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1

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

2

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment Peer Review Panel Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Peer Review Panel for predicting the performance of a repository at Yucca Mountain. TSPA First Interim Report - June 20, 1997 TSPA Second Interim Report - December 12, 1997 TSPA Third Interim Report - March, 1998 TSPA Final Report - February 11, 1999 Joint NEA-IAEA International Peer Review of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project's Total System Performance Assessment Supporting the Site Recommendation Process - December, 2001 More Documents & Publications Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear

3

Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Total .............. 16,164,874 5,967,376 22,132,249 2,972,552 280,370 167,519 18,711,808 1993 Total .............. 16,691,139 6,034,504 22,725,642 3,103,014 413,971 226,743 18,981,915 1994 Total .............. 17,351,060 6,229,645 23,580,706 3,230,667 412,178 228,336 19,709,525 1995 Total .............. 17,282,032 6,461,596 23,743,628 3,565,023 388,392 283,739 19,506,474 1996 Total .............. 17,680,777 6,370,888 24,051,665 3,510,330 518,425 272,117 19,750,793 Alabama Total......... 570,907 11,394 582,301 22,601 27,006 1,853 530,841 Onshore ................ 209,839 11,394 221,233 22,601 16,762 1,593 180,277 State Offshore....... 209,013 0 209,013 0 10,244 260 198,509 Federal Offshore... 152,055 0 152,055 0 0 0 152,055 Alaska Total ............ 183,747 3,189,837 3,373,584 2,885,686 0 7,070 480,828 Onshore ................ 64,751 3,182,782

4

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 9.3 11.9 18.2 11.0 2.......................................................... 16.2 2.9 3.5 5.5 4.4 3 or More............................................. 9.0 1.5 2.1 2.9 2.5 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 4.7 4.6 7.7 5.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 0.6 0.9 1.5 1.1 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q 0.3 Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 7.9 11.4 15.4 10.2 Flat-panel LCD.................................

5

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

47.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 21.1 8.3 10.7 10.1 2.......................................................... 16.2 6.2 2.8 4.1 3.0 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.4 3.2 1.6 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 9.1 3.6 6.0 3.8 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.6 1.3 0.7 3 or More............................................. 0.7 0.3 Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 17.7 7.5 10.2 9.6 Flat-panel LCD.................................

6

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 18.2 10.0 2.9 5.3 2.......................................................... 16.2 5.5 3.0 0.7 1.8 3 or More............................................. 9.0 2.9 1.5 0.5 0.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 7.7 4.3 1.1 2.4 2.......................................................... 4.0 1.5 0.9 Q 0.4 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)................... 45.0 15.4 7.9 2.8 4.8 Flat-panel LCD.................................

7

Total............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total................................................................... Total................................................................... 111.1 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546

8

Total...................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,690,065 52,331,397 2,802,751 4,409,699 7,526,898 209,616 1993 Total................... 4,956,445 52,535,411 2,861,569 4,464,906 7,981,433 209,666 1994 Total................... 4,847,702 53,392,557 2,895,013 4,533,905 8,167,033 202,940 1995 Total................... 4,850,318 54,322,179 3,031,077 4,636,500 8,579,585 209,398 1996 Total................... 5,241,414 55,263,673 3,158,244 4,720,227 8,870,422 206,049 Alabama ...................... 56,522 766,322 29,000 62,064 201,414 2,512 Alaska.......................... 16,179 81,348 27,315 12,732 75,616 202 Arizona ........................ 27,709 689,597 28,987 49,693 26,979 534 Arkansas ..................... 46,289 539,952 31,006 67,293 141,300 1,488 California ..................... 473,310 8,969,308 235,068 408,294 693,539 36,613 Colorado...................... 110,924 1,147,743

9

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 2.1 0.6 Q 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 13.6 3.7 3.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 9.5 3.7 3.4 4.2 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.6 2.7 2.5 3.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 5.0 2.1 2.8 2.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.7 1.8 2.8 2.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.0 1.4 1.7 1.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.6 0.8 1.5 1.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

10

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.6 Q Q 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 9.0 4.2 1.5 3.2 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 8.6 4.7 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 6.0 2.9 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 4.1 2.1 0.7 1.3 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 3.0 1.8 0.5 0.7 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 2.1 1.2 0.5 0.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.5 0.8 0.3 0.4 4,000 or More.....................................................

11

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.9 1.0 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.9 9.0 6.3 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 4.4 8.6 5.0 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 3.5 6.0 4.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 3.2 4.1 2.6 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 2.7 3.0 2.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 2.1 2.1 0.9 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 1.7 1.5 0.9 4,000 or More.....................................................

12

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 1.0 0.2 0.8 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 6.3 1.4 4.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 5.0 1.6 3.4 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 4.0 1.4 2.6 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.6 0.9 1.7 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.4 0.9 1.4 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.9 0.3 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 0.9 0.4 0.5 4,000 or More.....................................................

13

Total.........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Floorspace (Square Feet) Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 2 Fewer than 500.................................................. 3.2 Q 0.8 0.9 0.8 0.5 500 to 999.......................................................... 23.8 1.5 5.4 5.5 6.1 5.3 1,000 to 1,499.................................................... 20.8 1.4 4.0 5.2 5.0 5.2 1,500 to 1,999.................................................... 15.4 1.4 3.1 3.5 3.6 3.8 2,000 to 2,499.................................................... 12.2 1.4 3.2 3.0 2.3 2.3 2,500 to 2,999.................................................... 10.3 1.5 2.3 2.7 2.1 1.7 3,000 to 3,499.................................................... 6.7 1.0 2.0 1.7 1.0 1.0 3,500 to 3,999.................................................... 5.2 0.8 1.5 1.5 0.7 0.7 4,000 or More.....................................................

14

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.9 0.5 0.4 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 4.6 3.6 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 2.8 2.2 0.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 1.9 1.4 0.5 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 2.3 1.7 0.5 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 2.2 1.7 0.6 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 1.6 1.0 0.6 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 1.1 0.9 0.3 4,000 or More.....................................................

15

Total..........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................................... 3.2 0.4 Q Q 0.5 500 to 999........................................................... 23.8 2.5 1.5 2.1 3.7 1,000 to 1,499..................................................... 20.8 1.1 2.0 1.5 2.5 1,500 to 1,999..................................................... 15.4 0.5 1.2 1.2 1.9 2,000 to 2,499..................................................... 12.2 0.7 0.5 0.8 1.4 2,500 to 2,999..................................................... 10.3 0.5 0.5 0.4 1.1 3,000 to 3,499..................................................... 6.7 0.3 Q 0.4 0.3 3,500 to 3,999..................................................... 5.2 Q Q Q Q 4,000 or More.....................................................

16

Total..........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500...................................... 3.1 2.3 403 360 165 366 348 93 500 to 999.............................................. 22.2 14.4 763 660 277 730 646 303 1,000 to 1,499........................................ 19.1 5.8 1,223 1,130 496 1,187 1,086 696 1,500 to 1,999........................................ 14.4 1.0 1,700 1,422 412 1,698 1,544 1,348 2,000 to 2,499........................................ 12.7 0.4 2,139 1,598 Q Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999........................................ 10.1 Q Q Q Q Q Q Q 3,000 or More......................................... 29.6 0.3 Q Q Q Q Q Q Heated Floorspace (Square Feet) None...................................................... 3.6 1.8 1,048 0 Q 827 0 407 Fewer than 500......................................

17

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,033 2,033 1,618 1,031 791 630 401 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................................... 3.2 357 336 113 188 177 59 500 to 999....................................................... 23.8 733 667 308 343 312 144 1,000 to 1,499................................................. 20.8 1,157 1,086 625 435 409 235 1,500 to 1,999................................................. 15.4 1,592 1,441 906 595 539 339 2,000 to 2,499................................................. 12.2 2,052 1,733 1,072 765 646 400 2,500 to 2,999................................................. 10.3 2,523 2,010 1,346 939 748 501 3,000 to 3,499................................................. 6.7 3,020 2,185 1,401 1,177 851 546 3,500 to 3,999................................................. 5.2 3,549 2,509 1,508

18

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500................................... 3.2 1.9 0.9 Q Q Q 1.3 2.3 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 10.5 7.3 3.3 1.4 1.2 6.6 12.9 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 5.8 7.0 3.8 2.2 2.0 3.9 8.9 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 3.1 4.2 3.4 2.0 2.7 1.9 5.0 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.7 2.7 2.9 1.8 3.2 1.1 2.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.2 2.2 2.3 1.7 2.9 0.6 2.0 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 0.9 1.4 1.5 1.0 1.9 0.4 1.4 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 0.8 1.2 1.0 0.8 1.5 0.4 1.3 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3 0.9 1.9 2.2 2.0 6.4 0.6 1.9 Heated Floorspace

19

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500.................................... 3.2 0.7 Q 0.3 0.3 0.7 0.6 0.3 Q 500 to 999........................................... 23.8 2.7 1.4 2.2 2.8 5.5 5.1 3.0 1.1 1,000 to 1,499..................................... 20.8 2.3 1.4 2.4 2.5 3.5 3.5 3.6 1.6 1,500 to 1,999..................................... 15.4 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.0 2.4 2.4 2.1 1.2 2,000 to 2,499..................................... 12.2 1.4 0.9 1.8 1.4 2.2 2.1 1.6 0.8 2,500 to 2,999..................................... 10.3 1.6 0.9 1.1 1.1 1.5 1.5 1.7 0.8 3,000 to 3,499..................................... 6.7 1.0 0.5 0.8 0.8 1.2 0.8 0.9 0.8 3,500 to 3,999..................................... 5.2 1.1 0.3 0.7 0.7 0.4 0.5 1.0 0.5 4,000 or More...................................... 13.3

20

Total................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.. .. 111.1 86.6 2,522 1,970 1,310 1,812 1,475 821 1,055 944 554 Total Floorspace (Square Feet) Fewer than 500............................. 3.2 0.9 261 336 162 Q Q Q 334 260 Q 500 to 999.................................... 23.8 9.4 670 683 320 705 666 274 811 721 363 1,000 to 1,499.............................. 20.8 15.0 1,121 1,083 622 1,129 1,052 535 1,228 1,090 676 1,500 to 1,999.............................. 15.4 14.4 1,574 1,450 945 1,628 1,327 629 1,712 1,489 808 2,000 to 2,499.............................. 12.2 11.9 2,039 1,731 1,055 2,143 1,813 1,152 Q Q Q 2,500 to 2,999.............................. 10.3 10.1 2,519 2,004 1,357 2,492 2,103 1,096 Q Q Q 3,000 or 3,499.............................. 6.7 6.6 3,014 2,175 1,438 3,047 2,079 1,108 N N N 3,500 to 3,999.............................. 5.2 5.1 3,549 2,505 1,518 Q Q Q N N N 4,000 or More...............................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO S OT ERO IGNAC IO-BLANCO AZ TEC BALLAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

BOE Reserve Class BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1- 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline AZ UT NM CO 1 2 Index Map for 2 Paradox-San Juan Panels 2001 Reserve Summary for All Paradox-San Juan Basin Fields Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Paradox-San Juan 250 174,193 20,653,622 3,616,464 Basin CO NM IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO BASIN BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BISTI BAL LAR D BASIN BISTI BLA NCO S OT ERO BAL LAR D LIND RITH W BASIN BLA NCO BLA NCO S BLA NCO S TAPAC ITO GAVIL AN BASIN BLA NCO The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by

22

BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO S OT ERO IGNAC IO-BLANCO AZ TEC BALLAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Reserve Class Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1- 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Basin Outline AZ UT NM CO 1 2 Index Map for 2 Paradox-San Juan Panels 2001 Reserve Summary for All Paradox-San Juan Basin Fields Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Paradox-San Juan 250 174,193 20,653,622 3,616,464 Basin CO NM IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO BASIN BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BISTI BAL LAR D BASIN BISTI BLA NCO S OT ERO BAL LAR D LIND RITH W BASIN BLA NCO BLA NCO S BLA NCO S TAPAC ITO GAVIL AN BASIN BLA NCO The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by

23

BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO S OT ERO IGNAC IO-BLANCO AZ TEC BALLAR  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquids Reserve Class Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1- 10,000 Mbbl 10,000.1 - 100,000 Mbbl Basin Outline AZ UT NM CO 1 2 Index Map for 2 Paradox-San Juan Panels 2001 Reserve Summary for All Paradox-San Juan Basin Fields Total Total Total Number Liquid Gas BOE of Reserves Reserves Reserves Fields (Mbbl) (MMcf) (Mbbl) Paradox-San Juan 250 174,193 20,653,622 3,616,464 Basin CO NM IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO IGNAC IO-BLANCO BASIN BASIN BLAN CO BLAN CO BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BASIN BISTI BAL LAR D BASIN BISTI BLA NCO S OT ERO BAL LAR D LIND RITH W BASIN BLA NCO BLA NCO S BLA NCO S TAPAC ITO GAVIL AN BASIN BLA NCO The mapped oil and gas field boundary outlines were created by the Reserves and Production Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration pursuant to studies required by

24

Distribution of hazardous air pollutant trace elements, total sulfur, and ash in coals from five Tertiary basins in the Rocky Mountain Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Arithmetic mean values of the contents of hazardous air pollutant (HAP) trace elements named in the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (antimony, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, mercury, nickel, selenium, and uranium), ash, and total sulfur were statistically compared on a whole-coal basis for Paleocene coals from five Tertiary basins in the Rocky Mountain Region. The study of proximate and elemental analyses indicate a relationship between trace element contents and paleogeography.

Ellis, M.S.; Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Venice Sustainability Advisory Panel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Venice Sustainability Advisory PanelFINAL REPORT Venice Sustainability Advisory Panel FinalInvestigator The Venice Sustainability Advisory Panel (

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

patch panel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a communications system, a board, panel, or console that (a) is equipped with a jackfield mounted on its surface and (b) enables connection to various points in the system for patching, monitoring, and testing...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Interconnection Panel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation—given at at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the interconnection panel, including an overview of the generation interconnection process (GIP), and interconnection agreements and their terms.

28

Interconnection Panel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Interconnection Panel Dan Tunnicliff, P.E. Manager, Government Segment, Southern California Edison Southern California Edison Application Processing Technical Scoping Meeting Technical Studies Interconnection Agreement Project Implementation Overview of Generation Interconnection Process (GIP) * Transmission Level Interconnections - Governed by CAISO Tariff. * Generally for 220 kV and higher. * All applications must be submitted to the CAISO. * CAISO administers its tariff, which is approved by FERC. * Distribution Level Interconnections - Governed by SCE's WDAT. * Generally below 220 kV. * All applications must be submitted to SCE. * SCE administers its tariff, which is approved by FERC. 2 Southern California Edison Interconnection agreements are critically

29

MAKING SOLAR PANELS GREENER  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

MAKING SOLAR PANELS GREENER ... Producing PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS more sustainably will require reducing energy consumption, toxic substances ... For example, consider crystalline silicon-based photovoltaic solar panels, which currently boast about 80% of the global market. ...

SARAH EVERTS

2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

30

Independent External Peer Review Report ACT River Basin 2 July 2013 ii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ ACT River Basin 2 July 2013 ii Table of Contents List of Panel 6 3.3 Preparation and Charge for Peer Review Panel 7 3.4 Performing the IEPR 7 3.5 Panel Consensus 9 #12;Independent External Peer Review Report ­ ACT River Basin 2 July 2013 iii List of Tables Table

US Army Corps of Engineers

31

Estimating Demand Response with Panel Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we extend to panel data the iterated linear least squares estimator of Blundell and Robin (in J Appl Econometrics 14: 209–232 1999). It is shown to be consistent when total expenditure and regre...

Sébastien Lecocq; Jean-Marc Robin

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Proposal Review Panel Descriptions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proposal Review Panel Descriptions Proposal Review Panel Descriptions To ensure competent scientific review, a proposal may be assigned to a different panel (at the discretion of the Review Panel Chair), or the panel may seek additional ad hoc reviews from other experts. High-Pressure This panel reviews scattering and diffraction proposals that focus on materials at high pressure. Techniques such as (but not limited to) diffraction, nuclear resonant scattering, and inelastic x-ray scattering for materials at high pressure are appropriate for this panel to consider. Instrumentation This panel reviews proposals related to the development of beamline instrumentation, sample environments, x-ray optical components, and/or detectors that are relevant to synchrotron radiation research. This panel

33

GIS Ethics Panel Preparation Panel Session  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GIS Ethics Panel Preparation Panel Session: 3236 Geographic Information Ethics and GIScience II State University Geney Terry - GISCI Session Description: Ethical engagements with the multitude of GIS, the variety of applications of GIS&T has led the U.S. Department of Labor to highlight "geographic technology

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

34

Technical Review Panel Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TRP Report v7, 12 Aug 2012 TRP Report Final December 2012 TRP Report v7, 12 Aug 2012 TRP Report Final December 2012 Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report Evaluation and Identification of future R&D on eight Advanced Reactor Concepts, conducted April - September 2012 December 2012 Public release version 2 Public release version 3 Table of Contents Summary ................................................................................................................................... 4 1. Overview of the Technical Review Panel Process ............................................................... 5 2. Technical Review Panel Criteria ......................................................................................... 6 3. Concept Summaries ........................................................................................................... 8

35

Patch Panel Control Room  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patch Panel CCR-EE-092 Control Room CCR-EE-100 Control Room Optic Patch Rack CSS-EE-954 Junction (PC Fault Event) Patch Panel CCC-EE-209 Junction Area E O PC Fault Event PC Fault Event PC Fault Event CNBS-EE-358 138' Level Patch Panel CNBS-EE-389 138' Level E E E Crates 9, 19 COH1-EE-651 FCPC Crates 21

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

36

Solar reflection panels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar collector comprising a glass mirror, and a composite panel, wherein the back of the mirror is affixed to a front surface of the composite panel. The composite panel comprises a front sheet affixed to a surface of a core material, preferably a core material comprising a honeycomb structure, and a back sheet affixed to an opposite surface of the core material. The invention may further comprise a sealing strip, preferably comprising EPDM, positioned between the glass mirror and the front surface of the composite panel. The invention also is of methods of making such solar collectors.

Diver, Jr., Richard B. (Albuquerque, NM); Grossman, James W. (Albuquerque, NM); Reshetnik, Michael (Boulder, CO)

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

37

European Meteorological Telecommunications Panel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... under the auspices of the International Meteorological Organisation, which recently decided to establish a meteorological telecommunications panel under each of its six regional commissions. This was the first meeting of ... meeting of the panel for the European region, and it was attended by meteorologists and telecommunications experts from Belgium, Eire, France, Great Britain, Italy, Netherlands, Norway (also ...

1948-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

38

CAS marketing panel formed  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CAS marketing panel formed ... A nine-member marketing panel has been formed as an adjunct to the Chemical Abstracts Service advisory board. ... In discussing the role of the panel, Philip K. Reily, director of the CAS marketing division, commented: "Marketing techniques—specifically adapted to modern technical problems, well refined and developed, and skill-fully executed—are the only effective way to insure that our chemical information services are going to be fully understood and widely utilized by chemists and chemical engineers all over the world." ...

1967-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

39

EuropeanEuropean PanelPanel FederationFederation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EuropeanEuropean PanelPanel FederationFederation viewpointviewpoint onon sustainablesustainable woodwood energyenergy policiespolicies #12;EuropeanEuropean PanelPanel FederationFederation Members energy for manufacturingfor manufacturing ·· Wood products are anWood products are an energy source

40

Gas filled panel insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation.

Griffith, Brent T. (Berkeley, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Gas filled panel insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

42

Oven wall panel construction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

Ellison, Kenneth (20 Avondale Cres., Markham, CA); Whike, Alan S. (R.R. #1, Caledon East, both of Ontario, CA)

1980-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

43

SSRL- Proposal Review Panel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab search Go [an error occurred while processing this directive] Proposal Review Panel Sub Panels Structural Molecular Biology & Biophysics Materials 1: Structure, Reactivity & Self-Assembly Materials 2: Electronic Properties, Magnetic Properties & Surface Science Molecular Environmental & Interface Science Membership Torgny Gustafsson Rutgers University Dept of Physics & Astronomy 136 Frelinghuysen Rd Piscataway NJ 08854-0849 Victor Henrich Yale University Dept of Applied Physics 327 Becton Center, 15 Prospect St. New Haven CT 06511 Christopher P. Hill University of Utah Biochemistry 15 N. Medical Dr. East, Rm 4100 Salt Lake City, UT 84112-5650 Franz Himpsel University of Wisconsin Dept of Physics 1150 University Avenue

44

FPGA Implementation of Multilayer Perceptron for Modeling of Photovoltaic panel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Number of electronic applications using artificial neural network-based solutions has increased considerably in the last few years. However, their applications in photovoltaic systems are very limited. This paper introduces the preliminary result of the modeling and simulation of photovoltaic panel based on neural network and VHDL-language. In fact, an experimental database of meteorological data (irradiation, temperature) and output electrical generation signals of the PV-panel (current and voltage) has been used in this study. The inputs of the ANN-PV-panel are the daily total irradiation and mean average temperature while the outputs are the current and voltage generated from the panel. Firstly, a dataset of 4x364 have been used for training the network. Subsequently, the neural network (MLP) corresponding to PV-panel is simulated using VHDL language based on the saved weights and bias of the network. Simulation results of the trained MLP-PV panel based on Matlab and VHDL are presented. The proposed PV-panel model based ANN and VHDL permit to evaluate the performance PV-panel using only the environmental factors and involves less computational efforts, and it can be used for predicting the output electrical energy from the PV-panel.

Mekki, H.; Belhout, K. [Department of Electronics, RASIC laboratory BLIDA UniversityBLIDA (Algeria); Mellit, A.; Salhi, H. [Department of Electronics, Control laboratory BLIDA UniversityBLIDA (Algeria)

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

45

Solar Panels Plus LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Panels Plus LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Solar Panels Plus LLC Place: Chesapeake, Virginia Zip: 23320 Sector: Solar Product: Solar Panels Plus LLC distributes solar energy...

46

Industry Partners Panel  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Industry Panel presenters include: Michael G. Andrew, Director - Academic and Technical Programs, Advanced Products and Materials, Johnson Controls Power Solutions Michael A. Fetcenko, Vice President and Managing Director, BASF Battery Materials – Ovonic, BASF Corporation Adam Kahn, Founder and CEO, AKHAN Technologies, Inc. Stephen E. Zimmer, Executive Director, United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR)

47

Spotlight: Schools Expert Panel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......also covers teacher education and initial teacher...systems used by local education authorities and schools...on current practice. Posters and leaflets on ICT...Panel reports to the BCS Education and Training Forum...Department for Education and Science, the Office for Standards......

Spotlight: Schools Expert Panel

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

President's panel probes sustainable development  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

President's panel probes sustainable development ... The President's Council on Sustainable Development, a blue-ribbon advisory panel established by President Bill Clinton last June, held its first meeting outside the nation's capital earlier this month in the Seattle. ...

DEBORAH ILLMAN

1994-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Lighting Technology Panel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Technology Panel Technology Panel Federal Utility Partnership Working Group N b 2009 November 1 1 8, 2009 Doug Avery Southern California Edison Southern California Edison National Energy Conservation M d t Mandates * There are Federal and State Mandates to reduce energy consumption - California Investor Owned Electric Utilities are ordered to save around 3 Billion kWh's each y year from 2007-2113 - Federal buildings ordered to reduce electrical Federal buildings ordered to reduce electrical energy consumption 35% by 2012 Energy Consump ption gy Lighting accounts for 42 7% of energy consumption Lighting accounts for 42.7% of energy consumption Data Courtesy of SDG&E Data Courtesy of SDG&E Energy Consump ption gy More than ¾ of the lighting load is non-residential. Data Courtesy of SDG&E

50

Concentrating photovoltaic solar panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to photovoltaic power systems, photovoltaic concentrator modules, and related methods. In particular, the present invention features concentrator modules having interior points of attachment for an articulating mechanism and/or an articulating mechanism that has a unique arrangement of chassis members so as to isolate bending, etc. from being transferred among the chassis members. The present invention also features adjustable solar panel mounting features and/or mounting features with two or more degrees of freedom. The present invention also features a mechanical fastener for secondary optics in a concentrator module.

Cashion, Steven A; Bowser, Michael R; Farrelly, Mark B; Hines, Braden E; Holmes, Howard C; Johnson, Jr., Richard L; Russell, Richard J; Turk, Michael F

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

WIPP_Panel_7_Approved  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Panel 7 Certified and Ready for Waste Disposal Panel 7 Certified and Ready for Waste Disposal CARLSBAD, N.M., August 1, 2013 - In mid-July 2013, the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) approved the use of Panel 7 for disposal of defense- related transuranic (TRU) waste at the Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Approval by NMED for each underground waste disposal panel prior to use is required under the WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit (Permit). A panel consists of seven waste disposal rooms and each room is approximately 13 feet high, 33 feet wide and 300 feet long. Mining and outfitting, which includes installation of electricity, monitoring equipment and air regulating bulkheads, of a panel takes about two to two and a half years. Once the mining and outfitting are completed,

52

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change About the Lab Our Vision Lab Leadership History Nobelists Visit Navigate Section About the Lab Our Vision Lab Leadership History...

53

Thermal insulations using vacuum panels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Burke, Melissa S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

54

Plane and parabolic solar panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a plane and parabolic collector that absorbs radiant energy and transforms it in heat. Therefore we have a panel to heat water. We study how to increment this capture of solar beams onto the panel in order to increase its efficiency in heating water.

Sales, J H O

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Plane and parabolic solar panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a plane and parabolic collector that absorbs radiant energy and transforms it in heat. Therefore we have a panel to heat water. We study how to increment this capture of solar beams onto the panel in order to increase its efficiency in heating water.

J. H. O. Sales; A. T. Suzuki

2009-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

56

Panelized wall system with foam core insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

57

Hydrogen Safety Panel | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Panel Hydrogen Safety Panel 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C....

58

Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels September 20, 2011 - 7:13am Addthis These...

59

1994 Panel 1 Utilization Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is intended to receive, handle, and permanently dispose of transuranic (TRU) waste. To fulfill this mission, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) constructed a full-scale facility to demonstrate both technical and operational principles of the permanent isolation of TRU waste. The WIPP consists of surface and underground facilities. Panel 1 is situated in the underground facility horizon which is located approximately 2,150 feet below the surface in the predominantly halite Salado Formation. The Panel 1 Utilization Plan provides a strategy for the optimum use of Panel 1 which is consistent with the priorities established by the DOE to accomplish the WIPP mission. These priorities, which include maintaining personnel safety, conducting performance assessment, and continued operational enhancements, are the guiding premise for the decisions on the planned usage of the WIPP underground facility. The continuation of ongoing investigations along with the planned testing and training to be carried out in Panel 1 will enhance the current knowledge and understanding of the operational and geotechnical aspects of the panel configuration. This enhancement will ultimately lead to safer, more efficient, and more cost-effective methods of operation. Excavation of the waste storage area began in May 1986 with the mining of entries to Panel 1. The original design for the waste storage rooms at the WIPP provided a limited period of time during which to mine the openings and to emplace waste. Each panel, consisting of seven storage rooms, was scheduled to be mined and filled in less than 5 years. Panel 1 was developed to receive waste for a demonstration phase that was scheduled to start in October 1988. The demonstration phase was deferred, and the experimental test program was modified to use contact-handled (CH) transuranic waste in bin-scale tests, planned for Room 1, Panel 1.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

One Panel One Roof, DOE Powering Solar Workforce | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

One Panel One Roof, DOE Powering Solar Workforce One Panel One Roof, DOE Powering Solar Workforce...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $28.49 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $38.51 $39.67 - 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $20.35 $16.14 $16.64 -9.6 3.1 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $19.64 $19.60 $20.41 1.9 4.2 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $14.02 $16.13 $16.23 7.6 0.6 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $43.43 $40.18 $39.62 -4.5 -1.4

62

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $26.24 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $35.10 $35.74 - 1.8 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $18.74 $14.70 $14.99 -10.6 1.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $18.09 $17.86 $18.39 0.8 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $12.91 $14.70 $14.63 6.4 -0.5 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $40.00 $36.62 $35.70 -5.5 -2.5

63

TOTAL Full-TOTAL Full-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conducting - Orchestral 6 . . 6 5 1 . 6 5 . . 5 Conducting - Wind Ensemble 3 . . 3 2 . . 2 . 1 . 1 Early- X TOTAL Full- Part- X TOTAL Alternative Energy 6 . . 6 11 . . 11 13 2 . 15 Biomedical Engineering 52 English 71 . 4 75 70 . 4 74 72 . 3 75 Geosciences 9 . 1 10 15 . . 15 19 . . 19 History 37 1 2 40 28 3 3 34

Portman, Douglas

64

Total Imports  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Imports - Total Imports - Crude Oil Imports - Crude Oil, Commercial Imports - by SPR Imports - into SPR by Others Imports - Total Products Imports - Total Motor Gasoline Imports - Finished Motor Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Reformulated Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Other Reformulated Gasoline Imports - Conventional Gasoline Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol Imports - Conv. Gasoline Blended w/ Fuel Ethanol, Ed55 & Ed55 Imports - Other Conventional Gasoline Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Ether Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, RBOB w/ Alcohol Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, CBOB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, GTAB Imports - Motor Gasoline Blend. Components, Other Imports - Fuel Ethanol Imports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Imports - Distillate Fuel Oil Imports - Distillate F.O., 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Imports - Distillate F.O., > 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 500 ppm to 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Distillate F.O., > 2000 ppm Sulfur Imports - Residual Fuel Oil Imports - Propane/Propylene Imports - Other Other Oils Imports - Kerosene Imports - NGPLs/LRGs (Excluding Propane/Propylene) Exports - Total Crude Oil and Products Exports - Crude Oil Exports - Products Exports - Finished Motor Gasoline Exports - Kerosene-Type Jet Fuel Exports - Distillate Fuel Oil Exports - Residual Fuel Oil Exports - Propane/Propylene Exports - Other Oils Net Imports - Total Crude Oil and Products Net Imports - Crude Oil Net Imports - Petroleum Products Period: Weekly 4-Week Avg.

65

Detector Advisory Panel (DAP) Report  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ATLAS Project Manager's Review ATLAS Project Manager's Review 1-2 April 2010 Panel Members Lothar Bauerdick, FNAL Ray Larsen, SLAC Ronald Lipton, FNAL David Morrison, BNL Robert Roser, FNAL Steve Wolbers, FNAL Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York 10 May 2010 Executive Summary The Detector and Computing Advisory Panels (DAP and CAP) reviewed the status and plans of the US-ATLAS Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory on April 1-2, 2010. The Panel was extremely pleased to hear of the highly successful commissioning of the ATLAS detector during early LHC collisions. The detector operated successfully, with no worse than 97% active channel count in any subsystem, from the start of collisions. There appears to be an excellent understanding of the detector performance via simulations. The BNL computing center has

66

Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels September 20, 2011 - 7:13am Addthis These structural insulated panels consist of foam insulation sandwiched between oriented strand boards. (Courtesy of Michael Bacchler) These structural insulated panels consist of foam insulation sandwiched between oriented strand boards. (Courtesy of Michael Bacchler) Alexis Powers EDITOR'S NOTE: Originally posted on the Solar Decathlon News Blog on September 19, 2011. Editor's Note: This post is one of a series of technology spotlights that introduces common technologies used in U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon team houses. Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements

67

Peg supported thermal insulation panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprises high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

Peg supported thermal insulation panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprising high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

Nowobilski, Jeffert J. (Orchard Park, NY); Owens, William J. (Kenmore, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Geothermal Technologies Program Blue Ribbon Panel Recommendations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes the recommendations of the Geothermal Blue Ribbon Panel, a panel of geothermal experts assembled in March 2011 for a discussion on the future of geothermal energy in the U.S.

70

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43 $0.0294 W - W W - - - 43 $0.0294 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $0.0161 W W W W $0.0216 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $0.0296 $0.0277 $0.0292 $0.0309 $0.0325 $0.0328 $0.0357 $0.0451 $0.0427 4.7 -5.3 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

71

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

$15.49 $13.83 W - W W - - - $15.49 $13.83 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $19.46 W W W W $29.49 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $10.33 $9.58 $10.68 $12.03 $13.69 $14.71 $16.11 $19.72 $20.69 9.1 4.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

72

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

$0.0323 $0.0284 W - W W - - - $0.0323 $0.0284 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $0.0146 W W W W $0.0223 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $0.0269 $0.0255 $0.0275 $0.0299 $0.0325 $0.0339 $0.0380 $0.0490 $0.0468 7.2 -4.3 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

73

Inside the White House: Solar Panels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Go inside the White House and learn about the installation of solar panels on the roof of the residence.

74

European Panel FederationEuropean Panel Federation viewpoint on wood energy policiesviewpoint on wood energy policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

European Panel FederationEuropean Panel Federation viewpoint on wood energy policiesviewpoint on wood energy policies Eva JanssensEva Janssens (Economic Adviser)(Economic Adviser) #12;European Panel FederationEuropean Panel Federation Members in 23 countriesMembers in 23 countries Particleboard 32.1 million

75

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Basin Basin Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware W W $16.45 $14.29 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $21.45 W W W W $28.57 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $11.39 $10.39 $11.34 $12.43 $13.69 $14.25 $15.17 $18.16 $18.85 6.5 3.8

76

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

77

Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas-Louisiana- Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin Appalachian Basin Wind River Basin Eastern Shelf NW Shelf Abo Sussex-Shannon Muddy J Mesaverde- Lance-Lewis Medina/Clinton-Tuscarora Bradford-Venango-Elk Berea-Murrysville Piceance Basin Bossier Williston Basin Ft Worth Basin Davis Bighorn Basin Judith River- Eagle Permian Basin Anadarko Basin Denver Basin San Juan Basin North-Central Montana Area Uinta Basin Austin Chalk Codell-Niobrara Penn-Perm Carbonate Niobrara Chalk Dakota Morrow Mesaverde Thirty- One Cleveland Ozona Canyon Wasatch- Mesaverde Red Fork Mesaverde Granite Wash Stuart City-Edwards Bowdoin- Greenhorn Travis Peak Olmos Cotton Valley Vicksburg Wilcox Lobo Pictured Cliffs Cretaceous Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Mancos- Dakota Gilmer Lime Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States

78

Divergent/passive margin basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book discusses the detailed geology of the four divergent margin basins and establishes a set of analog scenarios which can be used for future petroleum exploration. The divergent margin basins are the Campos basin of Brazil, the Gabon basin, the Niger delta, and the basins of the northwest shelf of Australia. These four petroleum basins present a wide range of stratigraphic sequences and structural styles that represent the diverse evolution of this large and important class of world petroleum basins.

Edwards, J.D. (Shell Oil Company (US)); Santogrossi, P.A. (Shell Offshore Inc. (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Solar Panels Â… A Life Story  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PLAN PLAN Solar Panels: A Life Story Grade Level: 7-9 Subjects: Science & Economics Length: 3-4 Class Periods Solar Panels - A Life Story INTRODUCTION As solar power gains popularity, solar panels are quickly becoming a part of everyday life. However, the public knows surprisingly little about these energy sources. Where do solar panels come from? How do they work? How much do they really cost? This lesson plan will guide students toward answers by exploring the many factors that influence how solar panels are manufactured. LESSON OVERVIEW Grade Level & Subject: 7 - 9, Science and Economics Length: 3 - 4 class periods Objectives: After completing this lesson, students will be able to: ï‚· Identify the raw materials that comprise a solar (photovoltaic, or PV) panel, where

80

Integrated Solar Panel Antennas for Cube Satellites.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis work presents an innovative solution for small satellite antennas by integrating slot antennas and solar cells on the same panel to save small… (more)

Mahmoud, Mahmoud N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

82

Origin of cratonic basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tectonic subsidence curves show that the Illinois, Michigan, and Williston basins formed by initial fault-controlled mechanical subsidence during rifting and by subsequent thermal subsidence. Thermal subsidence began around 525 Ma in the Illinois Basin, 520-460 Ma in the Michigan Basin, and 530-500 Ma in the Williston Basin. In the Illinois Basin, a second subsidence episode (middle Mississippian through Early Permian) was caused by flexural foreland subsidence in response to the Alleghanian-Hercynian orogeny. Past workers have suggested mantle phase changes at the base of the crust, mechanical subsidence in response to isostatically uncompensated excess mass following igneous intrusions, intrusion of mantle plumes into the crust, or regional thermal metamorphic events as causes of basin initiation. Cratonic basins of North America, Europe, Africa, and South America share common ages of formation, histories of sediment accumulation, temporal volume changes of sediment fills, and common dates of interregional unconformities. Their common date of formation suggests initiation of cratonic basins in response to breakup of a late Precambrian supercontinent. This supercontinent acted as a heat lens that caused partial melting of the lower crust and upper mantle followed by emplacement of anorogenic granites during extensional tectonics in response to supercontinent breakup. Intrusion of anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks weakened continental lithosphere, thus providing a zone of localized regional stretching and permitting formation of cratonic basins almost simultaneously over sites of intrusion of these anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks.

de V. Klein, G.; Hsui, A.T.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

STFC Astronomy Advisory Panel Report (October 2012) STFC Astronomy Advisory Panel report (October 2012) 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;STFC Astronomy Advisory Panel Report (October 2012) STFC Astronomy Advisory Panel report (October 2012) 1 STFC Astronomy Advisory Panel 2012 Programmatic Review report to PPAN (October 2012) Executive summary This document provides a roadmap for UK astronomy and provides advice for future science

Crowther, Paul

84

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Expert Panel: Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes March 1999 Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes September 25-26, 1998 Arlington, Virginia The Expert Panel ............................................................................................. Page 1 Charge To The Expert Panel........................................................................... Page 2 Executive Summary......................................................................................... Page 3 Introduction ...................................................................................................... Page 4 Rationale.......................................................................................................... Page 6 Economic Analysis...........................................................................................

85

JGI - CSP Proposal Study Panel  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

User Programs User Programs Project Management Office Community Science Program Emerging Technologies Opportunity Program Technology Development Pilot Program Genomic Encyc. of Bacteria and Archaea MyJGI: Information for Collaborators The CSP Proposal Study Panel CSP | Overview | How to Propose a Project | Review Process | DOE Relevance Proposal Schedule | Project Management | Forms | FAQ | People and Contacts Members Nina Agabian University of California, San Francisco, http://www.ucsf.edu Chris Amemiya Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason, http://www.benaroyaresearch.org Gary L. Andersen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, http://www.lbl.gov Jo Ann Banks Purdue University, http://www.purdue.edu John Battista Louisiana State University, http://www.lsu.edu Fred Brockman

86

Laser illuminated flat panel display  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 10 inch laser illuminated flat panel Planar Optic Display (POD) screen has been constructed and tested. This POD screen technology is an entirely new concept in display technology. Although the initial display is flat and made of glass, this technology lends itself to applications where a plastic display might be wrapped around the viewer. The display screen is comprised of hundreds of planar optical waveguides where each glass waveguide represents a vertical line of resolution. A black cladding layer, having a lower index of refraction, is placed between each waveguide layer. Since the cladding makes the screen surface black, the contrast is high. The prototype display is 9 inches wide by 5 inches high and approximately I inch thick. A 3 milliwatt HeNe laser is used as the illumination source and a vector scanning technique is employed.

Veligdan, J.T.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Kingspan Insulated Panels: Order (2013-CE-5353)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE ordered Kingspan Insulated Panels, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Kingspan Insulated Panels had failed to certify that any basic models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

88

Carports with Solar Panels do Double Duty for Navy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carports with Solar Panels do Double Duty for Navy Carports with Solar Panels do Double Duty for Navy Carports with Solar Panels do Double Duty for Navy May 14, 2010 - 12:22pm Addthis Joshua DeLung What does this project do? In total, all of China Lake's solar PV projects generate enough electricity a year to power up to 1,200 houses on the grid provided by Southern California Edison, the local utility. The base estimates that it saves about $557,000 a year from the solar panels. At Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, heat is a fact of life. The base is located on the edge of the Mojave Desert near Ridgecrest, Calif., where the blistering summer heat can actually peel the paint off cars. Longtime desert residents know how to deal with it, but thanks to an ongoing environmental program, many base employees no longer have to do so. Since

89

Thin film photovoltaic panel and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thin film photovoltaic panel includes a backcap for protecting the active components of the photovoltaic cells from adverse environmental elements. A spacing between the backcap and a top electrode layer is preferably filled with a desiccant to further reduce water vapor contamination of the environment surrounding the photovoltaic cells. The contamination of the spacing between the backcap and the cells may be further reduced by passing a selected gas through the spacing subsequent to sealing the backcap to the base of the photovoltaic panels, and once purged this spacing may be filled with an inert gas. The techniques of the present invention are preferably applied to thin film photovoltaic panels each formed from a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged on a vitreous substrate. The stability of photovoltaic conversion efficiency remains relatively high during the life of the photovoltaic panel, and the cost of manufacturing highly efficient panels with such improved stability is significantly reduced.

Ackerman, Bruce (El Paso, TX); Albright, Scot P. (El Paso, TX); Jordan, John F. (El Paso, TX)

1991-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

90

Demonstration of membrane aeration panels: City of Geneva Wastewater Treatment Plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the design, construction, and testing of membrane aeration panels at the Marsh Creek wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Geneva, NY. The operators at the Geneva plant have undertaken a long-term program to upgrade wastewater treatment processes and lower operating costs. The aging mechanical surface aerators at the Marsh Creek treatment plant were replaced by a state-of-the-art membrane panel system. This fine-bubble diffused air system offers higher oxygen transfer efficiency than surface aerators or other types of fine-bubble diffused-air systems. The project had four objectives: to decrease the amount of electricity used at the plant for aeration; to enable the plant`s existing aeration basins to accommodate higher organic loads and/or nitrify the wastewater should the need arise; to provide an even distribution of dissolved oxygen within the aeration basins to enhance biological wastewater treatment activity; and to provide technical data to assess the performance of the membrane panel system versus other forms of wastewater aeration.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Oil and gas resources in the West Siberian Basin, Russia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this study is to assess the oil and gas potential of the West Siberian Basin of Russia. The study does not analyze the costs or technology necessary to achieve the estimates of the ultimate recoverable oil and gas. This study uses reservoir data to estimate recoverable oil and gas quantities which were aggregated to the field level. Field totals were summed to a basin total for discovered fields. An estimate of undiscovered oil and gas, from work of the US Geological Survey (USGS), was added to give a total basin resource volume. Recent production decline points out Russia`s need to continue development of its discovered recoverable oil and gas. Continued exploration is required to discover additional oil and gas that remains undiscovered in the basin.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

K-Basins.pub  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 AUDIT REPORT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES COMPLETION OF K BASINS MILESTONES APRIL 2002 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Completion of K Basins Milestones" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (Department) has been storing 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The fuel, used in support of Hanford's former mission, is currently stored in canisters that are kept in two enclosed water-filled pools known as the K Basins. The K Basins represent a significant risk to the environment due to their deteriorating condition. In fact, the K East Basin, which is near the Columbia River, has

93

Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the underside of the tilted solar panels and the surface of the roof under the solar panel (Fig.  2).  An air temperature of the  solar panel is similar to the roof 

Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

95

Bonded Bracket Assmebly for Frameless Solar Panels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 2011 the US Department of Energy announced their new Sunshot Initiative. The Sunshot goal is to reduce the total cost of solar energy systems by about 75 percent before the end of the decade. The DOE estimated that a total installed cost of $1 per watt for photovoltaic systems would be equivalent to 6���¢/kilowatt hour (kWh) for energy available from the grid. The DOE also estimated that to meet the $1 per watt goal, PV module costs would need to be reduced to $.50 per watt, balance of systems costs would need to be reduced to $.40 per watt, and power electronic costs would need to reach $.10 per watt. To address the BOS balance of systems cost component of the $1 per watt goal, the DOE announced a funding opportunity called (BOS-X) Extreme Balance of System Hardware Cost Reductions. The DOE identified eight areas within the total BOS costs: 1) installation labor, 2) installation materials, 3) installation overhead and profit, 4) tracker, 5) permitting and commissioning, 6) site preparation, 7) land acquisition, 8) sales tax. The BOS-X funding announcement requested applications in four specific topics: Topic 1: Transformational Building Integrated Photovoltaic (BIPV) Modules Topic 2: Roof and Ground Mount Innovations Topic 3: Transformational Photovoltaic System Designs Topic 4: Development of New Wind Load Codes for PV Systems The application submitted by ARaymond Tinnerman reflected the requirements listed in Topic #2, Roof and Ground Mount Innovations. The goal of topic #2 was to develop technologies that would result in the extreme reduction of material and labor costs associated with applications that require physical connections and attachments to roof and ground mount structures. The topics researched in this project included component cost reduction, labor reduction, weight reduction, wiring innovations, and alternative material utilization. The project objectives included: 1) The development of an innovative quick snap bracket assembly that would be bonded to frameless PV modules for commercial rooftop installations. 2) The development of a composite pultruded rail to replace traditional racking materials. 3) In partnership with a roofing company, pilot the certification of a commercial roof to be solar panel compliant, eliminating the need for structural analysis and government oversight resulting in significantly decreased permitting costs. 4) Reduce the sum of all cost impacts in topic #2 from a baseline total of $2.05/watt to $.34/watt.

Murray, Todd

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Minimal Viewing Distance Calculation in LED Display Panels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Light-emitting diode (LED) display panels have received more attention recently. These panels usually are placed in public places such as streets, ...

Nazeran Motlagh, A Ali; Hashemi, B Massoud Reza

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Obama Administration Announces Plans to Install New Solar Panels...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Plans to Install New Solar Panels on the White House Residence Obama Administration Announces Plans to Install New Solar Panels on the White House Residence October 5, 2010 -...

98

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Panel Discussion: 2010...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Panel Discussion: 2010 SAE World Congress DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Panel Discussion: 2010 SAE World Congress Presentation by...

99

New Ideas for Seeding Your Solar Marketplace Workshop Panel Presentati...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Panel Presentations New Ideas for Seeding Your Solar Marketplace Workshop Panel Presentations Download the speaker presentations from the 2014 SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and...

100

San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with Clean Water May 26, 2010 - 12:11pm Addthis San Diego’s Otay Water Treatment Plant is generating clean electricity along with clean water, with a total capacity of 945 KW | Photo courtesy of SunEdison San Diego's Otay Water Treatment Plant is generating clean electricity along with clean water, with a total capacity of 945 KW | Photo courtesy of SunEdison Just north of the U.S.-Mexican border, San Diego's Otay Water Treatment Plant processes up to 34 million gallons of water a day. Thanks to the city's ambitious solar energy program, the facility may soon be able to do that with net zero electricity consumption. In early April, workers activated a 945-kW solar photovoltaic (PV) energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Water Resource Challenges Water Resource Challenges From Energy Production Major Types of Power Generation in SRB - Total 15,300 Megawatts - 37.5% 4.0% 12.0% 15.5% 31.0% Nuclear Coal Natural Gas Hydroelectric Other Marcellus Shale Gas Development in the Susquehanna River Basin The Basin: * 27,510-square-mile watershed * Comprises 43 percent of the Chesapeake Bay watershed * 4.2 million population * 60 percent forested * 32,000+ miles of waterways The Susquehanna River: * 444 miles, largest tributary to the Chesapeake Bay * Supplies 18 million gallons a minute to the Bay Susquehanna River Basin Geographic Location of Marcellus Shale within Susq. River Basin 72% of Basin (20,000 Sq. Miles) Underlain by Marcellus Shale Approximate Amount of Natural Gas in Marcellus Shale * U.S. currently produces approx. 30 trillion

102

Proposal Review Panel | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proposal Review Panel Proposal Review Panel Submitting a proposal is the first step to access beam time at SSRL. Proposals are peer reviewed and rated by the SSRL Proposal Review Panel (PRP) on a scale from 1 (highest) to 5 (lowest). Successful proposals are eligble to request and may be awarded beam time on SSRL beam lines, with priority given to the highest rated proposals and those which demonstrate efficient and productive use of beam time. We have three proposal calls per year with one on-site PRP meeting at SSRL annually. Access Policy The work of the PRP is accomplished with four subpanels: BIO - The biology panel reviews proposals requesting beam time for imaging, X-ray spectroscopic studies, small-angle scattering experiments, and crystallography of biologically important samples.

103

Panel Discussion Crisis in Ukraine: Six Perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Panel Discussion Crisis in Ukraine: Six Perspectives Tuesday, March 11, 2014 | 7:00-9:00pm Maurer: Join IU Faculty and special guest, Sean Kay, for a discussion on the events unfolding in Ukraine

Indiana University

104

Barge Truck Total  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over...

105

Extended use of photovoltaic solar panels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of photovoltaic solar panels (and related generation of electric power) can be extended to a 24 hours per day under any environmental condition by equipping them with an artificial source of light with emitting wavelengths matched to the photovoltaic solar panels to be turned on in the absence of sunlight. This source of light can be obtained by heating a mantle to an incandescent temperature via the efficient low polluting combustion of Natural Gas Butane Propane or other gaseous Hydrocarbon fuel.

Guido E. Guazzoni; M. Frank Rose

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Flat panel ferroelectric electron emission display system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device which can produce a bright, raster scanned or non-raster scanned image from a flat panel. Unlike many flat panel technologies, this device does not require ambient light or auxiliary illumination for viewing the image. Rather, this device relies on electrons emitted from a ferroelectric emitter impinging on a phosphor. This device takes advantage of a new electron emitter technology which emits electrons with significant kinetic energy and beam current density.

Sampayan, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA); Orvis, William J. (Livermore, CA); Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Wieskamp, Ted F. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Neutron shielding panels for reactor pressure vessels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a nuclear reactor neutron panels varying in thickness in the circumferential direction are disposed at spaced circumferential locations around the reactor core so that the greatest radial thickness is at the point of highest fluence with lesser thicknesses at adjacent locations where the fluence level is lower. The neutron panels are disposed between the core barrel and the interior of the reactor vessel to maintain radiation exposure to the vessel within acceptable limits.

Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

108

Electrohydraulic Forming of Near Net Shape Automotive Panels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Development of Advancing Automotive Panel Manufacturing for Increased Energy and Material Savings

109

The Caribbean Basin: A prime market for renewables  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Countries in the Caribbean basin have high energy prices and need additional electrical generating capacity. Renewable energy and independent power sources could help meet that need. The Caribbean Basin and the Pacific Rim appear to offer the best total market opportunities considering government energy policies, prices of energy, and consumer attitudes on renewable energy applications. The Caribbean Basin was selected for an industry project opportunity review. This area was selected due to its proximity, renewable resource base, need for energy and growth, and potential for private and multidevelopment bank funding of projects. 3 figs.

Sklar, S.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vacuum Insulation Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Vacuum Insulation Panels Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research Windows, Skylights, & Doors Research

111

Report of the geotechnical panel on the effective life of rooms in Panel 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the effective life of underground rooms in Panel I of the waste storage area of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was performed during April 1991 by a panel of geotechnical experts. The evaluation addressed concerns regarding WIPP`s ability to complete a test program proposed for Panel 1. This program currently requires bins containing controlled quantities of contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste to be placed in rooms in the panel. The bins will be monitored to obtain data on the potential generation of gases from the degradation of wastes emplaced in the WIPP underground facility. The purpose of the evaluation was (1) to provide an estimate of the life expectancy of the rooms in Panel 1; and (2) if necessary, to recommend additional remedial actions that would improve the longevity of Panel 1 rooms to allow the testing to be successfully completed. Panel 1, the first panel to be mined in the waste storage area, was developed to receive waste for a demonstration phase that was scheduled to start in October 1988. Mining of the panel began during the second half of 1986 and was completed to final dimensions in June 1988. The original plan was to store drums of CH TRU waste in rooms for a period of 5 years. The demonstration phase was changed to an experimental program that will use CH TRU waste in bin scale tests which will be located in Panel 1. For the purposes of this report, a nine-year test period beginning July, 1991, was assumed to be necessary to complete these bin scale tests.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Report of the geotechnical panel on the effective life of rooms in Panel 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An evaluation of the effective life of underground rooms in Panel I of the waste storage area of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was performed during April 1991 by a panel of geotechnical experts. The evaluation addressed concerns regarding WIPP's ability to complete a test program proposed for Panel 1. This program currently requires bins containing controlled quantities of contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste to be placed in rooms in the panel. The bins will be monitored to obtain data on the potential generation of gases from the degradation of wastes emplaced in the WIPP underground facility. The purpose of the evaluation was (1) to provide an estimate of the life expectancy of the rooms in Panel 1; and (2) if necessary, to recommend additional remedial actions that would improve the longevity of Panel 1 rooms to allow the testing to be successfully completed. Panel 1, the first panel to be mined in the waste storage area, was developed to receive waste for a demonstration phase that was scheduled to start in October 1988. Mining of the panel began during the second half of 1986 and was completed to final dimensions in June 1988. The original plan was to store drums of CH TRU waste in rooms for a period of 5 years. The demonstration phase was changed to an experimental program that will use CH TRU waste in bin scale tests which will be located in Panel 1. For the purposes of this report, a nine-year test period beginning July, 1991, was assumed to be necessary to complete these bin scale tests.

Not Available

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Implementation of Safeguards and Security Policy Panels  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5,2008 5,2008 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION FROM URITY OFFICER AND SECURITY SUBJECT: Implementation of Safeguards and Security Policy Panels The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) recognizes the importance of well- conceived strategies and policies to support and communicate the security posture of the Department. In order for our security policies to properly reflect and enable Department of Energy corporate strategies, early and frequent communication between policy makers and end users is essential. As outlined in the attached HSS memo, dated December 3,2007, subject: Safeguards and Security Policy Panels, the HSS Office of Security Policy is establishing several new policy panels that will create new opportunities for communication and will include those

114

Optical panel system including stackable waveguides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical panel system including stackable waveguides is provided. The optical panel system displays a projected light image and comprises a plurality of planar optical waveguides in a stacked state. The optical panel system further comprises a support system that aligns and supports the waveguides in the stacked state. In one embodiment, the support system comprises at least one rod, wherein each waveguide contains at least one hole, and wherein each rod is positioned through a corresponding hole in each waveguide. In another embodiment, the support system comprises at least two opposing edge structures having the waveguides positioned therebetween, wherein each opposing edge structure contains a mating surface, wherein opposite edges of each waveguide contain mating surfaces which are complementary to the mating surfaces of the opposing edge structures, and wherein each mating surface of the opposing edge structures engages a corresponding complementary mating surface of the opposite edges of each waveguide.

DeSanto, Leonard (Dunkirk, MD); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

115

Circuits in the Sun: Solar Panel Physics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Typical commercial solar panels consist of approximately 60 individual photovoltaic cells connected in series. Since the usual Kirchhoff rules apply the current is uniform throughout the circuit while the electric potential of the individual devices is cumulative. Hence a solar panel is a good analog of a simple resistive series circuit except that the devices generate (rather than burn!) electrical power. For example in order to sustain the current flow each device must generate the requisite current. As a result the least efficient device limits the current throughout. Photovoltaic cells also have a more complicated current-voltage (I–V) characteristic which determines the optimal load for power extraction. These considerations among others make the solar panel an excellent platform for exploring the physics of electric circuits.

Tim Gfroerer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Panel Discussion | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

86 86 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142234786 Varnish cache server Panel Discussion Home Kyoung's picture Submitted by Kyoung(155) Contributor 10 October, 2012 - 09:02 GRR Workshop at GRC GRC GRR Panel Discussion workshop Last week, Tuesday (10/2), we held an all-day workshop at the Peppermill Hotel in Reno, NV. The workshop included presentations on the project background and history, status updates, analysis summary and future directions. The day ended with a panel discussion, with members including

117

Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lessons Learned for Hydrogen Panel Session III: Innovation Panel Session III: Innovation and Coordination and Coordination ______________________________ Stefan Unnasch Life Cycle Associates 3 April 2008 2 Hydrogen Vision Life Cycle Associates 3 Hydrogen Infrastructure Today Life Cycle Associates Source: Weinert, J. X., et al.. (2005). CA Hydrogen Highway Network Blueprint Plan, Economics Report 4 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes 5 Innovation and Coordination Life Cycle Associates Innovation Coordination ☯ Slow Fast Cars Codes Fuel production and delivery technology Vehicle technology Marketing Policy Early introduction strategy GHG strategies

118

Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province, Western  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province, Western Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province, Western United States: 10 Years of Observation with the Global Positioning System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Contemporary Tectonic Deformation of the Basin and Range Province, Western United States: 10 Years of Observation with the Global Positioning System Abstract [1] We have estimated patterns and rates of crustal movement across 800 km of the Basin and Range at ∼39° north latitude with Global Positioning System surveys in 1992, 1996, 1998, and 2002. The total rate of motion tangent to the small circle around the Pacific-North America pole of rotation is 10.4 ± 1.0 mm/yr, and motion normal to this small circle is 3.9 ± 0.9 mm/yr compared to the east end of our network. On the Colorado

119

Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism in Northwestern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism in Northwestern Nevada Abstract Some of the earliest volcanic rocks attributed to the Yellowstone hotspot erupted from the McDermitt caldera and related volcanic centers in northwestern Nevada at 17-15 Ma. At that time, extensional faulting was ongoing to the south in central Nevada, leading some to suggest that the nascent hotspot caused or facilitated middle Miocene Basin and Range extension. Regional geologic relationships indicate that the total magnitude of extension in northwestern Nevada is low compared to the amount

120

Training for Emergencies Panel: Chris Reed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training for Emergencies Panel: Chris Reed Ben Berman Immanuel Barshi It's very important to have pilots sharing ideas with other instructor pilots. IB: In aviation there is a lot of mentor training. Instructor pilots are not trained trainers; they are aviators who are providing training. When things

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Commonsense and Embodied Agents A Panel Discussion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commonsense and Embodied Agents A Panel Discussion Stuart C. Shapiro Computer Science and Engineering University at Buffalo, The State University of New York Buffalo, NY, USA shapiro Reasoning Group Grosskreutz: Knowledge-based Systems Group Shapiro: The SNePS Research Group Randell

Shapiro, Stuart C.

122

Commonsense and Embodied Agents A Panel Discussion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commonsense and Embodied Agents A Panel Discussion Stuart C. Shapiro Computer Science and Engineering University at Bu#11;alo, The State University of New York Bu#11;alo, NY, USA shapiro Reasoning Group Grosskreutz: Knowledge-based Systems Group Shapiro: The SNePS Research Group Randell

Shapiro, Stuart C.

123

Flexible solar panels for frontline power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Flexible solar panels for frontline power Blast debris x-rays to develop better armour Reducing to improve mission outcomes 6 Solar energy for soldier mobility 8 Reducing the risk of missile strike 10 Major research effort delivers air power enhancement 12 On a whale hunt to save the wildlife 13 Briefs

124

Input to Priorities Panel August 7, 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Input to Priorities Panel August 7, 2012 Jeff Freidberg MIT 1 #12;The Emperor of Fusion has · Comparison (1 GW overnight cost) · Coal $ 3B · Gas $ 1B · Nuclear $ 4B · Wind $ 2B · Solar-T $ 3B · ITER $25B

125

Dale Meade regarding input international collaboration panel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dale Meade regarding input international collaboration panel 1 message Saskia to add 2 comments to this discussion: 1. This regards not only international collaborations, but also national collaborations. We need to decide on using 1 video conferencing system. One of the main

126

Another Panel Rejects Nevada Disaster Theory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...southern Nevada United States waste disposal Yucca Mountain GeoRef, Copyright 2004, American...panel noted that 434 additional funding of $40 million would al-low...limited intellectual appeal, Yucca Mountain in far southern Ne-vada is fast...

Richard A. Kerr

1992-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

Data Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Basin Data Basin Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Data Basin Agency/Company /Organization: Conservation Biology Institute Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: databasin.org/ Data Basin Screenshot References: Data Basin [1] Overview "Data Basin is an innovative, online system that connects users with spatial datasets, tools, and expertise. Individuals and organization can explore and download a vast library of datasets, upload their own data, create and publish projects, form working groups, and produce customized maps that can be easily shared. The building blocks of Data Basin are: Datasets: A dataset is a spatially explicit file, currently Arcshape and ArcGrid files. These can be biological, physical, socioeconomic, (and

128

Mississippian Lodgepole Play, Williston Basin: A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waulsortian-type carbonate mud mounds in the lower Mississippian Lodgepole formation (Bottineau interval, Madison Group) comprise an important new oil play in the Williston basin with strong regional potential. The play is typified by wells capable of producing 1000-2500 bbl of oil per day and by reserves that have as much as 0.5-3.0 million bbl of oil per well. Currently centered in Stark County, North Dakota, along the southern flank of the basin, the play includes 38 wells, with 21 producers and 6 new fields. Initial discovery was made at a Silurian test in Dickinson field, traditionally productive from Pennsylvanian sands. The largest pool discovered to date is Eland field, which has 15 producers and estimated total reserves of 12-15 million bbl. This report summarizes geologic, well-log, seismic, and production data for this play, which promises to expand considerably in the years to come.

Montgomery, S.L. [Petroleum Consultant, Seattle, WA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Arizona: Solar Panels Replace Inefficient Fossil Fuel-Powered...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Arizona: Solar Panels Replace Inefficient Fossil Fuel-Powered Energy Systems Arizona: Solar Panels Replace Inefficient Fossil Fuel-Powered Energy Systems May 1, 2014 - 9:33am...

130

Solar panel manufacturing is greener in Europe than China, study...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The chart shows the number of years that a solar panel must operate in order to generate enough electricity to "pay back" the energy used to make the panel. Because there are fewer...

131

Mechanical behavior of dip-brazed aluminum sandwich panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental study was carried out to determine the mechanical behavior of sandwich panels containing cellular cores of varying shape. Compression and four point bend tests were performed on sandwich panels with square ...

Hohmann, Brian P. (Brian Patrick)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th............................................ 9 Ocean and Estuary

133

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r{sup 2}=0.95) and gas content (r{sup 2}=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. [Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

134

Devonian shale gas resource assessment, Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980 the National Petroleum Council published a resource appraisal for Devonian shales in the Appalachian, Michigan, and Illinois basins. Their Illinois basin estimate of 86 TCFG in-place has been widely cited but never verified nor revised. The NPC estimate was based on extremely limited canister off-gas data, used a highly simplified volumetric computation, and is not useful for targeting specific areas for gas exploration. In 1994 we collected, digitized, and normalized 187 representative gamma ray-bulk density logs through the New Albany across the entire basin. Formulas were derived from core analyses and methane adsorption isotherms to estimate total organic carbon (r[sup 2]=0.95) and gas content (r[sup 2]=0.79-0.91) from shale bulk density. Total gas in place was then calculated foot-by-foot through each well, assuming normal hydrostatic pressures and assuming the shale is gas saturated at reservoir conditions. The values thus determined are similar to peak gas contents determined by canister off-gassing of fresh cores but are substantially greater than average off-gas values. Greatest error in the methodology is at low reservoir pressures (or at shallow depths), however, the shale is generally thinner in these areas so the impact on the total resource estimate is small. The total New Albany gas in place was determined by integration to be 323 TCFG. Of this, 210 TCF (67%) is in the upper black Grassy Creek Shale, 72 TCF (23%) in the middle black and gray Selmier Shale, and 31 TCF (10%) in the basal black Blocher Shale. Water production concerns suggest that only the Grassy Creek Shale is likely to be commercially exploitable.

Cluff, R.M.; Cluff, S.G.; Murphy, C.M. (Discovery Group, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Basin Electric Power Cooperative EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Order authorizing Basin Electric Power Cooperative to export electric energy to Canada EA-64 Basin Electric...

136

Training in EPSRC peer review procedures, the "Mock Panel"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Training in EPSRC peer review procedures, the "Mock Panel" Have you ever wondered who is judging your project at peer review panels, and how? Does the whole peer review system seem like a mysterious lottery? You're not alone, and it's for this reason that EPSRC conducts "Mock" Peer Review Panel meetings

Meju, Max

137

NO. REV. MO EASEP SOLAR PANEL OCCULTAT ION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., : :. I · ' NO. REV. MO· EATM-59 EASEP SOLAR PANEL OCCULTAT ION PAGE l OF 9 DATE 24 Feb 1969 ()i~ ~ .I /1'1 . ! I Prepared by:~ ~Wallack . 11 ''--'/ ~~~ #12;: : .. EASEP SOLAR PANEL OCCULTATION. EATM-59 PAGE 2 OF 9 DATE 24 Feb I969 #12;NO. RIV. NO. : : .~ EASEP Solar Panel Occultation EATM-59 PAGI

Rathbun, Julie A.

138

EXPERIMENTAL TESTING OF TWO SOLAR PANEL SIMULATIONS Krisztina Leban  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPERIMENTAL TESTING OF TWO SOLAR PANEL SIMULATIONS Krisztina Leban Institute of Energy Technology solar panel for varying temperature and irradiance. Final validation was done by comparing experimental are a renewable, non-polluting source of energy that are increasingly used for hybrid (solar panels and grid

Ritchie, Ewen

139

Chemical technology news from across RSC Publishing. Printing solar panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Publishing Chemical technology news from across RSC Publishing. Printing solar panels 22 January size) silicon microcells that connect together to form flexible solar panels. By stamping hundreds solar panels 2/8/2010http://www.rsc.org/Publishing/ChemTech/Volume/2010/02/printing_solar.asp #12;Page 2

Rogers, John A.

140

Peer Effects in the Diffusion of Solar Photovoltaic Panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peer Effects in the Diffusion of Solar Photovoltaic Panels Bryan Bollinger NYU Stern School base of consumers in the reference group. We study the diffusion of solar photovoltaic panels of an environmentally beneficial technology, solar photovoltaic (PV) panels. Policymakers are particularly interested

Lee, Daeyeol

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS MODEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advanced Chemistry Basin Model project has been operative for 48 months. During this period, about half the project tasks are on projected schedule. On average the project is somewhat behind schedule (90%). Unanticipated issues are causing model integration to take longer then scheduled, delaying final debugging and manual development. It is anticipated that a short extension will be required to fulfill all contract obligations.

William Goddard III; Lawrence Cathles III; Mario Blanco; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Petroleum basin studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book reviews the tectonic setting, basin development and history of exploration of a number of selected petroleum provinces located in a variety of settings in the Middle East, North Sea, Nigeria, the Rocky Mountains, Gabon and China. This book illustrates how ideas and models developed in one area may be applied to other regions. Regional reviews and the reassessment of petroleum provinces are presented.

Shannon, P.M. (Univ. College, Dublin (IE)); Naylor, D. (Westland Exploration Ltd., Dublin (IE))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Variations of Total Domination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The study of locating–dominating sets in graphs was pioneered by Slater [186, 187...], and this concept was later extended to total domination in graphs. A locating–total dominating set, abbreviated LTD-set, in G

Michael A. Henning; Anders Yeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Caribbean basin framework, 3: Southern Central America and Colombian basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors recognize three basin-forming periods in southern Central America (Panama, Costa Rica, southern Nicaragua) that they attempt to correlate with events in the Colombian basin (Bowland, 1984): (1) Early-Late Cretaceous island arc formation and growth of the Central American island arc and Late Cretaceous formation of the Colombian basin oceanic plateau. During latest Cretaceous time, pelagic carbonate sediments blanketed the Central American island arc in Panama and Costa Rica and elevated blocks on the Colombian basin oceanic plateau; (2) middle Eocene-middle Miocene island arc uplift and erosion. During this interval, influx of distal terrigenous turbidites in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks the uplift and erosion of the Central American island arc. In the Colombian basin, turbidites fill in basement relief and accumulate to thicknesses up to 2 km in the deepest part of the basin. In Costa Rica, sedimentation was concentrated in fore-arc (Terraba) and back-arc (El Limon) basins; (3) late Miocene-Recent accelerated uplift and erosion of segments of the Central American arc. Influx of proximal terrigenous turbidites and alluvial fans in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks collision of the Panama arc with the South American continent (late Miocene early Pliocene) and collision of the Cocos Ridge with the Costa Rican arc (late Pleistocene). The Cocos Ridge collision inverted the Terraba and El Limon basins. The Panama arc collision produced northeast-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults and fault-related basins throughout Panama as Panama moved northwest over the Colombian basin.

Kolarsky, R.A.; Mann, P. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2002-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

146

Total Crude by Pipeline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Product: Total Crude by All Transport Methods Domestic Crude by All Transport Methods Foreign Crude by All Transport Methods Total Crude by Pipeline Domestic Crude by Pipeline Foreign Crude by Pipeline Total Crude by Tanker Domestic Crude by Tanker Foreign Crude by Tanker Total Crude by Barge Domestic Crude by Barge Foreign Crude by Barge Total Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Domestic Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Foreign Crude by Tank Cars (Rail) Total Crude by Trucks Domestic Crude by Trucks Foreign Crude by Trucks Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Product Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View

147

Congressional panel makes recommendations on belt safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006 (MINER Act) called for a Technical Study Panel to present a review and make recommendations on the use of belt air and the composition and fire retardant properties of belt materials in underground coal mining. In October 2007 the Panel released 20 recommendations publicly. These are presented in the article. Many recommendations encouraged the MSHA to enforce existing laws of maintenance and fire protection or example more vigorously. Maybe the biggest change recommended was that the industry should adopt the Belt Evaluation Laboratory Test (BELT) standard proposed in 1992. Another important recommendation was one that would help eliminate hazards associated with point feeding. 1 photo.

Fiscor, S.

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Proposal Review Panels (Areas Other Than Crystallography)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Proposal Review Panels Proposal Review Panels High Pressure Instrumentation Imaging/ Microbeam Macromolecular Crystallography Scattering Applied Materials Stanislav Sinogeikin, Chair Tim Graber, Chair Patrick LaRiviere, Chair John Rose, Chair Robert Suter, Chair Ercan Alp Maria Baldini Bin Chen Przemyslaw Dera Lars Ehm Ravi Kumar Barbara Lavina Sang-Heon (Dan) Shim Heather Watson Keith Brister Wenjun Liu Darren Dale Matthew Ginder-Vogel Xiaojing Huang (guest) Tony Lanzirotti Lisa Miller Mark Pfeifer Martina Ralle Xianghui Xiao Hanfei Yan Arnon Lavie Anne Mulichak Armand Beaudoin Dillon Fong Dileep Singh Mike Toney Bob Von Dreele Scattering Condensed Matter Scattering Chem/Biol/Environ Small Angle Scattering (SAXS) Spectroscopy Structural Science Roy Clarke, Chair Lynda Soderholm, Chair Peter Jemian, Chair Mali Balasubramanian, Chair

149

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

150

Total Space Heat-  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration...

151

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

152

Cross-Laminated Timber Panels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laminated Timber Panels Laminated Timber Panels Jump to: navigation, search TODO: add page breaks/images Cross-Laminated Timer Panels are formed using planed "lamellas" (planed boards from 1" thick x 5"-7" wide) laid and glued using formaldehyde-free, food-grade glue in a vacuum press in alternate layers, at 90 degrees to each other, creating panels that are from 3 to 11 layers thick. These panels form a robust, structurally strong building system that outperforms anything currently available in the USA. Quality control is optimized with the pre-fabrication of the structural panels in an atmospherically controlled facility using computer controlled cutting equipment. State-of-the-art computer aided design programming is transferred directly to the manufacturing process. More information can

153

EnergyPlus Review Panel: Summary of Conclusions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EnergyPlus Review Panel: Summary of Conclusions EnergyPlus Review Panel: Summary of Conclusions Speaker(s): Charles S. "Chip" Barnaby Robert Sonderegger Date: May 13, 2010 - 2:00pm Location: 90-3075 A five-member panel of "outsiders" has recently examined the software architecture of DOE's EnergyPlus building energy simulation program with respect to robustness, computational efficiency, extensibility, maintainability, and usability. Two members of the panel will informally present conclusions from that study and then open the floor for discussion of the panel's recommendations. Barnaby is Vice-President of Research at software developer Wrightsoft Corporation in Lexington, MA and is Chair of the Review Panel. He has a B.A. in Engineering and Applied Physics from Harvard University and a M.Arch. from the University of California,

154

Solar Panels to Help Iowa Students Learn About Renewable Energy |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Panels to Help Iowa Students Learn About Renewable Energy Panels to Help Iowa Students Learn About Renewable Energy Solar Panels to Help Iowa Students Learn About Renewable Energy May 10, 2010 - 10:53am Addthis Five Iowa schools will receive rooftop solar panels this summer to help teach students about the technology | File Photo Five Iowa schools will receive rooftop solar panels this summer to help teach students about the technology | File Photo Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Learning about the sun's power is just as important as harnessing it. New solar panels to be installed on the rooftops of five Iowa middle schools will give students hands-on experience with the technology and help offset some energy costs. "We really want this be an educational component to the schools'

155

FESAC Planning Panel Report to UFA: November 12, 2007 FESAC Planning Panel Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Martin Greenwald ­ Chair · Richard Callis · Bill Dorland · David Gates · Jeff Harris · Rulon Linford · Mike Mauel · Kathryn McCarthy Panel · Dale Meade · Farrokh Najmabadi · Bill Nevins · John Sarff · Mike

156

Economic appraisal of oil potential of Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An economic appraisal was made of the potential of more than 80 producing fields in the Williston basin of Montana, North Dakota, and South Dakota. The major oil producing formations investigated were in the Mississippian, Devonian, Silurian and Ordovician. Data for the study came from field production and drilling statistics. An extrapolated oil production decline curve for a theoretical average producing well first was made for each field. The value of the total extrapolated amount of producible oil for the average well was then calculated, discounted for royalty, taxes, etc., and divided by the estimated cost for a completed producing well. This gave an estimate of the return per dollar invested. No considerations were given for exploration and land acquisition costs. The estimated return per dollar values, after posting on Williston basin geologic maps, show relative economic comparisons of producing formations and where within the basin the best economic returns can be expected.

Jennings, A.H.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Dual circuit embossed sheet heat transfer panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transfer panel provides redundant cooling for fusion reactors or the like environment requiring low-mass construction. Redundant cooling is provided by two independent cooling circuits, each circuit consisting of a series of channels joined to inlet and outlet headers. The panel comprises a welded joinder of two full-size and two much smaller partial-size sheets. The first full-size sheet is embossed to form first portions of channels for the first and second circuits, as well as a header for the first circuit. The second full-sized sheet is then laid over and welded to the first full-size sheet. The first and second partial-size sheets are then overlaid on separate portions of the second full-sized sheet, and are welded thereto. The first and second partial-sized sheets are embossed to form inlet and outlet headers, which communicate with channels of the second circuit through apertures formed in the second full-sized sheet. 6 figs.

Morgan, G.D.

1984-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

158

Compact x-ray source and panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact, self-contained x-ray source, and a compact x-ray source panel having a plurality of such x-ray sources arranged in a preferably broad-area pixelized array. Each x-ray source includes an electron source for producing an electron beam, an x-ray conversion target, and a multilayer insulator separating the electron source and the x-ray conversion target from each other. The multi-layer insulator preferably has a cylindrical configuration with a plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers surrounding an acceleration channel leading from the electron source to the x-ray conversion target. A power source is connected to each x-ray source of the array to produce an accelerating gradient between the electron source and x-ray conversion target in any one or more of the x-ray sources independent of other x-ray sources in the array, so as to accelerate an electron beam towards the x-ray conversion target. The multilayer insulator enables relatively short separation distances between the electron source and the x-ray conversion target so that a thin panel is possible for compactness. This is due to the ability of the plurality of alternating insulator and conductor layers of the multilayer insulators to resist surface flashover when sufficiently high acceleration energies necessary for x-ray generation are supplied by the power source to the x-ray sources.

Sampayon, Stephen E. (Manteca, CA)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

159

Solar panels as cosmic-ray detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to fundamental limitations of accelerators, only cosmic rays can give access to centre-of- mass energies more than one order of magnitude above those reached at the LHC. In fact, extreme energy cosmic rays (1018 eV - 1020 eV) are the only possibility to explore the 100 TeV energy scale in the years to come. This leap by one order of magnitude gives a unique way to open new horizons: new families of particles, new physics scales, in-depth investigations of the Lorentz symmetries. However, the flux of cosmic rays decreases rapidly, being less than one particle per square kilometer per year above 1019 eV: one needs to sample large surfaces. A way to develop large-effective area, low cost, detectors, is to build a solar panel-based device which can be used in parallel for power generation and Cherenkov light detection. Using solar panels for Cherenkov light detection would combine power generation and a non-standard detection device.

Stella, Carlo; Assis, Pedro; Brogueira, Pedro; Santo, Catarina Espirito; Goncalves, Patricia; Pimenta, Mario; De Angelis, Alessandro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Microsoft Word - Quadrennial Energy Review David Eves Panel 2...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Energy Review (QER). Panel 2: Infrastructure Needs through 2030 (11:00 am MT) The natural gas industry and the electric industry use different processes to plan, finance...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Digital Video Bandwidth Requirements for Large Flat-Panel Televisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Consumer expectations for high quality high-definition programming will place greater demand on access networks as flat-panel display sizes increase. Herein, we investigate the...

Ruffin, A B

162

Design and Analysis of Cooling Methods for Solar Panels.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??As the future progresses, many companies and industries are striving to achieve a "greener" approach to energy production by using solar energy. Solar panels that… (more)

Palumbo, Adam M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Smart panels with SISO or MIMO velocity feedback control systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper summarizes and contrasts the research work that has been carried out on two types of smart panels with ASAC control systems: first a SISO velocity feedback control system with a sensor that detects the volumetric component of the vibration of the panel and an actuator that exerts a uniform force over the surface of the panel and second a MIMO decentralized feedback control system using a grid of sensors that measure the point velocities of the panel and a grid of actuators that generates point excitations in the locations of the sensors. Both theoretical predictions and experimental results are presented for a reference problem of control of sound radiation by a rectangular panel clamped along the perimeter. The simulations carried out for the two systems have shown that the smart panel with the volume velocity sensor and uniform force actuator can in principle give better control performance than the smart panel with the sixteen decentralized control units. However the practical implementation of the smart panel with the volume velocity sensor and uniform force actuator is limited by stability problems which are instead a minor issue for the panel with 16 decentralized velocity feedback control units.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite Panel Removal |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

(BJC) assembled an experienced team from both sites to evaluate both the manual and mechanical methods of transite panel removal. Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite...

165

"Increasing Solar Panel Efficiency And Reliability By Evaporative...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Increasing Solar Panel Efficiency And Reliability By Evaporative Cooling" Inventors..--.. Lewis Meixler, Charles Gentile, Patricia Hillyer, Dylan Carpe, Jason Wang, Caroline Brooks...

166

KE Basin Sludge Flocculant Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the revised path forward and schedule for the K Basins Sludge Retrieval and Disposal Project, the sludge in K East (KE) Basin will be moved from the floor and pits and transferred to large, free-standing containers located in the pits (so as to isolate the sludge from the basin). When the sludge is pumped into the containers, it must settle fast enough and clarify sufficiently that the overflow water returned to the basin pool will not cloud the water or significantly increase the radiological dose rate to the operations staff as a result of increased suspended radioactive material. The approach being evaluated to enhance sludge settling and speed the rate of clarification is to add a flocculant to the sludge while it is being transferred to the containers. In February 2004, seven commercial flocculants were tested with a specific K Basin sludge simulant to identify those agents that demonstrated good performance over a broad range of slurry solids concentrations. From this testing, a cationic polymer flocculant, Nalco Optimer 7194 Plus (7194+), was shown to exhibit superior performance. Related prior testing with K Basin sludge and simulant in 1994/1996 had also identified this agent as promising. In March 2004, four series of jar tests were conducted with 7194+ and actual KE Basin sludge (prepared by combining selected archived KE sludge samples). The results from these jar tests show that 7194+ greatly improves settling of the sludge slurries and clarification of the supernatant.

Schmidt, Andrew J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; Gano, Sue

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

167

Williston basin Seislog study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the results of Seislog (trade name) processing and interpretation of an east-west line in the North Dakota region of the Williston basin. Seislog processing involves inversion of the seismic trace data to produce a set of synthetic sonic logs. These resulting traces, which incorporate low-frequency velocity information, are displayed in terms of depth and isotransit times. These values are contoured and colored, based on a standard stratigraphic color scheme. The section studied is located just north of a dual producing oil pool from zones in the Ordovician Red River and Devonian Duperow Formations. A sonic log from the Long Creek 1 discovery well was digitized and filtered to match the frequency content of the original seismic data. This allows direct comparison between units in the well and the pseudosonic log (Seislog) trace nearest the well. Porosity development and lithologic units within the lower Paleozoic stratigraphic section can be correlated readily between the well and Seislog traces. Anomalous velocity zones within the Duperow and Red River Formations can be observed and correlated to producing intervals in the nearby wells. These results emphasize the importance of displaying inversion products that incorporate low-frequency data in the search for hydrocarbons in the Williston basin. The accumulations in this region are local in extent and are difficult to pinpoint by using conventional seismic data or displays. Seislog processing and displays provide a tested method for identification and delineation of interval velocity anomalies in the Red River and Duperow stratigraphic sections. These techniques can significantly reduce risks in both exploration and delineation drilling of these types of targets.

Mummery, R.C.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Reserve estimates in western basins: Unita Basin. Final report, Part III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, sandstone reservoirs of the Mesaverde group and Wasatch formation in the Uinta Basin, Utah. Total in-place resource is estimated at 395.5 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 3.8 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Two plays were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources; in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. About 82.1% of the total evaluated resource is contained within sandstones that have extremely poor reservoir properties with permeabilities considered too low for commerciality using current frac technology.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

170

Coal Supply Basin Destination State  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Implicit Price Deflators for Gross Domestic Product, as published by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. For the composition of coal basins, refer to the definition of...

171

Energy Physics Advisory Panel met at Fermilab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Charged with recommending how best to Charged with recommending how best to position the U.S. particle physics community for new facilities beyond CERN's Large Hadron Collider, a subpanel of the High- Energy Physics Advisory Panel met at Fermilab August 14-16 to hear presentations on such topics as the research agenda for Fermilab's Run II, the complicated upgrades to the CDF and DZero detectors and research on future accelerators. Volume 20 Friday, August 29, 1997 Number 17 Photo by Reidar Hahn HEPAP Looks into the Future HEPAP subpanel meets at Fermilab to chart the future of high-energy physics in the U.S. by Donald Sena and Sharon Butler, Office of Public Affairs In a letter to HEPAP, Martha Krebs, Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research, directed the subpanel to "recommend a scenario for an

172

Federal Technical Capability Panel Contacts list  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 U. S. Department of Energy and National Nuclear Security Administration Federal Technical Capability Panel Organization Name Telephone Fax E-Mail FTCP CHAIR Chair (DOE/NTC) Karen L. Boardman (505) 845-6444 (505) 845-6079 kboardman@ntc.doe.gov FTCP Deputy Dave Chaney (505) 845-4300 (505) 845-4879 david.chaney@nnsa.doe.gov FTCP Technical Standards Mgr. Jeanette Yarrington (301) 903-7030 (301) 903-3445 Jeanette.Yarrington@hq.doe.gov FTCP Coordinator Patricia Parrish (505) 845-4057 (505) 284-7057 patricia.parrish@nnsa.doe.gov FTCP Agents DOE Headquarters Chief of Nuclear Safety (CNS) Richard Lagdon (202) 586-9471 (202) 586-5533 Chip.Lagdon@eh.doe.gov Office of Health, Safety & Security Pat Worthington (301) 903-6929 (301) 903-3445 pat.worthington@hq.doe.gov

173

21 briefing pages total  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

briefing pages total p. 1 briefing pages total p. 1 Reservist Differential Briefing U.S. Office of Personnel Management December 11, 2009 p. 2 Agenda - Introduction of Speakers - Background - References/Tools - Overview of Reservist Differential Authority - Qualifying Active Duty Service and Military Orders - Understanding Military Leave and Earnings Statements p. 3 Background 5 U.S.C. 5538 (Section 751 of the Omnibus Appropriations Act, 2009, March 11, 2009) (Public Law 111-8) Law requires OPM to consult with DOD Law effective first day of first pay period on or after March 11, 2009 (March 15 for most executive branch employees) Number of affected employees unclear p. 4 Next Steps

174

MEASUREMENT OF MIRROR PANELS USING COLOURED PATTERN DEFLECTOMETRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and parabolic dish solar concentrators. Factory production of mirror panels also requires accurate measurementsMEASUREMENT OF MIRROR PANELS USING COLOURED PATTERN DEFLECTOMETRY Paul M. Scott1 , and Greg Burgess2 1 Research Assistant, Solar Thermal Group, Australian National University (ANU), Building 32 North

175

MACHINE LEARNING IN A DYNAMIC WORLD Panel Dmussion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MACHINE LEARNING IN A DYNAMIC WORLD Panel Dmussion Miecsyslaw M. Kohr Panel O&m and Editor. Michal~gi,George Mason University R.S.Sutton, GTE Laboratories Machine Learning was established of machine learning research was in Cybernetic Systems and Adaptive Control. Machine Learning has been

Antsaklis, Panos

176

GRR/Section 19-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process 9-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Ground Water Commission Colorado Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies CRS 37-90-107 Application for Use of Ground Water 2 CCR 410-1 Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf

177

Microsoft PowerPoint - 16.1400_Panel PMCDP CRB Panel slides final March 4 2011  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Development Program (PMCDP) Peter O'Konski PE, PMP, CCE Facility Policy & Professional Development Office of Engineering and Construction Management Agenda g * Update on the PMCDP Program - Key program updates - Maturing of the program - Challenges - Current statistics Website - Website * Certification Review Board Panel Discussion * Certification Review Board Panel Discussion 3/16/2011 2 Key Program Updates * Process changes * Process changes - Virtual voting for Level 1 and 2 candidates - Reference checks for Level 3 and 4 candidates * Curriculum updates - Changes to PMP® waivers - Course updates - Continuous improvement * Expect to remain static for next 1-2 years p y * Administration - Website updated 3 3/16/2011 Maturing of the Program Maturing of the Program aka: Leadership Matters * Project success is the ultimate goal

178

Ultrathin optical panel and a method of making an ultrathin optical panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultrathin optical panel, and a method of producing an ultrathin optical panel, are disclosed, including stacking a plurality of glass sheets, which sheets may be coated with a transparent cladding substance or may be uncoated, fastening together the plurality of stacked coated glass sheets using an epoxy or ultraviolet adhesive, applying uniform pressure to the stack, curing the stack, sawing the stack to form an inlet face on a side of the stack and an outlet face on an opposed side of the stack, bonding a coupler to the inlet face of the stack, and fastening the stack, having the coupler bonded thereto, within a rectangular housing having an open front which is aligned with the outlet face, the rectangular housing having therein a light generator which is optically aligned with the coupler. The light generator is preferably placed parallel to and proximate with the inlet face, thereby allowing for a reduction in the depth of the housing.

Biscardi, Cyrus (Bellport, NY); Brewster, Calvin (North Patchogue, NY); DeSanto, Leonard (Patchogue, NY); Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2001-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

179

City and County of Denver - Solar Panel Permitting (Colorado) | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solar Panel Permitting (Colorado) Solar Panel Permitting (Colorado) City and County of Denver - Solar Panel Permitting (Colorado) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction General Public/Consumer Industrial Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Heating & Cooling Water Heating Program Info State Colorado Program Type Solar/Wind Permitting Standards Provider Department of Development Services Construction, Electrical, Plumbing and Zoning Permits* are required for Photovoltaic (PV) systems installed in the city of Denver. Denver provides same day permit review for most solar panel projects. More complex engineering projects may still be required to go through the Plan Review process. To obtain Zoning Permits for flush mounted solar panels, applicants must

180

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes The Expert Panel has concluded that the Department of Energy and National Institutes of Health must develop the capability to produce a diverse supply of radioisotopes for medical use in quantities sufficient to support research and clinical activities. Such a capability would prevent shortages of isotopes, reduce American dependence on foreign radionuclide sources and stimulate biomedical research. The expert panel recommends that the U.S. government build this capability around either a reactor, an accelerator or a combination of both technologies as long as isotopes for clinical and research applications can be supplied reliably, with diversity in adequate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Diversified Panels Systems: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5346) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Diversified Panels Systems: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5346) Diversified Panels Systems: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5346) Diversified Panels Systems: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5346) February 21, 2013 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Diversified Panels Systems, Inc. failed to certify a variety of walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Diversified Panels Systems: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5346) More Documents & Publications

182

Memorandum, Safeguards & Security Policy Panels - February 15, 2008 |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Memorandum, Safeguards & Security Policy Panels - February 15, 2008 Memorandum, Safeguards & Security Policy Panels - February 15, 2008 Memorandum, Safeguards & Security Policy Panels - February 15, 2008 February 15, 2008 As outlined in the attached HSS memo, dated December 3,2007, subject: Safeguards and Security Policy Panels, the HSS Office of Security Policy is establishing several new policy panels that will create new opportunities for communication and will include those current active groups that are now effectively promoting cominunications in theirsafeguards and security topical areas. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) recognizes the importance of well conceived strategies and policies to support and communicate the security posture of the Department. In order for our security policies to

183

Electrostatic cleaning system for removal of sand from solar panels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An improved cleaning system has been developed that uses electrostatic force to remove sand from the surface of solar panels. A single-phase high voltage is applied to parallel wire electrodes embedded in the cover glass plate of a solar panel. It has been demonstrated that more than 90% of the adhering sand is repelled from the surface of the slightly inclined panel after the cleaning operation. The performance of the system was further improved by improving the electrode configuration and introducing natural wind on the surface of the panel, even when the deposition of sand on the panel is extremely high. The power consumption of this system is virtually zero. This technology is expected to increase the effective efficiency of mega solar power plants constructed in deserts at low latitudes.

Hiroyuki Kawamoto; Takuya Shibata

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Kingspan Insulated Panels: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5353) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kingspan Insulated Panels: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5353) Kingspan Insulated Panels: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5353) Kingspan Insulated Panels: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5353) March 26, 2013 DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Kingspan Insulated Panels, Inc. failed to certify a variety of walk-in cooler or freezer components as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards. DOE regulations require a manufacturer (which includes importers) to submit reports certifying that its products have been tested and meet the applicable energy conservation standards. This civil penalty notice advises the company of the potential penalties and DOE's administrative process, including the company's right to a hearing. Kingspan Insulated Panels: Proposed Penalty (2013-CE-5353) More Documents & Publications

185

Solar Panels Hit Energy Milestone For Potawatomi and Milwaukee | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Panels Hit Energy Milestone For Potawatomi and Milwaukee Panels Hit Energy Milestone For Potawatomi and Milwaukee Solar Panels Hit Energy Milestone For Potawatomi and Milwaukee October 26, 2011 - 10:44am Addthis The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe finishes installing solar panels on a Milwaukee, Wisconsin, administration building. | Photo courtesy of the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe The Forest County Potawatomi Tribe finishes installing solar panels on a Milwaukee, Wisconsin, administration building. | Photo courtesy of the Forest County Potawatomi Tribe Eric Escudero Eric Escudero Senior Public Affairs Specialist & Contractor, Golden Field Office "With the help of Recovery Act funding, clean energy projects across the county are creating skilled jobs, reducing our reliance on fossil fuels and saving consumers money on their energy bills."

186

Barge Truck Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Barge Barge Truck Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Total delivered cost per short ton Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments Year (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) (nominal) (real) (real) (percent) 2008 $6.26 $5.77 $36.50 15.8% 42.3% $6.12 $5.64 $36.36 15.5% 22.2% 2009 $6.23 $5.67 $52.71 10.8% 94.8% $4.90 $4.46 $33.18 13.5% 25.1% 2010 $6.41 $5.77 $50.83 11.4% 96.8% $6.20 $5.59 $36.26 15.4% 38.9% Annual Percent Change First to Last Year 1.2% 0.0% 18.0% - - 0.7% -0.4% -0.1% - - Latest 2 Years 2.9% 1.7% -3.6% - - 26.6% 25.2% 9.3% - - - = No data reported or value not applicable STB Data Source: The Surface Transportation Board's 900-Byte Carload Waybill Sample EIA Data Source: Form EIA-923 Power Plant Operations Report

187

Summary Max Total Units  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

188

Total Precipitable Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation was performed on 64K cores of Intrepid, running at 0.25 simulated-years-per-day and taking 25 million core-hours. This is the first simulation using both the CAM5 physics and the highly scalable spectral element dynamical core. The animation of Total Precipitable Water clearly shows hurricanes developing in the Atlantic and Pacific.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Total Sustainability Humber College  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Total Sustainability Management Humber College November, 2012 SUSTAINABILITY SYMPOSIUM Green An Impending Global Disaster #12;3 Sustainability is NOT Climate Remediation #12;Our Premises "We cannot, you cannot improve it" (Lord Kelvin) "First rule of sustainability is to align with natural forces

Thompson, Michael

190

K Basins Sludge Treatment Process | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basins Sludge Treatment Process K Basins Sludge Treatment Process Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download K Basins Sludge Treatment Process Summary - K...

191

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download K Basins Sludge Treatment Project...

192

Microsoft PowerPoint - 15.1615_Cost Estimating Panel | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

615Cost Estimating Panel Microsoft PowerPoint - 15.1615Cost Estimating Panel Microsoft PowerPoint - 15.1615Cost Estimating Panel More Documents & Publications Contractor SOW...

193

A study on rigid foam/evacuated powder composite panels for thermal insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study investigates the feasibility of a composite panel: a series of individually evacuated panels incapsulated in a rigid closed cell foam matrix. The panels were encapsulated in a thin glass shee...

L. R. Glicksman; N. Solomou; J. K. Hong

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

E-Print Network 3.0 - agard avionics panel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CHIPSat Spacecraft Design Significant Science on a Low Budget Summary: CHIPS E-box -Z-Y solar panel -Z+Y solar panel -X solar panel Magnetorquer 1 Bus avionics Reaction wheels......

195

Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel annual report, Fiscal year 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Fiscal Year 1992, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel (``the Panel``) handled 38 proceedings. The cases addressed issues in the construction, operation, and maintenance of commercial nuclear power reactors and other activities requiring a license from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This reports sets out the Panel`s caseload during the year and summarizes, highlights, and analyzes how the wide-ranging issues raised in those proceedings were addressed by the Panel`s judges and licensing boards.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Total isomerization gains flexibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isomerization extends refinery flexibility to meet changing markets. TIP (Total Isomerization Process) allows conversion of paraffin fractions in the gasoline boiling region including straight run naptha, light reformate, aromatic unit raffinate, and hydrocrackate. The hysomer isomerization is compared to catalytic reforming. Isomerization routes are graphed. Cost estimates and suggestions on the use of other feedstocks are given. TIP can maximize gas production, reduce crude runs, and complement cat reforming. In four examples, TIP reduces reformer severity and increases reformer yield.

Symoniak, M.F.; Holcombe, T.C.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

POLICY FLASH 2014-25 Revision to the Procurement Strategy Panel...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

5 Revision to the Procurement Strategy Panel (PSP) Briefing Process POLICY FLASH 2014-25 Revision to the Procurement Strategy Panel (PSP) Briefing Process For DOE questions...

198

Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES Sponsored...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in DOE-BES Sponsored Workshop on Basic Research for Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings in...

199

Total Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

200

Great Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Great Basin Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Great Basin Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.609920257001,"lon":-114.0380859375,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Denver Basin Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Map Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Denver Basin Map Abstract This webpage contains a map of the Denver Basin. Published Colorado...

202

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

203

Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Juan Basin C e n t r a l A p p a l a c h i a n B a s i n Michigan Basin Greater Green River Basin Black Warrior Basin North Central Coal Region Arkoma Basin Denver Basin...

204

Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

205

Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report Advanced Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Report This report documents the establishment of a technical review process and the findings of the Advanced Reactor Concepts (ARC) Technical Review Panel (TRP).1 The intent of the process is to identify R&D needs for viable advanced reactor concepts in order to inform DOE-NE R&D investment decisions. A goal of the process is to facilitate greater engagement between DOE and industry. The process involved establishing evaluation criteria, conducting a pilot review, soliciting concept inputs from industry entities, reviewing the concepts by TRP members and compiling the results. The eight concepts received from industry spanned a range of reactor types

206

CDM Accreditation Panel CDM AP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CDM Accreditation Panel CDM AP CDM Accreditation Panel CDM AP Jump to: navigation, search Name CDM Accreditation Panel (CDM-AP) Place Bonn, Germany Zip 53153 Product The CDM accreditation panel (CDM-AP) prepares the decision making of the Executive Board in accordance with the procedure for accrediting operational entities. Coordinates 50.7323°, 7.101695° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":50.7323,"lon":7.101695,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

207

Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite Panel Removal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

East Tennessee Technology Park Tennessee Washington Study of Alternative Approaches for Transite Panel Removal Challenge Large facilities operated by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) such as the Gaseous Diffusion Plant at Oak Ridge, TN and the former processing facilities at Hanford, WA are paneled entirely with transite siding (an early form of cement composite drywall panel containing up to 50% asbestos). Asbestos removal raises important worker safety issues. The panels must be treated as non-friable asbestos (Category II) with the potential of becoming friable if broken or crushed. Asbestos is considered friable if, when dry, it can be crumbled, pulverized or reduced to powder by hand pressure. These facilities comprise millions of square feet of transite which must be

208

PANEL OP CONSULTrnS MEETING ON RULISON  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

PANEL OP CONSULTrnS MEETING ON RULISON PANEL OP CONSULTrnS MEETING ON RULISON . - . . .. W V E Y GAP DAM) .. . . .. . N E V m OPERATIONS OFFICE Reported By: ( 2 - I / RTiXN0T.S ELECTRICAL U. ENGINEERING CO., INC., J 4 - .I, / I i Q b OFFICE OF COORDINATOR-BOARDS & PANELS This page intentionally left blank S.GETY PANEL 0 7 CC'_

209

Seismic retrofit of precast panel buildings in Eastern Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many countries in Eastern Europe, particularly ones from the former Soviet Bloc, are facing a potential crisis regarding their deteriorating precast panel apartment buildings. These complexes were built using industrial ...

Tzonev, Tzonu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Dynamic instabilities imparted by CubeSat deployable solar panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, multibody dynamics simulation was used to investigate the effects of solar panel deployment on CubeSat attitude dynamics. Nominal and partial/asymmetric deployments were simulated for four different solar ...

Peters, Eric David

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Haptic overlay device for flat panel touch displays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In an effort to present users with an increasing amount of information, many industries including automotive and aerospace are adopting flat panel touch displays as a user interface. These interfaces are becoming popular due to their reconfigurability ...

David Wang; Kevin Tuer; Mauro Rossi; Joseph Shu

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council 851 SW 6th Avenue Review: Part II Lower Snake River Compensation Plan Preliminary Proposal Review Richard N. Williams Snake River Compensation Plan Preliminary Proposal Review The Review Process

213

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council 851 SW 6th Avenue Compensation Plan Final Proposal Review The Review Process-6 LSRCP Final Review 1 Lower Snake River Compensation Plan Final Proposal Review The Review Process

214

Panel data analysis of U.S. coal productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze labor productivity in coal mining in the United States using indices of productivity change associated with the concepts of panel data modeling. This approach is valuable when there is extensive heterogeneity ...

Stoker, Thomas M.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Effects of solar photovoltaic panels on roof heat transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Itron Inc. , CPUC California Solar Initiative 2009 Impact hot  days found by the California Solar Initiative impact solar photovoltaic (PV) panels were conducted in  San Diego, California.  

Dominguez, Anthony; Kleissl, Jan; Luvall, Jeffrey C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

MORPHOMETRIC SUBTYPING FOR A PANEL OF BREAST CANCER CELL LINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the incubation of each line in the panel, which indicatespanel of breast cell lines were computed, and subpopulationsto a data set of 41 cell lines grown in 2D cell culture

Han, Ju

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

PANEL: DDI and Metadata from the Researcher's Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This was a panel discussion on lifecycle metadata issues from the researcher's perspective. A lot of focus has been placed on how to integrate DDI into large data collection processes in the world of official statistics, ...

Thomas, Wendy; Brown, J. Christopher; Nakao, Ron

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

218

Transite panel removal begins on K-31 Building  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Workers have begun removing transite paneling from the outside of the K-31 Building at East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP).  The 1.49 million ft former gaseous diffusion building was once used to...

219

Proceedings: special panel on geothermal model intercomparison study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separate abstracts were prepared for five papers. Two papers were abstracted previously for EDB. Five panel responses to the project, three workshop session summaries, and conclusions drawn are also included in this report. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

220

TWRS vadose zone contamination issue expert panel report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When members were first canvassed for participation in the Vadose Zone Expert Panel the stated purpose for convening the Panel was to review a controversial draft report, the SX Tank Farm Report. This report was produced by a DOE Grand Junction Project Office (GJPO) contractor, RUST Geotech, now MACTEC-ERS, for the DOE Richland Office (DOERL). Three meetings were planned for June, July and August, 1995 to review the draft report and to complete a Panel report by mid-September. The Expert Panel has found its efforts confounded by various non-technical issues. The Expert Panel has chosen to address some of the non-technical issues in this Preface rather than to dilute the technical discussion that follows in the body of this independent expert panel status report (Panel Report). Rather than performing a straightforward manuscript review, the Panel was asked to resolve conflicting interpretations of gamma-ray logging measurements performed in vadose zone boreholes (drywells) surrounding the high-level radioactive wastes of the SX tank farm. There are numerous and complex technical issues that must be evaluated before the vertical and radial extent of contaminant migration at the SX tank farm can be accurately assessed. When the Panel first met in early June, 1996, it quickly became apparent that the scientific and technical issues were obscured by policy and institutional affairs which have polarized discussion among various segments of the Hanford organization. This situation reflects the kinds of institutional problems described separately in reports by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS/NRC), The Hanford Tanks Environmental Impacts and Policy Choices and BmTiers to Science: Technical Management of the Department of Energy Environmental Remediation Program. The Vadose Zone Characterization Program, appears to be caught between conflicting pressures and organizational mandates, some imposed from outside DOE-RL and some self-imposed. The institutional problems they encountered include having both Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS), the parent organization of the Vadose Zone Characterization Program and Environmental Restoration (ER), each under different regulatory controls and different organizational units, seeking to defend the status quo and discount many of the Panel`s conclusions and recommendations. The results presented in the SX Tank Farm Report, especially the visualizations, have created concern in the public sector, both on a local, personal level and on a national political level.

Shafer, D.S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Total Marketed Production ..............  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

billion cubic feet per day) billion cubic feet per day) Total Marketed Production .............. 68.95 69.77 70.45 71.64 71.91 71.70 71.46 71.57 72.61 72.68 72.41 72.62 70.21 71.66 72.58 Alaska ......................................... 1.04 0.91 0.79 0.96 1.00 0.85 0.77 0.93 0.97 0.83 0.75 0.91 0.93 0.88 0.87 Federal GOM (a) ......................... 3.93 3.64 3.44 3.82 3.83 3.77 3.73 3.50 3.71 3.67 3.63 3.46 3.71 3.70 3.62 Lower 48 States (excl GOM) ...... 63.97 65.21 66.21 66.86 67.08 67.08 66.96 67.14 67.92 68.18 68.02 68.24 65.58 67.07 68.09 Total Dry Gas Production .............. 65.46 66.21 66.69 67.79 68.03 67.83 67.61 67.71 68.69 68.76 68.50 68.70 66.55 67.79 68.66 Gross Imports ................................ 8.48 7.60 7.80 7.95 8.27 7.59 7.96 7.91 7.89 7.17 7.61 7.73 7.96 7.93 7.60 Pipeline ........................................

222

Atlas of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Atlas of the Columbia River Basin Oregon State University Computer-Assisted Cartography Course & GEOVISUALIZATION GROUP UNIVERSITY #12;2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin FOREWORDAtlas, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. 2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin

Jenny, Bernhard

223

LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter WM LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN By T.T. Taber and S.A. Kinney In U.S. Geological........................................WM-1 Map Information for the Williston Basin Land Use And Land Cover Map.........................................................WM-2 Map Information for the Williston Basin Subsurface Ownership map

224

Development and evaluation of sealing technologies for photovoltaic panels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a study to develop and evaluate low temperature glass sealing technologies for photovoltaic applications. This work was done as part of Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) No. SC95/01408. The sealing technologies evaluated included low melting temperature glass frits and solders. Because the glass frit joining required a material with a melting temperature that exceeded the allowable temperature for the active elements on the photovoltaic panels a localized heating scheme was required for sealing the perimeter of the glass panels. Thermal and stress modeling were conducted to identify the feasibility of this approach and to test strategies designed to minimize heating of the glass panel away from its perimeter. Hardware to locally heat the glass panels during glass frit joining was designed, fabricated, and successfully tested. The same hardware could be used to seal the glass panels using the low temperature solders. Solder adhesion to the glass required metal coating of the glass. The adhesion strength of the solder was dependent on the surface finish of the glass. Strategies for improving the polyisobutylene (PIB) adhesive currently being used to seal the panels and the use of Parylene coatings as a protective sealant deposited on the photovoltaic elements were also investigated. Starting points for further work are included.

Glass, S.J.; Hosking, F.M.; Baca, P.M. [and others

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

BACKGROUND REPORTS FOR THE CALIFORNIA CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE REVIEW PANEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BACKGROUND REPORTS FOR THE CALIFORNIA CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE REVIEW PANEL Prepared by the Technical Advisory Team in support of The California Carbon Capture and Storage Review Panel 12 Carbon Capture and Storage Review Panel Contents 1. Overview of the Carbon Capture and Storage Panel

226

Optimization on Solar Panels: Finding the Optimal Output Brian Y. Lu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization on Solar Panels: Finding the Optimal Output Brian Y. Lu January 1, 2013 1 Introduction of solar panel: Routing the configuration between solar cells with a switch matrix. However, their result models and control policies for the optimal output of solar panels. The smallest unit on a solar panel

Lavaei, Javad

227

Project focus: Complete design of an interactive solar panel system to be situated on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project focus: · Complete design of an interactive solar panel system to be situated on top the effective area · Two types of solar cells: · 3 panel configurations: · Real-time power output data Si panels with 30.0o tilt c) 10 CdTe panels; 38.5o tilt · Solar insolation recorder, thermometer

228

Phase-change materials to improve solar panel's performance Pascal Biwole1,2,*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-change materials to improve solar panel's performance Pascal Biwole1,2,* , Pierre Eclache3 , Frederic Kuznik3 1-mail:phbiwole@unice.fr Abstract: High operating temperatures induce a loss of efficiency in solar photovoltaic and thermal panels set-up. Results show that adding a PCM on the back of a solar panel can maintain the panel

229

NILE BASIN INITIATIVE Claire Stodola  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Climate Change #12;Upstream states · Low water needs Downstream states · High water needs #12;Historical #12;Research Question How has the Nile Basin Initiative influenced the riparian states' management states 1959 ­ Still only BILATERAL 1960s to 1990s - Increasing frustration by upstream states #12;What

New Hampshire, University of

230

Tropical forests: Include Congo basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 478, 378–381; 2011). But their meta-analysis of 138 studies overlooks the Congo basin, the second-largest continuous area of rainforest in the world; moreover, only ... the lack of recent and accessible legacy data for this region. The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), which contains 98 million hectares of rainforest (60% of the ...

Hans Verbeeck; Pascal Boeckx; Kathy Steppe

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

231

GOLF COURSES FRASER RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

practices (BMP's) for golf courses, entitled Greening your BC Golf Course. A Guide to Environmental. It also summarizes conditions and practices in the Fraser Basin, reviews best management practices.C. Prepared by: UMA ENVIRONMENTAL A Division of UMA Engineering Ltd. Burnaby, B.C. March 1996 #12;THIRD PARTY

232

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings* ........................... 3,037 115 397 384 52 1,143 22 354 64 148 357 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 386 19 43 18 11 93 7 137 8 12 38 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 262 12 35 17 5 83 4 56 6 9 35 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 407 20 46 44 8 151 3 53 9 19 54 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 350 15 55 50 9 121 2 34 7 16 42 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 405 16 57 65 7 158 2 29 6 18 45 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 483 16 62 80 5 195 1 24 Q 31 56 200,001 to 500,000 .................... 361 8 51 54 5 162 1 9 8 19 43 Over 500,000 ............................. 383 8 47 56 3 181 2 12 8 23 43 Principal Building Activity

233

Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel Biennial Report, Fiscal Years 1993--1994. Volume 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In Fiscal Year 1993, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel (``the Panel``) handled 30 proceedings. In Fiscal Year 1994, the Panel handled 36 proceedings. The cases addressed issues in the construction, operation, and maintenance of commercial nuclear power reactors and other activities requiring a license form the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report sets out the Panel`s caseload during the year and summarizes, highlight, and analyzes how the wide- ranging issues raised in those proceedings were addressed by the Panel`s judges and licensing boards.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Determination of Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) Using Total Carbon Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several methods have been proposed to replace the Freon(TM)-extraction method to determine total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) content. For reasons of cost, sensitivity, precision, or simplicity, none of the replacement methods are feasible for analysis of radioactive samples at our facility. We have developed a method to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon content in aqueous sample matrixes using total organic carbon (total carbon) determination. The total carbon content (TC1) of the sample is measured using a total organic carbon analyzer. The sample is then contacted with a small volume of non-pokar solvent to extract the total petroleum hydrocarbons. The total carbon content of the resultant aqueous phase of the extracted sample (TC2) is measured. Total petroleum hydrocarbon content is calculated (TPH = TC1-TC2). The resultant data are consistent with results obtained using Freon(TM) extraction followed by infrared absorbance.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

235

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

236

Total Space Heat-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Revised: December, 2008 Revised: December, 2008 Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing Light- ing Cook- ing Refrig- eration Office Equip- ment Com- puters Other All Buildings ............................. 91.0 33.0 7.2 6.1 7.0 18.7 2.7 5.3 1.0 2.2 7.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ........................... 99.0 30.7 6.7 2.7 7.1 13.9 7.1 19.9 1.1 1.7 8.2 5,001 to 10,000 .......................... 80.0 30.1 5.5 2.6 6.1 13.6 5.2 8.2 0.8 1.4 6.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................ 71.0 28.2 4.5 4.1 4.1 14.5 2.3 4.5 0.8 1.6 6.5 25,001 to 50,000 ........................ 79.0 29.9 6.8 5.9 6.3 14.9 1.7 3.9 0.8 1.8 7.1 50,001 to 100,000 ...................... 88.7 31.6 7.6 7.6 6.5 19.6 1.7 3.4 0.7 2.0 8.1 100,001 to 200,000 .................... 104.2 39.1 8.2 8.9 7.9 22.9 1.1 2.9 Q 3.2 8.7 200,001 to 500,000 ....................

237

U.S. Total Exports  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Babb, MT Havre, MT Port of Morgan, MT Pittsburg, NH Grand Island, NY Massena, NY Niagara Falls, NY Waddington, NY Sumas, WA Sweetgrass, MT Total to Chile Sabine Pass, LA Total to China Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to India Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Japan Cameron, LA Kenai, AK Sabine Pass, LA Total to Mexico Douglas, AZ Nogales, AZ Calexico, CA Ogilby Mesa, CA Otay Mesa, CA Alamo, TX Clint, TX Del Rio, TX Eagle Pass, TX El Paso, TX Hidalgo, TX McAllen, TX Penitas, TX Rio Bravo, TX Roma, TX Total to Portugal Sabine Pass, LA Total to Russia Total to South Korea Freeport, TX Sabine Pass, LA Total to Spain Cameron, LA Sabine Pass, LA Total to United Kingdom Sabine Pass, LA Period: Monthly Annual

238

Lunar Rover Solar Panel MountTeam Members: Tian Le, Tudor Boiangiu, Jeremy Chan, James Haensel To develop a mechanized mount for a solar panel to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lunar Rover Solar Panel MountTeam Members: Tian Le, Tudor Boiangiu, Jeremy Chan, James Haensel To develop a mechanized mount for a solar panel to be mounted on a lunar rover. Must be: · capable of orienting panel towards sun · reside on mast extending vertically from rover · capable of unfurling solar

239

THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... havior of the ratio of total quanta to total energy (Q : W) within the spectral region of photosynthetic ..... For blue-green waters, where hRmax lies.

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Geology of interior cratonic sag basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interior cratonic sag basins are thick accumulations of sediment, generally more or less oval in shape, located entirely in the interiors of continental masses. Some are single-cycle basins and others are characterized by repeated sag cycles or are complex polyhistory basins. Many appear to have developed over ancient rift systems. Interior cratonic sag basins are typified by a dominance of flexural over fault-controlled subsidence, and a low ratio of sediment volume to surface area of the basin. The Baltic, Carpentaria, Illinois, Michigan, Parana, Paris, and Williston basins are examples of interior cratonic sag basins. Tectonics played a dominant role in controlling the shapes and the geometries of the juxtaposed packets of sedimentary sequences. While the mechanics of tectonic control are not clear, evidence suggests that the movements are apparently related to convergence of lithospheric plates and collision and breakup of continents. Whatever the cause, tectonic movements controlled the freeboard of continents, altering base level and initiating new tectono-sedimentologic regimes. Sag basins situated in low latitudes during their development commonly were sites of thick carbonates (e.g., Illinois, Michigan, Williston, and Paris basins). In contrast, siliciclastic sedimentation characterized basins that formed in higher latitudes (e.g., Parana and Carpentaria basins). Highly productive sag basins are characterized by widespread, mature, organic-rich source rocks, large structures, and good seals. Nonproductive basins have one or more of the following characteristics: immature source rocks, leaky plumbing, freshwater flushing, and/or complex geology due to numerous intrusions that inhibit mapping of plays.

Leighton, M.W.; Eidel, J.J.; Kolata, D.R.; Oltz, D.F. (Illinois Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

The spatial distribution of the lignite qualitative parameters and variant estimates of coal reserves: the Czech Part of the Vienna Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The aim of this article is to inform about the spatial distribution of the lignite qualitative parameters and total lignite reserves in the Czech Part of the Vienna Basin—The South Moravian Lignite Coalfield (...

Jan Jelínek; František Stan?k; Lukáš Vebr…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

REPORT OF THE BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES ADVISORY COMMITTEE PANEL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES ADVISORY COMMITTEE PANEL ON D.O.E. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES AND SCIENCE NOVEMBER 1997 EPRI Electric Power Research Institute Powering Progress through Innovative Solutions January 14th, 1998 Dr. Martha A. Krebs, Director Office of Energy Research United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Dear Martha, The purpose of this letter is to summarize the discussions of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee at its meeting on October 8 - 9, 1997 at the Holiday Inn in Gaithersburg as they related to the report from our Panel on Synchrotron Radiation Sources and Science. This Panel was assembled in response to the Charge presented to BESAC in your letter of October 9th, 1996 to reassess the need for and the opportunities presented by each of the four synchrotron

244

NREL: News Feature - Building Panels Protect, Provide Comfort  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Building Panels Protect, Provide Comfort Building Panels Protect, Provide Comfort October 30, 2009 Walking into a building constructed before the days of heating systems and air conditioning, such as a southwestern adobe, still elicits a sense of comfort and coziness. The concept of using thermal mass in walls to help maintain the temperature of a building is not new. And now, this tried and true method is being used to regulate comfort systems of NREL's Research Support Facilities (RSF), one of the most energy efficient buildings in the world. "In this case, the exterior skin of the building is doing more than just keeping the weather out," Philip Macey, project manager for RNL, the design firm for the RSF, said. "Precast panels installed as the walls are actually part of the heating and cooling system for the building.

245

Nuclear Energy Panel Discussion at University of Chicago  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Energy Panel Discussion at University of Chicago Nuclear Energy Panel Discussion at University of Chicago Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Nuclear Energy Panel Discussion at University of Chicago Did you miss this event? Watch recording of "Lessons from Fukushima" The event's webcast is over, but you can still watch and/or download the

246

Plasma Panel Sensors for Particle and Beam Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is an inherently digital, high gain, novel variant of micropattern gas detectors inspired by many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels (PDPs). The PPS is comprised of a dense array of small, plasma discharge, gas cells within a hermetically-sealed glass panel, and is assembled from non-reactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, metal electrodes and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing the technology to fabricate these devices with very low mass and small thickness, using gas gaps of at least a few hundred micrometers. Our tests with these devices demonstrate a spatial resolution of about 1 mm. We intend to make PPS devices with much smaller cells and the potential for much finer position resolutions. Our PPS tests also show response times of several nanoseconds. We report here our results in detecting betas, cosmic-ray muons, and our first proton beam tests.

Peter S. Friedman; Robert Ball; James R. Beene; Yan Benhammou; E. H. Bentefour; J. W. Chapman; Erez Etzion; Claudio Ferretti; Nir Guttman; Daniel S. Levin; Meny Ben-Moshe; Yiftah Silver; Robert L. Varner; Curtis Weaverdyck; Bing Zhou

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

247

THE INTRACONTINENTAL BASINS (ICONS) ATLAS APPLICATIONS IN EASTERN AUSTRALIA PESA Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium III Sydney, 1417 September, 2008 275  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INTRACONTINENTAL BASINS (ICONS) ATLAS ­ APPLICATIONS IN EASTERN AUSTRALIA PESA Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium III Sydney, 14­17 September, 2008 275 The IntraCONtinental basinS (ICONS) atlas of intracontinental basins (ICONS atlas), using freely available global and regional datasets. Firstly, we are trying

Müller, Dietmar

248

CD-1: Intracratonic Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal conductivity of salt rock, and might provide suitable geothermal reservoirs for district heating.4 Formations encountered in deeper parts of an intracratonic basin...

249

Hack's law of debris-flow basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hack's law was originally derived from basin statistics for varied spatial scales and regions. The exponent value of the law has been shown to vary between 0.47 and 0.70, causing uncertainty in its application. This paper focuses on the emergence of Hack's law from debris-flow basins in China. Over 5,000 debris-flow basins in different regions of China with drainage areas less than 100km2 are included in this study. Basins in the different regions are found to present similar distributions. Hack's law is derived from maximum probability and conditional distributions, suggesting that the law should describe some critical state of basin evolution. Results suggest the exponent value is approximately 0.5. Further analysis indicates that Hack's law is related to other scaling laws underlying the evolution of a basin and that the exponent is not dependent on basin shape but rather on the evolutionary stage. A case study of a well known debris-flow basin further confirms Hack's law and its implications in basin evolution.

Yong LI; Z.Q. YUE; C.F. LEE; R.E. BEIGHLEY; Xiao-Qing CHEN; Kai-Heng HU; Peng CUI

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

NMOSE Basin Guidelines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OtherOther: NMOSE Basin GuidelinesLegal Abstract The New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (NMOSE) provides links to final rules and administrative guidelines for particular...

251

Coalbed methane resource potential of the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As predicted, from an evolving coalbed methane producibility model, prolific coalbed methane production is precluded in the Piceance Basin by the absence of coal bed reservoir continuity and dynamic ground-water flow. The best potential for production may lie at the transition zone from hydropressure to hydrocarbon overpressure and/or in conventional traps basinward of where outcrop and subsurface coals are in good reservoir and hydraulic communication. Geologic and hydrologic synergy among tectonic and structural setting, depositional systems and coal distribution, coal rank, gas content, permeability and hydrodynamics are the controls that determine the coalbed methane resource potential of the Piceance Basin. Within the coal-bearing Upper Cretaceous Williams Fork Formation, the prime coalbed methane target, reservoir heterogeneity and thrust faults cause coal beds along the Grand Hogback and in the subsurface to be in modest to poor reservoir and hydraulic communication, restricting meteoric ground water recharge and basinward flow. Total subsurface coalbed methane resources are still estimated to be approximately 99 Tcf (3.09 Tm{sup 3}), although coalbed methane resource estimates range between 80 (2.49 Tm{sup 3}) and 136 Tcf (4.24 Tm{sup 3}), depending on the calculation method used. To explore for high gas contents or fully gas-saturated coals and consequent high productivity in the Piceance Basin, improved geologic and completion technologies including exploration and development for migrated conventionally and hydrodynamically trapped gases, in-situ generated secondary biogenic gases, and solution gases will be required.

Tyler, R.; Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The Barranco de Tirajana basin, Gran Canaria (Spain). A major erosive landform caused by large landslides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Barranco de Tirajana (BdT), located on the island of Gran Canaria (Spain), has some specific features that differentiate it from the ravines of other volcanic islands in the Atlantic Ocean. The origin of this unusually wide upper basin (35 km2) has been under discussion over the last century although its erosional origin is nowadays widely accepted. The purpose of this paper is to describe the landslide deposits that appear at the bottom of the basin and to assess their role in the geomorphological evolution of the basin. We suggest that the BdT basin is a major erosional landform initiated by important ravine incision and widened by a large number of landslides. There are 28 large landslides within the BdT basin. The main movements were of rock-slide and debris-slide types, affecting 70% and 25% of the total area, respectively. In addition, modes of displacement were predominantly translational (rock-, debris-, and earth-slides) consisting of 89% of the total, compared to rotations and flows that constitute only 11%. Three main periods of landslide activity have been established in the development of the BdT basin, using geomorphological criteria. Period I includes ancient movements that could have started at about 0.6 Ma or even 2.7 Ma ago and are considered as abandoned landslides. Period II corresponds to old landslides considered as dormant, which occurred within the Middle–Upper Pleistocene. Finally, period III includes recent Upper Pleistocene landslides and Holocene landslides that are still active. We suggest that interglacials in the Canary Islands and NW Africa included humid and wet episodes that could account for the occurrence of periods of landslide activity in the BdT basin.

Alejandro Lomoschitz; Joaqu??n Meco; Jordi Corominas

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Mujeres Hombres Total Hombres Total 16 5 21 0 10  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Julio de 2011 Tipo de Discapacidad Sexo CENTRO 5-Distribución del estudiantado con discapacidad por centro, tipo de discapacidad, sexo y totales. #12;

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

254

Relation between total quanta and total energy for aquatic ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Jan 22, 1974 ... ment of the total energy and vice versa. From a measurement of spectral irradi- ance ... unit energy (for the wavelength region specified).

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

255

Behavior of Concrete Panels Reinforced with Synthetic Fibers, Mild Steel, and GFRP Composites Subjected to Blasts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper presents experimental data generated for calibrating finite element models to predict the performance of reinforced concrete panels with a wide range of construction details under blast loading. The specimens were 1.2 m square panels constructed using Normal Weight Concrete (NWC) or Fiber Reinforced Concrete (FRC). FRC consisted of macro-synthetic fibers dispersed in NWC. Five types of panels were tested: NWC panels with steel bars; FRC panels without additional reinforcement; FRC panels with steel bars; NWC panels with glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bars; and NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces. Each panel type was constructed with three thicknesses: 152 mm, 254 mm, and 356 mm. FRC panels with steel bars had the best performance for new construction. NWC panels reinforced with steel bars and external GFRP laminates on both faces had the best performance for strengthening or rehabilitation of existing structures. The performance of NWC panels with GFRP bars was strongly influenced by the bar spacing. The behavior of the panels is classified in terms of damage using immediate occupancy, life safety, and near collapse performance levels. Preliminary dynamic simulations are compared to the experimental results.

C. P. Pantelides; T. T. Garfield; W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson; J. E. Blakeley

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Transient hydrodynamics within intercratonic sedimentary basins during glacial cycles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ka B.P.), such as the Williston, Michigan, and Illinois basins. We show that in such basins fluid of the Williston and Alberta basins. Under such con- ditions fluid fluxes in aquifers can be expected

Bense, Victor

257

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th To: Tony Grover, Fish and Wildlife Division Director, Northwest Power and Conservation Council From in the side channel after flow in the Wenatchee River recedes. Approximately 400 feet (16%) of the 2,500 foot

258

THE EGYPT LABOR MARKET PANEL SURVEY: INTRODUCING THE 2012 ROUND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;THE EGYPT LABOR MARKET PANEL SURVEY: INTRODUCING THE 2012 ROUND Ragui Assaad and Caroline Egypt www.erf.org.eg Copyright © The Economic Research Forum, 2013 All rights reserved. No part our data to other statistical sources for Egypt to evaluate the representativeness of the sample

Levinson, David M.

259

Panel seeks cut and delay in international fusion project  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... The panel also suggests a domestic programme that would enable the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) to extend the life of its Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) for three ... the international partners are "very upset" by the report. Ron Davidson, director of PPPL, said he was "very encouraged" by the Holdren report, which, he said, ...

Colin Macilwain

1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

260

Buckling Analysis of Debonded Sandwich Panel Under Compression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A sandwich panel with initial through-the-width debonds is analyzed to study the buckling of its faceskin when subject to an in-plane compressive load. The debonded faceskin is modeled as a beam on a Winkler elastic foundation in which the springs of ...

Sleight David W.; Wang John T.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Petrale Sole Stock Assessment Review (STAR) Panel Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constituted a major uncertainty in the assessment (Figure 1), as did the appropriate natural mortality ratePetrale Sole Stock Assessment Review (STAR) Panel Report Hotel Deca, Seattle, Washington 20-24 June Leipzig PFMC Groundfish Advisory Subpanel (GAP) Stock Assessment Team (STAT) Melissa Haltuch NMFS

262

Council Document ISRP 2000-6 Independent Scientific Review Panel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Council Document ISRP 2000-6 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council Review of the Northeast Oregon Hatchery Spring Chinook Master Plan Step One Review of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Three-Step Review Process Charles C. Coutant Daniel Goodman Susan S

263

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

component to the master planning effort. 2005 Step One Review In 2005, the ISRP conducted a Step One review of the hatchery program's Master Plan (ISRP 2005-23 ). Step One is the preliminary review at the feasibility stageIndependent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th

264

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council 851 SW 6 th Avenue Planning Council Members FROM: Rick Williams, ISRP Chair RE: ISRP Review of the Draft Monitoring revision of the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) component of the plan. From the review of the document

265

Council Document ISRP 2000-7 Independent Scientific Review Panel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Council Document ISRP 2000-7 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council Review of the MASTER PLAN FOR FEASIBILITY ASSESSMENT OF A WHITE STURGEON `PUT AND TAKE Power Planning Council's Three-Step Review Process Charles C. Coutant Daniel Goodman Susan S. Hanna

266

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council Review of the Final of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Three-Step Review Process Charles C. Coutant Daniel Goodman Susan S Facility (project #9500600) Review Process On January 8, 2001, the Northwest Power Planning Council

267

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

..................................................................................................................................... 16 #12;1 ISRP Review of the Chief Joseph Dam Hatchery Program Master Plan Background At the Northwest by the Council (Chapter 3 of the Master Plan provides a reference to the review elements). This projectIndependent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th

268

Council Document ISRP 2000-2 Independent Scientific Review Panel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Council Document ISRP 2000-2 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council Review of the Tucannon River Captive Broodstock Master Plan Steps One through Three of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Three-Step Review Process Charles C. Coutant Daniel Goodman Susan S

269

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The habitat- monitoring plan is based in part on the Estuary RME Plan. To place the review of the habitat-monitoring project in the proper context, Bonneville and the Council requested that the ISRP review the draft planIndependent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th

270

Council Document ISRP 2000-1 Independent Scientific Review Panel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Council Document ISRP 2000-1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council Review of Coeur d'Alene Tribe Trout Production Facility Master Plan Step One of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Three-Step Review Process Charles C. Coutant Daniel Goodman Susan S. Hanna

271

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in an iterative review of the Estuary RME Plan. The ISRP and the ISAB first reviewed a September 2003 draft of the Estuary RME Plan during their review of the Action Agencies/NOAA Fisheries RME Plan in fall 2003 1 SeeIndependent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th

272

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conducted a Step Two review of the Yakama Nation's Klickitat River Anadromous Fisheries Master Plan (project Step One review of the Klickitat Master Plan in 2008 (ISRP 2008-6; also see ISRP 2005-7). OverallIndependent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th

273

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council Preliminary Review-8 October 6, 2000 #12;ISRP 2000-8 Preliminary Gorge and Inter-Mountain Proposal Review Columbia River Gorge Reviewers Jack Griffith Susan S. Hanna Brian Riddell William Smoker Bruce Ward Richard N. Williams Inter

274

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council 851 SW 6th Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, Oregon 97204 isrp@nwppc.org Review of Draft Clearwater Subbasin Plan ISRP 2003 Merrill #12;ISRP 2002-3 Review of Draft Clearwater Subbasin Plan ISRP Review of Draft Clearwater Subbasin

275

Health and Safety Concerns of Photovoltaic Solar Panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The generation of electricity from photovoltaic (PV) solar panels is safe and effective. Because PV systems do not burn fossil fuels they do not produce the toxic air or greenhouse gas emissions associated with conventional fossil fuel fired generation technologies. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, few power-generating technologies have as little environmental impact as photovoltaic solar

unknown authors

276

PRESENTATION TO NRC BURNING PLASMA PANEL DR. STEPHEN O. DEAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PRESENTATION TO NRC BURNING PLASMA PANEL DR. STEPHEN O. DEAN PRESIDENT FUSION POWER ASSOCIATES REACTORS ! FISSION PRODUCT DEACTIVATION ! HAZARDOUS WASTE PROCESSING ! RECYCLING OF MATERIALS ! FUSION ! UNRESOLVED WASTE DISPOSAL ISSUE EPRI DID PREPARE TWO REPORTS ON FUSION, IN 1992 AND 1994 ! Report of the 1992

277

Panel on the Future of BPM Research/Publications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PAGE 0 Panel on the Future of BPM Research/Publications August 29th 2013, 13.00-13.30 Wil van der Aalst (moderator), Florian Daniel, Jianmin Wang, Barbara Weber (BPM PC chairs 2013), Shazia Sadiq, Pnina Soffer, Hagen Völzer (BPM PC chairs 2014) #12;Motivation · For the first time, BPM authors were asked

van der Aalst, Wil

278

Advance Reactor Concepts Technical Review Panel Public Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Office of Nuclear Energy supports research and development for advanced reactor technologies. This report documents the results of the 2014 Technical Review Panel (TRP) review of seven advanced reactor concepts. The intent of the process was to identify R&D needs for advanced reactor concepts in order to inform Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy R&D investment decisions.

279

Solar panels are cost intensive, have limitations with respect to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

advantage of being able to convert sunlight into clean energy. After the glass is coated, we install clean electricity. Advantages · Building-integratable. · Contributes to EU targets towards energySolar panels are cost intensive, have limitations with respect to where they can be integrated

Langendoen, Koen

280

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) conduct a review of the Spring Chinook Hatchery Program of the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP). The LSRCP was authorized by Congress in 1976 to conduct fish hatchery operations to produce a return of 58,700 adult spring/summer Chinook salmon above Lower Granite Dam after

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

1999IEEE Power Society Summer Meeting Panel Session  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61801 Background The electricity industry is in the middle of its greatest upheaval since Edison began. At the same time, the pace of developmentin technology has never been more rapid. The harnessing of new and the potential benefits attainable from new advances in technology. 624 #12;The panel addresses the compendium

Gross, George

282

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th To: Doug Marker, Fish and Wildlife Division Director, Northwest Power and Conservation Council From: ISRP Subject: Review of Fiscal Year 2006 Proposal, Acoustic Tracking for Studying Ocean Survival (2003

283

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th, 2006 To: Doug Marker, Fish and Wildlife Division Director, Northwest Power and Conservation Council for Studying Ocean Survival and Movements of Columbia River Salmon (2003-114-00)" Background At the request

284

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the ISRP reviewed a three-year progress report for the Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board's (UCSRB1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th Subject: Review of Progress Reports for Upper Columbia Programmatic Habitat Restoration Projects (#2010

285

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Subject: Second Follow-up Review of the Yakama Nations' Project, Rock Creek Fish and Habitat Assessment1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th (#2007-156-00) Background At the Council's February 3, 2012 request, the ISRP reviewed a revised proposal

286

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From: Eric Loudenslager, ISRP Chair Subject: Review of Accord Proposal, Yakama Nation Status and Trend including but not limited to Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board, the State of Washington, NOAA Fisheries1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th

287

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approximately $3.5 million in annual funding. The Upper Columbia Salmon Recovery Board (UCSRB) is the project for selecting and funding projects ­ the same as presently used for Salmon Recovery Funding Board and Mid1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th

288

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th conditions. Conditions one and two pertained to the relationship of JCAPE to the Idaho Supplementation Study. These conditions were addressed as part of the ISRP's Idaho Supplementation Study review (ISRP 2003

289

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th Loudenslager, ISRP Chair Subject: Response Request for Idaho Department of Fish and Game's Accord proposal, Idaho Nutrient Enhancement Project (2008-607-00) Background At the Council's July 9, 2010 request

290

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th specific conditions. Conditions one and two pertained to the relationship of JCAPE to the Idaho recommendation regarding the Idaho Supplementation Study in 2003; consequently, the Council did not request

291

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th the Idaho Department of Fish and Game's Master Plan for the Snake River Sockeye Program (#2007's responses to the Step 1 scientific review elements specified by the Council. Although this is a Step 1

292

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council 851 SW 6th Avenue, Suite 1100 Portland, Oregon 97204 isrp@nwppc.org Review of Idaho Supplementation Studies (IDFG 2003-8 May 22, 2003 #12;ISRP 2003-8 ISS Review i ISRP Review of Idaho Supplementation Studies Contents

293

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th, 2009 To: W. Bill Booth, Council Chair From: Eric Loudenslager, ISRP Chair Subject: Review of Idaho Department of Fish and Game's Revised Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation projects (1995-057-00 and -01

294

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power Planning Council Preliminary Review to ISRP comments requested Report Page # 24001 Lake Pend Oreille Predation Research Idaho Fish and Game No and conserve high priority bull and westslope cutthroat trout habitat in Trestle Creek. Idaho Department

295

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th' Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation Project 199505702 Background At the Council's April 24, 2007 request, the ISRP reviewed a revised proposal for the Shoshone- Bannock Tribes' Southern Idaho Wildlife Mitigation

296

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council 851 SW 6th Chair Subject: Final Review of Idaho Department of Fish and Game's Accord proposal, Idaho Nutrient Idaho Department of Fish and Game's (IDFG) response to a preliminary ISRP review of the Accord proposal

297

DOE/CBFO-11-3479 Panel Closure System Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Terms 40 CFR Part 191 Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for the Management and DisposalDOE/CBFO-11-3479 Panel Closure System Design Planned Change Request to the EPA 40 CFR Part 194.S. Department of Energy DRZ Disturbed Rock Zone EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency NMED New Mexico

298

Excitation of Flat Panels by Laterally Uncorrelated Fluctuating Pressures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The response of flat rectangular panels excited by specific acoustic fields are mathematically analyzed. The acoustic fields are assumed to be divided into an arbitrary number of “strip” pressure distributions across the width of the panel. Each strip is assumed to be continuous along the length of the panel in the propagation direction. An acoustic pressure distribution such as this permits the study of joint acceptance squared coefficient frequency spectra for lateral strip?pressure correlation conditions that vary between 0 and 1. An investigation of the joint acceptance squared coefficients for the special case of a simply supported flat panel excited by laterally uncorrelated “strip” pressures was conducted and the results were compared with a previous analysis by Bozich. [“Spatial Correlation in Structural?Acoustic Coupling ” J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 36 52–58 (1964).] Combining Bozich's results with the present analysis yielded an upper and lower bound on the joint acceptance squared coefficient frequency spectra. As would be expected the ratio of the joint acceptance squared coefficients for lateral strip pressure correlation conditions of 0 and 1 was highly dependent on the lateral half?wave number and pressure strip width.

W. W. Boyd

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Astronomy Advisory Panel Richard Bower, Michael Brown, Anthony  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Astronomy Advisory Panel Richard Bower, Michael Brown, Anthony Challinor, Chris Evans, Paul O to provide large contracts for UK industry. · High Performance Computing access ­ fund hardware upgrades via over 10 years Many UK science areas: dark energy/matter, galactic structure, transients, solar system

Crowther, Paul

300

Audio Visual Classroom Consoles(SMALL) Extron Multilink panel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Audio Visual Classroom Consoles(SMALL) Extron Multilink panel 1. Type in keypad code (please to have an adaptor from your computer for the VGA cable. 2. Audio: usually attached with the VGA cable into "Audio In" next to your VGA input. 3. Network: To access the internet, plug in the network cable to your

Peak, Derek

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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301

Developing a SNP panel for forensic identification of individuals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing a SNP panel for forensic identification of individuals Kenneth K. Kidd a,*, Andrew J) are likely in the near future to have a fundamental role in forensics in both human identification www.elsevier.com/locate/forsciint Forensic Science International 164 (2006) 20­32 * Corresponding

Kidd, Kenneth

302

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

49.2 49.2 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................... 93.3 31.3 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Use Cooling Equipment................................ 91.4 30.4 14.6 15.4 11.1 6.9 5.2 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............... 1.9 1.0 0.5 Q Q Q Q Q Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................... 17.8 17.8 N N N N N N Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................. 65.9 3.9 15.1 15.6 11.1 7.0 5.2 8.0 Without a Heat Pump................................ 53.5 3.5 12.9 12.7 8.6 5.5 4.2 6.2 With a Heat Pump..................................... 12.3 0.4 2.2 2.9 2.5 1.5 1.0 1.8 Window/Wall Units........................................ 28.9 27.5 0.5 Q 0.3 Q Q Q 1 Unit......................................................... 14.5 13.5 0.3 Q Q Q N Q 2 Units.......................................................

303

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.2 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 7.1 6.8 7.9 11.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 7.1 6.6 7.9 11.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N Q N 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 3.8 0.4 3.8 8.4 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 1.8 Q 3.1 6.0 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 1.5 Q 3.1 6.0 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 Q N Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.9 Q Q 0.2 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.8 Q N Q For Two Housing Units.................................

304

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q N Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 25.6 17.7 7.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 25.6 17.7 7.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 18.4 13.1 5.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 16.2 11.6 4.7 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 15.5 11.0 4.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.7 0.6 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 1.6 1.2 0.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 1.1 0.9 Q For Two Housing Units.................................

305

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units.................................................................

306

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Million U.S. Housing Units Renter- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Renter-Occupied Housing Unit U.S. Housing Units (millions Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Table HC4.2 Living Space Characteristics by Renter-Occupied Housing Units, 2005

307

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Personal Computers Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 14.2 7.2 2.8 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 26.6 14.5 4.1 7.9 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 20.5 11.0 3.4 6.1 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 6.1 3.5 0.7 1.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.0 2.6 1.0 1.3 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 10.3 5.9 1.6 2.9 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 4.1 2.3 0.6 1.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

308

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,171 ,171 1,618 1,031 845 630 401 Census Region and Division Northeast................................................... 20.6 2,334 1,664 562 911 649 220 New England.......................................... 5.5 2,472 1,680 265 1,057 719 113 Middle Atlantic........................................ 15.1 2,284 1,658 670 864 627 254 Midwest...................................................... 25.6 2,421 1,927 1,360 981 781 551 East North Central.................................. 17.7 2,483 1,926 1,269 999 775 510 West North Central................................. 7.9 2,281 1,930 1,566 940 796 646 South.......................................................... 40.7 2,161 1,551 1,295 856 615 513 South Atlantic......................................... 21.7 2,243 1,607 1,359 896 642 543 East South Central.................................

309

Total.........................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

..... ..... 111.1 7.1 7.0 8.0 12.1 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer...................................... 35.5 3.0 2.0 2.7 3.1 Use a Personal Computer.................................................. 75.6 4.2 5.0 5.3 9.0 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model............................................................. 58.6 3.2 3.9 4.0 6.7 Laptop Model................................................................. 16.9 1.0 1.1 1.3 2.4 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours......................................................... 13.6 0.7 0.9 0.9 1.4 2 to 15 Hours................................................................. 29.1 1.7 2.1 1.9 3.4 16 to 40 Hours............................................................... 13.5 0.9 0.9 0.9 1.8 41 to 167 Hours.............................................................

310

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 2.6 0.7 1.9 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 6.6 2.0 4.6 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 8.8 2.9 5.8 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 4.7 1.5 3.1 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.7 Q 0.6 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.7 0.3 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.2 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 23.7 7.5 16.2 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.7 0.4 1.3 Once a Day.......................................................

311

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.7 0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit......................................................................

312

Total....................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

14.7 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Household Size 1 Person.......................................................... 30.0 4.6 2.5 3.7 3.2 5.4 5.5 3.7 1.6 2 Persons......................................................... 34.8 4.3 1.9 4.4 4.1 5.9 5.3 5.5 3.4 3 Persons......................................................... 18.4 2.5 1.3 1.7 1.9 2.9 3.5 2.8 1.6 4 Persons......................................................... 15.9 1.9 0.8 1.5 1.6 3.0 2.5 3.1 1.4 5 Persons......................................................... 7.9 0.8 0.4 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.1 1.5 0.9 6 or More Persons........................................... 4.1 0.5 0.3 0.3 0.6 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 2005 Annual Household Income Category Less than $9,999............................................. 9.9 1.9 1.1 1.3 0.9 1.7 1.3 1.1 0.5 $10,000 to $14,999..........................................

313

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.9 8.1 14.2 6.4 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 13.7 17.5 26.6 17.8 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 10.4 14.1 20.5 13.7 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.3 3.4 6.1 4.1 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.4 3.4 5.0 2.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 5.2 7.0 10.3 6.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.1 2.8 4.1 3.4 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

314

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 13.7 4.2 9.5 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 4.1 1.1 3.0 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 2.9 0.9 2.0 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 6.6 2.0 4.6 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 3.4 0.9 2.5 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

315

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

33.0 33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 6.5 1.6 0.9 1.3 2.4 0.2 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 26.5 6.5 2.5 4.6 12.0 1.0 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 25.7 6.3 2.5 4.4 11.7 0.8 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 0.8 Q Q 0.2 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 14.1 3.6 1.5 2.1 6.4 0.6 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 12.4 3.1 1.3 1.8 5.7 0.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 1.7 0.6 Q 0.3 0.6 Q Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 12.4 2.9 1.0 2.5 5.6 0.4 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.3 1.2 0.5 1.4 3.9 0.2 2 Units.........................................................

316

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.7 1.6 1.4 1.5 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 10.8 4.1 4.3 5.5 Once a Day................................................................... 42.3 17.0 7.2 8.7 9.3 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 11.4 4.7 6.4 4.8 About Once a Week..................................................... 3.9 1.7 0.6 0.9 0.8 Less Than Once a Week.............................................. 4.1 2.2 0.6 0.8 0.5 No Hot Meals Cooked................................................... 0.9 0.4 Q Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven................................................................. 109.6 46.2 18.8

317

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Single-Family Units Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Single-Family Units Detached Type of Housing Unit Table HC2.7 Air Conditioning Usage Indicators by Type of Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Air Conditioning Usage Indicators Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) At Home Behavior Home Used for Business

318

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 2.1 1.8 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 23.5 16.0 7.5 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 23.4 15.9 7.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 17.3 11.3 6.0 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 16.2 10.6 5.6 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.1 0.8 0.4 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 6.6 4.9 1.7 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 4.1 2.9 1.2 2 Units...................................................................

319

Total..............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20.6 20.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................ 17.8 4.0 2.1 1.4 10.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 23.5 39.3 13.9 Use Cooling Equipment.............................................. 91.4 16.3 23.4 38.9 12.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q 0.5 1.0 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................... 65.9 6.0 17.3 32.1 10.5 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 16.2 23.2 8.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 1.1 9.0 1.7 Window/Wall Units..................................................... 28.9 10.7 6.6 8.0 3.6 1 Unit......................................................................

320

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.6 5.6 17.7 7.9 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 8.1 5.6 2.5 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 17.5 12.1 5.4 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 14.1 10.0 4.0 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 3.4 2.1 1.3 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 3.4 2.5 0.9 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 7.0 4.8 2.3 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 2.8 2.1 0.7 41 to 167 Hours......................................................... 6.3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Total...................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.2 15.2 7.8 1.0 1.2 3.3 1.9 For Two Housing Units............................. 0.9 Q N Q 0.6 N Heat Pump.................................................. 9.2 7.4 0.3 Q 0.7 0.5 Portable Electric Heater............................... 1.6 0.8 Q Q Q 0.3 Other Equipment......................................... 1.9 0.7 Q Q 0.7 Q Fuel Oil........................................................... 7.7 5.5 0.4 0.8 0.9 0.2 Steam or Hot Water System........................ 4.7 2.9 Q 0.7 0.8 N For One Housing Unit.............................. 3.3 2.9 Q Q Q N For Two Housing Units............................. 1.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 N Central Warm-Air Furnace........................... 2.8 2.4 Q Q Q 0.2 Other Equipment......................................... 0.3 0.2 Q N Q N Wood..............................................................

322

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................. 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment.............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment............................... 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System............................................ 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units...................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit....................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units.....................................................

323

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.4 1.0 0.4 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 5.8 3.5 2.3 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 10.7 7.8 2.9 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 5.6 4.0 1.6 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.9 0.6 0.3 Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 1.1 0.7 0.4 No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 Q Q N Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 25.3 17.6 7.7 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.3 0.8 0.5 Once a Day.......................................................

324

Total...............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ........... 35.5 17.1 10.8 4.2 1.8 1.6 10.3 20.6 Use a Personal Computer......................... 75.6 9.6 18.0 16.4 11.3 20.3 6.4 17.9 Number of Desktop PCs 1.......................................................... 50.3 8.3 14.2 11.4 7.2 9.2 5.3 14.2 2.......................................................... 16.2 0.9 2.6 3.7 2.9 6.2 0.8 2.6 3 or More............................................. 9.0 0.4 1.2 1.3 1.2 5.0 0.3 1.1 Number of Laptop PCs 1.......................................................... 22.5 2.2 4.6 4.5 2.9 8.3 1.4 4.0 2.......................................................... 4.0 Q 0.4 0.6 0.4 2.4 Q 0.5 3 or More............................................. 0.7 Q Q Q Q 0.4 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top

325

Total................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.5 0.3 0.2 Q 0.2 0.3 0.6 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 26.2 28.5 20.4 13.0 21.8 16.3 37.9 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 25.9 28.1 20.3 12.9 21.8 16.0 37.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 0.3 Q Q N 0.4 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 12.2 14.4 11.3 7.1 13.2 7.6 18.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 7.5 10.8 9.3 5.6 11.4 4.6 12.0 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 6.9 10.3 9.1 5.4 11.3 4.1 11.0 For Two Housing Units......................... 1.8 0.6 0.6 Q Q Q 0.4 0.9 Steam or Hot Water System..................... 8.2 2.4 2.5 1.0 1.0 1.3 1.5 3.6 For One Housing Unit...........................

326

Total...........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Q Q Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Apartments in Buildings With-- Living Space Characteristics Detached Attached Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Preliminary Housing Characteristics Tables Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Million U.S. Housing Units Owner- Occupied Housing Units (millions) Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Housing Units (millions)

327

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

25.6 25.6 40.7 24.2 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 25.6 40.3 23.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 25.6 40.1 22.9 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N Q 0.6 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 18.4 13.6 14.7 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 16.2 11.0 11.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 15.5 10.7 11.1 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.7 Q 0.3 Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 1.6 1.0 0.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 1.1 0.4

328

Total...........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0.6 0.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment.......................................... 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment........................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it.......................... 1.9 0.3 Q Q Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump........................................... 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump............................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit................................................................... 14.5 4.3 2.9 1.4 2 Units.................................................................

329

Total.......................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer ................... 35.5 6.4 2.2 4.2 Use a Personal Computer................................ 75.6 17.8 5.3 12.5 Number of Desktop PCs 1.................................................................. 50.3 11.0 3.4 7.6 2.................................................................. 16.2 4.4 1.3 3.1 3 or More..................................................... 9.0 2.5 0.7 1.8 Number of Laptop PCs 1.................................................................. 22.5 5.4 1.5 3.9 2.................................................................. 4.0 1.1 0.3 0.8 3 or More..................................................... 0.7 0.3 Q Q Type of Monitor Used on Most-Used PC Desk-top CRT (Standard Monitor)...........................

330

Total....................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 47.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Personal Computers Do Not Use a Personal Computer.................................. 35.5 16.9 6.5 4.6 7.6 Use a Personal Computer.............................................. 75.6 30.3 12.5 18.1 14.7 Most-Used Personal Computer Type of PC Desk-top Model......................................................... 58.6 22.9 9.8 14.1 11.9 Laptop Model............................................................. 16.9 7.4 2.7 4.0 2.9 Hours Turned on Per Week Less than 2 Hours..................................................... 13.6 5.7 1.8 2.9 3.2 2 to 15 Hours............................................................. 29.1 11.9 5.1 6.5 5.7 16 to 40 Hours........................................................... 13.5 5.5 2.5 3.3 2.2 41 to 167 Hours.........................................................

331

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7.1 7.1 19.0 22.7 22.3 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.2 Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 46.3 18.9 22.5 22.1 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 45.6 18.8 22.5 22.1 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.7 Q N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 27.0 11.9 14.9 4.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 19.8 8.6 12.8 3.6 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 18.8 8.3 12.3 3.5 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 1.0 0.3 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.4 2.1 1.4 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 2.1 1.6 1.0

332

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

15.1 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 20.5 15.1 5.4 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 20.5 15.1 5.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 N N N Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 11.4 9.1 2.3 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 6.1 5.3 0.8 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 5.6 4.9 0.7 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.5 0.4 Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 4.9 3.6 1.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 3.2 2.2 1.0 For Two Housing Units.................................

333

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.7 0.5 0.2 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC12.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region,...

334

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 1.8 1.2 0.5 Table HC11.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Northeast Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

335

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 2.8 1.1 0.7 Q 0.4 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC13.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by South Census Region,...

336

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 3.1 1.0 2.2 Table HC14.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

337

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

States New York Florida Texas California Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC15.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by Four Most Populated...

338

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 2.7 3.5 2.2 1.3 3.5 1.3 3.8 Table HC7.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Household Income, 2005 Below Poverty Line Eligible for Federal...

339

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 3.4 2.0 1.4 Table HC12.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by Midwest Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Appliances...

340

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Census Region Northeast Midwest South West Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC10.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by U.S. Census Region, 2005...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

(as Self-Reported) City Town Suburbs Rural Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC8.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location,...

342

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 13.2 4.4 2.5 3.0 3.4 Table HC8.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by UrbanRural Location, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units UrbanRural...

343

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 2.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Million U.S. Housing Units Home Electronics Usage Indicators Table HC14.12 Home Electronics Usage Indicators by West Census Region, 2005...

344

Total..........................................................  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

... 13.2 4.9 2.3 1.1 1.5 Table HC13.10 Home Appliances Usage Indicators by South Census Region, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units South Census Region...

345

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

... 51.9 7.0 4.8 2.2 Not Asked (Mobile Homes or Apartment in Buildings with 5 or More Units)... 23.7...

346

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Housing Units Living Space Characteristics Attached 2 to 4 Units 5 or More Units Mobile Homes Apartments in Buildings With-- Housing Units (millions) Single-Family Units Detached...

347

Total..........................................................  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0.7 21.7 6.9 12.1 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment... 1.2 Q Q N Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment... 109.8 40.3 21.4 6.9 12.0 Use Main Space Heating...

348

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

349

Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Normal ButaneButylene Other Liquids Oxygenates Fuel Ethanol MTBE Other Oxygenates Biomass-based Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Diesel Fuel Other Renewable Fuels Gasoline Blending...

350

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Cooking Appliances Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day......................................... 8.2 1.2 1.0 0.2 2 Times A Day...................................................... 24.6 4.0 2.7 1.2 Once a Day........................................................... 42.3 7.9 5.4 2.5 A Few Times Each Week...................................... 27.2 6.0 4.8 1.2 About Once a Week.............................................. 3.9 0.6 0.5 Q Less Than Once a Week....................................... 4.1 0.6 0.4 Q No Hot Meals Cooked........................................... 0.9 0.3 Q Q Conventional Oven Use an Oven......................................................... 109.6 20.3 14.9 5.4 More Than Once a Day..................................... 8.9 1.4 1.2 0.3 Once a Day.......................................................

351

Total........................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 24.5 1,090 902 341 872 780 441 Census Region and Division Northeast............................................. 20.6 6.7 1,247 1,032 Q 811 788 147 New England.................................... 5.5 1.9 1,365 1,127 Q 814 748 107 Middle Atlantic.................................. 15.1 4.8 1,182 978 Q 810 800 159 Midwest................................................ 25.6 4.6 1,349 1,133 506 895 810 346 East North Central............................ 17.7 3.2 1,483 1,239 560 968 842 351 West North Central........................... 7.9 1.4 913 789 329 751 745 337 South................................................... 40.7 7.8 881 752 572 942 873 797 South Atlantic................................... 21.7 4.9 875 707 522 1,035 934 926 East South Central........................... 6.9 0.7 Q Q Q 852 826 432 West South Central..........................

352

Total.................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

26.7 26.7 28.8 20.6 13.1 22.0 16.6 38.6 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day.............................. 8.2 2.9 2.5 1.3 0.5 1.0 2.4 4.6 2 Times A Day........................................... 24.6 6.5 7.0 4.3 3.2 3.6 4.8 10.3 Once a Day................................................ 42.3 8.8 9.8 8.7 5.1 10.0 5.0 12.9 A Few Times Each Week........................... 27.2 5.6 7.2 4.7 3.3 6.3 3.2 7.5 About Once a Week................................... 3.9 1.1 1.1 0.6 0.5 0.6 0.4 1.4 Less Than Once a Week............................ 4.1 1.3 1.0 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.7 1.4 No Hot Meals Cooked................................ 0.9 0.5 Q Q Q Q 0.2 0.5 Conventional Oven Use an Oven.............................................. 109.6 26.1 28.5 20.2 12.9 21.8 16.3 37.8 More Than Once a Day..........................

353

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . 111.1 14.7 7.4 12.5 12.5 18.9 18.6 17.3 9.2 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 3.9 1.8 2.2 2.1 3.1 2.6 1.7 0.4 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 10.8 5.6 10.3 10.4 15.8 16.0 15.6 8.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 10.6 5.5 10.3 10.3 15.3 15.7 15.3 8.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 Q Q Q Q 0.6 0.4 0.3 Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 3.7 2.6 6.1 6.8 11.2 13.2 13.9 8.2 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 3.6 2.3 5.5 5.8 9.5 10.1 10.3 6.4 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 Q 0.3 0.6 1.0 1.7 3.1 3.6 1.7 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 7.3 3.2 4.5 3.7 4.8 3.0 1.9 0.7 1 Unit..........................................................

354

Total..............................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

111.1 86.6 2,720 1,970 1,310 1,941 1,475 821 1,059 944 554 Census Region and Division Northeast.................................... 20.6 13.9 3,224 2,173 836 2,219 1,619 583 903 830 Q New England.......................... 5.5 3.6 3,365 2,154 313 2,634 1,826 Q 951 940 Q Middle Atlantic........................ 15.1 10.3 3,167 2,181 1,049 2,188 1,603 582 Q Q Q Midwest...................................... 25.6 21.0 2,823 2,239 1,624 2,356 1,669 1,336 1,081 961 778 East North Central.................. 17.7 14.5 2,864 2,217 1,490 2,514 1,715 1,408 907 839 553 West North Central................. 7.9 6.4 2,729 2,289 1,924 1,806 1,510 1,085 1,299 1,113 1,059 South.......................................... 40.7 33.0 2,707 1,849 1,563 1,605 1,350 954 1,064 970 685 South Atlantic......................... 21.7 16.8 2,945 1,996 1,695 1,573 1,359 909 1,044 955

355

Total.................................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

... ... 111.1 20.6 15.1 5.5 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................................. 17.8 4.0 2.4 1.7 Have Cooling Equipment............................................. 93.3 16.5 12.8 3.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................... 91.4 16.3 12.6 3.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................. 1.9 0.3 Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................................... 65.9 6.0 5.2 0.8 Without a Heat Pump.............................................. 53.5 5.5 4.8 0.7 With a Heat Pump................................................... 12.3 0.5 0.4 Q Window/Wall Units.................................................... 28.9 10.7 7.6 3.1 1 Unit.......................................................................

356

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 8.5 2.7 2.6 4.0 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 38.6 16.2 20.1 18.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 37.8 15.9 19.8 18.0 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.4 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 25.8 10.9 16.6 12.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 21.2 9.7 13.7 8.9 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 4.6 1.2 2.8 3.6 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 13.4 5.6 3.9 6.1 1 Unit.....................................................................

357

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 10.3 3.1 7.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 13.9 4.5 9.4 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 12.9 4.3 8.5 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 1.0 Q 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 10.5 3.9 6.5 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 8.7 3.2 5.5 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 1.7 0.7 1.0 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 3.6 0.6 3.0 1 Unit..................................................................... 14.5 2.9 0.5 2.4 2 Units...................................................................

358

Total..................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

78.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Cooling Equipment..................... 17.8 11.3 9.3 0.6 Q 0.4 0.9 Have Cooling Equipment................................. 93.3 66.8 54.7 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.8 Use Cooling Equipment.................................. 91.4 65.8 54.0 3.6 1.7 1.9 4.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it................. 1.9 1.1 0.8 Q N Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.............................................. 65.9 51.7 43.9 2.5 0.7 1.6 3.1 Without a Heat Pump.................................. 53.5 41.1 34.8 2.1 0.5 1.2 2.6 With a Heat Pump....................................... 12.3 10.6 9.1 0.4 Q 0.3 0.6 Window/Wall Units....................................... 28.9 16.5 12.0 1.3 1.0 0.4 1.7 1 Unit.......................................................... 14.5 7.2 5.4 0.5 0.2 Q 0.9 2 Units.........................................................

359

Total.............................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... Do Not Have Cooling Equipment............................... 17.8 1.4 0.8 0.2 0.3 Have Cooling Equipment............................................ 93.3 39.3 20.9 6.7 11.8 Use Cooling Equipment............................................. 91.4 38.9 20.7 6.6 11.7 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............................ 1.9 0.5 Q Q Q Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System........................................................ 65.9 32.1 17.6 5.2 9.3 Without a Heat Pump............................................. 53.5 23.2 10.9 3.8 8.4 With a Heat Pump................................................. 12.3 9.0 6.7 1.4 0.9 Window/Wall Units.................................................. 28.9 8.0 3.4 1.7 2.9 1 Unit.....................................................................

360

Total........................................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4.2 4.2 7.6 16.6 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment............... 1.2 0.7 Q 0.7 Have Main Space Heating Equipment.................. 109.8 23.4 7.5 16.0 Use Main Space Heating Equipment.................... 109.1 22.9 7.4 15.4 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It...................... 0.8 0.6 Q 0.5 Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.......................................................... 58.2 14.7 4.6 10.1 Central Warm-Air Furnace................................ 44.7 11.4 4.0 7.4 For One Housing Unit................................... 42.9 11.1 3.8 7.3 For Two Housing Units................................. 1.8 0.3 Q Q Steam or Hot Water System............................. 8.2 0.6 0.3 0.3 For One Housing Unit................................... 5.1 0.4 0.2 0.1 For Two Housing Units.................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Total..............................................................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ Do Not Have Cooling Equipment................ 17.8 5.3 4.7 2.8 1.9 3.1 3.6 7.5 Have Cooling Equipment............................. 93.3 21.5 24.1 17.8 11.2 18.8 13.0 31.1 Use Cooling Equipment.............................. 91.4 21.0 23.5 17.4 11.0 18.6 12.6 30.3 Have Equipment But Do Not Use it............. 1.9 0.5 0.6 0.4 Q Q 0.5 0.8 Type of Air-Conditioning Equipment 1, 2 Central System.......................................... 65.9 11.0 16.5 13.5 8.7 16.1 6.4 17.2 Without a Heat Pump.............................. 53.5 9.4 13.6 10.7 7.1 12.7 5.4 14.5 With a Heat Pump................................... 12.3 1.7 2.8 2.8 1.6 3.4 1.0 2.7 Window/Wall Units................................... 28.9 10.5 8.1 4.5 2.7 3.1 6.7 14.1 1 Unit...................................................... 14.5 5.8 4.3 2.0 1.1 1.3 3.4 7.4 2 Units....................................................

362

Idle Operating Total Stream Day  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Idle Operating Total Stream Day Barrels per Idle Operating Total Calendar Day Barrels per Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Capacity Idle Operating Total Operable Refineries Number of State and PAD District a b b 11 10 1 1,293,200 1,265,200 28,000 1,361,700 1,329,700 32,000 ............................................................................................................................................... PAD District I 1 1 0 182,200 182,200 0 190,200 190,200 0 ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................ Delaware......................................

363

March 29, 2011, Federal Technical Capabilities Panel Face-to-Face Meeting - National Training Center Activities  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Training Training National Training National Training National Training National Training National Training Center Center National Training National Training Center Center Federal Technical Capability Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) Meeting Panel (FTCP) Meeting Federal Technical Capability Federal Technical Capability Panel (FTCP) Meeting Panel (FTCP) Meeting Panel (FTCP) Meeting Panel (FTCP) Meeting Panel (FTCP) Meeting Panel (FTCP) Meeting March 29, 2011 March 29, 2011 March 29, 2011 March 29, 2011 Discussion Topics Discussion Topics p p * NTC Initiatives Update p Lesley Gasperow, Acting Director, NTC * Safety Training Program Update Jeannie Lozoya, Safety Training Program Manager, NTC * Security Training Program Update R Sh Di t S it T i i O ti NTC Russ Showers, Director, Security Training Operations, NTC

364

Findings and Recommendations by the California Carbon Capture and Storage Review Panel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Findings and Recommendations by the California Carbon Capture and Storage Review Panel December............................................................................1 Creation of the Carbon Capture and Storage Review Panel...................................................................................................................................................6 The Role of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) in Meeting California's Climate Reduction Goals

365

STFC Astronomy Advisory Panel Draft 2012 Programmatic Review report to PPAN (October 2012)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;STFC Astronomy Advisory Panel Draft 2012 Programmatic Review report to PPAN (October 2012) Astronomy Advisory Panel: Richard Bower (Durham University), Michael Brown (University of Manchester), Anthony Challinor (University of Cambridge), Chris Evans (STFC United Kingdom Astronomy Technology Centre

Crowther, Paul

366

Panel assemblage for housing : some form and construction explorations for small buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines the consequences of building homes in a factory and explores viable construction alternatives using factory-made panels. The exploration considers panelized systems of dwelling construction and its ...

Borenstein, David Reed

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

E-Print Network 3.0 - ad hoc panel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

panel Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: ad hoc panel Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Part 500, Chapter 25 SCIENTIFIC MISCONDUCT REVIEW...

368

Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel on the Review of the Radiation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel on the Review of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation Report of the Blue Ribbon Panel on the Review of the Radiation Effects Research...

369

POLICY FLASH 2014-25 Revision to the Procurement Strategy Panel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

25 Revision to the Procurement Strategy Panel (PSP) Briefing Process POLICY FLASH 2014-25 Revision to the Procurement Strategy Panel (PSP) Briefing Process POLICY FLASH 2014-25...

370

Performance of X-Lam panels in a sports center with an indoor swimming-pool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cross-laminated timber panels (X-Lam panels) are evaluated for structural applications in Service Classes 1 and 2 conditions. The structural application in Service Class 3 conditions is not allowed, mainly becaus...

Luís Jorge; Alfredo Dias; Ricardo Costa

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Design and analysis of a concrete modular housing system constructed with 3D panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An innovative modular house system design utilizing an alternative concrete residential building system called 3D panels is presented along with an overview of 3D panels as well as relevant methods and markets. The proposed ...

Sarcia, Sam Rhea, 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

White House Solar Panels Are a Symbol of Solar's Progress | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solar Panels Are a Symbol of Solar's Progress White House Solar Panels Are a Symbol of Solar's Progress May 13, 2014 - 12:02pm Addthis An insider look at the White House rooftop...

373

Final Report of theIgneous Consequences Peer Review Panel | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Report of theIgneous Consequences Peer Review Panel Final Report of theIgneous Consequences Peer Review Panel A report for the DOE on the Yucca Mountain Project. Final Report...

374

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System...

375

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

376

CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD,...

377

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section...

378

Refraction Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Northern Basin &...

379

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal...

380

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Total CWT costs in the Columbia River Basin 5/12/2011 Recovery costs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corp 153,000$ PGE 10,400$ Idaho Power 8,000$ PSMFC 32,500$ ODFW 472,600$ Anad. Fish Cons. Act 107,687$ PSMFC Mark Center 65,000$ ODFW Ocean Sampling (55%)1 209,100$ WDFW Selective Fisheries Monitoring 45,000$ WDFW - PST CWT Lab - (33.2%)1 37,228$ ODFW - PST Ocean Sampling (55%)1 65,605$ ODFW - Ocean

382

Ecology: Drought in the Congo Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... significantly expanded the tropical-forest research programme by focusing on chronic drought in Africa's Congo Basin, a region that has been the subject of much less investigation than the ... optical, microwave and gravity remote-sensing data to evaluate long-term drought response in the Congo Basin (Fig. 1). Annual precipitation in this region is bimodal, and the ...

Jeffrey Q. Chambers; Dar A. Roberts

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

383

6, 839877, 2006 Mexico City basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emitters of air pollutants leading to negative health effects and environmental degradation. The rate altitude basin with air pollutant concentrations above the health limits most days of the year. A mesoscale-dimensional wind patterns in25 the basin and found that the sea-breeze transports the polluted air mass up the moun

Boyer, Edmond

384

2012 Smart Grid Peer Review Presentations- Day 2 Smart Grid Panel Discussion  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentations from the Smart Grid panel discussion during Day 2 of the 2012 Smart Grid R&D Peer Review

385

Grand Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project, 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On July 1, 1984 the Bonneville Power Administration and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife entered into an intergovernmental contract to initiate fish habitat enhancement work in the Joseph Creek subbasin of the Grande Ronde River Basin in northeast Oregon. In 1985 the Upper and Middle Grande Ronde River, and Catherine Creek subbasins were included in the contract, and in 1996 the Wallowa River subbasin was added. The primary goal of 'The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project' is to create, protect, and restore riparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing the opportunities for natural fish production within the basin. This project originally provided for implementation of Program Measure 703 (C)(1), Action Item 4.2 of the Northwest Power Planning Council's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (NPPC, 1987), and continues to be implemented under revisions of the Fish and Wild Program as offsite mitigation for mainstem fishery losses caused by the Columbia River hydro-electric system. All work conducted by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and partners is on private lands and therefore requires considerable time be spent developing rapport with landowners to gain acceptance, and continued cooperation with this program throughout 10-15 year lease periods. Both passive and active restoration treatment techniques are used. Passive regeneration of habitat, using riparian exclosure fencing and alternate water sources, is the primary method to restore degraded streams when restoration can be achieved primarily through changes in management. Active restoration techniques using plantings, bioengineering, site-specific instream structures, or whole stream channel alterations are utilized when streams are more severely degraded and not likely to recover in a reasonable timeframe. Individual projects contribute to and complement ecosystem and basin-wide watershed restoration efforts that are underway by state, federal, and tribal agencies, and coordinated by the Grande Ronde Model Watershed Program (Project. No. 199202601). Work undertaken during 2008 included: (1) completing 1 new fencing project in the North Fork John Day subbasin that protects 1.82 miles of stream and 216.2 acres of habitat, and 1 fencing project in the Wallowa subbasin that protects an additional 0.59 miles of stream and 42.5 acres of habitat; (2) constructing 0.47 miles of new channel on the Wallowa river to enhance habitat, restore natural channel dimensions, pattern and profile and reconnect approximately 18 acres of floodplain and wetland habitat; (3) planting 10,084 plants along 0.5 miles of the Wallowa Riverproject; (4) establishing 34 new photopoints on 5 projects and retaking 295 existing photopoint pictures; (5) monitoring stream temperatures at 10 locations on 5 streams and conducting other monitoring activities; (6) completing riparian fence, water gap and other maintenance on 116.8 miles of project fences; and (7) completed a comprehensive project summary report to the Independent Scientific Review panel (ISRP) that provided our conclusions regarding benefits to focal species, along with management recommendations for the future. Since initiation of this program 57 individual projects have been implemented, monitoring and maintained along 84.9 miles of anadromous fish bearing streams, that protect and enhance 3,564 acres of riparian and instream habitat.

McGowan, Vance R.; Morton, Winston H. [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife] [Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

JANUARY 2007 THE BP U.S. REFINERIES INDEPENDENT SAFETY REVIEW PANEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF JANUARY 2007 THE REPORT THE BP U.S. REFINERIES INDEPENDENT SAFETY REVIEW PANEL #12;From left;PANEL STATEMENT The B.P. U.S. Refineries Independent Safety Review Panel i Process safety accidents can be prevented. On March 23, 2005, the BP Texas City refinery experienced a catastrophic process accident

Leveson, Nancy

387

Dying Green A Film Screening and Panel Discussion about Green Burial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dying Green A Film Screening and Panel Discussion about Green Burial March 20, 2014 6:00pm ­ 8:00pm to rest. The "Green Burial" movement is catching on in the U.S., and green cemetery options are now and panel discussion of the award-winning documentary, Dying Green (2011). Panel participants include Joshua

Virginia Tech

388

total energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

total energy total energy Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 1, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion BTUs, and quantifies the energy prices using U.S. dollars. The data is broken down into total production, imports, exports, consumption, and prices for energy types. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO consumption EIA export import production reference case total energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary - Reference Case (xls, 112.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

389

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power & Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

restoration plans for the Columbia Basin. The enhancement of nutrient availability and food web productivity, the effect of SCA addition on food web dynamics. The CPOM information would be valuable only if there is some hypothesized link between leaf litter transport rates and the manner in which SCA will impact food web dynamics

390

ORNL's Jeskie active on chemical safety panels | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

865.574.4399 865.574.4399 ORNL's Jeskie active on chemical safety panels Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Kim Jeskie. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Kim Jeskie. OAK RIDGE, Oct. 3, 2013 -- Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Kim Jeskie led the 12-member committee that developed new chemical safety guidelines described in the report, "Identifying and Evaluating Hazards in Research Laboratories," released by the American Chemical Society (ACS) at its 246th National Meeting & Exposition held in September. Jeskie was also appointed last spring to serve on the National Research Council Committee on Establishing and Promoting a Culture of Safety in Academic Laboratory Research. That panel is examining chemical research laboratory safety in nonindustrial settings.

391

Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3 and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m.sup.2/ g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraakyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders.

Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Fred J. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm{sup 3} and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m{sup 2}/g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraalkyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders. 2 figs.

Harris, M.T.; Basaran, O.A.; Kollie, T.G.; Weaver, F.J.

1996-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

393

Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3 and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m.sup.2/ g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraakyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders.

Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Fred J. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Silica powders for powder evacuated thermal insulating panel and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A powder evacuated thermal insulating panel using generally spherical and porous silica particles of a median size less than about 100 nanometers in diameter, a pour packing density of about 0.4 to 0.6 g/cm.sup.3 and an external surface area in the range of about 90 to 600 m.sup.2 /g is described. The silica powders are prepared by reacting a tetraakyl silicate with ammonia and water in an alcohol solvent, distilling the solution after the reaction to remove the ammonia and recover the alcohol. The resulting aqueous slurry was dried, ball-milled, and dried again to provide the silica particles with defined internal and external porosity. The nanometer size and the large external surface area of the silica particles along with the internal and external porosity of the silica particles provide powder evacuated thermal insulating panels with significantly higher R-values than obtainable using previously known silica powders.

Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Fred J. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Bending properties of foamed aluminum panels and sandwiches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The foamed panels and sandwiches were prepared by powder metallurgical route using various matrix alloys. The effect of the apparent density, geometry and structure of the foam on its bending stiffness was studied with respect to the results of the four-point-bending. It has been shown that the modulus of elasticity of the foam cannot be related only to its apparent density, because the distribution of the cell-wall material along the thickness of the foamed panel is not uniform. Therefore the real moment of inertia of the foam`s cross-section should be used for the calculation of bending stiffness. This moment can be determined from the square weight of the foamed sample.

Simancik, F.; Kovacik, J.; Minarikova, N. [Inst. of Materials and Machine Mechanics, Bratislava (Slovakia)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Managing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation (SREX) Print E-mail Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation (SREX) Print E-mail Introduction The United States Global Change Research Program, in cooperation with the Department of State, request expert review of the Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation (SREX)of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). On behalf of the U.S. Department of State, the U.S. Global Change Research Program is coordinating the solicitation of comments by U.S. experts to inform development of an integrated set of U.S. Government comments on the report. The Global Change Research Program Office will coordinate collation of U.S. expert comments and the review of the report by panels of Federal scientists and program managers in order to develop a consolidated U.S. Government submission. Expert comments must be received via the internet-based application by Midnight, Eastern Daylight Time, 7 March 2011 to be considered for inclusion in the U.S. Government submission. An expert reviewer may also be asked to participate in the government review organized within his or her own country. In such a case, he/she should submit comments either as an individual or as part of the government review, but not both.

397

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Managing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation (SREX) Print E-mail Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation (SREX) Print E-mail Introduction The United States Global Change Research Program, in cooperation with the Department of State, request expert review of the Special Report on Managing the Risks of Extreme Events and Disasters to Advance Climate Change Adaptation (SREX) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). On behalf of the U.S. Department of State, thethe U.S. Global Change Research Program is coordinating the solicitation of comments by U.S. experts to inform development of an integrated set of U.S. Government comments on the report. The Global Change Research Program Office will coordinate collation of U.S. expert comments and the review of the report by panels of Federal scientists and program managers in order to develop a consolidated U.S. Government submission. Expert comments must be received via the internet-based application by Midnight, Eastern Daylight Time, 7 March 2011 to be considered for inclusion in the U.S. Government submission. An expert reviewer may also be asked to participate in the government review organized within his or her own country. In such a case, he/she should submit comments either as an individual or as part of the government review, but not both.

398

Total Sky Imager (TSI) Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The total sky imager (TSI) provides time series of hemispheric sky images during daylight hours and retrievals of fractional sky cover for periods when the solar elevation is greater than 10 degrees.

Morris, VR

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

The inverse problems of wing panel manufacture processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown that inverse problems of steady-state creep bending of plates in both the geometrically linear and nonlinear formulations can be represented in a variational formulation. Steady-state values of the obtained functionals corresponding to the solutions of the problems of inelastic deformation and springback are determined by applying a finite element procedure to the functionals. Optimal laws of creep deformation are formulated using the criterion of minimizing damage in the functionals of the inverse problems. The formulated problems are reduced to the problems solved by the finite element method using MSC.Marc software. Currently, forming of light metals poses tremendous challenges due to their low ductility at room temperature and their unusual deformation characteristics at hot-cold work: strong asymmetry between tensile and compressive behavior, and a very pronounced anisotropy. We used the constitutive models of steady-state creep of initially transverse isotropy structural materials the kind of the stress state has influence. The paper gives basics of the developed computer-aided system of design, modeling, and electronic simulation targeting the processes of manufacture of wing integral panels. The modeling results can be used to calculate the die tooling, determine the panel processibility, and control panel rejection in the course of forming.

Oleinikov, A. I., E-mail: a.i.oleinikov@mail.ru [Komsomolsk-on-Amur State Technical University, Lenina prospect 27, Komsomolsk-on-Amur, 681013, Russian Federation, and Institute of Machinery and Metallurgy Far Eastern Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Metallurgov Street 1, Komsomolsk-on-Am (Russian Federation); Bormotin, K. S., E-mail: cvmi@knastu.ru [Komsomolsk-on-Amur State Technical University, Lenina prospect 27, Komsomolsk-on-Amur, 681013, Russian Federation (Russian Federation)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

403

Divya Energy Solar Panel Savings Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Divya Energy Solar Panel Savings Calculator Divya Energy Solar Panel Savings Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Divya Energy Solar Panel Savings Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Boston Cleanweb Hackathon Resource Type: Application prototype User Interface: Website Website: hackerleague.org/hackathons/boston-cleanweb-hackathon/hacks/divya-ener Web Application Link: www.divyaenergy.com/cleanweb/ OpenEI Keyword(s): Cleanweb Hackathon, Boston, Community Generated Coordinates: 42.3490737°, -71.0481764° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3490737,"lon":-71.0481764,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

404

2012 Smart Grid Peer Review Presentations - Day 2 Smart Grid Panel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Smart Grid Panel Smart Grid Panel Discussion 2012 Smart Grid Peer Review Presentations - Day 2 Smart Grid Panel Discussion The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability held its bi-annual peer review of the Smart Grid Research and Development Program on June 7-8, 2012. More than 30 projects were presented at San Diego Gas & Electric's Energy Innovation Center. Presentations from the Day 2 Smart Grid panel discussion are below. Moderator: Lee Kreval, SDG&E 2012 SG Peer Review - Day 2 Panel Discussion: Puesh Kumar, American Public Power Association 2012 SG Peer Review - Day 2 Panel Discussion: Rogelio Sullivan, NC State University 2012 SG Peer Review - Day 2 Panel Discussion: Matt Wakefield, EPRI More Documents & Publications Smart Grid Characteristics, Values, and Metrics

405

Another SunShot Success: GE to Make PrimeStar Solar Panels at New Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Another SunShot Success: GE to Make PrimeStar Solar Panels at New Another SunShot Success: GE to Make PrimeStar Solar Panels at New Colorado Plant Another SunShot Success: GE to Make PrimeStar Solar Panels at New Colorado Plant October 14, 2011 - 4:03pm Addthis Thin film solar panels produced by General Electric’s PrimeStar in Arvada, Colorado | Image courtesy of Edelman. Thin film solar panels produced by General Electric's PrimeStar in Arvada, Colorado | Image courtesy of Edelman. Minh Le Minh Le Program Manager, Solar Program Yesterday, General Electric (GE) announced that it will build a new thin-film photovoltaic (PV) solar panel manufacturing facility in Aurora, Colorado, to produce highly-efficient, low-cost panels that are based on innovative technology originally developed at the Energy Department's

406

Arkansas Students Get Their Hands Dirty in Solar Panel Project | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Arkansas Students Get Their Hands Dirty in Solar Panel Project Arkansas Students Get Their Hands Dirty in Solar Panel Project Arkansas Students Get Their Hands Dirty in Solar Panel Project September 9, 2010 - 5:47pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE What does this mean for me? Lamar School District installed four solar panels with Recovery Act funds,10 more on the way Students helped install solar panels as part of school-to-work transition program 45 panels at City Hall to be installed by students Wallie Shaw remembers where he got the idea to do a hands-on solar panel project for his Jobs for America's Graduates (JAG) students, a school-to-work transition program focused on helping at-risk youth graduate from high school. "Having been in the military and stationed in Germany, I saw a magazine

407

K Basins isolation barriers summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 105-K East and 105-K West fuel storage basins (105-K Basins) were designed and constructed in the early 1950`s for interim storage of irradiated fuel following its discharge from the reactors. The 105-K- East and 105-K West reactor buildings were constructed first, and the associated storage basins were added about a year later. The construction joint between each reactor building structure and the basin structure included a flexible membrane waterstop to prevent leakage. Water in the storage basins provided both radiation shielding and cooling to remove decay heat from stored fuel until its transfer to the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility for chemical processing. The 105-K West Reactor was permanently shut down in February 1970; the 105-K East Reactor was permanently shut down in February 1971. Except for a few loose pieces, fuel stored in the basins at that time was shipped to the PUREX Facility for processing. The basins were then left idle but were kept filled with water. The PUREX Facility was shut down and placed on wet standby in 1972 while N Reactor continued to operate. When the N Reactor fuel storage basin began to approach storage capacity, the decision was made to modify the fuel storage basins at 105-K East and 105-K West to provide additional storage capacity. Both basins were subsequently modified (105-K East in 1975 and 105-K West in 1981) to provide for the interim handling and storage of irradiated N Reactor fuel. The PUREX Facility was restarted in November 1983 to provide 1698 additional weapons-grade plutonium for the United States defense mission. The facility was shut down and deactivated in December 1992 when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the plant was no longer needed to support weapons-grade plutonium production. When the PUREX Facility was shut down, approximately 2.1 x 1 06 kg (2,100 metric tons) of irradiated fuel aged 7 to 23 years was left in storage in the 105-K Basins pending a decision on final disposition of the material. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1994), also known as the Tri-Party Agreement, commits to the removal of all fuel and sludge from the 105-K Basins by the year 2002.

Strickland, G.C., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

408

A review of solar photovoltaic panel cooling systems with special reference to Ground coupled central panel cooling system (GC-CPCS)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The efficiency of wafer-based crystalline as well as Thin film Solar photovoltaic cells get reduced with increase of panel temperature. It is noted that the efficiency drops by about 0.5% for increase of 1 °C of panel temperature. It is necessary to operate them at low temperatures in order to keep the PV module electrical efficiency at acceptable level. Therefore need for a low-cost cooling system for the Solar panels is felt. The cooling of Solar PV panels is a problem of great practical significance. It has the potential to reduce the cost of solar energy in three ways. First, cooling can improve the electrical production of standard flat plate PV modules. Second, cooling makes possible the use of concentrating PV systems. Finally, the heat removed by the PV cooling system can be used for domestic or industrial use. Various Solar PV panel cooling systems have been developed in past. A new system for cooling of Solar PV panels called the Ground-Coupled Central Panel Cooling System (GC-CPCS) is installed and operational at the Energy Park of Rajiv Gandhi Proudyogiki Vishwavidyalaya (RGPV), Bhopal, India. This paper discusses various Solar PV panel cooling technologies and the testing and performance of the newly developed Ground-Coupled Central Panel Cooling System (GC-CPCS). This study is unique in three ways. First, it introduces the concept of Central cooling of Solar PV panels. Second, Ground Coupled Heat Exchanger is used for the first time in any Solar PV Panel Cooling System. Third, the testing is done on site under actual solar irradiance.

Amit Sahay; V.K. Sethi; A.C. Tiwari; Mukesh Pandey

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 Mark Person*1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Mount Simon, Illinois Basin, CO2, earthquakes, pressure, brine transport69 #12;Page | 3 1. IntroductionPage | 1 Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 2 3 4 sharp-interface models of CO2 injection were constructed for the Illinois49 Basin in which porosity

Gable, Carl W.

410

Death of a carbonate basin: The Niagara-Salina transition in the Michigan basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The A-O Carbonate in the Michigan basin comprises a sequence of laminated calcite/anhydrite layers intercalated with bedded halite at the transition between normal marine Niagaran carbonates and lower Salina Group evaporites. The carbonate/anhydrite interbeds represent freshing events during initial evaporative concentration of the Michigan basin. Recent drilling in the Michigan basin delineates two distinct regions of A-O Carbonate development: a 5 to 10 m thick sequence of six 'laminites' found throughout most of the western and northern basin and a 10 to 25 m thick sequence in the southeastern basin containing both thicker 'laminates' and thicker salt interbeds. Additionally, potash deposits of the overlying A-1 evaporite unit are restricted to the northern and western basin regions. The distribution of evaporite facies in these two regions is adequately explained by a source of basin recharge in the southeast-perhaps the 'Clinton Inlet' of earlier workers. This situation suggest either that: (1) the source of basin recharge is alternately supplying preconcentrated brine and more normal marine water, or (2) that the basin received at least two distinct sources of water during A-O deposition.

Leibold, A.W.; Howell, P.D. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Mass balance for lead in the California South Coast Air Basin: An update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mass balance for lead for the year 1989 in the South Coast Air Basin has inputs to the atmosphere of 600 {+-} 190 kg/day and outputs of 580 {+-} 160 kg/day, showing rough agreement. Stationary sources are responsible for only about 5% of the total lead emissions. The bulk of the lead is emitted from vehicles using leaded gasoline (37%) and unleaded gasoline (15%), as well as from resuspension of previously deposited lead on roads (43%). Over half of the total emitted lead deposits on roads and nearby soil, while about one-third is carried out of the basin by wind. A small amount, less than 10%, is deposited on surfaces throughout the basin. These percentages are approximately the same as those in a mass balance for the same region calculated for 1972, when lead emissions from leaded gasoline were about a factor of 70 greater than leaded gas emissions in 1989. When the lead emissions re used as inputs o a simple continuously stirred flow reactor model for the basin, reasonable, agreement is obtained between calculated and measured concentrations.

Lankey, R.L.; Davidson, C.I.; McMichael, F.C. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Forthcoming Projects Peer Review Panel (PPRP) meeting The next meeting of the Projects Peer Review Panel (PPRP) will take place in Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forthcoming Projects Peer Review Panel (PPRP) meeting The next meeting of the Projects Peer Review September 2012, Polaris House, Swindon. The Panel will be reviewing 3 project proposals. Members.Aziz@stfc.ac.uk if they are likely to attend the open sessions. The proposals being reviewed are as follows: 19th September & 20th

413

Forthcoming Projects Peer Review Panel (PPRP) meeting The next meeting of the Projects Peer Review Panel (PPRP) will take place at Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forthcoming Projects Peer Review Panel (PPRP) meeting The next meeting of the Projects Peer Review 2012 The Panel will be reviewing 2 project proposals and 15 PRD applications. Due to the large number of PRD applications being reviewed there will be no open presentations for PRDs. Members of the science

414

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 104.0 Beam(m) 3.7 Depth(m) 4.6 Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 1.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach 12' by 12' concrete slabs anchored to flume walls

415

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report Herb G. Sutter Michael Poirier Art W. Etchells Gary Smith Kris Thomas Jim J. Davis Paul Macbeth November 16, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 16, 2009 ii Herbert G. Sutter, Team Lead Date Michael Poirier, Team Member Date Arthur W. Etchells, Team Member Date Gary Smith, Team Member Date Kris Thomas, Team Member Date Jim J. Davis, Team Member Date Paul Macbeth, Team Member Date Signatures 11/09/2009 11/09/2009 11/09/2009 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 16, 2009

416

Alden Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Alden Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Alden Research Laboratory, Inc Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 33.5 Beam(m) 21.3 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Depends on study Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 1.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 1.8 Wave Period Range(s) 1.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Period adjustable electronically, height adjustable mechanically Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Designed as needed using commercially available sand/sediment

417

Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

418

Flathead Basin Commission Act of 1983 (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act establishes the Flathead Basin Commission, the purpose of which is to protect the Flathead Lake aquatic environment, its waters, and surrounding lands and natural resources. The Commission...

419

The Uinta Basin Case Robert J. Bayer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Overburden Tailings Oil Shale Mining Open Pit Underground Ex situ extraction Ex situ thermal conversion EIS for Oil Sands and Oil Shale Ongoing concerns with Basin-wide air quality Wildlife and wildlife

Utah, University of

420

Sheets Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sheets Wave Basin Sheets Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sheets Wave Basin Overseeing Organization University of Rhode Island Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 30.0 Beam(m) 3.6 Depth(m) 1.8 Cost(per day) $750(+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.0 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Pre-programmed for regular and irregular waves, but wavemaker is capable of any input motion. Wave Direction Uni-Directional

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 38.1 Beam(m) 22.9 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $150/hour (excluding labor) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.3 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10.7 Wave Period Range(s) 3.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.2 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Directional, irregular, any spectrum, cnoidal or solitary wave Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Stone Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None

422

Assessment of undiscovered carboniferous coal-bed gas resources of the Appalachian Basin and Black Warrior Basin Provinces, 2002  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coalbed methane (CBM) occurs in coal beds of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) age in the Appalachian basin, which extends almost continuously from New York to Alabama. In general, the basin includes three structural subbasins: the Dunkard basin in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and northern West Virginia; the Pocahontas basin in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia; and the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi. For assessment purposes, the Appalachian basin was divided into two assessment provinces: the Appalachian Basin Province from New York to Alabama, and the Black Warrior Basin Province in Alabama and Mississippi. By far, most of the coalbed methane produced in the entire Appalachian basin has come from the Black Warrior Basin Province. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Milici, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Energy Frontier Research Centers: A View from Senior EFRC Representatives (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A distinguished panel of scientists from the EFRC community provide their perspective on the importance of EFRCs for addressing critical energy needs at the 2011 EFRC Summit. Persis Drell, Director at SLAC, served as moderator. Panel members are Neal Armstrong (Director of the Center for Interface Science: Solar Electric Materials, led by the University of Arizona), Emily Carter (Co-Director of the Combustion EFRC, led by Princeton University. She is also Team Leader of the Heterogeneous Functional Materials Center, led by the University of South Caroline), Don DePaolo (Director of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2, led by LBNL), and Brent Gunnoe (Director of the Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization, led by the University of Virginia). The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

Drell, Persis (SLAC) [SLAC; Armstrong, Neal (University of Arizona) [University of Arizona; Carter, Emily (Princeton University) [Princeton University; DePaolo, Don (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Gunnoe, Brent (University of Virginia) [University of Virginia

2011-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

424

Science for Energy Technology: The Industry Perspective (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A distinguished panel of industry leaders discussed how basic science impacts energy technology at the 2011 EFRC Summit. Panel members are Jeffrey Wadworth, President and CEO of Battelle Memorial Institute; David E. Carlson, the Chief Scientist for BP Solar; Yet-Ming Chiang, Professor at MIT and the founder of A123 Systems; and Catherine T. Hunt, the R&D Director of Innovation Sourcing and Sustainable Technologies at the Dow Chemical Company. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss 'Science for our Nation's Energy Future.' In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

Wadsworth, Jeffrey (Battelle Memorial Institute); Carlson, David E. (BP Solar); Chiang, Yet-Ming (MIT and A123 Systems); Hunt, Catherine T. (Dow Chemical)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

425

Petroleum geochemistry of Atrau region, Pre-Caspian Basin, Kazakhstan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pre-Caspian Basin covers an area of approx. 500,000 sq. km. and is characterized mainly by thick (0-5000 m) Kungurian salts. Atrau region occupies 100,000 sq.km. and is located at the southern part of the basin. Oils of this basin are found in the sub-salt (Carboniferous reefs) and supra-salts (Triassic red beds and Jurassic-Cretaceous clastics) reservoirs. Seventeen crude oil samples analyzed from different wells appear to be paraffinic and paraffinic-naphthenic type. Some of the oils hardly contained any n-alkanes, probably owing to biodegradation. Biomarker signatures of saturate and aromatic fractions and stable carbon isotopes of whole oils revealed two genetically different oil families; family I and family II. Family I was generated from clastic supra-salt sediments having immature (%Rc=0.55) terrestrial organic matter. Family II was generated from carbonate rich sub-salt sediments, containing mature (%Rc=0.65-0.80) marine organic matter. Majority of Triassic, Kungurian and Upper Cretaceous successions contained enough organic matter with considerably low total petroleum potential (S1+S2). Upper Carboniferous sediments, on the other hand, contain enough and oil prone organic matter that reached peak oil generation stage (233.1 Ma) and hydrocarbon saturation level for expulsion as a result of high sedimentation rates in the Lower to Middle Triassic succession in Kobyekovskaya-2 well. Maximum paleotemperature reached in the area was not enough for H{sub 2}S formation and cracking of already generated hydrocarbons to natural gas.

Guerge, K. [TPAO dis Projeler Grup Baskanligi, Ankara (Turkey)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Mineralogy and organic petrology of oil shales in the Sangkarewang formation, Ombilin Basin, West Sumatra, Indonesia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Ombilin Basin, which lies in Sumatra Island, is one of the Tertiary basins in Indonesia. This basin contains a wide variety of rock units,… (more)

Fatimah, Fatimah

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Heat Recovery From Arc Furnaces Using Water Cooled Panels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to maintain a constant cooling water supply temperature in the cold well. The cooling tower fans can be manually reversed on slow speed for de-icing the cooling tower in winter to remove ice buildup on the slats. Level controller LL-2 shuts down pumps PI...HEAT RECOVERY FROM ARC FURNACES USING WATER COOLED PANELS D. F. Darby Deere & Company Moline, Illinois ABSTRACT In 1980-81, the John Deere Foundry at East Moline underwent an expansion program that in creased its capacity by over 60...

Darby, D. F.

428

Application of a panel method to hydrodynamics of underwater vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low-order singularity panel method based on Green`s formulation is used to predict the hydrodynamics characteristics of underwater vehicles. The low-order modeling employs constant strength sources and doublets, and the body surface is modeled by quadrilaterals. The method is first applied to predicting the force and moment coefficients of underwater vehicles for the body-alone and finned configurations. Hydrodynamic coefficients of added mass and added moment of inertia are also calculated by modifying the code. Results for several two and three-dimensional bodies show the usefulness of the method for predicting the added mass and added moment of inertia.

Sahin, I. [Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States); Crane, J.W.; Watson, K.P. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Panama City, FL (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Panel Discussion  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Energy 1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Panel Discussion Dr. Sunita Satyapal Chief Engineer & Deputy Program Manager Fuel Cell Technologies Program United States Department of Energy SAE World Congress SAE World Congress April 15, 2010 April 15, 2010 U. S. Department of Energy 2 2 Technology Barriers* Economic & Institutional Barriers Fuel Cell Cost & Durability Targets*: Vehicles: $30 per kW, 5,000-hr durability Stationary Systems: $750 per kW, 40,000-hr durability Safety, Codes & Standards Development Domestic Manufacturing & Supplier Base Public Awareness & Acceptance Hydrogen Supply & Delivery Infrastructure Hydrogen Cost Target: $2 - 3 /gge, delivered Key Challenges Technology Validation: Technologies must

430

Basin evolution, diagenesis and uranium mineralization in the PaleoproterozicThelon Basin,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin evolution, diagenesis and uranium mineralization in the PaleoproterozicThelon Basin, Nunavut,Canada Eric E. Hiatt,n Sarah E. Palmer,w1 T. Kurt Kyserw and Terrence K. O'Connorz n Geology Department, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Oshkosh,Wisconsin, USA wDepartment of Geological Sciences and Engineering

Hiatt, Eric E.

431

The Reality of Solar Panels at 50% Cost | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Reality of Solar Panels at 50% Cost The Reality of Solar Panels at 50% Cost The Reality of Solar Panels at 50% Cost August 3, 2010 - 12:01pm Addthis Dr. Arun Majumdar Dr. Arun Majumdar Former Director, Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy Last week, residents in the Baltimore-Washington area experienced their 42nd day of 90+ degree temperatures this year. Wouldn't it be nice to capture more of that intense sunlight and convert it into electricity? Modern photovoltaic cells (more commonly known as solar panels) were invented in the 1950s at Bell Laboratories. But despite the passage of over fifty years, solar energy's full potential has yet to be tapped due in part to the cost of actually putting the pieces of a solar panel together -- installing solar panels still far exceeds the cost of using traditional

432

Water balance in the Amazon basin from a land surface model ensemble  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite recent advances in modeling and remote sensing of land surfaces, estimates of the global water budget are still fairly uncertain. The objective of this study is to evaluate the water budget of the Amazon basin based on several state-of-the-art land surface model (LSM) outputs. Water budget variables [total water storage (TWS), evapotranspiration (ET), surface runoff (R) and baseflow (B)] are evaluated at the basin scale using both remote sensing and in situ data. Fourteen LSMs were run using meteorological forcings at a 3-hourly time step and 1-degree spatial resolution. Three experiments are performed using precipitation which has been rescaled to match monthly global GPCP and GPCC datasets and the daily HYBAM dataset for the Amazon basin. R and B are used to force the Hydrological Modeling and Analysis Platform (HyMAP) river routing scheme and simulated discharges are compared against observations at 165 gauges. Simulated ET and TWS are compared against FLUXNET and MOD16A2 evapotranspiration, and GRACE TWS estimates in different catchments. At the basin scale, simulated ET ranges from 2.39mm.d-1 to 3.26mm.d-1 and a low spatial correlation between ET and P indicates that evapotranspiration does not depend on water availability over most of the basin. Results also show that other simulated water budget variables vary significantly as a function of both the LSM and precipitation used, but simulated TWS generally agree at the basin scale. The best water budget simulations resulted from experiments using the HYBAM dataset, mostly explained by a denser rainfall gauge network the daily rescaling.

Getirana, Augusto; Dutra, Emanuel; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Kam, Jonghun; Li, Hongyi; Decharme, Bertrand; Zhang, Zhengqiu J.; Ducharne, Agnes; Boone, Aaron; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Rodell, Matthew; Mounirou Toure, Ally; Xue, Yongkang; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Arsenault, Kristi Rae; Drapeau, Guillaume; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Ronchail, Josyane; Sheffield, Justin

2014-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

433

Performance Period Total Fee Paid  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Period Period Total Fee Paid 4/29/2012 - 9/30/2012 $418,348 10/1/2012 - 9/30/2013 $0 10/1/2013 - 9/30/2014 $0 10/1/2014 - 9/30/2015 $0 10/1/2015 - 9/30/2016 $0 Cumulative Fee Paid $418,348 Contract Type: Cost Plus Award Fee Contract Period: $116,769,139 November 2011 - September 2016 $475,395 $0 Fee Information Total Estimated Contract Cost $1,141,623 $1,140,948 $1,140,948 $5,039,862 $1,140,948 Maximum Fee $5,039,862 Minimum Fee Fee Available Portage, Inc. DE-DT0002936 EM Contractor Fee Site: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings - MOAB, UT Contract Name: MOAB Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Contract September 2013 Contractor: Contract Number:

434

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" L1. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type for Non-Mall Buildings, 1995" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings*",54068,51570,45773,6746,34910,1161,3725,779 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000",6272,5718,4824,986,3767,50,22,54 "5,001 to 10,000",7299,6667,5728,1240,4341,61,169,45 "10,001 to 25,000",10829,10350,8544,1495,6442,154,553,"Q"

435

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

436

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" L2. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Types (Non-Mall Buildings), 1999" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",61707,58693,49779,6496,37150,3058,5343,1913 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6750,5836,4878,757,3838,231,109,162 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",7940,7166,5369,1044,4073,288,160,109 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",10534,9773,7783,1312,5712,358,633,232

437

Buildings","Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" L3. Floorspace Lit by Lighting Type (Non-Mall Buildings), 2003" ,"Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"Total (Lit or Unlit) in All Buildings","Total (Lit or Unlit) in Buildings With Any Lighting","Lighted Area Only","Area Lit by Each Type of Light" ,,,,"Incan- descent","Standard Fluor-escent","Compact Fluor- escent","High Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,62060,51342,5556,37918,4004,4950,2403 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6038,4826,678,3932,206,76,124 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,6090,4974,739,3829,192,238,248 "10,001 to 25,000 .............",11535,11229,8618,1197,6525,454,506,289

438

Dual-circuit embossed-sheet heat-transfer panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A heat transfer panel provides redundant cooling for fusion reactors or the like environment requiring low-mass construction. Redundant cooling is provided by two independent cooling circuits, each circuit consisting of a series of channels joined to inlet and outlet headers. The panel comprises a welded joinder of two full-size and two much smaller partial-size sheets. The first full-size sheet is embossed for form first portions of channels for the first and second circuits, as well as a header for the first circuit. The second full-sized sheet is then laid over and welded to the first full-size sheet. The first and second partial-size sheets are then overlaid on separate portions of the second full-sized sheet, and are welded thereto. The first and second partial-sized sheets are embossed to form inlet and outlet headers, which communicate with channels of the second circuit through apertures formed in the second full-sized sheet.

Morgan, G.D.

1982-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

439

E-Print Network 3.0 - automobile front panel Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: automobile front panel Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 FUTURES OF AUTOMOBILE INDUSTRY AND...

440

Regulation and Measuring Cost-Efficiency with Panel Data Models: Application to Electricity Distribution Utilities  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines the performance of panel data models in measuring cost-efficiency of electricity distribution utilities. Different cost frontier models are applied to a sample...

Mehdi Farsi; Massimo Filippini

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Optimal design of actively cooled panels for hypersonic vehicles: A combined  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal design of actively cooled panels for hypersonic vehicles: A combined materials, Irvine The design of materials for the thermo-structural protection of fully reus- able hypersonic

Ponce, V. Miguel

442

Developement of a digitally controlled low power single phase inverter for grid connected solar panel.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The work consists in developing a power conversion unit for solar panel connected to the grid. This unit will be a single phase inverter… (more)

Marguet, Raphael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

E-Print Network 3.0 - advisory panel meeting Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

that meets throughout the year. Recommendations from the Independent... Review Panel and Peer Review Group members. The Independent Scientific ... Source: Northwest Power Planning...

444

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous selenium flat-panel Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

films with near-single-crystalline quality and high carrier mobility Summary: , such as solar cells and flat-panel displays, our ACSi technology promises to fundamentally...

445

E-Print Network 3.0 - amorphous silicon flat-panel Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with the low cost of amorphous and polycrystalline silicon films on non... , such as solar cells and flat-panel displays, our ACSi technology promises to fundamentally...

446

Annual Muslim Studies Program Conference Introduction, panel schedule and presenter biographical statements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Essentialism and Resistance" 12:00-12:45 Lunch 1:00-2:15 Panel 3 Sylvia Chan-Malik, "Of Bikinis and Burqas

447

Williston in the family of cratonic basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Williston basin is one of a clan of subcircular to elliptical elements in the interiors of all cratons; such basins are distinguished by characteristics common to all. In each, the basement consists of continental crust and each basin is surrounded by areas of continental crust. Subsidence rates are typically low, so that conditions near depositional base level prevailed during much of the history of sediment accumulation. Episodic subsidence occurred over time spans of 10/sup 7/-10/sup 8/ years; major episodes of subsidence are broadly concurrent on all cratons. Tectonic tempo and mode of subsidence evolved synchronously on all cratons; therefore, similar isopach and facies patterns (and similar oil or gas maturation, migration, and trap potentials) occur on all cratons. All members of the clan exhibit a range of individual variations imposed by latitude and climate. Intraplate tectonism and volcanism, approach to or distance from source areas, and distribution paths of detrital sediment. Nevertheless, facts and concepts developed by intensive study of basins with high-density documentation (outcrop and subsurface) are commonly applicable to basins such as the Williston, which is in a less mature stage of exploration.

Sloss, L.L.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

E-Print Network 3.0 - athabasca basin western Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thelon Basin Boomerang Lake Western Thelon Basin Eastern Thelon... to the world-class uranium-producing Athabasca basin. At present, the Thelon basin is only known to host......

449

Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida W $38.51 W $140.84 27.3% 134 W 100.0% Florida W $38.51 W $140.84 27.3% 134 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - W W W - W Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W $16.14 W $63.35 25.5% 1,681 W 88.5% Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $20.69 $19.60 -5.3% $74.23 26.4% 4,845 31.9% 97.7% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $13.74 $16.13 17.4% $99.82 16.2% 840 32.1% 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W $40.18 W $94.03 42.7% 699 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Jersey W $32.44 W $89.13 36.4% 1,064 W 47.6% Northern Appalachian Basin New York $21.87 $18.86 -13.8% $59.40 31.7% 2,373 49.3% 91.9%

450

Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware W $28.49 W $131.87 21.6% 59 W 100.0% Delaware W $28.49 W $131.87 21.6% 59 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin Florida W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W $20.35 W $64.82 31.4% 1,715 W 75.9% Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $19.73 $19.64 -0.4% $81.15 24.2% 4,650 24.8% 99.3% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan W $14.02 W $76.22 18.4% 713 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W $43.43 W $90.90 47.8% 499 W 89.6% Northern Appalachian Basin New Jersey W $27.19 W $74.81 36.3% 1,864 W 44.1% Northern Appalachian Basin New York $20.08 $15.26 -24.0% $53.68 28.4% 3,726 39.2% 79.1%

451

Sediment Basin Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sediment Basin Flume Sediment Basin Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sediment Basin Flume Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 22.7 Beam(m) 5.1 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Two pumps provide up to 18 cfs of flow capacity Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Available Sensors Acoustics, Flow, Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability Real-Time Yes Test Services Test Services Yes On-Site fabrication capability/equipment Machine shop, carpenter shop, welding shop, instrumentation and electronics shop

452

Dan Klempel Basin Electric Power Cooperative DOE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dan Dan Klempel Basin Electric Power Cooperative DOE 2009 Congestion Study Workshop Oklahoma City, Oklahoma June 18, 2008 Page 1 of 5 Basin Electric Power Cooperative would like to thank the Department of Energy for this opportunity to share some of our thoughts on transmission congestion issues. Basin Electric is a wholesale power supplier to rural electric cooperatives located in the mid-west and in both the east and west interconnections. Naturally, our generation and transmission facilities also reside in both interconnections so we use asynchronous back-to-back DC facilities to balance loads with resources. With headquarters in Bismarck, North Dakota; we find ourselves in the heart of some of the nations most desirable wind patterns for potential renewable energy development as well as electric energy production from more traditional sources. Lignite coal has been a reliable

453

Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin 2 Wave Basin 2 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Length(m) 48.8 Beam(m) 26.5 Depth(m) 2.1 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Built to client specifications, currently rigid concrete over gravel fill

454

SWP.SanJuanBasin.factsheet0919  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Principal Investigator Reid Grigg/Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Field Test Information: Field Test Name San Juan Basin, New Mexico: Enhanced Coalbed Methane-Sequestration Test Test Location Near Navajo City, New Mexico Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Source 20,000 - 35,000 tons; CO2 sourced from McElmo Dome, CO ConocoPhillips KinderMorgan CO 2 Company, L.P. Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Summary of Field Test Site and Operations General Geology and Target Reservoirs: The San Juan basin (SJB) is one of the top ranked basins in the world for CO 2 coalbed sequestration because it has: 1) advantageous geology and high methane content; 2) abundant anthropogenic CO

455

Southern Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basin and Range Geothermal Region Basin and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Southern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: {{{Name}}} North-south-striking and west-dipping Basin and Range province normal faults form the western edge of the Sierra Madre Occidental plateau in northeastern Sonora. These faults and associated half-grabens extend over a distance of more than 300 km between the San Bernardino basin in the north and the Sahuaripa basin in the south. Active Tectonics of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (Southern Basin and Range Province) and the 3 May 1887 Mw 7.4 Earthquake [1] References ↑ "Active Tectonics of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (Southern Basin and Range Province) and the 3 May 1887 Mw 7.4 Earthquake"

456

Sources of Atmospheric Moisture for the La Plata River Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The La Plata River basin (LPRB) is the second largest basin of South America and extends over a highly populated and socioeconomically active region. In this study, the spatiotemporal variability of sources of moisture for the LPRB are quantified ...

J. Alejandro Martinez; Francina Dominguez

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Improvement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore reparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin.

McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Colorado Division of Water Resources Denver Basin Webpage | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Denver Basin Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Division of Water Resources Denver Basin Webpage Abstract This is the...

459

Total Adjusted Sales of Kerosene  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: End Use: Total Residential Commercial Industrial Farm All Other Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: End Use Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 492,702 218,736 269,010 305,508 187,656 81,102 1984-2012 East Coast (PADD 1) 353,765 159,323 198,762 237,397 142,189 63,075 1984-2012 New England (PADD 1A) 94,635 42,570 56,661 53,363 38,448 15,983 1984-2012 Connecticut 13,006 6,710 8,800 7,437 7,087 2,143 1984-2012 Maine 46,431 19,923 25,158 24,281 17,396 7,394 1984-2012 Massachusetts 7,913 3,510 5,332 6,300 2,866 1,291 1984-2012 New Hampshire 14,454 6,675 8,353 7,435 5,472 1,977 1984-2012

460

Solar total energy project Shenandoah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the description of the final design for the Solar Total Energy System (STES) to be installed at the Shenandoah, Georgia, site for utilization by the Bleyle knitwear plant. The system is a fully cascaded total energy system design featuring high temperature paraboloidal dish solar collectors with a 235 concentration ratio, a steam Rankine cycle power conversion system capable of supplying 100 to 400 kW(e) output with an intermediate process steam take-off point, and a back pressure condenser for heating and cooling. The design also includes an integrated control system employing the supervisory control concept to allow maximum experimental flexibility. The system design criteria and requirements are presented including the performance criteria and operating requirements, environmental conditions of operation; interface requirements with the Bleyle plant and the Georgia Power Company lines; maintenance, reliability, and testing requirements; health and safety requirements; and other applicable ordinances and codes. The major subsystems of the STES are described including the Solar Collection Subysystem (SCS), the Power Conversion Subsystem (PCS), the Thermal Utilization Subsystem (TUS), the Control and Instrumentation Subsystem (CAIS), and the Electrical Subsystem (ES). Each of these sections include design criteria and operational requirements specific to the subsystem, including interface requirements with the other subsystems, maintenance and reliability requirements, and testing and acceptance criteria. (WHK)

None

1980-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

462

Hydrodynamic potential of upper cretaceous Mesaverde group and Dakota formation, San Juan Basin, northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Geothermal-gradient map of the San Juan Basin area. 25 Diagram relating pressure head, P/p g, to total head, Z + P/p g 29 Index map of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico and Colorado showing areas of Dakota gas accumulation. 31 Southwest... wells near the present site of the New Mexico Public Service power plants in 1912-13; (6) Mesa Verde Oil Company drilled two wells near Flora Vista in 1918-19; and the T. E. Williams Syndicate drilled the the deepest test to date (3, 900 ft) 5 miles...

Dougless, Thomas Clay

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

463

Statistical model for source rock maturity and organic richness using well-log data, Bakken Formation, Williston basin, United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study of the Bakken Formation, the proposed source rock for much of the hydrocarbons generated in the Williston basin, was done using bulk density, neutron porosity, and resistivity logs, and formation temperatures. Principal components, cluster, and discriminant analyses indicate that the present-day distribution of organic matter controls much of the variability in the log values. Present-day total organic carbon values are high in the central part of the basin near northeastern Montana and along the east edge of the basin, and low in the area of the Nesson anticline and along the southwest edge of the basin. Using a regression of density on temperature and the analysis of residuals from this regression, hydrocarbon maturity effects were partially separated from depositional effects. These analyses suggest that original concentrations of organic matter were low near the limits of the Bakken and increased to a high in northeastern Montana. The pre-maturation distribution of total organic carbon and the present-day total organic carbon distribution, as determined by statistical analyses of well-log data, agree with the results of geochemical analyses. The distributions can be explained by a relatively simple depositional pattern and thermal history for the Bakken. 6 figures, 3 tables.

Krystinik, K.B.; Charpentier, R.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

465

Groundwater Availability Within the Salton Sea Basin Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that increasing demands for water in Southern California are being affected by actions to reduce and redirect the amount of water imported from the Colorado River. In the Imperial Valley region, for example, import reductions will not only affect agricultural users but also could produce significant collateral impacts on the level and quality of water in the Salton Sea, its regional ecology, or even the long term air quality in the greater basin. The notion of using groundwater in the Imperial Valley as an additional source for agricultural or domestic needs, energy production, or Salton Sea restoration efforts, so as to offset reductions in imported water, is not a new concept. Even though it has been discussed recently (e.g., LLNL, 2002), the idea goes back, in part, to several studies performed by the US Department of Interior and other agencies that have indicated that there may be substantial, usable amounts of groundwater in some portions of the Imperial Valley. It has been estimated, for example, that between 1.1 and 3 billion acre-feet (AF) of groundwater lie within the extended, deep basin underlying the valley and Salton Sea region, even though much of it may be unrecoverable or too poor in its quality (Imperial County, 1997). This is a significant volume with respect to the total annual precipitation volume received in California, whose average is close to 200 million (or 0.2 billion) AF per year (DWR, 1998), and especially with respect to the total annual precipitation received in the Salton Sea watershed itself, which we estimate (Appendix A) to be approximately 2.5 million acre feet (MAF) per year. Clearly, a thorough appraisal of the groundwater resources in the Imperial Valley and Salton Sea region--i.e., an assessment of their overall physical availability--will be needed to determine how they can be used and managed to suit new or redirected demands in the region. Development of an improved or updated groundwater assessment in the Salton Sea Basin is the subject of the project described in this report. Much of the project work was done in cooperation with the US Bureau of Reclamation, Lower Colorado Region Office ('Reclamation'), which manages the Salton Sea Restoration project for the US Department of the Interior, and complements other recent assessment efforts (e.g., Imperial County, 1995). In this context, the notion of groundwater availability is defined by four separate, but interrelated concepts or components: (1) Volume and Capacity--This refers to the volume of groundwater available in storage in (or the related storage capacity of) the sediments and geologic media that comprise a groundwater basin. The volume of groundwater in a basin will vary in time as a function of recharge, well production, and land subsidence. (2) Producibility--This refers to the ease or difficulty of extracting groundwater in a basin from wells. Groundwater producibility will be affected by well depth and the formation permeability surrounding the open intervals in wells. (3) Quality--This refers to the extent that water produced from wells is potable or otherwise suitable for domestic or other uses. It may also refer to the chemical compositions of groundwater that are unrelated to potability or suitability issues. Groundwater quality will be affected by its residence time and flow pathway in the formation and will also be influenced by the quality of its original source before entering the groundwater regime. (4) Renewability and Recharge--This refers to the extent that groundwater is recharged to the basin as part of the natural hydrologic cycle or other artificial means. Groundwater renewability is normally a function of recharge derived from precipitation (and thus a function of regional climate), but may also be affected in local areas by irrigation, leaking canals, aquifer storage and recovery operations, and so forth. Along with the other factors, renewability will strongly affect how much water can be safely produced from a basin from one year to the next. In this report, we specificall

Tompson, A; Demir, Z; Moran, J; Mason, D; Wagoner, J; Kollet, S; Mansoor, K; McKereghan, P

2008-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

466

FINAL REPORT WASTE PACKAGE MATERIALS PERFORMANCE PEER REVIEW PANEL  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

REPORT REPORT WASTE PACKAGE MATERIALS PERFORMANCE PEER REVIEW PANEL FEBRUARY 28, 2002 This document is not an official copy and is for informational purposes only. Signature Page Preface Executive Summary TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Organization of the Peer Review 1.2 Objectives of the Review 1.3 Content of the Final Report 2. MAIN FINDINGS 2.1 Perspective 2.2 Overall Findings 2.3 Corrosion Degradation Modes 2.4 Higher or Lower Temperature Operating Modes 2.5 Long-Term Uniform Corrosion of Passive Metal 2.6 Alloy Specification and Comparison 2.7 Technical Issues to be Resolved 2.8 Organizational-Managerial Issues 3. SUMMARY OF DEGRADATION MODES AND CONTRIBUTING FACTORS 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Repository Conditions: Overview of Time, Temperature, Environment

467

Federal Utility Partnership Working Group - Utility Interconnection Panel  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WORKING GROUP - Utility Interconnection Panel M. Renee Jewell, Program/Energy Manager, & Contracting Officer, Forest Service (reneejewell@fs.fed.us) SCENARIO: Fed Agencies had Solar PV Projects To Connect with Utility in California * United States (US) Forest Service (FS) - 1 small Solar Photovoltaic (PV) project; and - 1 small Renewable project (Solar PV) exporting energy to grid. * U.S. National Park Service (NPS) - 24 Small Solar Photovoltaic projects. * U.S. Dept. of Veterans Affairs (VA) - 6 Renewable generation projects of different sizes. FS Region 5 (California) - Solar Photovoltaic Installations Solar PV Project @ Mono Lake Visitor Center (Inyo NF) Solar PV Project (net exporter) @ San Dimas Technology and Development Center SITUATION - Utility Wanted Feds to Sign Its

468

Insurance demand and country risks: A nonlinear panel data analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper investigates the impact of country risks, including political, financial, and economic risks, on the income elasticity of insurance demand. Using the panel smooth transition regression model, we find that there is a significant regime-switching effect concerning the impact of country risks on the income elasticity of insurance demand. A full-sample analysis shows that the income elasticity of insurance demand decreases when country risks diminish. In a subsample analysis based on income level, legal origin, and restriction on banks' participation in insurance activities, we find that the elasticity diminishes in general when economic risk drops. When political risk is lower, the elasticity decreases in countries with high-income, common law origin, and insurance activities permitted by banks, whereas a clear pattern cannot be identified in the case of financial risk.

Chien-Chiang Lee; Yi-Bin Chiu; Chi-Hung Chang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

470

Lithosphere structure beneath the Phanerozoic intracratonic basins of North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Four intracratonic basins of North America, the Hudson Bay, Michigan, Illinois and Williston. The Williston and Illinois basins are associated with wide (V200 km) and thin anomalies (V100 km), whereas basin and 270 km beneath the Williston [4,6]. For two ba- sins of similar age located on the same Precam

Kaminski, Edouard

471

BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, WILLISTON BASIN By D.J. Nichols  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter WB BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, WILLISTON BASIN By D.J. Nichols in U.S. Geological Survey Professional .........................................................................................................WB-3 Figures WB-1. Biostratigraphic reference sections in the Williston Basin. WB-2. Occurrences. Palynostratigraphic zones of the Paleocene in the Williston Basin composite reference section. WB-4. Distribution

472

Total quality management implementation guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These Guidelines were designed by the Energy Quality Council to help managers and supervisors in the Department of Energy Complex bring Total Quality Management to their organizations. Because the Department is composed of a rich mixture of diverse organizations, each with its own distinctive culture and quality history, these Guidelines are intended to be adapted by users to meet the particular needs of their organizations. For example, for organizations that are well along on their quality journeys and may already have achieved quality results, these Guidelines will provide a consistent methodology and terminology reference to foster their alignment with the overall Energy quality initiative. For organizations that are just beginning their quality journeys, these Guidelines will serve as a startup manual on quality principles applied in the Energy context.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Effect of a Radiant Panel Cooling System on Indoor Air Quality of a Conditioned Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper discusses the effect of a radiant cooling panel system on an indoor air quality (IAQ) of a conditioned space. In this study, ceiling radiant cooling panel, mechanical ventilation with fan coil unit (FCU) and 100% fresh air are used...

Mohamed, E.; Abdalla, K. N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Independent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville). The Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and peer reviewIndependent Scientific Review Panel for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council 851 SW 6 th to the Northwest Power Act directed the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (Council) to appoint an 11-member

475

Lessons learned from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Advisory Panel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to public concern about the cleanup of the Three Mile Island, Unit 2 (TMI-2) facility after an accident on March 28, 1979 involving a loss of reactor coolant and subsequent damage to the reactor fuel, twelve citizens were asked to serve on an independent Advisory Panel to consult with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on the decontamination and cleanup of the facility. The panel met 78 times over a period of thirteen years, holding public meetings in the vicinity of TMI-2 and meeting regularly with NRC Commissioners in Washington, DC. This report describes the results of a project designed to identify and describe the lessons learned from the Advisory Panel and place those lessons in the context of what we generally know about citizen advisory groups. A summary of the empirical literature on citizen advisory panels is followed by a brief history of the TMI-2 Advisory Panel. The body of the report contains the analysis of the lessons learned, preliminary conclusions about the effectiveness of the Panel, and implications for the NRC in the use of advisory panels. Data for the report include meeting transcripts and interviews with past and present Panel participants.

Lach, D.; Bolton, P.; Durbin, N. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States); Harty, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Corporate Information and Computing Services Registration for cPanel web hosting service  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corporate Information and Computing Services Registration for cPanel web hosting service This will be your web-site address (URL). The name must identify the person or group clearly. For personal users) - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - The following account has been created on the cPanel web manager service: Username: _____________________ Space

Martin, Stephen John

477

Milking Diatoms for Sustainable Energy: Biochemical Engineering versus Gasoline-Secreting Diatom Solar Panels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Milking Diatoms for Sustainable Energy: Biochemical Engineering versus Gasoline-Secreting Diatom Solar Panels ... In this communication, we propose ways of harvesting oil from diatoms, using biochemical engineering and also a new solar panel approach that utilizes genomically modifiable aspects of diatom biology, offering the prospect of “milking” diatoms for sustainable energy by altering them to actively secrete oil products. ...

T. V. Ramachandra; Durga Madhab Mahapatra; Karthick B; Richard Gordon

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

478

Review of the Projects Peer Review Panel and the Project Research and Development Scheme Summary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Review of the Projects Peer Review Panel and the Project Research and Development Scheme Summary Peer Review Panel (PPRP) process and the Project Research and Development (PRD) scheme to develop to funding can sometimes be too long with some delays occurring after the peer review process; Proposals

479

Propagating Uncertainty in Solar Panel Performance for Life Cycle Modeling in Early Stage Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Propagating Uncertainty in Solar Panel Performance for Life Cycle Modeling in Early Stage Design. This work is conducted in the context of an amorphous photovoltaic (PV) panel, using data gathered from the National Solar Radiation Database, as well as realistic data collected from an experimental hardware setup

Yang, Maria

480

Building on a Decade of Accomplishments Report of the 2010 Blue Ribbon Panel on Genomics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building on a Decade of Accomplishments Report of the 2010 Blue Ribbon Panel on Genomics Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Genomics Programs National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Blue Ribbon Panel on Genomics Division of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, Genomics Programs

Levin, Judith G.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin panels total" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

PANEL: HTML: POISON OR PANACEA? Moderator: Robert Glushko, Passage Systems (USA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PANEL: HTML: POISON OR PANACEA? Moderator: Robert Glushko, Passage Systems (USA) Panel: Dale Dougherty, O'Reilly & Associates (USA) Eliot Kimber, Passage Systems (USA) Antoine Rizk, Euroclid (France) Daniel Russell, Apple Computer (USA) Kent Summers, Electronic Book Technologies (USA) Many people

Glushko, Robert J.

482

Energy consumption and financial development in Sub-Saharan Africa: a panel econometric analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigated the energy consumption-financial development linkage for Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Annual data for 26 countries spanning the period 1996 to 2009 was used to elicit answers on the questions of interest. This is the first attempt, as far as we are aware, at examining the linkage between shocks to and response of the energy and financial markets of SSA economies. Recent panel causality techniques are deployed to probe causal orderings both in the short- and long-run. The results suggest that regardless of the financial development measure, there is weak evidence for short-run causality. Contrariwise, there appears to be ample evidence in support of long-run causality particularly flowing from private sector credit as a share of GDP to total energy consumption. For electricity consumption, there is short-run and long-run causality from private sector credit to GDP ratio. In sum, these plausibly imply that a deeper financial system effectively allocates resources to the private sector enabling a scaling up in operations and by extension higher energy requirements.

Kazeem Ajide; William Bekoe; Jameelah Yaqub; Oluwatosin Adeniyi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Total Heart Transplant: A Modern Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

use of the total artificial heart. New England Journal ofJ. (1997). Artificial heart transplants. British medicala total artificial heart as a bridge to transplantation. New

Lingampalli, Nithya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

DOE Completes Disposal Operations In Panel 5 of the WIPP Underground |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposal Operations In Panel 5 of the WIPP Disposal Operations In Panel 5 of the WIPP Underground DOE Completes Disposal Operations In Panel 5 of the WIPP Underground August 15, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill www.wipp.energy.gov 575-234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced that disposal operations in Panel 5 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) underground repository are complete. Last month, the final contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste shipment was emplaced in the panel, which took just over two years to fill. "All TRU waste management employees at WIPP and at the generator sites deserve the credit for this accomplishment," National TRU Program Director J.R. Stroble said. "It is through their dedication to performing their jobs safely, compliantly and timely that WIPP and the TRU Waste

485

DOE Completes Disposal Operations In Panel 5 of the WIPP Underground |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Completes Disposal Operations In Panel 5 of the WIPP DOE Completes Disposal Operations In Panel 5 of the WIPP Underground DOE Completes Disposal Operations In Panel 5 of the WIPP Underground August 15, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Deb Gill www.wipp.energy.gov 575-234-7270 CARLSBAD, N.M. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced that disposal operations in Panel 5 of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) underground repository are complete. Last month, the final contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste shipment was emplaced in the panel, which took just over two years to fill. "All TRU waste management employees at WIPP and at the generator sites deserve the credit for this accomplishment," National TRU Program Director J.R. Stroble said. "It is through their dedication to performing

486

New GE Plant to Produce Thin Film PV Solar Panels Based on NREL Technology  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New GE Plant to Produce Thin Film PV Solar Panels Based on NREL New GE Plant to Produce Thin Film PV Solar Panels Based on NREL Technology New GE Plant to Produce Thin Film PV Solar Panels Based on NREL Technology April 22, 2011 - 10:17am Addthis Photo courtesy of General Electric Photo courtesy of General Electric Minh Le Minh Le Program Manager, Solar Program Earlier this month, General Electric announced plans to enter the global marketplace for solar photovoltaic (PV) panels in a big way - and to do it, they will be using technology pioneered at the Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL). The record-breaking Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) thin film photovoltaic technology GE has chosen for its solar panels was originally developed more than a decade ago by a team of scientists led by NREL's Xuanzhi Wu, and

487

Fabrication and development of several heat pipe honeycomb sandwich panel concepts. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of fabricating and processing liquid metal heat pipes in a low mass honeycomb sandwich panel configuration for application on the NASA Langley airframe-integrated Scramjet engine was investigated. A variety of honeycomb panel facesheet and core-ribbon wick concepts was evaluated within constraints dictated by existing manufacturing technology and equipment. The chosen design consists of an all-stainless steel structure, sintered screen facesheets, and two types of core-ribbon, a diffusion bonded wire mesh and a foil-screen composite. Cleaning, fluid charging, processing, and process port sealing techniques were established. The liquid metals, potassium, sodium and cesium were used as working fluids. Eleven honeycomb panels 15.24 cm X 15.24 cm X 2.94 cm were delivered to NASA Langley for extensive performance testing and evaluation, nine panels were processed as heat pipes, and two panels were left unprocessed.

Tanzer, H.J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Workshop Panel Report on Accelerating the Spread of Knowledge...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

interfaces for accessing the totality of scientific knowledge. They need to explore the deep Web, where specialized databases are beyond the reach of, or invisible to, commercial...

489

Productivity of Spring Chinook Salmon and Summer Steelhead in the John Day River Basin, 2008 Annual Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The John Day River subbasin supports one of the last remaining intact wild populations of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead in the Columbia River Basin. These populations remain depressed relative to historic levels and limited information is available for steelhead life history. Numerous habitat protection and rehabilitation projects have been implemented in the basin to improve salmonid freshwater production and survival. However, these projects often lack effectiveness monitoring. While our monitoring efforts outlined here will not specifically measure the effectiveness of any particular project, they will provide much needed programmatic or watershed (status and trend) information to help evaluate project-specific effectiveness monitoring efforts as well as meet some data needs as index stocks. Our continued monitoring efforts to estimate salmonid smolt abundance, age structure, SAR, smolts/redd, freshwater habitat use, and distribution of critical life states will enable managers to assess the long-term effectiveness of habitat projects and to differentiate freshwater and ocean survival. Because Columbia Basin managers have identified the John Day subbasin spring Chinook population as an index population for assessing the effects of alternative future management actions on salmon stocks in the Columbia Basin (Schaller et al. 1999) we continue our ongoing studies. This project is high priority based on the level of emphasis by the NWPPC Fish and Wildlife Program, Independent Scientific Advisory Board (ISAB), Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP), NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and the Oregon Plan for Salmon and Watersheds (OWEB). Each of these groups have placed priority on monitoring and evaluation to provide the real-time data to guide restoration and adaptive management in the region. The objective is to estimate smolt-to-adult survival rates (SAR) and out-migrant abundance for spring Chinook Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and summer steelhead O. mykiss and life history characteristics of summer steelhead.

Wilson, Wayne H.; Schricker, Jaym'e; Ruzychi, James R. (Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife)

2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

490

Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume II. Palo Duro basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and high variable precipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume I. Dalhart Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and highly variable prcipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Timing and Tectonic implications of basin inversion in the Nam Con Son Basin and adjacent areas, southern South China Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Malay basins. Contraction in the Western NCS, West Natuna, and Malay basins was accommodated through reactivation of major basin-bounding fault systems that resulted in asymmetric fault-bend folding of syn- and early post-rift strata. Inversion...

Olson, Christopher Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

493

Tobacco vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers Tobacco use vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tobacco vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers 1 Tobacco use vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers: Self-medication in humans? Casey J-546-9257 #12;Tobacco vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers 2 Summary

494

OTRC Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OTRC Wave Basin OTRC Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name OTRC Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (OTRC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 45.7 Beam(m) 30.5 Depth(m) 5.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $300/hour (excluding labor) Special Physical Features 4.6m wide x 9.1m long x 16.8m deep pit with adjustable depth floor in test area Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 0.6 Length of Effective Tow(m) 27.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.9 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 4.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 25 Wave Period Range(s) 4.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.6 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description GEDAP 3D wave generation software, 48 hinged flap wave generator

495

Upper San Juan Basin Biological Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the biological assessment. The Colorado Natural Heritage Program began its research by updating its BiologicalUpper San Juan Basin Biological Assessment Colorado State University 8002 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, CO 80523-8002 June 2003 Colorado Natural Heritage Program #12;Southwest Land Alliance Pagosa

496

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: The State of the Columbia River Basin in 2012 07 Northwest Energy Efficiency Achievements, 1978-2011 10 Council undertakes mid-term review of Sixth Power Plan 11 Energy Efficiency met most of the new and Commerce United states House of representatives and Committee on Natural resources United states House

497

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Washington. The Act authorized the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish Overview 11 Sixth Northwest Power Plan boosts energy efficiency, renewable energy, Energy efficiency

498

GUNNISON BASIN CLIMATE CHANGE VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change is already changing ecosystems and affecting people in the southwestern United States, as well as ecosystem services, e.g., water supply. The climate of the Gunnison Basin, Colorado Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest Service, Upper Gunnison River Water Conservancy District, Western

Neff, Jason

499

Summary - K Basins Sludge Treatment Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

K Basin K Basin DOE is Proces the va at Han subsys oxidati objecti of-fact maturi Eleme Techn The as which seven * M * M * Pr * Pr * As The Ele Site: H roject: K P Report Date: A ited States Why DOE ns Sludge Treatme s constructing ss (STP) for re rious sludge st nford. The STP stems: sludge ion, assay, pac ive of the asse t" appraisal of t ty by first ident ents (CTEs) of t ology Readine What th ssessment team was further div CTEs and the Material Mobiliza Material Transfe rocess Chemis rocess Instrum ssay (TRL=2) To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Hanford/ORP K Basins Slud Process/STP August 2007 Departmen K Bas E-EM Did This ent Process Flow D a K Basins Slu trieving, treatin treams stored i P is comprised containerizatio ckaging, and dr ssment was to the project's ov

500

K Basin sludge dissolution engineering study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this engineering study is to investigate the available technology related to dissolution of the K Basin sludge in nitric acid. The conclusion of this study along with laboratory and hot cell tests with actual sludge samples will provide the basis for beginning conceptual design of the sludge dissolver. The K Basin sludge contains uranium oxides, fragments of metallic U, and some U hydride as well as ferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum oxides and hydroxides, windblown sand that infiltrated the basin enclosure, ion exchange resin, and miscellaneous materials. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be conditioned so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System waste acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the underground storage tanks. Sludge conditioning will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and then reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. There will be five distinct feed streams to the sludge conditioning process two from the K East (KE) Basin and three from the K West (KW) Basin. The composition of the floor and pit sludges which contain more iron oxides and sand than uranium is much different than the canister sludges which are composed of mostly uranium oxides. The sludge conditioning equipment will be designed to process all of the sludge streams, but some of the operating parameters will be adjusted as necessary to handle the different sludge stream compositions. The volume of chemical additions and the amount of undissolved solids will be much different for floor and pit sludge than for canister sludge. Dissolution of uranium metal and uranium dioxide has been studied quite thoroughly and much information is available. Both uranium metal and uranium dioxide have been dissolved on a large scale in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in Europe, Japan, and the USA. Ash and sludge containing uranium compounds also have been dissolved in reprocessing or plutonium scrap recovery plants, but only a limited amount of information is available on how the ferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum compounds and silicates in the sand will behave during nitric acid dissolution. Laboratory work with simulants and hot cell work with actual K Basin sludge is in progress to obtain data in these areas.

Westra, A.G.

1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z