregon Recipient Bonneville Power Administration Published Publisher Not Provided, 10222010 DOI Not Provided Check for...

28

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - african river basin Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

<< < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Adaptation to climate change in international river basins in Africa: a review* Summary: ). There are 60 international river basins within the African...

30

Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Resource Challenges Water Resource Challenges From Energy Production Major Types of Power Generation in SRB - Total 15,300 Megawatts - 37.5% 4.0% 12.0% 15.5% 31.0% Nuclear Coal Natural Gas Hydroelectric Other Marcellus Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin The Basin: * 27,510-square-mile watershed * Comprises 43 percent of the Chesapeake Bay watershed * 4.2 million population * 60 percent forested * 32,000+ miles of waterways The Susquehanna River: * 444 miles, largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay * Supplies 18 million gallons a minute to the Bay Susquehanna River Basin Geographic Location of Marcellus Shale within Susq. River Basin 72% of Basin (20,000 Sq. Miles) Underlain by Marcellus Shale Approximate Amount of Natural Gas in Marcellus Shale * U.S. currently produces approx. 30 trillion

31

Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission (Multiple States)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Roanoke River Basin Bi-State Commission was established as a bi-state commission composed of members from the Commonwealth of Virginia and the State of North Carolina.The purpose of the...

32

Hydrologic and Institutional Water Availability in the Brazos River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been constructed to facilitate management of the water resources of the various river basins of the state. Effective control and utilization of the water resource supplied by a stream/reservoir system requires an understanding of the amount of water...

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Bergman, Carla E.; Carriere, Patrick E.; Walls, W. Brian

33

Negotiating nature : expertise and environment in the Klamath River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Negotiating Nature" explores resource management in action and the intertwined roles of law and science in environmental conflicts in the Upper Klamath River Basin in southern Oregon. I follow disputes over the management ...

Buchanan, Nicholas Seong Chul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

HYDROCLIMATIC ASPECTS OF THE 2011 ASSINIBOINE RIVER BASIN FLOOD  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the spring and early summer of 2011, the Assiniboine River Basin in Canada experienced an extreme flood that was unprecedented in terms of duration and severity. The flood had significant socioeconomic impacts and caused over one billion ...

Julian Brimelow; Kit Szeto; Barrie Bonsal; John Hanesiak; Bohdan Kochtubajda; Fraser Evans; Ronald Stewart

35

Rock River LLC Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River LLC Wind Farm River LLC Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search The Rock River LLC Wind Farm is in Carbon County, Wyoming. It consists of 50 turbines and has a total capacity of 50 MW. It is owned by Shell Wind Energy.[1] Based on assertions that the site is near Arlington, its approximate coordinates are 41.5946899°, -106.2083459°.[2] References ↑ http://www.wsgs.uwyo.edu/Topics/EnergyResources/wind.aspx ↑ http://www.thefreelibrary.com/Shell+WindEnergy+Acquires+Second+Wind+Farm+in+the+U.S.,+in+an...-a082345438 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Rock_River_LLC_Wind_Farm&oldid=132230" Category: Wind Farms What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

36

Analysis of salt concentrations in the Brazos River Basin, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF SALT CONCENTRATIONS IN THE BRAZOS RIVER BASIN, TEXAS A Thesis by CHARLES KEITH GANZE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Civil Engineering Analysis of Salt Concentrations in the Brazos River Basin, Texas A Thesis by CHARLES KEITH GANZE Approved as to style and content by: Ralph A. Wurbs (Chair of Committee) James S. Bonner...

Ganze, Charles Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

Screening model optimization for Panay River Basin planning in the Philippines .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The state of the water resources of the Panay River Basin have motivated studies and initial basin planning to mitigate flood damages, to produce hydroelectricity, (more)

Millspaugh, John Henry

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

SALINITY MANAGEMENT IN THE UPPER COLORADO RIVER BASIN: MODELING, MONITORING, AND COST-EQUITY CHALLENGES.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Salinity issues in the Upper Colorado River Basin have been a serious concern to the western United States and northern Mexico. The Colorado River (more)

Keum, Jongho

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Microsoft Word - Powder River Basin 1_6_06.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Economics of Powder River Basin Economics of Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Prepared by: Gregory C. Bank Vello A. Kuuskraa vkuuskraa@adv-res.com Advanced Resources International, Inc. January 2006 Disclaimer This material was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Department of Energy, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. The Economics of Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development

40

Northwest Power and Conservation Council's1 Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northwest Power and Conservation Council's1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife .................................................................................................5 A. The Northwest Power and Conservation Council and the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife. Ocean

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Natural Salt Pollution and Water Supply Reliability in the Brazos River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Brazos River Basin is representative of several major river basins in the Southwestern United States in regard to natural salt pollution. Geologic formations underlying portions of the upper watersheds of the Brazos, Colorado, Pecos, Canadian...

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Karama, Awes S.; Saleh, Ishtiaque; Ganze, C. Keith

42

Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

Onjukka, Sam T. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR); Harbeck, Jim (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Enterprise, OR)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Grande Ronde Basin Supplementation Program; Lostine River, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) identified supplementation as a high priority to achieve its goal of increasing runs of anadromous fish in the Columbia Basin. Supplementation activities in the Lostine River and associated monitoring and evaluation conducted by the Nez Perce Tribe relate directly to the needs addressed in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC 1994). Measure 7.4L.1 of the Program mandates that appropriate research accompany any proposed supplementation. In addition, measure 7.3B.2 of the Program stresses the need for evaluating supplementation projects to assess their ability to increase production. Finally, Section 7.4D.3 encourages the study of hatchery rearing and release strategies to improve survival and adaptation of cultured fish. In 1997, Oregon Department of Fisheries and Wildlife (ODFW) requested a modification of Permit 1011 to allow the take of adult spring chinook salmon. In 1998, the Nez Perce Tribe also requested a permit specific to activities on Lostine River. The permit was issued in 2000. A special condition in the permits required the development of a long term management plan for the spring chinook salmon of the Grande Ronde Basin. The Nez Perce Tribe, ODFW, and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) completed a formal long range plan entitled ''Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program''. The program proposes to increase the survival of spring chinook salmon in the Grand Ronde Basin through hatchery intervention. Adult salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, and the Upper Grande Ronde River are used for a conventional supplementation program in the basin. The Nez Perce program currently operates under the ESA Section 10 Permit 1149.

Onjukka, Sam T. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR); Harbeck, Jim (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Enterprise, OR)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

"1. Coal Creek","Coal","Great River Energy",1133 "2. Antelope Valley","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop",900  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "1. Coal Creek","Coal","Great River Energy",1133 "2. Antelope Valley","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop",900 "3. Milton R Young","Coal","Minnkota Power Coop, Inc",697 "4. Leland Olds","Coal","Basin Electric Power Coop",670 "5. Garrison","Hydroelectric","USCE-Missouri River District",508 "6. Coyote","Coal","Otter Tail Power Co",427 "7. Stanton","Coal","Great River Energy",202 "8. Tatanka Wind Power LLC","Other Renewables","Acciona Wind Energy USA LLC",180 "9. Langdon Wind LLC","Other Renewables","FPL Energy Langdon Wind LLC",159

45

Description of the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Technical Report is to provide background information about the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES). This study, which was supported by the U.S. Department of Energys Wind and Water Power Program, was conducted from 16 November 2010 through 21 March 2012 at a field site in northeastern Oregon. The primary goal of the study was to provide profiles of wind speed and wind direction over the depth of the boundary layer in an operating wind farm located in an area of complex terrain. Measurements from propeller and vane anemometers mounted on a 62 m tall tower, Doppler Sodar, and Radar Wind Profiler were combined into a single data product to provide the best estimate of the winds above the site during the first part of CBWES. An additional goal of the study was to provide measurements of Turbulence Kinetic Energy (TKE) near the surface. To address this specific goal, sonic anemometers were mounted at two heights on the 62 m tower on 23 April 2011. Prior to the deployment of the sonic anemometers on the tall tower, a single sonic anemometer was deployed on a short tower 3.1 m tall that was located just to the south of the radar wind profiler. Data from the radar wind profiler, as well as the wind profile data product are available from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Data Archive (http://www.arm.gov/data/campaigns). Data from the sonic anemometers are available from the authors.

Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Nelson, Danny A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

47

The Columbia River Estuary the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" fish and wildlife in the Columbia River as affected by development and operation of the hydroelectric modified in terms of physical and biological processes. The development and operation of the hydroelectric

48

CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Management at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge

49

A study to determine the feasibility of diverting a portion of the Red River into the Trinity, Neches and Sabine River basins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

outlook ~Pt t 1 Trinity River Basin EconoInic outlook ~Pt t 1 Neches River Basin 10 10 Economic outlook 10 ~Pt t 1 Sabine River Basin Economic outlook 12 I I I. THE WATER RESOURCES DF THE NECHES AND RED RIVER BASINS 14 Neches River Basin 14.... Municipal and Industrial Water Requirements Page 13 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Page I- 1. State of Texas 2-1. Population Projection and Municipal and Industrial Water Requirements 3-1. Neches River Basin Reservoirs 19 3-2. Low Flow Events, Neches River...

Cook, John Henry

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Red River play, Gulf Canada deal boost Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

High levels of activity in the Williston basin are assured this year with an expanding horizontal drilling play for oil in Ordovician Red River. The Red River play, like the Mississippian Lodgepole mound play, is centered in North Dakota. But the Red River play is much larger, extending into eastern Montana and northwestern South Dakota. More than 500 Red River B wells have been staked. One of the most recent companies to position itself in both plays is Gulf Canada Resources Ltd. The company forged an agreement with the Assiniboine and Sioux Indian tribes. The agreement initially provides Gulf access to about 800,000 acres on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, mostly in Roosevelt County, Mont., on the western slope of the Williston basin. Under an option, Gulf`s access could later expand to cover the reservation`s remaining 1.3 million acres. The paper discusses the extent of the Red River play, and Gulf Canada`s role in its development.

NONE

1997-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

51

Missouri River Energy Services (MRES) Wind Farm (2003) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Missouri River Energy Services (MRES) Wind Farm (2003) Facility Missouri River Energy Services (MRES) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Missouri River Energy Services Energy Purchaser Missouri River Energy Services Location Worthington County MN Coordinates 43.6659°, -95.7493° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.6659,"lon":-95.7493,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

52

Interaction of Groundwater and Surface Water in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interaction of Groundwater and Surface Water in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins Cretaceous aquifer systems in the Williston and Powder River structural basins is currently being assessed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The Williston basin is located in parts of North Dakota, South Dakota

Torgersen, Christian

53

Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range geothermal areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Microearthquake surveys of Snake River plain and Northwest Basin and Range geothermal areas Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: applications; Basin and Range Province; Black Rock Desert; Cassia County Idaho; earthquakes; economic geology; exploration; fracture zones; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; Humboldt County Nevada; Idaho; microearthquakes; Nevada; North America; passive systems; Pershing County Nevada; Raft River; reservoir rocks; seismic methods; seismicity; seismology; Snake River plain; surveys; United States; Western U.S. Author(s): Kumamoto, L.H.

54

Paleotopography and hydrocarbon accumulation: Williston, Powder River, and Denver basins  

SciTech Connect

Recent geomorphic analyses of 1:24,000 scale topographic maps in the three major basins of the northern Great Plains have disclosed a persistent system of basement paleotopographic features that trend north-northeast throughout the region. Superimposed across this system and subtly influenced by it, are the northwesterly trending Laramide structural features. Paleozoic depositional patterns have been strongly influenced by the paleoridge and trough system formed by the north-northeast features. Mesozoic deposition has also been affected by the ancient subsurface system but in a more subtle manner. Many of the Paleozoic and Mezoxoic hydrocarbon locations in the three basins appear to be the results of paleotopographic control on hydrocarbon accumulation sites. This affect ranges from Paleozoic reef sites in the Williston basin through paleotrough localization of Pennsylvanian Minnelusa production in the Powder River basin to fractured Cretaceous Niobrara production at the Silo field in the Denver basin. Basement paleotopography is the underlying factor in all deposition and subsequent hydrocarbon migration in any basin. As such, it should be considered a major factor in the exploration for oil and gas.

Thomas, G.E. (Thomas and Associates, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Missouri River Energy Services (MRES) Wind Farm (2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Missouri River Energy Services (MRES) Wind Farm (2002) Name Missouri River Energy Services (MRES) Wind Farm (2002) Facility Missouri River Energy Services (MRES) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Missouri River Energy Services (MRES) Developer Missouri River Energy Services (MRES) with Tom Wind Energy Purchaser MRES/ Worthington Public Utilities Location Worthington - Nobles County MN Coordinates 43.6659°, -95.7493° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.6659,"lon":-95.7493,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

56

Coalbed methane potential of the Greater Green River, Piceance, Powder River, and Raton Basins. Topical report, January 1991-July 1991  

SciTech Connect

Coalbed methane potential of the Greater Green River, Piceance, Powder River, and Raton Basins was evaluated in the context of geologic and hydrologic characteristics identified in the San Juan Basin, the nation's leading coalbed methane producing basin. The major comparative criteria were (1) coalbed methane resources, (2) geologic and hydrologic factors that predict areas of high gas producibility and high coalbed reservoir permeability, and (3) coalbed thermal maturity. The technical criteria were expanded to include structure, depositional systems, and data base and then combined with economic criteria (production, industry activity, and pipeline availability) to evaluate the coalbed methane potential of the basins. The Greater Green River and Piceance Basins have primary potential to make a significant near-term contribution to the nation's gas supply. These basins have large gas resources, high-rank coals, high gas contents, and established coalbed methane production. The Greater Green River Basin has numerous coalbed methane targets, good coal-seam permeability, and extensive hydrologic areas favorable for production. The Powder River and Raton Basins were judged to have secondary potential. Coal beds in the Powder River Basin are thermally immature and produce large volumes of water; the Raton Basin has a poor data base and has no gas pipeline infrastructure. Low production and minimal industry activity further limit the near-term potential of the Raton Basin. However, if economic criteria are discounted and only major technical criteria are considered, the Greater Green River and Raton Basins are assigned primary potential. The Raton Basin's shallow, thermally mature coal beds of good permeability are attractive coalbed methane targets, but low coal-seam permeability limits the coalbed methane potential of the Piceance Basin.

Tyler, R.; Ambrose, W.A.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

XXI Century Climatology of Snow Cover for the Western River Basins of the Indus River System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under changing climate, freshwater resources of Hindu Kush-Karakoram-Himalaya (HKH) region can be affected by changes in temperature and in amount, type and distribution of precipitation. This can have serious implications for the water supply and in turn threaten the food security and economic wellbeing of Indus basin. Using MODIS daily snow products (Terra & Aqua), this study focuses on the assessment of the 2000-2010 snow cover dynamics on seasonal/annual basis against geophysical parameters (aspect, elevation and slope) for the so called western river basins of Indus River System (IRS), namely Indus, Kabul, Jhelum, Astore, Gilgit, Hunza, Swat, Shigar and Shyok basins. Results show that inputs from MODIS instrument provide unprecedented better opportunity to study by using GIS techniques the snow cover dynamics in the remote areas like HKH region at such hyper-temporal and finer planar resolution. Adapted non-spectral cloud filtering techniques have significantly reduced cloud coverage and improved sno...

Hasson, Shabeh ul; Lucarini, Valerio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

CRAD, Training - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Training - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Environment, Safety and Health program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Training - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge

59

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Basin Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Conduct of Operations program at the Office of River Protection, K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin

60

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Engineering program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Wind River Watershed Restoration 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

During 2004, researchers from U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize physical habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. Juvenile salmonid population surveys were conducted within select study areas throughout the subbasin. We expanded our survey coverage of the mainstem Wind River to a reach in the vicinity of Carson National Fish Hatchery to assess effects of non-indigenous Chinook on native steelhead. These efforts add to a database of habitat and fish data collected in the Wind River since 1996. This research contributes to the Wind River Restoration Project, which includes active stream habitat restoration and monitoring of adult and juvenile steelhead populations. We maintained a network of 32 thermographs in the Wind River subbasin during 2004. Additionally, Underwood Conservation District provided us with data from seven thermographs that they maintained during 2004. Thermograph data are identifying areas with chronic high water temperatures and stream sections where high rates of warming are occurring. During 2004, water temperatures at 26 thermograph sites exceeded the 16 C limit for surface waters set by the Washington Department of Ecology. Water temperatures exceeded 20 C at five sites in the Trout Creek watershed. Our thermograph dataset includes information from as early as 1996 at some sites and has become a valuable long-term dataset, which will be crucial in determining bioenergetic relationships with habitat and life-histories. We have monitored salmonid populations throughout the Wind River subbasin by electrofishing and snorkeling. We electrofished four stream sections for population estimates during 2004. In these sections, and others where we simply collected fish without a population estimate, we tagged juvenile steelhead and Chinook salmon with Passive Integrated Transponder (PIT) tags to track growth and movement of individuals. We snorkeled nine stream sections during 2004. Juvenile steelhead populations have varied greatly between streams and between years. Numbers of age-0 steelhead have increased substantially since 2000 within the MINE reach (rkm 35.0-40.0) section of the upper Wind River. Because of potential negative interactions with steelhead, naturally spawned populations of introduced juvenile Chinook salmon are of concern in the mainstem of the Wind River. During 2004, we deployed over 3,000 PIT tags in the Wind River subbasin, primarily in juvenile steelhead, but also in juvenile Chinook. We are compiling a dataset of recapture information on these tagged fish as well as interrogation information from Bonneville Dam and other sites. The habitat and fish data collected have been used in Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment modeling efforts, the Wind River Subbasin Plan, and the Total Maximum Daily Load report from Washington Department of Ecology. Continued monitoring of changes in habitat, combined with data on fish populations, will help guide planning efforts of land and fish managers. As long-term active and passive restoration actions are implemented in the Wind River and its tributaries, these data will provide the ability to measure change. Because the Wind River subbasin has no steelhead hatchery or supplementation, these data will be useful to compare population trends in subbasins with hatchery or supplementation management.

Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G. [U.S. Geological Survey

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

62

Groundwater recharge estimates for the Powder River and Williston structural basins Katherine R. Aurand and Andrew J. Long  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Groundwater recharge estimates for the Powder River and Williston structural basins Katherine R Cretaceous aquifer system in the Powder River and Williston structural basins. The study area covers about 75 production in the Powder River structural basin and oil production in the Williston structural basin

Torgersen, Christian

63

Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Water Resources Compact (multi-state)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act describes the management of the Great Lakes - St. Lawrence River basin, and regulates water withdrawals, diversions, and consumptive uses from the basin. The Act establishes a Council,...

64

Savannah River Site - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

D-Area Oil Seepage Basin Savannah River Site - D-Area Oil Seepage Basin January 1, 2014 - 12:00pm Addthis US Department of Energy Groundwater Database Groundwater Master Report...

65

OUTDOOR RECREATION USE AND VALUE: SNAKE RIVER BASIN OF CENTRAL IDAHO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OUTDOOR RECREATION USE AND VALUE: SNAKE RIVER BASIN OF CENTRAL IDAHO John R. McKean Agricultural . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Recreation Demand Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Recreation Demand Survey

O'Laughlin, Jay

66

E-Print Network 3.0 - ameca river basin Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River is an inte- grated biophysical system, but the basin is ... Source: Northwest Power Planning Council Collection: Power Transmission, Distribution and Plants 13 Future of...

67

Inventing the Charles River Basin : urban images and civic discourse in Boston, 1844-1994  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Charles River Basin, extending from the foot of Beacon Hill upstream past Harvard's Soldiers Field, has been called Boston's "Central Park." The river looks to all appearances tranquil and unchanging, one of the most ...

Haglund, Karl T

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Thermal analysis of the southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Temperature and geologic data from over 3,000 oil and gas wells within a 180 km x 30 km area that transect across the southern Powder River Basin in Wyoming, U.S.A., were used to determine the present thermal regime of the basin. Three-dimensional temperature fields within the transect, based on corrected bottom-hole temperatures (BHTs) and other geologic information, were assessed using: (1) A laterally constant temperature gradient model in conjunction with an L{sub 1} norm inversion method, and (2) a laterally variable temperature gradient model in conjunction with a stochastic inversion technique. The mean geothermal gradient in the transect is 29 C/km, but important lateral variations in the geothermal gradient exist. The average heat flow for the southern Powder River Basin is 52 mW/m{sup 2} with systematic variations between 40 mW/m{sup 2} and 60 mW/m{sup 2} along the transect. Extremely high local heat flow (values up to 225 mW/m{sup 2}) in the vicinity of the Teapot Dome and the Salt Creek Anticline and low heat flow of 25 mW/m{sup 2} occurring locally near the northeast end of the transect are likely caused by groundwater movement.

McPherson, B.J.O.L.; Chapman, D.S. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics] [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The 52nd Annual Wind River Conference on Prokaryotic Biology2008  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...transport, metabolism, and carbohydrate and energy production. All of these virulence and...seldom found at scientific meetings. The Wind River Conference on Prokaryotic Biology...regardless of seniority. We thank the Wind River Executive Committee and this years...

E. Mann; M. A Zaunbrecher; K. Hitz; G. Churchward

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

70

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Environment, Safety and Health program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

71

Conditional Reliability Modeling of Short-term River Basin Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONDITIONAL RELIABILITY MODELING OF SHORT-TERM RIVER BASIN MANAGEMENT ASCE Texas Section Spring Meeting 2003 By: A.Andr?s Salazar, Ph.D. Freese and Nichols, Inc. and Ralph A. Wurbs, P.E., Ph.D. Texas A&M University 2 TEXAS WATER AVAILABITY MODEL...-88Year Storage (x 1000 ac-ft) Periods without shortage = 657 out of 672 (97.8%) What is the probability of satisfying demand when reservoir falls below 100,000 ac-ft? 9 CONDITIONAL RELIABILITY Statistical analysis of small sequences. Simulation 1...

Salazar, A.; Wurbs, R. A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Wind River Watershed Restoration, 2005-2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work completed by U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) in the Wind River subbasin during the period April 2005 through March 2006 under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract 22095. During this period, we collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. We also conducted electrofishing and snorkeling surveys to determine juvenile salmonid populations within select study areas throughout the subbasin. Portions of this work were completed with additional funding from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group (LCFEG). A statement of work (SOW) was submitted to BPA in March 2005 that outlined work to be performed by USGS-CRRL. The SOW was organized by work elements, with each describing a research task. This report summarizes the progress completed under each work element.

Jezorek, Ian G.; Connolly, Patrick J.; Munz, Carrie [U.S. Geological Survey

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Independent External Peer Review Report ACT River Basin 2 July 2013 ii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ ACT River Basin 2 July 2013 ii Table of Contents List of Panel 6 3.3 Preparation and Charge for Peer Review Panel 7 3.4 Performing the IEPR 7 3.5 Panel Consensus 9 #12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ ACT River Basin 2 July 2013 iii List of Tables Table

US Army Corps of Engineers

74

Distribution of Chironomidae (Insecta: Diptera) in polluted rivers of the Juru River Basin, Penang, Malaysia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of physical and chemical parameters on the abundance and diversity of chironomids was studied in six rivers with moderate to highly polluted water in the Juru River Basin. The rivers: Ceruk Tok Kun (CTKR) as reference site, and polluted rivers of Pasir (PR), Juru (JR), Permatang Rawa (PRR), Ara (AR) and Kilang Ubi (KUR) were sampled over a period of five months (November 2007-March 2008). Nine chirnomid species: Chironimus kiiensis, C. javanus, Polypedilum trigonus, Microchironomus sp., Dicrotendipes sp., Tanytarsus formosanus, Clinotanypus sp., Tanypus punctipennis and Fittkauimyia sp. were identified. Assessment of their relationships with several environmental parameters was performed using the canonical correspondence analysis (CCA). Tanytarsus formosanus was the most dominant in the relatively clean CTKR and moderately polluted JR with mean densities of 19.66 and 25.32 m?2, respectively while C. kiiensis was abundant in more polluted rivers. Tanytarsus formosanus, Dicrotendipes sp. and Microchironomus sp. were grouped under moderate to high water temperature, total organic matter (TOM), total suspended solids (TSS), velocity, pH, phosphates and sulphates. However, Tanypus punctipennis, Fittkauimyia sp., and Clinotanypus sp. were associated with high contents of river sediment such as TOM, Zn and Mn and water ammonium-N and nitrate-N and they were associated with higher dissolved oxygen (DO) content in the water. Chironomus kiiensis, C. javanus and P. trigonus showed positive relationships with TOM, ammonium-N and nitrate-N as well as trace metals of Zn, Cu and Mn. These three species could be considered as tolerant species since they have the ability to survive in extreme environmental conditions with low DO and high concentrations of pollutants. Based on the water parameter scores in all rivers, the highest diversity of chironomid larvae was reported in CTKR. With higher concentrations of organic and/or inorganic pollutants as reported in PPR, KUR and AR, the chironomid larval diversity decreased, and the abundance of tolerant species, mainly Chironomus spp., increased.

Salman A. Al-Shami; Che Salmah Md Rawi; Abu HassanAhmad; Siti Azizah Mohd Nor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Attribution and Characteristics of Wet and Dry Seasons in the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Previous research has shown that the temperature and precipitation variability in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) is correlated with large-scale climate variability (i.e., El Nio - Southern Oscillation [ENSO] and Pacific Decadal Oscillation ...

Rebecca A. Bolinger; Christian D. Kummerow; Nolan J. Doesken

76

Texas Legislative and Irrigation Districts of the Rio Grande River Basin: A Map Series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The title of this map series is Texas Legislative and Irrigation Districts of the Rio Grande River Basin. The series consists of nine (9) maps showing the boundaries of legislative districts and 32 water districts that deliver irrigation water...

Leigh, Eric; Fipps, G.

77

The role of passive microwaves in characterizing snow cover in the Colorado river basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Snow cover and snow depth data acquired from meteorological stations and SNOTEL sites in the Colorado river basin of the western US were compared and correlated with brightness...o latitude by 1/4o...longitude gr...

A. T. C. Chang; J. L. Foster; A. Rango

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hydrocarbon trapping mechanisms in the Miller Creek area of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

'' 1975 43'W'79 ABSTRACT Hydrocarbon Trapoing Mechanisms in the Miller Creek Area of the Powder River Basin, Wyoming. (May 1975) Jennifer Ann Armstrong, B. S. , University of Texas at Austin Chairman of Advisory Committee: 17r. Robert. R. Berg...

Armstrong, Jennifer Ann

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Comparison Between Two Hydrodynamic Models for Flooding Simulations at River Lima Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

According to EU flood risks directive, flood hazard maps should include information on hydraulic ... Lima basin, Portugal. This river includes several flood-prone areas. Ponte Lima town is one of the places of hi...

Jos Pinho; Rui Ferreira; Lus Vieira; Dirk Schwanenberg

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Water quality modelling for recreational use in the Kallang River Basin, Singapore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Singapore's Active, Beautiful, and Clean Waters Programme (ABC) aims to provide functional use of its water bodies to the public. The Kallang River Basin, being part of the ABC Programme, will be used for recreational ...

Angeles, Justin Victor V. (Justin Victor Velayo)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Linking Water Conservation and Natural Resource Stewardship in the Trinity River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water conservation is a critical issue in Texas today. This publication explores the relationship between ecosystem health and land stewardship in the Trinity River Basin. It also describes how responsible land stewardship can be applied in urban...

Cathey, James; Locke, Shawn; Feldpausch, A.M.; Parker, I.D.; Frentress, C.; Whiteside, J.; Mason, C.; Wagner, M.

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

82

Effects of oceanic and atmospheric phenomena on precipitation and flooding in the Manafwa River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation was performed to determine the relationship between certain oceanic and atmospheric phenomena and the precipitation patterns in the Manafwa River Basin of eastern Uganda. Such phenomena are the El Nio ...

Finney, William W., III (William Warner)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from interfluvial wetlands in the upper Negro River basin, Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extensive interfluvial wetlands occur in the upper Negro River basin (Brazil) and contain a mosaic of vegetation dominated by emergent grasses and sedges with patches of shrubs and palms. To characterize the rele...

Lauren Belger; Bruce R. Forsberg; John M. Melack

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Mapping of Surface Albedo over Mackenzie River Basin from Satellite Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents the approach and results of mapping surface albedo and bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) properties over the Mackenzie River Basin (MRB). Satellite observations from...

Alexander P. Trishchenko

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Wind River Watershed Restoration, 2006-2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work completed by U.S. Geological Survey's Columbia River Research Laboratory (USGS-CRRL) in the Wind River subbasin during the period April 2006 through March 2007 under Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) contract 26922. During this period, we collected temperature, flow, and habitat data to characterize physical habitat condition and variation within and among tributaries and mainstem sections in the Wind River subbasin. We also conducted electrofishing and snorkeling surveys to determine juvenile salmonid populations within select study areas throughout the subbasin. Portions of this work were completed with additional funding from U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Lower Columbia Fish Enhancement Group (LCFEG). Funding from USFWS was for work to contribute to a study of potential interactions between introduced Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and wild steelhead O. mykiss. Funding from LCFEG was for work to evaluate the effects of nutrient enrichment in small streams. A statement of work (SOW) was submitted to BPA in March 2006 that outlined work to be performed by USGS-CRRL. The SOW was organized by work elements, with each describing a research task. This report summarizes the progress completed under each work element.

Connolly, Patrick J.; Jezorek, Ian G.; Munz, Carrie S. [U.S. Geological Survey

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

Floods in the Nueces, Guadalupe, Lavaca and Mission river basins: magnitude and frequency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

APPENDIX B - TABULATION OF RECURRENCE INTERVALS 12 20 29 50 51 133 LIST OP TABLES Table Page 1 ~ Example of Data Prepared for hnalysls . . . ~ ~ . . . , . . . , , , 36 2 ~ Determination of Median Ratio Por Stations Numbers 1, 2, 6 and 10... of the Nueces River Basin ~ . . . . ? . . . . . . . . . . ~ . . . 41 3. Tabulation of Median Ratios for All Stations except Numbers 1, 2, 6 and 10 of the Nueces River Basin 4. Listing of Base Gaging Stations LIST Op PIQURES tigure Page I, Typical Plot...

Caffey, James Enoch

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

87

Prediction of ungauged river basin for hydropower potential and flood risk mitigation: a case study at Gin River, Sri Lanka  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A hydrologic study was performed for ungauged river basin of Sri Lanka to examine synthetic discharge relations. Rainfall-runoff relationships were used for identifying hydrological conditions of the Gin River basin. The peak discharge achieves within 4.74 hours from the onset of the rainstorm and 11.95 hours take to reach its normal discharge conditions. Stream frequency of the Gin River is 4.56 junctions/km while the channel slope gradient is 7.90 m/km. The regional coefficient of the catchment is 0.00296. Higher stream frequency and gentle channel slope were identified as flood triggering factors of the basin. Mini-hydropower systems were recognised as the most applicable and economical flood controlling hydraulic structures. Also, it can be utilised as a reliable energy source (8,630.0 kW).

A.S. Ratnayake; A. Pitawala

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Fluctuating Asymmetry of Chironomus spp. (Diptera: Chironomidae) Larvae in Association with Water Quality and Metal Pollution in Permatang Rawa River in the Juru River Basin, Penang, Malaysia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Malaysia, considerable efforts have been made in the past two decades toward analyzing chemical pollution in several rivers, including those in the Juru River Basin (e.g., Lim and Kiu 1995; Fulazzaky et al. 20...

Salman Abdo Al-Shami; Mad Rawi Che Salmah; Ahmad Abu Hassan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screens Evaluations, 2006 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated Gardena Farms, Little Walla Walla, and Garden City/Lowden II Phase II fish screen facilities and provided underwater videography beneath a leaking rubber dam in the Walla Walla River basin in 2006. Evaluations of the fish screen facilities took place in early May 2006, when juvenile salmonids are generally outmigrating. At the Gardena Farms site, extended high river levels caused accumulations of debris and sediment in the forebay. This debris covered parts of the bottom drum seals, which could lead to early deterioration of the seals and drum screen. Approach velocities were excessive at the upstream corners of most of the drums, leading to 14% of the total approach velocities exceeding 0.4 feet per second (ft/s). Consequently, the approach velocities did not meet National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) design criteria guidelines for juvenile fish screens. The Little Walla Walla site was found to be in good condition, with all approach, sweep, and bypass velocities within NMFS criteria. Sediment buildup was minor and did not affect the effectiveness of the screens. At Garden City/Lowden II, 94% of approach velocities met NMFS criteria of 0.4 ft/s at any time. Sweep velocities increased toward the fish ladder. The air-burst mechanism appears to keep large debris off the screens, although it does not prevent algae and periphyton from growing on the screen face, especially near the bottom of the screens. In August 2006, the Gardena Farm Irrigation District personnel requested that we look for a leak beneath the inflatable rubber dam at the Garden City/Lowden II site that was preventing water movement through the fish ladder. Using our underwater video equipment, we were able to find a gap in the sheet piling beneath the dam. Erosion of the riverbed was occurring around this gap, allowing water and cobbles to move beneath the dam. The construction engineers and irrigation district staff were able to use the video footage to resolve the problem within a couple weeks. We had hoped to also evaluate the effectiveness of modifications to louvers behind the Nursery Bridge screens when flows were higher than 350 cubic feet per second, (cfs) but were unable to do so. Based on the one measurement made in early 2006 after the modified louvers were set, it appears the modified louvers may help reduce approach velocities. The auxiliary supply water system gates also control water through the screens. Evaluating the effect of different combinations of gate and louver positions on approach velocities through the screens may help identify optimum settings for both at different river discharges.

Chamness, Mickie; Abernethy, Scott; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Yakima River Basin Phase II Fish Screen Evaluations, 2003  

SciTech Connect

In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

Vucelick, Jessica A.; McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, Mickie A.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Sediment budget of the Napo River, Amazon basin, Ecuador and Peru A., Laraque1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Sediment budget of the Napo River, Amazon basin, Ecuador and Peru A., Laraque1 , C., Bernal2 , J-downstream sediment budget along the Napo River (100,520 km2 , 6,300 m3 s-1 ) was studied in the Andean Foothill an unusual increase in the concentration of suspended sediment recorded for the western part of the Amazon

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

92

Hydrodynamic and water quality river basin modeling using CE-QUAL-W2 version 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dimensional (longitudinal-vertical) water quality and hydrodynamic computer simulation model that was originally developed of the Lower Snake River in the Northwestern USA; the Bull Run River basin composed of 3 water supply and computes water levels, horizontal and vertical velocities, temperature, and 21 other water quality

Wells, Scott A.

93

Clay mineralogy of surface sediments as a tool for deciphering river contributions to the Cariaco Basin (Venezuela)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basin (Venezuela) V. Bout-Roumazeilles,1 A. Riboulleau,1 E. Armynot du Châtelet,1 L. Lorenzoni,3 N for deciphering river contributions to the Cariaco Basin (Venezuela), J. Geophys. Res. Oceans, 118, doi:10

Meyers, Steven D.

94

A tale of two rivers: Pathways for improving water management in the Jordan and Colorado River basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper considers two river systems that have been subject to significant development during the last 60 years: the Jordan River in the Middle East and the Colorado River in the western United States. Both play major roles in serving the demands of growing populations, and climate change models predict both semi-arid to arid regions to become hotter and/or drier in the future. The Jordan River basin, shared by five nations, is already experiencing a critical level of environmental damage. Its lower stretch is practically a sewage canal with less than 10% of its natural base-flow. Due to its unique historical, religious and environmental role, restoration efforts have gained momentum and wide public support. In the Colorado River Basin, water law is characterized by the Law of the River and water use is managed through regional allocation constraints. The Colorado River, shared by seven U.S. states and Mexico, is highly managed and over-allocated. Shortage declarations have serious implications for low priority users, with the Central Arizona Project being among the lowest. This makes large population centers and agricultural users vulnerable to curtailment of deliveries. We argue that there are common factors with respect to the policy and management options of these two basins that may provide insights into the similarities and divergences of their respective future pathways. These factors are: regional water supply and demand pressures, water governance, transboundary issues and demand for environmental flows. With a particular focus on the Israel and Arizona portions of these respective river basins, we address synergies and tradeoffs between groundwater and surface water usage, sectoral allocation strategies, public vs. private water ownership and legality, transboundary sharing, technical options for addressing growing regional water scarcity, and economic considerations. Difficult and bold decisions are required in both regions.

Assaf Chen; Adam Abramson; Nir Becker; Sharon B. Megdal

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A comparison of groundwater recharge estimation methods in the Williston and Powder River structural basins in the Northern Great Plains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison of groundwater recharge estimation methods in the Williston and Powder River-water-balance (SWB) model to estimate groundwater recharge in the Williston and Powder River structural basins

Torgersen, Christian

96

Greater Platte River Basins Symposium PROGRAM Thursday, October 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Niobrara River in the National Scenic Reach, Nebraska ­ Jason Alexander, US Geological Survey ­ Nebraska

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

97

Wind extremes in the North Sea Basin under climate change: An ensemble study of 12 CMIP5 GCMs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind extremes in the North Sea Basin under climate change: An ensemble study of 12 CMIP5 GCMs R. C levels and waves are generated by low atmospheric pressure and severe wind speeds during storm events. As a result of the geometry of the North Sea, not only the maximum wind speed is relevant, but also wind

Haak, Hein

98

Application of a medium-range global hydrologic probabilistic forecast scheme to the Ohio River Basin  

SciTech Connect

A 10-day globally applicable flood prediction scheme was evaluated using the Ohio River basin as a test site for the period 2003-2007. The Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrology model was initialized with the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis temperatures and wind, and Tropical Rainfall Monitoring Mission Multi Satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation up to the day of forecast. In forecast mode, the VIC model was then forced with a calibrated and statistically downscaled ECMWF ensemble prediction system (EPS) 10-day ensemble forecast. A parallel set up was used where ECMWF EPS forecasts were interpolated to the spatial scale of the hydrology model. Each set of forecasts was extended by 5 days using monthly mean climatological variables and zero precipitation in order to account for the effect of initial conditions. The 15-day spatially distributed ensemble runoff forecasts were then routed to four locations in the basin, each with different drainage areas. Surrogates for observed daily runoff and flow were provided by the reference run, specifically VIC simulation forced with ECMWF analysis fields and TMPA precipitation fields. The flood prediction scheme using the calibrated and downscaled ECMWF EPS forecasts was shown to be more accurate and reliable than interpolated forecasts for both daily distributed runoff forecasts and daily flow forecasts. Initial and antecedent conditions dominated the flow forecasts for lead times shorter than the time of concentration depending on the flow forecast amounts and the drainage area sizes. The flood prediction scheme had useful skill for the 10 following days at all sites.

Voisin, Nathalie; Pappenberger, Florian; Lettenmaier, D. P.; Buizza, Roberto; Schaake, John

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS IN AQUATIC ENVIRONMENTS OF THE MISSISSIPPI RIVER BASIN  

SciTech Connect

In December 1992, the CBR was awarded a five-year grant of $25M from the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ''Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin'' project was an interdisciplinary, collaborative research and education project aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments. This project funded 15 collaborative cluster multi-year projects and 41 one-year initiation projects out of 165 submitted research proposals. This project was carried out by 134 research and technical support faculty from Xavier University (School of Arts and Sciences, and College of Pharmacy) and Tulane University (Schools of Liberal Arts and Sciences, Engineering, Medicine, and Public Health and Tropical Medicine), and 173 publications and 140 presentations were produced. More than 100 graduate and undergraduate students were trained through these collaborative cluster and initiation research projects. Nineteen Tulane graduate students received partial funding to conduct their own competitively-chosen research projects, and 28 Xavier undergraduate LIFE Scholars and 30 LIFE Interns were supported with DOE funding to conduct their mentored research projects. Studies in this project have defined: (1) the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, (2) the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and (3) the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The bayou and spoil banks of Bayou Trepagnier were mapped and analyzed in terms of risks associated with the levels of hydrocarbons and metals at specific sample sites. Data from contaminated sample sites have been incorporated into a large database and used in GIS analyses to track the fate and transport of heavy metals from spoil banks into the surrounding marsh. These data are crucial to understanding how heavy metals move through wetlands environments. These data, coupled with plume characterization data, indicate that Bayou Trepagnier is a model system for understanding how wetlands populations of fish, amphibians, and plants respond to long-term hydrocarbon and metals contamination. The CBR has fifteen years of experience in developing model aquatic ecosystems for evaluating environmental problems relevant to DOE cleanup activities. Using biotechnology screens and biomarkers of exposure, this project supports other CBR research demonstrating that chemicals in the environment can signal/alter the development of species in aquatic ecosystems, and show detrimental impacts on community, population, and the ecosystem, including human health. CBR studies funded through this grant have resulted in private sector investments, international collaborations, development of new technologies, and substantial new knowledge concerning the effects of hazardous materials on human and ecosystem health. Through the CBR, Tulane and Xavier Universities partnered with DOE-EM to lay groundwork for an effective research agenda that has become part of the DOE long term stewardship science and technology program and institutional management of the DOE complex.

John A. McLachlan

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston structural basins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Groundwater recharge estimates using a soil-water-balance model for the Powder River and Williston for the lower Tertiary and Upper Cretaceous aquifer system in the Powder River and Williston structural basins in the Williston structural basin will require trillions of gallons of water from this aquifer system over the next

Torgersen, Christian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fsh Habitat Enhancement Project : 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Umatilla River Basin Anadromous Fish Habitat Enhancement Project continued to identify impacted stream reaches throughout the Umatilla River Basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public outreach efforts, biological and physical monitoring, and continued development of a Umatilla River Basin Watershed Assessment assisted the project in fostering public cooperation, targeting habitat deficiencies and determining habitat recovery measures. Habitat enhancement projects continued to be maintained on 44 private properties, four riparian easements and one in-stream enhancement agreement were secured, two new projects implemented and two existing projects improved to enhance anadromous fish habitat and natural fisheries production capabilities in the Umatilla River Basin. New project locations included sites on the mid Umatilla River and Buckaroo Creek. Improvements were implemented at existing project sites on the upper Umatilla River and Wildhorse Creek. A stream bank stabilization project was implemented at approximately River Mile 37.4 Umatilla River to stabilize 760 feet of eroding stream bank and improve in-stream habitat diversity. Habitat enhancements at this site included construction of six rock barbs with one large conifer root wad incorporated into each barb, stinging approximately 10,000 native willow cuttings, planting 195 tubling willows and 1,800 basin wildrye grass plugs, and seeding 40 pounds of native grass seed. Staff time to assist in development of a subcontract and fence materials were provided to establish eight spring sites for off-stream watering and to protect wetlands within the Buckaroo Creek Watershed. A gravel bar was moved and incorporated into an adjacent point bar to reduce stream energy and stream channel confinement within the existing project area at River Mile 85 Umatilla River. Approximately 10,000 native willow cuttings were stung and trenched into the stream channel margins and stream banks, and 360 basin wildrye grass plugs planted and 190 pounds of native grass seed broadcast on terraces between River Mile 10 and 12.5 within the existing Wildhorse Creek Project Area. Approximately 70 pounds of native grasses were seeded in the existing McKay Creek Project Area at approximately River Mile 21.5. Financial and in-kind cost share assistance was provided by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Department of Agriculture, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Fish and Wildlife Federation and the Umatilla National Forest for the enhancements at River Mile 37.4 Umatilla River and within the Buckaroo Creek Watershed. Monitoring continued to quantify effects of habitat enhancements in the upper basin. Maximum, minimum and average daily stream temperatures were collected from June through September at 22 sites. Suspended sediment samples were obtained at three gage stations to arrive at daily sediment load estimates. Photographs were taken at 94 existing and two newly established photo points to document habitat recovery. Umatilla Basin Watershed Assessment efforts were continued under a subcontract with Washington State University. This endeavor involves compiling existing information, identifying data gaps, determining habitat-limiting factors and recommending actions to improve anadromous fisheries habitat. This watershed assessment document and working databases will be completed in fiscal year 2002 and made available to assist project personnel with sub-watershed prioritization of habitat needs.

Shaw, R. Todd

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Wind River Watershed Project; Volume I of III Reports A thru E, 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the ongoing efforts to document life history strategies of steelhead in the Wind River watershed and to formulate criteria for ranking restoration needs and proposed projects.

Connolly, Patrick J.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Transport of Atmospheric Aerosol by Gap Winds in the Columbia River Gorge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Typical diurnal wind patterns and their relationship to transport of atmospheric aerosol in the Columbia River gorge of Oregon and Washington are addressed in this paper. The measurement program included measurements of light scattering by ...

Mark C. Green; Jin Xu; Narendra Adhikari

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Coping with changing water resources: The case of the Syr Darya river basin in Central Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coping with changing water resources: The case of the Syr Darya river basin in Central Asia A. Sorg adaptation measures will be needed to cope with changing water resources. In view of the geo, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan make up an area that is larger in size than India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh

Stoffel, Markus

105

CATOSTOMID FISH LARVAE AND EARLY JUVENILES OF THE UPPER COLORADO RIVER BASIN --  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CATOSTOMID FISH LARVAE AND EARLY JUVENILES OF THE UPPER COLORADO RIVER BASIN -- MORPHOLOGICAL fertilization. Reared at 18-19 C in March and April 1990 by the Larval Fish Laboratory from artificially fertilized eggs provided by Dexter National Fish Hatchery (New Mexico). Xyrauchen texanus O #12

106

Estimates of Vadose Zone Drainage from a Capped Seepage Basin, F-Area, Savannah River Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...because saturated unit gradient (gravity...primarily NO3 salts and because NO3...M.E. 1995. SRS geology/hydrogeology...Rehfeldt. 1992. A critical review of data...Superfund record of decision: Savannah River...SC1890008989, Operable Unit 6. USEPA, Aiken...2012088776 Waste disposal into seepage basins...

Tetsu K. Tokunaga; Jiamin Wan; Miles E. Denham

107

NIDIS Weekly Climate, Water and Drought Assessment Summary Upper Colorado River Basin Pilot Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the past week which should decrease irrigation water demand from the Western Slope. Areas of SW Colorado of moisture moving over western Colorado on Tuesday will spark off widely scattered showers in the highNIDIS Weekly Climate, Water and Drought Assessment Summary Upper Colorado River Basin Pilot Project

108

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Environment, Safety and Health program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System.

109

CRAD, Engineering- Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Engineering program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System.

110

CRAD, Training- Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Environment, Safety and Health program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System.

111

CRAD, Emergency Management- Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Emergency Management program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System.

112

Assessing Water Deprivation at the Sub-river Basin Scale in LCA Integrating Downstream Cascade Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Assessing Water Deprivation at the Sub-river Basin Scale in LCA Integrating Downstream Cascade Effects ... Although these indicators represent a great step forward in the assessment of water-use-related impacts in LCA, significant challenges still remain in improving their accuracy and relevance. ...

Philippe Loubet; Philippe Roux; Montserrat Nez; Gilles Belaud; Vronique Bellon-Maurel

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

113

Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 200852400 CRITFC Lamprey Passage Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and conservation initiatives is imperative if this valuable resource is to be maintained and the cultural legacy Restoration Plan for the Columbia River Basin (CRITFC 2008). Province(s) Intermountain and Lower Columbia in abundance over the last few decades and the need to acquire information to inform management

114

FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

...................................................................................PS-18 Coal-Bed Methane ResourceChapter PS FORT UNION COAL IN THE POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA: A SYNTHESIS By R of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U

115

Landslide Inventory in the Area of Dubra?ina River Basin (Croatia)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Systematic landslide mapping was performed for an area of 9.35 km2 of the geomorphological unit of hills in the Dubra?ina River Basin. Based on the visual interpretation of LiDAR imagery, supplemented by field re...

Petra ?omlija; Sanja Bernat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Economic Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Powder River Basin Coal  

SciTech Connect

Unminable coalbeds are potentially large storage reservoirs for the sequestration of anthropogenic CO2 and offer the benefit of enhanced methane production, which can offset some of the costs associated with CO2 sequestration. The objective of this paper is to study the economic feasibility of CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. Economic analyses of CO2 injection options are compared. Results show that injecting flue gas to recover methane from CBM fields is marginally economical; however, this method will not significantly contribute to the need to sequester large quantities of CO2. Separating CO2 from flue gas and injecting it into the unminable coal zones of the Powder River Basin seam is currently uneconomical, but can effectively sequester over 86,000 tons (78,200 tonne) of CO2 per acre while recovering methane to offset costs. The cost to separate CO2 from flue gas was identified as the major cost driver associated with CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams. Improvements in separations technology alone are unlikely to drive costs low enough for CO2 sequestration in unminable coal seams in the Powder River Basin to become economically viable. Breakthroughs in separations technology could aid the economics, but in the Powder River Basin they cannot achieve the necessary cost reductions for breakeven economics without incentives.

Eric P. Robertson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

CRAD, Conduct of Operations- Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Conduct of Operations program at the Office of River Protection, K Basin Sludge Waste System.

118

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Ocean and Plume Science Workshop Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean and Plume Science Workshop Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program February 14, 2013 8:30am ­ 4pm Northwest Power and Conservation Council #12;Workshop Objectives Prepare for the upcoming current Program language Indentify Fish and Wildlife Program priorities for ocean, plume and estuary

120

COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PN COAL RESOURCES, POWDER RIVER BASIN By M.S. Ellis,1 G.L. Gunther,2 A.M. Ochs,2 S, Delaware 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

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SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter PH SHERIDAN COALFIELD, POWDER RIVER BASIN: GEOLOGY, COAL QUALITY, AND COAL RESOURCES By M assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great

123

Without proper controls, consolidation could influence performance in the Powder River Basin  

SciTech Connect

The American coal industry is in a period of consolidation. Fewer firms with larger production are replacing a more dispersed industry. Because of the southern Powder River Basin's great importance as source of coal, there is a need to monitor the performance of southern PRB coal producers.

Bierman, S.; Nelson, P.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Thermal springs in the Payette River basin, west-central Idaho  

SciTech Connect

The Payette River basin, characterized by steep, rugged mountains and narrow river valleys, occupies an area of about 3300 square miles in west-central Idaho. Predominant rock types in the basin include granitic rocks of the Idaho batholith and basalt flows of the Columbia River Basalt Group. Waters from thermal springs in the basin, temperatures of which range from 34/sup 0/ to 86/sup 0/ Celsius, are sodium bicarbonate type and are slightly alkaline. Dissolved-solids concentrations range from 173 to 470 milligrams per liter. Reservoir temperatures determined from the sodium-potassium-calcium, silicic acid-corrected silica, and sulfate-water isotope geothermometers range from 53/sup 0/ to 143/sup 0/ Celsius. Tritium, present in concentrations between 0 and 2 tritium units, indicate that sampled thermal waters are at least 100 years and possibly more than 1000 years old. Stable-isotope data indicate it is unlikely any of the nonthermal waters sampled are representative of precipitation that recharges the thermal springs in the basin. Thermal springs discharged about 5700 acre-feet of water in 1979. Associated convective heat flux is 1.1 x 10/sup 7/ calories per second.

Lewis, R.E.; Young, H.W.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

EFFECT OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON WATERSHED RUNOFF FLOW - UPPER COOSA RIVER BASIN UPSTREAM FROM PLANT HAMMOND  

SciTech Connect

The ability of water managers to maintain adequate supplies in the coming decades depends on future weather conditions, as climate change has the potential to reduce stream flows from their current values due to potentially less precipitation and higher temperatures, and possibly rendering them unable to meet demand. The upper Coosa River basin, located in northwest Georgia, plays an important role in supplying water for industry and domestic use in northern Georgia, and has been involved in water disputes in recent times. The seven-day ten-year low flow (7Q10 flow) is the lowest average flow for seven consecutive days that has an average recurrence interval of 10 years. The 7Q10 flow is statistically derived from the observed historical flow data, and represents the low flow (drought) condition for a basin. The upper Coosa River basin also supplies cooling water for the 935MW coal-fired Hammond plant, which draws about 65% of the 7Q10 flow of the upper Coosa River to dissipate waste heat. The water is drawn through once and returned to the river directly from the generator (i.e., no cooling tower is used). Record low flows in 2007 led to use of portable cooling towers to meet temperature limits. Disruption of the Plant Hammond operation may trigger closure of area industrial facilities (e.g. paper mill). The population in Georgia is expected to double from 9 million to 18 million residents in the next 25 years, mostly in the metropolitan Atlanta area. Therefore, there will be an even greater demand for potable water and for waste assimilation. Climate change in the form of persistent droughts (causing low flows) and high ambient temperatures create regulatory compliance challenges for Plant Hammond operating with a once-through cooling system. Therefore, the Upper Coosa River basin was selected to study the effect of potential future weather change on the watershed runoff flow.

Chen, K.

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

126

Yakima River Basin Fish Passage Phase II Fish Screen Construction, Project Completion Report.  

SciTech Connect

On December 5, 1980, Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Public Law 96-501). The Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council (now the Northwest Power and Conservation Council). The Council was charged with the responsibility to prepare a Regional Conservation and Electric Power Plan and to develop a program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife including related spawning grounds and habitat on the Columbia River and its tributaries. The Council adopted its Fish and Wildlife Program on November 15, 1982. Section 800 of the Program addresses measures in the Yakima River Basin. The Yakima measures were intended to help mitigate hydroelectric impacts in the basin and provide off-site mitigation to compensate for fish losses caused by hydroelectric project development and operations throughout the Columbia River Basin. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) was designated as a major source of funding for such off-site mitigation measures and was requested to initiate discussions with the appropriate Federal project operators and the Council to determine the most expeditious means for funding and implementing the program. The primary measures proposed for rapid implementation in the Yakima River basin were the installation of fish passage and protective facilities. Sec. 109 of The Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984, authorized the Secretary of the Interior to design, construct, operate, and maintain fish passage facilities within the Yakima River Basin. Under Phase I of the program, improvements to existing fish passage facilities and installation of new fish ladders and fish screens at 16 of the largest existing diversion dams and canals were begun in 1984 and were completed in 1990. The Yakima Phase II fish passage program is an extension of the Phase I program. In 1988, the Yakama Nation (YN) submitted an application to amend Sections 803(b) and 1403(4.5) of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to begin preliminary design on the Phase II fish screen program. Based on citizen and agency endorsement, the Council approved the amendment in 1989. The Council authorized BPA to provide funding for Phase II screens through the Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA then asked the Bureau of Reclamation to provide engineering and design expertise to the Phase II projects.

Hudson, R. Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Numerical Simulation of 2010 Pakistan Flood in the Kabul River Basin by Using Lagged Ensemble Rainfall Forecasting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lagged ensemble forecasting of rainfall and rainfallrunoffinundation (RRI) forecasting were applied to the devastating flood in the Kabul River basin, the first strike of the 2010 Pakistan flood. The forecasts were performed using the Global ...

Tomoki Ushiyama; Takahiro Sayama; Yuya Tatebe; Susumu Fujioka; Kazuhiko Fukami

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Salmonid Gamete Preservation in the Snake River Basin, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect

In spite of an intensive management effort, chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) and steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations in the Northwest have not recovered and are currently listed as threatened species under the Endangered Species Act. In addition to the loss of diversity from stocks that have already gone extinct, decreased genetic diversity resulting from genetic drift and inbreeding is a major concern. Reduced population and genetic variability diminishes the environmental adaptability of individual species and entire ecological communities. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT), in cooperation with Washington State University and the University of Idaho, established a germplasm repository in 1992 in order to preserve the remaining salmonid diversity in the region. The germplasm repository provides long-term storage for cryopreserved gametes. Although only male gametes can be cryopreserved, conserving the male component of genetic diversity will maintain future management options for species recovery. NPT efforts have focused on preserving salmon and steelhead gametes from the major river subbasins in the Snake River basin. However, the repository is available for all management agencies to contribute gamete samples from other regions and species. In 2002 a total of 570 viable semen samples were added to the germplasm repository. This included the gametes of 287 chinook salmon from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River, Imnaha River (Lookingglass Hatchery), Lake Creek, South Fork Salmon River, Johnson Creek, Big Creek, Capehorn Creek, Marsh Creek, Pahsimeroi River (Pahsimeroi Hatchery), and upper Salmon River (Sawtooth Hatchery) and the gametes of 280 steelhead from the North Fork Clearwater River (Dworshak Hatchery), Fish Creek, Little Sheep Creek, Pahsimeroi River (Pahsimeroi Hatchery) and Snake River (Oxbow Hatchery). In addition, gametes from 60 Yakima River spring chinook and 34 Wenatchee River coho salmon were added to the repository by Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife and Columbia River Intertribal Fish Commission, respectively. To date, a total of 3,928 Columbia River salmon and steelhead gamete samples and three Kootenai River white sturgeon are preserved in the repository. Samples are stored in independent locations at the University of Idaho (UI) and Washington State University (WSU).

Young, William; Kucera, Paul

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Application of the ELOHA Framework to Regulated Rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin: A Case Study  

SciTech Connect

In order for habitat restoration in regulated rivers to be effective at large scales, broadly applicable frameworks are needed that provide measurable objectives and contexts for management. The Ecological Limits of Hydrologic Alteration (ELOHA) framework was created as a template to assess hydrologic alterations, develop relationships between altered streamflow and ecology, and establish environmental flow standards. We tested the utility of ELOHA in informing flow restoration applications for fish and riparian communities in regulated rivers in the Upper Tennessee River Basin (UTRB). We followed the steps of ELOHA to generate flow alteration-ecological response relationships and then determined whether those relationships could predict fish and riparian responses to flow restoration in the Cheoah River, a regulated system within the UTRB. Although ELOHA provided a robust template to construct hydrologic information and predict hydrology for ungaged locations, our results do not support the assertion that over-generalized univariate relationships between flow and ecology can produce results sufficient to guide management in regulated rivers. After constructing multivariate models, we successfully developed predictive relationships between flow alterations and fish/riparian responses. In accordance with model predictions, riparian encroachment displayed consistent decreases with increases in flow magnitude in the Cheoah River; however, fish richness did not increase as predicted four years post- restoration. Our results suggest that altered temperature and substrate and the current disturbance regime may have reduced opportunities for fish species colonization. Our case study highlights the need for interdisciplinary science in defining environmental flows for regulated rivers and the need for adaptive management approaches once flows are restored.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Dolloff, Dr. Charles A [USDA Forest Service, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Sciences, Virginia Tech; Mathews, David C [Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin; 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This is the second year report of a multi-year project that monitors the outmigration and survival of hatchery and naturally-produced juvenile salmonids in the lower Umatilla River. This project supplements and complements ongoing or completed fisheries projects in the Umatilla River basin. Knowledge gained on outmigration and survival will assist researchers and managers in adapting hatchery practices, flow enhancement strategies, canal operations, and supplementation and enhancement efforts for natural and restored fish populations. The authors also report on tasks related to evaluating juvenile salmonid passage at Three Mile Falls Dam and West Extension Canal.

Knapp, Suzanne M.; Kern, J. Chris; Carmichael, Richard W. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Portland, OR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

current encounters a large island (main islands of Palau) basin-scale currents are driven by winds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary · current encounters a large island (main islands of Palau) · basin-scale currents are driven by winds · strong boundary currents like Gulf Stream · Palau has a boundary current · current

Johnston, Shaun

132

Provenance study and environments of deposition of the Pennslyvanian-Permian Wood River Formation, south-central Idaho, and the paleotectonic character of the Wood River basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROVENANCE STUDY AND ENVIRONMENTS OF DEPOSITION OF THE PENNSYLVANIAN-PERMIAN WOOD RIVER FORMATION, SOUTH-CENTRAL IDAHO, AND THE PALEOTECTONIC CHARACTER OF THE WOOD RIVER BASIN A 'Ihesis by CHRISTOPHER WILLIAM DEAN Submitted to the Graduate... College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December, 1982 Major Subject: Geology PROVENANCE STUDY AND ENVIRONMENTS OF DEPOSITION OF THE PENNSYLVANIAN-PERMIAN WOOD RIVER FORMATION...

Dean, Christopher William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

133

Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seam Well Completion Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy and National Energy Technology Laboratory Strategic Center for Natural Gas September 2003 DOE/NETL-2003/1193 Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) (Strategic Center for Natural Gas) DOE/NETL-2003/1193 September 2003 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal

134

Late-Quaternary Stratigraphy and Geoarchaeology of the Upper Neosho River Basin, East-Central Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C o. L yo n C o. C of fe y C o. 15 0 22 5 30 0 km 75 0 20 30 40 k m 10 0 N K an sa s U pp er N eo sh o R iv er B as in Cr F ig ur e 1. 1. U pp er N eo sh o R iv er b as in in K an sa s, U SA 2 3 settlement patterns (Mandel, 2006a: 28... Arkansas River Basin Upper Neosho River Basin (Study Area) Gulf of Mexico M ississippi R i ver 6 S m ok y H il ls B lu e H il ls C ha lk B ut te s H ig h P la in s A rk an sa s R iv er L ow la nd s F li nt H il ls O sa ge...

Gottsfield, Andrew Stefan

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

135

Climate-change scenario for the Columbia River basin. Forest Service research paper  

SciTech Connect

This work describes the method used to generate a climate-change scenario for the Columbia River basin. The scenario considers climate patterns that may change if the atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2), or its greenhouse gas equivalent, were to double over pre-Industrial Revolution values. A composite approach was taken to generate a climate scenario that considers knowledge of current regional climate controls, available output from general circulation and regional climate models, and observed changes in climate.

Ferguson, S.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Groundwater and surface water supplies in the Williston and Powder River structural basins are necessary for future development in these regions. To help determine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;i Abstract Groundwater and surface water supplies in the Williston and Powder River structural of streams, and quantify reservoir interaction in the Williston and Powder River structural basins the loss to underlying aquifers was 7790 ft3 /s. Both the Powder River and Williston basins contain gaining

Torgersen, Christian

137

File:Willamette River Basin MOU 102210.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Willamette River Basin MOU 102210.pdf Willamette River Basin MOU 102210.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:Willamette River Basin MOU 102210.pdf Size of this preview: 464 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 465 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,278 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 3.79 MB, MIME type: application/pdf, 72 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 16:44, 13 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 16:44, 13 November 2012 1,278 × 1,650, 72 pages (3.79 MB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs)

138

Geothermal energy resource investigations in the Eastern Copper River Basin, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of a review of the geological, geochemical and geophysical data available for the Eastern Copper River basin with emphasis on the mud volcanoes, and the results of geophysical and geochemical studies carried out in the summers of 1982 and 1984. The purpose was to determine if there are geothermal energy resources in the Copper River Basin. The Eastern Copper River basin is situated on the flanks of a major volcano, Mt. Drum, which was active as late as 200,000 years ago and which is thought to have retained significant amounts of residual heat at high levels. Mt. Wrangell, farther to the east, has been volcanically active up to the present time. The 1982 geophysical and geochemical surveys located three principal areas of possible geothermal interest, one near Tazlina and two near the Klawasi mud volcanoes. The intensive survey work of 1984 was concentrated on those areas. We have integrated the results of soil helium, soil mercury, gravity, aeromagnetic, electrical, self-potential, and controlled-source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) surveys to evaluate the geothermal potential of the areas studied. 36 figs.

Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Northwest Power and Conservation Council Striking a Balance Between Energy and the Environment in the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Of Willamette River Basin Dams Volume Nine, Number Four Fall 2010 (Continued on page 2) Notes From the Chair Columbia River Treaty Deadline Approaches 3 4 5 8 11 WHAT'S INSIDE he state of Oregon and the Bonneville Program. Under terms of the agreement, Bonneville will provide funding through 2025 for the state

140

CREATING A GEOLOGIC PLAY BOOK FOR TRENTON-BLACK RIVER APPALACHIAN BASIN EXPLORATION  

SciTech Connect

Private- and public-sector stakeholders formed the new ''Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration Consortium'' and began a two-year research effort that will lead to a play book for Trenton-Black River exploration throughout the Appalachian basin. The final membership of the Consortium includes 17 gas exploration companies and 6 research team members, including the state geological surveys in Kentucky, Ohio, Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the New York State Museum Institute and West Virginia University. Seven integrated research tasks are being conducted by basin-wide research teams organized from this large pool of experienced professionals. More than 3400 miles of Appalachian basin digital seismic data have been quality checked. In addition, inquiries have been made regarding the availability of additional seismic data from government and industry partners in the consortium. Interpretations of the seismic data have begun. Error checking is being performed by mapping the time to various prominent reflecting horizons, and analyzing for any anomalies. A regional geological velocity model is being created to make time-to-depth conversions. Members of the stratigraphy task team compiled a generalized, basin-wide correlation chart, began the process of scanning geophysical logs and laid out lines for 16 regional cross sections. Two preliminary cross sections were constructed, a database of all available Trenton-Black River cores was created, and a basin-wide map showing these core locations was produced. Two cores were examined, described and photographed in detail, and were correlated to the network of geophysical logs. Members of the petrology team began the process of determining the original distribution of porous and permeable facies within a sequence stratigraphic framework. A detailed sedimentologic and petrographic study of the Union Furnace road cut in central Pennsylvania was completed. This effort will facilitate the calibration of subsurface core and log data. A core-sampling plan was developed cooperatively with members of the isotope geochemistry and fluid inclusion task team. One hundred thirty (130) samples were prepared for trace element and stable isotope analysis, and six samples were submitted for strontium isotope analysis. It was learned that there is a good possibility that carbon isotope stratigraphy may be a useful tool to locate the top of the Black River Formation in state-to-state correlations. Gas samples were collected from wells in Kentucky, New York and West Virginia. These were sent to a laboratory for compositional, stable isotope and hydrogen and radiogenic helium isotope analysis. Decisions concerning necessary project hardware, software and configuration of the website and database were made by the data, GIS and website task team. A file transfer protocol server was established for project use. The project website is being upgraded in terms of security.

Douglas G. Patchen; James Drahovzal; Larry Wickstrom; Taury Smith; Chris Laughery; Katharine Lee Avary

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Salmonid Gamete Preservation in the Snake River Basin : 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) populations in the Northwest are decreasing. Genetic diversity is being lost at an alarming rate. The Nez Perce Tribe (Tribe) strives to ensure availability of genetic samples of the existing male salmonid population by establishing and maintaining a germplasm repository. The sampling strategy, initiated in 1992, has been to collect and preserve male salmon and steelhead genetic diversity across the geographic landscape by sampling within the major river subbasins in the Snake River basin, assuming a metapopulation structure existed historically. Gamete cryopreservation conserves genetic diversity in a germplasm repository, but is not a recovery action for listed fish species. The Tribe was funded in 2000 by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) to coordinate gene banking of male gametes from Endangered Species Act listed steelhead and spring and summer chinook salmon in the Snake River basin. In 2000, a total of 349 viable chinook salmon semen samples from the Lostine River, Catherine Creek, upper Grande Ronde River, Lookingglass Hatchery (Imnaha River stock), Rapid River Hatchery, Lake Creek, the South Fork Salmon River weir, Johnson Creek, Big Creek, Capehorn Creek, Marsh Creek, Pahsimeroi Hatchery, and Sawtooth Hatchery (upper Salmon River stock) were cryopreserved. Also, 283 samples of male steelhead gametes from Dworshak Hatchery, Fish Creek, Grande Ronde River, Imnaha River, Little Sheep Creek, Pahsimeroi Hatchery and Oxbow Hatchery were also cryopreserved. The Tribe acquired 5 frozen steelhead samples from the Selway River collected in 1994 and 15 from Fish Creek sampled in 1993 from the U.S. Geological Survey, for addition into the germplasm repository. Also, 590 cryopreserved samples from the Grande Ronde chinook salmon captive broodstock program are being stored at the University of Idaho as a long-term archive, half of the total samples. A total of 2,420 cryopreserved samples from Snake River basin steelhead and spring and summer chinook salmon, from 1992 through 2000, are stored in two independent locations at the University of Idaho and Washington State University. Two large freezer tanks are located at each university, each of which holds approximately 25% of the cryopreserved sperm. One tank at each university is considered long-term archival storage, while the other is short-term. Fertility trials were conducted at each university to test the viability of the cryopreserved chinook salmon sperm. The experiments on the 2000 frozen and thawed sperm at both universities found a fertility rate of 60-70%. This document also summarizes 1999-2000 steelhead genetic analysis report. The results of mitochondrial, nuclear DNA and microsatellite analysis found differences and shared haplotypes between the stocks of fish sampled for cryopreservation. Recommendations for future gene banking efforts include the need for establishment of a regional genome resource bank, a greater emphasis on cryopreserving wild fish, continued fertility trials, exploring field cryopreservation and genetic analysis on all fish represented in the germplasm repository.

Armstrong, Robyn; Kucera, Paul A. [Nez Perce Tribe. Dept. of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID (US)

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1992.  

SciTech Connect

This document is the 1992 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook Salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the National Biological Survey (NBS) and the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon cannot be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

A numerical soil-water-balance (SWB) model was used to estimate groundwater recharge in the Williston and Powder River structural basins in the Northern Great Plains.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Williston and Powder River structural basins in the Northern Great Plains. The SWB model consisted of 1 km2 to 2011. Average calculated recharge in the Williston basin was 0.190 in/yr (1,281 ft3 /sec) and ranged.1 percent of precipitation in the Williston basin. Average recharge in the Powder River basin was 0.136 in

Torgersen, Christian

144

Evaluation of mentum deformities of Chironomus spp. (Chironomidae: Diptera) larvae using modified toxic score index (MTSI) to assess the environmental stress in Juru River Basin, Penang, Malaysia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Morphological mentum deformities which represent sublethal effect of exposure to different types of pollutants were evaluated in Chironomus spp. larvae inhabiting three polluted rivers of Juru River Basin in nort...

Salman Abdo Al-Shami; Mad Rawi Che Salmah

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The dynamics of the Mississippi River plume: Impact of topography, wind and offshore forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of the Mississippi River plume: Impact of topography, wind and offshore forcing of topography, winddriven and eddydriven circulation on the offshore removal of plume waters. A realistically that the offshore removal is a frequent plume pathway. Eastward winddriven currents promote large freshwater

Miami, University of

146

Effects of LCRA Lakes on Riparian Property Values: Recreational and Aesthetic Components of Lake Side Housing in the Colorado River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lower Colorado River Authority (LCRA) manages the Colorado River Basin in a ten county area stretching from central Texas to the gulf coast of Texas. In its recent "Water Management Plan for the Lower Colorado River," the Lower Colorado River...

Lansford, Notie H. Jr.; Jones, Lonnie L.

147

Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Development and Produced Water Management Study  

SciTech Connect

Coalbed methane resources throughout the entire Powder River Basin were reviewed in this analysis. The study was conducted at the township level, and as with all assessments conducted at such a broad level, readers must recognize and understand the limitations and appropriate use of the results. Raw and derived data provided in this report will not generally apply to any specific location. The coal geology in the basin is complex, which makes correlation with individual seams difficult at times. Although more than 12,000 wells have been drilled to date, large areas of the Powder River Basin remain relatively undeveloped. The lack of data obviously introduces uncertainty and increases variability. Proxies and analogs were used in the analysis out of necessity, though these were always based on sound reasoning. Future development in the basin will make new data and interpretations available, which will lead to a more complete description of the coals and their fluid flow properties, and refined estimates of natural gas and water production rates and cumulative recoveries. Throughout the course of the study, critical data assumptions and relationships regarding gas content, methane adsorption isotherms, and reservoir pressure were the topics of much discussion with reviewers. A summary of these discussion topics is provided as an appendix. Water influx was not modeled although it is acknowledged that this phenomenon may occur in some settings. As with any resource assessment, technical and economic results are the product of the assumptions and methodology used. In this study, key assumptions as well as cost and price data, and economic parameters are presented to fully inform readers. Note that many quantities shown in various tables have been subject to rounding; therefore, aggregation of basic and intermediate quantities may differ from the values shown.

Advanced Resources International

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Lead and cadmium concentrations in the hair of fishermen from the Subae River basin, Brazil  

SciTech Connect

Previous studies have shown heavy pollution by lead and cadmium in the Subae River basin, State of Bahia, Brazil, caused by a lead smelter. Concentrations of these metals were determined in scalp hair of fishermen from three riverside towns and from a reference town. Increased levels for both metals were associated with increasing proximity to the smelter. Mean concentrations of lead and cadmium were higher among fishermen with straight hair than among those with curly hair. The effects of hair washing, hair type, and color and age on metal concentrations in fishermen's hair were studied.

Carvalho, F.; Tavares, T.M.; Souza, S.P.; Linhares, P.S.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Technical Appendix for Development for Modified Streamflows 1928-1989 : Columbia River & Coastal Basin.  

SciTech Connect

The report ``Adjusted Streamflow and Storage 1928-1989`` contains listings of historical flows for the sites in the Columbia River and Coastal Basins. This section of the Technical Appendix provides for the site specific procedures used to determine those historical flows. The study purpose, authority, and definitions are given in the main report. The purpose of this section of the Technical Appendix is to document the computational procedures used at each of the project sites to develop historical flows for the period July 1928--September 1989.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; A.G. Crook Company

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

What explains the increased utilization of Powder River Basin coal in electric power generation?  

SciTech Connect

This article examines possible explanations for increased utilization of Powder River Basin (PRB) coal in electric power generation that occurred over the last two decades. Did more stringent environmental policy motivate electric power plants to switch to less polluting fuels? Or, did greater use of PRB coal occur because relative price changes altered input markets in favor of this fuel. A key finding is that factors other than environmental policy such as the decline in railroad freight rates together with elastic demand by power plants were major contributors to the increased utilization of this fuel.

Gerking, S.; Hamilton, S.F. [University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Hydrologic sensitivities of the Sacramento-San Joaquin River basin, California, to global warming  

SciTech Connect

The hydrologic sensitivities of four medium-sized mountainous catchments in the Sacramento and San Joaquin River basins to long-term global warming were analyzed. The hydrologic response of these catchments, all of which are dominated by spring snowmelt runoff, were simulated by the coupling of the snowmelt and the soil moisture accounting models of the U.S. National Weather Service River Forecast System. In all four catchments the global warming pattern, which was indexed to CO{sub 2} doubling scenarios simulated by three (global) general circulation models, produced a major seasonal shift in the snow accumulation pattern. Under the alternative climate scenarios more winter precipitation fell as rain instead of snow, and winter runoff increased while spring snowmelt runoff decreased. In addition, large increases in the annual flood maxima were simulated, primarily due to an increase in rain-on-snow events, with the time of occurrence of many large floods shifting from spring to winter.

Lettenmaier, D.P. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA)); Gan, Thian Yew (Asian Institute of Technology, Bangkok (Thailand))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Sediment Problems and Sediment Management in Asian River Basins (Proceedings of the ICCE Workshop held at Hyderabad, India, September 2009). IAHS Publ. 349, 2011.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment Problems and Sediment Management in Asian River Basins (Proceedings of the ICCE Workshop Sedimentation of reservoirs in Uzbekistan: a case study of the Akdarya Reservoir, Zerafshan River Basin SHAVKAT-made water reservoirs are affected by high sedimentation rates. It is of strategic importance to rationally

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

153

A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia River Gorge. Photo: C. Bruce Forster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia and wildlife recovery. At a conceptual level, the Act aimed for a power system that would meet energy demands pressure off Columbia River fish and wildlife. For the power system, moving ahead would require modified

154

Southwest region solar pond study for three sites: Tularosa Basin, Malaga Bend, and Canadian River  

SciTech Connect

In the study, the Bureau of Reclamation investigated the technical and economic feasibility of using solar salt-gradient ponds to generate power and to produce freshwater in Bureau projects at three sites--the Canadian River at Logan, New Mexico; Malaga Bend on the Pecos River near Carlsbad, New Mexico; and the Tularosa Basin in the vicinity of Alamogordo, New Mexico. The ponds would be used to generate electric power that could be integrated with the Bureau's power grid or used in combination with thermal energy from the ponds to power commercially available desalination systems to produce freshwater. Results of the economic analysis, which concentrated primarily on the Tularosa Basin site, showed that solar-pond-generated intermediate load power would cost between 62 and 90 mills/kWh and between 52 and 83 mills/kWh for baseload power. This results in benefit-cost ratios of approximately 2.0 and 1.3 for intermediate and baseload, respectively, when compared to similar facilities powered by fossil fuels. The cost savings are even more pronounced when comparing the two (solar versus fossil fuel) as a source of power for conventional distillation and membrane-type desalination systems.

Boegli, W.J.; Dahl, M.M.; Remmers, H.E.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential benefits of applying multiseam [well] completion (MSC) technology to the massive stack of low-rank coals in the Powder River Basin. As part of this, the study objectives are: Estimate how much additional CBM resource would become accessible and technically recoverable--compared to the current practice of drilling one well to drain a single coal seam; Determine whether there are economic benefits associated with MSC technology utilization (assuming its widespread, successful application) and if so, quantify the gains; Briefly examine why past attempts by Powder River Basin CBM operators to use MSC technology have been relatively unsuccessful; Provide the underpinnings to a decision whether a MSC technology development and/or demonstration effort is warranted by DOE. To a great extent, this assessment builds on the previously published study (DOE, 2002), which contains many of the key references that underlie this analysis. It is available on the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy technology Laboratory, Strategic Center for Natural Gas website (www.netl.doe.gov/scng). It is suggested that readers obtain a copy of the original study to complement the current report.

Office of Fossil Energy; National Energy Technology Laboratory

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Creating a Geologic Play Book for Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary isopach and facies maps, combined with a literature review, were used to develop a sequence of basin geometry, architecture and facies development during Cambrian and Ordovician time. The main architectural features--basins, sub basins and platforms--were identified and mapped as their positions shifted with time. This is significant because a better understanding of the control of basin geometry and architecture on the distribution of key facies and on subsequent reservoir development in Ordovician carbonates within the Trenton and Black River is essential for future exploration planning. Good exploration potential is thought to exist along the entire platform margin, where clean grainstones were deposited in skeletal shoals from Indiana thorough Ohio and Ontario into Pennsylvania. The best reservoir facies for the development of hydrothermal dolomites appears to be these clean carbonates. This conclusion is supported by observations taken in existing fields in Indiana, Ontario, Ohio and New York. In contrast, Trenton-Black River production in Kentucky and West Virginia has been from fractured, but non-dolomitized, limestone reservoirs. Facies maps indicate that these limestones were deposited under conditions that led to a higher argillaceous content than the cleaner limestones deposited in higher-energy environments along platform margins. However, even in the broad area of argillaceous limestones, clean limestone buildups have been observed in eastern outcrops and, if present and dolomitized in the subsurface, may provide additional exploration targets. Structure and isopach maps developed as part of the structural and seismic study supported the basin architecture and geometry conclusions, and from them some structural control on the location of architectural features may be inferred. This portion of the study eventually will lead to a determination of the timing relative to fracturing, dolomitization and hydrocarbon charging of reservoirs in the Trenton and Black River carbonates. The focus of this effort will shift in the next few months from regional to more detailed structural analyses. This new effort will include topics such as the determination of the source of the hot, dolomitizing fluids that created hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the Black River, and the probable migration paths of these fluids. Faults of suitable age, orientation and location to be relevant for hydrothermal dolomite creation in the Trenton-Black River play will be isolated and mapped, and potential fairways delineated. A detailed study of hydrothermal alteration of carbonate reservoirs was completed and is discussed at length in this report. New ideas that were developed from this research were combined with a literature review and existing concepts to develop a model for the development of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the study area. Fault-related hydrothermal alteration is a key component of this model. Hydrothermal alteration produces a spectrum of features in reservoirs, ranging from leached limestone and microporosity to matrix dolomite, saddle dolomite-lined breccias, zebra fabrics and fractures. Mineralization probably occurred during the pressure drop associated with the rise of fluids up the fault system, and is due to the mixing of hydrothermal fluids with cooler, in situ fluids. Once they began to cool themselves, the hydrothermal fluids, which had a lower pH and higher salinity than formation fluids, were capable of leaching the host limestones. Microporosity is common in leached limestones, and it is likely that it was formed, in some cases, during hydrothermal alteration. Dolomite leaching occurs near the end of the paragenetic sequence, and may significantly enhance porosity. However, leaching of dolomite typically is followed by the precipitation of calcite or anhydrite, which reduces porosity. A final conclusion is that hydrothermal alteration may be more common than previously thought, and some features previously attributed to other processes may be in fact be hydrothermal in origin. Production d

Douglas G. Patchen; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski; David Harris; John Hickman; John Bocan; Michael Hohn

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

DOE/EA-1689: Environmental Assessment PrairieWinds - ND 1 Basin Electric Power Cooperative (June 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PrairieWinds - ND 1 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Prepared for: Rural Utilities Service Prepared by: Tetra Tech 4900 Pearl East Circle, Suite 300W Boulder, CO 80301 June 2009 Environmental Assessment PrairieWinds - ND 1 Tetra Tech June 2009 i Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................1 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR PROPOSED ACTION ..............................................................1 1.1 Purpose and Need ...........................................................................................................1

158

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys: Cowlitz River Basin, 1934-1942 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Cowlitz River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead. The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, [open quotes]to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes[close quotes]. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946. Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

NMR Determination of Carbon Aromatization during Hydrous Pyrolysis of Coals from the Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NMR Determination of Carbon Aromatization during Hydrous Pyrolysis of Coals from the Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin ... This process is thought to activate capillary seals and could lead to abnormally pressured compartments, which represent a new class of hydrocarbon gas resources. ...

Francis P. Miknis; Daniel A. Netzel; Ronald C. Surdam

1996-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

160

Systematic Analysis of Priority Water Resources Problems to Develop a Comprehensive Research Program for the Southern Plains River Basins Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TR- 61 1975 Systematic Analysis of Priority Water Resources Problems to Develop a Comprehensive Research Program for the Southern Plains River Basins Region R.E. Babcock J.W. Clark E.J. Dantin M.T. Edmison N.A. Evans...

Babcock, R. E.; Clark, J. W.; Dantin, E. J.; Edmison, M. T.; Evans, N. A.; Power, W. L.; Runkles, J. L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SOURCES OF FINE-GRAINED SUSPENDED SEDIMENT IN MILL STREAM BRANCH WATERSHED, CORSICA RIVER BASIN, A TRIBUTARY TO THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

affected the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem (Phillips, 2002). In order to reduce sediment and nutrients Corsica River Basin from the State's impaired water bodies (303D) list (http://www.dnr.state.md.us watershed, the largest estuary in the United States, was listed as an "impaired water body" in 2000 under

162

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1993.  

SciTech Connect

Recovery efforts for the endangered fall chinook salmon necessitates knowledge of the factors limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which affect spawning of the fish in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing seward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs. The spawning was generally a November event in 1993, with some activity in late Oct. and early Dec. Spawning habitat availability was assessed by applying hydraulic and habitat models to known fall chinook salmon spawning sites. Juveniles were seined and PIT tagged in the free-flowing Snake River, and in the Columbia River in he Hanford Reach and in McNary Reservoir. Subyearling fish were marked at McNary Dam to relate river flow and migration patterns of juveniles to adult returns. Hydroacoustic surveys were conducted on McNary and John Day reservoirs and in net pens.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

A model study of tide-and wind-induced mixing in the Columbia River Estuary and plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model study of tide- and wind-induced mixing in the Columbia River Estuary and plume Parker Mac Article history: Received 5 April 2007 Received in revised form 30 January 2008 Accepted 10 March 2008 Keywords: Mathematical models River plumes Estuarine dynamics Energy budget a b s t r a c t A numerical

Hickey, Barbara

164

Challenges in assessment, management and development of coalbed methane resources in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Coalbed methane development in the Powder River Basin has accelerated rapidly since the mid-1990's. forecasts of coalbed methane (CBM) production and development made during the late 1980's and early 1990's have proven to be distinctly unreliable. Estimates of gas in place and recoverable reserves have also varied widely. This lack of reliable data creates challenges in resource assessment, management and development for public resource management agencies and the CBM operators. These challenges include a variety of complex technical, legal and resource management-related issues. The Bureau of Land Management's Wyoming Reservoir Management Group (WRMG) and US Geological Survey (USGS), with the cooperation and assistance of CBM operators and other interested parties have initiated cooperative studies to address some of these issues. This paper presents results of those studies to date and outlines the agencies' goals and accomplishments expected at the studies' conclusion.

McGarry, D.E.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan for Fiscal Year 1989.  

SciTech Connect

The FY 1989 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Work Plan (Work Plan) presents Bonneville Power Administration's plans for implementing the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) in FY 1989. The Work Plan focuses on individual Action Items found in the 1987 Program for which Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has determined that it has authority and responsibility to implement. Each of the entries in the Work Plan includes objectives, background, and progress to date in achieving those objectives, and a summary of plans for implementation in FY 1989. Most Action Items are implemented through one or more BPA-funded projects. Each Action Item entry is followed by a list of completed, ongoing, and planned projects, along with objectives, results, schedules, and milestones for each project. The FY 1989 Work Plan emphasizes continuation of 113 projects, most of which involve protection, mitigation, or enhancement of anadromous fishery resources. BPA also plans to start 20 new projects in FY 1989. The number of ongoing FY 1988 projects to be continued in FY 1989 and the number of new projects planned to start in FY 1989 are based on current (September 7, 1988) procurement expectations. Several projects presently in BPA's procurement process are expected to be contracted by September 30, 1988, the last day of FY 1988. Although these projects have not yet started, they have been listed in the Work Plan as ongoing FY 1988 projects, based on projected start dates in late September 1988. Throughout the Work Plan, those projects with projected start dates in September 1988 have been noted.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration. Division of Fish and Wildlife.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Characterization and fluid flow simulation of naturally fractured Frontier sandstone, Green River Basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Significant gas reserves are present in low-permeability sandstones of the Frontier Formation in the greater Green River Basin, Wyoming. Successful exploitation of these reservoirs requires an understanding of the characteristics and fluid-flow response of the regional natural fracture system that controls reservoir productivity. Fracture characteristics were obtained from outcrop studies of Frontier sandstones at locations in the basin. The fracture data were combined with matrix permeability data to compute an anisotropic horizontal permeability tensor (magnitude and direction) corresponding to an equivalent reservoir system in the subsurface using a computational model developed by Oda (1985). This analysis shows that the maximum and minimum horizontal permeability and flow capacity are controlled by fracture intensity and decrease with increasing bed thickness. However, storage capacity is controlled by matrix porosity and increases linearly with increasing bed thickness. The relationship between bed thickness and the calculated fluid-flow properties was used in a reservoir simulation study of vertical, hydraulically-fractured and horizontal wells and horizontal wells of different lengths in analogous naturally fractured gas reservoirs. The simulation results show that flow capacity dominates early time production, while storage capacity dominates pressure support over time for vertical wells. For horizontal wells drilled perpendicular to the maximum permeability direction a high target production rate can be maintained over a longer time and have higher cumulative production than vertical wells. Longer horizontal wells are required for the same cumulative production with decreasing bed thickness.

Harstad, H. [New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM (United States); Teufel, L.W.; Lorenz, J.C.; Brown, S.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Geomechanics Dept.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

John Day River Sub-Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project; 2008 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

Work undertaken in 2008 included: (1) Seven new fence projects were completed thereby protecting approximately 10.97 miles of streams with 16.34 miles of riparian fence; (2) Renewal of one expired lease was completed thereby continuing to protect 0.75 miles of stream with 1.0 mile of riparian fence. (3) Maintenance of all active project fences (106.54 miles), watergaps (78), spring developments (33) were checked and repairs performed; (3) Planted 1000 willow/red osier on Fox Creek/Henslee property; (4) Planted 2000 willows/red osier on Middle Fork John Day River/Coleman property; (5) Planted 1000 willow/red osier cuttings on Fox Creek/Johns property; (6) Since the initiation of the Fish Habitat Project in 1984 we have 126.86 miles of stream protected using 211.72 miles of fence protecting 5658 acres. The purpose of the John Day Fish Habitat Enhancement Program is to enhance production of indigenous wild stocks of spring Chinook and summer steelhead within the sub basin through habitat protection, enhancement and fish passage improvement. The John Day River system supports the largest remaining wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead in Northeast Oregon.

Powell, Russ M.; Alley, Pamela D.; Goin Jr, Lonnie [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993  

SciTech Connect

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Pine Ridge Sandstone and Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group, Lewis Shale and Fox Hills Sandstone in the Greater Green River Basin, Rawlins, Wyoming, were investigated to test and develop mineral separation techniques. The methods developed here...

Lippert, Peter Gregory

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Hazardous materials in Aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 January 1994--30 March 1994  

SciTech Connect

Projects associated with this grant for studying hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin are reviewed and goals, progress and research results are discussed. New, one-year initiation projects are described briefly.

Abdelghani, A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Relationship between Use Value and Ecological Importance of Floristic Resources of Seasonally Dry Tropical Forest in the Balsas River Basin, Mxico  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Relationship between Use Value and Ecological Importance of Floristic Resources of Seasonally Dry Tropical Forest in the Balsas River Basin, Mxico. The use of seasonally dry tropical forest in t...

Belinda Maldonado; Javier Caballero; Alfonso Delgado-Salinas

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Characterization of black volcanites from the Limay river basin, Patagonia, Argentina, using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry: an aid to infer human group mobility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The investigation of hunter-gatherers archaeological sites in the Limay river basin, Patagonia, Argentina, raised questions concerning the lithic technology....14C 71060 BP), Cueva Traful I (CTI; 14C 943023...

Oscar M. Palacios; Katleen Van Meel

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Radio-Ecological Situation in River Basins of Central Asia Syrdarya and Amudarya According to the Results of the Project Navruz  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of investigations of radio-ecological situation in river basins of Central Asia Syrdarya and Amudarya have been presented. The work has been fulfilled under the International project "Navruz" (USA,...

D. S. Barber; B. S. Yuldashev

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Genetic and Phenotype [Phenotypic] Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the interior Columbia River Basin : FY-99 Report : Populations of the Pend Oreille, Kettle, and Sanpoil River Basins of Colville National Forest.  

SciTech Connect

The 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council specifies the recovery and preservation of population health of native resident fishes of the Columbia River Basin. Among the native resident species of concern are interior rainbow trout of the Columbia River redband subspecies Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri 1 and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi. The westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing under the U. S. Endangered Species Act (American Wildlands et al. 1997). Before at-risk populations can be protected, their presence and status must be established. Where introgression from introduced species is a concern, as in the case of both westslope cutthroat trout and redband rainbow trout, genetic issues must be addressed as well. As is true with native trout elsewhere in the western United States (Behnke 1992), most of the remaining pure populations of these species in the Columbia River Basin are in relatively remote headwater reaches. The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique. FY-99 was year two of a five-year project in which we conducted field visits to remote locations to seek out and catalog these populations. In FY-99 we worked in collaboration with the Colville National Forest and Kalispel Indian Tribe to catalog populations in the northeastern corner of Washington State.

Trotter, Patrick C.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A data reconnaissance on the effect of suspended-sediment concentrations on dissolved-solids concentrations in rivers and tributaries in the Upper Colorado River Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary The Colorado River is one of the most important sources of water in the western United States, supplying water to over 35 million people in the U.S. and 3 million people in Mexico. High dissolved-solids loading to the River and tributaries are derived primarily from geologic material deposited in inland seas in the mid-to-late Cretaceous Period, but this loading may be increased by human activities. High dissolved solids in the River causes substantial damages to users, primarily in reduced agricultural crop yields and corrosion. The Colorado River Basin Salinity Control Program was created to manage dissolved-solids loading to the River and has focused primarily on reducing irrigation-related loading from agricultural areas. This work presents a reconnaissance of existing data from sites in the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) in order to highlight areas where suspended-sediment control measures may be useful in reducing dissolved-solids concentrations. Multiple linear regression was used on data from 164 sites in the UCRB to develop dissolved-solids models that include combinations of explanatory variables of suspended sediment, flow, and time. Results from the partial t-test, overall likelihood ratio, and partial likelihood ratio on the models were used to group the sites into categories of strong, moderate, weak, and no-evidence of a relation between suspended-sediment and dissolved-solids concentrations. Results show 68 sites have strong or moderate evidence of a relation, with drainage areas for many of these sites composed of a large percentage of clastic sedimentary rocks. These results could assist water managers in the region in directing field-scale evaluation of suspended-sediment control measures to reduce UCRB dissolved-solids loading.

Fred D Tillman; David W. Anning

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2011 Oil & Natural Gas Technology Office of Fossil Energy Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah Topical Report Reporting Period: October 31, 2009 through March 31, 2011 Authors: Lauren P. Birgenheier, Energy and Geoscience Insitute, University of Utah

177

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual wind river Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utilizing Wind: Optimal Wind Farm Placement in the United States By: Yintao Sun Advisor: Professor... An Introduction to Wind Energy 1 1.1 Wind, a Brief History . . . . . ....

178

A Statistical Analysis of Characteristics of Mesoscale Convective System Mountain Initiation Location Clusters in the Arkansas-Red River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Statistical Analysis of Characteristics of Mesoscale Convective System Mountain Initiation Location Clusters in the Arkansas-Red River Basin By Elisabeth F. Callen Submitted to the graduate degree program in Geography and the Graduate... ____________________________________ David Mechem Date Defended: November 9, 2012 ii The Thesis Committee for Elisabeth F. Callen certifies that this is the approved version of the following thesis: A Statistical Analysis of Characteristics of Mesoscale Convective...

Callen, Elisabeth F.

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Powder River Basin coalbed methane: The USGS role in investigating this ultimate clean coal by-product  

SciTech Connect

For the past few decades, the Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin has supplied the Nation with comparatively clean low ash and low sulfur coal. However, within the past few years, coalbed methane from the same Fort Union coal has become an important energy by-product. The recently completed US Geological Survey coal resource assessment of the Fort Union coal beds and zones in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains (Fort Union Coal Assessment Team, 1999) has added useful information to coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. Coalbed methane exploration and development in the Powder River Basin has rapidly accelerated in the past three years. During this time more than 800 wells have been drilled and recent operator forecasts projected more than 5,000 additional wells to be drilled over the next few years. Development of shallow (less than 1,000 ft. deep) Fort Union coal-bed methane is confined to Campbell and Sheridan Counties, Wyoming, and Big Horn County, Montana. The purpose of this paper is to report on the US Geological Survey's role on a cooperative coalbed methane project with the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM), Wyoming Reservoir Management Group and several gas operators. This paper will also discuss the methodology that the USGS and the BLM will be utilizing for analysis and evaluation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Powder River Basin. The USGS and BLM need additional information of coalbed methane reservoirs to accomplish their respective resource evaluation and management missions.

Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Ochs, A.M.; Stanton, R.W.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Reaches Project : Ecological and Geomorphic Dtudies Supporting Normative Flows in the Yakima River Basin, Washington, Final Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect

The Yakima River system historically produced robust annual runs of chinook, sockeye, chum and coho salmon and steelhead. Many different stocks or life history types existed because the physiography of the basin is diverse, ranging from very dry and hot in the high desert of the lower basin to cold and wet in the Cascade Mountains of the headwaters (Snyder and Stanford 2001). Habitat diversity and life history diversity of salmonids are closely correlated in the Yakima Basin. Moreover, habitat diversity for salmonids and many other fishes maximizes in floodplain reaches of river systems (Ward and Stanford 1995, Independent Scientific Group 2000). The flood plains of Yakima River likely were extremely important for spawning and rearing of anadromous salmonids (Snyder and Stanford 2001). However, Yakima River flood plains are substantially degraded. Primary problems are: revetments that disconnect main and side channel habitats; dewatering associated with irrigation that changes base flow conditions and degrades the shallow-water food web; chemical and thermal pollution that prevents proper maturation of eggs and juveniles; and extensive gravel mining within the floodplain reaches that has severed groundwater-channel connectivity, increased thermal loading and increased opportunities for invasions of nonnative species. The Yakima River is too altered from its natural state to allow anything close to the historical abundance and diversity of anadromous fishes. Habitat loss, overharvest and dam and reservoir passage problems in the mainstem Columbia River downstream of the Yakima, coupled with ocean productivity variation, also are implicated in the loss of Yakima fisheries. Nonetheless, in an earlier analysis, Snyder and Stanford (2001) concluded that a significant amount of physical habitat remains in the five floodplain reaches of the mainstem river because habitat-structuring floods do still occur on the remaining expanses of floodplain environment. Assuming main stem and ocean bottlenecks are not overriding, restoration of floodplain connectivity by elevating base flows throughout the corridor, removing revetments and refilling gravel pits by natural riverine transport of gravel where possible could be successful in substantially enhancing Yakima salmon and steelhead runs. Hence, the overarching purpose of this research was to determine the ecology of major floodplain reaches of the Yakima River: Cle Elum, Kittitas, Naches, Union Gap and Wapato. Specifically, the study documented groundwater-channel connectivity and flow relations; use and quality of side channel and other floodplain habitats by salmonid fishes; and classification and analysis of floodplain habitat using remote sensing and documentation of geomorphic processes, required for a robust understanding of the feasibility of revetment removal and establishment of a normative flow regime for the mainstem river.

Stanford, Jack A.; Lorang, Mark N.; Matson, Phillip L. (University of Montana, Flathead Lake Biological Station, Poison, MT)

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect

Redd counts were used to document the spawning distribution of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2003; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992) and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2003 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (Projects 199801003, 199801004, 199403400, 198335003), Idaho Power Company, and Bureau of Land Management.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.M.; Arnsberg, B.D.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2007; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches counted upstream of Lower Granite Dam into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2007 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Arnsberg, B.D. [Nez Perce Tribe; Groves, P.A. [Idaho Power Company

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Redd counts are routinely used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2005; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2005 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration and Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, 2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Redd counts were used to document the spawning distribution of fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2004; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992), and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document, containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2004 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, Idaho Power Company, and Bureau of Land Management.

Garcia, A.P.; Bradbury, S.; Arnsberg, B.D.; Rocklage, S.J.; Groves, P.A.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Fall Chinook Salmon Spawning Ground Surveys in the Snake River Basin Upriver of Lower Granite Dam, Annual Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect

Redd counts were used to document the spawning distribution of fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Snake River basin upriver of Lower Granite Dam. The first reported redd counts were from aerial searches conducted intermittently between 1959 and 1978 (Irving and Bjornn 1981, Witty 1988; Groves and Chandler 1996)(Appendix 1). In 1986, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife began an annual monitoring program that, in addition to the Snake River, included aerial searches of the Grande Ronde River the first year (Seidel and Bugert 1987), and the Imnaha River in subsequent years (Seidel et al. 1988; Bugert et al. 1989-1991; Mendel et al. 1992). The U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service and Idaho Power Company began contributing to this effort in 1991 by increasing the number of aerial searches conducted each year and adding underwater searches in areas of the Snake River that were too deep to be searched from the air (Connor et al. 1993; Garcia et al. 1994a, 1994b, 1996-2001; Groves 1993; Groves and Chandler 1996). The Nez Perce Tribe added aerial searches in the Clearwater River basin beginning in 1988 (Arnsberg et. al 1992) and the Salmon River beginning in 1992. Currently searches are conducted cooperatively by the Nez Perce Tribe, Idaho Power Company, and U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our objective for this report was to consolidate the findings from annual redd searches into a single document containing detailed information about the searches from the most recent spawning season, and summary information from previous years. The work conducted in 2002 was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (Projects 1998-01-003 and 1994-03-400) and the Idaho Power Company.

Garcia, Aaron P.; Bradbury, S.M.; Arnsberg, Billy D.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

The Wyodak-Anderson coal assessment, Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana -- An ArcView project  

SciTech Connect

In 1997, more than 305 million short tons of clean and compliant coal were produced from the Wyodak-Anderson and associated coal beds and zones of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana. To date, all coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson, which averages 0.47 percent sulfur and 6.44 percent ash, has met regulatory compliance standards. Twenty-eight percent of the total US coal production in 1997 was from the Wyodak-Anderson coal. Based on the current consumption rates and forecast by the Energy Information Administration (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coal is projected to produce 413 million short tons by the year 2016. In addition, this coal deposit as well as other Fort Union coals have recently been targeted for exploration and development of methane gas. New US Geological Survey (USGS) digital products could provide valuable assistance in future mining and gas development in the Powder River Basin. An interactive format, with querying tools, using ArcView software will display the digital products of the resource assessment of Wyodak-Anderson coal, a part of the USGS National Coal Resource Assessment of the Powder River Basin. This ArcView project includes coverages of the data point distribution; land use; surface and subsurface ownerships; coal geology, stratigraphy, quality and geochemistry; and preliminary coal resource calculations. These coverages are displayed as map views, cross sections, tables, and charts.

Flores, R.M.; Gunther, G.; Ochs, A.; Ellis, M.E.; Stricker, G.D.; Bader, L.R. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Willamette River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat-surveys, conducted in the Willamette River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the basis to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Yakima River Basin, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in the Yakima River basin, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1934-1942. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Walla Walla River Basin Fish Screen Evaluations, 2001 : Burlingame and Little Walla Walla Sites.  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 2 newly constructed fish screen sites in the Walla Walla River Basin during the spring of 2001. The fish screens facilities at the Little Walla Walla River in Milton-Freewater, Oregon and at Burlingame west of Walla Walla, Washington were examined to determine if they were being effectively operated and maintained to provide for safe fish passage. Data were collected to determine if velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met current National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage and whether bypass outfall conditions allowed fish to safely return to the river. Due to a calibration problem with the instrument used to measure water velocities during the spring evaluations, we re-evaluated the water velocities at both sites after the canals discharges were increased in the fall. Based on the results of our studies in 2001, we concluded: Burlingame site--The rotary-drum screen design appeared to be efficiently protecting juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, and migration delay in May and June. However, sediment and debris accumulations in the screen forebay could result in screen seal wear (due to silt) and may increase mortality due to predation in the screen forebay (due to woody debris accumulations along the screen face). All approach velocities were below the NMFS criteria of 0.4 feet per second in November. Sweep velocities were appreciably higher than approach velocities, however sweep velocities did not increase toward the bypass. Bypass velocity was greater than sweep velocities. Little Walla Walla--The flat-plate screen design appeared to be efficiently protecting juvenile fish from entrainment, impingement, and migration delay in May and June. All approach velocities were below the NMFS criteria of 0.4 feet per second in November. Sweep velocities were substantially higher than approach velocities and increased toward the bypass. Bypass velocity was greater than sweep velocities. The automated cleaning brushes at the Little Walla Walla site generally functioned properly. However, there was a small (6 to 12 in.) band along the length of the facility at the bottom of the screen that was not being cleaned effectively by the brush. In addition, the cable that drives the cleaning brush was showing signs of wear (cracks and frays) and should be replaced.

McMichael, Geoffrey A.; Chamness, M.A.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In 2003, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 23 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2003, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by the NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve juvenile fish passage conditions. (4) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well greased and operative. (5) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites.

Vucelick, J.; McMichael, G.; Chamness, M. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Regional hydrocarbon generation, migration, and accumulation pattern of Cretaceous strata, Powder River Basin  

SciTech Connect

A cell of abnormally high fluid pressure in the deep part of the Powder River basin is centered in an area where oil-generation-prone source rocks in the Skull Creek (oldest), Mowry, and Niobrara (youngest) formations are presently at their maximum hydrocarbon-volume generation rate. The overpressures are believed to be caused by the high conversion rate of solid kerogen in the source rocks to an increased volume of potentially expellable fluid hydrocarbons. In this area, hydrocarbons appear to be the principal mobile fluid species present in reservoirs within or proximal to the actively generating source rocks. Maximum generation pressures within the source rocks have caused vertical expulsion through a pressure-induced microfracture system and have charged the first available underlying and/or overlying sandstone carrier-reservoir bed. Hydrocarbons generated in the Skull Creek have been expelled downward into the Dakota Sandstone and upward into the Muddy Sandstone. Hydrocarbons generated in the Mowry have been expelled downward into the Muddy or upward into lower Frontier sandstones. Hydrocarbons generated in the Niobrara have been expelled downward into upper Frontier sandstones or upward into the first available overlying sandstone in the Upper Cretaceous. The first chargeable sandstone overlying the Niobrara, in ascending order, may be the (1) Shannon, (2) Sussex, (3) Parkman, (4) Teapot, or (5) Tekla, depending on the east limit of each sandstone with respect to vertical fracture migration through the Cody Shale from the underlying area of mature overpressured Niobrara source rocks.

Meissner, F.F.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

UPPER COLORADO RIVER BASIN COMPACT The state of Arizona, the state of Colorado, the state of New Mexico, the state of Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UPPER COLORADO RIVER BASIN COMPACT The state of Arizona, the state of Colorado, the state of New for the state of Arizona, Clifford H. Stone for the state of Colorado, Fred. E. Wilson for the state of New of the United States of America, have agreed, subject to the provisions of the Colorado River Compact [72

Johnson, Eric E.

193

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 1999-2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to document the seasonal distribution of adult/sub-adult bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) in the Malheur River basin. Due to the decline of bull trout in the Columbia Basin, the United States Fish and Wildlife Service listed bull trout as a threatened species in June 1998. Past land management activities; construction of dams; and fish eradication projects in the North Fork and Middle Fork Malheur River by poisoning have worked in concert to cumulatively impact native species in the Malheur Basin (Bowers et. al. 1993). Survival of the remaining bull trout populations is severely threatened (Buchanan 1997). 1999 Research Objects are: (1) Document the migratory patterns of adult/sub-adult bull trout in the North Fork Malheur River; (2) Determine the seasonal bull trout use of Beulah Reservoir and bull trout entrainment; and (3) Timing and location of bull trout spawning in the North Fork Malheur River basin. The study area includes the Malheur basin from the mouth of the Malheur River located near Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur River (Map 1). All fish collected and most of the telemetry effort was done on the North Fork Malheur River subbasin (Map 2). Fish collection was conducted on the North Fork Malheur River at the tailwaters of Beulah Reservoir (RK 29), Beulah Reservoir (RK 29-RK 33), and in the North Fork Malheur River at Crane Crossing (RK 69) to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. Radio telemetry was done from the mouth of the Malheur River in Ontario, Oregon to the headwaters of the North Fork Malheur. This report will reflect all migration data collected from 3/1/99 to 12/31/99.

Schwabe, Lawrence; Tiley, Mark (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR); Perkins, Raymond R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Ontario, OR)

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Chamberlain Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chamberlain Wind Project Chamberlain Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Chamberlain Wind Project Facility Chamberlain Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Basin Electric Developer Crown Butte Wind Power Energy Purchaser Basin Electric/East River Coop Location Chamberlain SD Coordinates 43.8096°, -99.3272° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.8096,"lon":-99.3272,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

195

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

196

The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Hydrogeological restrictions to saline ground-water discharge in the Red River of the North drainage basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Discharge of saline water from bedrock aquifers along the eastern margin of the Williston basin is restricted by surficial glacial till and lacustrine deposits in the Red River of the North drainage basin. Water from these aquifers reaches the surface by (1) diffusion; (2) slow, upward seepage along zones of relatively larger hydraulic conductivity in the till and lacustrine deposits; or (3) flow from artesian wells. Ground-water quality varies near the surface because of mixing of water being discharged from bedrock aquifers with shallower ground water in the surficial deposits. Ground-water quality, hydraulic-gradient, and hydraulic-conductivity data obtained from pumped-well and slug tests indicate that flow in the surficial deposits is eastward, but at slow rates because of small hydraulic conductivities. Base-flow and specific-conductance measurements of water in tributaries to the Red River of the North indicate that focused points of ground-water discharge result in substantial increases in salinity in surface water in the northern part of the basin in North Dakota. Core analyses and drillers' logs were used to generalize hydrogeologic characteristics of the deposits in the basin, and a two-dimensional ground-water-flow model was used to simulate the basin's geohydrologic processes. Model results indicate that the ground-water flow paths in the bedrock aquifers and surficial deposits converge, and that water from the bedrock aquifers contributes to the overall increase in ground-water discharge toward the east. Model results are supported by water-quality data collected along an east-west hydrogeologic section.

Strobel, M.L. (Geological Survey, Grand Forks, ND (United States) Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Impacts of Wind Power Integration on Sub-Daily Variation in River Flows Downstream of Hydroelectric Dams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Impacts of Wind Power Integration on Sub-Daily Variation in River Flows Downstream of Hydroelectric Dams ... Due to their operational flexibility, hydroelectric dams are ideal candidates to compensate for the intermittency and unpredictability of wind energy production. ... In this paper, we examine the effects of increased (i.e., 5%, 15%, and 25%) wind market penetration on prices for electricity and reserves, and assess the potential for altered price dynamics to disrupt reservoir release schedules at a hydroelectric dam and cause more variable and unpredictable hourly flow patterns (measured in terms of the Richards-Baker Flashiness (RBF) index). ...

Jordan D. Kern; Dalia Patino-Echeverri; Gregory W. Characklis

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

199

Columbia River Basin Accords -Narrative Proposal Form 1 200880000 ISRP FAN1B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The Columbia Basin Fish Accords (Accords) are ten-year agreements between the federal action agencies and states and tribes. The Accords supplement the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program and are intended substantial biological benefits for Columbia Basin fish. The Accords also acknowledge the tribes' and states

200

The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed, Washington, to evaluate the effects of nutrient enhancement on measures of stream and fish production. We compared low level water chemistry, water quality, and periphyton, insect, and fish production

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Investigation of hydroelectric energy potential of the Zab River Basin using geographic information systems and remote sensing methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Turkey's energy need is increasing day by day. The required energy is mostly imported from foreign countries since it cannot be met by the country's own resources. However Turkey has rich renewable water resources to produce energy. To fulfill the aim of closing this energy gap and using the country's water resources more efficiently the hydropower potential of the Zab River Basin is investigated in this paper. The overall objective of the study is to evaluate the hydropower potential of the Zab River Basin using Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing methods and utilize this potential for the economical development of the region and the country. Within the study appropriate locations were determined for 12 dams in the basin; estimated costs and annual electric energy generation were calculated with the Simahpp Software. According to these calculations the total cost installed power capacity and the annual electric energy generation of the dams were found respectively as 838.753??106 US$ 580.928?MW and 1112.327?GWh.

S. N. abuk; R. Bak??; S. Gnc; E. Gm?lo?lu; A. abuk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Evaluation of Juvenile Salmonid Outmigration and Survival in the Lower Umatilla River Basin, Annual Report 2003-2006.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes activities conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife's Juvenile Outmigration and Survival M&E project in the Umatilla River subbasin between 2004-2006. Information is used to make informed decisions on hatchery effectiveness, natural production success, passage improvement and flow enhancement strategies. Data collected includes annual estimates of smolt abundance, migration timing, and survival, life history characteristics and productivity status and trends for spring and fall Chinook salmon, coho salmon and summer steelhead. Productivity data provided is the key subbasin scale measure of the effectiveness of salmon and steelhead restoration actions in the Umatilla River. Information is also used for regional planning and recovery efforts of Mid-Columbia River (MCR) ESA-listed summer steelhead. Monitoring is conducted via smolt trapping and PIT-tag interrogation at Three Mile Falls Dam. The Umatilla Juvenile Outmigration and Survival Project was established in 1994 to evaluate the success of management actions and fisheries restoration efforts in the Umatilla River Basin. Project objectives for the 2004-2006 period were to: (1) operate the PIT tag detection system at Three Mile Falls Dam (TMFD), (2) enhance provisional PIT-tag interrogation equipment at the east bank adult fish ladder, (3) monitor the migration timing, abundance and survival of naturally-produced juvenile salmonids and trends in natural production, (4) determine migration parameters and survival of hatchery-produced fish representing various rearing, acclimation and release strategies, (5) evaluate the relative survival between transported and non-transported fish, (6) monitor juvenile life history characteristics and evaluate trends over time, (7) investigate the effects of river, canal, fishway operations and environmental conditions on smolt migration and survival, (8) document the temporal distribution and diversity of resident fish species, and (9) participate in planning and coordination activities within the basin and dissemination of results.

White, Tara

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste...

204

Tree-ring footprint of joint hydrologic drought in Sacramento and Upper Colorado river basins, western USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Growing and changing demands on water supply, along with natural climate variability and possible anthropogenically induced climate change, make water resource management and planning increasingly challenging, particularly in arid regions. Instrumental climate and gaged streamflow records provide just a snapshop of recent natural hydrologic variability. In this paper, we use tree-ring-based annual streamflow reconstructions for the Sacramento River in California and the Blue River in western Colorado to analyze the temporal and spatial variability of widespread drought simultaneously affecting both basins over the past five centuries. Stability of joint-drought episodes and the covariation of reconstructed flows in the two basins are analyzed with sliding correlations, spectral analysis and a hypergeometric test. Year-to-year spatial patterns of moisture anomalies in a singular joint-drought episode in the late-1500s are mapped with a network of tree-ring data. Climatological aspects of joint droughts of the 20th century are investigated with 500-mb geopotential height data and climatic indices. Although flow in the two rivers is only very weakly correlated over the full 538-yr reconstruction period, more years of joint drought occur than would be expected by chance alone. Covariation in reconstructed flows is stronger in the late 1500s and mid-1700s than at any time since 1800. The late 1500s period of drought is not characterized as a decades-long unbroken drought, but as a series of drought impulses broken by wet years, with widespread moisture deficits in joint dry years. Periods of high inter-basin correlation in reconstructed flow are characterized by coherency at frequencies within the ENSO band. However, joint droughts in instrumental gage records do not display any consistent relationship with ENSO or the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), and so it is difficult to infer either as a causal mechanism for joint droughts in the past.

David M. Meko; Connie A. Woodhouse

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2008 Annual Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations remain depressed relative to historic levels and limited information is available for steelhead life history. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects have been implemented in the basin to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival. However, these projects often lack effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed programmatic or watershed (status and trend) information to help evaluate project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts as well as meet some data needs as index stocks. Our continued monitoring efforts to estimate salmonid smolt abundance, age structure, SAR, smolts/redd, freshwater habitat use, and distribution of critical life states will enable managers to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the level of emphasis by the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Independent Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB), Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP), NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds (OWEB). Each of these groups have placed priority on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. The objective is to estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead.

Wilson, Wayne H.; Schricker, Jaym'e; Ruzychi, James R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

206

Detailed geochemical study of the Dan River-Danville Triassic Basin, North Carolina and Virginia. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program  

SciTech Connect

This abbreviated data report presents results of surface geochemical reconnaissance in the Dan River-Danville Triassic Basin of north-central North Carolina and south-central Virginia. Unweathered rock samples were collected at 380 sites within the basin at a nominal sampling density of one site per square mile. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site; analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. A detailed four-channel spectrometric survey was conducted, and the results are presented as a series of symbol plot maps for eU, eTh, and eU/eTh. Data from rock sample sites (on microfiche in pocket) include rock type and color and elemental analyses for U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Na, Sc, Sm, Ti, V, and Yb. Elemental uranium in 362 sedimentary rock samples from the Dan River-Danville Basin ranges from a low of 0.1 to a maximum of 13.3 parts per million (ppM). The log mean uranium concentration for these same samples is 0.37 ppM, and the log standard deviation is 0.24 ppM. Elemental uranium in 10 diabase dike samples from within the basin is in the range 0.1 to 0.7 ppM. The log mean uranium concentration for diabase samples is -.65 ppM, and the log standard deviation is 0.27. This report is issued in draft form, without detailed technical and copy editing. This was done to make the report available to the public before the end of the NURE program.

Thayer, P. A.; Cook, J. R.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly project status report discusses research projects being conducted on hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. We continued to seek improvement in our methods of communication and interactions to support the inter-disciplinary, inter-university collaborators within this program. In addition to the defined collaborative research teams, there is increasing interaction among investigators across projects. Planning for the second year of the project has included the development of our internal request for proposals, and refining the review process for selection of proposals for funding.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Ordovician Red River {open_quotes}B{close_quotes}: Horizontal oil play in the southern Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

Recent application of horizontal drilling technology to the Ordovician Red River {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} zone in the southern Williston basin has resulted in a successful oil play, with more than 100 wells drilled in 1995 and 1996. The Red River {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} reservoir is a dolomitized laminated carbonate with microsucrosic porosity of 8-25% and permeabilities in the range of 1-66 md. It occurs within the middle of three depositional cycles ({open_quotes}A,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}B,{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}C{close_quotes}) that form the upper Red River Formation. Each cycle consists of a lower burrowed limestone, middle laminated member, and capping anhydrite or lime mudstone. The {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} reservoir is confined to the {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} laminated member and consists of an upper portion, characterized by better reservoir quality, and a lower, less permeable portion. Horizontal drilling has the advantage of significantly increasing well-bore exposure to the upper, more permeable portion. Well data indicate the total Red River {open_quotes}B{close_quotes} porosity zone has remarkable extent over parts of southwestern North Dakota, southeastern Montana, and northwestern South Dakota. Productivity from horizontal well displays considerable variation that can be correlated with structure/tectonic patterns and with reservoir petrophysical character.

Montgomery, S.L.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Assessment of Salmonids and Their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

SciTech Connect

This study began in 1998 to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. Stream flows in the Walla Walla Basin continue to show a general trend that begins with a sharp decline in discharge in late June, followed by low summer flows and then an increase in discharge in fall and winter. Manual stream flow measurements at Pepper bridge showed an increase in 2002 of 110-185% from July-September, over flows from 2001. This increase is apparently associated with a 2000 settlement agreement between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the irrigation districts to leave minimum flows in the river. Stream temperatures in the Walla Walla basin were similar to those in 2001. Upper montane tributaries maintained maximum summer temperatures below 65 F, while sites in mid and lower Touchet and Walla Walla rivers frequently had daily maximum temperatures well above 68 F (high enough to inhibit migration in adult and juvenile salmonids, and to sharply reduce survival of their embryos and fry). These high temperatures are possibly the most critical physiological barrier to salmonids in the Walla Walla basin, but other factors (available water, turbidity or sediment deposition, cover, lack of pools, etc.) also play a part in salmonid survival, migration, and breeding success. The increased flows in the Walla Walla, due to the 2000 settlement agreement, have not shown consistent improvements to stream temperatures. Rainbow/steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) trout represent the most common salmonid in the basin. Densities of Rainbow/steelhead in the Walla Walla River from the Washington/Oregon stateline to Mojonnier Rd. dropped slightly from 2001, but are still considerably higher than before the 2000 settlement agreement. Other salmonids including; bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), mountain whitefish (Prosopium williamsoni), and brown trout (Salmo trutta) had low densities, and limited distribution throughout the basin. A large return of adult spring chinook to the Touchet River drainage in 2001 produced higher densities of juvenile chinook in 2002 than have been seen in recent years, especially in the Wolf Fork. The adult return in 2002 was substantially less than what was seen in 2001. Due to poor water conditions and trouble getting personnel hired, spawning surveys were limited in 2002. Surveyors found only one redd in four Walla Walla River tributaries (Cottonwood Ck., East Little Walla Walla, West Little Walla Walla, and Mill Ck.), and 59 redds in Touchet River tributaries (10 in the North Fork Touchet, 30 in the South Fork Touchet, and 19 in the Wolf Fork). Bull trout spawning surveys in the upper Touchet River tributaries found a total of 125 redds and 150 live fish (92 redds and 75 fish in the Wolf Fork, 2 redds and 1 fish in the Burnt Fork, 0 redds and 1 fish in the South Fork Touchet, 29 redds and 71 fish in the North Fork Touchet, and 2 redds and 2 fish in Lewis Ck.). A preliminary steelhead genetics analysis was completed as part of this project. Results indicate differences between naturally produced steelhead and those produced in the hatchery. There were also apparent genetic differences among the naturally produced fish from different areas of the basin. Detailed results are reported in Bumgarner et al. 2003. Recommendations for assessment activities in 2003 included: (1) continue to monitor the Walla Walla River (focusing from the stateline to McDonald Rd.), the Mill Ck system, and the Little Walla Walla System. (2) reevaluate Whiskey Ck. for abundance and distribution of salmonids, and Lewis Ck. for bull trout density and distribution. (3) select or develop a habitat survey protocol and begin to conduct habitat inventory and assessment surveys. (4) summarize bull trout data for Mill Ck, South Fork Touchet, and Lewis Ck. (5) begin to evaluate temperature and flow data to assess if the habitat conditions exist for spring chinook in the Touchet River.

Mendel, Glen; Trump, Jeremy; Gembala, Mike

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Yakima and Touchet River Basins Phase II Fish Screen Evaluation, 2006-2007 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In 2006, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers evaluated 27 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima and Touchet river basins. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performs these evaluations for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to determine whether the fish screening devices meet those National Marine Fisheries (NMFS) criteria for juvenile fish screen design, that promote safe and timely passage of juvenile salmonids. The NMFS criteria against which the sites were evaluated are as follows: (1) a uniform flow distribution over the screen surface to minimize approach velocity; (2) approach velocities less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s protects the smallest salmonids from impingement; (3) sweep velocities that are greater than approach velocities to minimize delay of out-migrating juveniles and minimize sediment deposition near the screens; (4) a bypass flow greater than or equal to the maximum flow velocity vector resultant upstream of the screens to also minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; (5) a gradual and efficient acceleration of flow from the upstream end of the site into the bypass entrance to minimize delay of out-migrating salmonids; and (6) screen submergence between 65% and 85% for drum screen sites. In addition, the silt and debris accumulation next to the screens should be kept to a minimum to prevent excessive wear on screens, seals and cleaning mechanisms. Evaluations consist of measuring velocities in front of the screens, using an underwater camera to assess the condition and environment in front of the screens, and noting the general condition and operation of the sites. Results of the evaluations in 2006 include the following: (1) Most approach velocities met the NMFS criterion of less than or equal to 0.4 ft/s. Of the sites evaluated, 31% exceeded the criterion at least once. Thirty-three percent of flat-plate screens had problems compared to 25% of drum screens. (2) Woody debris and gravel deposited during high river levels were a problem at several sites. In some cases, it was difficult to determine the bypass pipe was plugged until several weeks had passed. Slow bypass flow caused by both the obstructions and high river levels may have discouraged fish from entering the bypass, but once they were in the bypass, they may have had no safe exit. Perhaps some tool or technique can be devised that would help identify whether slow bypass flow is caused by pipe blockage or by high river levels. (3) Bypass velocities generally were greater than sweep velocities, but sweep velocities often did not increase toward the bypass. The latter condition could slow migration of fish through the facility. (4) Screen and seal materials generally were in good condition. (5) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (6) Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) generally operated and maintained fish screen facilities in a way that provided safe passage for juvenile fish. (7) Efforts with WDFW to find optimal louver settings at Naches-Selah were partly successful. The number of spots with excessive approach velocities was decreased, but we were unable to adjust the site to bring all approach values below 0.4 ft/s. (8) In some instances, irrigators responsible for specific maintenance at their sites (e.g., debris removal) did not perform their tasks in a way that provided optimum operation of the fish screen facility. Enforcement personnel proved effective at reminding irrigation districts of their responsibilities to maintain the sites for fish protection as well as irrigation. (9) We recommend placing datasheets providing up-to-date operating criteria and design flows in each site's logbox. The datasheet should include bypass design flows and a table showing depths of water over the weir and corresponding bypass flow. A similar datasheet relating canal gage readings and canal discharge in cubic feet per second would help identify times when the canal is taking mo

Chamness, Mickie; Tunnicliffe, Cherylyn [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, 1991 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

This document is the 1991 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha conducted by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. The decline in abundance of fall chinook salmon in the Snake River basin has become a growing concern. In April 1992, Snake River fall chinook salmon were listed as ``threatened`` under the Endangered Species Act. Effective recovery efforts for fall chinook salmon can not be developed until we increase our knowledge of the factors that are limiting the various life history stages. This study attempts to identify those physical and biological factors which influence spawning of fall chinook salmon in the free-flowing Snake River and their rearing and seaward migration through Columbia River basin reservoirs.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Miller, William H.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Tulane/Xavier University Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This progress report covers activities for the period January 1 - March 31, 1995 on project concerning `Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin.` The following activities are each summarized by bullets denoting significant experiments/findings: biotic and abiotic studies on the biological fate, transport and ecotoxicity of toxic and hazardous waste in the Mississippi River Basin; assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in quatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environments: biological uptake and metabolism studies; ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River system; bioremediation of selected contaminants in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin; a sensitive rapid on-sit immunoassay for heavy metal contamination; pore-level flow, transport, agglomeration and reaction kinetics of microorganism; biomarkers of exposure and ecotoxicity in the Mississippi River Basin; natural and active chemical remediation of toxic metals, organics and radionuclides in the aquatic environment; expert geographical information systems for assessing hazardous wastes in aquatic environments; enhancement of environmental education; and a number of just initiated projects including fate and transport of contaminants in aquatic environments; photocatalytic remediation; radionuclide fate and modeling from Chernobyl.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Radionuclide contamination in the Syrdarya river basin of Kazakhstan; Results of the Navruz Project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As part of an international collaboration (the Navruz Project) between Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, and the United States of America on transboundary river monitoring, the Radiometric Laborator...

K. K. Kadyrzhanov; D. S. Barber

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Penetration of buoyancy driven current due to a wind forced river plume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is proportional to freshwater input and inversely proportional to upwelling wind stress strength. Strong wind more quickly prevents fresh waters penetration. Under upwelling favorable winds, the plume is advected offshore by Ekman transport as well as upcoast...

Baek, Seong-Ho

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Two Years in the Life of the Indus River Basin [book chapter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reviews the major challenges and current water and agriculture context, plans, and policies following difficult years of drought and catastrophic monsoon flooding in Pakistan's Indus Basin. The years from 2009 through 2011 ...

Yu, Winston

216

Transport of fallout and reactor radionuclides in the drainage basin of the Hudson River estuary  

SciTech Connect

The transport and fate of Strontium 90, Cesium 137 and Plutonium 239, 240 in the Hudson River Estuary is discussed. Rates of radionuclide deposition and accumulation over time and space are calculated for the Hudson River watershed, estuary, and continental shelf offshore. 37 references, 7 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

Simpson, H.J.; Linsalata, P.; Olsen, C.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Stratigraphic overview of upper Cretaceous (early Campanian-Late Maestrichtian) Montana Group, Powder River basin, Wyoming: implications for complex interplay between eustatic sea level fluctuations, sedimentation rates, and intraforeland basin subsidence  

SciTech Connect

Isopach maps of chronostratigraphic and lithostratigraphic units from the Late Cretaceous (early Campanian-late Maestrichtian) Montana Group of the Powder River basin, Wyoming, reveal a complex interplay between eustatic sea level fluctuations, sedimentation rates, and intraforeland basin subsidence rates. The Montana Group is characterized by numerous asymmetrical, coarsening- and thickening-upward, progradational deltaic, strand-plain, and/or shallow-marine deposits that thin eastward and merge into thick offshore-marine and pelagic deposits on the Pierre Shale. From oldest to youngest these are the Gammon, Shannon, and Sussex Members of the Steele Shale, the Parkman and Teapot Sandstone Members of the Mesaverde Formation, the Teckla Sandstone Member of the Lewis Shale, and the Fox Hills Sandstone. Formation tops and bentonite beds from approximately 30,000 well logs were correlated throughout the Powder River basin and adjacent areas.

Gustason, E.R.; Devine, P.E.; McClurg, J.; Rappold, C.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Assessment of Salmonids and their Habitat Conditions in the Walla Walla River Basin within Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Concerns about the decline of native salmon and trout populations have increased among natural resource managers and the public in recent years. As a result, a multitude of initiatives have been implemented at the local, state, and federal government levels. These initiatives include management plans and actions intended to protect and restore salmonid fishes and their habitats. In 1998 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) were listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), as ''Threatened'', for the Walla Walla River and its tributaries. Steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were listed as ''Threatened'' in 1999 for the mid-Columbia River and its tributaries. These ESA listings emphasize the need for information about these threatened salmonid populations and their habitats. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) is entrusted with ''the preservation, protection, and perpetuation of fish and wildlife....[and to] maximize public recreational or commercial opportunities without impairing the supply of fish and wildlife (WAC 77.12.010).'' In consideration of this mandate, the WDFW submitted a proposal in December 1997 to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for a study to assess salmonid distribution, relative abundance, genetics, and the condition of salmonid habitats in the Walla Walla River basin. The primary purposes of this project are to collect baseline biological and habitat data, to identify major data gaps, and to draw conclusions whenever possible. The study reported herein details the findings of the 2001 field season (March to November, 2001).

Mendel, Glen Wesley; Trump, Jeremy; Karl, David

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Identification of the Spawning, Rearing, and Migratory Requirements of Fall Chinook Salmon in the Columbia River Basin, Annual Report 1994.  

SciTech Connect

Spawning ground surveys were conducted in 1994 as part of a five year study of Snake River chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawyacha begun in 1991. Observations of fall chinook salmon spawning in the Snake River were limited to infrequent aerial red counts in the years prior to 1987. From 1987-1990, red counts were made on a limited basis by an interagency team and reported by the Washington Department of Fisheries. Starting in 1991, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), and other cooperating agencies and organizations, expanded the scope of spawning ground surveys to include: (1) additional aerial surveys to improve red counts and provide data on the timing of spawning; (2) the validation (ground truthing) of red counts from aerial surveys to improve count accuracy; (3) underwater searches to locate reds in water too deep to allow detection from the air; and (4) bathymetric mapping of spawning sites for characterizing spawning habitat. This document is the 1994 annual progress report for selected studies of fall chinook salmon. The studies were undertaken because of the growing concern about the declining salmon population in the Snake River basin.

Rondorf, Dennis W.; Tiffan, Kenneth F.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Factors Affecting the Survival of Upstream Migrant Adult Salmonids in the Columbia River Basin : Recovery Issues for Threatened and Endangered Snake River Salmon : Technical Report 9 of 11.  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is developing conservation planning documentation to support the National Marine Fisheries Service`s (NMFS) recovery plan for Columbia Basin salmonid stocks that are currently listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Information from the conservation planning documentation will be used as a partial scientific basis for identifying alternative conservation strategies and to make recommendations toward conserving, rebuilding, and ultimately removing these salmon stocks from the list of endangered species. This report describes the adult upstream survival study, a synthesis of biological analyses related to conditions affecting the survival of adult upstream migrant salmonids in the Columbia River system. The objective of the adult upstream survival study was to analyze existing data related to increasing the survival of adult migrant salmonids returning to the Snake River system. The fate and accountability of each stock during its upstream migration period and the uncertainties associated with measurements of escapement and survival were evaluated. Operational measures that affected the survival of adult salmon were evaluated including existing conditions, augmented flows from upstream storage release, and drawdown of mainstem reservoirs. The potential impacts and benefits of these measures to each ESA stock were, also described based on considerations of species behavior and run timing.

Dauble, Dennis D.; Mueller, Robert P.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Age at ocean entry of Snake River Basin fall Chinook salmon and its significance to adult returns prior to summer spill at Lower Granite, Little  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Snake River basin. Transactions of the American Fisheries Society 134:291-304. Marsh D. M., Harmon, J. R, Douglas M. Marsh, William D. Muir, Kenneth F. Tiffan, Jay Hesse Prior to 2002, it was largely assumed entrants is an important area for future research. REFERENCES Connor, W. P., H. L. Burge, R. Waitt, and T

222

Geohydrologic feasibility study of the greater Green River Basin for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool  

SciTech Connect

Geraghty & Miller, Inc, of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Greater Green River Basin through literature surveys.

Reed, P.D.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Sediment Problems and Sediment Management in Asian River Basins (Proceedings of the ICCE Workshop held at Hyderabad, India, September 2009). IAHS Publ. 349, 2011.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment Problems and Sediment Management in Asian River Basins (Proceedings of the ICCE Workshop held at Hyderabad, India, September 2009). IAHS Publ. 349, 2011. 1 Sedimentation of reservoirs sedimentation rates. It is of strategic importance to rationally quantify available water resources in existing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

224

QuarterlyCouncilNorthwest Power and Conservation Council > Spring 2013 STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of natural gas-fired generation, as well as an emphasis on energy efficiency and development of renewableQuarterlyCouncilNorthwest Power and Conservation Council > Spring 2013 STRIKING A BALANCE BETWEEN ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT IN THE COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN In March, the Northwest Power and Conservation

225

Report of the Independent Scientific Advisory Board Regarding a Research Proposal for Inclusion in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recovery Project Independent Scientific Advisory Board Northwest Power Planning Council National MarineISAB 97-4 Report of the Independent Scientific Advisory Board Regarding a Research Proposal for Inclusion in the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Proposal Reviewed: Lake Pend Oreille Fishery

226

Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, Technical Report 2004-2005.  

SciTech Connect

The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. Spawning ground surveys for spring (stream-type) Chinook salmon were conducted in four main spawning areas (Mainstem, Middle Fork, North Fork, and Granite Creek System) and seven minor spawning areas (South Fork, Camas Creek, Desolation Creek, Trail Creek, Deardorff Creek, Clear Creek, and Big Creek) in the John Day River basin during August and September of 2005. Census surveys included 298.2 river kilometers (88.2 rkm within index, 192.4 rkm additional within census, and 17.6 rkm within random survey areas) of spawning habitat. We observed 902 redds and 701 carcasses including 227 redds in the Mainstem, 178 redds in the Middle Fork, 420 redds in the North Fork, 62 redds in the Granite Creek System, and 15 redds in Desolation Creek. Age composition of carcasses sampled for the entire basin was 1.6% age 3, 91.2% age 4, and 7.1% age 5. The sex ratio was 57.4% female and 42.6% male. Significantly more females than males were observed in the Granite Creek System. During 2005, 82.3% of female carcasses sampled had released all of their eggs. Significantly more pre-spawn mortalities were observed in Granite Creek. Nine (1.3%) of 701 carcasses were of hatchery origin. Of 298 carcasses examined, 4.0% were positive for the presence of lesions. A significantly higher incidence of gill lesions was found in the Granite Creek System when compared to the rest of the basin. Of 114 kidney samples tested, two (1.8%) had clinical BKD levels. Both infected fish were age-4 females in the Middle Fork. All samples tested for IHNV were negative. To estimate spring Chinook and summer steelhead smolt-to-adult survival (SAR) we PIT tagged 5,138 juvenile Chinook and 4,913 steelhead during the spring of 2005. We estimated that 130,144 (95% CL's 97,133-168,409) Chinook emigrated from the upper John Day subbasin past our seining area in the Mainstem John Day River (river kilometers 274-296) between February 4 and June 16, 2005. We also estimated that 32,601 (95% CL's 29,651 and 36,264) Chinook and 47,921 (95% CL's 35,025 and 67,366) steelhead migrated past our Mainstem rotary screw trap at river kilometer (rkm) 326 between October 4, 2004 and July 6, 2005. We estimated that 20,193 (95% CL's 17,699 and 22,983) Chinook and 28,980 (95% CL's 19,914 and 43,705) steelhead migrated past our Middle Fork trap (rkm 24) between October 6, 2004 and June 17, 2005. Seventy three percent of PIT tagged steelhead migrants were age-2 fish, 13.8% were age-3, 12.7% were age-2, and 0.3% were age 4. Spring Chinook SAR for the 2002 brood year was estimated at 2.5% (100 returns of 4,000 PIT tagged smolts). Preliminary steelhead SAR (excluding 2-ocean fish) for the 2004 tagging year was estimated at 1.61% (60 returns of 3,732 PIT-tagged migrants).

Wilson, Wayne

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Groundwater abstraction impacts on spring flow and base flow in the Hillsborough River Basin, Florida, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater abstraction has resulted in spring flow and groundwater base-flow declines in the Hillsborough River system of central Florida, USA. These declines have resulted in reduction of inflows to the Tamp...

Kenneth A. Weber; Robert G. Perry

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ecological interactions between hatchery summer steelhead and wild Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Willamette River basin, 2014  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which juvenile hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead overlap in space and time, to evaluate the extent of residualism among hatchery summer steelhead in the South Santiam River, and to evaluate the potential for negative ecological interactions among hatchery summer steelhead and wild winter steelhead. Because it is not possible to visually discern juvenile winter steelhead from resident rainbow trout, we treated all adipose-intact juvenile O. mykiss as one group that represented juvenile wild winter steelhead. The 2014 study objectives were to 1) estimate the proportion of hatchery summer steelhead that residualized in the South Santiam River in 2014, 2) determine the extent to which hatchery and naturally produced O. mykiss overlapped in space and time in the South Santiam River, and 3) characterize the behavioral interactions between hatchery-origin juvenile summer steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss. We used a combination of radio telemetry and direct observations (i.e., snorkeling) to determine the potential for negative interactions between hatchery summer and wild winter steelhead juveniles in the South Santiam River. Data collected from these two independent methods indicated that a significant portion of the hatchery summer steelhead released as smolts did not rapidly emigrate from the South Santiam River in 2014. Of the 164 radio-tagged steelhead that volitionally left the hatchery, only 66 (40.2%) were detected outside of the South Santiam River. Forty-four (26.8% of 164) of the radio-tagged hatchery summer steelhead successfully emigrated to Willamette Falls. Thus, the last known location of the majority of the tagged fish (98 of 164 = 59.8%) was in the South Santiam River. Thirty-three of the tagged hatchery steelhead were detected in the South Santiam River during mobile-tracking surveys. Of those, 21 were found to be alive in the South Santiam River over three months after their release, representing a residualization rate of 12.8% (21 of 164). Snorkeling revealed considerable overlap of habitat use (in space and time) by residual hatchery steelhead and naturally produced O. mykiss in the South Santiam River. Results from our study (and others) also indicated that hatchery steelhead juveniles typically dominate interactions with naturally produced O. mykiss juveniles. The overlap in space and time, combined with the competitive advantage that residual hatchery steelhead appear to have over naturally produced O. mykiss, increases the potential for negative ecological interactions that could have population-level effects on the wild winter steelhead population of the South Santiam River.

Harnish, Ryan A.; Green, Ethan D.; Vernon, Christopher R.; Mcmichael, Geoffrey A.

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

229

A summary of 22 Years of Fish Screen Evaluation in the Yakima River Basin, Summary Report 1985-2007.  

SciTech Connect

Sixty fish screen facilities were constructed in the Yakima River basin between 1985 and 2006 as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council plan to mitigate the effects of federal hydroelectric projects on fish and wildlife populations. This report summarizes evaluations of some of those and other fish screen facilities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from 1985 through 2006. The objective of these studies was to determine if the newly designed and constructed fish screens were effective at providing juvenile salmonids safe passage past irrigation diversions. To answer that question, PNNL conducted release-and-catch studies at eight Phase I sites in the Yakima River basin. Increasing concerns about the impacts of hatchery fish releases on the wild fish population, as well as the cost and time necessary to perform these kinds of biological studies at more than 60 planned Phase II sites, required development of techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of the sites without releasing fish. The new techniques involved collecting information on screen design, operation, and effectiveness at guiding fish safely through the fish screen facility. Performance measures including water velocities and passage conditions provide a good alternative to biological studies at significantly lower cost and time. Physical techniques were used at all 10 Phase I and 28 Phase II sites evaluated by PNNL over the following 19 years. Results of these studies indicate the Phase I and II fish screen facilities are designed and capable of providing safe passage for juvenile salmonids so long as construction, maintenance, and operations meet the criteria used in the design of each site and the National Marine Fisheries Service criteria for juvenile fish screen design.

Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

230

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

231

Turbulent Rivers Bjorn Birnir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) function gives rise to Hack's law [16]; stating that the length of the main river, in mature river basins, scales with the area of the basin l Ah, h = 0.568 being Hack's exponent. 1 Introduction The flow]. One of the best known scaling laws of river basins is Hack's law [16] that states that the area

Birnir, Björn

232

Wind Mills  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Over 5,000 years ago, the ancient Egyptians used wind to sail ships on the Nile River. While the proliferation of water mills was in full swing, windmills appeared to harness more inanimate energy by employing wind

J. S. Rao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Multiscale Genetic Structure of Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout in the Upper Snake River Basin.  

SciTech Connect

Populations of Yellowstone cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarkii bouvierii have declined throughout their native range as a result of habitat fragmentation, overharvest, and introductions of nonnative trout that have hybridized with or displaced native populations. The degree to which these factors have impacted the current genetic population structure of Yellowstone cutthroat trout populations is of primary interest for their conservation. In this study, we examined the genetic diversity and genetic population structure of Yellowstone cutthroat trout in Idaho and Nevada with data from six polymorphic microsatellite loci. A total of 1,392 samples were analyzed from 45 sample locations throughout 11 major river drainages. We found that levels of genetic diversity and genetic differentiation varied extensively. The Salt River drainage, which is representative of the least impacted migration corridors in Idaho, had the highest levels of genetic diversity and low levels of genetic differentiation. High levels of genetic differentiation were observed at similar or smaller geographic scales in the Portneuf River, Raft River, and Teton River drainages, which are more altered by anthropogenic disturbances. Results suggested that Yellowstone cutthroat trout are naturally structured at the major river drainage level but that habitat fragmentation has altered this structuring. Connectivity should be restored via habitat restoration whenever possible to minimize losses in genetic diversity and to preserve historical processes of gene flow, life history variation, and metapopulation dynamics. However, alternative strategies for management and conservation should also be considered in areas where there is a strong likelihood of nonnative invasions or extensive habitat fragmentation that cannot be easily ameliorated.

Cegelski, Christine C.; Campbell, Matthew R.

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

In Search of the Correct Wind and Wave Fields in a Minor Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors analyze the accuracy of the surface wind of the Adriatic Sea from a global model. They find it to be substantially underestimated and propose a calibration by a suitable enhancement of the strength of the fields. The reasons for the ...

Luigi Cavaleri; Luciana Bertotti

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Geological controls on matrix permeability of Devonian Gas Shales in the Horn River and Liard basins, northeastern British Columbia, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Controls of matrix permeability are investigated for Devonian Gas Shales from the Horn River and Liard basins in northeastern British Columbia, Canada. Mineralogy is varied with high carbonate, high quartz and moderate quartz, carbonate and clay rich strata. Quartz content varies between 2 and 73%, carbonate varies between 1 and 93% and clay varies between 3 and 33%. The TOC content ranges between 0.3 and 6wt.% and porosity varies between about 1 and 7%. For Horn River basin samples, quartz is mainly biogenic in origin derived from radiolarians. TOC content increases with the quartz content suggesting the TOC and quartz both are derived from siliceous phytoplankton. A positive relationship between porosity and quartz content is due to the positive relationship between quartz and TOC. Matrix permeability parallel to bedding varies between 7.5E?02 and 7.1E?07mD at an effective stress of 15MPa. Variation in permeability is due to a complex combination of factors that includes origin and distribution of minerals, pore?size distribution and fabric. Mercury intrusion capillary curves indicate that the higher matrix permeability values (>2E?03mD) occurs in samples that contain interconnected pore apertures greater than 16?m even when these samples may contain less macropores than low permeability samples. The fabric of high permeability samples can be either isotropic or anisotropic; however permeability of anisotropic samples is more sensitive to changes in effective stress than isotropic samples. More highly anisotropic samples contain moderate amounts of quartz, carbonate and in some, clay. High permeability samples that contain a more balanced ratio between micro-, meso- and macroporosity would not only have faster flow rates but also greater access to sorbed gas within the microporosity compared to samples that lack mesopores. Several Muskwa samples compared to Evie and Besa River samples contain higher quartz, moderate clay and high TOC content coupled with high permeability, less sensitivity to effective stress and balanced ratios between micro-, meso- and macroporosity would be a lower exploration risk due a greater propensity to fracture, the ability to produce and store hydrocarbons due to higher TOC contents and greater communication between macropores and micropores in the organic and clay fractions.

Gareth R.L. Chalmers; Daniel J.K. Ross; R. Marc Bustin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Geologic origins of salinization in a semi-arid river: The role of sedimentary basin brines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...as it passes through three large and deep sedimentary...The results of all three isotopic systems exhibit...river, which includes three distinct inputs, a 5...supported by SAHRA (Sustainability of Semi-Arid Hydrology...Postel, S., 1999, Pillar of sand: Can the irrigation...

237

Potential Economic Impacts of Zebra Mussels on the Hydropower Facilities in the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was to estimate costs to the Federal Columbia River Power System hydroelectric projects in the event of a zebra found that the one-time cost for installing zebra mussel control systems at hydroelectric projects could hypochlorite (NaOCl) injection system and anti-fouling paint), at 13 select hydroelectric projects, was $23

238

CE-QUAL-W2 Version 3: Hydrodynamic and Water Quality River Basin Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dimensional (longitudinal-vertical) water quality and hy- drodynamic computer simulation model that was originally developed segments. Test cases for this new code include a 244 km section of the Lower Snake River in Idaho and ver- tical velocities, temperature, and 21 other wa- ter quality parameters (such as dissolved oxy

Wells, Scott A.

239

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment columbia river Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for: assessment columbia river Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 352000 Columbia river Basin Fish and Wildlife Program "...the Council is adopting Summary: 352000 Columbia river Basin...

240

Degradation rates of advanced treatment effluents anticipated in the Trinity River Basin, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technique was described originally by G. v. R. Marais , who used the procedure to study the deoxygenation rates (37) of sewage effluents and river water. Reynolds and Eckenfelder (38) used the method on Houston Ship Channel waters and found... it to be effective and reliable. This method, commonly known as the "Marais Technique, " was employed as a part of all three runs. Replicate samples indicated the nutrient stock had no effect on the rates of deoxygenation, and none of the subsequent Marais runs...

Esmond, Steven Earl

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The estimation of radiation doses in human organs due to natural and artificial radioactivity in surface waters of the Ebro river basin (Northeast Spain)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports the estimation of the radiation doses in the human body in the Ebro river basin (Northeast Spain), following drinking water ingestion by measuring 40K, 226Ra, 90Sr and 3H. The equivalent dose in ten different organs was estimated. Dose calculations were performed by means of the GENII computer program. The lowest equivalent dose calculated through ingesting drinking water was in the small intestine whereas the highest was in the bone surface.

Feda Oner; Nazmi T. Okumusoglu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Evaluation of Fish Passage Sites in the Walla Walla River Basin, 2008  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory evaluated the Hofer Dam fish screen and provided technical assistance at two other fish passage sites as requested by the Bonneville Power Administration, the Walla Walla Watershed Council, or the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. Evaluation of new sites such as Hofer Dam focuses on their design, construction, operation, and maintenance to determine if they effectively provide juvenile salmonids with safe passage through irrigation diversions. There were two requests for technical assistance in 2008. In the first, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation requested an evaluation of the Nursery Bridge fish screens associated with the fish ladder on the east side of the Walla Walla River. One set of brushes that clean the screens was broken for an extended period. Underwater videography and water velocity measurements were used to determine there were no potential adverse effects on juvenile salmonids when the west set of screens was clean enough to pass water normally. A second request, received from the National Marine Fisheries Service and the Walla Walla Watershed Council, asked for evaluation of water velocities through relatively new head gates above and adjacent to the Eastside Ditch fish screens on the Walla Walla River. Water moving through the head gates and not taken for irrigation is diverted to provide water for the Nursery Bridge fish ladder on the east side of the river. Elevations used in the design of the head gates were incorrect, causing excessive flow through the head gates that closely approached or exceeded the maximum swimming burst speed of juvenile salmonids. Hofer Dam was evaluated in June 2008. PNNL researchers found that conditions at Hofer Dam will not cause impingement or entrainment of juvenile salmonids but may provide habitat for predators and lack strong sweeping flows to encourage juvenile salmonid passage downstream. Further evaluation of velocities at the Eastside Ditch and wasteway gates should occur as changes are made to compensate for the design problems. These evaluations will help determine whether further changes are required. Hofer Dam also should be evaluated again under more normal operating conditions when the river levels are typical of those when fish are emigrating and the metal plate is not affecting flows.

Chamness, Mickie A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

243

Petrography and prediction of reservoir rock properties in the Sussex Sandstone, Powder River Basin, Wyoming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and taken at room temperature. 100 90 KAOLINITE (OOIj 7 ~ A 60 6 ~ 50 KAOLINITE IOOZI 5 55 5 WOODS EM, IRE I C 0 0 (25'0 5 I -2 10 60 , (6 II I 51 ll QUARTZ I 425 A 4 5AARUW 165ZAt CHLORITE (OOS) 471 A ILL I TE (OOZI 4 98 A SIIIECT TE...PETPOGJVPHY AND PREDICTION OF 1'L'SERVO IR R(. &CJ; PROPER IFS IN 1HE SIJSSFX SAvDSTOXE, POXDEJ& RIVER BASIM, EYOMIiA A Thesis by RICIIARD HOYT SHIRLEY JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(M University in partial fulfillment...

Shirley, Richard Hoyt

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Washington Phase II Fish Diversion Screen Evaluations in the Yakima River Basin, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

In 2004, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) evaluated 25 Phase II fish screen sites in the Yakima River Basin as part of a multi-year project for the Bonneville Power Administration on the effectiveness of fish screening devices. PNNL collected data to determine whether velocities in front of the screens and in the bypasses met the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries, formerly the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)) criteria to promote safe and timely fish passage. In addition, PNNL conducted underwater video surveys to evaluate the environmental and operational conditions of the screen sites with respect to fish passage. Based on evaluations in 2004, PNNL concluded that: (1) In general, water velocity conditions at the screen sites met fish passage criteria set by NOAA Fisheries. (2) Conditions at most facilities would be expected to provide for safe juvenile fish passage. (3) Automated cleaning brushes generally functioned properly; chains and other moving parts were typically well-greased and operative. (4) Removal of sediment buildup and accumulated leafy and woody debris could be improved at some sites. (5) Conditions at some facilities indicate that operation and/or maintenance should be modified to improve passage conditions for juvenile fish. For example, Taylor has had problems meeting bypass flow and submergence operating criteria since the main river channel shifted away from the site 2 years ago, and Fruitvale consistently has had problems meeting bypass flow criteria when the water is low. (6) Continued problems at Gleed point to design flaws. This site should be considered for redesign or replacement.

Vucelick, Jessica; McMichael, Geoffrey; Chamness, Mickie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Population Structure of Columbia River Basin Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout, Technical Report 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The population structure of chinook salmon and steelhead trout is presented as an assimilation of the life history forms that have evolved in synchrony with diverse and complex environments over their Pacific range. As poikilotherms, temperature is described as the overwhelming environmental influence that determines what life history options occur and where they are distributed. The different populations represent ecological types referred to as spring-, summer-, fall, and winter-run segments, as well as stream- and ocean-type, or stream- and ocean-maturing life history forms. However, they are more correctly described as a continuum of forms that fall along a temporal cline related to incubation and rearing temperatures that determine spawn timing and juvenile residence patterns. Once new habitats are colonized, members of the founding populations spread through adaptive evolution to assume complementary life history strategies. The related population units are collectively referred to as a metapopulation, and members most closely associated within common temporal and geographic boundaries are designated as first-order metapopulations. Population structure of chinook salmon and steelhead in the Columbia Basin, therefore, is the reflection of the genetic composition of the founding source or sources within the respective region, shaped by the environment, principally temperature, that defines life history evolutionary strategy to maximize fitness under the conditions delineated. The complexity of structure rests with the diversity of opportunities over the elevations that exist within the Basin. Consistent with natural selection, rather than simply attempting to preserve populations, the challenge is to provide opportunities to expand their range to new or restored habitat that can accommodate genetic adaptation as directional environmental changes are elaborated. Artificial propagation can have a critical role in this process, and the emphasis must be placed on promoting the ability for anadromous salmonids to respond to change by assuring that the genetic diversity to facilitate such responses is present. The key in developing an effective recovery program for chinook salmon and steelhead is to recognize that multiple life history forms associated with temperature characterize the species in the Columbia Basin, and recovery measures taken must address the biological requirements of the population unit within the environmental template identified. Unless such measures are given first and highest priority, establishment of biologically self-sustaining populations will be restrained.

Brannon, E.L.; National Science Foundation (U.S.)

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Elements of an environmental decision support system for seasonal wetland salt management in a river basin subjected to water quality regulation  

SciTech Connect

Seasonally managed wetlands in the Grasslands Basin on the west-side of California's San Joaquin Valley provide food and shelter for migratory wildfowl during winter months and sport for waterfowl hunters during the annual duck season. Surface water supply to these wetlands contain salt which, when drained to the San Joaquin River during the annual drawdown period, can negatively impact water quality and cause concern to downstream agricultural riparian water diverters. Recent environmental regulation, limiting discharges salinity to the San Joaquin River and primarily targeting agricultural non-point sources, now also targets return flows from seasonally managed wetlands. Real-time water quality management has been advocated as a means of continuously matching salt loads discharged from agricultural, wetland and municipal operations to the assimilative capacity of the San Joaquin River. Past attempts to build environmental monitoring and decision support systems (EDSS's) to implement this concept have enjoyed limited success for reasons that are discussed in this paper. These reasons are discussed in the context of more general challenges facing the successful implementation of a comprehensive environmental monitoring, modelling and decision support system for the San Joaquin River Basin.

Quinn, N.W.T.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2000-2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Malheur basin lies within southeastern Oregon. The Malheur River is a tributary to the Snake River, entering at about River Kilometer (RK) 595. The hydrological drainage area of the Malheur River is approximately 12,950 km{sup 2} and is roughly 306 km in length. The headwaters of the Malheur River originate in the Blue Mountains at elevations of 6,500 to 7,500 feet, and drops to an elevation of 2000 feet at the confluence with the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the Malheur basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 300 centimeters and ranges from 100 centimeters in the upper mountains to less than 25 centimeters in the lower reaches (Gonzalez 1999). Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2000. The Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT), United States Forest Service (USFS), and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), have been working cooperatively to achieve this common goal. Bull trout ''Salvenlinus confluentus'' have specific environmental requirements and complex life histories making them especially susceptible to human activities that alter their habitat (Howell and Buchanan 1992). Bull trout are considered to be a cold-water species and are temperature dependent. This presents a challenge for managers, biologists, and private landowners in the Malheur basin. Because of the listing of bull trout under the Endangered Species Act as threatened and the current health of the landscape, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power contract period starting 1 April 2000 and ending 31 March 2001. The study area will include the North Fork Malheur River and the Upper Malheur River from Warm Springs Reservoir upstream to the headwaters.

Gonzales, Dan; Schwabe, Lawrence; Wenick, Jess (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Summary Report for Bureau of Fisheries Stream Habitat Surveys : Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Basins, 1934-1942, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This document contains summary reports of stream habitat surveys, conducted in Idaho, by the Bureau of Fisheries (BOF, now National Marine Fisheries Service) from 1938-1942.. These surveys were part of a larger project to survey streams in the Columbia River basin that provided, or had provided, spawning and rearing habitat for salmon and steelhead (Rich, 1948). The purpose of the survey was, as described by Rich, 'to determine the present condition of the various tributaries with respect to their availability and usefulness for the migration, breeding, and rearing of migratory fishes'. The Idaho portion of the survey consisted of extensive surveys of the Clearwater, Salmon, Weiser, and Payette River Subbasins. Current estimates of the loss of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin are based on a series of reports published from 1949-1952 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The reports were brief, qualitative accounts of over 5000 miles of stream surveys conducted by the BOF from 1934-1946 (Bryant, 1949; Bryant and Parkhurst, 1950; Parkhurst, 1950a-c; Parkhurst et al., 1950). Despite their brevity, these BOF reports have formed the basis for estimating fish habitat losses and conditions in the Columbia River Basin (Fulton, 1968, 1970; Thompson, 1976; NPPC, 1986). Recently, the field notebooks from the BOF surveys were discovered. The data is now archived and stored in the Forest Science DataBank at Oregon State University (Stafford et al., 1984; 1988). These records are the earliest and most comprehensive documentation available of the condition and extent of anadromous fish habitat before hydropower development in the Columbia River Basin. They provide the baseline data for quantifying changes and setting a benchmark for future restoration of anadromous fish habitat throughout the Basin. The summaries contained in this book are exact replicates of the originals. Due to discrepancies between the field data and the summaries, the database should be used to assess pool and substrate conditions. This data is available from the Bonneville Power Administration. The Bureau of Fisheries survey is unique because it is the only long-term data set that quantifies fish habitat in a manner that is replicable over time; no other similar work is known to exist. Other surveys, such as Thompson and Haas (1960), inventoried extensive areas in a manner that was mostly qualitative, subjectively estimating physical characteristics like bank cover and stream shading. Spawning, rearing, and resting habitat were not systematically quantified to allow comparisons over time. Knowledge of the past and present quantity and quality of anadromous fish habitat in the Columbia River Basin is essential to any effort to enhance fish populations. Habitat condition is a key element in monitoring and evaluating progress towards the doubling goal. Integration of this information into the Columbia River Fish and Wildlife Plan can provide the baseline information to greatly enhance understanding of past, present, and future habitat conditions in the basin to provide for improved management decisions.

McIntosh, Bruce A.; Clark, Sharon E.; Sedell, James R.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Don't let the river run dry: Efficiency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the project. This team works with local irrigation districts, agricultural producers, homeowners, and other state and federal agencies to address the various water issues in the basin. ?The Rio Grande Basin Initiative is a model outcome- based program... the project. This team works with local irrigation districts, agricultural producers, homeowners, and other state and federal agencies to address the various water issues in the basin. ?The Rio Grande Basin Initiative is a model outcome- based program...

Supercinski, Danielle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Don't let the river run dry: Efficiency and conservation efforts in the Rio Grande Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the project. This team works with local irrigation districts, agricultural producers, homeowners, and other state and federal agencies to address the various water issues in the basin. ?The Rio Grande Basin Initiative is a model outcome- based program... the project. This team works with local irrigation districts, agricultural producers, homeowners, and other state and federal agencies to address the various water issues in the basin. ?The Rio Grande Basin Initiative is a model outcome- based program...

Supercinski, Danielle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE LOWER GREEN RIVER FORMATION, SOUTHWEST UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect

Reservoir simulations of different fields in the Green River Formation are reported. Most extensive simulations were performed on the Monument Butte Northeast unit. Log data were used to construct detailed geostatistical models, which were upscaled to obtain reasonable number of grid blocks for reservoir simulation. Porosities, permeabilities, and water saturations required for reservoir simulation were thus generated. Comparison of the production results with the field data revealed that there was a phenomenological deficiency in the model. This was addressed by incorporating hydraulic fractures into the models. With this change, much better agreement between simulation results and field data was obtained. Two other fields, Brundage Canyon and Uteland Butte, were simulated in primary production. Only preliminary simulations were undertaken since a number of critical data elements were missing and could not be obtained from the operators. These studies revealed that the production performance of the Brundage Canyon field is much better than what can be predicted from simulations of a typical non-fractured, undersaturated reservoir. Uteland Butte field performance was that of a typical undersaturated reservoir.

Milind D. Deo

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

252

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Fish Enhancement Project, Annual Report for FY 2000.  

SciTech Connect

The CTUIR North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Enhancement Project (NFJDAFEP) identified and prioritized stream reaches in The North Fork John day River basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public out reach was emphasized during this first year of the project. We presented multiple funding and enhancement options to landowners. We concentrated on natural recovery methods, riparian fencing and off-stream livestock water developments. Under this BPA contract four riparian easements were signed protecting almost 5 miles of tributary streams. There are nine offstream water developments associated with these easements. Some landowners chose to participate in other programs based on Tribal outreach efforts. Two landowners chose NRCS programs for enhancement and one chose OWEB as a funding source. Two landowners implemented there own enhancement measures protecting 3 miles of stream. Cooperation between the NRCS/FSA/SWCDs and the Tribe to create joint projects and develop alternative funding scenarios for riparian enhancement was a major effort. The Tribe also worked with the North Fork John Day Watershed Council, USFS and ODFW to coordinate projects and support similar projects throughout the John Day Basin. We provided input to the John Day Summary prepared for the NWPPC by ODFW. The Tribe worked with the Umatilla National Forest on the Clear Creek Dredgetailings Rehabilitation project and coordinated regularly with USFS Fisheries, Hydrology and Range staff.

Macy, Tom L.; James, Gary A.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Fish Enhancement Project, Annual Report for FY 2001.  

SciTech Connect

The CTUIR North Fork John Day River Basin Anadromous Enhancement Project (NFJDAFEP) identified and prioritized stream reaches in The North Fork John day River basin for habitat improvements during the 2000 project period. Public outreach was emphasized during this first year of the project. During the past year we concentrated on satisfying landowner needs, providing cost share alternatives, providing joint projects and starting implementation. We presented multiple funding and enhancement options to landowners. We concentrated on natural recovery methods, riparian fencing and offstream livestock water developments. Under this BPA contract four riparian easements have been signed protecting almost 5 miles of tributary streams. There are nine offstream water developments associated with these easements. Some landowners chose to participate in other programs based on Tribal outreach efforts. Some landowners chose NRCS programs for enhancement and others chose OWEB as a funding source. The exact amount of stream protection due to other funding sources probably exceeds that by BPA, however most would not have entered any program without initial Tribal outreach. Cooperation between the NRCS/FSA/SWCDs and the Tribe to create joint projects and develop alternative funding scenarios for riparian enhancement was a major effort. The Tribe also worked with the North Fork John Day Watershed Council, USFS and ODFW to coordinate projects and support similar projects throughout the John Day Basin.

Macy, Tom L.; James, Gary A.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the Interior Columbia River Basin; Populations of the Upper Yakima Basin, 1997-1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique.

Trotter, Patrick C. (Fishery Science Consultant, Seattle, WA); McMillan, Bill; Gayeski, Nick (Washington Trout, Duvall, WA)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Quantitative evaluation of effects of the soft interventions or cleaner production in households and the hard interventions: A Social Experiment Programme in a large river basin in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts have been made to reduce municipal wastewater pollutant discharge and improve river water quality in the Yamato-gawa River basin since 2005, as part of a Social Experiment Programme. The Programme was the first one in Japan to disseminate soft interventions in households, measurements to reduce pollutant discharge, in a large river basin with more than two million population. The soft interventions in households are similar to cleaner production in industrial sector because they are not the wastewater treatment and changing of lifestyles. This paper presents several methods for quantification of the pollutant discharge reduction. Two hypothetical soft intervention combinations were defined, the effects of 16 soft interventions were estimated using their proliferation rates, and estimated pollutant discharge reduction was compared with changes in river water quality during the Programme events. For the first method, environmental accounting housekeeping (EAH) books were applied to estimate a 3853% reduction in biological oxygen demand (BOD), 2640% reduction in total nitrogen (TN), and 2132% reduction in total phosphorus (TP). These estimation results were comparable with the field survey results of approximately 100 person population, which were conducted in the late 1980s. Soft interventions were found to be several times more cost effective than hard interventions, such as development of municipal wastewater treatment and river water purification systems. The BOD discharge reduction effects of soft interventions initiated during Programme events increased from 0.32.3% in 20052007 to 2.44.7% in 20072009. The questionnaire surveys found that participants in the Programme events in average newly implemented three or four soft interventions in addition to those already implemented at normal times.

Yoshiaki Tsuzuki; Minoru Yoneda; Ryohei Tokunaga; Shinsuke Morisawa

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Mercury oxidation promoted by a selective catalytic reduction catalyst under simulated Powder River Basin coal combustion conditions  

SciTech Connect

A bench-scale reactor consisting of a natural gas burner and an electrically heated reactor housing a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst was constructed for studying elemental mercury (Hg{sup 0}) oxidation under SCR conditions. A low sulfur Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal combustion fly ash was injected into the entrained-flow reactor along with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and trace Hg{sup 0}. Concentrations of Hg{sup 0} and total mercury (Hg) upstream and downstream of the SCR catalyst were measured using a Hg monitor. The effects of HCl concentration, SCR operating temperature, catalyst space velocity, and feed rate of PRB fly ash on Hg0 oxidation were evaluated. It was observed that HCl provides the source of chlorine for Hg{sup 0} oxidation under simulated PRB coal-fired SCR conditions. The decrease in Hg mass balance closure across the catalyst with decreasing HCl concentration suggests that transient Hg capture on the SCR catalyst occurred during the short test exposure periods and that the outlet speciation observed may not be representative of steady-state operation at longer exposure times. Increasing the space velocity and operating temperature of the SCR led to less Hg{sup 0} oxidized. Introduction of PRB coal fly ash resulted in slightly decreased outlet oxidized mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) as a percentage of total inlet Hg and correspondingly resulted in an incremental increase in Hg capture. The injection of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) for NOx reduction by SCR was found to have a strong effect to decrease Hg oxidation. The observations suggest that Hg{sup 0} oxidation may occur near the exit region of commercial SCR reactors. Passage of flue gas through SCR systems without NH{sub 3} injection, such as during the low-ozone season, may also impact Hg speciation and capture in the flue gas. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Chun W. Lee; Shannon D. Serre; Yongxin Zhao; Sung Jun Lee; Thomas W. Hastings [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hydrocarbon accumulation conditions and exploration direction of Baiyun-Liwan deep water areas in the Pearl River Mouth Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An integrated geologic study was performed in the Baiyun-Liwan deep water areas, Pearl River Mouth Basin, based on the achievements obtained during the past five exploration stages. The following understandings were obtained. (1) The Baiyun Sag has superior source rock conditions and has experienced three tectonic evaluation stages like rifting, rifting-depression and depression. The Wenchang-Enping Fms deposited during the rifting stage have large hydrocarbon generation potentials. During the rifting-depression and depression stages, the deposition in the study area was controlled by the Oligocene and Miocene shelf slope break zones. The Oligocene Zhuhai Fm shallow marine delta-longshore depositional system and the Miocene Zhujiang-Hanjiang Fms deep fan depositional system were formed, and they are the most favorable reservoir-caprock assemblages in the study area. (2) The Hydrocarbon accumulation pattern in the deep waters is different from that in the northern shallow waters. Shelf slope break zone, composite conduction system consisting of structural ridge, fault, sandbody, unconformity and fluid diapir as well as late tectonic movement are the three major factors controlling hydrocarbon migration and accumulation in the study area. (3) The Liwan 3-1 gas field is a typical example. The superior trapping conditions, high-quality reservoirs of delta distributary channel controlled by shelf slope break zone, vertical conduction system consisting of fault and diapir, as well as the overlying massive marine mudstone caprock provide favorable geologic conditions for the formation of large gas fields. Four areas were identified as the targets of gas exploration in the near future: the deep water fan system in the central sag, the structural-stratigraphic traps in the uplifted areas on both sides of the main sag of Baiyun, a series of large structural traps on the fault terrace to the southwest of the main sag, and the ultradeep frontiers in sags such as Liwan to the south of the main sag.

Lin Heming; Shi Hesheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems and Regulated Flows in Kootenai and Yakima Sub-Basins : Volume I Kootenai River (Overview, Report and Appendices).  

SciTech Connect

Riparian vegetation and especially cottonwood and willow plant communities are dependent on normative flows and especially, spring freshette, to provide conditions for recruitment. These plant communities therefore share much in common with a range of fish species that require natural flow conditions to stimulate reproduction. We applied tools and techniques developed in other areas to assess riparian vegetation in two very different sub-basins within the Columbia Basin. Our objectives were to: Document the historic impact of human activity on alluvial floodplain areas in both sub-basins; Provide an analysis of the impacts of flow regulation on riparian vegetation in two systems with very different flow regulation systems; Demonstrate that altered spring flows will, in fact, result in recruitment to cottonwood stands, given other land uses impacts on each river and the limitations imposed by other flow requirements; and Assess the applicability of remote sensing tools for documenting the distribution and health of cottonwood stands and riparian vegetation that can be used in other sub-basins.

Jamieson, Bob; Braatne, Jeffrey H.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Annual Report on Resident Fish Activities, 1986 Fiscal Year, Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program, Action Item 41.8.  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the status of resident fish projects currently funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program) established pursuant to the Northwest Power Act (P.L. 96-501). The report provides a brief synopsis, review and discussion of 13 resident fish projects funded during September 1985 to May 1986. The resident fish section of the Program addresses measures which are intended to protect resident fish, mitigate fishery losses caused by hydroelectric projects, and compensate for past losses through enhancement measures. These measures include, but are not limited to: flow requirements, drawdown requirements, temperature control, and streambed protection.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Comparative Water Law and Management: The Yellow River Basin In Western China and the State of Kansas In the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@BCL@A8059DC2.DOC (DO NOT DELETE) 8/17/2009 7:50 AM 428 COMPARATIVE WATER LAW AND MANAGEMENT: THE YELLOW RIVER BASIN IN WESTERN CHINA AND THE STATE OF KANSAS IN THE WESTERN UNITED STATES Burke W. Griggs Counsel, Division of Water Resources... Kansas Department of Agriculture John C. Peck Professor of Law, University of Kansas School of Law Special Counsel, Foulston Siefkin, LLP Xue Yunpeng Deputy Division Chief / Senior Engineer Department of Water Resources Management and Regulation Yellow...

Griggs, Burke W.; Peck, John C.; Yupeng, Xue

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Facies, stratigraphic architecture, and lake evolution of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Eastern Uinta Basin, Utah.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lacustrine basin systems have historically been valued for their abundant conventional oil and gas reserves, but they also contain a vast potential for unconventional petroleum (more)

Rosenberg, Morgan Joshua

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin Project management. Technical quarterly progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report summarizes accomplishments for the Project examining hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Among the many research areas summarized are the following: assessment of mechanisms of metal-induced reproductive toxicity in aquatic species as a biomarker of exposure; hazardous wastes in aquatic environment;ecological sentinels of aquatic contamination in the lower Mississippi River System; remediation of selected contaminants; rapid on-site immunassay for heavy metal contamination; molecular mechanisms of developmental toxicity induced by retinoids and retinoid-like molecules; resuseable synthetic membranes for the removal of aromatic and halogenated organic pollutants from waste water; Effects of steroid receptor activation in neurendocrine cell of the mammalian hypothalamus; modeling and assessment of environmental quality of louisiana bayous and swamps; enhancement of environmental education. The report also contains a summary of publications resulting from this project and an appendix with analytical core protocals and target compounds and metals.

McLachlan, J.; Ide, C.F.; O`Connor, S.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Evaluation of the Life History of Native Salmonids in the Malheur River Basin; Cooperative Bull Trout/Redband Trout Research Project, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Malheur River is a 306-kilometer tributary to the Snake River, which drains 12,950 square kilometers. The Malheur River originates in the Blue Mountains and flows into the Snake River near Ontario, Oregon. The climate of the basin is characterized by hot dry summers, occasionally exceeding 38 C, and cold winters that may drop below -29 C. Average annual precipitation is 30 centimeters in the lower reaches. Wooded areas consist primarily of mixed fir and pine forest in the higher elevations. Sagebrush and grass communities dominate the flora in the lower elevations. Efforts to document salmonid life histories, water quality, and habitat conditions have continued in fiscal year 2002. Bull trout Salvelinus confluentus are considered to be cold water species and are temperature-dependant. Due to the interest of bull trout from various state and Federal agencies, a workgroup was formed to develop project objectives related to bull trout. Table 1 lists individuals that participated in the 2002 work group. This report will reflect work completed during the Bonneville Power Administration contract period starting April 1, 2002, and ending March 31, 2003. All tasks were conducted within this timeframe, and a more detailed timeframe may be referred to in each individual report.

Miller, Alan; Soupir, Jim (US Forest Service, Prairie City Ranger District, Prairie City, OR); Schwabe, Lawrence (Burns Paiute Tribe, Department of Fish and Wildlife, Burns, OR)

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Assessment of boreal forest historical C dynamics in Yukon River Basin: relative roles of warming and fire regime change  

SciTech Connect

Carbon (C) dynamics of boreal forest ecosystems have substantial implications for efforts to mitigate the rise of atmospheric CO2 and may be substantially influenced by warming and changing wildfire regimes. In this study we applied a large-scale ecosystem model that included dynamics of organic soil horizons and soil organic matter characteristics of multiple pools to assess forest C stock changes of the Yukon River Basin (YRB) in Alaska, USA, and Canada from 1960 through 2006, a period characterized by substantial climate warming and increases in wildfire. The model was calibrated for major forests with data from long-term research sites and evaluated using a forest inventory database. The regional assessment indicates that forest vegetation C storage increased by 46 Tg C, but that total soil C storage did not change appreciably during this period. However, further analysis suggests that C has been continuously lost from the mineral soil horizon since warming began in the 1970s, but has increased in the amorphous organic soil horizon. Based on a factorial experiment, soil C stocks would have increased by 158 Tg C if the YRB had not undergone warming and changes in fire regime. The analysis also identified that warming and changes in fire regime were approximately equivalent in their effects on soil C storage, and interactions between these two suggests that the loss of organic horizon thickness associated with increases in wildfire made deeper soil C stocks more vulnerable to loss via decomposition. Subbasin analyses indicate that C stock changes were primarily sensitive to the fraction of burned forest area within each subbasin and that boreal forest ecosystems in the YRB are currently transitioning from being sinks to sources at ;0.7% annual area burned. We conclude that it is important for international mitigation efforts focused on controlling atmospheric CO2 to consider how climate warming and changes in fire regime may concurrently affect the CO2 sink strength of boreal forests. It is also important for large-scale biogeochemical and earth system models to include organic soil dynamics in applications to assess regional C dynamics of boreal forests responding to warming and changes in fire regime.

Yuan, Fengming [ORNL; Yi, Shuhua [Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, CAS; McGuire, A. David [University of Alaska; Johnson, Kristopher D [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Liang, Jingjing [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Harden, Jennifer [USGS, Menlo Park, CA; Kasischke, Eric S. [University of Maryland, College Park; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS < 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS < PAGE 1 2013 Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS Basin Fish and Wildlife Program Costs Report 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS #12;PAGE 2 > 13TH ANNUAL REPORT TO THE NORTHWEST GOVERNORS > FISH & WILDLIFE COSTS 851 S.W. SIXTH AVENUE, SUITE

266

R Reactor seepage basins soil moisture and resistivity field investigation using cone penetrometer technology, Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this report is the summer 1999 investigation of the shallow groundwater system using cone penetrometer technology characterization methods to determine if the water table is perched beneath the R Reactor Seepage Basins (RRSBs).

Harris, M.K.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

267

Perspective: Towards environmentally acceptable criteria for downstream fish passage through mini hydro and irrigation infrastructure in the Lower Mekong River Basin  

SciTech Connect

Tropical rivers have high annual discharges optimal for hydropower and irrigation development. The Mekong River is one of the largest tropical river systems, supporting a unique mega-diverse fish community. Fish are an important commodity in the Mekong, contributing a large proportion of calcium, protein, and essential nutrients to the diet of the local people and providing a critical source of income for rural households. Many of these fish migrate not only upstream and downstream within main-channel habitats but also laterally into highly productive floodplain habitat to both feed and spawn. Most work to date has focused on providing for upstream fish passage, but downstream movement is an equally important process to protect. Expansion of hydropower and irrigation weirs can disrupt downstream migrations and it is important to ensure that passage through regulators or mini hydro systems is not harmful or fatal. Many new infrastructure projects (<6?m head) are proposed for the thousands of tributary streams throughout the Lower Mekong Basin and it is important that designs incorporate the best available science to protect downstream migrants. Recent advances in technology have provided new techniques which could be applied to Mekong fish species to obtain design criteria that can facilitate safe downstream passage. Obtaining and applying this knowledge to new infrastructure projects is essential in order to produce outcomes that are more favorable to local ecosystems and fisheries.

Baumgartner, Lee J.; Deng, Zhiqun; Thorncraft, Garry; Boys, Craig A.; Brown, Richard S.; Singhanouvong, Douangkham; Phonekhampeng, Oudom

2014-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

268

Pre-and post-Missoula flood geomorphology of the Pre-Holocene ancestral Columbia River Valley in the Portland forearc basin, Oregon and Washington, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geomorphic landscape development in the pre-Holocene ancestral Columbia River Valley (15km width) in the Portland forearc basin (~50km length) is established from depositional sequences, which pre-date and post-date the glacial Lake Missoula floods. The sequences are observed from selected borehole logs (150 in number) and intact terrace soil profiles (56 in number) in backhoe trenches. Four sequences are widespread, including (1) a vertically aggraded Pleistocene alluvial plain, (2) a steep sided valley that is incised (125150m) into the Pleistocene gravel plain, (3) Missoula flood terraces (1913ka) abandoned on the sides of the ancestral valley, and (4) Holocene flooding surfaces (118ka) buried at 7030m depth in the axial Columbia River Valley. Weathering rims and cementation are used for relative dating of incised Pleistocene gravel units. Soil development on the abandoned Missoula flood terraces is directly related to terrace deposit lithology, including thin Bw horizons in gravel, irregular podzols in sand, and multiple Bw horizons in thicker loess-capping layers. Radiocarbon dating of sand and mud alluvium in the submerged axial valley ties Holocene flooding surfaces to a local sea level curve and establishes Holocene sedimentation rates of 1.5cmyear?1 during 119ka and 0.3cmyear?1 during 90ka. The sequences of Pleistocene gravel aggradation, river valley incision, cataclysmic Missoula flooding, and Holocene submergence yield complex geomorphic landscapes in the ancestral lower Columbia River Valley.

Curt D. Peterson; Rick Minor; Gary L. Peterson; Edward B. Gates

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Report on the Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Program Evaluation for the Columbia River Basin Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results for year seventeen in the basin-wide Experimental Northern Pikeminnow Management Program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis) in the Columbia and Snake Rivers. This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991 - a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trap nets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Report C of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed in Report C. Program cooperators include the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC), Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), and Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the U. S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal Damage Unit as a contractor to test Dam Angling. The PSMFC was responsible for coordination and administration of the program; PSMFC subcontracted various tasks and activities to ODFW and WDFW based on the expertise each brought to the tasks involved in implementing the program and dam angling to the USDA.

Porter, Russell [Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission].

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

Sulfur and ash in Paleocene Wyodak-Anderson coal in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana: A fuel source beyond 2000  

SciTech Connect

When coal-fired power plants are required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to meet more stringent sulfur emission standards (0.6 pound per million Btu) after the year 2000, most of the clean and compliant coals will come from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. In 1996 more than 300 million short toms of these clean and compliant coals were produced from the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plans region. This is more than 30% of the total US coal production of 1.03 billion short tons in 1996. Future demand for clean and compliant coals can probably be met through production of more F or Union coals in the region. It is projected by the Energy Information Agency (1996) that most of the low-sulfur and low-ash coals in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region will be produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin. To date, coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone, containing 0.5% sulfur, 1.2 lb SO{sub 2} per million btu, and 6% ash (mean values on an as-received basis) meet current EPA regulatory compliance. This coal bed/zone alone produced 262 million short toms of >26% of the total US coal production in 1996. Based on the current consumption rates of coal and a forecast by the EIA (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coals are projected to produce an additional 153 million short tons a year by the year 2016. At this rate of production, high quality Wyodak-Anderson coals may be adequate to fill future energy needs.

Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Bader, L.R.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Sulfur and ash in paleocene Wyodak-Anderson coal in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana: A fuel source beyond 2000  

SciTech Connect

When coal-fired power plants are required by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to meet more stringent sulfur emission standards (0.6 pound per million Btu) after the year 2000, most of the clean and compliant coals will come from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana. In 1996 more than 300 million short tons of these clean and compliant coals were produced from the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region. This is more than 30 percent of the total US coal production of 1.03 billion short tons in 1996. Future demand for clean and compliant coals can probably be met through production of more Fort Union coals in the region. It is projected by the Energy Information Agency (1996) that most of the low-sulfur and low-ash coals in the northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region will be produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation in the Powder River Basin. To date, coal produced from the Wyodak-Anderson coal bed/zone, containing 0.5 percent sulfur, 1.2 lb SO{sub 2} per million btu, and 6 percent ash (mean values on an as-received basis) meet current EPA regulatory compliance. This coal bed/zone alone produced 262 million short tons or >26 percent of the total U.S. coal production in 1996. Based on the current consumption rates of coal and a forecast by the EIA (1996), the Wyodak-Anderson coals are projected to produce an additional 153 million short tons a year by the year 2016. At this rate of production, high quality Wyodak-Anderson coals may be adequate to fill our future energy needs.

Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.; Bader, L.R. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Environmental sensor networks and continuous data quality assurance to manage salinity within a highly regulated river basin  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a new approach to environmental decision support for salinity management in the San Joaquin Basin of California that focuses on web-based data sharing using YSI Econet technology and continuous data quality management using a novel software tool, Aquarius.

Quinn, N.W.T.; Ortega, R.; Holm, L.

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

273

Pilot-scale study of the effect of selective catalytic reduction catalyst on mercury speciation in Illinois and Powder River Basin coal combustion flue gases  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to investigate the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst on mercury (Hg) speciation in bituminous and subbituminous coal combustion flue gases. Three different Illinois Basin bituminous coals (from high to low sulfur (S) and chlorine (Cl)) and one Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal with very low S and very low Cl were tested in a pilot-scale combustor equipped with an SCR reactor for controlling nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions. The SCR catalyst induced high oxidation of elemental Hg (Hg{sup 0}), decreasing the percentage of Hg{sup 0} at the outlet of the SCR to values <12% for the three Illinois coal tests. The PRB coal test indicated a low oxidation of Hg{sup 0} by the SCR catalyst, with the percentage of Hg{sup 0} decreasing from {approximately} 96% at the inlet of the reactor to {approximately} 80% at the outlet. The low Cl content of the PRB coal and corresponding low level of available flue gas Cl species were believed to be responsible for low SCR Hg oxidation for this coal type. The test results indicated a strong effect of coal type on the extent of Hg oxidation. 16 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Lee, C.W.; Srivastava, R.K.; Ghorishi, S.B.; Karwowski, J.; Hastings, T.H.; Hirschi, J.C. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Triangle Park, NC (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Juan Basin C e n t r a l A p p a l a c h i a n B a s i n Michigan Basin Greater Green River Basin Black Warrior Basin North Central Coal Region Arkoma Basin Denver Basin...

275

Escapement and Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2005-2006 Annual Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect

The objectives are: (1) Estimate number and distribution of spring Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha redds and spawners in the John Day River subbasin; and (2) Estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead. The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations, however, remain depressed relative to historic levels. Between the completion of the life history and natural escapement study in 1984 and the start of this project in 1998, spring Chinook spawning surveys did not provide adequate information to assess age structure, progeny-to-parent production values, smolt-to-adult survival (SAR), or natural spawning escapement. Further, only very limited information is available for steelhead life history, escapement, and productivity measures in the John Day subbasin. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival have also been implemented in the basin and are in need of effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed background information for developing context for project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts. To meet the data needs as index stocks, to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects, and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival, sufficient annual estimates of spawner escapement, age structure, SAR, egg-to-smolt survival, smolt-per-redd ratio, and freshwater habitat use are essential. We have begun to meet this need through spawning ground surveys initiated for spring Chinook salmon in 1998 and smolt PIT-tagging efforts initiated in 1999. Additional sampling and analyses to meet these goals include an estimate of smolt abundance and SAR rates, and an updated measure of the freshwater distribution of critical life stages. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the high level of emphasis the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Subbasin Summaries, NMFS, and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds have placed on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. By implementing the proposed program we have been able to address many of the goals for population status monitoring, such as defining areas currently used by spring Chinook for holding and spawning habitats and determining range expansion or contraction of summer rearing and spawning populations. The BiOp describes these goals as defining population growth rates (adult monitoring), detecting changes in those growth rates or relative abundance in a reasonable time (adult/juvenile monitoring), estimating juvenile abundance and survival rates (juvenile/smolt monitoring), and identifying stage-specific survival (adult-to-smolt, smolt-to-adult).

Schultz, Terra Lang; Wilson, Wayne H.; Ruzycki, James R. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

276

"1. Oahe","Hydroelectric","USCE-Missouri River District",714  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "1. Oahe","Hydroelectric","USCE-Missouri River District",714 "2. Big Bend","Hydroelectric","USCE-Missouri River District",520 "3. Big Stone","Coal","Otter Tail Power Co",476 "4. Fort Randall","Hydroelectric","USCE-Missouri River District",360 "5. Angus Anson","Gas","Northern States Power Co - Minnesota",338 "6. Buffalo Ridge II LLC","Other Renewables","Iberdrola Renewables Inc",210 "7. Groton Generating Station","Gas","Basin Electric Power Coop",169 "8. MinnDakota Wind LLC","Other Renewables","Iberdrola Renewables Inc",150

277

Rate of deformation in the Pasco Basin during the Miocene as determined by distribution of Columbia River basalt flows  

SciTech Connect

Detailed mapping of over 8000 square kilometers and logs from 20 core holes were used to determine the distribution and thickness of basalt flows and interbeds in the Pasco Basin. The data indicate the high-MgO Grande Ronde Basalt and Wanapum Basalt thicken from the northeast to the southwest. Deformation began in late Frenchman Springs time in the Saddle Mountains along a northwest-southeast trend and in Roza time along an east-west trend. By late Wanapum time, basalt flows were more restricted on the east side. Saddle Mountains Basalt flows spread out in the basin from narrow channels to the east. The Umatilla Member entered from the southeast and is confined to the south-central basin, while the Wilbur Creek, Asotin, Esquatzel, Pomona, and Elephant Mountain Members entered from the east and northeast. The distribution of these members is controlled by flow volume, boundaries of other flows, and developing ridges. The Wilbur Creek, Asotin, and Esquatzel flows exited from the basin in a channel along the northern margin of the Umatilla flow, while the Pomona and Elephant Mountain flows exited between Umtanum Ridge and Wallula Gap. The thickness of sedimentary interbeds and basalt flows indicated subsidence and/or uplift began in post-Grande Ronde time (14.5 million years before present) and continued through Saddle Mountains time (10.5 million years before present). Maximum subsidence occurred 40 kilometers (24 miles) north of Richland, Washington with an approximate rate of 25 meters (81 feet) per million years during the eruption of the basalt. Maximum uplift along the developing ridges was 70 meters (230 feet) per million years.

Reidel, S.P.; Ledgerwood, R.K.; Myers, C.W.; Jones, M.G.; Landon, R.D.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The influence of controlled floods on fine sediment storage in debris fan-affected canyons of the Colorado River basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Prior to the construction of large dams on the Green and Colorado Rivers, annual floods aggraded sandbars in lateral flow-recirculation eddies with fine sediment scoured from the bed and delivered from upstream. Flows greater than normal dam operations may be used to mimic this process in an attempt to increase time-averaged sandbar size. These controlled floods may rebuild sandbars, but sediment deficit conditions downstream from the dams restrict the frequency that controlled floods produce beneficial results. Here, we integrate complimentary, long-term monitoring data sets from the Colorado River in Marble and Grand Canyons downstream from Glen Canyon dam and the Green River in the Canyon of Lodore downstream from Flaming Gorge dam. Since the mid-1990s, several controlled floods have occurred in these canyon rivers. These controlled floods scour fine sediment from the bed and build sandbars in eddies, thus increasing channel relief. These changes are short-lived, however, as interflood dam operations erode sandbars within several months to years. Controlled flood response and interflood changes in bed elevation are more variable in Marble Canyon and Grand Canyon, likely reflecting more variable fine sediment supply and stronger transience in channel bed sediment storage. Despite these differences, neither system shows a trend in fine-sediment storage during the period in which controlled floods were monitored. These results demonstrate that controlled floods build eddy sandbars and increase channel relief for short interflood periods, and this response may be typical in other dam-influenced canyon rivers. The degree to which these features persist depends on the frequency of controlled floods, but careful consideration of sediment supply is necessary to avoid increasing the long-term sediment deficit.

Erich R. Mueller; Paul E. Grams; John C. Schmidt; Joseph E. Hazel Jr.; Jason S. Alexander; Matt Kaplinski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Root River Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name: Root River Energy LLC Place: Minnesota Zip: 55961 Sector: Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product: Minesota-based wind development company tasked with developing...

280

Predicting the rivers blue line for fish conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Basin (VRB), a tributary to the lower Colorado River that has been the poster child...rivers like the San Pedro River (also a Colorado River tributary in Arizona), citizen...reaches with zero flows (i.e., during floods) and hence colonize parts of the distant...

John L. Sabo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production  

SciTech Connect

Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal. Water-enhancement activities, consists of pumping 60 bbl of water/min into the coal seam during approximately 15 min. This is done to clean the well-bore and to enhance CBM production. Hydraulic fracturing is of concern because vertical hydraulic fracture growth could extend into adjacent formations and potentially result in excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. Analysis of the pressure-time records of the water-enhancement tests enabled us to determine the magnitude of the least principal stress (S{sub 3}) in the coal seams of 372 wells. These data reveal that because S{sub 3} switches between the minimum horizontal stress and the overburden at different locations, both vertical and horizontal hydraulic fracture growth is inferred to occur in the basin, depending on the exact location and coal layer. Relatively low water production is observed for wells with inferred horizontal fractures, whereas all of the wells associated with excessive water production are characterized by inferred vertical hydraulic fractures. The reason wells with exceptionally high water production show delays in gas production appears to be inefficient depressurization of the coal caused by water production from the formations outside the coal. To minimize CBM water production, we recommend that in areas of known vertical fracture propagation, the injection rate during the water-enhancement tests should be reduced to prevent the propagation of induced fractures into adjacent water-bearing formations.

Colmenares, L.B.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Increased Levels of Harvest and Habitat Law Enforcement and Public Awareness for Anadromous Salmonids and Resident Fish in the Columbia River Basin -- Demonstration Period, 1992--1994, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), US Department of Energy, as part of BPA`s program to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife affected by the development and operation of hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Illegal harvest and violation of habitat protection regulations are factors affecting the survival of many native species of anadromous and resident fish in the Columbia Basin.

NeSmith, Frank (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Boise, ID); Long, Mack (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Paks, Kalispell, MT); Matthews, Dayne (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Lateral Drilling and Completion Technologies for Shallow-Shelf Carbonates of the Red River and Ratcliffe Formations, Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

Luff Exploration Company (LEC) focused on involvement in technologies being developed utilizing horizontal drilling concepts to enhance oil- well productivity starting in 1992. Initial efforts were directed toward high-pressure lateral jetting techniques to be applied in existing vertical wells. After involvement in several failed field attempts with jetting technologies, emphasis shifted to application of emerging technologies for drilling short-radius laterals in existing wellbores and medium-radius technologies in new wells. These lateral drilling technologies were applied in the Mississippi Ratcliffe and Ordovician Red River formations at depths of 2590 to 2890 m (8500 to 9500 ft) in Richland Co., MT; Bowman Co., ND; and Harding Co., SD.

David Gibbons; Larry A. Carrell; Richard D. George

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Determining erodibility, critical shear stress, and allowable discharge estimates for cohesive channels: case study in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

The continuous discharge of coalbed natural gas-produced (CBNG-produced) water within ephemeral, cohesive channels in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming can result in significant erosion. A study was completed to investigate channel stability in an attempt to correlate cohesive soil properties to critical shear stress. An in situ jet device was used to determine critical shear stress (tau{sub c}) and erodibility (k{sub d}); cohesive soil properties were determined following ASTM procedures for 25 reaches. The study sites were comprised of erodible to moderately resistant clays with tau{sub c} ranging from 0.11 to 15.35 Pa and k{sub d} ranging from 0.27 to 2.38 cm{sup 3}/N s. A relationship between five cohesive soil characteristics and tau{sub c} was developed and presented for use in deriving tau{sub c} for similar sites. Allowable discharges for CBNG-produced water were also derived using tau{sub c} and the tractive force method. An increase in the allowable discharge was found for channels in which vegetation was maintained. The information from this case study is critical to the development of a conservative methodology to establish allowable discharges while minimizing flow-induced instability.

Thoman, R.W.; Niezgoda, S.L. [Lowham Engineering LLC, Lander, WY (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Letter to the Editor: Botnia Fray Bentos and the environment of Uruguay River basin. The reports of EcoMetrix-World Bank  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pollution load caused by Botnia Fray Bentos S.A., a Mega Kraft Mills with ECF bleaching, is analysed on the basis of two reports of EcoMetrix at the request of the International Finance Corporation, World Bank. The first report evaluates the first six months of mill operations, from November 2007 to April 2008. The second report covers the 12 months of 2008. Regardless of the opinions expressed by EcoMetrix, from the numerical values shown in the reports it is clear that Botnia has discharged huge quantities of dangerous pollutants into the Uruguay River and into the atmosphere. This pollution load, according to the background known, will cause serious and irreversible damage to the flora, fauna and health of the inhabitants of the basin within a few years. Since the findings of EcoMetrix are in contradiction to the logical analysis of the same values that the consultant presents, a detailed discussion of the criteria and limits (standard) used in the reports is unavoidable.

Elias Jorge Matta

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Prediction of reservoir properties using diagenetic analysis of a template unit: example from Upper Cretaceous sandstones in Powder River basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Depositional and postdepositional histories of the Parkman formation in the Powder River basin, Wyoming, were studied in detail and compared with other Upper Cretaceous lenticular sandstone units of the Teapot, Sussex, and Shannon sandstones. Petrographic analysis was done using light, cathodoluminescent, scanning, scanning transmission, and backscattered microscopic techniques. X-ray microanalysis was done using energy and wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy systems. The primary diagenetic events observed in these Upper Cretaceous sandstones include ductile-grain deformation and original porosity reduction; formation of authigenic chlorite, kaolinite, illite, and smectite; quartz overgrowths; formation of authigenic feldspar; alteration of feldspar; carbonate cementation; and pyrite and iron oxide precipitation. The major effects upon reservoir properties include: porosity and permeability reduction due to formation of authigenic clays, quartz, and carbonate cement; and early formation of chlorite coatings preventing complete destruction of porosity by quartz overgrowths. Diagenetic alternations appear to be strongly influenced by depositional facies and chemistries of original interstitial waters. However, sources for authigenic silica and clays were predominantly exogenic, although some authigenic minerals had endogenic sources such as feldspar alteration to clay minerals. Authigenic minerals that have exogenic sources appear to have precipitated from fluids generated during diagenesis of the surrounding mud rocks. For this reason, major diagenetic trends in these lenticular sandstones are similar. A diagenetic model developed from the results of analysis of the Parkman formation was successfully used to predict reservoir properties in the Teapot, Sussex, and Shannon sandstones.

Dogan, A.U.; Brenner, R.L.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

PNNL Study Helping Improve Wind Predictions | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study gathered massive amounts of wind data between November 2010 and November...

288

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2008-2009 Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia River Basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: The ratio of jack to adult male Chinook salmon were varied in experimental breeding populations to test the hypothesis that reproductive success of the two male phenotypes would vary with their relative frequency in the population. Adult Chinook salmon males nearly always obtained primary access to nesting females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Observed participation in spawning events and adult-to-fry reproductive success of jack and adult males was consistent with a negative frequency-dependent selection model. Overall, jack males sired an average of 21% of the offspring produced across a range of jack male frequencies. Implications of these and additional findings on Chinook salmon hatchery broodstock management will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. Expression levels of basic amino acid receptor (BAAR) mRNA in the olfactory epithelium increased dramatically during final maturation in both Stanley Basin and Okanogan River sockeye. These increases appeared to be independent of odor exposure history, rising significantly in both arginine-naive and arginine-exposed fish. However, sockeye exposed to arginine during smolting demonstrated a larger increase in BAAR mRNA than arginine-naive fish. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that odorant receptors sensitive to home stream waters may be upregulated at the time of the homing migration and may afford opportunities to exploit this system to experimentally characterize imprinting success and ultimately identify hatchery practices that will minimize straying of artificially produced salmonids. Additional analysis of Sockeye salmon imprinting and further implications of these findings will be presented in the FY 2009 Annual Report. Objective 3: Photoperiod at emergence and ration after ponding were varied in Yakima River spring Chinook salmon to test the hypothesis that seasonal timing of emergence and growth during early stages of development alter seasonal timing of smoltification and age of male maturation. Fish reared under conditions to advance fry emergence and accelerate growth had the greatest variation in seasonal timing of smolting (fall, spring and summer) and highest rates of early male maturation with most males maturing at age 1 (35-40%). In contrast, fish with delayed emergence and slow growth had the least variation in phenotypes with most fish smolting as yearlings in the spring and no age-1 male maturation. Growth (not emergence timing) altered rates of age-2 male maturation. Results of this study demonstrate that altering fry development, as is often done in hatcheries, can profoundly affect later life history transitions and the range of phenotypes within a spring Chinook salmon population. Additional work in the next funding period will determine if these rearing regimes affected other aspects of smolt quality, which may affect ultimate survival upon ocean entry.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

289

CedarCreekanticlineCedarCreekanticline Yellowstone River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Principal Aquifer Systems in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins, United States and Canada #12;Cover. Conceptual block diagram of groundwater flow in the Williston structural basin. #12;Conceptual Model of the Uppermost Principal Aquifer Systems in the Williston and Powder River Structural Basins

290

Bull Trout Population Assessment in the Columbia River Gorge : Annual Report 2000.  

SciTech Connect

We summarized existing knowledge regarding the known distribution of bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) across four sub-basins in the Columbia River Gorge in Washington. The Wind River, Little White Salmon River, White Salmon River, and the Klickitat River sub-basins were analyzed. Cold water is essential to the survival, spawning, and rearing of bull trout. We analyzed existing temperature data, installed Onset temperature loggers in the areas of the four sub-basins where data was not available, and determined that mean daily water temperatures were <15 C and appropriate for spawning and rearing of bull trout. We snorkel surveyed more than 74 km (46.25 mi.) of rivers and streams in the four sub-basins (13.8 km at night and 60.2 km during the day) and found that night snorkeling was superior to day snorkeling for locating bull trout. Surveys incorporated the Draft Interim Protocol for Determining Bull Trout Presence (Peterson et al. In Press). However, due to access and safety issues, we were unable to randomly select sample sites nor use block nets as recommended. Additionally, we also implemented the Bull Trout/Dolly Varden sampling methodology described in Bonar et al. (1997). No bull trout were found in the Wind River, Little White Salmon, or White Salmon River sub-basins. We found bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat drainage of the Klickitat River Sub-basin. Bull trout averaged 6.7 fish/100m{sup 2} in Trappers Creek, 2.6 fish/100m{sup 2} on Clearwater Creek, and 0.4 fish/100m{sup 2} in Little Muddy Creek. Bull trout was the only species of salmonid encountered in Trappers Creek and dominated in Clearwater Creek. Little Muddy Creek was the only creek where bull trout and introduced brook trout occurred together. We found bull trout only at night and typically in low flow regimes. A single fish, believed to be a bull trout x brook trout hybrid, was observed in the Little Muddy Creek. Additional surveys are needed in the West Fork Klickitat and mainstem Klickitat to determine the distribution of bull trout throughout the drainage and to determine the extent of hybridization with brook trout.

Byrne, Jim; McPeak, Ron

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT: HUMATE INJECTION AS AN ENHANCED ATTENUATION METHOD AT THE F-AREA SEEPAGE BASINS, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

A field test of a humate technology for uranium and I-129 remediation was conducted at the F-Area Field Research Site as part of the Attenuation-Based Remedies for the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) funded by the DOE Office of Soil and Groundwater Remediation. Previous studies have shown that humic acid sorbed to sediments strongly binds uranium at mildly acidic pH and potentially binds iodine-129 (I-129). Use of humate could be applicable for contaminant stabilization at a wide variety of DOE sites however pilot field-scale tests and optimization of this technology are required to move this technical approach from basic science to actual field deployment and regulatory acceptance. The groundwater plume at the F-Area Field Research Site contains a large number of contaminants, the most important from a risk perspective being strontium-90 (Sr-90), uranium isotopes, I-129, tritium, and nitrate. Groundwater remains acidic, with pH as low as 3.2 near the basins and increasing to the background pH of approximately 5at the plume fringes. The field test was conducted in monitoring well FOB 16D, which historically has shown low pH and elevated concentrations of Sr-90, uranium, I-129 and tritium. The field test included three months of baseline monitoring followed by injection of a potassium humate solution and approximately four and half months of post monitoring. Samples were collected and analyzed for numerous constituents but the focus was on attenuation of uranium, Sr-90, and I-129. This report provides background information, methodology, and preliminary field results for a humate field test. Results from the field monitoring show that most of the excess humate (i.e., humate that did not sorb to the sediments) has flushed through the surrounding formation. Furthermore, the data indicate that the test was successful in loading a band of sediment surrounding the injection point to a point where pH could return to near normal during the study timeframe. Future work will involve a final report, which will include data trends, correlations and interpretations of laboratory data.

Millings, M.

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

292

K-Basins.pub  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 AUDIT REPORT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES COMPLETION OF K BASINS MILESTONES APRIL 2002 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Completion of K Basins Milestones" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (Department) has been storing 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The fuel, used in support of Hanford's former mission, is currently stored in canisters that are kept in two enclosed water-filled pools known as the K Basins. The K Basins represent a significant risk to the environment due to their deteriorating condition. In fact, the K East Basin, which is near the Columbia River, has

293

DOE Science Showcase - Wind Power  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Science Showcase - Wind Power DOE Science Showcase - Wind Power Wind Powering America Wind Powering America is a nationwide initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program designed to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Wind Power Research Results in DOE Databases IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2, Energy Citations Database NREL Triples Previous Estimates of U.S. Wind Power Potential, Energy Citations Database Dynamic Models for Wind Turbines and Wind Power Plants, DOE Information Bridge 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling General Compression: A River of Wind, ScienceCinema, multimedia Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Data from the

294

Comparative Evaluation of Generalized River/Reservoir System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report reviews user-oriented generalized reservoir/river system models. The terms reservoir/river system, reservoir system, reservoir operation, or river basin management "model" or "modeling system" are used synonymously to refer to computer...

Wurbs, Ralph A.

295

For the Federal Columbia River Power System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

its products and services . BPA markets wholesale electrical power from 31 federal hydro projects in the Columbia River Basin, one nonfederal nuclear plant and several small...

296

Prairie Winds Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prairie Winds Wind Farm Prairie Winds Wind Farm Facility Prairie Winds Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Basin Electric Power Coop/Central Power Electric Coop Developer Basin Electric Power Coop/Central Power Electric Coop Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Power Coop/Central Power Electric Coop Location Near Minot ND Coordinates 48.022927°, -101.291435° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.022927,"lon":-101.291435,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

297

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2002 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results for year twelve in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow1 (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and damangling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system-wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale.

Porter, Russell G.; Winther, Eric C.; Fox, Lyle G.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Environmental restoration in the Atchafalaya Basin : boundaries and interventions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Atchafalaya River is a 135-mile long river in Louisiana. This makes it the largest distributary of the Mississippi. In this thesis, I will review the ways in which the Atchafalaya Basin is described as a complex system ...

Van Maasakkers, Mattijs J. (Mattijs Johannes)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

"Research to Improve the Efficacy of Captive Broodstock Programs and Advance Hatchery Reform Throughout the Columbia River Basin." [from the Abstract], 2007-2008 Annual Progress Report.  

SciTech Connect

This project was developed to conduct research to improve the efficacy of captive broodstock programs and advance hatchery reform throughout the Columbia river basin. The project has three objectives: (1) maintain adaptive life history characteristics in Chinook salmon, (2) improve imprinting in juvenile sockeye salmon, and (3) match wild phenotypes in Chinook and sockeye salmon reared in hatcheries. A summary of the results are as follows: Objective 1: Adult and jack Chinook salmon males were stocked into four replicate spawning channels at a constant density (N = 16 per breeding group), but different ratios, and were left to spawn naturally with a fixed number of females (N = 6 per breeding group). Adult males obtained primary access to females and were first to enter the nest at the time of spawning. Jack male spawning occurred primarily by establishing satellite positions downstream of the courting pair, and 'sneaking' into the nest at the time of spawning. Male dominance hierarchies were fairly stable and strongly correlated with the order of nest entry at the time of spawning. Spawning participation by jack and adult males is consistent with a negative frequency dependent selection model, which means that selection during spawning favors the rarer life history form. Results of DNA parentage assignments will be analyzed to estimate adult-to-fry fitness of each male. Objective 2: To determine the critical period(s) for imprinting for sockeye salmon, juvenile salmon were exposed to known odorants at key developmental stages. Molecular assessments of imprinting-induced changes in odorant receptor gene expression indicated that regulation of odorant expression is influenced by developmental status and odor exposure history. The results suggest that sockeye salmon are capable of imprinting to homing cues during the developmental periods that correspond to several of current release strategies employed as part of the Captive Broodstock program (specifically, planting eyed eggs, fall and smolt releases into the lake) appear to be appropriate for successful homing of sockeye in Redfish Lake. Also, our findings indicated that sockeye salmon were capable of olfactory imprinting at multiple life stages and over varying exposure durations. Fish exposed to odors just prior to smolting showed the strongest attraction to the imprinting odor arginine and this period corresponds to the period of highest plasma thyroxine levels and increased BAAR receptor mRNA in juveniles. Objective 3: Spring Chinook salmon were exposed to three different photoperiods and three feed rations at the button-up stage of development. Both photoperiod at emergence and ration post-ponding affected the number of males maturing at age one. Nearly 70% of the males in the early emergence and satiation fed group matured after the first year of rearing, while none of the fish reared on late emergence photoperiod (equivalent to emergence on May 1) matured during this time irrespective of ration treatment. Within the early emergence groups, reducing growth using ration (low or high) appeared to reduce the number of males maturing at age one from 70% to 40-50%. Maturation rates of fish that emerged in a photoperiod equivalent to mid-February (middle emergence) ranged from 10-25%. Together these data indicate that the seasonal timing of fry emergence and growth after ponding can alter life history patterns in spring Chinook salmon. The results imply that hatchery rearing practices that alter seasonal timing of fry emergence can have drastic effects on life history patterns in juvenile Chinook salmon. All three objectives are on-going and will result in recommendations (at the end of the FY 2009 performance period) to advance hatchery reforms in conventional and captive broodstock programs.

Berejikian, Barry A. [National Marine Fisheries Service

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

300

Wind stress forcing of the North Sea 'pole tide'  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......raising the elevation of the basin without a sea level gradient...piles up in the shallow German Bight and flows northwards along the...past both wind-forcing and a basin resonance have been examined...can only be the result of the basin response to westerly wind forcing......

William P. O?Connor; Benjamin Fong Chao; Dawei Zheng; Andrew Y. Au

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

3-D RESERVOIR AND STOCHASTIC FRACTURE NETWORK MODELING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY, CIRCLE RIDGE PHOSPHORIA/TENSLEEP RESERVOIR, WIND RIVER RESERVATION, ARAPAHO AND SHOSHONE TRIBES, WYOMING  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results made in fulfillment of contract DE-FG26-00BC15190, ''3-D Reservoir and Stochastic Fracture Network Modeling for Enhanced Oil Recovery, Circle Ridge Phosphoria/Tensleep Reservoir, Wind River Reservation, Arapaho and Shoshone Tribes, Wyoming''. The goal of this project is to improve the recovery of oil from the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations in Circle Ridge Oilfield, located on the Wind River Reservation in Wyoming, through an innovative integration of matrix characterization, structural reconstruction, and the characterization of the fracturing in the reservoir through the use of discrete fracture network models. Fields in which natural fractures dominate reservoir permeability, such as the Circle Ridge Field, often experience sub-optimal recovery when recovery processes are designed and implemented that do not take advantage of the fracture systems. For example, a conventional waterflood in a main structural block of the Field was implemented and later suspended due to unattractive results. It is estimated that somewhere less than 20% of the OOIP in the Circle Ridge Field have been recovered after more than 50 years' production. Marathon Oil Company identified the Circle Ridge Field as an attractive candidate for several advanced IOR processes that explicitly take advantage of the natural fracture system. These processes require knowledge of the distribution of matrix porosity, permeability and oil saturations; and understanding of where fracturing is likely to be well-developed or poorly developed; how the fracturing may compartmentalize the reservoir; and how smaller, relatively untested subthrust fault blocks may be connected to the main overthrust block. For this reason, the project focused on improving knowledge of the matrix properties, the fault block architecture and to develop a model that could be used to predict fracture intensity, orientation and fluid flow/connectivity properties. Knowledge of matrix properties was greatly extended by calibrating wireline logs from 113 wells with incomplete or older-vintage logging suites to wells with a full suite of modern logs. The model for the fault block architecture was derived by 3D palinspastic reconstruction. This involved field work to construct three new cross-sections at key areas in the Field; creation of horizon and fault surface maps from well penetrations and tops; and numerical modeling to derive the geometry, chronology, fault movement and folding history of the Field through a 3D restoration of the reservoir units to their original undeformed state. The methodology for predicting fracture intensity and orientation variations throughout the Field was accomplished by gathering outcrop and subsurface image log fracture data, and comparing it to the strain field produced by the various folding and faulting events determined through the 3D palinspastic reconstruction. It was found that the strains produced during the initial folding of the Tensleep and Phosphoria Formations corresponded well without both the orientations and relative fracture intensity measured in outcrop and in the subsurface. The results have led to a 15% to 20% increase in estimated matrix pore volume, and to the plan to drill two horizontal drain holes located and oriented based on the modeling results. Marathon Oil is also evaluating alternative tertiary recovery processes based on the quantitative 3D integrated reservoir model.

Paul La Pointe; Jan Hermanson; Robert Parney; Thorsten Eiben; Mike Dunleavy; Ken Steele; John Whitney; Darrell Eubanks; Roger Straub

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

302

Economic and Technical Feasibility Study of Utility-Scale Wind Generation for the New York Buffalo River and South Buffalo Brownfield Opportunity Areas  

SciTech Connect

Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic and technical feasibility of utilizing contaminated lands in the Buffalo, New York, area for utility-scale wind development is explored. The study found that there is available land, electrical infrastructure, wind resource, and local interest to support a commercial wind project; however, economies of scale and local electrical markets may need further investigation before significant investment is made into developing a wind project at the Buffalo Reuse Authority site.

Roberts, J. O.; Mosey, G.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Wind-Tunnel Simulation of Pedestrian-Level Wind in Los Angeles Bruce R. White  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind-Tunnel Simulation of Pedestrian-Level Wind in Los Angeles Bruce R. White University-level winds within the South Coast Air Basin, a 6,000-square mile area that includes Orange County, most of Los Angeles and Riverside Counties. Working with the city of Los Angeles officials guidelines for wind

White, Bruce

304

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) Scenic River Protection Policy, Minnesota Wild and Scenic Rivers Act (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Siting and Permitting

305

Impact of Water Resource Development on Coastal Erosion, Brazos River, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major dam and reservoir development within the Brazos River Basin is correlative with a significant decrease in the suspended sediment load of the river and with increased coastal erosion rates near the delta. A hydrologic analysis of the river...

Mathewson, C. C.; Minter, L. L.

306

Development of a System-Wide Predator Control Program: Stepwise Implementation of a Predation Index, Predator Control Fisheries, and Evaluation Plan in the Columbia River Basin; Northern Pikeminnow Management Program, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results for year ten in a basin-wide program to harvest northern pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus oregonensis). This program was started in an effort to reduce predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids during their emigration from natal streams to the ocean. Earlier work in the Columbia River Basin suggested predation by northern pikeminnow on juvenile salmonids might account for most of the 10-20% mortality juvenile salmonids experience in each of eight Columbia River and Snake River reservoirs. Modeling simulations based on work in John Day Reservoir from 1982 through 1988 indicated that, if predator-size northern pikeminnow were exploited at a 10-20% rate, the resulting restructuring of their population could reduce their predation on juvenile salmonids by 50%. To test this hypothesis, we implemented a sport-reward angling fishery and a commercial longline fishery in the John Day Pool in 1990. We also conducted an angling fishery in areas inaccessible to the public at four dams on the mainstem Columbia River and at Ice Harbor Dam on the Snake River. Based on the success of these limited efforts, we implemented three test fisheries on a system-wide scale in 1991--a tribal longline fishery above Bonneville Dam, a sport-reward fishery, and a dam-angling fishery. Low catch of target fish and high cost of implementation resulted in discontinuation of the tribal longline fishery. However, the sport-reward and dam-angling fisheries were continued in 1992 and 1993. In 1992, we investigated the feasibility of implementing a commercial longline fishery in the Columbia River below Bonneville Dam and found that implementation of this fishery was also infeasible. Estimates of combined annual exploitation rates resulting from the sport-reward and damangling fisheries remained at the low end of our target range of 10-20%. This suggested the need for additional effective harvest techniques. During 1991 and 1992, we developed and tested a modified (small-sized) Merwin trapnet. We found this floating trapnet to be very effective in catching northern pikeminnow at specific sites. Consequently, in 1993 we examined a system wide fishery using floating trapnets, but found this fishery to be ineffective at harvesting large numbers of northern pikeminnow on a system-wide scale. In 1994, we investigated the use of trapnets and gillnets at specific locations where concentrations of northern pikeminnow were known or suspected to occur during the spring season (i.e., March through early June). In addition, we initiated a concerted effort to increase public participation in the sport-reward fishery through a series of promotional and incentive activities. In 1995, 1996, and 1997, promotional activities and incentives were further improved based on the favorable response in 1994. Results of these efforts are subjects of this annual report under Section I, Implementation. Evaluation of the success of test fisheries in achieving our target goal of a 10-20% annual exploitation rate on northern pikeminnow is presented in Section II of this report. Overall program success in terms of altering the size and age composition of the northern pikeminnow population and in terms of potential reductions in loss of juvenile salmonids to northern pikeminnow predation is also discussed under Section II.

Porter, Russell G.; Glaser, Bryce G.; Amren, Jennifer

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Positive correlation between Li and Mg isotope ratios in the river waters of the Mackenzie Basin challenges the interpretation of apparent isotopic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geochemistry magnesium Mg isotopes lithium Li isotopes chemical weathering a b s t r a c t During chemical expressed as d26 Mg) show in excess of one per mil variability. Part of this variability is attributed covariation between lithium (7 Li/6 Li, expressed as d7 Li) and Mg isotope ratios in the river waters

Paytan, Adina

308

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Program < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources Rivers included in the Scenic Rivers System will be classified, designated and administered as Wild, Scenic, Pastoral, Recreational and Modified Recreational Rivers (Sections 4; (a) (1) of the Pennsylvania Scenic Rivers Act). Low dams are permitted on Modified Recreational Rivers, but are not

309

Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (Multiple States)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Ohio River Valley Water Sanitation Commission (ORSANCO), was established on June 30, 1948 to control and abate pollution in the Ohio River Basin. ORSANCO is an interstate commission...

310

NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

311

6, 839877, 2006 Mexico City basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emitters of air pollutants leading to negative health effects and environmental degradation. The rate altitude basin with air pollutant concentrations above the health limits most days of the year. A mesoscale-dimensional wind patterns in25 the basin and found that the sea-breeze transports the polluted air mass up the moun

Boyer, Edmond

312

PNE WIND USA II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PNE WIND USA II PNE WIND USA II 1 PNE Wind USA Tribal Energy Partnerships Cherokee & Chilocco Wind Parks Buchholz wind farm, Germany André De Rosa Managing Director Andre.DeRosa@PNEWind.com p. (312) 919-8042 Hot Springs NP M is s i s s i ppi M iss is s i pp i Mis si ss ip p i M ississippi M iss iss ippi M i ss i ss i pp i M is s issippi Missis sip pi M i s s is s ip p i Bonny State Park Bonny State Park Buffalo River State Park Buffalo River State Park Caprock Caprock Canyons Canyons State Park State Park Robbers Cave State Park Robbers Cave State Park Clinton State Park Clinton State Park Hillsdale State Park Hillsdale State Park Indian Cave State Park Indian Cave State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake of Lake of the Ozarks the Ozarks St Park St Park Little River State Park Little River State Park Palo Duro

313

Book Review: Radiological Conditions in the Dnieper River Basin: Assessment by an International Expert Team and Recommendations for an Action Plan  

SciTech Connect

This article is a book review of a report from the International Atomic Energy Agency that was prepared by a team of scientists from Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine as an assessment of radiological contamination of the Dnieper River, which flows through these three countries. The topics covered begin with radioactive sources (actual and potential) including areas affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, nuclear power plants along the river and its tributaries, uranium mining and ore processing, radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and non-power sources, such as medicine, industry, and research. The report continues with an assessment of human exposures to radiation from these sources. An additional area of consideration is radiological hot spots in the region. The report finishes with conclusions and recommendations to the regional governments for a strategic action plan and individual government national plans.

Napier, Bruce A.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Monitoring and Evaluation of Smolt Migration in the Columbia Basin : Volume XVIII: Survival and Transportation Effects of Migrating Snake River Wild Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates From 1996-2004 and Comparison to Hatchery Results. Draft.  

SciTech Connect

The combined juvenile and adult detection histories of PIT-tagged wild salmonids migrating through the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) were analyzed using the ROSTER (River-Ocean Survival and Transportation Effects Routine) statistical release-recapture model. This model, implemented by software Program ROSTER, was used to estimate survival on large temporal and spatial scales for PIT-tagged wild spring and summer Chinook salmon and steelhead released in the Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam from 1996 to 2004. In addition, annual results from wild salmonids were compared with results from hatchery salmonids, which were presented in a previous report in this series (Buchanan, R. A., Skalski, J. R., Lady, J. L., Westhagen, P., Griswold, J., and Smith, S. 2007, 'Survival and Transportation Effects for Migrating Snake River Hatchery Chinook Salmon and Steelhead: Historical Estimates from 1996-2003', Technical report, Bonneville Power Administration, Project 1991-051-00). These results are reported here. Annual estimates of the smolt-to-adult return ratio (SAR), juvenile inriver survival from Lower Granite to Bonneville, the ocean return probability from Bonneville to Bonneville, and adult upriver survival from Bonneville to Lower Granite are reported. Annual estimates of transport-inriver (T/I) ratios and differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) are reported on a dam-specific basis for release years with sufficient numbers of wild PIT-tagged smolts transported. Transportation effects are estimated only for dams where at least 1,000 tagged wild smolts were transported from a given upstream release group. Because few wild Chinook salmon and steelhead tagged upstream of Lower Granite Dam were transported before the 2003 release year, T/I and D were estimated only for the 2003 and 2004 release years. Performance measures include age-1-ocean adult returns for steelhead, but not for Chinook salmon. Spring and summer Chinook salmon release groups were pooled across the entire Snake River Basin upstream of Lower Granite Dam for this report. Annual estimates of SAR from Lower Granite back to Lower Granite averaged 0.92% with an estimated standard error (dSE) of 0.25% for wild spring and summer Chinook salmon for tagged groups released from 1996 through 2004, omitting age-1-ocean (jack) returns. Only for the 1999 and 2000 release years did the wild Chinook SAR approach the target value of 2%, identified by the NPCC as the minimum SAR necessary for recovery. Annual estimates of SAR for wild steelhead from the Snake River Basin averaged 0.63% (dSE = 0.15%), including age-1-ocean returns, for release years 1996 through 2004. For release years when the ocean return probability from Bonneville back to Bonneville could be estimated (i.e., 1999 through 2004), it was estimated that on average approximately 83% of the total integrated mortality for nontransported, tagged wild spring and summer Chinook, and 78% for steelhead (omitting the 2001 release year), occurred during the ocean life stage (i.e., from Bonneville to Bonneville). This suggests that additional monitoring and research efforts should include the ocean and estuary environment. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Lower Granite Dam were available for the 2003 and 2004 release years for both wild Chinook salmon and wild steelhead. The estimated T/I for Lower Granite was significantly > 1.0 for Chinook in 2004 (P < 0.0001) and for steelhead in both 2003 (P < 0.0001) and 2004 (P < 0.0001), indicating that for these release years, wild fish transported at Lower Granite returned there in higher proportions than fish that were returned to the river at Lower Granite, or that passed Lower Granite without detection as juveniles. Annual estimates of the dam-specific T/I for Little Goose Dam were available for wild Chinook salmon for both 2003 and 2004. The estimated T/I for Little Goose was significantly > 1.0 for wild Chinook in 2004 (P = 0.0024), but not in 2003 (P = 0.1554). Differential post-Bonneville mortality (D) is the ratio of pos

Buchanan, Rebecca A.; Skalski, John R.; Broms, Kristin

2008-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

Adjusted Streamflow and Storage 1928-1989 : with Listings of Historical Streamflow, Summation of Storage Change and Adjusted Streamflow : Columbia River and Coastal Basins.  

SciTech Connect

The development of irrigation projects since the 1830's and the construction of major dams and reservoirs since the early 1900's have altered substantially the natural streamflow regimen of the Columbia River and its tributaries. As development expanded a multipurpose approach to streamflow regulation evolved to provide flood control, irrigation, hydropower generation, navigation, recreation, water quality enhancement, fish and wildlife, and instream flow maintenance. The responsible agencies use computer programs to determine the effects of various alternative system regulations. This report describes the development of the streamflow data that these computer programs use.

A.G. Crook Company

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Energy - Water Nexus -- Meeting the Energy and Water Needs of the Snake/Columbia River Basin in the 21st CenturyScience and Technology SummitConference Results  

SciTech Connect

In June 2007, representatives from federal, state, and academic institutions met to discuss the role of innovative science, technology, and policy in meeting future energy and water demands in the Snake-Columbia River Basin. Conference members assessed the state-of-the-science, technology, and associated research to develop cost-effective and environmentally sound methodologies and technologies to maximize the production of energy and availability of water and to minimize the consumption of both water and energy in the Snake-Columbia River system. Information on all phases of science and technology development, theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, pilot tests, and field applications were relevant topics for discussion. An overview of current management needs was presented the first day. On the second day, five focus groups were created: ? Energy Generation and Use ? Water Allocation and Use ? Energy/Water Storage ? Environmental Considerations ? Social, Economic, Political, and Regulatory Considerations. Each group started with a list of status items and trends, and discussed the future challenges and research needed to reach four goals: ? Balance energy production and resource consumption ? Balance water availability and competing needs ? Balance water consumption/energy production and competing needs ? Balance environmental impacts and water use/energy production ? Balance costs and benefits of water use. The resulting initiatives were further broken down into three categories of importance: critical, important, and nice to do but could be delayed. Each initiative was assigned a number of dots to show a more refined ranking. The results of each focus group are given in the pages that follow. These results are intended to help local and regional researchers 1. Develop a technical strategy for developing cost-effective science and technology to predict, measure, monitor, purify, conserve, and store water and to maximize power generation, storage, and efficiency in the region 2. Evaluate methods and technologies for reducing the impacts of energy and water development and use on the environment.

Paul L. Wichlacz; Gerald Sehlke

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Prairie Winds ND I | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winds ND I Winds ND I Jump to: navigation, search Name Prairie Winds ND I Facility Prairie Winds ND I Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Basin Electric Developer Basin Electric Power Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Ward County ND Coordinates 48.022462°, -101.292365° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.022462,"lon":-101.292365,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

318

Integrated Hatchery Operations Team: Operations Plans for Anadromous Fish Production Facilities in the Columbia River Basin, Volume IV of IV; Washington: Rocky Reach Hatchery Addendum, 1992 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Rocky Reach Hatchery is located along the Columbia Paver, just downstream from Rocky Reach Dam. Site elevation is 800 feet above sea level. The Turtle Rock Island facility, located 2 miles upstream, is operated as a satellite facility (shared with the Washington Department of Wildlife). The facility is staffed with 2.75 FTE`S. The hatchery was originally designed as a mile-long spawning channel at Turtle Rock Island. Rearing units consist of eight vinyl raceways at Rocky Reach and four rearing ponds at Turtle Rock. Water rights are held by Chelan County PUD and total 3,613 gpm from the Columbia River. Water available for use in the Turtle Rock rearing ponds averages 12,000 gpm from the Columbia River. Rocky Reach Hatchery and the Turtle Rock satellite facility are owned by Chelan County PUD. They are operated as mitigation facilities for the fishery impacts caused by the construction and operation of Rocky Reach Dam. Rocky Reach Hatchery is used for incubation and early rearing of upriver bright (URB) fall chinook. Fingerlings are later transferred to the Turtle Rock facility for final rearing and release.

Peck, Larry

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Record of Decision/Remedial Alternative Selection for the Motor Shops Seepage Basin (716-A)  

SciTech Connect

This decision document presents the selected remedial alternative for the Motor Shops Seepage Basin located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

Palmer, E.

1999-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

320

Project Management Institute Highlights Savannah River Nuclear...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Site's H Canyon Work Ensures Future Missions for Facility Restoration of a 90-acre powerhouse ash basin at the Savannah River Site, pictured here, is under way as workers remove...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Wind derivatives: hedging wind risk:.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind derivatives are financial contracts that can be used to hedge or mitigate wind risk. In this thesis, the focus was on pricing these wind (more)

Hoyer, S.A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Coalbed methane production potential in U. S. basins  

SciTech Connect

The major emphasis of the U.S. DOE's coalbed methane research has been on estimating the magnitude of the resource and developing systems for recovery. Methane resource estimates for 16 basins show that the greatest potential is in the Piceance, Northern Appalachian, Central Appalachian, Powder River, and Greater Green River coal basins. Small, high-potential target areas have been selected for in-depth analysis of the resource. Industry interest is greatest in the Warrior, San Juan, Piceance, Raton Mesa, and Northern and Central Appalachian basins. Production curves for several coalbed methane wells in these basins are included.

Byer, C.W.; Mroz, T.H.; Covatch, G.L.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1: Hood River Fisheries Program 1: Hood River Fisheries Program EIS-0241: Hood River Fisheries Program SUMMARY This EIS evaluates a BPA proposal to protect and improve anadromous salmonid populations in the Hood River Basin. These actions are proposed in an attempt to mitigate the losses of fish and wildlife associated with the construction and operation of Federal hydro-power facilities in the Columbia River Basin. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 4, 2008 EIS-0241-SA-02: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project May 16, 2005 EIS-0241-SA-01: Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project, Hood River County, Oregon Supplement Analysis for the Hood River Fisheries Project

324

EIS-0374: Klondike III/ Bigelow Canyon Wind Integration Project, OR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to approve an interconnection requested by PPM Energy, Inc. (PPM) to integrate electrical power from their proposed Klondike III Wind roject (Wind Project) into the Federal Columbia River Transmission System (FCRTS).

325

Minot Wind 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Minot Wind 2 Minot Wind 2 Jump to: navigation, search Name Minot Wind 2 Facility Minot Wind 2 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Prairie Winds ND 1 Developer Basin Electric Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location South of Minot ND Coordinates 48.02516°, -101.290905° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.02516,"lon":-101.290905,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

326

DOE Names Two 2012 Wind Cooperatives of the Year | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The awardees were selected by a panel of experts from the wind industry, utilities, government, national laboratories, and cooperatives. East River Electric Power Cooperative of...

327

Environmental aspects of coal production in the Applachian Region. Progress report, June 1, 1979-May 31, 1980. [New River Basin, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The overall project focus is on damage agent flow resulting from strip mining. Attention has focused on (1) field work related to quantifying sediment yield from control plots that have been reclaimed back to contour including surface runoff water quality; (2) continued measurement of water quality in six primary watersheds, 5 mined and 1 control, to follow the long term behavior of changes in water quality that results from mining activity; (3) continued measurement of biological changes that result from mining activity, the time required for recovery and the nature of recovery, i.e., changes in post mining community structure; and (4) application of simulation models for stream hydrographs, sediment detention basins and hydrologic assessments. Although field study plots had a uniform heavy grass and conformed to current state and federal reclamation standards, suspended sediment concentrations leaving the site consistently exceeded federal and state allowable concentration during all storms. Water quality changes that occur very soon after mining commences in a watershed, that is elevated calcium, magnesium, iron, manganese and sulfate, do not return to premining levels even after 5 years. Mining disturbance produces long term water quality changes in dissolved constituents, even in alkaline systems, which may have an economic impact on downstream water users. The major impact of strip mining on water quality is the continued production of suspended sediment in drainage streams. Significant biological changes occur in watershed streams after surface mining is initiated and are strongly related to suspended sediment. Recovery is observed and seems related to type of mining practiced and condition of tributary stream. A mathematical model for simulating stormwater response and pollutant yield in strip mined watersheds was developed.

Minear, R.A.; Overton, D.E.; Vaughn, G.L.; Tschantz, B.A.

1980-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Lateral drilling and completion technologies for shallow-shelf carbonates of the Red River and Ratcliffe Formations, Williston Basin. Topical report, July 1997  

SciTech Connect

Luff Exploration Company (LEC) focused on involvement in technologies being developed utilizing horizontal drilling concepts to enhance oil-well productivity starting in 1992. Initial efforts were directed toward high-pressure lateral jetting techniques to be applied in existing vertical wells. After involvement in several failed field attempts with jetting technologies, emphasis shifted to application of emerging technologies for drilling short-radius lateral in existing wellbores and medium-radius technologies in new wells. These lateral drilling technologies were applied in the Mississippi Ratcliffe and Ordovician Red River formations at depths of 2,590 to 2,890 m in Richland County, MT; Bowman County, ND; and Harding County, SD. In theory, all of the horizontal drilling techniques explored in this project have merit for application fitting specific criteria. From a realistic point of view, the only relatively trouble-free, adequately-proven technology employed was the medium-radius steered motor/MWD technology. The slim-tool steered motor/MWD re-entry technology has been used extensively but appears to still be significantly in developmental stages. This technology will probably always be more troublesome than the technology used to drill new wells because the smaller diameter required for the tools contributes to both design and operational complexities. Although limited mechanical success has been achieved with some of the lateral jetting technologies and the Amoco tools, their predictability and reliability is unproven. Additionally, they appear to be limited to shallow depths and certain rock types. The Amoco technology probably has the most potential to be successfully developed for routinely reliable, field applications. A comparison of the various horizontal drilling technologies investigated is presented.

Carrell, L.A.; George, R.D.; Gibbons, D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

West Kent House Penge East Lower Sydenham Forest Hill Honor Oak Park Crofton Park Nunhead New CrossC BD A River Thames River Thames Waterloo & City Southwark Northwood Northwood Hills North Harrow Harrow- on-the-Hill Northwick Park Harrow & Wealdstone Headstone Lane Pinner Kenton Stanmore Canons Park

Delmotte, Nausicaa

330

River Thames River Thames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

River Thames River Thames Du Cane Road Wood Lane Wood Lane North Pole Road Barlby Road Highlever Street Acton Market Place Acton Horn Lane Wood Lane Du Cane Road Wood Lane South Africa Road White City for BBC Television Centre Wood Lane Ariel Way Wood Lane Shepherd's Bush Green Shepherd's Bush Green

331

Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Crowdfunding |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Crowdfunding Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Crowdfunding September 24, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis A wind turbine is installed at the Crow Lake Wind project, just east of Chamberlain, S.D. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power Cooperative A wind turbine is installed at the Crow Lake Wind project, just east of Chamberlain, S.D. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power Cooperative The Crow Lake Wind project is the largest cooperative-owned wind project in the United States. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power Cooperative The Crow Lake Wind project is the largest cooperative-owned wind project in the United States. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power

332

Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Crowdfunding |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Crowdfunding Want to Finance a Wind Farm Project in Your Community? Try Crowdfunding September 24, 2013 - 10:12am Addthis A wind turbine is installed at the Crow Lake Wind project, just east of Chamberlain, S.D. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power Cooperative A wind turbine is installed at the Crow Lake Wind project, just east of Chamberlain, S.D. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power Cooperative The Crow Lake Wind project is the largest cooperative-owned wind project in the United States. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power Cooperative The Crow Lake Wind project is the largest cooperative-owned wind project in the United States. | Photo Courtesy of East River Electric Power

333

EA-1173: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplemental  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon 3: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplemental Program (Preliminary), Oregon EA-1173: Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplemental Program (Preliminary), Oregon SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy Bonneville Power Administration's proposal to fund a program designed to prevent the extinction and begin the recovery of spring Chinook salmon stocks in the Grande Ronde River Basin in the Upper Grande Ronde River, Lostine River, and Catherine Creek in Northeastern Oregon. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 18, 2003 EA-1173-SA-01: Supplement Analysis Grande Ronde Basin Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program

334

FRASER BASIN LANDFILL INVENTORY DOE FRAP 1997-19  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-term sustainability of the Fraser River Basin. Inventories of point and non-point sources of pollution from both's WASTE database, Federal Indian Band Landfill investigations, and BC Environment's Municipal Landfill

335

Recovery Act Workers Complete Environmental Cleanup of Coal Ash Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Savannah River Site (SRS) recently cleaned up a 17-acre basin containing coal ash residues from Cold War operations. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project was safely completed at a...

336

Williston basin Seislog study  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of Seislog (trade name) processing and interpretation of an east-west line in the North Dakota region of the Williston basin. Seislog processing involves inversion of the seismic trace data to produce a set of synthetic sonic logs. These resulting traces, which incorporate low-frequency velocity information, are displayed in terms of depth and isotransit times. These values are contoured and colored, based on a standard stratigraphic color scheme. The section studied is located just north of a dual producing oil pool from zones in the Ordovician Red River and Devonian Duperow Formations. A sonic log from the Long Creek 1 discovery well was digitized and filtered to match the frequency content of the original seismic data. This allows direct comparison between units in the well and the pseudosonic log (Seislog) trace nearest the well. Porosity development and lithologic units within the lower Paleozoic stratigraphic section can be correlated readily between the well and Seislog traces. Anomalous velocity zones within the Duperow and Red River Formations can be observed and correlated to producing intervals in the nearby wells. These results emphasize the importance of displaying inversion products that incorporate low-frequency data in the search for hydrocarbons in the Williston basin. The accumulations in this region are local in extent and are difficult to pinpoint by using conventional seismic data or displays. Seislog processing and displays provide a tested method for identification and delineation of interval velocity anomalies in the Red River and Duperow stratigraphic sections. These techniques can significantly reduce risks in both exploration and delineation drilling of these types of targets.

Mummery, R.C.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Bosque River Environmental Infrastructure Improvement Plan: Phase II BMP Modeling Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Bosque River Watershed is located in the Brazos River Basin in central Texas and is facing a suite of water quality issues resulting in sediment, nutrient and bacteria loading. These loadings are potentially derived from improperly managed...

Tuppad, Pushpa; Srinivasan, Raghavan

338

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WIND ENERGY Wind Energ. (2014) Published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary Correspondence M. Wächter, ForWind-Center for Wind Energy Research, Institute of Physics, Carl Von Ossietzky on the operation of wind energy converters (WECs) imposing different risks especially in terms of highly dynamic

Peinke, Joachim

339

Wind-wave modelling aspects within complicate topography S. Christopoulos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind-wave modelling aspects within complicate topography S. Christopoulos Division of Hydraulics, are investigated through an intercomparison study. The efficiency of the available wind models (ECMWF, UKMO) to reproduce wind patterns over special basins, as well as three wave models incorporating different physics

Boyer, Edmond

340

wind energy  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

5%2A en Pantex to Become Wind Energy Research Center http:nnsa.energy.govfieldofficesnponpopressreleasespantex-become-wind-energy-research-center

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

North Dakota Wind I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

I Wind Farm I Wind Farm Facility North Dakota Wind I Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Edgeley/Kulm ND Coordinates 46.319182°, -98.890818° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.319182,"lon":-98.890818,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

342

Caney River | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River River Jump to: navigation, search Name Caney River Facility Caney River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Enel Green Power North America Inc. Developer Tradewind Energy LLC Energy Purchaser Tennessee Valley Authority Location Elk County KS Coordinates 37.448424°, -96.425027° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.448424,"lon":-96.425027,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

343

Marble River | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River River Jump to: navigation, search Name Marble River Facility Marble River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner EDP Renewables North America LLC Developer EDP Renewables North America LLC Energy Purchaser Merchant Location Churubusco NY Coordinates 44.9406848°, -73.9303307° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.9406848,"lon":-73.9303307,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

344

The Colorado River and its tributaries have undergone drastic alterations from their nat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Colorado River and its tributaries have undergone drastic alterations from their nat ural basin (Figure), the Colorado River has been changed from its natural state perhaps as much as any river laden with silt and chemical pollutants. The Gila River of Arizona, one of the Colorado's largest

345

The Need for Ichthyological Surveys of the Major Rivers of Western North America  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...system, is restricted to Klamath Lake, along with close...5 Now extinct in the Klamath basin. 6 Perhaps introduced...constitutes the only group of spined minnows in...Columatilla Whitley therefore falls as a synonym of Columbia...River Sacramento River Klamath River Columbia River...

Robert R. Miller

1946-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

346

GUNNISON BASIN CLIMATE CHANGE VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change is already changing ecosystems and affecting people in the southwestern United States, as well as ecosystem services, e.g., water supply. The climate of the Gunnison Basin, Colorado Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest Service, Upper Gunnison River Water Conservancy District, Western

Neff, Jason

347

Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FUPWG Meeting FUPWG Meeting NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Robi Robichaud November 18, 2009 Topics Introduction Review of the Current Wind Market Drivers for Wind Development Siting g Issues Wind Resource Assessment Wind Characteristics Wind Power Potential Basic Wind Turbine Theory Basic Wind Turbine Theory Types of Wind Turbines Facts About Wind Siting Facts About Wind Siting Wind Performance 1. United States: MW 1 9 8 2 1 9 8 3 1 9 8 4 1 9 8 5 1 9 8 6 1 9 8 7 1 9 8 8 1 9 8 9 1 9 9 0 1 9 9 1 1 9 9 2 1 9 9 3 1 9 9 4 1 9 9 5 1 9 9 6 1 9 9 7 1 9 9 8 1 9 9 9 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 2 0 0 2 2 0 0 3 2 0 0 4 2 0 0 5 2 0 0 6 2 0 0 7 2 0 0 8 Current Status of the Wind Industry Total Global Installed Wind Capacity Total Global Installed Wind Capacity Total Global Installed Wind Capacity

348

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power Act. The Council's bylaws, which include its organizational structure, practices, and procedures.......................................................................... 10 Energy efficiency................................................................................. 13 Energy efficiency funding

349

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) of the Northwest Power Act. The Council's bylaws, which include its organizational structure, practices................................................... 7 Energy Efficiency met most of the new electricity demand in 2010 and 2011 .................... 7

350

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) of the Northwest Power Act. The Council's bylaws, which include its organizational structure, practices............................................................................................................. 9 Proving new energy-efficiency technologies.......................................................................... 9 Television energy efficiency

351

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Section 4(h)(12)(A) of the Northwest Power Act. The Council's bylaws, which include its organizational first-year energy-efficiency goals in the Plan, which challenges the Northwest to meet most of the new demand for electricity over the 20-year horizon of the Plan with energy efficiency improvements

352

EIS-0169: Yakima River Basin Fisheries Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS assesses the potential impacts of the Bangor Hydro-electric Tranmission Line and associated infrastructure, including adding an alternative acclimation site, water rights issues and discussion of irrigation water availability, adding more information on recreation impacts, and clarifying agency roles and responsibilities.

353

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

............................................................................................................................ 8 Energy Efficiency Achievements States House of Representatives and Committee on Natural Resources United States House of Representatives

354

Resistivity sections, Upper Arkansas River Basin, Colorado |...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conservancy District, and the Colorado Division of Water Resources, Colorado State Engineer. As part of the investigation, surface geophysical electrical resistivity surveys...

355

The Columbia River System Inside Story  

SciTech Connect

The Columbia River is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Pacific Northwestfrom fostering world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying clean natural fuel for 50 to 65 percent of the regions electrical generation. Since early in the 20th century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system.

none,

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program River Falls Municipal Utilities - Renewable Energy Finance Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Other Buying & Making Electricity Solar Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Wind Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type PACE Financing Provider River Falls Municipal Utilities River Falls Municipal Utilities (RFMU) offers loans of $2,500 - $50,000 to its residential customers for the installation of photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, geothermal, wind electric systems. The program will also support the installation of energy efficiency measures in connection with a qualifying renewable energy project, provided that the renewable energy

357

Sediment Basin Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sediment Basin Flume Sediment Basin Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sediment Basin Flume Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 22.7 Beam(m) 5.1 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Two pumps provide up to 18 cfs of flow capacity Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Available Sensors Acoustics, Flow, Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability Real-Time Yes Test Services Test Services Yes On-Site fabrication capability/equipment Machine shop, carpenter shop, welding shop, instrumentation and electronics shop

358

A Fresh Perspective for Managing Water in California: Insights from Applying the European Water Framework Directive to the Russian River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environmental and economic impacts associated with water managementfor environmental, water resources, and economic managementRiver basin water management, by establishing environmental

Grantham, Ted; Christian-Smith, Juliet; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Scheuer, Stefan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Managing hydroclimatic risks in federal rivers: a diagnostic assessment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...including flood plain forest death, salinization, thermal pollution, acidification, invasion of exotic species...character. 9 For example, in the Nile river basin, South Sudan, Sudan and Ethiopia are federal countries whose internal...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Behavior of selected hydrochemical indicators of the Euphrates River, Iraq  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Euphrates is the longest river in western Asia, and it extends into three riparian countries, i.e., Turkey, Syria, and Iraq. The total basin area is about 400...2...in these countries. It is the prime source for ...

Sawsan M. Ali

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Wind Farm  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The wind farm in Greensburg, Kansas, was completed in spring 2010, and consists of ten 1.25 megawatt (MW) wind turbines that supply enough electricity to power every house, business, and municipal...

362

Wind Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Power As the accompanying map of New Mexico shows, the best wind power generation potential near WIPP is along the Delaware Mountain ridge line of the southern Guadalupe...

363

Wind Power  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For off-shore wind energy, it is not economically profitable to locate wind turbines in waters with depths larger than about 40m. For this reason, some floating turbine prototypes are being tested, which can be ...

Ricardo Guerrero-Lemus; Jos Manuel Martnez-Duart

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume II. Palo Duro basin  

SciTech Connect

This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and high variable precipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume I. Dalhart Basin  

SciTech Connect

This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and highly variable prcipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Stakeholder Engagement and Outreach: Wind Power on State Lands  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Power on State Lands Wind Power on State Lands Wind development can be an attractive revenue option for states that have viable wind resources on their trust lands. Wind can provide much higher revenue per acre than many other sources of typical revenue. An added benefit is that harvesting the wind does not deplete any finite resources. Several state land offices are already pursuing wind development on state trust lands. The first such wind project, in west Texas, is a joint project by the Texas General Land Office and the Lower Colorado River Authority, a public utility in central Texas. Wind Powering America Assistance to State Land Offices Analysis of State Land Potential NREL can assist state land offices in analyzing their trust lands for wind development potential. By overlaying wind resource maps with land use,

367

Wind energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...is approximately 4.5-6.01 for onshore wind farms. The price for offshore wind farms is estimated to be 50% higher. For comparison...visually intrusive. The visual impact of offshore wind farms quickly diminishes with distance and 10km...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Chinook winds.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of south-easterly winds, which blow over the...Ocean, from which the winds come, can at this season...freezing-point. The wind well known in the Alps as the foehn is another example of...result is complicated by local details; regions of...

George M. Dawson

1886-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

369

Field Mapping At Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Raft River Geothermal Area (1980) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Field Mapping Activity Date 1980 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Delineate the subsurface geology Notes The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. The Raft River geothermal system is a hot water convective system relying on deep circulation of meteoric water in a region of high geothermal gradients and open fractures near the base of the Tertiary basin fill. References Covington, H. R. (1 September 1980) Subsurface geology of the

370

Wind Power Partners '94 Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 Wind Farm 4 Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wind Power Partners '94 Wind Farm Facility Wind Power Partners '94 Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer Kenetech Wind Power Energy Purchaser Lower Colorado River Authority Location Culberson County TX Coordinates 31.3508°, -104.443° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.3508,"lon":-104.443,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

Wind Energy Center Edgeley/Kulm Project, North Dakota  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Wind Energy Center Edgeley/Kulm Project North Dakota North Dakota Wind, LLC FPL Energy DOE/EA-1465 April 2003 Summary S - 1 Final EA SUMMARY The proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project is a 21-megawatt (MW) wind generation project proposed by Florida Power and Light (FPL) Energy North Dakota Wind LLC (Dakota Wind) and Basin Electric Power Cooperative (Basin). The proposed windfarm would be located in La Moure County, south central North Dakota, near the rural farming communities of Kulm and Edgeley. The proposed windfarm is scheduled to be operational by the end of 2003. Dakota Wind and other project proponents are seeking to develop the proposed Edgeley/Kulm Project to provide utilities and, ultimately, electric energy consumers with electricity from a

372

Advanced Wind Energy Systems AWES | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AWES AWES Jump to: navigation, search Name Advanced Wind Energy Systems (AWES) Place Toms River, New Jersey Sector Wind energy Product Advanced Wind Energy Systems (AWES) was formed in 2006 to commercialize the novel wind turbine energy capture technologies invented by Frank McClintic, AWES founder and Chief Designer. References Advanced Wind Energy Systems (AWES)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Advanced Wind Energy Systems (AWES) is a company located in Toms River, New Jersey . References ↑ "Advanced Wind Energy Systems (AWES)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Advanced_Wind_Energy_Systems_AWES&oldid=341809

373

Wind Blog  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

wind-blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable wind-blog Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry http://energy.gov/eere/articles/two-facilities-one-goal-advancing-america-s-wind-industry wind-industry" class="title-link">Two Facilities, One Goal: Advancing America's Wind Industry

374

N O R T H W E S T P O W E R A N D C O N S E R VAT I O N C O U N C I L COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, improved ocean conditions likely are one cause. Ocean conditions today are similar to conditions to the increased success. Beginning in 2000, above-average returns of salmon to the river were sustained for three

375

The Columbia River System : the Inside Story.  

SciTech Connect

The Columbia Ricer is one of the greatest natural resources in the western United States. The river and its tributaries touch the lives of nearly every resident of the Northwest-from providing the world-famous Pacific salmon to supplying the clean natural fuel for over 75 percent of the region's electrical generation. Since early in the century, public and private agencies have labored to capture the benefits of this dynamic river. Today, dozens of major water resource projects throughout the region are fed by the waters of the Columbia Basin river system. And through cooperative efforts, the floods that periodically threaten developments near the river can be controlled. This publication presents a detailed explanation of the planning and operation of the multiple-use dams and reservoirs of the Columbia River system. It describes the river system, those who operate and use it, the agreements and policies that guide system operation, and annual planning for multiple-use operation.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The Influences of Human Activities on the Waters of the Pecos Basin of Texas: A Brief Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is not fully understood at this point. Lower Pecos River near Pandale #24; The Pecos Basin was once covered by the shallow Permian Sea. When the sea receded, significant amounts of evaporated gypsum, halites and related salts were left in soils and rock... Irrigation in the Pecos Basin of Texas Historically, the majority of early efforts to develop irrigation in the Pecos Basin were focused on flowing streams and the river, shallow alluvial aquifers and sites with plentiful groundwater supplies. In the late...

Jensen, R.; Hatler, W.; Mecke, M.; Hart, C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $28.49 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $38.51 $39.67 - 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $20.35 $16.14 $16.64 -9.6 3.1 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $19.64 $19.60 $20.41 1.9 4.2 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $14.02 $16.13 $16.23 7.6 0.6 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $43.43 $40.18 $39.62 -4.5 -1.4

378

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $26.24 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $35.10 $35.74 - 1.8 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $18.74 $14.70 $14.99 -10.6 1.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $18.09 $17.86 $18.39 0.8 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $12.91 $14.70 $14.63 6.4 -0.5 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $40.00 $36.62 $35.70 -5.5 -2.5

379

Malawis Shire River Fluctuations and Climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hydrological fluctuations of Malawis Shire River and climatic drivers are studied for a range of time and space scales. The annual cycles of basin rainfall and river flow peak in summer and autumn, respectively. Satellite and model products at <...

Mark R. Jury

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

RETURN TO THE RIVER -2000 Return to Table of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

impacts from development of the river's hydroelectric potential. The most recent fishery recovery program from the Columbia River hydroelectric system, contained important provisions regarding mitigation for the impacts of hydroelectric development on fish and wildlife in the basin. The act authorized the states of M

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Bull Trout Population Assessment in the White Salmon and Klickitat Rivers, Columbia River Gorge, Washington, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

We utilized night snorkeling and single pass electroshocking to determine the presence or absence of bull trout Salvelinus confluentus in 26 stream reaches (3,415 m) in the White Salmon basin and in 71 stream reaches (9,005 m) in the Klickitat River basin during summer and fall 2001. We did not find any bull trout in the White Salmon River basin. In the Klickitat River basin, bull trout were found only in the West Fork Klickitat River drainage. We found bull trout in two streams not previously reported: Two Lakes Stream and an unnamed tributary to Fish Lake Stream (WRIA code number 30-0550). We attempted to capture downstream migrant bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River by fishing a 1.5-m rotary screw trap at RM 4.3 from July 23 through October 17. Although we caught other salmonids, no bull trout were captured. The greatest limiting factor for bull trout in the West Fork Klickitat River is likely the small amount of available habitat resulting in a low total abundance, and the isolation of the population. Many of the streams are fragmented by natural falls, which are partial or complete barriers to upstream fish movement. To date, we have not been able to confirm that the occasional bull trout observed in the mainstem Klickitat River are migrating upstream into the West Fork Klickitat River.

Thiesfeld, Steven L.; McPeak, Ronald H.; McNamara, Brian S. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Honanie, Isadore (Confederated Tribes and Bands, Yakama Nation)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Metro Wind LLC Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LLC Wind Farm LLC Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Metro Wind LLC Wind Farm Facility Metro Wind LLC Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NAE/Enel North America Developer Northern Alternative Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Elk River - Sherbourne County MN Coordinates 45.379527°, -93.634011° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.379527,"lon":-93.634011,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

383

Wind Power Forecasting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Retrospective Reports 2011 Smart Grid Wind Integration Wind Integration Initiatives Wind Power Forecasting Wind Projects Email List Self Supplied Balancing Reserves Dynamic...

384

Wind turbine  

SciTech Connect

The improvement in a wind turbine comprises providing a tower with a freely liftable mount and adapting a nacelle which is fitted with a propeller windwheel consisting of a plurality of rotor blades and provided therein with means for conversion of wind energy to be shifted onto said mount attached to the tower. In case of a violent wind storm, the nacelle can be lowered down to the ground to protect the rotor blades from breakage due to the force of the wind. Required maintenance and inspection of the nacelle and replacement of rotor blades can be safely carried out on the ground.

Abe, M.

1982-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

385

Media Treatment of`Climate Change' in Shaping Colorado River Problems and Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Media Treatment of`Climate Change' in Shaping Colorado River Problems and Solutions WESTERN WATER ASSESSMENT WHITE PAPER Abby Kuranz and Doug Kenney University of Colorado 2014 #12;Western Water Assessment 2 on the hydrology of the Colorado River Basin and those water systems dependent upon the river.1 Among the impacts

Neff, Jason

386

Wind Powering America: Wind Events  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

calendar.asp Lists upcoming wind calendar.asp Lists upcoming wind power-related events. en-us julie.jones@nrel.gov (Julie Jones) http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/images/wpa_logo_sm.jpg Wind Powering America: Wind Events http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/calendar.asp Pennsylvania Wind for Schools Educator Workshop https://www.regonline.com/builder/site/Default.aspx?EventID=1352684 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4068 Wed, 4 Dec 2013 00:00:00 MST 2014 Joint Action Workshop http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=3996 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=3996 Mon, 21 Oct 2013 00:00:00 MST AWEA Wind Project Operations and Maintenance and Safety Seminar http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4009 http://www.windpoweringamerica.gov/filter_detail.asp?itemid=4009 Mon, 21

387

Impact assessment of hydroclimatic change on water stress in the Indus Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ninety percent of Pakistan's agricultural output is produced in fields irrigated by the Indus basin irrigation system, the world's largest network of canals, dams, barrages and tubewells. River flows, primarily fed by snow ...

Rasheed, Bilhuda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 76.2 Beam(m) 15.2 Depth(m) 1.8 Water Type Freshwater Special Physical Features Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control sys

389

Hood River Production Program Review, Final Report 1991-2001.  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a comprehensive review of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funded activities within the Hood River Basin from 1991 to 2001. These activities, known as the Hood River Production Program (HRPP), are intended to mitigate for fish losses related to operation of federal dams in the Columbia River Basin, and to contribute to recovery of endangered and/or threatened salmon and steelhead, as directed by Nation Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Fisheries (NOAA Fisheries). The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the HRPP, which authorized BPA to fund salmon and steelhead enhancement activities in the Hood River Basin, was completed in 1996 (BPA 1996). The EIS specified seven years of monitoring and evaluation (1996-2002) after program implementation to determine if program actions needed modification to meet program objectives. The EIS also called for a program review after 2002, that review is reported here.

Underwood, Keith; Chapman, Colin; Ackerman, Nicklaus

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Solid state 13C NMR analysis of shales and coals from Laramide Basins. Final report, March 1, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This Western Research Institute (WRI) jointly sponsored research (JSR) project augmented and complemented research conducted by the University of Wyoming Institute For Energy Research for the Gas Research Institute. The project, {open_quotes}A New Innovative Exploitation Strategy for Gas Accumulations Within Pressure Compartments,{close_quotes} was a continuation of a project funded by the GRI Pressure Compartmentalization Program that began in 1990. That project, {open_quotes}Analysis of Pressure Chambers and Seals in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming and Montana,{close_quotes} characterized a new class of hydrocarbon traps, the discovery of which can provide an impetus to revitalize the domestic petroleum industry. In support of the UW Institute For Energy Research`s program on pressure compartmentalization, solid-state {sup 13}C NMR measurements were made on sets of shales and coals from different Laramide basins in North America. NMR measurements were made on samples taken from different formations and depths of burial in the Alberta, Bighorn, Denver, San Juan, Washakie, and Wind River basins. The carbon aromaticity determined by NMR was shown to increase with depth of burial and increased maturation. In general, the NMR data were in agreement with other maturational indicators, such as vitrinite reflectance, illite/smectite ratio, and production indices. NMR measurements were also obtained on residues from hydrous pyrolysis experiments on Almond and Lance Formation coals from the Washakie Basin. These data were used in conjunction with mass and elemental balance data to obtain information about the extent of carbon aromatization that occurs during artificial maturation. The data indicated that 41 and 50% of the original aliphatic carbon in the Almond and Lance coals, respectively, aromatized during hydrous pyrolysis.

Miknis, F.P.; Jiao, Z.S.; Zhao, Hanqing; Surdam, R.C.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Chandler Hills Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chandler Hills Wind Farm Chandler Hills Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Chandler Hills Wind Farm Facility Chandler Hills Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Terra-Gen Power Energy Purchaser Great River Energy Location Chandler Murray County MN Coordinates 43.916988°, -95.953898° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.916988,"lon":-95.953898,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

392

Marshall Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marshall Wind Farm Marshall Wind Farm Facility Marshall Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner John Deere Wind Energy Developer Community Energy Purchaser Missouri River Energy Services Location Lyon County MN Coordinates 44.331173°, -95.816331° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.331173,"lon":-95.816331,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

393

Trimont Area Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trimont Area Wind Farm Trimont Area Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Trimont Area Wind Farm Facility Trimont Area Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PPM Energy Inc Developer PPM Energy Inc Energy Purchaser Great River Energy Location Southwest MN MN Coordinates 43.779594°, -94.852874° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.779594,"lon":-94.852874,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

394

Wind Effects on the Water in a Narrow Two-Layered Lake  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

5 May 1966 research-article Wind Effects on the Water in a Narrow Two-Layered...movement in a long narrow lake subject to wind action during the summer season of thermal...the basin to an instantaneous rise in the wind stress applied tangentially over the surface...

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Origin of the Spring-time Westerly Bias in Equatorial Atlantic Surface Winds in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-atmosphere interaction generally rules. #12;Page 2 of 32 1. Introduction Trade winds (easterlies) prevail over most) in the central and eastern basins; and vice-versa. Along the equator, easterly winds generate equatorialOrigin of the Spring-time Westerly Bias in Equatorial Atlantic Surface Winds in CAM3/CCSM3 Model

Carton, James

396

Wyoming Wind Power Project (generation/wind)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Power > Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Wyoming Wind Power Project (Foote Creek Rim I and II) Thumbnail image of wind...

397

DOE Science Showcase - Wind Power | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Science Showcase - Wind Power Science Showcase - Wind Power Wind Powering America is a nationwide initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program designed to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Wind Power Research Results in DOE Databases IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2, Energy Citations Database NREL Triples Previous Estimates of U.S. Wind Power Potential, Energy Citations Database Dynamic Models for Wind Turbines and Wind Power Plants, DOE Information Bridge 2012 ARPA-E Energy Innovation Summit: Profiling General Compression: A River of Wind, ScienceCinema, multimedia Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) Data from the

398

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the Catchment Area and Water of the River Taff in South Wales, United Kingdom, and Its Potential Relationship to Clustering of Crohn's Disease Cases in the City of Cardiff  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...prevailing southwesterly winds. This would influence...America (18, 37, 49). Wildlife reservoirs may contribute...prevailing southwesterly winds. (Map reproduced with...Agency (Wales) for the wind, river, and rainfall...infection of nonruminant wildlife in Scotland. J. Clin...

R. W. Pickup; G. Rhodes; S. Arnott; K. Sidi-Boumedine; T. J. Bull; A. Weightman; M. Hurley; J. Hermon-Taylor

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels June 28, 2010 - 5:14pm Addthis Located in one of Reno's natural wind tunnels, City Hall proved to be the perfect location for one of the city's nine new wind turbines. | Photo courtesy of the City of Reno Located in one of Reno's natural wind tunnels, City Hall proved to be the perfect location for one of the city's nine new wind turbines. | Photo courtesy of the City of Reno On the street level in Reno, it may be easy to forget that every time the breeze blows off the Truckee River and past the 17-story City Hall, the town is quietly saving money. But the $11,000 the city is expected to save each year from wind power will be a friendly reminder. Installed in early June, the two 1.5-kilowatt wind

400

Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels Saving Money in Reno's Wind Tunnels June 28, 2010 - 5:14pm Addthis Located in one of Reno's natural wind tunnels, City Hall proved to be the perfect location for one of the city's nine new wind turbines. | Photo courtesy of the City of Reno Located in one of Reno's natural wind tunnels, City Hall proved to be the perfect location for one of the city's nine new wind turbines. | Photo courtesy of the City of Reno On the street level in Reno, it may be easy to forget that every time the breeze blows off the Truckee River and past the 17-story City Hall, the town is quietly saving money. But the $11,000 the city is expected to save each year from wind power will be a friendly reminder. Installed in early June, the two 1.5-kilowatt wind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Offshore Wind Power USA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Offshore Wind Power USA conference provides the latest offshore wind market updates and forecasts.

402

Mass energy storage using off-river pumped hydro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Energy storage assists very high penetration of variable renewable energy sources such as wind and solar. In many regions short-term off-river pumped hydro energy storage can...

Blakers, Andrew

403

North Sky River | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky River Sky River Jump to: navigation, search Name North Sky River Facility North Sky River Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Pacific Gas & Electric Location Tehachapi CA Coordinates 35.335578°, -118.186347° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.335578,"lon":-118.186347,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

404

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43 $0.0294 W - W W - - - 43 $0.0294 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $0.0161 W W W W $0.0216 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $0.0296 $0.0277 $0.0292 $0.0309 $0.0325 $0.0328 $0.0357 $0.0451 $0.0427 4.7 -5.3 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

405

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

$15.49 $13.83 W - W W - - - $15.49 $13.83 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $19.46 W W W W $29.49 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $10.33 $9.58 $10.68 $12.03 $13.69 $14.71 $16.11 $19.72 $20.69 9.1 4.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

406

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

$0.0323 $0.0284 W - W W - - - $0.0323 $0.0284 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $0.0146 W W W W $0.0223 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $0.0269 $0.0255 $0.0275 $0.0299 $0.0325 $0.0339 $0.0380 $0.0490 $0.0468 7.2 -4.3 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

407

Dan Klempel Basin Electric Power Cooperative DOE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dan Dan Klempel Basin Electric Power Cooperative DOE 2009 Congestion Study Workshop Oklahoma City, Oklahoma June 18, 2008 Page 1 of 5 Basin Electric Power Cooperative would like to thank the Department of Energy for this opportunity to share some of our thoughts on transmission congestion issues. Basin Electric is a wholesale power supplier to rural electric cooperatives located in the mid-west and in both the east and west interconnections. Naturally, our generation and transmission facilities also reside in both interconnections so we use asynchronous back-to-back DC facilities to balance loads with resources. With headquarters in Bismarck, North Dakota; we find ourselves in the heart of some of the nations most desirable wind patterns for potential renewable energy development as well as electric energy production from more traditional sources. Lignite coal has been a reliable

408

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Savannah River Operations Office |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 11, 2009 August 11, 2009 CX-000513: Categorical Exclusion Determination Cone Penetration Test sampling at ECODS (Early Construction and Operational Disposal Sites) B3 and B5 CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 08/11/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office August 5, 2009 CX-000511: Categorical Exclusion Determination Isolation of Domestic Water Line, 782-4G CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 08/05/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office August 5, 2009 CX-000512: Categorical Exclusion Determination Tree Removal and Chipping at P-Area Ash Basin and R-Area Ash Basin and P-007 Outfall Date: 08/05/2009 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

409

23.-THE FISHES OF THE COLORADO BASIN. By BARTON W. EVERMANN AND CLOUD. RUTTER.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

23.-THE FISHES OF THE COLORADO BASIN. By BARTON W. EVERMANN AND CLOUD. RUTTER. In this paper we of the fishes in the basin of the Colorado River of the West. The approximate area drained by the Oolorado strip along the entire length of the western side of New Mexico, a large part of western polorado

410

Impacts of Climate Change on the Great Lakes Basin Primary Investigator: Frank H. Quinn  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project ended in 1998 The potential impacts of climate change and variability on the Great Lakes of the Binational Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin Climate Change and Variability Project was completedImpacts of Climate Change on the Great Lakes Basin Primary Investigator: Frank H. Quinn

411

Comparative risk analysis of development of the lignite basins in Serbian part of the Danube region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper gives an overview of the global business risks and risks in the mining development in the Kolubara and Kostolac lignite basins in the area of the Danube river in Serbia. An identification of main risks is undertaken by application of a comprehensive ... Keywords: danube region, lignite basin, mining and energetics, strategic business risks, sustainable development

Slavka Zekovi?; Tamara Mari?i?

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

offshore wind farm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

offshore wind farm, wind farm [Wind park which one may find on the ... engineers and should not be used. A wind farm consists of a network of wind turbines] ? Windkraftanlage f, Windpark m; Offshore

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Wind Energy Leasing Handbook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind Energy Leasing Handbook Wind Energy Leasing Handbook E-1033 Oklahoma Cooperative Extension?..................................................................................................................... 31 What do wind developers consider in locating wind energy projects?............................................................................................ 37 How do companies and individuals invest in wind energy projects?....................................................................

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

414

Design Wind Speed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind is characterized by various different parameters. They include the following items: (1) wind speed, such as the mean wind speed and maximum instantaneous wind speed; (2) wind direction such as the azimuth di...

Yozo Fujino; Kichiro Kimura; Hiroshi Tanaka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Baldwin Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Baldwin Wind Farm Baldwin Wind Farm Facility Baldwin Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Burleigh County near Wilton ND Coordinates 47.059561°, -100.776° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.059561,"lon":-100.776,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

416

Wind Powering America: New England Wind Forum  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

About the New England Wind Forum About the New England Wind Forum New England Wind Energy Education Project Historic Wind Development in New England State Activities Projects in New England Building Wind Energy in New England Wind Resource Wind Power Technology Economics Markets Siting Policy Technical Challenges Issues Small Wind Large Wind Newsletter Perspectives Events Quick Links to States CT MA ME NH RI VT Bookmark and Share The New England Wind Forum was conceived in 2005 as a platform to provide a single, comprehensive and objective source of up-to-date, Web-based information on a broad array of wind-energy-related issues pertaining to New England. The New England Wind Forum provides information to wind energy stakeholders through Web site features, periodic newsletters, and outreach activities. The New England Wind Forum covers the most frequently discussed wind energy topics.

417

Wind News  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable news Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 en New Report Shows Trend Toward Larger Offshore Wind Systems, with 11 Advanced Stage Projects Proposed in U.S. Waters http://energy.gov/eere/articles/new-report-shows-trend-toward-larger-offshore-wind-systems-11-advanced-stage-projects wind-systems-11-advanced-stage-projects" class="title-link">New Report Shows Trend Toward Larger Offshore Wind Systems, with 11 Advanced Stage Projects Proposed in U.S. Waters

418

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Basin Basin Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware W W $16.45 $14.29 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $21.45 W W W W $28.57 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $11.39 $10.39 $11.34 $12.43 $13.69 $14.25 $15.17 $18.16 $18.85 6.5 3.8

419

Temporal and spatial patterns in wind stress and wind stress curl over the central Southern California Bight  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, together with several other federal and municipal agencies, began a series of field programs to determine along and cross-shelf transport patterns over the continental shelves in the central Southern California Bight. As a part of these programs, moorings that monitor winds were deployed off the Palos Verdes peninsula and within San Pedro Bay for six 34 month summer and winter periods between 2001 and 2008. In addition, nearly continuous records of winds for this 7-year period were obtained from a terrestrial site at the coast and from a basin site offshore of the long-term coastal site. The mean annual winds are downcoast at all sites. The alongshelf components of wind stress, which are the largest part of the low-frequency wind stress fields, are well correlated between basin, shelf and coastal sites. On average, the amplitude of alongshelf fluctuations in wind stress are 34 times larger over the offshore basin, compared to the coastal site, irrespective of whether the fluctuations represent the total, or just the correlated portion of the wind stress field. The curl in the large-scale wind stress tends to be positive, especially in the winter season when the mean wind stress is downcoast and larger at the offshore basin site than at the beach. However, since the fluctuation in wind stress amplitudes are usually larger than the mean, periods of weak negative curl do occur, especially in the summer season when the largest normalized differences in the amplitude of wind stress fluctuations are found in the nearshore region of the coastal ocean. Even though the low-frequency wind stress field is well-correlated over the continental shelf and offshore basins, out to distances of 35km or more from the coast, winds even 10km inshore of the beach do not represent the coastal wind field, at least in the summer months. The seasonal changes in the spatial structures in wind stress amplitudes suggest that an assessment of the amplitude of the responses of coastal ocean processes to wind forcing is complex and that the responses may have significant seasonal structures.

Marlene A. Noble; Kurt J. Rosenberger; Leslie K. Rosenfeld; George L. Robertson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Wind energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind energy is rapidly growing. In 2006 the installed generating capacity in the world increased by 25%, a growth rate which has more or less been sustained during the last decade. And there is no reason to believe that this growth will slow significantly in the coming years. For example, the United Kingdom's goal for installed wind turbines by 2020 is 33GW up from 2GW in 2006, an average annual growth rate of 22% over that period. More than half of all turbines are installed in Europe, but United States, India and lately China are also rapidly growing markets. The cradle of modern wind energy was set by innovative blacksmiths in rural Denmark. Now the wind provides more than 20% of the electrical power in Denmark, the industry has professionalized and has close ties with public research at universities. This focus issue is concerned with research in wind energy. The main purposes of research in wind energy are to: decrease the cost of power generated by the wind; increase the reliability and predictability of the energy source; investigate and reduce the adverse environmental impact of massive deployment of wind turbines; build research based educations for wind energy engineers. This focus issue contains contributions from several fields of research. Decreased costs cover a very wide range of activities from aerodynamics of the wind turbine blades, optimal site selection for the turbines, optimization of the electrical grid and power market for a fluctuating source, more efficient electrical generators and gears, and new materials and production techniques for turbine manufacturing. The United Kingdom recently started the construction of the London Array, a 1GW off-shore wind farm east of London consisting of several hundred turbines. To design such a farm optimally it is necessary to understand the chaotic and very turbulent flow downwind from a turbine, which decreases the power production and increases the mechanical loads on other nearby turbines. Also addressed within the issue is how much conventional power production can be replaced by the ceaseless wind, with the question of how Greece's target of 29% renewables by 2020 is to be met efficiently. Other topics include an innovative way to determine the power curve of a turbine experimentally more accurately, the use of fluid dynamics tools to investigate the implications of placing vortex generators on wind turbine blades (thereby possibly improving their efficiency) and a study of the perception of wind turbine noise. It turns out that a small but significant fraction of wind turbine neighbours feel that turbine generated noise impairs their ability to rest. The annoyance is correlated with a negative attitude towards the visual impact on the landscape, but what is cause and effect is too early to say. As mentioned there is a rush for wind turbines in many countries. However, this positive development for the global climate is currently limited by practical barriers. One bottleneck is the difficulties for the sub-suppliers of gears and other parts to meet the demand. Another is the difficulties to meet the demand for engineers specialized in wind. For that reason the Technical University of Denmark (DTU) recently launched the world's first Wind Energy Masters Program. Here and elsewhere in the world of wind education and research we should really speed up now, as our chances of contributing to emission free energy production and a healthier global climate have never been better. Focus on Wind Energy Contents The articles below represent the first accepted contributions and further additions will appear in the near future. Wind turbineslow level noise sources interfering with restoration? EjaPedersen andKerstin PerssonWaye On the effect of spatial dispersion of wind power plants on the wind energy capacity credit in Greece GeorgeCaralis, YiannisPerivolaris, KonstantinosRados andArthourosZervos Large-eddy simulation of spectral coherence in a wind turbine wake AJimenez, ACrespo, EMigoya andJGarcia How to improve the estimation of

Jakob Mann; Jens Nrkr Srensen; Poul-Erik Morthorst

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin wind river" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Section 4 - Wind  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The exploitation of wind power for useful energy is both a practice dating back to ancient times and a key component of todays effort to substitute renewable energy sources for fossil fuels. Use of wind energy has progressed historically through three stages. First came the use of wind for propulsion of water craft via sails. Then the windmill came into use in agriculture, originally to grind grain and then later to drain water from fields or raise it from a well. Finally (much later) came the use of wind to power turbines to generate electricity. The two historic uses of wind power, sailing ships and windmills, are both still in existence today, though on a lesser scale than in the past. The earliest use of the sail is thought to have occurred more than 5,000 years ago on the Nile River and in the Mediterranean Sea. A major advance in sailing came in the era of the Roman Empire, as early as the 2nd century A.D., with the appearance on the Mediterranean of the lateen (triangular) sail, which was capable of taking the wind on either side and thus could sail into the wind, as opposed to the earlier square sail which could only sail with the wind. This technology is believed to have originated with Arab sailors on the Red Sea about 200 years earlier. The use of multiple triangular sails, in combination with square sails, led to the Age of Sail, during which sailing vessels were employed for global exploration, international trade, and naval warfare. The ultimate in wind-powered ships were the clipper ships of the mid 19th century, famous for their high speed, elegant design, and graceful appearance. Ironically, the finest clipper ships appeared just as the Age of Sail was in its twilight years, having been overtaken by the development of the steam-powered ship. The classic European windmill first appeared in the Middle Ages, probably in the 12th century. A written record of one in England dates from the 1180s. The common type was the tower mill, which was developed shortly afterward. It became known as the Dutch windmill because it was ubiquitous in that country, and even today it is a popular symbol of the Dutch nation. The windmill influenced the topography of the Netherlands in that it was widely used to provide the power to reclaim submerged land. The windmill also was reported in China at about the same time it emerged in Europe, though it may have developed even earlier. In the United States the so-called American farm or American-style windmill became a familiar sight from the middle of the 19th century onward, especially in the developing Western region. It was used to provide power to raise well water and to run farm machinery. New technology enabled it to turn its wheel to adjust to changing wind direction, and also to restrict the wheel speed so that the blades would not be destroyed during storms. The use of steel rather than wood as the blade material was a later refinement. This type of windmill eventually spread far beyond the U.S. borders to be used globally. The beginnings of the use of wind power to generate electricity came in the late 1880s and early 1890s, through the work of Charles Brush in the U.S. and Poul la Cour in Denmark. Brush modified a windmill to operate a DC generator, creating what is considered to be the first wind power plant. The experiments of la Cour with wind turbines laid the foundation for modern wind energy technology. In the 1920s the U.S. wind pioneer Marcellus Jacobs developed the first commercial propeller-type rotor for a wind turbine. Companies such as his Jacobs Wind continued on the path established by Brush of modifying existing windmills to provide power to drive DC generators, especially for use by farms that were not on the electrical grid prior to the coming of widespread rural electrification. Another major development of the 1920s was the vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT), which was patented by the French engineer Georges J. M. Darrieus. This new type of wind turbine had a distinctive eggbeateror skipping rope design, in contrast with the horizontal a

Cutler J. Cleveland; Christopher Morris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Crow Lake Wind | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crow Lake Wind Crow Lake Wind Jump to: navigation, search Name Crow Lake Wind Facility Crow Lake Wind Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Prairie Winds SD 1 Inc. (100) Mitchell Technical Institute (1) South Dakota Wind Partners (7) Developer Prairie Winds SD 1 Inc. Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Power Cooperative Location White Lake SD Coordinates 43.920959°, -98.7282157° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.920959,"lon":-98.7282157,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

423

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

424

Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power Program (WWPP) Wind Energy Benefits, Wind Powering America (WPA) (Fact Sheet), Wind And Water Power...

425

North Dakota Company Wins Praise for Wind Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Dakota Company Wins Praise for Wind Projects North Dakota Company Wins Praise for Wind Projects North Dakota Company Wins Praise for Wind Projects March 12, 2010 - 4:48pm Addthis Construction teams set up a turbine foundation in Minot, N.D. | Photo courtesy of Basin Electric Power Cooperative Construction teams set up a turbine foundation in Minot, N.D. | Photo courtesy of Basin Electric Power Cooperative Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Wind energy is taking off in the Dakotas, contributing hundreds of megawatts of power to the grid and putting hundreds of people to work. Take two of Basin Electric Power Cooperative's PraireWinds projects, for example. The 80 wind turbines scattered across the plains in Minot, N.D., are generating enough energy to power about 35,000 homes a year.

426

North Dakota Company Wins Praise for Wind Projects | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

North Dakota Company Wins Praise for Wind Projects North Dakota Company Wins Praise for Wind Projects North Dakota Company Wins Praise for Wind Projects March 12, 2010 - 4:48pm Addthis Construction teams set up a turbine foundation in Minot, N.D. | Photo courtesy of Basin Electric Power Cooperative Construction teams set up a turbine foundation in Minot, N.D. | Photo courtesy of Basin Electric Power Cooperative Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Wind energy is taking off in the Dakotas, contributing hundreds of megawatts of power to the grid and putting hundreds of people to work. Take two of Basin Electric Power Cooperative's PraireWinds projects, for example. The 80 wind turbines scattered across the plains in Minot, N.D., are generating enough energy to power about 35,000 homes a year.

427

Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana) Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana) Wabash River Heritage Corridor (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info Start Date 1991 State Indiana Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Wabash River Heritage Corridor Commission The Wabash River Heritage Corridor, consisting of the Wabash River, the Little River, and the portage between the Little River and the Maumee

428

Our River  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River River Nature Bulletin No. 22 July 7, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation OUR RIVER The people of Cook County are missing a bet. They are not using their DesPlaines River. The other day we took a boat trip down that river from Lake County to Lawndale Avenue in Summit. It being a week day, we saw few people other than an occasional fisherman or pairs of strolling boys. Except for a bridge now and then, there were no signs or sounds of civilization. Chicago might have been a thousand miles away. We rested. There was isolation. There was peace. Once in a while a heron flew ahead of us; or a squirrel scampered up a tree; once we saw a family of young muskrats playing around the entrance to their den in the bank; twice we saw and heard a wood duck; again and again big fish plowed ripples surging ahead of us. It was shady and cool and still beneath the arching trees. We thought of the centuries this river had traveled. We were babes nuzzling again at the breast of Mother Nature.

429

The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley, investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: The investigation of anomalous magnetization in the Raft River valley, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Cassia County Idaho; clastic sediments; economic geology; exploration; geophysical methods; geophysical surveys; geothermal energy; gravel; ground methods; Idaho; isothermal remanent magnetization; magnetic anomalies; magnetic methods; magnetic properties; magnetic susceptibility; magnetization; paleomagnetism; Raft River basin; remanent magnetization; sediments; surveys; United States Author(s): Anderson, L.A.; Mabey, D.R. Published: Abstracts - Society of Exploration Geophysicists International

430

Westridge Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Westridge Wind Farm Westridge Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Westridge Wind Farm Facility Westridge Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Group Developer Farmers' cooperatives with Dan Juhl Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy/Great River Energy Location Various MN Coordinates 44.115854°, -96.115186° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.115854,"lon":-96.115186,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

431

Odin Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Odin Wind Farm Odin Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Odin Wind Farm Facility Odin Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Edison Mission Group/Rahn Group Developer Edison Mission Group/Rahn Group Energy Purchaser Missouri River Energy Services Location MN Coordinates 43.808589°, -94.824893° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.808589,"lon":-94.824893,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

432

Elm Creek Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Elm Creek Wind Farm Elm Creek Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Elm Creek Wind Farm Facility Elm Creek Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Iberdrola Renewables Energy Purchaser Great River Energy Location MN Coordinates 43.780285°, -94.845586° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.780285,"lon":-94.845586,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

433

High Plains Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Plains Wind Farm Plains Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name High Plains Wind Farm Facility High Plains Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner PacifiCorp Developer PacifiCorp Energy Purchaser PacifiCorp Location Southwest of Rock River WY Coordinates 41.665943°, -106.043487° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.665943,"lon":-106.043487,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

434

Rugby Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rugby Wind Farm Rugby Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Rugby Wind Farm Facility Rugby Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Iberdrola Renewables Energy Purchaser Missouri River Energy Services Location Pierce County ND Coordinates 48.511277°, -99.889169° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.511277,"lon":-99.889169,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

435

Wind Energy 101 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy 101 Energy 101 Jump to: navigation, search The 63-MW Dry Lake Wind Power Project in Arizona is the first utility-scale power project. The Salt River Project is purchasing 100% of the power from the Phase I of this project for the next 20 years. Photo from Iberdrola Renewables, NREL 16692 Wind is a form of solar energy and is a result of the uneven heating of the atmosphere by the sun, the irregularities of the earth's surface, and the rotation of the earth. Wind flow patterns and speeds vary greatly across the United States and are modified by bodies of water, vegetation, and differences in terrain. Humans use this wind flow, or motion energy, for many purposes: sailing, flying a kite, and even generating electricity.[1] The following links provide more information about wind energy basics.

436

Farmer's Cooperatives Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Farmer's Cooperatives Wind Farm Farmer's Cooperatives Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Farmer's Cooperatives Wind Farm Facility Farmer's Cooperatives Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer DanMar & Associates Energy Purchaser Xcel/ Great River Energy Location Jackson County MN Coordinates 43.612366°, -95.142403° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.612366,"lon":-95.142403,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

437

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Resource Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Resource Assessment Wind Resource Assessment A map of the United States is color-coded to indicate the high winds at 80 meters. This map shows the wind resource at 80 meters for both land-based and offshore wind resources in the United States. Correct estimation of the energy available in the wind can make or break the economics of wind plant development. Wind mapping and validation techniques developed at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) along with collaborations with U.S. companies have produced high-resolution maps of the United States that provide wind plant developers with accurate estimates of the wind resource potential. State Wind Maps International Wind Resource Maps Dynamic Maps, GIS Data, and Analysis Tools Due to the existence of special use airspace (SUA) (i.e., military airspace

438

New England Wind Forum: Wind Power Technology  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Wind Power Technology Wind Power Technology Modern wind turbines have become sophisticated power plants while the concept of converting wind energy to electrical energy remains quite simple. Follow these links to learn more about the science behind wind turbine technology. Wind Power Animation An image of a scene from the wind power animation. The animation shows how moving air rotates a wind turbine's blades and describes how the internal components work to produce electricity. It shows small and large wind turbines and the differences between how they are used, as stand alone or connected to the utility grid. How Wind Turbines Work Learn how wind turbines make electricity; what are the types, sizes, and applications of wind turbines; and see an illustration of the components inside a wind turbine.

439

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that includes wind turbine towers. 2011 Wind TechnologiesSets Other Wind Turbine Components Towers Wind-Poweredselected wind turbine components includes towers as well as

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that includes wind turbine towers. 2010 Wind TechnologiesImports : Other Wind Turbine Components Towers Wind-Poweredselected wind turbine components includes towers as well as

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z