National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for basin southern part

  1. Southern Colombia's Putumayo basin deserves renewed attention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthews, A.J. ); Portilla, O. )

    1994-05-23

    The Putumayo basin lies in southern Colombia between the Eastern Cordillera of the Andes and the Guyana-Brazilian shield. It covers about 50,000 sq km between 0--3[degree]N. Lat. and 74--77[degree]W. Long. and extends southward into Ecuador and Peru as the productive Oriente basin. About 3,500 sq km of acreage in the basin is being offered for licensing in the first licensing round by competitive tender. A recent review of the available data from this area by Intera and Ecopetrol suggests that low risk prospects and leads remain to be tested. The paper describes the tectonic setting, stratigraphy, structure, hydrocarbon geology, reservoirs, and trap types.

  2. Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the Southern Great Basin |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the Southern Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Magnitude of Crustal Extension in the...

  3. Geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1985-06-13

    This report describes the geothermal resources of the Southern Powder River Basin. The report contains a discussion of the hydrology as it relates to the movement of heated water, a description and interpretation of the thermal regime, and four maps: a generalized geological map, a structure contour map, a thermal gradient contour map, and a ground water temperature map. 10 figs. (ACR)

  4. Playa basin development, southern High Plains, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, T.C. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Holliday, V.T. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States))

    1992-01-01

    More than 20,000 playa basins have formed on fine-grained eolian sediments of the Quaternary Blackwater Draw and Tertiary Ogallala Formations on the High Plains of TX and NM. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed for the development of playa basins: (1) subsidence due to dissolution of underlying Permian bedded salt, (2) dissolution of soil carbonate and piping of clastic sediment into the subsurface, (3) animal activity, and (4) deflation. Evidence of eolian processes includes lee dunes and straightened shorelines on the eastern and southern margins of many playas. Lee dunes, which occur on the eastern side of ca 15% of playa basins and contain sediment deflated from adjacent playas, are cresentic to oval in plain view and typically account for 15--40% of the volume of the playa basin. Quaternary fossil biotas and buried calcic soils indicate that grasslands and semi-arid to aid climatic conditions prevailed as these basins formed. Evidence of fluviolacustrine processes in playa basins includes centripetal drainage leading to fan deltas at playa margins and preserved deltaic and lacustrine sediments. Playa basins expanded as fluvial processes eroded basin slopes and carried sediment to the basin floor where, during periods of minimal vegetation cover, loose sediment was removed by deflation. Other processes that played secondary roles in the development of certain playa basins include subsidence induced by dissolution of deeply buried Permian salt, dissolution of soil carbonate and piping, and animal activity. Two small lake basins in Gray County, TX, occur above strata affected by dissolution-induced subsidence. Dissolution of soil carbonate was observed in exposures and cores of strata underlying playa basins. Cattle, and in the past vast numbers of migrating buffalo, destroy soil crusts in dry playas, making these sediments more susceptible to deflation, and carry sediment out of flooded playas on their hooves.

  5. Upper Permian lacustrine oil shales, southern Junggar basin, northwest China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, A.R.; Brassell, S.C.; Graham, S.A. )

    1992-12-01

    Upper Permian organic-rich lacustrine mudstones (oil shales) that crop out in the southern Junggar basin rank among the richest and thickest petroleum source rock intervals in the world, with maximum TOC values reaching 34% and Rock-Eval pyrolytic yields (S[sub 2]) up to 200 kg HC/t rock. Lacustrine sedimentary facies define an overall transgressive-regressive cycle of approximately 2000 m gross thickness, which includes approximately 800 m of source rocks averaging 4.1% TOC and 26.2 kg HC/t rock. Basinal facies comprise silicic, organic-rich, laminated lacustrine mudstones and interbedded siltstones; organic matter contained in the mudstones ranges in composition from type I to type III. Basinal facies were deposited in a deep, oxygen-deficient, stratified lake. Lake-margin facies consist of nonlaminated siliciclastic mudstones, rippled dolomitic silstones and sandstones, and minor limestones. Maximum TOC values are approximately 6%. Desiccation cracks are common in the marginal facies, but evaporite minerals are rare or absent. Biomarker correlation parameters measured from rock extracts exhibit significant stratigraphic variability, but strongly support the hypothesis that Upper Permian lacustrine oil shales charge the giant Karamay field in the northwestern Junggar basin. Karamay oils are characterized by high relative abundances of [beta]-carotane. This characteristic is restricted to desiccated facies in the outcrop sections, however. We therefore propose that an abundance of [beta]-carotane indicates elevated environmental salinities during deposition of the oil shales. 16 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  7. Reservoir geology of Landslide field, southern San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, T.R.; Tucker, R.D.; Singleton, M.T. )

    1991-02-01

    The Landslide field, which is located on the southern margin of the San Joaquin basin, was discovered in 1985 and consists of 13 producers and six injectors. Cumulative production as of mid-1990 was approximately 10 million bbl of oil with an average daily production of 4700 BOPD. Production is from a series of late Miocene turbidite sands (Stevens Sand) that were deposited as a small constructional submarine fan (less than 2 mi in diameter). Based on interpretation of wireline logs and engineering data, deposition of the fan and of individual lobes within the fan was strongly influenced by preexisting paleotopography and small syndepositional slump features. Based on mapping of individual depositional units and stratigraphic dipmeter analysis, transport direction of the sand was to the north-north across these paleotopographic breaks in slope. Dipmeter data and pressure data from individual sands are especially useful for recognition and mapping of individual flow units between well bores. Detailed engineering, geophysical and geological studies have increased our understanding of the dimensions, continuity, geometry, and inherent reservoir properties of the individual flow units within the reservoir. Based on the results of these studies a series of water isolation workovers and extension wells were proposed and successfully undertaken. This work has increased recoverable reserves and arrested the rapid production decline.

  8. Reevaluation of Stevens sand potential - Maricopa depocenter, southern San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolb, M.M.; Parks, S.L. )

    1991-02-01

    During the upper Miocene in the Southern San Joaquin basin surrounding highlands contributed coarse material to a deep marine basin dominated by fine grained silicious bioclastic deposition. these coarse deposits became reservoirs isolated within the silicious Antelope Shale Member of the Monterey Formation. In the southern Maricopa depocenter these Stevens sands are productive at Yowlumne, Landslide, Aqueduct, Rio Viejo, San Emidio Nose, Paloma, and Midway-Sunset fields, and are major exploration targets in surrounding areas. In the ARCO Fee lands area of the southern Maricopa depocenter, Stevens sands occur as rapidly thickening lens-shaped bodies that formed as channel, levee, and lobe deposits of deep-marine fan systems. These fans were fed from a southerly source, with apparent transport in a north-northwesterly direction. Sands deflect gently around present-day structural highs indicating that growth of structures influenced depositional patterns. Correlations reveal two major fan depositional intervals bounded by regional N, O, and P chert markers. Each interval contains numerous individual fan deposits, with many lobes and channels recognizable on three-dimensional seismic data. In addition to these basinal sand plays presently being evaluated, ARCO is pursuing a relatively new trend on Fee lands along the southern basin margin, where correlation to mountain data reveals Stevens sands trend into the steeply dipping beds of the mountain front. This area, the upturned Stevens,' has large reserve potential and producing analogies at Metson, Leutholtz, Los Lobos, and Pleito Ranch fields.

  9. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaszuba, John P.; Sims, Kenneth W.W.; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-06-01

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  10. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaszuba, John P. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). School of Energy Resources; Pluda, Allison R. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Wyoming High-Precision Isotope Lab.

    2014-03-01

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  11. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatcher, Robert D

    2005-11-30

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our

  12. Tectonic controls on carbonate platform evolution in southern Papua New Guinea: Passive margin to foreland basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pigram, C.J., Davies, P.J.; Feary, D.A.; Symonds, P.A. )

    1989-03-01

    The middle Oligocene collision of the northern margin of the Australian craton with a complex subduction system resulted in emplacement of a thrust mass and formation of a foreland basin that extended from the Coral Sea to the Indian Ocean. The distribution of carbonate-platform facies in southwestern Papua New Guinea reflects the transition from an Eocene passive margin setting to the early stages of foreland basin evolution. The initial basin configuration, with terrigenous sedimentation confined to the proximal foredeep, allowed carbonate deposition in the shallow environment adjacent to the peripheral forebulge. Subsequent southward migration of the basin resulted in a rapid increase in the area and thickness of carbonate-platform deposition. When the proximal foredeep became filled by detritus shed from the emerging orogen, clastic sediments buried the platform and terminated carbonate deposition. The history of the southern Papua New Guinea carbonate platform illustrates the paradox of carbonate deposition within the foreland basin, whereby basin configuration initially encourages thick and extensive carbonate deposition but inevitably leads to terrigenous inundation and the demise of the carbonate platform.

  13. Future oil and gas potential in southern Caspian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, R.B. Jr.; Castle, R.A.; Nelson, D.R. )

    1993-05-03

    Turkmenistan is the most southerly C.I.S. Republic and lies on the southeastern border of the Caspian Sea. On January 23, 1993 an important bidding round was held for producing and shut-in oil and gas fields in the western part of the country. Nine international companies registered for the round, and winning bids were submitted on three of four blocks. A bid on block 1, the only block not to be awarded, was rejected as being insufficient. The purpose of this article and another planned for later this year is to present background information on the huge oil and gas potential of western Turkmenistan and to put the recent bidding round into perspective. The current official estimate of remaining reserves on the blocks just tendered is 2.7 billion bbl of oil equivalent, roughly half of which is oil. The authors believe this to be a very conservative estimate as they shall attempt to demonstrate.

  14. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert D. Hatcher

    2003-05-31

    RDH for conodont alteration index determination to better define regional P-T conditions. Efforts are being made to calibrate and standardize geophysical log correlation, seismic reflection data, and Ordovician lithologic signatures to better resolve subsurface stratigraphy and structure beneath the poorly explored Plateau in Tennessee and southern Kentucky. We held a successful workshop on Ordovician rocks geophysical log correlation August 7, 2003 that was cosponsored by the Appalachian PTTC, the Kentucky and Tennessee geological surveys, the Tennessee Oil and Gas Association, and small independents. Detailed field structural and stratigraphic mapping of a transect across part of the Ordovician clastic wedge in Tennessee was begun in January 2003 to assist in 3-D reconstruction of part of the southern Appalachian basin and better assess the nature of a major potential source rock assemblage. (3) Laying the groundwork through (1) and (2) to understand reservoir architecture, the petroleum systems, ancient fluid migration, and conduct 3-D analysis of the southern Appalachian basin.

  15. Development of the Permian-Triassic sequence in the basin Fringe area, southern Netherlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geluk, M.; Van Doorn, D.; Plomp, A.; Duin, E. )

    1993-09-01

    Geological studies in the fringe area of the southern Permian basin led to new insights in the distribution and development of the Permian-Triassic sequence. During the Permian, the fringe area formed a platform, attached to the London-Brabant Massif, while during the Triassic it is characterized by strongly subsiding half grabens. In the southern Netherlands, Rotliegende sandstones and conglomerates have a much wider distribution than previously recognized. The Rotliegende deposits are capped by claystones and carbonates of the Upper Permian Zechstein. In the offshore, an important feeder system of clastics from the London-Brabant Massif was active during deposition of the Rotliegende and the Zechstein. In course of time, the location of major sandstone deposition shifted westward. Deposition of the Triassic Buntsandstein was controlled by the development of a large feeder system, which transported clastics from the Vosges northward, through the Roer Valley Graben and West netherlands Basin into the Off Holland Low. This system was responsible for the deposition of the economically important sheet sandstones of the Volpriehausen, Detfurth, Hardegsen, and Solling formations. A regional unconformity occurs below the Solling Formation. The sandstones are capped by claystones, evaporites, and sandstones of the Rot Formation. During deposition of the Muschelkalk, the differences in subsidence decreased and shallow marine sediments are interbedded with evaporites. Several unconformities occur within the Keuper. In the previous half grabens in the southern Netherlands, the Keuper is incomplete, which may be indicative for a possible reversal of the tectonic movements during this period.

  16. Appraisal of coal resources from uranium drill-hole logs, southern San Juan basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, S.C.

    1984-04-01

    Geophysical logs from uranium drill holes in the Grants region are a valuable source of information on coal resources. Coal occurs in the southern San Juan basin of New Mexico in the Upper Cretaceous Gallup Sandstone, Crevasse Canyon Formation, and Menefee Formation. Uranium has been mined from the Upper Jurassic Morrison Formation that underlies the coal-bearing Cretaceous formations and is separated from them by approximately 1000 ft (300 m) of section. Permission was obtained from Santa Fe Mining, Inc., Pathfinder Mines Corp., and Ranchers Exploration and Development Corp. to examine their uranium drill logs for information on coal. Over 1400 logs spudded above the base of the Gallup formation were examined, and depth to coal, coal thickness, and coal stratigraphic horizon were determined for coal beds at least 3 ft (1 m) thick. Coal isopachs have been drawn, and depth from the surface to the first coal have been contoured for the Crevasse Canyon and Menefee Formations. Data from an earlier study, which used geophysical logs from petroleum test borings, has been incorporated. The relationship between the coal resources determined from uranium drill holes and known coal deposits and mines in the southern San Juan basin is discussed.

  17. Seismicity and focal mechanisms for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: 1987 through 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmsen, S.C.; Bufe, C.G.

    1991-12-31

    For the calendar year 1987, the southern Great basin seismic network (SGBSN) recorded about 820 earthquakes in the southern Great Basin (SGB). Local magnitudes ranged from 0.2 to 4.2 (December 30, 1987, 22:50:42 UTC at Hot Creek Valley). Five earthquakes epicenters in 1987 within the detection threshold of the seismic network are at Yucca Mountain, the site of a potential national, high-level nuclear waste repository. The maximum magnitude of those five earthquakes is 1.1, and their estimated depths of focus ranged from 3.1 to 7.6 km below sea level. For the calendar year 1988, about 1280 SGB earthquakes were catalogued, with maximum magnitude-4.4 for an Owens Valley, California, earthquake on July 5, 1988. Eight earthquake epicenters in 1988 are at Yucca Mountain, with depths ranging from three to 12 km below sea level, and maximum magnitude 2.1. For the calendar year 1989, about 1190 SGB earthquakes were located and catalogued, with maximum magnitude equal to 3.5 for earthquake about ten miles north of Las Vegas, Nevada, on January 9. No Yucca Mountain earthquakes were recorded in 1989. An earthquake having a well-constrained depth of about 30 km below sea level was observed on August 21, 1989, in eastern Nevada Test Site (NTS).

  18. Reserve estimates in western basins: Unita Basin. Final report, Part III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, sandstone reservoirs of the Mesaverde group and Wasatch formation in the Uinta Basin, Utah. Total in-place resource is estimated at 395.5 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 3.8 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Two plays were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources; in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. About 82.1% of the total evaluated resource is contained within sandstones that have extremely poor reservoir properties with permeabilities considered too low for commerciality using current frac technology.

  19. Coal stratigraphy of deeper part of Black Warrior basin in Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, W.A.; Womack, S.H.

    1983-09-01

    The Warrior coal field of Alabama is stratigraphically in the upper part of the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation and structurally in the eastern part of the Black Warrior foreland basin. The productive coal beds extend southwestward from the mining area downdip into the deeper part of the Black Warrior structural basin. Because the deep part of the basin is beyond the limits of conventional coal exploration, study of the stratigraphy of coal beds must rely on data from petroleum wells. Relative abundance of coal can be stated in terms of numbers of beds, but because of the limitations of the available data, thicknesses of coals presently are not accurately determined. The lower sandstone-rich coal-poor part of the Pottsville has been interpreted as barrier sediments in the mining area. To the southwest in the deeper Black Warrior basin, coal beds are more numerous within the sandstone-dominated sequence. The coal-productive upper Pottsville is informally divided into coal groups each of which includes several coal beds. The Black Creek, Mary Lee, and Utley coal groups are associated with northeast-trending delta-distributary sandstones. The areas of most numerous coals also trend northeastward and are laterally adjacent to relatively thick distributary sandstones, suggesting coal accumulation in backswamp environments. The most numerous coals in the Pratt coal group are in an area that trends northwestward parallel with and southwest of a northwest-trending linear sandstone, suggesting coal accumulation in a back-barrier environment. Equivalents of the Cobb, Gwin, and Brookwood coal groups contain little coal in the deep part of the Black Warrior basin.

  20. Fluvial sedimentology and basin analyses of the Permian Fairchild and Buckley formations, Beardmore Glacier region, and the Weller Coal Measures, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isbell, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Beardmore Glacier region contains a 1-km-thick Permian fluvial sequence that was deposited in an elongate basin along the margin of the East Antarctica craton. Fluvial architecture, sandstone composition and paleocurrents within the basin record a change from an early Permian cratonic to a late Permian foreland basin. The Lower Permian Fairchild Formation consists entirely of overlapping channel-form sandstone bodies deposited by braided streams. Arkosic sandstone was deposited by SE flowing streams. Fairchild strata record slow subsidence within a broad cratonic basin. The Lower to Upper Permian Buckley Formation consists of an arkosic lower member and a volcaniclastic upper member. Paleocurrents which consist of transverse and longitudinal paleocurrents, suggest a cratonward migration of the basin axis through time. The Buckley Formation was deposited within a braided stream setting and is an important unit because it contains interstratified channel-sandstone sheets, shale and coal, along with evidence of channel-belt avulsions. Sandstone sheets predominate at the base of the formation, while flood-plain deposits thicken and increase in abundance upward. The interaction between fluvial processes and subsidence rates produced this alluvial stratigraphy. The Lower Permian Weller Coal Measures in southern Victoria Land were deposited within a narrow basin located cratonward of the foreland basin. Basin geometry and depositional patterns are similar to those of fault-bounded basins. Although basin formation is not constrained, deposition of the Weller was contemporaneous with the development of the foreland basin. This suggests a relationship between subsidence within the two basins.

  1. Exploration for deep gas in the Devonian Chaco Basin of Southern Bolivia: Sequence stratigraphy, predictions, and well results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.E.; Radovich, B.J.; Brett, J.W.

    1995-12-31

    In mid 1991, a team was assembled in Texaco`s Frontier Exploration Department (FED) to define the hydrocarbon potential of the Chaco Basin of Southern Bolivia. The Miraflores No. 1 was drilled in the fall of 1992, for stratigraphic objectives. The well confirmed the predicted stratigraphic trap in the Mid-Devonian, with gas discovered in two highstand and transgressive sands. They are low contrast and low resistivity sands that are found in a deep basin `tight gas` setting. Testing of the gas sands was complicated by drilling fluid interactions at the well bore. Subsequent analysis indicated that the existing porosity and permeability were reduced, such that a realistic test of reservoir capabilities was prevented.

  2. Subsurface basin analysis of fault-controlled turbidite system in Bradano trough, southern Adriatic foredeep, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casnedi, R.

    1988-11-01

    Subsurface data (seismic lines, wireline logs, cores, and drill cuttings) from intensive hydrocarbon exploration in the Pliocene-Pleistocene Bradano Trough were used in performing a three-dimensional basin analysis and in reconstructing the time-space evolution of the basin. A middle Pliocene sedimentary system characterizes the hydrocarbon-bearing sands of the major gas field of the Bradano Trough, the Candela field. This system includes two phases of deposition in a migrating basin. 9 figures.

  3. Preliminary seismicity and focal mechanisms for the southern Great Basin of Nevada and California: January 1992 through September 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmsen, S.C.

    1994-06-01

    The telemetered southern Great Basin seismic network (SGBSN) is operated for the Department of Energy`s Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The US Geological Survey, Branch of Earthquake and Landslide Hazards, maintained this network until September 30, 1992, at which time all operational and analysis responsibilities were transferred to the University of Nevada at Reno Seismological Laboratory (UNRSL). This report contains preliminary earthquake and chemical explosion hypocenter listings and preliminary earthquake focal mechanism solutions for USGS/SGBSN data for the period January 1, 1992 through September 30, 1992, 15:00 UTC.

  4. 3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagoner, J

    2009-02-23

    The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

  5. 3D Geologic Modeling of the Southern San Joaquin Basin for the Westcarb Kimberlina Demonstration Project- A Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagoner, J

    2009-04-24

    The objective of the Westcarb Kimberlina pilot project is to safely inject 250,000 t CO{sub 2}/yr for four years into the deep subsurface at the Clean Energy Systems (CES) Kimberlina power plant in southern San Joaquin Valley, California. In support of this effort, we have constructed a regional 3D geologic model of the southern San Joaquin basin. The model is centered on the Kimberlina power plant and spans the UTM range E 260000-343829 m and N 3887700-4000309 m; the depth of the model ranges from the topographic surface to >9000 m below sea level. The mapped geologic units are Quaternary basin fill, Tertiary marine and continental deposits, and pre-Tertiary basement rocks. Detailed geologic data, including surface maps, borehole data, and geophysical surveys, were used to define the geologic framework. Fifteen time-stratigraphic formations were mapped, as well as >140 faults. The free surface is based on a 10 m lateral resolution DEM. We use Earthvision (Dynamic Graphics, Inc.) to integrate the geologic and geophysical information into a 3D model of x,y,z,p nodes, where p is a unique integer index value representing the geologic unit. This grid represents a realistic model of the subsurface geology and provides input into subsequent flow simulations.

  6. Diagenesis and reservoir potential of Permian-Triassic fluvial/lacustrine sandstones in the southern Junggar basin, northwestern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Zhaohui; Longstaffe, F.J.; Parnell, J.

    1997-11-01

    The Junggar basin is one of the largest oil-producing areas in China, and contains Upper Permian lacustrine oil shales with some of the greatest hydrocarbon potential in the world. In this study, we present the diagenetic characteristics of Permian-Triassic sandstones from the southern Junggar basin and evaluate their reservoir potential. The uppermost Permian and Lower Triassic Cangfanggou Group in the southern Junggar basin is characterized by alternating fluvial and lacustrine deposits, whereas the Middle-upper Triassic Xiaoquangou Group was deposited predominantly in a lacustrine environment; fluvial and deltaic sedimentation was subordinate. The sandstones of the Cangfanggou and Xiaoquangou groups are volcanic litharenites. Their detrital modes and textures of volcanic fragments suggest a primarily andesitic/basaltic volcanic-arc provenance. Early diagenesis of the sandstones is characterized by nonferroan calcite cementation, grain-coating, pore-lining clay minerals, and the initial dissolution of detrital grains. Authigenic quartz; pore-filling phyllosilicates; pore-filling, grain-replacive zeolites; albitized detrital plagioclase; authigenic K-feldspar; illite; and late calcite dominate burial diagenesis. The formation of iron oxides and dissolution of calcite cement resulted from tectonic uplift during the Tertiary. Albitization and zeolite formation during burial are among the most pronounced diagenetic processes that affected these sandstones. Pore-filling clay minerals, calcite, and zeolites have substantially reduced sandstone porosity. However, appreciable primary porosity has been preserved by the formation of early clay coats and pore linings, which retarded further cementation. Secondary porosity is present to varying degrees in the sandstones and is the result of dissolution of unstable framework grains.

  7. Geology of uranium deposits in the southern part of the Rocky Mountain province of Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malan, R.C.

    1983-07-01

    This report summarizes the geology of uranium deposits in the southern part of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado, an area of about 20,000 square miles. In January 1966, combined ore reserves and ore production at 28 uranium deposits were about 685,000 tons of ore averaging 0.24 percent U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (3.32 million pounds U/sub 3/O/sub 8/). About half of these deposits each contain <1,000 tons of ore. The two largest deposits, the Pitch in the Marshall Pass locality southwest of Salida and the T-1 in the Cochetopa locality southeast of Gunnison, account for about 90 percent of all production and available reserves. The probability in excellent for major expansion of reserves in Marshall Pass and is favorable at a few other vein localities. There are six types of uranium deposits, and there were at least four ages of emplacement of these deposits in the southern part of the Colorado Rockies. There are eight types of host rocks of eight different ages. Veins and stratiform deposits each account for about 40 percent of the total number of deposits, but the veins of early and middle Tertiary age account for nearly all of the total reserves plus production. The remaining 20 percent of the deposits include uraniferous pegmatites, irregular disseminations in porphyry, and other less important types. The wall rocks at the large Tertiary vein deposits in the southern part of the Rocky Mountains of Colorado are Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rocks, whereas Precambrian metamorphic wall rocks predominate at the large veins in the Front Range of the northern Colorado Rockies. Metallogenetic considerations and tectonic influences affecting the distribution of uranium in Colorado and in adjacent portions of the western United States are analyzed.

  8. A preliminary investigation of the structure of southern Yucca Flat, Massachusetts Mountain, and CP basin, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, based on geophysical modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geoffrey A. Phelps; Leigh Justet; Barry C. Moring, and Carter W. Roberts

    2006-03-17

    New gravity and magnetic data collected in the vicinity of Massachusetts Mountain and CP basin (Nevada Test Site, NV) provides a more complex view of the structural relationships present in the vicinity of CP basin than previous geologic models, helps define the position and extent of structures in southern Yucca Flat and CP basin, and better constrains the configuration of the basement structure separating CP basin and Frenchman Flat. The density and gravity modeling indicates that CP basin is a shallow, oval-shaped basin which trends north-northeast and contains ~800 m of basin-filling rocks and sediment at its deepest point in the northeast. CP basin is separated from the deeper Frenchman Flat basin by a subsurface ridge that may represent a Tertiary erosion surface at the top of the Paleozoic strata. The magnetic modeling indicates that the Cane Spring fault appears to merge with faults in northwest Massachusetts Mountain, rather than cut through to Yucca Flat basin and that the basin is downed-dropped relative to Massachusetts Mountain. The magnetic modeling indicates volcanic units within Yucca Flat basin are down-dropped on the west and supports the interpretations of Phelps and KcKee (1999). The magnetic data indicate that the only faults that appear to be through-going from Yucca Flat into either Frenchman Flat or CP basin are the faults that bound the CP hogback. In general, the north-trending faults present along the length of Yucca Flat bend, merge, and disappear before reaching CP hogback and Massachusetts Mountain or French Peak.

  9. Palomagnetic orientation of fractures and bedding in Rotliegende and Zechstein cores from the southern Permian basin, North Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Alstine, D.R.; Butterworth, J.E. )

    1993-09-01

    Fractures and bedding in Rotliegende sandstone and Zechstein dolomite cores of the southern Permian Basin can be accurately oriented using our standard paleomagnetic core-orientation technique. In recent project involving vertical, deviated, and horizontal wells, we have paleomagnetically oriented 1874 ft of Rotliegende and Zechstein cores from 113 intervals ranging in length from 8 in. to 119 ft. Accuracy of our paleomagnetic core-orientations can be demonstrated by (1) consistency in fracture patterns derived from vertical and horizontal cores near the same reservoir location, (2) consistency in Rotliegende paleowind directions derived from paleomagnetically oriented cores with paleowind directions derived from mechanically oriented cores from the southern Permian Basin, and (3) agreement between structural dip determined from paleomagnetically oriented interdune bedding planes with structural dip determined from paleomagnetically oriented strike-0parallel, strike-perpendicular, and bedding-plane fractures. Paleomagnetic orientation of Rotliegende cores can be especially cost effect. Excellent core recovery and use of long core barrels in the Rotliegende means that [open quotes]continuous intervals[close quotes] (defined as the maximum lengths of core that can be reliably reconstructed by fitting adjacent core pieces) of more than 100 ft long can be achieved by following our recommended core-handling procedures. We statistically average the same number of paleomagnetic plug samples regardless of the length of a [open quotes]continuous interval.[close quotes] The paleomagnetic signals in Rotliegende sandstone and Zechstein dolomite are sufficiently stable that fractures and bedding can be paleomagnetically oriented even in slabbed cores drilled decades ago.

  10. Geometry and evolution of the frontal part of the Magallanes foreland thrust and fold belt (Vicuna Area), Tierra del Fuego, southern Chile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez-Marron, J.; McClay, K.R. ); Harambour, S.; Rojas, L.; Skarmeta, J. )

    1993-11-01

    The Magallanes foreland thrust and fold belt is a thin-skinned foreland thrust and fold belt of Paleocene to Oligocene age that deforms Upper Jurassic through Tertiary volcanic, volcaniclastic, and siliciclastic strata of the Magallanes basin, southern Andean Cordillera, Chile. This paper is a detailed description and analysis of the geology and structural evolution of the thrust front (Vicuna area of southern Tierra del Fuego). Reflection seismic and well data, together with 1:50,000 scale geological mapping, have been used in the analysis. In the southern part of the Vicuna area, two different thrust systems have been found: an upper imbricate fan that deforms Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous strata, and a younger, lower duplex composed of Cretaceous and probably Upper Jurassic rocks. The imbricate fan is characterized by fault-propagation folding in which listric thrust faults merge downward into a sole thrust that probably is located within the Upper Jurassic stratigraphy. The sole thrust of the upper imbricates forms the roof thrust of the underlying duplex. In the northern part of the Vicuna area, the syntectonic sedimentary wedge of the foredeep consists of Late Cretaceous through Tertiary siliciclastics that have been deformed and uplifted by passive back thrusting at the triangle zone. The structural style in the foreland region shows three main subhorizontal detachment levels located within the sedimentary wedge as a result of the progressive transfer of slip from the thrust belt to the foreland. Minor blind thrusts produce stacked [open quotes]pop up[close quotes] and triangle structures that result in complex geometries in the cores of anticlines. A forward-breaking sequence of thrusting is interpreted. During deformation, the active foredeep wedge migrated at least 10 km northward. Balanced geological cross sections indicate approximately 60% (-30 km) shortening for this part of the Magallanes thrust belt.

  11. Fracture characterization and diagenesis in the Clipper field, Sole Pit basin, southern north sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franssen, R.C.M.W.; Brint, J.F. ); Sleeswijk Visser, T.J. ); Beecham, A. )

    1993-09-01

    The Clipper field in the Sole Pit basin produces from tight Leman sandstones of the Rotliegende Group (Lower Permian). The reservoir consists of aeolian sediments. Gas production comes from open natural fractures and dune slipface sands with highly variable rates. The effects of fractures and diagenesis on reservoir quality were investigated. Three fracture networks have been observed in two highly deviated cored wells. Fault-related fractures occur close to, and parallel with, seismically mapped faults. Fold-related fractures occur as two sets of conjugate fractures, with the local maximum compressive stresses ([sigma][sub 1]) trending northeast-southwest and northwest-southeast, respectively. The dominant fracture types are cataclastic and dilational shear fractures. The cataclastic shear fractures were reopened and both fracture types are partially filled by silica, carbonate, and anhydrite cements. The main cement types within the sandstone matrix include dolomite, silica, anhydrite, illite, and ferroan carbonates. Early carbonate cements precipitated during initial burial from a mixture of Rotliegende groundwater and marine pore-fluids from the higher temperatures from Zechstein-derived pore fluids. Pore-filling and fracture-related ferroan carbonate and silica cement precipitated between temperatures of 100-150[degrees]C from isotopically evolved pore fluid. Integration of these data with the burial history and regional geological data reveal that the fault-related fractures formed during the formation of the Sole Pit rift basin in the Middle to Late Jurassic. The fold-related fractures formed during the Late Cretaceous inversion. The open fractures that contribute to production are associated with the inversion-related deformation. Modeling of these fracture networks, calibrated against available well data, can be used to define areas with high shear fracture density and assist development of fields in the Sole Pit basin.

  12. Geological and reservoir characterization of shallow-shelf carbonate fields, Southern Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Eby, D.E.

    1996-12-31

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to three wells with primary per field production ranging from 700 MBO to 2 MMBO at a 15-20% recovery rate. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah have been evaluated for CO{sub 2}-flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Conventional cores from the five fields show that three compositional reservoir types are present: (1) phylloid algal, (2) bioclastic calcarenite, and (3) bryozoan-dominated. Phylloid algal mounds are abundant in four of the five fields, and exhibit the best overall porosity and permeability. This mound type developed where shallow water depths and low energy allowed establishment of calcareous algal colonies possibly on paleohighs. The principal reservoir rock is algal bafflestone composed mostly of the phylloid Ivanovia and occasionally dolomitized. The Heron North field is a bioclastic calcarenite reservoir. It represents high-energy conditions resulting in carbonate beaches developed over foreshore carbonate rubble. The principal reservoir rocks are grainstones and rudstones having grain-selective dissolution and complete dolomitization. Bryozoan-dominated mounds present in Runway field developed in quiet, below wave-base settings that appear to be localized along Mississippian fault blocks trends. The principal reservoir rocks are bindstone and framestone with no dolomitization. The resulting model suggests that CO{sub 2} miscible flooding of these and other small carbonate reservoirs in the Paradox basin could significantly increase ultimate recovery of oil.

  13. Geological and reservoir characterization of shallow-shelf carbonate fields, Southern Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr. ); Eby, D.E. )

    1996-01-01

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to three wells with primary per field production ranging from 700 MBO to 2 MMBO at a 15-20% recovery rate. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah have been evaluated for CO[sub 2]-flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Conventional cores from the five fields show that three compositional reservoir types are present: (1) phylloid algal, (2) bioclastic calcarenite, and (3) bryozoan-dominated. Phylloid algal mounds are abundant in four of the five fields, and exhibit the best overall porosity and permeability. This mound type developed where shallow water depths and low energy allowed establishment of calcareous algal colonies possibly on paleohighs. The principal reservoir rock is algal bafflestone composed mostly of the phylloid Ivanovia and occasionally dolomitized. The Heron North field is a bioclastic calcarenite reservoir. It represents high-energy conditions resulting in carbonate beaches developed over foreshore carbonate rubble. The principal reservoir rocks are grainstones and rudstones having grain-selective dissolution and complete dolomitization. Bryozoan-dominated mounds present in Runway field developed in quiet, below wave-base settings that appear to be localized along Mississippian fault blocks trends. The principal reservoir rocks are bindstone and framestone with no dolomitization. The resulting model suggests that CO[sub 2] miscible flooding of these and other small carbonate reservoirs in the Paradox basin could significantly increase ultimate recovery of oil.

  14. Hunter-gatherer adaptations and environmental change in the southern Great Basin: The evidence from Pahute and Rainier mesas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pippin, L.C.

    1998-06-01

    This paper reviews the evidence for fluctuations in past environments in the southern Great Basin and examines how these changes may have affected the strategies followed by past hunter and gatherers in their utilization of the resources available on a highland in this region. The evidence used to reconstruct past environments for the region include botanical remains from packrat middens, pollen spectra from lake and spring deposits, faunal remains recovered from archaeological and geologic contexts, tree-ring indices from trees located in sensitive (tree-line) environments, and eolian, alluvial and fluvial sediments deposited in a variety of contexts. Interpretations of past hunter and gatherer adaptive strategies are based on a sample of 1,311 archaeological sites recorded during preconstruction surveys on Pahute and Rainier mesas in advance of the US Department of Energy`s nuclear weapons testing program. Projectile point chronologies and available tree-ring, radiocarbon, thermoluminescence and obsidian hydration dates were used to assign these archaeological sites to specific periods of use.

  15. Geology of offshore southern Namibia: Evidence from tectonic and basin-fill modeling based on modern seismic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houghton, M.L.; Peacock, D.N. )

    1993-09-01

    License 2815 is located offshore southern Namibia between Cape Dernberg and the South African border, approximately 50 km east of the 1974 Kudu gas discovery. Interactive workstation modeling of modern two-dimensional seismic data from the License area provides an improved understanding of the geology and tectonic history of this unexplored region. Although presently a broad submarine shelf influenced by late Cretaceous-Tertiary deltaic sedimentation from the Orange River, Interpretation based on modern seismic coverage has resulted in the recognition of a Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous rift complex associated with the initial opening of the Atlantic Ocean. Geologic modeling suggests that a seismically-identified elongate rift localized along a major westward-dipping bounding fault may contain significant thicknesses of Neocomian( ) clastic sediments. Barremian-Aptian marine flooding of this area followed the rifting episode. Mixed marine and deltaic sedimentation has dominated the region since the middle Aptian. Palinspastic restorations of depth-converted seismic lines have helped to unravel the episodic tectonic history of rifting in this area. Input of geologic parameters, including relative sea level changes and sedimentation rates, has yielded computer-derived basin-fill models, which have in turn been integrated with the local tectonic model to make lithology predictions.

  16. Pyrolysis and hydrocarbon source bed potential of the Upper Devonian Woodford Shale, Hovey Channel, southern Permian basin, west Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, M.; Bloom, M.A. )

    1991-03-01

    The Upper Devonian Woodford Shale in the Hovey Channel area, southern Permian basin, is 50 m thick and composed largely of brown to black, pyritic, spore-bearing, organic-rich, fissile shale an chert. Total organic carbon, distillable hydrocarbons, genetic potential, organic carbon index, hydrogen index, temperature of maximum hydrocarbon generation, and kerogen transformation index of the Woodford Shale suggest a matured to overmatured, gas-generating source bed. The total organic carbon content of the formation ranged from a low of 0.77% in the cherty samples to a high of 4.59% in a shaley sample, averaging 2.18%. Distillable hydrocarbon content of the samples is fairly high (averaging 1.72 mg HC/gm{degree} rock), varying from 0.90 mg HC/gm{degree} rock to 3.22 mg HC/gm{degree} rock. Genetic potential evaluated in terms of both residual and total generative potential showed above average potential, averaging 3.25 mg HC/gm{degree} rock for the residual and 4.90 mg HC/gm{degree} rock for the total, respectively. Live organic carbon index values ranged from 11-28%, characterizing the formation as a moderate to good source bed. Hydrogen index values ranged from 73 mg HC/gm{degree} C org to 155 mg HC/gm{degree} C org, suggesting overmaturity and gas-generation potential of the source bed. Temperature of maximum hydrocarbon generation values and kerogen transformation ratio values (averaging 0.34) also indicate overmatured nature of the Woodford Shale.

  17. Regional diagenetic variations in Middle Pennsylvanian foreland basin sandstones of the southern Appalachians: Comparison to passive margin Cenozoic sandstones of the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, K.L. . Dept. of Geological Science)

    1992-01-01

    Water/rock interactions recorded by authigenic phases in lithic-rich sandstones of the southern Appalachian basin, in the region of the Pine Mountain Overthrust (PMO), began with early post-depositional burial, extended through deeper burial and temperatures > 100 C during the Alleghenian orogeny, and continued through uplift and exposure at the modern weathering surface. Early-formed carbonate in the form of highly localized calcite concretions preserves IGVs greater than 30% and has widely ranging trace element concentrations. Later-formed calcite is characterized by relative low trace element concentrations in sandstones of low IGV. Precipitation of kaolinite cement and grain replacements partially overlapped formation of early carbonate and quartz cement. Dissolution and albitization of detrital feldspars are the primary types of grain alteration observed. Complete loss of the detrital feldspar assemblage is observed only around the eastern end of the PMO where a portion of the feldspar loss is recorded as quartz-replaced grains. Compaction due to ductile behavior of phyllosilicate-rich rock fragments and pressure solution of detrital quartz has reduced IGV to an average of around 11% below the PMO and 6% above the fault. In general, these foreland basin sandstones manifest authigenic phases and sequences of diagenetic events similar to those observed in the passive margin Gulf of Mexico sedimentary basin. The most striking diagenetic differences between the two basins are seen in terms of the comparative amounts of compaction (greater in the foreland basin) and grain alteration (less in the foreland basin) which most likely relate to primary differences in the texture and mineralogy of the sediments.

  18. Reservoir potential of dolomites in the Western part of the Maracaibo basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marquez, X.M.; Romulo, C.

    1996-08-01

    Recent exploration activities in the Western part of the Maracaibo basin, has increased interest in the hydrocarbon potential of dolomitized intervals within usually non-porous Cretaceous carbonate sequence. Sedimentological and geochemical data from this carbonate sequence reveals two major dolomitized intervals. The upper dolomitized zone occurs in the Middle Cretaceous Lisure Formation. The lower (and thicker) interval is to be found in the Lower Cretaceous Apon Formation, which is the subject of this study. In the Apon Formation the rocks am partially (< 75% dolomite) to completely dolomitized. In partially dolomitized rocks, selective matrix replacement is represented by planar, unimodal, euhedral, medium crystalline dolomite rhombs. Porosity is low (<2%) and consists of small irregular vugs. Complete dolomitization (dolomites as such) is characterized by planar, unimodal euhedral to subhedral, medium crystalline dolomite mosaics. Dolomitization occurs during burial as it is related to pressure solution and late diagenetic processes. Polihedral intercrystalline pores, up to 500 micrometers, irregular vugs and minor moldic pores contribute towards an effective porosity value of up to 20%. Permeabilities range from 7 to 2000 md. Hydrocarbon saturation is about 75%. Those dolomites range in thickness from 10 to 100 ft and extend for more than 50 km. In some areas (e.g. La Villa Field) the dolomitized interval is the main contributor to production (1500-2200 bopd) of light gravity oil. This study shows that delineation of the variability and distribution of dolomites will reduce the exploratory risk for this Cretaceous carbonate sequence. In addition, the recovery of oil from dolomites is improved by understanding the relationships between dolomite types and pore system (e.g. relationship to fractures).

  19. The flux and recovery of bioactive substances in the surface sediments of deep basins off southern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jahnke, R.A.

    1990-06-11

    Sediment microbial community biomass and activity in Santa Monica Basin, a nearshore basin in the California Continental Borderland, were examined in October 1985, 1986 and 1987, May 1986, April 1987 and January 1990. Millimeter-scale ATP profiles and incubation of intact cores with {sup 3}H-adenine indicated a high-biomass interface microbial population in the low-oxygen central basin, which was absent in samples from the basin slope sediments. A majority of microbial activity and organic matter mineralization occurred in the top cm of sediment. Comparison of measured ATP and total organic carbon profiles suggest that the C:ATP ratio (wt:wt) ranges between 47:1 and 77:1 in central basin interfacial populations, substantially lower than reported for other aquatic environments. Carbon production estimated from DNA synthesis measurements via {sup 3}H-adenine incorporation was compared with TCO{sub 2} fluxes measured by in situ benthic chamber experiments. Within the uncertainty of the C:ATP ratio, an overall microbial carbon assimilation efficiency of 75--90% was indicated. The low C:ATP ratios and high carbon assimilation efficiencies significantly affect estimates of microbial growth and respiration and are substantially different than those often assumed in the literature. These results suggest that without independent knowledge of these ratios, the uncertainty in tracer-derived microbial growth and respiration rates may be larger than previously reported. 66 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Permian Bone Spring formation: Sandstone play in the Delaware basin. Part I - slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montgomery, S.L.

    1997-08-01

    New exploration in the Permian (Leonardian) Bone Spring formation has indicated regional potential in several sandstone sections across portions of the northern Delaware basin. Significant production has been established in the first, second, and third Bone Spring sandstones, as well as in a new reservoir interval, the Avalon sandstone, above the first Bone Spring sandstone. These sandstones were deposited as submarine-fan systems within the northern Delaware basin during periods of lowered sea level. The Bone Spring as a whole consists of alternating carbonate and siliciclastic intervals representing the downdip equivalents to thick Abo-Yeso/Wichita-Clear Fork carbonate buildups along the Leonardian shelf margin. Hydrocarbon exploration in the Bone Spring has traditionally focused on debris-flow carbonate deposits restricted to the paleoslope. Submarine-fan systems, in contrast, extend a considerable distance basinward of these deposits and have been recently proven productive as much as 40-48 km south of the carbonate trend.

  1. The geologic structure of part of the southern Franklin Mountains, El Paso County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W.R.; Julian, F.E. . Dept. of Geosciences)

    1993-02-01

    The Franklin Mountains are a west tilted fault block mountain range which extends northwards from the city of El Paso, Texas. Geologic mapping in the southern portion of the Franklin Mountains has revealed many previously unrecognized structural complexities. Three large high-angle faults define the boundaries of map. Twenty lithologic units are present in the field area, including the southernmost Precambrian meta-sedimentary rocks in the Franklin Mountains (Lanoria Quartzite and Thunderbird group conglomerates). The area is dominated by Precambrian igneous rocks and lower Paleozoic carbonates, but Cenozoic ( ) intrusions are also recognized. Thin sections and rock slabs were used to describe and identify many of the lithologic units. The Franklin Mountains are often referred to as a simple fault block mountain range related to the Rio Grande Rift. Three critical regions within the study area show that these mountains contain structural complexities. In critical area one, Precambrian granites and rhyolites are structurally juxtaposed, and several faults bisecting the area affect the Precambrian/Paleozoic fault contact. Critical area two contains multiple NNW-trending faults, three sills and a possible landslide. This area also shows depositional features related to an island of Precambrian rock exposed during deposition of the lower Paleozoic rocks. Critical area three contains numerous small faults which generally trend NNE. They appear to be splays off of one of the major faults bounding the area. Cenozoic kaolinite sills and mafic intrusion have filled many of the fault zones.

  2. Cutoff walls and cap for lime and M-1 settling basins, Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Colorado. Part 1: Final design analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-10-01

    This document consists of 2 parts, final design analysis and specifications. The purpose of the project was to develop a design for the Interim Response Actions (IRA) at the Lime and M-l Settling Basins at Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA), Commerce City, Colorado. The purpose of the IRA at the Lime and M-l Settling Basins is to mitigate the threat of release from the Basins on an interim basis, pending determination of the final remedy in the Onpost Record of Decision (ROD). The IRA for the M-l Basins also includes treatment of the waste materials in the basins with in-situ vitrification (ISV), which is being designed by contract with Woodward-Clyde Consultants.

  3. Lithostratigraphy and environmental considerations of Cenomanian-Early Turonian shelf carbonates (Rumaila and Mishrif Formations) of Mesopotamian basin, middle and southern Iraq

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwani, G.H.M.; Aqrawi, A.A.M.

    1987-05-01

    Rumaila and Mishrif Formations form the major part of the Cenomanian early Turonian deposits of middle and southern Iraq. The Rumaila Formation consists of lithographic chalky limestone at the lower part and marly limestone and marl at the upper part. The formation represents deep off-shelf deposits, whereas the overlying Mishrif Formation is composed of various types of shallow-shelf carbonates such as rudist-bearing patchy reefs and lagoonal and off-shelf limestones. An environmental model is suggested to delineate the stratigraphic relationships between the above mentioned two formations and to correlate them with their equivalents in central Iraq (i.e., Mahilban, Fahad, and Maotsi Formations). The gradational contact between the two formations and the intertonguing with their equivalents are considered to be the most important stratigraphic phenomena.

  4. Apatite fission track evidence for post-Early Cretaceous erosional unroofing of Middle Pennsylvanian sandstones from the southern Appalachian Basin in Kentucky and Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boettcher, S.S.; Milliken, K.L. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Apatite fission track ages and mean etchable track lengths for 7 samples of Middle Pennsylvanian (Breathitt Formation) depositional age from the southern Appalachian Basin of KY and VA suggest that 3--4 km of erosional unroofing has occurred since the Early Cretaceous. The samples were collected over a 1,600 km[sup 2] area at the northern end of the Pine Mountain Overthrust southeast of Pikeville, KY. This new data set overlaps 8 published apatite fission track ages and 3 mean etchable lengths from the Cumberland Plateau and Valley and Ridge areas of WV. Because all of the apatite fission track ages are significantly younger than the depositional age, maximum burial temperatures in the area exceeded 125 C, such that fission tracks that formed in the detrital apatite prior to deposition have been totally annealed. Furthermore, mean etchable track lengths show considerable length reduction from initial values revealing that the samples resided in the zone of partial annealing on the order of 100 Ma following attainment of maximum temperatures. The burial history for these samples began with deposition and rapid burial of synorogenic sediments in front of the westward advancing Alleghenian deformation front. The fission track data are compatible with the hypothesis that maximum temperatures were attained during the Late Paleozoic as tectonically driven synorogenic fluids penetrated the foreland basin deposits. Slow erosional unroofing (< 15 m/Ma for a thermal gradient of 30 C/km) has occurred since the onset of Triassic-Jurassic rifting along the atlantic continental margin and continued into the Cenozoic.

  5. Parana basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalan, P.V.; Wolff, S.; Conceicao, J.C.J.; Vieira, I.S.; Astolfi, M.A.; Appi, V.T.; Zanotto, O.; Neto, E.V.S.; Cerqueira, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    The Parana basin is a large intracratonic basin in South America, developed entirely on continental crust and filled with sedimentary and volcanic rocks ranging in age from Silurian to Cretaceous. It occupies the southern portion of Brazil (1,100,000 km/sup 2/ or 425,000 mi/sup 2/) and the eastern half of Paraguay (100,000 km/sup 2/ or 39,000 mi/sup 2/); its extension into Argentina and Uruguay is known as the Chaco-Parana basin. Five major depositional sequences (Silurian, Devonian, Permo-Carboniferous, Triassic, Juro-Cretaceous) constitute the stratigraphic framework of the basin. The first four are predominantly siliciclastic in nature, and the fifth contains the most voluminous basaltic lava flows of the planet. Maximum thicknesses are in the order of 6000 m (19,646 ft). The sequences are separated by basin wide unconformities related in the Paleozoic to Andean orogenic events and in the Mesozoic to the continental breakup and sea floor spreading between South America and Africa. The structural framework of the Parana basin consists of a remarkable pattern of criss-crossing linear features (faults, fault zones, arches) clustered into three major groups (N45/sup 0/-65/sup 0/W, N50/sup 0/-70/sup 0/E, E-W). The northwest- and northeast-trending faults are long-lived tectonic elements inherited from the Precambrian basement whose recurrent activity throughout the Phanerozoic strongly influenced sedimentation, facies distribution, and development of structures in the basin. Thermomechanical analyses indicate three main phases of subsidence (Silurian-Devonian, late Carboniferous-Permian, Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous) and low geothermal gradients until the beginning of the Late Jurassic Permian oil-prone source rocks attained maturation due to extra heat originated from Juro-Cretaceous igneous intrusions. The third phase of subsidence also coincided with strong tectonic reactivation and creation of a third structural trend (east-west).

  6. Lithospheric flexure and composite tectonic loads in the foreland of the Marathon orogenic belt: Permian Basin, west Texas and southern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kenn Ming; Dorobek, S. . Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    Lithospheric flexure caused by loading of orogenic belts is regarded as the main process that produces subsidence in foreland basins. However in some foreland areas, subsidence may be affected by synorogenic foreland uplifts that act as additional loads. The Permian Basin is located in the foreland area of the late Paleozoic Marathon orogenic belt (Mob). The Permian Basin consists of several sub-basins that are separated by several structurally complex uplifts. Uplift of the Central Basin Platform (CBP) and subsidence in adjacent basins were coeval with final stages of deformation in the Marathon orogen. The CBP is oriented at high angles to the Marathon orogen and consists of several blocks arranged in an en echelon pattern. Data suggest that uplift of the CBP was affected by clockwise rotation of crustal blocks between NNW-SSE trending boundary faults. Although both the Delaware Basin (DB) and Val Verde Basin (VVB) are adjacent to the Mob, the synorogenic geometries of these basins are different. The VVB has a typical flexural profile that apparently is due to loading of the Marathon orogen. However, the flexural profile becomes narrower and deeper toward the western end of the VVB where the basin is bordered by the southernmost block of the CBP. In contrast, synorogenic DB profiles have composite wavelengths which show maximum deflection next to the Mob and toward the uplifted blocks of the CBP. This suggests that synorogenic subsidence of the DB was affected by loading of the CBP. In addition, the loading geometry across the uplifted CBP is asymmetric, with greater uplift and basement shortening on the western side of the CBP and less uplift and basement shortening on the eastern side. This may explain greater synorogenic subsidence in the DB than the Midland Basin.

  7. A modern look at the petroleum geology of the Maracaibo basin, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, K.W.; Croft, G.D.

    1995-06-05

    The Maracaibo basin of western Venezuela is one of the world`s most important oil producing basins, with a cumulative production of more than 35 billion bbl. The reasons for this great wealth of hydrocarbons are a combination of source beds of excellent quality, thick reservoirs with high porosity and permeability, and a series of sealing shales, faults, and unconformities, which provide large and numerous traps. Recent discoveries combined with Venezuela`s opening to international investment suggest that the story of this basin is far from over. Surprisingly little exploration has taken place in large parts of the basin, especially southwest of Lake Maracaibo and in the southern part of the lake. This paper describes the history of the basin, stratigraphy, structure, oil fields, and its future prospects.

  8. Geologic and hydrologic characterization and evaluation of the Basin and Range Province relative to the disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Part I. Introduction and guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedinger, M.S.; Sargent, K.A.; Reed, J.E.

    1984-12-31

    The US Geological Survey`s program for geologic and hydrologic evaluation of physiographic provinces to identify areas potentially suitable for locating repository sites for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes was announced to the Governors of the eight states in the Basin and Range Province on May 5, 1981. Representatives of Arizona, California, Idaho, New Mexico, Nevada, Oregon, Texas, and Utah, were invited to cooperate with the federal government in the evaluation process. Each governor was requested to nominate an earth scientist to represent the state in a province working group composed of state and US Geological Survey representatives. This report, Part I of a three-part report, provides the background, introduction and scope of the study. This part also includes a discussion of geologic and hydrologic guidelines that will be used in the evaluation process and illustrates geohydrologic environments and the effect of individual factors in providing multiple natural barriers to radionuclide migration. 27 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Structure and geologic history of late Cenozoic Eel River basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, S.H. Jr.

    1988-03-01

    The Eel River basin formed as a late Cenozoic forearc basin floored by late Mesozoic and early Cenozoic allochthonous terranes (central and coastal belts of the Franciscan complex). Regionally, basement rocks are unconformably overlain on land by a sedimentary sequence as much as about 4200 m thick that comprises the Bear River Formation (early and middle Miocene) and the Wildcat Group (late Miocene to middle Pleistocene) and offshore by broadly coeval upper Tertiary and Quaternary deposits as much as 3300 m thick. Offshore, the southern part of the basin is typified by the seaward extensions of youthful northeast-dipping thrust and reverse faults and northwest-trending anticlines. The latest period of deformation in this part of the basin began during the middle Pleistocene and probably reflects north-northwestward migration of the Mendocino triple junction and encroachment of the Pacific plate. Farther north, the western basin margin and adjacent upper continental slope are separated from the axial part of the offshore basin by a narrow zone of north-northwest-trending, right-stepping en echelon folds. These folds indicate that northeast-southwest compression characteristic of the southern part of the basin is accompanied toward the north by right-lateral shear between the accretionary complex to the west and the basin to the east. The northeastern margin of the offshore basin is cut by north to north-northwest-trending high-angle reverse faults that vertically offset basement rocks as much as 1300 m, west side down. These faults, which may merge northward, coincide with older terrane boundaries and locally show evidence of late Cenozoic reactivation with possible right-lateral slip.

  10. Fault-related CO2 degassing, geothermics, and fluid flow in southern California basins---Physiochemical evidence and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boles, James R.; Garven, Grant

    2015-08-04

    Our studies have had an important impact on societal issues. Experimental and field observations show that CO2 degassing, such as might occur from stored CO2 reservoir gas, can result in significant stable isotopic disequilibrium. In the offshore South Ellwood field of the Santa Barbara channel, we show how oil production has reduced natural seep rates in the area, thereby reducing greenhouse gases. Permeability is calculated to be ~20-30 millidarcys for km-scale fault-focused fluid flow, using changes in natural gas seepage rates from well production, and poroelastic changes in formation pore-water pressure. In the Los Angeles (LA) basin, our characterization of formation water chemistry, including stable isotopic studies, allows the distinction between deep and shallow formations waters. Our multiphase computational-based modeling of petroleum migration demonstrates the important role of major faults on geological-scale fluid migration in the LA basin, and show how petroleum was dammed up against the Newport-Inglewood fault zone in a “geologically fast” interval of time (less than 0.5 million years). Furthermore, these fluid studies also will allow evaluation of potential cross-formational mixing of formation fluids. Lastly, our new study of helium isotopes in the LA basin shows a significant leakage of mantle helium along the Newport Inglewood fault zone (NIFZ), at flow rates up to 2 cm/yr. Crustal-scale fault permeability (~60 microdarcys) and advective versus conductive heat transport rates have been estimated using the observed helium isotopic data. The NIFZ is an important deep-seated fault that may crosscut a proposed basin decollement fault in this heavily populated area, and appears to allow seepage of helium from the mantle sources about 30 km beneath Los Angeles. The helium study has been widely cited in recent weeks by the news media, both in radio and on numerous web sites.

  11. Geothermal regime and thermal history of the Llanos Basin, Columbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachu, S.; Underschultz, J.R.; Ramon, J.C.; Villegas, M.E.

    1995-01-01

    The Llanos basin is a siliciclastic foreland sub-Andean sedimentary basin located in Columbia between the Cordillera Oriental and the Guyana Precambrian shield. Data on bottom-hole temperature, lithology, porosity, and vitrinite reflectance from all 318 wells drilled in the central and southern parts of the basin were used to analyze its geothermal regime and thermal history. Average geothermal gradients in the Llanos basin decrease generally with depth and westward toward the fold and thrust belt. The geothermal regime is controlled by a moderate, generally westward-decreasing basement heat flow, by depositional and compaction factors, and, in places, by advection by formation waters. Compaction leads to increased thermal conductivity with depth, whereas westward downdip flow in deep sandstone formations may exert a cooling effect in the central-western part of the basin. Vitrinite reflectance variation with depth shows a major discontinuity at the pre-Cretaceous unconformity. Areally, vitrinite reflectance increases southwestward in Paleozoic strata and northwestward in post-Paleozoic strata. These patterns indicate that the thermal history of the basin probably includes three thermal events that led to peaks in oil generation: a Paleozoic event in the southwest, a failed Cretaceous rifting event in the west, and an early Tertiary back-arc event in the west. Rapid cooling since the last thermal event is possibly caused by subhorizontal subduction of cold oceanic lithospheric plate.

  12. Sedimentology of Permian upper part of the Minnelusa Formation, eastern Powder River basin, Wyoming, and a comparison to the subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenk, C.J.; Schmoker, J.W.; Fox, J.E.

    1993-04-01

    Outcrops of the Permian upper part of the Minnelusa Formation near Beulah, Wyoming consist of dolomite, gypsum, and sandstone units deposited in transgressive-regressive cycles. Three depositional cycles are partly exposed in the Simons Ranch anticline near Beulah, and provide an opportunity to view fades of the upper Minnelusa Formation in three dimensions. The cycles observed in outcrop were informally labelled cycle 1, cycle 2, and cycle 3 in ascending stratigraphic order. Cycle 2 contains a basal, laterally extensive sabkha sandstone and an overlying, laterally restricted sandstone that represents a preserved eolian-dune complex. The eolian-dune sandstone of cycle 2 was partially reworked during the marine transgression that initiated cycle 3. The eolian-dune deposit grades laterally into an apron of contorted and massive-bedded sandstones that formed as water-saturated sands liquified and slumped from the margins of the eolian dune. The partially reworked eolian-dune topography was covered by gypsum beds of cycle 3. The sandstone of cycle 3 is interpreted as a laterally continuous sabkha sandstone. West Mellott field (secs. 8, 9, T52N, R68W) represents a subsurface example of the facies and facies relationships observed in outcrop. The eolian-dune sandstone of the C cycle, which was partially reworked by the transgression of the B cycle, produces oil at West Mellott. The draping of dolomite and anhydrite of the B cycle on the eolian-dune sandstone of the C cycle is analogous to the draping of gypsum on dune sand in cycle 2 in outcrop.

  13. Flow of formation waters in the cretaceous-miocene succession of the Llanos basin, Colombia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villegas, M.E.; Ramon, J.C.; Bachu, S.; Underschultz, J.R.

    1994-12-01

    This study presents the hydrogeological characteristics and flow of formation waters in the post-Paleozoic succession of the Llanos basin, a mainly siliciclastic foreland sub-Andean sedimentary basin located in Columbia between the Cordillera Oriental and the Guyanan Precambrian shield. The porosity of the sandy formations is generally high, in the range of 16-20% on average, with a trend of decreasing values with depth. Permeabilities are also relatively high, in the 10{sup 2} and 10{sup 3} md range. THe salinity (total dissolved solids) of formation waters is generally low, in the 10,000-20,000 mg/L range, suggesting that at least some strata in the basin have been flushed by metoeoric water. The shaly units in the sedimentary succession are weak aquitards in the eastern and southern parts of the basin, but are strong in the central-western part. The pressure in the basin is close to or slightly subdepth, particularly in the central-western area. The flow of formation waters in the upper units is driven mainly by topography from highs in the southwest to lows in the northeast. Local systems from the foothills and from local topographic highs in the east feed into this flow system. The flow of formation waters in the lower units is driven by topography only in the southern, eastern, and northern parts of the basin. In the central-western part, the flow is downdip toward the thrust-fold belt, driven probably by pore-space rebound induced by erosional unloading, which also is the cause of underpressuring. Hydrocarbons generated in the Cretaceous organic-rich, shaly Gacheta Formation probably have migrated updip and to the north-northeast, driven by buoyancy and entrained by the topography-driven flow of formation waters in Cretaceous-Oligocene strata in the central-western part of the basin could have created conditions for hydrodynamic entrapment of hydrocarbons.

  14. Undrilled New Ireland basin in Papua New Guinea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Exon, N.F.; Marlow, M.S.

    1986-07-01

    The arcuate, west-northwest-trending, mostly offshore New Ireland basin is 900 km long and about 160 km wide, and extends northeastward from Manus Island, New Hanover, and New Ireland. The basin formed in a forearc between a southerly Eocene to early Miocene volcanic arc, and a northerly outer-arc high bounding the Manus Trench. Its southern margin drops down to the back-arc Manus basin, which commenced spreading in the Pilocene. North of Manus Island, the New Ireland basin contains areas of deformed strata that have apparently been accreted to the Manus arc by south-dipping thrust faults. In places these strata are overlain by shallowly buried lava flows, which may represent attempted spreading. The sedimentary sequence in the eastern part of the basin is interpreted to contain thick Oligocene to early Miocene volcaniclastic sediments, overlain by 1000-2000 m of Miocene shelf carbonates, overlain by 2000 m of overburden. The presumed shelf carbonates could contain both source and reservoir rocks. The Lee line 401 revealed a flat, high-amplitude reflector or bright spot in an anticlinal core 1700 m beneath the seabed in water 2500 m deep off New Ireland, suggesting that hydrocarbons have been generated in New Ireland basin.

  15. Late Cenozoic fault kinematics and basin development, Calabrian arc, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knott, S.D.; Turco, E.

    1988-08-01

    Current views for explaining the present structure of the Calabrian arc emphasize bending or buckling of an initially straight zone by rigid indentation. Although bending has played an important role, bending itself cannot explain all structural features now seen in the arc for the following reasons: (1) across-arc extension is inconsistent with buckling, (2) north-south compression predicted by a bending mechanism to occur in the internal part of a curved mountain belt is not present in the Calabrian arc, and (3) lateral shear occurs throughout the arc, not just along the northern and southern boundaries. The model presented here is based on lateral bending of mantle and lower crust (demonstrated by variation in extension in the Tyrrhenian basin) and semibrittle faulting and block rotation in the upper crust. These two styles of deformation are confined to the upper plate of the Calabrian subduction system. This deformation is considered to have been active from the beginning of extension in the Tyrrhenian basin (late Tortonian) and is still active today (based on Holocene seismicity). Block rotations are a consequence of lateral heterogeneous shear during extension. Therefore, some of the observed rotation of paleo-magnetic declinations may have occurred in areas undergoing extension and not just during thrusting. Inversion of sedimentary basins by block rotation is predicted by the model. The model will be a useful aid in interpreting reflection seismic data and exploring and developing offshore and onshore sedimentary basins in southern Italy.

  16. Structure and facies development of the Dutch/north German Rotliegende basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gralla, P. )

    1993-09-01

    The apparent east-west extension of the southern Rotliegende basin, stretching from southern England via the Netherlands and north Germany to Poland, developed from several subbasins running in a northwest-southeast direction. The orientation of the subbasins and the graben systems have largely been caused by a regional stress field, which existed in the Late Paleozic of northern central Europe. The maximum extension was in an east-west direction. The graben systems of northern Germany and the southern part of the North Sea are running roughly north-south and are connected via a parallel set of wrench faults. The subbasin with the largest Rotliegende thickness lies in the German part of the North Sea. It subsided in the region where the rift axis of the north-south-running north German graben system experienced left lateral displacments by northwest-southeast-running wrench faults. The active graben zone extended into the Horn-Bamle-Oslo graben. The initial Dutch subbasin was connected with the early central graben and merged with the north German subbasin in the course of the progressive sedimentation of the basin. In contrast to the north German subbasin, where the initial sedimentation was mainly determined by the north-south-directed graben tectonics, intensive northwest-southeast-directed step faults developed in the Dutch subbasin. The initial subbasins were arranged in an en echelon pattern and merged during the main subsidence of the basin. The origin of the subbasins is linked to the Stephanian basins. Their development continued while several climate changes occurred up to the early Mesozoic. The development of the intracontinental sedimentation from the small initial subbasin to the widespread southern Rotliegende basin can therefore be divided into three main stages: initial stage-tectonics more effective than climate cycles, main stage-equal effect of tectonics and climate cycles, and late stage-climate cycles more effective than tectonics.

  17. Upper Permian fluviolacustrine deposits of southern Africa and the late Permian climate southern Gondwana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yemane, K. . Dept. of Geology Bryn Mawr Coll., PA . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Upper Permian-age fluviolacustrine deposits are widespread throughout southern Africa. In the southern part of the subcontinent, where deposition took place in foreland basin settings, the sequences are thicker and fluvial-dominated whereas, lacustrine-dominated deposits accumulated in settings of low relief, broad warping and mild faulting at the northern end. The geographic extent and lateral correlatability of these deposits suggest the existence of concurrent, perhaps interconnected, giant lakes within major fluvial frameworks throughout the subcontinent, thousands of miles inland from the sea. This period of major lake development within fluvial depositional settings suggests climatic conditions that sustained a uniquely wet continental environment, deep in the heart of the Gondwanan supercontinent. Simulations based on various general circulation and energy balance climate models predict extreme seasonal temperatures and aridity for Gondwana at the palaeolatitudes of southern Africa during the Late Permian. On the other hand, distribution of climate-sensitive rocks, palynologic and palaeobotanic data and vertebrate fossils, coroborate the temperature climate documented by sedimentologic studies. The erroneous modeling results may have arisen from the fact that the models do not employ palaeogeographies that accommodate the existence of the vast lakes and rivers of Gondwana. The Late Permian palaeogeography of series of giant lakes within major fluvial frameworks would have had considerable influences on the regional climate. This suggests that it is imperative that numerical modeling studies incorporate accurate palaeogeographies, constructed based on available geological data, in order to recreate past climates with acceptable degree of accuracy.

  18. Petroleum geology of principal sedimentary basins in eastern China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, K.Y.

    1986-05-01

    The principal petroliferous basins in eastern China are the Songliao, Ordos, and Sichuan basins of Mesozoic age, and the North China, Jianghan, Nanxiang, and Subei basins of Cenozoic age. These basins contain mostly continental fluvial and lacustrine detrital sediments. Four different geologic ages are responsible for the oil and gas in this region: (1) Mesozoic in the Songliao, Ordos, and Sichuan basins; (2) Tertiary in the North China, Jianghan, Nanxiang, and Subei basins; (3) Permian-Carboniferous in the southern North China basin and the northwestern Ordos basin; and (4) Sinian in the southern Sichuan basin. The most prolific oil and gas sources are the Mesozoic of the Songliao basin and the Tertiary of the North China basin. Although the major source rocks in these basins are lacustrine mudstone and shale, their tectonic settings and the resultant temperature gradients differ. For example, in the Songliao, North China, and associated basins, trapping conditions commonly are associated with block faulting of an extensional tectonic regime; the extensional tectonics in turn contribute to a high geothermal gradient (40/sup 0/-60/sup 0/C/km), which results in early maturation and migration for relatively shallow deposits. However, the Ordos and Sichuan basins formed under compressional conditions and are cooler. Hence, maturation and migration occurred late, relative to reservoir deposition and burial, the result being a poorer quality reservoir.

  19. Petroleum source rock potential and thermal maturity, Palo Duro Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, S.P.

    1980-01-01

    Samples collected from 20 geographically widespread wells in the sparsely drilled Palo Duro Basin were analyzed for total organic carbon content (TOC). Highest values of TOC, up to 6.9%, occur in Upper Permian San Andres dolomite in the southern part of the basin. Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian (Wolfcampian) basinal shales contain up to 2.4% TOC and are fair to very good source rocks. Kerogen color and vitrinite reflectance, which indicate maximum paleotemperatures, were analyzed in all samples containing greater than 0.5% TOC. Pennsylvanian and Wolfcampian kerogen is yellow orange to orange, an indication that temperatures were sufficiently high to begin to generate hydrocarbons from lipid-rich organic material. Palo Duro Basin samples have a broad range of vitrinite reflectance values, but populations with the lowest reflectance probably indicate the true temperatures that were reached in the basin. Average reflectance in representative Pennsylvanian vitrinite is 0.52%; in Wolfcampian samples the average reflectance is 0.48%. These values are consistent with kerogen color and suggest that basinal source rocks may have begun to generate hydrocarbons.

  20. Regional Climate Zone Modeling of a Commercial Absorption Heat Pump Hot Water Heater Part 1: Southern and South Central Climate Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geoghegan, Patrick J; Shen, Bo; Keinath, Christopher M.; Garrabrant, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Commercial hot water heating accounts for approximately 0.78 Quads of primary energy use with 0.44 Quads of this amount from natural gas fired heaters. An ammonia-water based commercial absorption system, if fully deployed, could achieve a high level of savings, much higher than would be possible by conversion to the high efficiency nonheat-pump gas fired alternatives. In comparison with air source electric heat pumps, the absorption system is able to maintain higher coefficients of performance in colder climates. The ammonia-water system also has the advantage of zero Ozone Depletion Potential and low Global Warming Potential. A thermodynamic model of a single effect ammonia-water absorption system for commercial space and water heating was developed, and its performance was investigated for a range of ambient and return water temperatures. This allowed for the development of a performance map which was then used in a building energy modeling software. Modeling of two commercial water heating systems was performed; one using an absorption heat pump and another using a condensing gas storage system. The energy and financial savings were investigated for a range of locations and climate zones in the southern and south central United States. A follow up paper will analyze northern and north/central regions. Results showed that the system using an absorption heat pump offers significant savings.

  1. Southern Research Institute Visit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southern Reaserch Engineering Capabilities Briefing 2010 Southern Research Institute Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology Research Briefing 2010 CAMD Introduction - Richard Kurtz Mary ...

  2. Late Paleozoic structural evolution of Permian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, T.E.

    1984-04-01

    The southern Permian basin is underlain by the NNW-trending Central Basin disturbed belt of Wolfcamp age (Lower Permian), the deep Delaware basin to its west, and the shallower Midland basin to its eat. The disturbed belt is highly segmented with zones of left-lateral offset. Major segments from south to north are: the Puckett-Grey Ranch zone; the Fort Stockton uplift; the Monahans transverse zone; the Andector ridges and the Eunice ridge; the Hobbs transverse zone; and the Tatum ridges, which abut the broad Roosevelt uplift to the north. The disturbed belt may have originated along rift zones of either Precambrian or Cambrian age. The extent of Lower and Middle Pennsylvanian deformation is unclear; much of the Val Verde basin-Ozona arch structure may have formed then. The main Wolfcamp deformation over thrust the West Texas crustal block against the Delaware block, with local denudation of the uplifted edge and eastward-directed backthrusting into the Midland basin. Latter in the Permian, the area was the center of a subcontinental bowl of subsidence - the Permian basin proper. The disturbed belt formed a pedestal for the carbonate accumulations which created the Central Basin platform. The major pre-Permian reservoirs of the Permian basin lie in large structural and unconformity-bounded traps on uplift ridges and domes. Further work on the regional structural style may help to predict fracture trends, to assess the timing of oil migration, and to evaluate intrareservoir variations in the overlying Permian giant oil fields.

  3. Source rocks of the Sub-Andean basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raedeke, L.D. )

    1993-02-01

    Seven source rock systems were mapped using a consistent methodology to allow basin comparison from Trinidad to southern Chile. Silurian and Devonian systems, deposited in passive margin and intracratonic settings, have fair-good original oil/gas potential from central and northern Bolivia to southern Peru. Kerogens range from mature in the foreland to overmature in the thrust belt. Permian to Carboniferous deposition in local restricted basins formed organic-rich shales and carbonates with very good original oil/gas potential, principally in northern Bolivia and southern Peru. Late Triassic to early Jurassic marine shales and limestones, deposited in deep, narrow, basins from Ecuador to north-central maturity. Locally, in the Cuyo rift basin of northern Argentina, a Triassic lacustrine unit is a very good, mature oil source. Early Cretaceous to Jurassic marine incursions into the back-arc basins of Chile-Argentina deposited shales and limestones. Although time transgressive (younging to the south), this system is the principal source in southern back-arc basins, with best potential in Neuquen, where three intervals are stacked A late Cretaceous marine transgressive shale is the most important source in northern South America. The unit includes the La Luna and equivalents extending from Trinidad through Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, and into northern Peru. Elsewhere in South America upper Cretaceous marine-lacustrine rocks are a possible source in the Altiplano and Northwest basins of Bolivia and Argentina. Middle Miocene to Oligocene source system includes shallow marine, deltaic, and lacustrine sediments from Trinidad to northern Peru.

  4. Target reservoirs for CO/sub 2/ miscible flooding. Task Two: summary of available reservoir and geological data. Volume 1. Permian basin geological and reservoir data; Part 3. FARMER-San Andres through NOLLEY-Wolfcamp. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cobb, L.B.

    1981-10-01

    The stated objective of this study is to build a solid engineering foundation to serve as the basis for field mini- and pilot tests in both high and low oil saturation carbonate reservoirs for the purpose of extending the technology base in carbon dioxide miscible flooding. The six tasks in this study are as follows: summary of available CO/sub 2/ field test data; summary of existing reservoir and geological data; selection of target reservoirs; selection of specific reservoirs for CO/sub 2/ injection tests; selection of specific sites for test wells in carbonate reservoirs; and drilling and coring activities. This report for Task Two consists of a summary of existing reservoir and geological data on carbonate reservoirs located in west Texas, southeast New Mexico, and the Rocky Mountain states and is contained in two volumes, each with several parts. This volume, in four parts, is a summary of reservoir data for fields in the Permian basin of west Texas and southeast New Mexico.

  5. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for October, November, and December 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-03-22

    This report provides information on groundwater monitoring at the K Basins during October, November, and December 2006. Conditions remained very similar to those reported in the previous quarterly report, with no evidence in monitoring results to suggest groundwater impact from current loss of basin water to the ground. The K Basins monitoring network will be modified in the coming months as a consequence of new wells having been installed near KW Basin as part of a pump-and-treat system for chromium contamination, and new wells installed between the KE Basin and the river to augment long-term monitoring in that area.

  6. MASK basin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MASK basin - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  7. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Animal, Vegetable or Mineral? Iron is a limiting nutrient in many parts of the oceans, nowhere more so than in the Southern Ocean's photic zone, which receives enough sunlight for...

  8. Origin and diagenesis of clay minerals in relation to sandstone paragenesis: An example in eolian dune reservoirs and associated rocks, Permian upper part of the Minnelusa Formation, Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollastro, R.M.; Schenk, C.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Eolian dune sandstones are the principal reservoir rocks in the Permian upper part of the Minnelusa Formation, Powder River basin, Wyoming. These sandstones formed as shorelines retreated and dunes migrated across siliciclastic sabkhas. Sandstones are mainly quartzarenites; on average, clay minerals constitute about 5 wt.% the whole rock. Although present in minor amounts, clay minerals play an important role in the diagenetic evolution of these sandstones. Allogenic clay minerals are present in shaly rock fragments and laminae. Early infiltration of clays into porous sabkha sands commonly form characteristic menisei or bridges between framework grains or, when more extensive, form coatings or rims on grain surfaces. Authigenic clays include nearly pure smectite, mixed-layer illite/smectite (I/S), and late diagenetic illite and corrensite; these clay minerals are present as pore-lining cements. In addition to the deposition and neoformation of clay minerals throughout sandstone paragenesis, the conversion of smectite to illite occurred as temperatures increased with progressive burial. A temperature of 103C is calculated at a present depth of 3,200 m using a geothermal gradient of 30C/km and a mean annual surface temperature of 7C. After correction for uplift and erosion (250 m), the maximum calculated temperature for the conversion of all random I/S to ordered I/S is 100C. This calculated temperature is in excellent agreement with temperatures of 100-110C implied from I/S geothermometry.

  9. Water Resources Data. Ohio - Water Year 1992. Volume 1. Ohio River Basin excluding project data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H.L. Shindel; J.H. Klingler; J.P. Mangus; L.E. Trimble

    1993-03-01

    Water-resources data for the 1992 water year for Ohio consist of records of stage, discharge, and water quality of streams; stage and contents of lakes and reservoirs; and water levels and water quality of ground-water wells. This report, in two volumes, contains records for water discharge at 121 gaging stations, 336 wells, and 72 partial-record sites; and water levels at 312 observation wells. Also included are data from miscellaneous sites. Additional water data were collected at various sites not involved in the systematic data-collection program and are published as miscellaneous measurements and analyses. These data represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the US Geological Survey and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. Volume 1 covers the central and southern parts of Ohio, emphasizing the Ohio River Basin. (See Order Number DE95010451 for Volume 2 covering the northern part of Ohio.)

  10. Basin Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware 26.24 - W...

  11. Basin Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware 28.49 - W...

  12. Basin Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    43 0.0294 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida 0.0161 W W W W 0.0216 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin...

  13. Helium isotopes and tectonics in southern Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sano, Yuji; Wakita, Hiroshi ); Nuccio, M.P. ); Italiano, F.

    1989-06-01

    Geodynamic evolution of southern Italy can be understood within the framework of the Mediterranean-Alpine System. Subduction of a plate along the Sicily-Calabrian forearc under the Tyrrhenian Sea has been suggested by many geophysicists, although it is not yet confirmed and remains somewhat controversial. Helium isotope ratios provide useful information on the geotectonic structure of the region. The authors report here the {sup 3}H/{sup 4}He ratios of terrestrial gas samples from southern Italy. The observed {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios are relatively high in the Eolian volcanic arc region and low in the other areas. Dichotomous explanations are presented. Firstly, volcanic arc-forearc hypothesis suggests the subduction along the Sicily-Calabrian forearc. Secondly, horizontal transport hypothesis is described based on the relationship between the ratios and radial distance from the recent spreading basin in Southern Tyrrhenian Sea.

  14. Geothermal resources of the Washakie and Great Divide basins, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heasler, H.P.; Buelow, K.L.

    1985-01-01

    The geothermal resources of the Great Divide and Washakie Basins of southern Wyoming are described. Oil well bottomhole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data were interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. It was concluded large areas in Wyoming are underlain by water hotter than 120{sup 0}F. Isolated areas with high temperature gradients exist within each basin. 68 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs. (ACR)

  15. Tularosa Basin Play Fairway Analysis: Partial Basin and Range Heat and Zones of Critical Stress Maps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adam Brandt

    2015-11-15

    Interpolated maps of heat flow, temperature gradient, and quartz geothermometers are included as TIF files. Zones of critical stress map is also included as a TIF file. The zones are given a 5km diameter buffer. The study area is only a part of the Basin and Range, but it does includes the Tularosa Basin.

  16. Structural evolution of Val Verde basin, west Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, D.E.; Petersen, N.

    1984-04-01

    The Val Verde basin is a northwest-southeast trending foreland basin contained within the southern portion of the Permian basin. The Val Verde basin has several large fields, e.g., Brown Bassett and JM, which have a combined ultimate recovery of over 1 tcf of gas. Structurally, the major fields are complexly faulted features related to differential uplift of basement blocks. Middle and Upper Permian strata are not present in the central and southern Val Verde basin. Appreciable amounts of Permian sediment were eroded prior to deposition of Cretaceous strata, thus, Cretaceous rocks unconformably overlie Wolfcamp sediments. Restored estimates for vitrinite reflectance data indicate a minimum of 8000-10,000 ft (2400-3000 m) of Permian rocks have been eroded. Therefore, in the central and southern portions of the basin, Paleozoic rocks are inferred to have occupied depths several miles deeper than present. Vitrinite reflectance values for Ellenburger (Ordovician) rocks at Brown Bassett are approximately 1.8 to 2.0% R/sub o/. Ellenburger reflectance values increase to the south and southeast to values greater than 4.5% R/sub o/. The most southerly wells also have reflectance depth trends which show a break in gradient within Wolfcamp sediments (9000-10,000 ft, 2700-3000 m). The change in gradient suggests a thermal event contemporaneous with the basin's rapid downwarping and Wolfcamp deposition. Any exploration in the basin, therefore, must recognize the unique relationships between structural timing, structural position, depth of burial, thermal pulses, and hydrocarbon mobility for a large portion of Val Verde basin.

  17. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for April, May, and June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-08-08

    This report provides information on groundwater monitoring near the K Basins during April, May, and June 2007. Conditions remained similar to those reported in the previous quarters report, with no evidence in monitoring results to suggest groundwater impact from current loss of shielding water from either basin to the ground. During the current quarter, the first results from two new wells installed between KE Basin and the river became available. Groundwater conditions at each new well are reasonably consistent with adjacent wells and expectations, with the exception of anomalously high chromium concentrations at one of the new wells. The K Basins monitoring network will be modified for FY 2008 to take advantage of new wells recently installed near KW Basin as part of a pump-and-treat system for chromium contamination, and also the new wells recently installed between the KE Basin and the river, which augment long-term monitoring capability in that area.

  18. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iraq NNSA program strengthens national security from afar The Nuclear Smuggling Detection and Deterrence (NSDD) program is a key component of NNSA's core mission to reduce nuclear threats. The program, part of NNSA's Office of Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation, provides partners tools and training to deter, detect, and investigate smuggling of

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South

  19. The petroleum geology of the sub-Andean basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathalone, J.M.P.

    1996-08-01

    The sub-Andean trend of basins spans the entire length of South America from Venezuela in the north to Argentina in the south. All the basins produce hydrocarbons with the exception of the Argentinean Bolsones complex and the Peruvian Madro de Dios which is prospective but virtually unexplored. There have been some 119 billion barrels of oil and 190 TCF of gas discovered to date, comprising 93% of the continent`s oil reserves. The basins lie immediately east of the Andes mountain range and are mainly asymmetric Upper Tertiary, westerly dipping foreland basins that overlie a series of earlier Tertiary, Mesozoic and Paleozoic depocentres. All the basins have been compressively deformed as recently as the Upper Miocene, by the eastwards growth of the Andean Cordillera. Giant oil and gas fields sourced from shales of varying age, have been found along the whole trend of basins, with a predominance of gas in the south. The rich marine Upper Cretaceous La Luna and equivalent shales of Venezuela, Colombia and Ecuador have been responsible for generating 86% of the hydrocarbons discovered to date in the sub-Andean basins. Proven sources include Devonian, Carboniferous, Permian and Triassic shales in the central area, comprising Peru, Bolivia and northern Argentina. In southern Argentina, oils have been sourced from Uppermost Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous marine and lacustrine shales. Over 7500 wildcat wells have been drilled in basins along the trend, with a 15% success rate. Many of the basins are very lightly explored, with considerable potential for future discoveries.

  20. Physiochemical Evidence of Faulting Processes and Modeling of Fluid in Evolving Fault Systems in Southern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boles, James

    2013-05-24

    Our study targets recent (Plio-Pleistocene) faults and young (Tertiary) petroleum fields in southern California. Faults include the Refugio Fault in the Transverse Ranges, the Ellwood Fault in the Santa Barbara Channel, and most recently the Newport- Inglewood in the Los Angeles Basin. Subsurface core and tubing scale samples, outcrop samples, well logs, reservoir properties, pore pressures, fluid compositions, and published structural-seismic sections have been used to characterize the tectonic/diagenetic history of the faults. As part of the effort to understand the diagenetic processes within these fault zones, we have studied analogous processes of rapid carbonate precipitation (scaling) in petroleum reservoir tubing and manmade tunnels. From this, we have identified geochemical signatures in carbonate that characterize rapid CO2 degassing. These data provide constraints for finite element models that predict fluid pressures, multiphase flow patterns, rates and patterns of deformation, subsurface temperatures and heat flow, and geochemistry associated with large fault systems.

  1. Basin Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0.0323 0.0284 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida 0.0146 W W W W 0.0223 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian...

  2. sRecovery Act: Geologic Characterization of the South Georgia Rift Basin for Source Proximal CO2 Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waddell, Michael

    2014-09-30

    This study focuses on evaluating the feasibility and suitability of using the Jurassic/Triassic (J/TR) sediments of the South Georgia Rift basin (SGR) for CO2 storage in southern South Carolina and southern Georgia The SGR basin in South Carolina (SC), prior to this project, was one of the least understood rift basin along the east coast of the U.S. In the SC part of the basin there was only one well (Norris Lightsey #1) the penetrated into J/TR. Because of the scarcity of data, a scaled approach used to evaluate the feasibility of storing CO2 in the SGR basin. In the SGR basin, 240 km (~149 mi) of 2-D seismic and 2.6 km2 3-D (1 mi2) seismic data was collected, process, and interpreted in SC. In southern Georgia 81.3 km (~50.5 mi) consisting of two 2-D seismic lines were acquired, process, and interpreted. Seismic analysis revealed that the SGR basin in SC has had a very complex structural history resulting the J/TR section being highly faulted. The seismic data is southern Georgia suggest SGR basin has not gone through a complex structural history as the study area in SC. The project drilled one characterization borehole (Rizer # 1) in SC. The Rizer #1 was drilled but due to geologic problems, the project team was only able to drill to 1890 meters (6200 feet) instead of the proposed final depth 2744 meters (9002 feet). The drilling goals outlined in the original scope of work were not met. The project was only able to obtain 18 meters (59 feet) of conventional core and 106 rotary sidewall cores. All the conventional core and sidewall cores were in sandstone. We were unable to core any potential igneous caprock. Petrographic analysis of the conventional core and sidewall cores determined that the average porosity of the sedimentary material was 3.4% and the average permeability was 0.065 millidarcy. Compaction and diagenetic studies of the samples determined there would not be any porosity or permeability at depth in SC. In Georgia there appears to be porosity in

  3. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Website: http:www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains ... Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy ... and their daughters Allison Moore (husband ...

  4. Oil and gas occurrences vs. geodynamic evolution in the southern Apennines (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casero, P. ); Roure, F.; Vially, R. ); Sarp, A.R.

    1990-05-01

    The present architecture of the southern Apennines results from the Neogene continental subduction of the Apulia margin (part of North Africa margin). An allochthonous complex is formed by the low-angle, large-scale, east-vergent tectonic stack of Triassic to upper Miocene (Messinian) units. The rocks represent both a shelf carbonate domain (Apennine platform) and a deep marine domain (Lagonegro-Molise basin). They are emplaced as a nappe during uppermost Miocene (Messinian) to lowermost Pliocene. They are transported to the northeast onto the flexed inner part of the Apulia platform (Mesozoic to late Miocene shelf carbonate series). During the middle-upper Pliocene, the inner Apulia carbonate margin (intermediate platform) was thrust against the outer Apulia domain (overthrust belt). Pliocene-Quaternary syntectonic clastic series were deposited in the flexural basin developed to the east of the Apenninic, allochthon outer ramp and also in piggyback basins carried on top of the allochthon. Oil occurrences are confined to the top of the platform carbonates. Discoveries have been made in (1) compressional structures of the overthrust belt (outer margin of the inner Apulian Platform), (2) late-stage compressive folds in the outer slope of the foredeep, and (3) slightly inverted structures of the foreland margin. Gas accumulations at the top of platform limestones occur only in antithetic fault block traps or in slightly inverted structures of the foreland. The most important and frequent biogenic accumulations are in clastic rocks of the foredeep, beneath and to the east of the frontal ramp of the allochthon.

  5. Permian-triassic paleogeography and stratigraphy of the west Netherlands basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speksnijder, A. )

    1993-09-01

    During the Permian, the present West Netherlands basin (WNB) was situated at the southernmost margin of the southern Permian basin (SPB). The thickness of Rotilegende sandstones therefore is very much reduced in the WNB. The relatively thin deposits of the Fringe Zechstein in the WNB, however, also contrast strongly in sedimentary facies with thick evaporite/carbonate alternations in the main SPB to the north, although the classic cyclicity of Zechstein deposition still can be recognized. The Fringe Zechstein sediments are mainly siliciclastic and interfinger with both carbonates and anhydrites toward the evaporite basin. End members are thin clay layers that constitute potential seals to underlying Rotliegende reservoirs and relatively thick sandstones (over 100 m net sand) in the western part of the WNB. Nevertheless, favorable reservoir/seal configurations in the Fringe Zechstein seem to be sparse because only minor hydrocarbon occurrences have been proven in the area to date. The situation is dramatically different for the Triassic in the WNB. The [open quotes]Bunter[close quotes] gas play comprises thick Fringe Buntsandstein sandstones (up to 250 m), vertically sealed by carbonates and anhydritic clays of the Muschelkalk and Keuper formations. The Bunter sandstones are largely of the same age as the classic Volpriehausen, Detfurth, and Hardegsen alluvial sand/shale alternations recognized elsewhere, but the upper onlapping transgressive sands and silts correlate with evaporitic clays of the Roet basin to the north. A total volume of 65 x 10[sup 9]m[sup 3] of gas has so far been found in the Triassic Bunter sandstones of the WNB.

  6. Southern Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    faults form the western edge of the Sierra Madre Occidental plateau in northeastern Sonora. These faults and associated half-grabens extend over a distance of more than 300 km...

  7. Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin ... Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles Source: Energy ...

  8. Central and southern Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrew, H.J.

    1981-10-01

    Exploration in central and southern Africa continued to expand during 1980. The greatest concentration of activity was in Nigeria. However, there was considerable increase in the level of exploratory work in Cameroon and Congo. Significant new finds have been made in Ivory Coast. Geological and geophysical activity was carried out in 18 of the countries, with those in the western part having the largest share. Seismic work involved 225 party months of operation. Most of this time was spent on land, but marine operations accounted for 73,389 km of new control. Gravity and magnetic data were recorded during the marine surveys, and several large aeromagnetic projects were undertaken to obtain a total of 164,498 line km of data. Exploratory and development drilling accounted for a total of 304 wells and 2,605,044 ft (794,212 m) of hole. The 92 exploratory wells that were drilled resulted in 47 oil and gas discoveries. In development drilling 89% of the 212 wells were successful. At the end of the year, 27 exploratory wells were underway, and 34 development wells were being drilled for a total of 61. Oil production from the countries that this review covers was 918,747,009 bbl in 1980, a drop of about 9% from the previous year. Countries showing a decline in production were Nigeria, Gabon, Cabinda, and Zaire. Increases were recorded in Cameroon, Congo, and Ghana. A new country was added to the list of producers when production from the Belier field in Ivory Coast came on stream. 33 figures, 15 tables.

  9. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    African Researcher Visits Oklahoma As a follow-up to the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) ... Niamey, Niger, to the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) site near Lamont, Oklahoma. Dr. ...

  10. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANLEVSNL-06-04 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http:www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains...

  11. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the ACRF Southern Great Plains (SGP) site has helped to correct problems related to signal interference. The WACR is a 95-GHz system designed for a unique purpose -...

  12. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govSitesSouthern Great Plains SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Summer Training SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Southern Great Plains SGP Central Facility, Lamont, OK 36° 36' 18.0" N, 97° 29' 6.0" W Altitude: 320 meters

  13. Comparative analysis of discharges into Lake Michigan, Phase I - Southern Lake Michigan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Elcock, D.; Gasper, J. R.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-06-30

    BP Products North America Inc. (BP) owns and operates a petroleum refinery located on approximately 1,700 acres in Whiting, East Chicago, and Hammond, Indiana, near the southern tip of Lake Michigan. BP provided funding to Purdue University-Calumet Water Institute (Purdue) and Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to conduct studies related to wastewater treatment and discharges. Purdue and Argonne are working jointly to identify and characterize technologies that BP could use to meet the previous discharge permit limits for total suspended solids (TSS) and ammonia after refinery modernization. In addition to the technology characterization work, Argonne conducted a separate project task, which is the subject of this report. In Phase I of a two-part study, Argonne estimated the current levels of discharge to southern Lake Michigan from significant point and nonpoint sources in Illinois, Indiana, and portions of Michigan. The study does not consider all of the chemicals that are discharged. Rather, it is narrowly focused on a selected group of pollutants, referred to as the 'target pollutants'. These include: TSS, ammonia, total and hexavalent chromium, mercury, vanadium, and selenium. In Phase II of the study, Argonne will expand the analysis to cover the entire Lake Michigan drainage basin.

  14. Basin Destination State

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    10.68 12.03 13.69 14.71 16.11 19.72 20.69 9.1 4.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan 6.74 8.16 W 8.10 W W...

  15. Basin Destination State

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    11.34 12.43 13.69 14.25 15.17 18.16 18.85 6.5 3.8 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan 7.43 8.85 W 8.37 W W...

  16. Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWaveBasin&oldid596392" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference...

  17. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  18. Reserves in western basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldwell, R.H.; Cotton, B.W.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this project is to investigate the reserves potential of tight gas reservoirs in three Rocky Mountain basins: the Greater Green River (GGRB), Uinta and Piceance basins. The basins contain vast gas resources that have been estimated in the thousands of Tcf hosted in low permeability clastic reservoirs. This study documents the productive characteristics of these tight reservoirs, requantifies gas in place resources, and characterizes the reserves potential of each basin. The purpose of this work is to promote understanding of the resource and to encourage its exploitation by private industry. At this point in time, the GGRB work has been completed and a final report published. Work is well underway in the Uinta and Piceance basins which are being handled concurrently, with reports on these basins being scheduled for the middle of this year. Since the GGRB portion of the project has been completed, this presentation win focus upon that basin. A key conclusion of this study was the subdivision of the resource, based upon economic and technological considerations, into groupings that have distinct properties with regard to potential for future producibility, economics and risk profile.

  19. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-04 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Site Operations Manager to Retire Southern Great Plains (SGP) site operations manager Jim Teske has announced that he will retire in October

  20. Tectonic controls on Upper Permian lacustrine oil shales in the Junggar basin, NW China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, A.R.; Brassell, S.C.; Graham, S.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Collision of the Tarim craton with the southern margin of Asia during the Late Carboniferous-Early Permian resulted in uplift of an ancestral Tian Shan range and geographic isolation of the previously marine Junggar basin. Dramatic shifts from marine to nonmarine sedimentation took place in both the southern Junggar and northern Tarim basins during the Permina. Paleocurrent analysis indicate that by the Late Permian, coarse-grained sediments in both basins were being supplied predominantly from the area of the Tian Shan. During the Late Permian, the southern Junggar received in excess of 5,000 m of nonmarine sediments, including approximately 1,000 m of laminated, highly organic-rich lacustrine mudstones (oil shales). These deposits commonly have TOCs of 20-30%, and Rock-Eval pyrolitic yields reaching 2,000 mg/g, ranking them among the most prolific petroleum source rocks in the world. Based on a comparison of the distribution of steranes and extended tricyclic terpanes, these Upper Permian oil shales appear to be the primary source of oils in the giant Karamay field in the northwestern Junggar basin. Ancestral uplift of the Tian Shan thus produced a complex tectono-hydrologic partitioning of the Late Permina Junggar basin, which exerted a strong influence on the character of petroleum source rocks deposited within the basin.

  1. the Central Basin Platform,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... As a result. it is believed that most of the structures formed within the context of an ... order to facilitate flexure modeling of the CBP and adjacent Delaware and Midland basins. ...

  2. Recurrent motion on Precambrian-age basement faults, Palo Duro basin, Texas Panhandle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budnik, R.T.

    1983-03-01

    The distribution of Late Precambrian through Quaternary strata in the Palo Duro basin and surrounding uplifts documents recurrent motion on Precambrian-age basement faults. Basement blocks have been uplifted with little tilting or folding of overlying strata along a system of northwest-southeast oriented faults, part of a regional trend extending from central Colorado to southwestern Oklahoma. The orientation of basement terranes in Colorado and that of a 50-mi (80-km) long mylonite zone in east-central New Mexico suggest a Precambrian age for the faults. An Arkosic sandstone overlies basement and underlies a Cambrian(.) quartzose sandstone in a few Palo Duro basin wells. It may represent debris shed from active fault blocks during the opening of the southern Oklahoma aulocogen in the Late Precambrian or Early Cambrian. Ordovician carbonates thin or are missing beneath Mississippian carbonates on some fault blocks, indicating a post-Ordovician-pre-Mississippian period of faulting. The greatest amount of deformation occurred during the Pennsylvanian. Thickness, distribution, and facies of sediments were controlled by the location of active faults. Lower Pennsylvanian strata thin by up to 50% across some structures. Fault blocks provided sources of arkosic debris and loci for carbonate buildups throughout the Pennsylvanian and Early Permian. Around the periphery of the basin, Late Pennsylvanian or Early Permian faulting caused a wedging out of older units beneath the Wolfcamp. Permian, Triassic, and Neogene units, along with present topography, all have been subtly affected by basement structures. The entire section thins over basement highs. Middle and Upper Permian evaporites are thicker in structural lows. The overlying Dockum Group (Triassic) and Ogallala Formation (Neogene), both nonmarine clastic units, become finer grained over basement highs. Present topographic highs coincide with some basement highs.

  3. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  4. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  5. Permian basin gas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haeberle, F.R.

    1995-06-01

    Of the 242 major gas fields in the Permian basin, 67 are on the Central Basin Platform, 59 are in the Delaware basin, 44 are in the Midland basin, 28 are in the Val Verde basin, 24 are on the Eastern Shelf, 12 are in the Horshoe Atoll and eight are on the Northwest Shelf. Eleven fields have produced over one trillion cubic feet of gas, 61 have produced between 100 billion and one trillion cubic feet of gas and 170 have produced less than 100 billion cubic feet. Highlights of the study show 11% of the gas comes from reservoirs with temperatures over 300 degrees F. and 11% comes from depths between 19,000 and 20,000 feet. Twenty percent of the gas comes from reservoirs with pressures between 1000 and 2000 psi, 22% comes from reservoirs with 20-24% water saturation and 24% comes from reservoirs between 125 and 150 feet thick. Fifty-three reservoirs in the Ellenburger formation have produced 30% of the gas, 33% comes from 88 reservoirs in the Delaware basin and 33% comes from reservoirs with porosities of less than five percent. Forty percent is solution gas and 46% comes from combination traps. Over 50% of the production comes from reservoirs with five millidarcys or less permeability, and 60% of the gas comes from reservoirs in which dolomite is the dominant lithology. Over 50% of the gas production comes from fields discovered before 1957 although 50% of the producing fields were not discovered until 1958.

  6. Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin...

  7. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Southern California Edison...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California Edison Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Southern California Edison Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Southern California Edison Joined the Challenge: February ...

  8. Groundwater Availability Within the Salton Sea Basin Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tompson, A; Demir, Z; Moran, J; Mason, D; Wagoner, J; Kollet, S; Mansoor, K; McKereghan, P

    2008-01-11

    It is widely recognized that increasing demands for water in Southern California are being affected by actions to reduce and redirect the amount of water imported from the Colorado River. In the Imperial Valley region, for example, import reductions will not only affect agricultural users but also could produce significant collateral impacts on the level and quality of water in the Salton Sea, its regional ecology, or even the long term air quality in the greater basin. The notion of using groundwater in the Imperial Valley as an additional source for agricultural or domestic needs, energy production, or Salton Sea restoration efforts, so as to offset reductions in imported water, is not a new concept. Even though it has been discussed recently (e.g., LLNL, 2002), the idea goes back, in part, to several studies performed by the US Department of Interior and other agencies that have indicated that there may be substantial, usable amounts of groundwater in some portions of the Imperial Valley. It has been estimated, for example, that between 1.1 and 3 billion acre-feet (AF) of groundwater lie within the extended, deep basin underlying the valley and Salton Sea region, even though much of it may be unrecoverable or too poor in its quality (Imperial County, 1997). This is a significant volume with respect to the total annual precipitation volume received in California, whose average is close to 200 million (or 0.2 billion) AF per year (DWR, 1998), and especially with respect to the total annual precipitation received in the Salton Sea watershed itself, which we estimate (Appendix A) to be approximately 2.5 million acre feet (MAF) per year. Clearly, a thorough appraisal of the groundwater resources in the Imperial Valley and Salton Sea region--i.e., an assessment of their overall physical availability--will be needed to determine how they can be used and managed to suit new or redirected demands in the region. Development of an improved or updated groundwater assessment

  9. The Rotliegende sedimentation history of the Southern north sea and adjacent countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verdier, J.P. )

    1993-09-01

    Since the discovery of the giant Groningen gas field in 1959, followed in the mid 1960s by smaller accumulations in the offshore and onshore areas, the Southern Permian Basin has had a lot of industry activity. The resulting large amount of data available has made possible a study of the basin's evolution at a regional scale in a more detailed manner than had been done and reported in the past. Data from the United Kingdom offshore and netherlands and Germany onshore and offshore were gathered and investigated. The study addressed a total of 905 wells distributed over the three counties of which 129 had core descriptions. A stratigraphic subdivision, combining the cyclicity of both halite precipitation and clastic deposition represented by a large variety of facies, was established. Three periods of sedimentation are distinguished: Schneverdingen, Slochteren, and Hannover. They correspond to distinct phases of basin extension. The variety in pre-Rotliegende tectonic evolution of the various hinterlands surrounding the basin as well as climatic differences are important sedimentological controls of the basin fill. A series of facies and time maps illustrates the basin sedimentological composition and the distribution of lake, sabkha, eolian, and fluvial deposits during the three periods. Tectonic elements, climate, and westward prograding extension are the main controlling factors responsible for the sedimentological differences across the basin. These distinctive features are retained and enhanced during post-Rotliegende basin evolution.

  10. First conference on ground control problems in the Illinois Coal Basin: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chugh, Y. P.; Van Besien, A.

    1980-06-01

    The first conference on ground control problems in the Illinois Coal Basin was held at the Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, Illinois, August 22-24, 1979. Twenty-one papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB; one had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  11. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  12. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  13. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2002-09-21

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  14. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    1999-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  15. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2000-09-28

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  16. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-30

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  17. Tectonosedimentary evolution of the Crotone basin, Italy: Implications for Calabrian Arc geodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smale, J.L. ); Rio, D. ); Thunell, R.C. )

    1990-05-01

    Analysis of outcrop, well, and offshore seismic data has allowed the Neogene tectonosedimentary evolution of an Ionian Sea satellite basin to be outlined. The Crotone basin contains a series of postorogenic sediments deposited since Serravallian time atop a complex nappe system emplaced in the early Miocene. The basin's evolution can be considered predominantly one of distension in a fore-arc setting punctuated by compressional events. The earliest sediments (middle-late Miocene) consist of conglomerates, marls, and evaporites infilling a rapidly subsiding basin. A basin-wide Messinian unconformity and associated intraformational folding mark the close of this sedimentary cycle. Reestablishment of marine conditions in the early Pliocene is documented by sediments which show a distinct color banding and apparent rhythmicity, which may represent the basin margin to lowermost Pliocene marl/limestone rhythmic couplets present in southern Calabria. A bounding unconformity surface of middle Pliocene age (3.0 Ma), which corresponds to a major northwest-southeast compressional event, closes this depositional sequence. The basin depocenter shifted markedly toward the southeast, and both chaotic and strong subparallel reflector seismic facies of wide-ranging thicknesses fill the depositional topography created during this tectonic episode. Basin subsidence decreases dramatically in the late Pliocene and cessates in response to basin margin uplift in the early Pleistocene. The chronostratigraphic hierarchy of these depositional sequences allows them to constrain the deformational history of the basin. In addition, similar depositional hierarchies in adjacent basins (i.e., Paola, Cefalu, and Tyrrhenian Sea) allow them to tie the stratigraphy and evolution of the Crotone basin to the geodynamic evolution of the Calabrian arc system.

  18. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 ANL/ER/NL-05-08 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. SGP Hosts Instrument Team Meeting The SGP central facility hosted the biennial ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Instrument Team Meeting on August 2-4, 2005. Almost 50 instrument mentors, site

  19. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-08 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. ACRF Instrument Team Meets at SGP The ARM Program has had unprecedented success in operating a large array of sophisticated

  20. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feb./Mar. 2006 ANL/EVS/NL-06-02 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by The University of Chicago for the U.S. Department of Energy. New Shipping and Receiving Building Dedicated The SGP central facility is operating more efficiently with a newly completed Shipping and Receiving building. The SGP Shipping and

  1. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-01 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. ARM Archive Sets Record for User Accounts The ARM Archive stores and distributes the large quantities of data generated by routine

  2. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 ANL/EVS/NL-06-07 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Infrared Sky Imager Takes a Shot in the Dark Imaging technologies help scientists correlate and compare visual data with the non-visual data retrieved by

  3. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 ANL/EVS/NL-07-09 Technical Contact: Brad W. Orr Phone: 630-252-8665 Email: brad.orr@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Contributor: Lynne Roeder Website: http://www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, managed by UChicago Argonne, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC02-06CH11357. Multifilter Radiometer Added to Cessna Payload Downward-facing multifilter radiometers (MFRs) are instruments used to measure the

  4. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-07 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Global Dimming: A Hot Climate Topic Global dimming, also referred to as solar dimming, is a new buzz word in the scientific community. Coined

  5. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-03 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge Website: www.arm.gov ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. 2004 ARM Science Team Meeting Sets Attendance Record A record-breaking 316 scientists and researchers from 22 different

  6. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-11 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. Flare Field Campaign Aims to Rid Data of Clutter A series of aircraft flares were ignited on the ground at the SGP on October 19 and 20,

  7. Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    September 2004 ANL/ER/NL-04-09 Technical Contact: James C. Liljegren Phone: 630-252-9540 Email: jcliljegren@anl.gov Editor: Donna J. Holdridge ACRF Southern Great Plains Newsletter is published by Argonne National Laboratory, an Office of Science laboratory operated by The University of Chicago under contract W-31-109-Eng-38 with the U.S. Department of Energy. ARM Mobile Facility Will Explore New Locales For some time, scientists have wanted to expand the reach of the ARM Program to additional

  8. the Central Basin Platform,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Bolden, G.P., 1984, Wrench Faulting in Selected Areas of the Permian Basin, &: Moore, G. ... I I I I I 1 I I I I I I 1 I I I I Henry, C.A. and Price, J.G., 1985, Summary of ...

  9. Geologic characterization and carbon storage resource estimates for the knox group, Illinois Basin, Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, David; Ellett, Kevin; Rupp, John; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    Research documented in this report includes (1) refinement and standardization of regional stratigraphy across the 3-state study area in Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, (2) detailed core description and sedimentological interpretion of Knox cores from five wells in western Kentucky, and (3) a detailed calculation of carbon storage volumetrics for the Knox using three different methodologies. Seven regional cross sections document Knox formation distribution and thickness. Uniform stratigraphic nomenclature for all three states helps to resolve state-to-state differences that previously made it difficult to evaluate the Knox on a basin-wide scale. Correlations have also refined the interpretation of an important sandstone reservoir interval in southern Indiana and western Kentucky. This sandstone, a CO2 injection zone in the KGS 1 Blan well, is correlated with the New Richmond Sandstone of Illinois. This sandstone is over 350 ft (107 m) thick in parts of southern Indiana. It has excellent porosity and permeability at sufficient depths, and provides an additional sequestration target in the Knox. The New Richmond sandstone interval has higher predictability than vuggy and fractured carbonates, and will be easier to model and monitor CO2 movement after injection.

  10. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10`` to 20`` API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

  11. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

  12. Stratigraphy of Pennsylvanian detrital reservoirs, Permian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Der Loop, M. )

    1992-04-01

    Significant oil reserves have been found to date in stratigraphic traps in Pennsylvanian detrital reservoirs on the Central Basin platform and Reagan uplift of the Permian basin. The 32 MMBOEG Arenoso field area, discovered in 1966, is the largest producing field. Along a 75 mi northwest-southeast trend, 23 other smaller fields will produce an average 850 MBOEG each, for a total estimated ultimate recovery to date in the trend of 52 MMBOEG. These stratigraphic traps are elusive and complex. However, reservoir quality is excellent, and because of the poorly understood trap types, significant reserves remain to be found in the trend. The Pennsylvanian detrital consists of chert cobble conglomerates, coarse sands, red shales, and gray limestones deposited in an environment that grades seaward from alluvial fan to braided stream to shallow marine. The chert cobble conglomerates of the alluvial fan facies and the coarse sands of the braided stream facies are the highest quality pay zones. Porosities range from 5 to 20%, with permeability ranging up to 26 d. The total unit is seldom more than 400 ft thick; reservoir rock thicknesses within the unit range up to 100 ft. Because of the complex nature of the alluvial fan and braided stream deposits, dry development wells can be expected within fields. These Strawn deposits are located adjacent to and overlying the eroded lower Paleozoic uplifts of the southern Central Basin platform. The major source of the chert cobbles is erosion of the Devonian tripolitic chert. Renewed structural uplift combined with sea level drop in the middle Wolfcampian locally truncated some Pennsylvanian detrital alluvial fan deposits, and complicated or destroyed a potential trap by depositing Wolfcamp chert conglomerates on top of the Pennsylvanian conglomerates.

  13. System Description for the KW Basin Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) (70.3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DERUSSEAU, R.R.

    2000-04-18

    This is a description of the system that collects and processes the sludge and radioactive ions released by the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) processing operations conducted in the 105 KW Basin. The system screens, settles, filters, and conditions the basin water for reuse. Sludge and most radioactive ions are removed before the water is distributed back to the basin pool. This system is part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP).

  14. QER- Comment of Southern Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Company Services, Inc., as agent for Alabama Power Company, Georgia Power Company, Gulf Power Company, and Mississippi Power Company, (collectively, “Southern Companies”), are pleased to hereby provide their comments to the Department of Energy as it prepares the Quadrennial Energy Review. If there is anything else that we can do in this regard, please feel free to contact us.

  15. Exploration within the Sub-Andean Thrust Belt of Southern Bolivia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, K.J. )

    1993-02-01

    The Sub-Andean thrust belt of Southern Bolivia is a proven hydrocarbon province. Chevron began a regional study of the area in 1988 and chose the Caipipendi block due to its high potential for significant new oil reserves. A regional work program designed to acquire and integrate seismic data, geologic field data, geochemistry, and gravity data was used to generated structural models, evaluate regional risk components and to detail leads. The structural style within the Caipipendi block is interpreted as being an in sequence, thin skinned thrust belt with eastward verging folds and thrust faults. Tight surface anticlines associated with a Middle Devonian detachment have been later folded by deeper fault bend folds associated with the Silurian detachment. While the tight surface folds are presently producing oil, the deeper broader structures associated with the Silurian detachement have not been tested. Seismic data, utilized for the first time in this part of the Sub-Andean thrust belt, integrated with balanced structural cross sections, is the key to evaluating this new play. Geochemical analysis, including oil biomarker work, indicate that the oils are sourced from the Silurian-Devonian sequence. A generative oil system model formulated by integrating the geochemical analysis with maturation modeling indicates that the Devonian Los Monos formation is the primary oil source. Anticipated reservoirs for the new play are Carboniferous and Devonian sandstones which are also productive elsewhere in the basin.

  16. Global Warming Solutions Inc previously Southern Investments...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solutions Inc previously Southern Investments Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Global Warming Solutions Inc (previously Southern Investments Inc) Place: Houston, Texas...

  17. Southern Nevada Health District | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Health District Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Southern Nevada Health District Author Southern Nevada Health District Published...

  18. Southern Energy Management | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Management Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southern Energy Management Place: Morrisville, NC Website: www.southernenergymanagement.c References: Southern Energy...

  19. Southern Sustainable Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resources Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Southern Sustainable Resources Name: Southern Sustainable Resources Address: 792 Piccadilly Dr., Ste. 204 Place: Charleston, South...

  20. Peru onshore-deepwater basins should have large potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuniga-Rivero, F.; Keeling, J.A.; Hay-Roe, H.

    1998-10-19

    Perupetro`s recent announcement that 13 offshore exploration blocks of nearly 1 million acres each will be offered for bids in the fourth quarter of 1998 has reawakened interest in this extensive, largely unexplored area. The new government policy, combined with the results of modern, deep-probing seismic surveys, has already led to a stepped-up search for oil and gas that will probably escalate. Most of Peru`s ten coastal basins are entirely offshore, but at both ends of the 1,500-mile coastline the sedimentary basins stretch from onshore across the continental shelf and down the continental slope. Two of these basin areas, both in the north, have commercial production. The third, straddling the country`s southern border, has never been drilled either on land or offshore. The Peruvian sectors of these three basins total roughly 50,000 sq miles in area, 75% offshore. All have major oil and gas potential. They are described individually in this article, an update in the ongoing studies last reported at the 1998 Offshore Technology Conference and in the first article of this series.

  1. Permian evolution of sandstone composition in a complex back-arc extensional to foreland basin: The Bowen Basin, eastern Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, J.C. . Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis); Fielding, C.R. . Dept. of Earth Sciences); Caritat, P de . Dept. of Geology); Wilkinson, M.M. )

    1993-09-01

    The Bowen Basin is a Permo-Triassic, back-arc extensional to foreland basin that developed landward of an intermittently active continental volcanic arc associated with the eastern Australian convergent plate margin. The basin has a complex, polyphase tectonic history that began with limited back-arc crustal extension during the Early Permian. This created a series of north-trending grabens and half grabens which, in the west, accommodated quartz-rich sediment derived locally from surrounding, uplifted continental basement. In the east, coeval calc-alkaline, volcanolithic-rich, and volcaniclastic sediment was derived from the active volcanic arc. This early extensional episode was followed by a phase of passive thermal subsidence accompanied by episodic compression during the late Early Permian to early Late Permian, with little contemporaneous volcanism. In the west, quartzose sediment was shed from stable, polymictic, continental basement immediately to the west and south of the basin, whereas volcanolithic-rich sediment that entered the eastern side of the basin during this time was presumably derived from the inactive, and possibly partly submerged volcanic arc. During the late Late Permian, flexural loading and increased compression occurred along the eastern margin of the Bowen Basin, and renewed volcanism took place in the arc system to the east. Reactivation of this arc led to westward and southward spread of volcanolithic-rich sediment over the entire basin. Accordingly, areas in the west that were earlier receiving quartzose, craton-derived sediment from the west and south were overwhelmed by volcanolithic-rich, arc-derived sediment from the east and north. This transition from quartz-rich, craton-derived sediments to volcanolithic-rich, arc-derived sediments is consistent with the interpreted back-arc extensional to foreland basin origin for the Bowen Basin.

  2. BINARY STAR ORBITS. IV. ORBITS OF 18 SOUTHERN INTERFEROMETRIC PAIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Tokovinin, Andrei E-mail: wih@usno.navy.mi

    2010-09-15

    First orbits are presented for 3 interferometric pairs and revised solutions for 15 others, based in part on first results from a recently initiated program of speckle interferometric observations of neglected southern binaries. Eight of these systems contain additional components, with multiplicity ranging up to 6.

  3. Newsletter Southern Great Plains

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12, 2007. Munchkin has been with us since 1993. He has been a fine and loyal friend, guardian, and companion on long shifts and a part of the ARM family. He personally greeted...

  4. Late glacial aridity in southern Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, O.K.; Pitblado, B.L.

    1995-09-01

    While the slopes of the present-day Colorado Rocky Mountains are characterized by large stands of subalpine and montane conifers, the Rockies of the late glacial looked dramatically different. Specifically, pollen records suggest that during the late glacial, Artemisia and Gramineae predominated throughout the mountains of Colorado. At some point between 11,000 and 10,000 B.P., however, both Artemisia and grasses underwent a dramatic decline, which can be identified in virtually every pollen diagram produced for Colorado mountain sites, including Como Lake (Sangre de Cristo Mountains), Copley Lake and Splains; Gulch (near Crested Butte), Molas Lake (San Juan Mountains), and Redrock Lake (Boulder County). Moreover, the same pattern seems to hold for pollen spectra derived for areas adjacent to Colorado, including at sites in the Chuska Mountains of New Mexico and in eastern Wyoming. The implications of this consistent finding are compelling. The closest modem analogues to the Artemisia- and Gramineae-dominated late-glacial Colorado Rockies are found in the relatively arid northern Great Basin, which suggests that annual precipitation was much lower in the late-glacial southern Rocky Mountains than it was throughout the Holocene.

  5. New interpretations of Pennsylvanian and Permian stratigraphy, San Juan basin and southeast Paradox basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huffman, A.C. Jr.; Condon, S.M. )

    1989-09-01

    The Honaker Trail, Paradox, and Pinkerton Trail Formations of the Hermosa Group are recognized throughout most of the San Juan basin. The Paradox Formation is extended southeastward beyond the limits of its evaporite facies into the basin, where it consists of thick shelf-carbonate rocks and thin black shale, sandstone, and siltstone interbeds. Where the Hermosa Group thins onto the marginal uplifts, the Paradox loses the thick carbonate rocks and becomes indistinguishable from the rest of the Hermosa. The Hermosa is correlated in the subsurface with the Madera and Sandia Formations to the southeast. The transitional Rico Formation, between the marine Hermosa Group and the continental Cutler Formation, is identified throughout the subsurface of the San Juan basin and is correlated with similar deposits out-cropping along the northern and eastern margins. The Cutler Formation includes the Organ Rock, Cedar Mesa, and Halgaito members throughout most of the basin. In the vicinity of the Hogback monocline, the Cedar Mesa Sandstone Member undergoes a gradational eastward facies change from cyclic evaporite and sandstone to thick-bedded sandstone. The subsurface Cedar Mesa is correlated in part with similar rocks in the outcropping Abo and Supai Formations.

  6. Denver Basin Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin Map Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Denver Basin Map Abstract This webpage contains a map of the Denver Basin. Published Colorado...

  7. Part 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1 Page 1-1 of 20 PART 1 - GENERAL PERMIT CONDITIONS 1.1. AUTHORITY This Permit is issued pursuant to the authority of the Secretary of the New Mexico Environment Department (Secretary) under the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Act (HWA), NMSA 1978, §§74- 4-1 through 74-4-14, in accordance with the New Mexico Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (HWMR), 20.4.1 NMAC. Pursuant to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), 42 U.S.C. §§6901 to 6992k, and 40 CFR Part 271 and Part 272 Subpart

  8. Part 5

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    May 8, 2012 PERMIT PART 5 Page 5-1 of 11 PART 5 - GROUNDWATER DETECTION MONITORING 5.1. DETECTION MONITORING PROGRAM This Part specifies the requirements of the Detection Monitoring Program (DMP). The DMP shall establish background groundwater quality and monitor indicator parameters and waste constituents that provide a reliable indication of the presence of hazardous constituents in the groundwater, as required by 20.4.1.500 NMAC (incorporating 40 CFR §§264.97 and 264.98). The DMP consists

  9. Analysis of a Cluster Strategy for Near Term Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout in Southern California

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Cluster Strategy for Near term Hydrogen Infrastructure Rollout in Southern California Michael Nicholas, Joan Ogden Institute of Transportation Studies University of California, Davis November 16, 2009 Scope of study * Analyze "cluster" strategy for introducing H2 vehicles and refueling infrastructure in So. California over the next decade, to satisfy ZEV regulation. * Analyze: Station placement within the Los Angeles Basin Convenience of the refueling network (travel time to

  10. Part 2

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... March 13, 2013 PERMIT PART 2 Page 2-6 of 21 2.3.3.6. PCB Waste Wastes with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) not authorized under an EPA PCB waste disposal authorization are not ...

  11. PART I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B B-3 B.4 - ALLOWABILITY OF SUBCONTRACTOR FEE If the Contractor is part of a consortium, joint venture, andor other teaming arrangement, the team shall share in this Contract fee...

  12. Oil and Gas Resources of the West Siberian Basin, Russia

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1997-01-01

    Provides an assessment of the oil and gas potential of the West Siberian Basin of Russia. The report was prepared in cooperation with the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) and is part of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Foreign Energy Supply Assessment Program (FESAP).

  13. Sediment Basin Flume | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sediment Basin Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sediment Basin Flume Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility...

  14. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Great Basin Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Great Basin Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3...

  15. Fifteenmile Basin Habitat Enhancement Project: Annual Report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    wild winter steelhead in the Fifteenmile Creek Basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The project is funded by through the Bonneville Power...

  16. Understanding Long-Term Solute Transport in Sedimentary Basins: Simulating Brine Migration in the Alberta Basin. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alicia M. Wilson

    2009-11-30

    Mass transport in deep sedimentary basins places important controls on ore formation, petroleum migration, CO2 sequestration, and geochemical reactions that affect petroleum reservoir quality, but large-scale transport in this type of setting remains poorly understood. This lack of knowledge is highlighted in the resource-rich Alberta Basin, where geochemical and hydrogeologic studies have suggested residence times ranging from hundreds of millions of years to less than 5 My, respectively. Here we developed new hydrogeologic models that were constrained by geochemical observations to reconcile these two very different estimates. The models account for variable-density fluid flow, heat transport, solute transport, sediment deposition and erosion, sediment compressibility, and dissolution of salt deposits, including Cl/Br systematics. Prior interpretations of Cl/Br ratios in the Alberta Basin concluded that the brines were derived from evaporatively-concentrated brines that were subsequently diluted by seawater and freshwater; models presented here show that halite dissolution must have contributed strongly as well, which implies significantly greater rates of mass transport. This result confirms that Cl/Br ratios are subject to significant non-uniqueness and thus do not provide good independent indicators of the origin of brines. Salinity and Cl/Br ratios provided valuable new constraints for basin-scale models, however. Sensitivity studies revealed that permeabilities obtained from core- and field-scale tests were appropriate for basin-scale models, despite the differences in scale between the tests and the models. Simulations of groundwater age show that the residence time of porefluids in much of the basin is less than 100 My. Groundwater age increases with depth and approaches 200 My in the deepest part of the basin, but brines are significantly younger than their host rocks throughout the basin.

  17. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.; Serrato, M.

    2009-12-03

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate in tact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose of, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate if from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,424 cubic meters or 31,945 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were design and tested for the reactor ISD project and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and work flow considerations, the recommended maximum lift height is 5 feet with 24 hours between lifts. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R-Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material designs

  18. Oil and gas potential of Tularosa basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, W.E.; Harder, V.M.

    1986-03-01

    Although the Tularosa basin of south-central New Mexico has not been extensively explored, there is a high probability of discovering commercial hydrocarbon reserves. Wells drilled along the eastern margin of the basin have been promising. Drill-stem tests of the Houston Oil and Minerals 1 Lewelling well, located near Three Rivers, indicate the possibility of significant gas reservoirs. The largest volume of gas tested was from the Desmoines (Strawn) section, where recovery was slightly more than 430 MCFGD. The same well yielded gas from the Atoka and Wolfcamp. In the Hodges 1 Houston well, located between Three Rivers and Alamogordo, a Missouri (Canyon) sandstone tested 16 mcf/day of 98% methane gas. Several other hydrocarbon shows have been recorded, mainly from upper Paleozoic rocks. Detailed cross sections and gravity data reveal the complex fault-block structure of the basin. A fault that is displaced approximately 6300 ft lies between the Houston 1 Lewelling and 2 Lewelling wells. A large fault block that is tilted to the east is defined by a cross section from the Texaco Federal (USA) F 1 and the Texaco Federal (USA) E 1 wells in the southern basin. Stratigraphic sections in the surrounding mountains substantiate the presence of source and reservoir beds. Structural and stratigraphic traps undoubtedly abound, but possible hydrodynamic flushing of reservoirs must be considered. The federal government has withdrawn this land from future exploration, primarily for the White Sands Missile Range, thus closing the inviting central and western areas of the basin for about four decades.

  19. PART I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C PART I SECTION C DESCRIPTION/SPECS./WORK STATEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE NO. C.1 - INTRODUCTION C-1 C.2 - IMPLEMENTATION OF DOE'S MISSION FOR AMES C-2 C.3 - PERFORMANCE EXPECTATIONS, OBJECTIVES, AND MEASURES C-3 C.4 - STATEMENT OF WORK C-8 C.5 - PLANS AND REPORTS C-17 i Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Section C PART I SECTION C - DESCRIPTION/SPECS./WORK STATEMENT C.1 - INTRODUCTION This Performance-Based Management Contract (PBMC) is for the management and operation of the AMES Laboratory

  20. PART I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE NO. D.1 - PACKAGING D-1 D.2 - MARKING D-1 i Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Section D PART I SECTION D - PACKAGING AND MARKING D.1 - PACKAGING Preservation, packaging, and packing for shipment or mailing of all work delivered hereunder shall be in accordance with good commercial practice and adequate to ensure acceptance by common carrier and safe transportation at the most economical rates. D.2 - MARKING Each package, report or

  1. PART I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G Contract Modification No. 133 i PART I SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE NO. G.1- DOE CONTRACTING OFFICER G-1 G.2 - DOE CONTRACTING OFFICER'S REPRESENTATIVE (COR) G-1 G.3 - CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION G-1 G.4 - COST REPORTING PROCEDURES G-2 G.5 - INDIRECT CHARGES G-2 Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Section G Contract Modification No. 133 G-1 PART I SECTION G - CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA G.1 - DOE CONTRACTING OFFICER For the definition of Contracting Officer see Federal

  2. PART I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B i PART I SECTION B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE NO. B.1 - SERVICE BEING ACQUIRED B-1 B.2 - OBLIGATION OF FUNDS AND FINANCIAL LIMITATIONS B-1 B.3 - PERFORMANCE AND OTHER INCENTIVE FEES B-1 B.4 - ALLOWABILITY OF SUBCONTRACTOR FEE B-3 B.5 - PROVISIONAL PAYMENT OF PERFORMANCE FEE B-3 Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section B B-1 PART I SECTION B - SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS B.1 - SERVICE BEING ACQUIRED The Contractor shall provide the personnel,

  3. PART I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section D i PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE NO. D.1 - PACKAGING D-1 D.2 - MARKING D-1 Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section D D-1...

  4. Minimum 186 Basin levels required for operation of ECS and CWS pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, K.K.; Barbour, K.L.

    1992-10-01

    Operation of K Reactor with a cooling tower requires that 186 Basin loss of inventory transients be considered during Design Basis Accident analyses requiring ECS injection, such as the LOCA and LOPA. Since the cooling tower systems are not considered safety systems, credit is not taken for their continued operation during a LOPA or LOCA even though they would likely continue to operate as designed. Without the continued circulation of cooling water to the 186 Basin by the cooling tower pumps, the 186 Basin will lose inventory until additional make-up can be obtained from the river water supply system. Increasing the make-up to the 186 Basin from the river water system may require the opening of manually operated valves, the starting of additional river water pumps, and adjustments of the flow to L Area. In the time required for these actions a loss of basin inventory could occur. The ECS and CWS pumps are supplied by the 186 Basin. A reduction in the basin level will result in decreased pump suction head. This reduction in suction head will result in decreased output from the pumps and, if severe enough, could lead to pump cavitation for some configurations. The subject of this report is the minimum 186 Basin level required to prevent ECS and CWS pump cavitation. The reduction in ECS flow due to a reduced 186 Basin level without cavitation is part of a separate study.

  5. Biomarker analysis of Upper Permian lacustrine oil shales, Junggar basin, NW China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, A. )

    1990-05-01

    Upper Permian lacustrine oil shales containing up to 34% TOC (total organic carbon) underlie approximately 50,000 km{sup 2} of the Junggar basin in western China, and appear to be the principal source of oils in the giant Karamay field in the northwestern Junggar and in several recent discoveries in other areas of the basin. The siliceous oil shales were deposited in a sediment-starved foreland basin during a period of predominantly humid climate. Previous biomarker studies of crude oils from Karamay field have documented an abundance of {beta}-carotane (which in some cases dominates the aliphatic hydrocarbon distribution) and gammacerane, suggesting a source bed deposited under hypersaline conditions. However, relatively complete outcrop exposures of finely laminated oil shales in the southern Junggar conspicuously lack evaporites, extensive dessication horizons, or other sedimentological evidence of playa lake environments. Indeed, the aliphatic hydrocarbon distribution in bitumen extracts from southern Junggar oil shales appear characteristic of freshwater to brakish water deposition of organic matter in an anoxic lake. Normal alkanes show a slight odd-over-even preference with relatively low levels of the C{sub 22}, n-alkane, pristane/phytane ratios close to unity, low {beta}-carotane and gammacerane levels, and the absence of C{sub 34}-C{sub 35} hopanes. This apparent difference in source bed depositional environments may be due to tectonic partitioning between separate depocenters of the Late Permian Junggar basin. Alternatively, hypersaline oil shale facies may be limited to deeper basinal areas, whereas upslope southern Junggar sediments record highstands in lake level or influx of fresh water from the adjacent drainage areas.

  6. PART III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J TOC i PART III List of Documents, Exhibits and Other Attachments Section J - List of Attachments Table of Contents Attachment No: Attachment: J.1 Appendix A - Advance Understandings on Human Resources J.2 Appendix B - Performance and Evaluation Measurement Plan J.3 Appendix C - Special Financial Institution Account Agreement J.4 Appendix D - Budget Program J.5 Appendix E - PPPL DOE (Lessee) Ingrants J.6 Appendix F - Contractor Resources, Commitments and

  7. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southern Energy Homes...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Southern Energy Homes, Russellville, AL DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southern Energy Homes, Russellville, AL DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southern Energy Homes, ...

  8. Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern ...

  9. Part II

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    80 Thursday, No. 251 December 31, 2015 Part II Department of Defense General Services Administration National Aeronautics and Space Administration 48 CFR Chapter 1 Federal Acquisition Regulations; Final Rules VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Dec 30, 2015 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\31DER2.SGM 31DER2 tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with RULES2 81886 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 251 / Thursday, December 31, 2015 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL

  10. Great Basin semi-arid woodland dynamics during the late quaternary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigand, P.E.; Hemphill, M.L.; Sharpe, S.E.

    1995-09-01

    Semi-arid woodlands have dominated the middle elevations of Great Basin mountain ranges during the Holocene where subalpine woodlands prevailed during the Pleistocene. Ancient woodrat middens, and in a few cases pollen records indicate in the late Pleistocene and early Holocene woodland history lowered elevation of subalpine woodland species. After a middle Holocene retrenchment at elevations in excess of 500 meters above today, Juniper-dominated semi-arid woodland reached its late Holocene maximum areal extent during the Neoglacial (2 to 4 ka). These records, along with others indicate contracting semi-arid woodland after the Neoglacial about 1.9 ka. Desert shrub community expansion coupled with increased precariousness of wetland areas in the southern Great Basin between 1.9 and 1.5 ka coincide with shrinking wet-lands in the west-central and northern Great Basin. Coincident greater grass abundance in northern Great Basin sagebrush steppe, reaching its maximum between 1.5 and 1.2 ka, corresponds to dramatic increases in bison remains in the archaeological sites of the northern Intermontane West. Pollen and woodrat midden records indicate that this drought ended about 1.5 ka. Succeeding ameliorating conditions resulted in the sudden northward and downward expansion of pinon into areas that had been dominated by juniper during the Neoglacial. Maximum areal extent of pinon dominated semi-arid woodland in west-central Nevada was centered at 1.2 ka. This followed by 100 years the shift in dominance from juniper to pinon in southern Nevada semi-arid woodlands. Great Basin woodlands suffered from renewed severe droughts between .5 to .6 ka. Effectively wetter conditions during the {open_quotes}Little Ice Age{close_quotes} resulted in re-expansion of semi-arid woodland. Activities related to European settlement in the Great Basin have modified prehistoric factors or imposed new ones that are affecting woodland response to climate.

  11. Southern CA Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CA Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Southern CA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Southern CA Area 1.2 Research and Development...

  12. Southern Iowa Bio Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bio Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southern Iowa Bio-Energy Place: Leon, Iowa Zip: 50144 Product: Biodiesel producer based in Iowa References: Southern Iowa Bio-Energy1...

  13. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory

  14. Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-24

    The Southern Regional Center for Lightweight Innovative Design (SRCLID) has developed an experimentally validated cradle-to-grave modeling and simulation effort to optimize automotive components in order to decrease weight and cost, yet increase performance and safety in crash scenarios. In summary, the three major objectives of this project are accomplished: To develop experimentally validated cradle-to-grave modeling and simulation tools to optimize automotive and truck components for lightweighting materials (aluminum, steel, and Mg alloys and polymer-based composites) with consideration of uncertainty to decrease weight and cost, yet increase the performance and safety in impact scenarios; To develop multiscale computational models that quantify microstructure-property relations by evaluating various length scales, from the atomic through component levels, for each step of the manufacturing process for vehicles; and To develop an integrated K-12 educational program to educate students on lightweighting designs and impact scenarios. In this final report, we divided the content into two parts: the first part contains the development of building blocks for the project, including materials and process models, process-structure-property (PSP) relationship, and experimental validation capabilities; the second part presents the demonstration task for Mg front-end work associated with USAMP projects.

  15. Subsurface cross section of lower Paleozoic rocks, Powder River basin, Wyoming and Montana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macke, D.L.

    1988-07-01

    The Powder River basin is one of the most actively explored Rocky Mountain basins for hydrocarbons, yet the lower Paleozoic (Cambrian through Mississippian) rocks of this interval remain little studied. As a part of a program studying the evolution of sedimentary basins, approximately 3200 km of cross section, based on more than 50 combined geophysical and lithologic logs, have been constructed covering an area of about 200,000 km/sup 2/. The present-day basin is a Cenozoic structural feature located between the stable interior of the North American craton and the Cordilleran orogenic belt. At various times during the early Paleozoic, the basin area was not distinguishable from either the stable craton, the Williston basin, the Central Montana trough, or the Cordilleran miogeocline. Both deposition and preservation in the basin have been greatly influenced by the relative uplift of the Transcontinental arch. Shows of oil and dead oil in well cuttings confirm that hydrocarbons have migrated through at least parts of the basin's lower Paleozoic carbonate section. These rocks may have been conduits for long-distance migration of hydrocarbons as early as Late Cretaceous, based on (1) the probable timing of thermal maturation of hydrocarbon-source rocks within the basin area and to the west, (2) the timing of Laramide structural events, (3) the discontinuous nature of the reservoirs in the overlying, highly productive Pennsylvanian-Permian Minnelusa Formation, and (4) the under-pressuring observed in some Minnelusa oil fields. Vertical migration into the overlying reservoirs could have been through deep fractures within the basin, represented by major lineament systems. Moreover, the lower Paleozoic rocks themselves may also be hydrocarbon reservoirs.

  16. Structural Inventory of Great Basin Geothermal Systems and Definition of Favorable Structural Settings

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31

    Over the course of the entire project, field visits were made to 117 geothermal systems in the Great Basin region. Major field excursions, incorporating visits to large groups of systems, were conducted in western Nevada, central Nevada, northwestern Nevada, northeastern Nevada, east‐central Nevada, eastern California, southern Oregon, and western Utah. For example, field excursions to the following areas included visits of multiple geothermal systems: - Northwestern Nevada: Baltazor Hot Spring, Blue Mountain, Bog Hot Spring, Dyke Hot Springs, Howard Hot Spring, MacFarlane Hot Spring, McGee Mountain, and Pinto Hot Springs in northwest Nevada. - North‐central to northeastern Nevada: Beowawe, Crescent Valley (Hot Springs Point), Dann Ranch (Hand‐me‐Down Hot Springs), Golconda, and Pumpernickel Valley (Tipton Hot Springs) in north‐central to northeast Nevada. - Eastern Nevada: Ash Springs, Chimney Hot Spring, Duckwater, Hiko Hot Spring, Hot Creek Butte, Iverson Spring, Moon River Hot Spring, Moorman Spring, Railroad Valley, and Williams Hot Spring in eastern Nevada. - Southwestern Nevada‐eastern California: Walley’s Hot Spring, Antelope Valley, Fales Hot Springs, Buckeye Hot Springs, Travertine Hot Springs, Teels Marsh, Rhodes Marsh, Columbus Marsh, Alum‐Silver Peak, Fish Lake Valley, Gabbs Valley, Wild Rose, Rawhide‐ Wedell Hot Springs, Alkali Hot Springs, and Baileys/Hicks/Burrell Hot Springs. - Southern Oregon: Alvord Hot Spring, Antelope Hot Spring‐Hart Mountain, Borax Lake, Crump Geyser, and Mickey Hot Spring in southern Oregon. - Western Utah: Newcastle, Veyo Hot Spring, Dixie Hot Spring, Thermo, Roosevelt, Cove Fort, Red Hill Hot Spring, Joseph Hot Spring, Hatton Hot Spring, and Abraham‐Baker Hot Springs. Structural controls of 426 geothermal systems were analyzed with literature research, air photos, google‐Earth imagery, and/or field reviews (Figures 1 and 2). Of the systems analyzed, we were able to determine the structural settings

  17. Petroleum prospects for offshore sedimentary basins in the eastern Papua New Guinea and Solomon Islands regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruns, T.R.; Vedder, J.G. )

    1990-06-01

    Intra-arc basins in the Buka-Bougainville region of Papua New Guinea and in the Solomon Islands contain thick sedimentary sequences that may be prospective for petroleum. The Queen Emma basin, between Bougainville and New Ireland, contains as much as 8 km of deformed Oligocene and younger strata. The Central Solomons Trough, which underlies New Georgia Sound, is a composite intra-arc basin that contains late Oligocene and younger strata as much as 7 km thick. Farther east, beneath Indispensable Strait, the down-faulted Indispensable basin locally contains as much as 5.4 km of Miocene( ) and younger strata, and the offshore part of Mbokokimbo basin off eastern Guadalcanal includes 6 km or more of late Miocene and younger strata. All of these basins have some of the attributes necessary to generate and trap petroleum. Structural and stratigraphic traps are common, including faulted anticlines, sedimentary wedges, and carbonate reefs and reef-derived deposits on submarine ridges and along the basin margins. The thickness of the basin deposits ensures that some strata are buried deeply enough to be within the thermal regime required for hydrocarbon generation. However, little source or reservoir rock information is available because of the lack of detailed surface and subsurface stratigraphy. Moreover, much of the basin sediment is likely to consist of volcaniclastic material, derived from uplifted volcanogenic rocks surrounding the basins, and may be poor in source and reservoir rocks. Until additional stratigraphic information is available, analysis of the petroleum potential of these basins is a matter of conjecture.

  18. Ramu basin, Papua New Guinea: A record of late Miocene terrane collision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cullen, A.B.

    1996-05-01

    The Ramu basin lies along a plate boundary where the Finisterre terrane is colliding with the Indo-Australian plate. Estimates for the age of initial collision range from early Miocene to middle Pliocene. Two unsuccessful wells (Keram 1 and Tsumba 1) drilled to basement and two-dimensional seismic data show that folded and faulted early to middle Miocene carbonates and clastics (the Wogamush sequence) are overlain by relatively undeformed Pliocene marine clastics (the Wewak sequence) along a regional unconformity. The pre-Pliocene section, which is at the crux of resolving the age of initial collision, has been correlated previously to the Finisterre terrane. Clastics within that section, derived from older terranes south of the basin, imply an early Miocene age for collision. I propose that Miocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks in the two wells are correlative with the Wogamush beds of the Maramuni arc. The Ramu basin can then be viewed as having a two-stage evolution. During the Miocene, the basin was part of the Maramuni arc, the polarity of which is unresolved. A collisional successor basin developed in the late Miocene as the Finisterre terrane (Adelbert block) collided with the arc. Thrust faults on the northeastern side of the basin, truncated by a regional unconformity, are interpreted to mark the suture of the Adelbert block. A northern earliest Pliocene sediment source for the basal Wewak sequence was probably the Finisterre terrane, but multiple source areas are inferred for the rest of that sequence. Middle Pliocene inversion of the basin`s northeastern flank, characterized by reverse faulting and forced folding, is attributed to plate boundary reorganization caused by rifting in the Bismarck Sea. The Ramu basin has numerous untested structures related to both collision and basin inversion. Gas-prone source rocks are present, but are largely immature. Reservoir and charge considerations place the Ramu basin in the very high risk sector for exploration.

  19. Stormwater detention basin sediment removal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, W.E.

    1995-12-31

    In the past, stormwater runoff from landfills has been treated mainly by focusing on reducing the peak storm discharge rates so as not to hydraulically impact downstream subsheds. However, with the advent of stricter water quality regulations based on the Federal Clean Water Act, and the related NPDES and SPDES programs, landfill owners and operators are now legally responsible for the water quality of the runoff once it leaves the landfill site. At the Fresh Kills Landfill in New York City, the world`s largest covering over 2000 acres, landfilling activities have been underway since 1945. With the main objective at all older landfill sites having focused on maximizing the available landfill footprint in order to obtain the most possible airspace volume, consideration was not given for the future siting of stormwater basin structures. Therefore, when SCS Engineers began developing the first comprehensive stormwater management plan for the site, the primary task was to locate potential sites for all the stormwater basins in order to comply with state regulations for peak stormwater runoff control. The basins were mostly constructed where space allowed, and were sized to be as large as possible given siting and subshed area constraints. Seventeen stormwater basins have now been designed and are being constructed to control the peak stormwater runoff for the 25-year, 24-hour storm as required by New York State. As an additional factor of safety, the basins were also designed for controlled discharge of the 100-year, 24 hour storm.

  20. Application for Approval of Modification for the 105-KE Basin Encapsulation Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    This application is being submitted to US EPA pursuant to Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 61.07, amended. The encapsulation activity will consist of the activities necessary to complete encapsulation of the fuel elements and sludge in 105-KE basin, a storage basin for irradiated N Reactor fuel in Hanford 100-K Area; it currently stores 1,150 MTU of N Reactor irradiated fuel elements transferred to the basin from 1975 through 1989. The application presents the chemical and physical processes relating to the encapsulation activity, source term, expected annual emissions, radionuclide control and monitoring equipment, and projected dose to the maximally exposed individual.

  1. Southern Great Plains Safety Orientation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, John

    2014-05-01

    Welcome to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site is managed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). It is very important that all visitors comply with all DOE and ANL safety requirements, as well as those of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the National Fire Protection Association, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and with other requirements as applicable.

  2. EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Basin Electric Power Cooperative EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Order authorizing Basin Electric Power Cooperative to export electric energy to Canada EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative (2.8 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-64-A

  3. Modern methods wrest more gas, oil from Ukraine`s historic producing basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Texas, L.C.; Machuzhak, M.I.; Chepily, P.M.

    1998-11-23

    The major oil and gas producing area of the Republic of Ukraine is the Dnieper-Donets basin located in the eastern part of the country. The paper describes the geology of the basin, the oil and gas accumulations, field activities, and potential for further production. The paper then discusses the Precarpathian region located in western Ukraine, its oil and gas accumulation, potential, specifications of the fluids, and future outlook.

  4. H-Area Seepage Basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stejskal, G.

    1990-12-01

    During the third quarter of 1990 the wells which make up the H-Area Seepage Basins (H-HWMF) monitoring network were sampled. Laboratory analyses were performed to measure levels of hazardous constituents, indicator parameters, tritium, nonvolatile beta, and gross alpha. A Gas Chromatograph Mass Spectrometer (GCMS) scan was performed on all wells sampled to determine any hazardous organic constituents present in the groundwater. The primary contaminants observed at wells monitoring the H-Area Seepage Basins are tritium, nitrate, mercury, gross alpha, nonvolatile beta, trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene, lead, cadmium, arsenic, and total radium.

  5. The Pennsylvanian and Permian Oquirrh-Wood River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geslin, J.K. . Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Strata of the Middle Pennsylvanian to Lower Permian Oquirrh-Wood River Basin (OWRB) lie unconformably above the Antler orogenic belt and flysch trough/starved basin in NW Utah, NE Nevada, and SC Idaho. Strata of the basin, now separated geographically by the Neogene Snake River Plain, show similar subsidence histories, identical mixed carbonate-siliciclastic sedimentary fill, and identical chert pebble conglomerate beds supplied by one or more DesMoinesian uplifts containing Lower Paleozoic strata. This conglomerate, of the lower Sun Valley Group, Snaky Canyon Formation, and parts of the Oquirrh Formation, was reworked progressively southward, to at least the Idaho-Utah border. It is present in strata as young as Virgilian. Virgilian to Leonardian rocks are ubiquitously fine-grained mixed carbonate-siliciclastic turbidites. These rocks contain cratonal, well-sorbed subarkosic and quartzose sand and silt in part derived from the Canadian Shield. This siliciclastic fraction is intimately mixed with arenaceous micritized skeletal material and peloids derived from an eastern carbonate platform represented by the Snaky Canyon Formation in east-central Idaho, an eastern facies of the Eagle Creek Member, Wood River Formation in the Boulder Mountains, and the Oquirrh Formation in the Deep Creek Mountains. Subsidence of the OWRB may have been caused by two phases (DesMoinesian and Wolfcampian to Leonardian) of crustal loading by continental margin tectonism to the west. An elevated rim separated the OWRB from coeval volcanogenic basins to the west. Earlier, Antler-age structures may have been reactivated. A new pulse of tectonism occurred in Leonardian to Guadalupian time as in most places carbonatic and phosphatic strata of the Leonardian to Guadalupian Park City and Phosphoria Formation overlie OWRB strata, with different geographic arrangement of basinal, slope, and shelf depocenters.

  6. Reservoir heterogeneity in Carboniferous sandstone of the Black Warrior basin. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.; Irvin, G.D.; Moore, H.E.

    1994-04-01

    Although oil production in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama is declining, additional oil may be produced through improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, chemical injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling. High-quality characterization of reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin is necessary to utilize advanced technology to recover additional oil and to avoid premature abandonment of fields. This report documents controls on the distribution and producibility of oil from heterogeneous Carboniferous reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report summarizes the structural and depositional evolution of the Black Warrior basin and establishes the geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks and oil in the basin. This second part characterizes facies heterogeneity and petrologic and petrophysical properties of Carter and Millerella sandstone reservoirs. This is followed by a summary of oil production in the Black Warrior basin and an evaluation of seven improved-recovery projects in Alabama. In the final part, controls on the producibility of oil from sandstone reservoirs are discussed in terms of a scale-dependent heterogeneity classification.

  7. Reservoir heterogeneity in carboniferous sandstone of the Black Warrior basin. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L.; Pashin, J.C.; Carroll, R.E.; Irvin, G.D.; Moore, H.E.

    1994-06-01

    Although oil production in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama is declining, additional oil may be produced through improved recovery strategies, such as waterflooding, chemical injection, strategic well placement, and infill drilling. High-quality characterization of reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin is necessary to utilize advanced technology to recover additional oil and to avoid premature abandonment of fields. This report documents controls on the distribution and producibility of oil from heterogeneous Carboniferous reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama. The first part of the report summarizes the structural and depositional evolution of the Black Warrior basin and establishes the geochemical characteristics of hydrocarbon source rocks and oil in the basin. This second part characterizes facies heterogeneity and petrologic and petrophysical properties of Carter and Millerella sandstone reservoirs. This is followed by a summary of oil production in the Black Warrior basin and an evaluation of seven improved-recovery projects in Alabama. In the final part, controls on the producibility of oil from sandstone reservoirs are discussed in terms of a scale-dependent heterogeneity classification.

  8. Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  9. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for July, August, and September 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2006-12-08

    This report provides information on groundwater monitoring at the K Basins during July, August, and September 2006. Conditions remain very similar to those reported in the previous quarterly report, with no evidence in monitoring results to suggest groundwater impact from current loss of basin water to the ground. The K Basins monitoring network will be modified in the coming quarters as a consequence of remedial action at KE Basin, i.e., removal of sludge and basin demolition.

  10. New basins invigorate U.S. gas shales play

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, S.R.; Kuuskraa, V.A.; Hill, D.G.

    1996-01-22

    While actually the first and oldest of unconventional gas plays, gas shales have lagged the other main unconventional gas resources--tight gas and coalbed methane--in production and proved reserves. Recently, however, with active drilling of the Antrim shales in Michigan and promising results from the Barnett shales of North Texas, this gas play is growing in importance. While once thought of as only an Appalachian basin Devonian-age Ohio shales play and the exclusive domain of regional independents, development of gas shales has expanded to new basins and has began to attract larger E and P firms. Companies such as Amoco, Chevron, and Shell in the Michigan basin and Mitchell Energy and Development and Anadarko Petroleum Corporation in the Fort Worth basin are aggressively pursuing this gas resource. This report, the third of a four part series assessing unconventional gas development in the US, examines the state of the gas shales industry following the 1992 expiration of the Sec. 29 Nonconventional Fuels Tax Credit. The main questions being addressed are first, to what extent are these gas sources viable without the tax credit, and second, what advances in understanding of these reservoirs and what progress in extraction technologies have changed the outlook for this large but complex gas resource?

  11. Geology of north-central Delaware basin, Eddy and Lea Counties, New Mexico: its hydrocarbon potential, focusing on 12 townships centered on WIPP site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheeseman, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site is located within the Carlsbad potash mining area, southeastern New Mexico, about 20 mi east of Carlsbad. Structurally, the WIPP site is located in the north-central part of the Delaware basin, which yields hydrocarbon production from the following: the Ordovician Ellenburger; the Pennsylvanian Morrow (gas), Atoka (oil and gas), and Strawn (reef oil) intervals; the Wolfcamp (gas) and Bone Spring (oil) formations of lowermost Permian; the Permian Yates (800-3500 ft deep), Queen, and Seven Rivers Formations; and the Delaware Mountain Group (4700-5200 ft deep). Structure contour maps demonstrate favorable Bone Spring conditions north of the WIPP site and the centrally located Delaware targets, as well as important Morrow development in the southern part. Five prospects are explored, and two are especially promising. Five anticlinal trends in this 12-township area bear field names as a result of production: Big Eddy, South Salt Lake, Cabin Lake, Los Medanos, and Sand Dunes. The Department of Energy's WIPP project is a planned repository for nuclear waste; despite centering on a deep dry hole, it occurs just northeast of productive Morrow formation. Whereas the successful tests seem concentrated on the structural highs, significant wells produce offtrend; the WIPP site lies in a syncline.

  12. Development of transfer zones and location of oil and gas fields in frontal part of Bolivian Andean fold-and-thrust belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baby, P. ); Specht, M.; Colletta, B.; Letouzey, J. ); Mendez, E. ); Guillier, B. )

    1993-02-01

    The frontal part of the Bolivian Andean thrust belt consists of a thick series of paleozoic to cenozoic sedimentary rocks (5 to 8 km thick) which are folded and thrusted towards the east on a sole thrust at the base of paleozoic series. The front of this tectonic wedge is characterized by transfer zones of various scales and geometries. The main oil and gas fields are located in these transfer zones. A study realized from YPFB (Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales Bolivianos) seismic data shows that in all the cases, the deformation is controlled by the geometry and thickness variations of the paleozoic basin. The most spectacular transfer zone appears at the bolivian orocline scale and corresponds to the famous bending of the andean thrust front close to Santa Cruz. More to the south (19 to 22[degrees] S) the southern foreland fold and thrust belt is characterized by a set of local right lateral offset transfer zones ([open quotes]en echellon[close quotes] folds). The difference of geometry and scale of the transfer zones seems to be related to the variation of the angle value between the shortening direction and the direction of the paleozoic basin borders. In order to test our interpretation, to constrain the boundary conditions and to study the thrust propagation sequence, we performed a set of analog model experiments whose 3D visualization was analyzed by computerized X-ray tomography.

  13. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    At bottom left, the kinds of iron species found in two transects of the Southern Ocean are ... (ACC stands for Antarctic Circumpolar Current.) The map shows chlorophyll ...

  14. Southern Rockies Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENERGYGeothermal Home Southern Rockies Geothermal Region Details Areas (1) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Assessment of Moderate- and High-Temperature...

  15. Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Characterization Experiment Final Campaign Summary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Southern Great Plains Ice Nuclei Characterization Experiment Final Campaign ...

  16. Southern Wind Farms Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Services Product: Chennai-based firm involved in manufacturing, installation and marketing of WEGs on turnkey basis. Also offers O&M services. References: Southern Wind Farms...

  17. Southern Solar Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Southern Solar Ltd Place: Offham, East Sussex, United Kingdom Sector: Solar Product: Installer of PV and solar passive hot water systems in the UK. References:...

  18. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll...

  19. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    so than in the Southern Ocean's photic zone, which receives enough sunlight for photosynthesis to occur, but whose biological diversity is limited due to a lack of bioavailable...

  20. Oil discoveries and basin resource prediction in Latin America: Past, present, and future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kronman, G.E.; Aleman, A.M.; Rushworth, S.W. )

    1993-02-01

    Over 350 oil discoveries were made in Latin America during the 1980s. About 12% are estimated to contain reserves greater than 100 MMBO. Several of the larger finds (>500 MMBO), such as Cusiana (Colombia), Furrial/Musipan (Venezuela), Cano Lima (Colombia) and Marlim (Brazil) represent an important part of the giant field found worldwide since 1980. Most of the larger discoveries were made by national oil companies in Venezuela, Mexico and Brazil. Undiscovered oil resources of 40-80 BBO are estimated to remain in the highest potential Latin American basins, including those in Mexico, based on historical field size data and current geological knowledge. Over 150 BBO of produced oil and proven reserves has been found in the same group of basins. The probability of finding large undiscovered oil and gas fields (>100 MMBOE) in selected established and mature Latin American basins is high. The Campos (Brazil), Llanos (Colombia), Magadalena (Colombia), Maracaibo (Venezuela), Marahon-Oriente-Putomayo (Peru-Ecuador-Colombia), Maturin (Venezuela), Reforma-Campeche (Mexico) and Ucayali (Peru) basins have the best possibility for such accumulations. Another tier of frontier and emerging basins may also contain significant resources, but limited data makes it difficult to estimate their undiscovered resources. Some of the higher potential basins in this group include the Sierra de Chiapas (Mexico/Guatemala), Huallaga (Peru), Yucatan (Mexico), Sabinas, and Burgos (Mexico) basins.

  1. Structural evolution of the Permian-Triassic Cooper basin, Australia: Relation to hydrocarbon trap styles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apak, S.N.; Stuart, W.J.; Lemon, N.M.; Wood, G.

    1997-04-01

    The structural and depositional history of the Cooper basin in eastern central Australia has revealed that the basin is a mildly compressional structural depression controlled by northwestrending and northeast-trending pre-Permian basement features. Pronounced pre-Permian compressions are indicated by northeast-trending major structures, the Gidgealpa-Merrimelia-Innamincka and Murteree-Nappacoongee trends. Detailed chronostratigraphic facies analysis, with closely spaced palynological control, of the Patchawarra Formation revealed that two pronounced phases of uplift occurred during the Sakmarian. The major intrabasin highs were rejuvenated during these tectonic events, as documented by crestal unconformities (middle and upper Patchawarra unconformities). Evidence of each event is dominantly tectonic in character, with similar depositional patterns over these highs related to each event. These events are also recognizable in midflank areas and basin margins with contemporaneous deposition in deeper parts of the basin. Results from this research show potential for future hydrocarbon discoveries within structural, stratigraphic, and structural/stratigraphic traps in the Cooper basin. Various trap styles are closely associated with faults, unconformities, and lateral facies changes. Lowside fault closures, onlap plays, and unconformity traps are expected to be well developed along intrabasinal highs, basin margins, and preexisting structures. The primary reservoir targets would be deltaic sequences comprising shoreline sandstones, distributary and delta-mouth bar deposits that may be well developed in synclinal areas, and flanks of intrabasin highs in the Copper basin.

  2. Precambrian basement geology of the Permian basin region of west Texas and Eastern New Mexico: A geophysical perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, D.C.; Keller, G.R.

    1996-03-01

    Because most of the Permian basin region of west Texas and southern New Mexico is covered by Phanerozoic rocks, other means must be found to examine the Precambrian upper crustal geology of the region. We have combined geologic information on the Precambrian from outcrops and wells with geophysical information from gravity and magnetic surveys in an integrated analysis of the history and structure of basement rocks in the region. Geophysical anomalies can be related to six Precambrian events: formation of the Early Proterozoic outer tectonic belt, igneous activity in the southern Granite-Rhyolite province, an episode of pre-Grenville extension, the Grenville orogeny, rifting to form the Delaware aulacogen, and Eocambrian rifting to form the early Paleozoic continental margin. Two geophysical features were studied in detail: the Abilene gravity minimum and the Central Basin platform gravity high. The Abilene gravity minimum is shown to extend from the Delaware basin across north-central Texas and is interpreted to be caused by a granitic batholith similar in size to the Sierra Nevada batholith in California and Nevada. This batholith appears to be related to formation of the southern Granite- Rhyolite province, possibly as a continental margin arc batholith. Because of this interpretation, we have located the Grenville tectonic front southward from its commonly quoted position, closer to the Llano uplift. Middle Proterozoic mafic intrusions are found to core the Central Basin platform and the Roosevelt uplift. These intrusions formed at about 1.1 Ga and are related in time to both the Mid-Continent rift system and the Grenville orogeny in Texas. Precambrian basement structures and changes in lithology have influenced the structure and stratigraphy in the overlying Permian basin, and thus have potential exploration significance.

  3. Magnetostratigraphic constraints on the development of paired fold-thrust belts/foreland basins in the Argentine Andes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.H. ); Damanti, J.F. ); Jordan, T.E. )

    1991-03-01

    Development of a paired fold thrust-thrust belt/foreland basin is correlated to the flattening of the subducting Nazca plate between 28-33{degree}S. Magnetostratigraphic studies in neogene basin-filling continental strata determine local basin subsidence rates and provide relatively precise chronostratigraphic correlation between different depositional environments. The data demonstrate that most existing lithostratigraphic units are diachronous and require new tectonic interpretations. Increases in sediment accumulation rates closely correspond to changes in provenance and indicate that the Frontal Cordillera, on the Chile-Argentina border was a positive topographic province by 18 Ma. The Precordillera evolved from {approx}16 Ma to the present as thrusting migrated from west to east. Published ages from intercalated airfall tuffs constrain some sedimentary sections in the eastern Sierras Pampeanas where the earliest uplift occurred since 10 Ma. The youngest uplifts are on the west side close to continuing thrusting in the Precordillera. Not all fold-thrust belt/foreland basin pairs are associated with flat subduction, suggesting that tectonic controls exceeding the scale of individual plate segments may be important. The hydrocarbon-producing Subandean fold-thrust belt/foreland basin, located in the area of 'steep' subduction that underlies northern Argentina and Bolivia (18-24{degree}S), is also believed to have evolved since middle Miocene time. Recently initiated magnetostratigraphic studies in the Subandean foreland basin will attempt to temporally constrain the Neogene tectonic evolution for comparison with the southern region.

  4. Potiguar basin: geologic model and habitat of oil of a Brazilian equatorial basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falkenhein, F.U.; Barros, R.M.; Da Costa, I.G.; Cainelli, C.

    1984-04-01

    The Potiguar basin integrates the eastern part of the Brazilian equatorial Atlantic-type margin. The rifting stage of this basin occurred during the Neocomian and Aptian. The drifting stage and sea-floor spreading began in the Late Albian. The rifting stage clearly was intracratonic during the Neocomian and is recognized as a mosaic of half-grabens trending mostly northeast-southwest and filled with syntectonic lacustrine siliciclastics. The half-graben pattern exhibits rotation of beds into the major fault zone, and the preserved uplifted margins display either paleostructures of paleogeomorphic features with hydrocarbons. A regional pre-Aptian unconformity preceded the Aptian proto-oceanic rifting stage which was characterized by syntectonic fluvio-deltaic sediments. The Aptian tectonics were represented by reactivation of former lineaments superimposed by predominant east-west normal faulting. Structural highs during this stage are so far the most prolific oil accumulations. The most important source beds and reservoir rocks are both Neocomian and Aptian sediments. Geochemistry and hydrodynamics have shown that hydrocarbon migration was driven through fracture or fault zones in both Aptian or Albian plays. Lithofacies maps support this interpretation because pools occur whenever adjacent downthrown blocks present a high shale content.

  5. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  6. Interactive Maps from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The interactive maps are built with layers of spatial data that are also available as direct file downloads (see DDE00299). The maps allow analysis of these many layers, with various data sets turned on or off, for determining potential areas that would be favorable for geothermal drilling or other activity. They provide information on current exploration projects and leases, Bureau of Land Management land status, and map presentation of each type of scientific spatial data: geothermal, geophysical, geologic, geodetic, groundwater, and geochemical.

  7. Tectonic mechanisms for formation of the Central Basin platform and adjacent basinal areas, Permian basin, Texas and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Kennming; Dorobek, S.L. )

    1992-04-01

    Formation of the Central Basin platform (CBP), with the Delaware basin to its west and the Midland basin to its east, has been attributed to the crustal deformation in the foreland area of the Marathon Orogen during the late Paleozoic. Because of complexities in the areal distribution and magnitudes of uplift along the length of the CBP, its formative mechanisms are still controversial. Previous interpretations about the mechanisms for uplift of the CBP are based on the characteristics of the boundary faults between the CBP and adjacent basinal areas. Here, an integrated tectonic model is proposed for formation of the uplift and adjacent basins based on studies of the structure of sedimentary layers overlying Precambrian basement rocks of the uplift and restoration of the lower Paleozoic strata in the Delaware basin.

  8. Southern California Edison Interconnection Process Challenges

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration View All Maps Addthis

    Southern California Edison Interconnection Process Challenges Roger Salas P.E. Generation Interconnection Manager Southern California Edison Different Jurisdictional Tariffs  Three Interconnection Tariffs in CA  State of California Interconnection Tariff (CA Rule 21)  SCE's FERC Interconnection Tariff (WDAT)  TO Tariff (for transmission interconnected

  9. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state's emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor's designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments.

  10. Southern state radiological emergency preparedness and response agencies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01

    This Report provides information on the state agencies assigned to radioactive materials transportation incidents in 16 Southern States Energy Board member states. For each, the report lists the agencies with primary authority for preparedness and response, their responsibilities and personnel within the agencies who can offer additional information on their radioactive materials transportation programs. The report also lists each state`s emergency team members and its laboratory and analytical capabilities. Finally, the governor`s designee for receiving advance notification of high-level radioactive materials and spent fuel shipments under 10 CFR Parts 71 and 73 of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s regulations is listed for each state. Part 71 requires prenotification for large quantity radioactive waste shipments. Part 73 addresses prenotification for spent nuclear reactor fuel shipments.

  11. Southern Energy Efficiency Center (SEEC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vieira, Robin; Sonne, Jeffrey; Withers, Charles; Cummings, James; Verdict, Malcolm; Roberts, Sydney

    2009-09-30

    The Southern Energy Efficiency Center (SEEC) builds collaborative partnerships with: state and local governments and their program support offices, the building delivery industry (designers, contractors, realtors and commissioning agents), product manufacturers and their supply chains, utilities and their program implementers, consumers and other stakeholders in order to forge a strong regional network of building energy efficiency allies. Through a project Steering Committee composed of the state energy offices and building industry stakeholders, the SEEC works to establish consensus-based goals, priorities and strategies at the regional, state and local levels that will materially advance the deployment of high-performance “beyond code” buildings. In its first Phase, SEEC will provide limited technical and policy support assistance, training, certification and education to a wide spectrum of the building construction, codes and standards, and the consumer marketplace.

  12. AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF LIQUEFIED NATURAL GAS IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carerras-Sospedra, Marc; Brouwer, Jack; Dabdub, Donald; Lunden, Melissa; Singer, Brett

    2011-07-01

    The effects of liquefied natural gas (LNG) on pollutant emission inventories and air quality in the South Coast Air Basin of California were evaluated using recent LNG emission measurements by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the Southern California Gas Company (SoCalGas), and with a state-of-the-art air quality model. Pollutant emissions can be affected by LNG owing to differences in composition and physical properties, including the Wobbe index, a measure of energy delivery rate. This analysis uses LNG distribution scenarios developed by modeling Southern California gas flows, including supplies from the LNG receiving terminal in Baja California, Mexico. Based on these scenarios, the projected penetratino of LNG in the South Coast Air Basin is expected to be limited. In addition, the increased Wobbe index of delivered gas (resulting from mixtures of LNG and conventional gas supplies) is expected to cause increases smaller than 0.05 percent in overall (area-wide) emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx). BAsed on the photochemical state of the South Coast Air Basin, any increase in NOx is expected to cause an increase in the highest local ozone concentrations, and this is reflected in model results. However, the magnitude of the increase is well below the generally accepted accuracy of the model and would not be discernible with the existing monitoring network. Modeling of hypothetical scenarios indicates that discernible changes to ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations would occur only at LNG distribution rates that are not achievable with current or planned infrastructure and with Wobbe index vlaues that exceed current gas quality tariffs. Results of these hypothetical scenarios are presented for consideration of any proposed substantial expansion of LNG supply infrastructure in Southern California.

  13. Estimating Annual Precipitation in the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

    2000-05-15

    Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Previous attempts to create precipitation-elevation functions in western Nevada have been difficult and result in large uncertainty. In the WRD data analysis, the effect of geographic scale on the precipitation-elevation function was overlooked. This contributed to an erroneous Maxey-Eakin recharge estimate.

  14. Bakken and other Devonian-Mississippian petroleum source rocks, northern Rocky Mtns.-Williston basin: Depositional and burial history and maturity estimations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, J.A.

    1996-06-01

    The three-member Devonian-Mississippian Bakken-Exshaw organic-rich shaly facies is widely distributed in the northern U.S. and southern Canadian Cordillera. Equivalent facies are also present as far south as Utah and Nevada. Paleogeographically, these rocks thin markedly or pinchout to the west approximately along the Devonian-Mississippian carbonate reef-mound belt of the Cordilleran shelf margin. Although these rocks reach maximum organic richness approximately at the Devonian-Carboniferous transition, similar but somewhat less organic-rich Bakken-like beds are also present in underlying Upper Devonian and overlying Lower Carboniferous carbonate depositional cycles. At least ten cycles are identified in the underlying Duperow and Jefferson Formations, characterized by basal organic-rich Bakken-like shale or shaly carbonate that grades upward into carbonate mound or reefal beds, overlain by evaporite or solution breccia. Cycles in the overlying Lodgepole and Mission Canyon Formations, as many as 10-12 in number, are similar except that the carbonates are composed of algal-oolith, crinoid, or mixed skeletal beds, and end-cycle evaporitic units are less prevalent in the lower cycles. These dark shaly beds are the most important source of hydrocarbon reserves in Montana and the Williston basin. Maximum net thickness of the Devonian-Mississippian organic-rich facies is in the Williston basin. However, variable thicknesses of these potential source rocks is present in parts of Montana as far west as the thrust belt. Burial history studies suggest that in some areas these rocks are probably thermally immature. However, in much of the area original burial depths are sufficient for them to reach the thermally mature stage, and therefore are of importance to further exploration efforts in the Devonian-Mississippian Madison-Duperow-Jefferson Formations.

  15. University of Southern California-Energy Institute | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California-Energy Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name: University of Southern California-Energy Institute Place: Los Angeles, California Zip: 90089 Region: Southern CA Area...

  16. Southern California Edison Company SCE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southern California Edison Company SCE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southern California Edison Company (SCE) Place: Rosemead, California Zip: 91770 Sector: Renewable Energy...

  17. Southern Alliance for Clean Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) Name: Southern Alliance for Clean Energy (SACE) Address: P.O. Box 1842 Place: Knoxville,...

  18. Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment Tool Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Map: Southern Great Plains Crucial Habitat Assessment...

  19. Savannah River Site - L-Area Southern Groundwater | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    L-Area Southern Groundwater Savannah River Site - L-Area Southern Groundwater January 1, ... InstallationName, State: Savannah River Site, SC Responsible DOE Office: Savannah River ...

  20. Characterizing wind power resource reliability in southern Africa...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE PAGES Search Results Published Article: Characterizing wind power resource reliability in southern Africa Title: Characterizing wind power resource reliability in southern...

  1. NGEN Partners LLC (Southern California) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NGEN Partners LLC (Southern California) Address: 1114 State Street, Suite 247 Place: Santa Barbara, California Zip: 93101 Region: Southern CA Area Product: Invests in early to...

  2. Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (SMMPA) Wind Farm I...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I Jump to: navigation, search Name Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (SMMPA) Wind Farm I Facility Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (SMMPA) Sector Wind energy...

  3. Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (SMMPA) Wind Farm Ii...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ii Jump to: navigation, search Name Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (SMMPA) Wind Farm Ii Facility Southern Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (SMMPA) Sector Wind energy...

  4. Technology Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Southern Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Southern Energy Homes, First DOE Zero Energy Ready Manufactured Home Technology Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Southern Energy ...

  5. Integrated Southern Africa Business Advisory INSABA | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southern Africa Business Advisory INSABA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Integrated Southern Africa Business Advisory (INSABA) Place: Berlin, Germany Zip: 10785 Sector: Renewable...

  6. K Basins Groundwater Monitoring Task, K Basins Closure Project: Report for January, February, and March 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.

    2007-04-01

    This report describes the results of groundwater monitoring near the K Basins for the period January, February, and March 2007.

  7. Geothermal Resources Of California Sedimentary Basins | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geothermal Resources Of California Sedimentary Basins Abstract The 2004 Department of Energy...

  8. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print Friday, 21 June 2013 10:08 The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is

  9. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2001-09-28

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. EPA requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard and must consider inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  10. Structural styles of subandean fold and thrust belt of Peru and Southern Ecuador

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleman, A.M.

    1988-01-01

    Along-strike variations in structural styles of the east-verging Subandean fold and thrust belt (SAFTB) in Peru and southern Ecuador are controlled by the presence or absence of thick Late Permian to Jurassic evaporite sequences rather than changes in subducting plate geometries as has been suggested previously for the Andes. Salt distribution and thickness have not only controlled the styles and segmentation along the SAFTB but also have been important factors in strike variations across the belt. The southern Ecuador SAFTB lacks significant evaporite units and is characterized by thick-skinned deformation that encompasses high-angle reverse faults, and broad, low-amplitude folds. The style changes to thin-skinned deformation near 2S lat. and it is well illustrated in the Santiago and Huallaga basins where thick evaporite units are present. This segment is characterized by a major decollement on the salt, grabens formed by salt withdrawal from reactivation of thrust faults as listric normal faults, salt piercement at or near synclinal axes, and periclines and asymmetric folds. The frontal thrust of this thin-skinned segment consists of box, overturned and upright folds above shallow salt domes, and by a major backthrust at the mountain front. This segment extends to 1030'S lat., near Oxapampa, Peru, where the thin-skinned SAFTB is narrow and changes across strike to a thick-skinned deformation as the evaporite units thin and disappear eastward. South of 1030'S lat., a new thick-skinned deformation segment is present in southern Peru and characterizes most of the deformation in the SAFTB of the Ucayali and Madre De Dios basins.

  11. Fall 2012 FUPWG Meeting Welcome: Southern Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—covers the Southern Company's retail service territory, financials, customers and sales, power generation, U.S. military projects, and more.

  12. Southern Electric Gen Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gen Co Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southern Electric Gen Co Place: Alabama References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id...

  13. The Metropolitan Water District of Southern California

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 QERcomments@hq.doe.gov Comments on the Department of Energy's Quadrennial Energy Review: Water-Energy Nexus The Metropolitan Water District of Southern ...

  14. Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Basin and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (51) Power Plants (10)...

  15. Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio Grande and Buckman Wellfield Structure and Groundwater Flow in the Espanola Basin Near Rio Grande and Buckman...

  16. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section ...

  17. PP-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Basin Electric Power Cooperative to construct, operate, and maintain transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. PDF icon PP-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative More ...

  18. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range...

  19. Judith Basin County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    6 Climate Zone Subtype B. Places in Judith Basin County, Montana Hobson, Montana Stanford, Montana Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleJudithBasinCounty,...

  20. Climate Change and the Macroeconomy in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis and Projections to 2099 Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change and the Macroeconomy in the Caribbean Basin: Analysis and Projections to...

  1. L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name L-Shaped Flume Wave Basin Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers...

  2. Southern California Gas | Energy Systems Integration | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southern California Gas Southern California Gas Company has joined with NREL and the National Fuel Cell Research Center to launch demonstration projects to create and test a carbon-free, power-to-gas system for the first time ever in the United States. The technology converts electricity into gaseous energy and could provide North America with a large-scale, cost-effective solution for storing excess energy produced from renewable sources. Read our news story on the project.

  3. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  4. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  5. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  6. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  7. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  8. Proceedings of the North Aleutian Basin information status and research planning meeting.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaGory, K. E.; Krummel, J. R.; Hayse, J. W.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Stull, E. A.; Gorenflo, L.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-10-26

    The North Aleutian Basin Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) is a large geographic area with significant ecological and natural resources. The Basin includes most of the southeastern part of the Bering Sea continental shelf including all of Bristol Bay. The area supports important habitat for a wide variety of species and globally significant habitat for birds and marine mammals including federally listed species. Villages and communities of the Alaska Peninsula and other areas bordering or near the Basin rely on its natural resources (especially commercial and subsistence fishing) for much of their sustenance and livelihood. The offshore area of the North Aleutian Basin is considered to have important hydrocarbon reserves, especially natural gas. In 2006, the MMS released a draft proposed program, Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program, 2007-2012 and an accompanying draft programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS). The draft proposed program identified two lease sales proposed in the North Aleutian Basin in 2010 and 2012, subject to restrictions. The area proposed for leasing in the Basin was restricted to the Sale 92 Area in the southwestern portion. Additional EISs will be needed to evaluate the potential effects of specific lease actions, exploration activities, and development and production plans in the Basin. A full range of updated multidisciplinary scientific information will be needed to address oceanography, fate and effects of oil spills, marine ecosystems, fish, fisheries, birds, marine mammals, socioeconomics, and subsistence in the Basin. Scientific staff at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) were contracted to assist the MMS Alaska Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region in identifying and prioritizing information needs related to the North Aleutian Basin and potential future oil and gas leasing and development activities. The overall approach focused on three related but separate tasks: (1) identification and

  9. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE R-REACTOR DISASSEMBLY BASIN IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING -10499

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.; Serrato, M.; Blankenship, J.; Griffin, W.

    2010-01-04

    The US DOE concept for facility in-situ decommissioning (ISD) is to physically stabilize and isolate intact, structurally sound facilities that are no longer needed for their original purpose, i.e., generating (reactor facilities), processing(isotope separation facilities) or storing radioactive materials. The 105-R Disassembly Basin is the first SRS reactor facility to undergo the in-situ decommissioning (ISD) process. This ISD process complies with the 105-R Disassembly Basin project strategy as outlined in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for the Grouting of the R-Reactor Disassembly Basin at the Savannah River Site and includes: (1) Managing residual water by solidification in-place or evaporation at another facility; (2) Filling the below grade portion of the basin with cementitious materials to physically stabilize the basin and prevent collapse of the final cap - Sludge and debris in the bottom few feet of the basin will be encapsulated between the basin floor and overlying fill material to isolate it from the environment; (3) Demolishing the above grade portion of the structure and relocating the resulting debris to another location or disposing of the debris in-place; and (4) Capping the basin area with a concrete slab which is part of an engineered cap to prevent inadvertent intrusion. The estimated total grout volume to fill the 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin is 24,384 cubic meters or 31,894 cubic yards. Portland cement-based structural fill materials were designed and tested for the reactor ISD project, and a placement strategy for stabilizing the basin was developed. Based on structural engineering analyses and material flow considerations, maximum lift heights and differential height requirements were determined. Pertinent data and information related to the SRS 105-R Reactor Disassembly Basin in-situ decommissioning include: regulatory documentation, residual water management, area preparation activities, technology needs, fill material

  10. Preliminary analysis of gravity and aeromagnetic surveys of the Timber Mountain Area, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kane, M.F.; Webring, M.W.; Bhattacharyya, B.K.

    1981-12-31

    Recent (1977 to 1978) gravity and aeromagnetic surveys of the Timber Mountain region, southern Nevada, have revealed new details of subsurface structure and lithology. The data strongly suggest that deformation caused by volcanic events has been accommodated along straight-line faults combining in such a fashion as to given a curvilinear appearance to regional structure. The magnetic data suggest that rock units in the central graben and along the southeast margin of Timber Mountain may have been altered, perhaps thermally, from their original state. The gravity data indicate that the south part of the Timber Mountain is underlain by relatively dense rock possibly intrusive rock, like that which crops out along its southeast side. The gravity data also suggest that the Silent Canyon caldera may extend considerably south of its presently indicated southern limit and may underlie much of the area of Timber Mountain. The moat areas appear to be more rectangular or triangular than annular in shape. The southern part of Timber Mountain caldera is separated from the Yucca Mountain area to the south by a triangular horst. The structural relations of the rock units making up the horst are complex. Several linear terrain features in the southern part of the caldera area are closely aligned with geophysical features, implying that the terrain features are fault-controlled.