Sample records for basin eastern shelf

  1. Mississippian facies relationships, eastern Anadarko basin, Oklahoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, H.W. (Oryx Energy, Inc., Midland, TX (United States)); Forgotson, J.M. (Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mississippian strata in the eastern Anadarko basin record a gradual deepening of the basin. Late and post-Mississippian tectonism (Wichita and Arbuckle orogenies) fragmented the single large basin into the series of paired basins and uplifts recognized in the southern half of Oklahoma today. Lower Mississippian isopach and facies trends (Sycamore and Caney Formations) indicate that basinal strike in the study area (southeastern Anadarko basin) was predominantly east-west. Depositional environment interpretations made for Lower Mississippian strata suggest that the basin was partially sediment starved and exhibited a low shelf-to-basin gradient. Upper Mississippian isopach and facies trends suggest that basinal strike within the study area shifted from dominantly east-west to dominantly northwest-southeast due to Late Mississippian and Early Pennsylvanian uplift along the Nemaha ridge. Within the study area, the Chester Formation, composed of gray to dove-gray shales with interbedded limestones deposited on a carbonate shelf, thins depositionally into the basin and is thinnest at its facies boundary with the Springer Group and the upper portion of the Caney Formation. As basin subsidence rates accelerated, the southern edge of the Chester carbonate shelf was progressively drowned, causing a backstepping of the Chester Formation calcareous shale and carbonate facies. Springer Group sands and black shales transgressed northward over the drowned Chester Formation shelf.

  2. Sandstone-carbonate cycles in Tensleep Formation, eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rittersbacher, D.J.; Wheeler, D.M.; Horne, J.C.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outcrop and core study of the Tensleep Formation in the eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin has revealed cyclic deposits of eolian sandstone and marine carbonate. These cycles, several meters to tens of meters thick, represent the rise and fall of sea level on the Wyoming shelf during Pennsylvanian and Early Permian time. Falling sea level was marked by development of a sharp scour surface at the base of each cycle and progradation of eolian dunes over an exposed, shallow carbonate shelf. Subsequent sea level rise resulted in the reworking of eolian sand through wave activity and burrowing organisms. Subtidal carbonates overlies the reworked eolian sands and are sandy at the base, grading upward into fossiliferous dolomite mudstones to wackestones. The sharp scour surface, normally present directly on the subtidal carbonates, indicates that erosion eliminated any regressive marine deposits by deflation to the ground-water table during shoreline progradation or by deflation related to abrupt drop in sea level. Relative sea level changes on the low-relief Wyoming shelf affected large areas during Tensleep deposition. This resulted in widespread sandstone-carbonate cycles that provide the basis for regional correlations of the Tensleep Formation throughout the eastern Bighorn basin and western Powder River basin.

  3. VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT OF WATER RESOURCES SYSTEMS IN THE EASTERN NILE BASIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT OF WATER RESOURCES SYSTEMS IN THE EASTERN NILE BASIN TO ENVIRONMENTAL Resources VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT OF WATER RESOURCES SYSTEMS IN THE EASTERN NILE BASIN TO ENVIRONMENTAL Resources Institute of African Research and Studies, Cairo University For the Degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE

  4. Petrology and Petrography of Ely Limestone in Part of Eastern Great Basin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seamons, Kent E.

    Petrology and Petrography of Ely Limestone in Part of Eastern Great Basin* YAZDAN MOLLAZAL Tehran petrology and petrography in three areas in the eastern Great Basin. Results are as follows: (1) At Moorman ..............................Ely Limestone 7 Carbonate petrology and ......................................petrography 8

  5. Chronostratigraphic framework and evolution of the Fortuna basin (Eastern Betics) since the Late Miocene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Chronostratigraphic framework and evolution of the Fortuna basin (Eastern Betics) since the Late, Spain ABSTRACT A Tortonian to Pliocene magnetostratigraphy of the Fortuna basin supports a new Betics in SE Spain. The Neogene Fortuna basin is an elongated trough which formed over a left

  6. Respiratory and Reproductive Characteristics of Eastern Mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    ) Inhabiting a Coal Ash Settling Basin B. P. Staub, W. A. Hopkins, J. Novak, J. D. Congdon Savannah River 2002/Accepted: 29 March 2002 Abstract. Coal fly ash and effluent from coal ash settling basins viable populations in areas contaminated by coal ash. While eastern mosquitofish are present

  7. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The geohistory of the North Louisiana Salt Basin is comparable to the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin with the major difference being the elevated heat flow the strata in the North Louisiana Salt Basin experienced in the Cretaceous due primarily to reactivation of upward movement, igneous activity, and erosion associated with the Monroe and Sabine Uplifts. Potential undiscovered reservoirs in the North Louisiana Salt Basin are Triassic Eagle Mills sandstone and deeply buried Upper Jurassic sandstone and limestone. Potential underdeveloped reservoirs include Lower Cretaceous sandstone and limestone and Upper Cretaceous sandstone.

  8. annecy basin eastern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsidence histories of the Aquitaine Basin (Fig.8c) record a minor ac- celeration in subsidence. The shortening of the Australian plate adjacent to the basin is small (from 2...

  9. Evolution of the Llanos Basin and the deformation of the Eastern Cordiller, Columbia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addison, F.; Cooper, M.; Hayward, A.; Howe, S. O'Leary, J. (BP Exploration Co. Ltd., Santafe de Bogota (Colombia))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Llanos Basin is located on the flank of the Eastern Cordillera in northeast Colombia. Basin development commenced with the deposition of a synrift Triassic and Jurassic megasequence related to the separation of North and South America in the Caribbean. Basin development continued with the Cretaceous Back Arc Megasequence deposited in a back arc basin behind the Andean subduction zone. Three major sequences can be recognized corresponding to extensional pulses in the Tithonian, Albian, and the Santonian which control thickness and facies distributions. The primary reservoir in the basin is the Late Eocene Mirandor Formation which was deposited in a fluvial system which prograded from the Guyana Shield to the west-northwest. This was deposited as part of the Pre-Andean Foreland Basin Megasequence (Bartonian to Serravallian) which developed as a result of uplift onset and deformation in the Central Cordillera. This megasequence covered the Magdalena Valley the Eastern Cordillera ad the Llanos Basin. In the foothills of the Eastern Cordillera, the Mirador Formation begins to show evidence of marine influence and was probably deposited in a series of shoreface sands and offshore bar complexes in the Cordillera. The Pre-Andean Foreland Basin Megasequence includes the Eocene-Oligocene Carbonera Formation which was deposited in a low every fluvial system that was mud dominated. Within the Carbonera Formation, a series of major, grossly coarsening upward cycles can be seen which are separated by maximum flooding surfaces that approximate to time lines. These cycles correspond to the early phases of development of the Central Cordillera with each pulse being seen as an influx of coarser clastics to the basin. The deformation style in the Eastern Cordillera is a mixture of thin-skinned thrust structures and the inversion of the thick-skinned basement involved extension faults. The inversion structures include the Cuisana field, a giant oil and gas-condensate discovery.

  10. Depositional sequences and integrated recovery efficiency forecast models for San Andres and Clearfork Units in the Central Basin Platform and the Northern Shelf, west Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao, Hongbin

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    models of primary, initial waterflood and infill drilling are developed for the San Andres and Clearfork reservoirs in Central Basin Platform and the Northern Shelf, west Texas. The geological parameters and well spacing are considered major factors...

  11. Lower Permian facies of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas: depositional systems, shelf-margin evolution, paleogeography, and petroleum potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handford, C.R.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Palo geological study suggests that potential hydrocarbon reservoirs occur in shelf-margin carbonates, delta-front sandstones, and fan-delta arkoses. Zones of porous (greater than 10 percent) dolomite are concentrated near shelf margins and have configurations similar to productive Lower Permian shelf-margin trends in New Mexico. Delta-front sandstones (log-computed porosity of 18 to 25 percent) are similar to producing deltaic sandstones of Morris Buie-Blaco Fields in North-Central Texas. Porous (18 percent) fan-delta sandstones along the south flank of the Amarillo Uplift may form reservoirs similiar to that of the Mobeetie Field on the north side of the Amarillo Uplife in Wheeler County, Texas. Potential hydrocarbon source beds occur in slope and basinal environments. Total organic carbon generally ranges from 1 to 2.3 percent by weight and averages 0.589 percent by weight.

  12. Sequence stratigraphic and sedimentologic analysis of the Permian San Andres Formation (upper Leonardian-lower Guadalupian), Northwest Shelf, Permian Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beserra, Troy Brett

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHIC AND SEDIMENTOLOGIC ANALYSIS OF THE PERMIAN SAN ANDRES FORMATION (UPPER LEONARDIAN-LOWER GUADALUPIAN), NORTHWEST SHELF, PERMIAN BASIN A Thesis by TROY BRETT BESERRA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1994 Major Subject: Geology SEQUENCE STRATIGRAPHIC AND SEDIMENTOLOGIC ANALYSIS OF THE PERMIAN SAN ANDRES FORMATION (UPPER LEONARDIAN-LOWER GUADALUPIANl...

  13. Geothermal systems of the Mono Basin-Long Valley region, eastern California and western Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, C.T.; Flynn, T.; Chapman, R.H.; Trexler, D.T.; Chase, G.R.; Bacon, C.F.; Ghusn, G. Jr.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The region that includes Mono Basin, Long Valley, the Bridgeport-Bodie Hills area, and Aurora, in eastern California and western Nevada was studied to determine the possible causes and interactions of the geothermal anomalies in the Mono Basin-Long Valley region as a whole. A special goal of the study was to locate possible shallow bodies of magma and to determine their influence on the hydrothermal systems in the region. (ACR)

  14. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring mainly during the Late Cretaceous.

  15. Wave energy potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. An integrated 10-year study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgiou, Georgios

    Data bank Wave energy potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. An integrated 10-year Article history: Received 30 July 2013 Accepted 25 March 2014 Available online Keywords: Wave energy Numerical atmospheric Wave modeling a b s t r a c t The main characteristics of wave energy potential over

  16. Carboniferous terrigenous clastic facies, hydrocarbon producing zones, and sandstone provenance, northern shelf of Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleaves, A.W.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deltaic and barrier-bar depositional systems from the Chester and Pottsville Groups of the Black Warrior basin produce natural gas and minor oil from 11 Mississippian sandstone reservoirs and four Pennsylvanian clastic units. Within the Chester, four major genetic sequences containing cratonic delta systems have been mapped. Chester deltas prograded southeastward onto the stable northern shelf from a cratonic source area, most likey the Ozark uplift. Net sandstone isolith maps for discrete genetic units demonstrate a northwest-to-southeast progradational trend and a tendency for the sub-Millerella units to thicken updip to the line of post-Carboniferous erosinal truncation. An isopach map of the Tuscumbia-Millerella interval shows thickening toward the north, away from the Ouachita orogenic source area. Limited petrographic evidence from Lewis and Carter sandstone bodies associated with the principal subsurface deltaic facies tract indicates a dominance of monocrystalline quartz and chert rock fragments, as well as an absence of lithologic indicators for an orogenic provenance. The Pottsville Group can be broken down into a maximum of 10 regionally mappable subsurface intervals. Widespread delta destructional coal seams and marine reworked sandstone bodies serve as marker units. Pottsville gas production derives from barrier bar facies in the lowest two genetic intervals and from the mixed barrier-bar and deltaic sandstone units of interval 3 (Nason). This Lower Pennsylvanian clastic wedge has its predominant source area to the south in the Ouachita orogenic belt. An isopach map of the total Pottsville documents significant thickening to an excess of 10,000 ft (3,000 m) in central Mississippi. All of the previously mentioned orogenic indicators are noted in the outcropping deltaic Pottsville facies.

  17. Magnetic lineations constraints for the back-arc opening of the Late Neogene South Banda Basin (eastern Indonesia)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyment, Jérôme

    (eastern Indonesia) F. Hinschbergera,*, J.-A. Maloda , J. Dymenta , C. Honthaasb , J.-P. Re?haulta , S 05, France c Departemen Teknik Geologi, Universitas Hasanuddin, Ujung Pandang, Indonesia Abstract The South Banda Basin is located within eastern Indonesia near the triple junction between the Eurasian

  18. Geochemical analysis of crude oil from northern Appalachian, eastern Illinois, and southern Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, J.A.; Cole, J.; Innes, C.; Juzwick, S.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 1986, the Ohio Board of Regents awarded a research grant to Ashland College to investigate the basinal origin of crude oil through trace-element analysis. The major thrust of the project was to attempt to finger print crude oils of various ages and depths from the northern Appalachian, eastern Illinois, and southern Michigan basins, to learn if the oldest crudes may have migrated among the basins. This in turn might give a more definitive time for the separation of the three basins. Nickel to vanadium ratios, were chosen to be the discriminators. Nickel to vanadium ratios show that the Trenton oil from the fields at Lima, Ohio; Oak Harbor in Ottawa County, Ohio; Urbana, Indiana; Peru, Indiana; and Albion, Michigan, are all different. The Trempealeau oils in Harmony and Lincoln Townships, Morrow County, are similar but they are different from those in Peru and Bennington Townships. The Devonian oils of the Illinois and Appalachian basins are distinctly different. The Berea oil shows little or no variability along strike. The Mississippian oils of the Illinois basin are different from the Berea oils and the Salem oil is different from the Chester. The only thing consistent about the Clinton is its inconsistency.

  19. Primary oil-shale resources of the Green River Formation in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudell, L.G.; Smith, J.W.; Beard, T.N.; Mason, G.M.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resources of potential oil in place in the Green River Formation are measured and estimated for the primary oil-shale resource area east of the Green River in Utah's Uinta Basin. The area evaluated (Ts 7-14 S, Rs 19-25 E) includes most of, and certainly the best of Utah's oil-shale resource. For resource evaluation the principal oil-shale section is divided into ten stratigraphic units which are equivalent to units previously evaluated in the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado. Detailed evaluation of individual oil-shale units sampled by cores, plus estimates by extrapolation into uncored areas indicate a total resource of 214 billion barrels of shale oil in place in the eastern Uinta Basin.

  20. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hatcher, Robert D

    2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our undertaking this project, this system was the least understood in the Appalachian basin. This project, in contrast to many if not most programs undertaken in DOE laboratories, has a major educational component wherein three Ph.D. students have been partially supported by this grant, one M.S. student partially supported, and another M.S. student fully supported by the project. These students will be well prepared for professional careers in the oil and gas industry.

  1. Basin Analysis of Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest Mancini

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 3 (Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation) objectives are to provide an analysis of the Smackover petroleum system in Years 4 and 5 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work Accomplished (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - Basin flow modeling has been completed and the topical report has been submitted to the U.S. DOE for review. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum source rocks has been integrated into the basin flow model. The information on the source rocks is being prepared for inclusion in the final report. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum reservoirs continues. The cores to be described have been identified and many of the cores for the eastern and western parts of the basin have been described. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Work on reservoir diagenesis continues. Samples from the cores selected for the reservoir characterization are being used for this task. Task 5 - Underdeveloped Reservoirs - Two underdeveloped Smackover reservoirs have been identified. They are the microbial reef and shoal reservoirs. Work Planned (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - This task has been completed and the topical report has been submitted to the U.S. DOE. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Petroleum source rock information will continue to be prepared for the final report. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Characterization of petroleum reservoirs will continue through core studies. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Characterization of reservoir diagenesis will continue through petrographic analysis. Task 5 - Underdeveloped Reservoirs - Study of Smackover underdeveloped reservoirs will continue with focus on the microbial reef and shoal reservoirs.

  2. Model for deposition of bedded halite in a shallow shelf setting, San Andres Formation, Palo Duro Basin, Texas panhandle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hovorka, S.D.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing depositional models for evaporites do not adequately describe facies relationships, halite fabrics, and trace element geochemistry of halite from the Permian San Andres Formation. Interbedding of anhydritic halite and mudstone with disrupted bedding records alternation between marine-dominated brine pool and subaerial environments. Chevron structures and hopper crystal cumulates in the halite indicate subaqueous deposition. Abundant anhydrite partings within halite, which thicken and become interbedded with marine shelf carbonates to the south, demonstrate the facies equivalence and physical connection of evaporite and marine environments. Maintenance of marine character in trace element profiles through halite sequences documents the episodic influx of marine water. Haloturbated structure in mudstone interbeds within the halite is produced by displacive growth of halite within mudstone and dissolution and collapse of this halite as ground-water chemistry fluctuates in response to conditions of alternating desiccation and wetting. Karst features cutting the halite also imply subaerial exposure. Mapping of the fine-scale sedimentary structures, geochemical signature, and insoluble component mineralogy of halite sequences indicates that the brine pool environment extended over areas in excess of 100 km/sup 2/. Sabkha, salina, playa, and deep water basin models of halite-precipitating environments do not satisfactorily describe the shallow marine shelf depositional environment of the San Andres halite.

  3. Sequence Stratigraphy of the Dakota Sandstone, Eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and its Relationship to Reservoir Compartmentalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varney, Peter J.

    2002-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This research established the Dakota-outcrop sequence stratigraphy in part of the eastern San Juan Basin, New Mexico, and relates reservoir quality lithologies in depositional sequences to structure and reservoir compartmentalization in the South Lindrith Field area. The result was a predictive tool that will help guide further exploration and development.

  4. HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the second half of the third project year (October 6, 2002, through April 5, 2003). The primary work included describing and mapping regional facies of the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Regional cross sections show the development of ''clean carbonate'' packages that contain all of the productive reservoir facies. These clean carbonates abruptly change laterally into thick anhydrite packages that filled several small intra-shelf basins in the upper Ismay zone. Examination of upper Ismay cores identified seven depositional facies: open marine, middle shelf, inner shelf/tidal flat, bryozoan mounds, phylloid-algal mounds, quartz sand dunes, and anhydritic salinas. Lower Desert Creek facies include open marine, middle shelf, protomounds/collapse breccia, and phylloid-algal mounds. Mapping the upper Ismay zone facies delineates very prospective reservoir trends that contain porous, productive buildups around the anhydrite-filled intra-shelf basins. Facies and reservoir controls imposed by the anhydritic intra-shelf basins should be considered when selecting the optimal location and orientation of any horizontal drilling from known phylloidalgal reservoirs to undrained reserves, as well as identifying new exploration trends. Although intra-shelf basins are not present in the lower Desert Creek zone of the Blanding sub-basin, drilling horizontally along linear shoreline trends could also encounter previously undrilled, porous intervals and buildups. Technology transfer activities consisted of a technical presentation at a Class II Review conference sponsored by the National Energy Technology Laboratory at the Center for Energy and Economic Diversification in Odessa, Texas. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

  5. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest Mancini

    2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 3 (Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation) objectives are to provide an analysis of the Smackover petroleum system in Years 4 and 5 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work Accomplished (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - Basin flow modeling has been completed and the modeling results are being interpreted for report writing (Table 1). Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum source rocks has been integrated into the basin flow model. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Work on the characterization of Smackover petroleum reservoirs continues. The cores to be described have been identified and many of the cores for the eastern part of the basin have been described. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Work on reservoir diagenesis has been initiated. Samples from the cores selected for the reservoir characterization are being used for this task. Work Planned (Year 5): Task 1 - Basin Flow - The report on basin flow will be completed. Task 2 - Petroleum Source Rocks - Petroleum source rock data will be reviewed in light of the basin flow model results. Task 3 - Petroleum Reservoirs - Characterization of petroleum reservoirs will continue through core studies. Task 4 - Reservoir Diagenesis - Characterization of reservoir diagenesis will continue through petrographic analysis.

  6. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  7. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  8. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

  9. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project is the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and basin modeling and petroleum system identification of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first six (6) to nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus is on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  10. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project is the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and basin modeling and petroleum system identification of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first six (6) to nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus is on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  11. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  12. BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  13. Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Southern Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert D. Hatcher

    2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the second-year accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employs the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempts to characterize the T-P parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempts to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is working with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) is geochemically characterizing the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Second-year results include: All current milestones have been met and other components of the project have been functioning in parallel toward satisfaction of year-3 milestones. We also have been effecting the ultimate goal of the project in the dissemination of information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky have much greater extensibility than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that is generating considerable exploration interest. If this structure is productive, it will be one of the largest structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our undertaking this project, this system was the least understood in the Appalachian basin. We have made numerous presentations, convened a workshop, and are beginning to disseminate our results in print. This project, in contrast to many if not most programs undertaken in DOE laboratories, has a major educational component wherein three Ph.D. students have been partially supported by this grant, one M.S. student partially supported, and another M.S. student fully supported by the project. These students will be well prepared for professional careers in the oil and gas industry.

  14. araripe basin north-eastern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boyer, Edmond 198 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic...

  15. Jurassic sequence stratigraphy in Mississippi interior salt basin: an aid to petroleum exploration in eastern Gulf of Mexico area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Tew, B.H.

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of sequence stratigraphy of Jurassic units in onshore basins can serve as an aid to identify potential petroleum reservoir and source rocks in the eastern Gulf of Mexico area. Three depositional sequences associated with cycles of eustatic sea level change and coastal onlap have been identified in the Mississippi Interior Salt basin. Three depositional sequences probably correspond to the J2.4, J3.1, and J3.2 sequences of Vail et al for Callovian through Kimmeridgian strata. In the Mississippi Interior salt basin, the lower depositional sequence is bounded by a basal type 2 unconformity and an upper type 2 unconformity in the Callovian. This sequence includes Louann evaporites (transgressive), Pine Hill anhydrites and shales (condensed section), and Norphlet eolian sandstones (highstand regressive). The middle depositional sequence reflects relative sea level rise in the late Callovian. This sequence includes Norphlet marine sandstones and lower Smackover packstones and mudstones (transgressive), middle Smackover mudstones (condensed section), and upper Smackover grainstones and anhydrites (highstand regressive).

  16. The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stuwe a,*, H. Fritz a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stuwe a,*, H. Fritz, Austria b Department of Geology, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Received 8 September 2004; received of kilometres of the East- ern Desert of Egypt. Its sedimentary record shows that deposition occurred in two

  17. Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic) sand erg: depositional model for northeastern De Soto salt basin, eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemmer, D.A.; Reagan, R.L.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available well control, seismic reflection geometries, and seismic modeling suggest the interpretation of a Norphlet Formation (Upper Jurassic) sand erg in the northeastern De Soto salt basin. Ranging in thickness from less than 100 ft to nearly 1000 ft, the Norphlet erg encompasses an area of approximately 700 mi/sup 2/. Separated from the major gas accumulation in the Norphlet in the Mobile Bay area by the offshore extension of the Pensacola arch, the Norphlet erg appears to be oriented transverse to the axis of the De Soto salt basin. Seismic signatures for the Smackover carbonate, Norphlet sand, and Louann Salt intervals are investigated using synthetic seismograms generated from six wells in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. General characteristics about the reflection coefficients from the major units in the interval are noted. The reflection coefficient information and synthetic seismograms are used to interpret seismic data on a regional basis. Two-dimensional, vertical-incidence, ray-trace modeling of the seismic data is done to aid the interpretation on a detailed basis. Interpreted Norphlet sandstone thicknesses and Louann Salt structures are combined to support the Norphlet Formation sand erg hypothesis.

  18. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  19. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  20. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    1997-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to provide a comprehensive geologic analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  1. Geology and oil production of the Ervay (Phosphoria) reservoirs, eastern Big Horn Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coalson, E.B. (Bass Enterprises Production, Co., Denver, CO (USA)); Inden, R.F. (LSSI, Denver, CO (USA))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ervay consists of carbonate ramp sediments deposited under conditions of varying sea level. On the east flank of the Bighorn Basin, the Ervay displays two major, regionally correlative, shallowing-upward cycles that vary in lithofacies across the basin. West of this area, the Ervay contains four regional cycles. Within each cycle, lithofacies tracts lie subparallel to northwest-trending Permian uplifts. From southwest to northeast, the lithofacies are open-marine limestones, restricted-subtidal dolomites, peritidal (island) dolomites, and lagoon/salina deposits. Each Ervay lithofacies displays characteristic ranges in matrix permeability. The most permeable reservoirs are lower-intertidal dolomite boundstones containing well-connected laminoid-fenestral pores. As a result, lower matrix permeabilities are seen in upper-intertidal to supratidal dolomites containing poorly-connected irregular fenestral pores and vugs. Restricted-subtidal dolomites contain mainly small intercrystalline pores and poorly-connected vugs and molds, and therefore also display poor reservoir quality. Vertical tectonic macrofractures probably make a significant contribution to primary production in relatively few wells, while negatively affecting secondary recovery. Microfractures, on the other hand, may be important to primary production throughout the study area. Thus, the major factors determining Ervay Member producibility are stratigraphic and diagenetic, even though may traps are structural. In the Cottonwood Creek area, many wells with thick sequences of lower-intertidal rocks produce more than 250,000 BO, irrespective of whether or not they are structurally high. By contrast, upper-intertidal, restricted-subtidal, and fractured reservoirs generally produce fewer than 100,000 BO per well.

  2. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest A.

    2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The project objectives are improving access to information for the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the region, making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format, increasing the amount of information available on domestic sedimentary basins through a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin, and enhancing the understanding of the petroleum systems operating in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin.

  3. BASIN ANALYSIS OF THE MISSISSIPPI INTERIOR SALT BASIN AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM MODELING OF THE JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, EASTERN GULF COASTAL PLAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A,. Mancini

    1999-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 2 (Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin) objectives are to provide a comprehensive analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin in Years 2 and 3 of the project and to transfer effectively the research results to producers through workshops and topical reports. Work accomplished so far: (Task 1) Tectonic History--Petroleum traps in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin have been characterized. (Task 2) Depositional History--The depositional systems for Mesozoic strata in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin have been identified and characterized. (Task 3) Fluid Flow--Modeling of 1-D burial and thermal history profiles for 48 wells in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been completed. Multidimensional thermal maturity modeling has been initiated. (Task 4) Underdeveloped Plays--Three major exploration plays have been identified. These include the basement ridge play, the regional peripheral fault trend play, and the salt anticline play. (Task 5) Technology Transfer--No work was performed on this task for this quarter. (Task 6) Topical Reports--The topical reports on the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal histories of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin have been completed and sent to DOE.

  4. Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium IVBrisbane, QLD, 1014 September, 2012 1 1 School of Earth Sciences, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    -poor lithologies. Thick brown coal sequences in the Latrobe Valley area create temperatures of about 6070C-commodity basin containing reserves of oil, gas, brown coal, heat, and groundwater, and with significant

  5. Provenance of middle to late Miocene clastic sedimentary rocks in the central to eastern Cibao basin, northern Hispaniola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Meng

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The provenance of middle to late Miocene clastic sediments of Cibao basin in northern Hispaniola has been assessed via integrated methods including detrital framework modes, clay mineral assemblages and ratios, the composition of individual feldspar...

  6. Competing for Shelf Space.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martnez-de-Albniz, V.; Roels, G.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Retailers, and Shelf Space. Journal of Marketing, 26(3),Model for Optimizing Retail Space Allocations. ManagementMethods to Estimate Shelf Space Elasticities. Quant.

  7. Fast Track Reservoir Modeling of Shale Formations in the Appalachian Basin. Application to Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grujic, Ognjen; Mohaghegh, Shahab; Bromhal, Grant

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a fast track reservoir modeling and analysis of the Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky is presented. Unlike conventional reservoir simulation and modeling which is a bottom up approach (geo-cellular model to history matching) this new approach starts by attempting to build a reservoir realization from well production history (Top to Bottom), augmented by core, well-log, well-test and seismic data in order to increase accuracy. This approach requires creation of a large spatial-temporal database that is efficiently handled with state of the art Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining techniques (AI & DM), and therefore it represents an elegant integration of reservoir engineering techniques with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining. Advantages of this new technique are a) ease of development, b) limited data requirement (as compared to reservoir simulation), and c) speed of analysis. All of the 77 wells used in this study are completed in the Lower Huron Shale and are a part of the Big Sandy Gas field in Eastern Kentucky. Most of the wells have production profiles for more than twenty years. Porosity and thickness data was acquired from the available well logs, while permeability, natural fracture network properties, and fracture aperture data was acquired through a single well history matching process that uses the FRACGEN/NFFLOW simulator package. This technology, known as Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling, starts with performing conventional reservoir engineering analysis on individual wells such as decline curve analysis and volumetric reserves estimation. Statistical techniques along with information generated from the reservoir engineering analysis contribute to an extensive spatio-temporal database of reservoir behavior. The database is used to develop a cohesive model of the field using fuzzy pattern recognition or similar techniques. The reservoir model is calibrated (history matched) with production history from the most recently drilled wells. The calibrated model is then further used for field development strategies to improve and enhance gas recovery.

  8. Dupont-Nivet, G., Sier, M., Campisano, C.J., Arrowsmith, J R., DiMaggio, E., Reed, K., Lockwood, C., Franke, C., and Hsing, S., 2008, Magnetostratigraphy of the eastern Hadar Basin (Ledi-Geraru research area, Ethiopia) and implications for hominin paleoen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    -Geraru research area, Ethiopia) and implications for hominin paleoenvironments, in Quade, J., and Wynn, J.G., eds Magnetostratigraphy of the eastern Hadar Basin (Ledi-Geraru research area, Ethiopia) and implications for hominin and climatic context. The Plio- cene Hadar Basin in the Afar region of northern Ethiopia (Fig. 1) includes some

  9. Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

    2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

  10. Exploration concepts for syntectonic sediments of Triassic and Jurassic Age along northern and eastern rim of Gulf of Mexico basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, D.A.; Wilkerson, R.P.; Putnam, M.W.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current tectonic models for the formation of the Gulf of Mexico generally include continental rifting starting in the Triassic and continuing through the Jurassic. A comparison between the sedimentology and structural geology of known continental rifts (such as the Gulf of Suez, Egypt) and the Triassic and Jurassic of the Gulf of Mexico suggests the following. (1) The interior salt basins of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama probably were deposited within a failed continental rift. (2) Positive features such as the Angelina-Caldwell flexure, Wiggins arch, and Middle ground arch probably represent the southern edge of the failed rift. (3) Positive features such as the Sabine uplift and Monroe arch are probably isolated horst blocks within the failed rift. Pre-evaporite sediments account for much of the production in the Gulf of Suez, and these rock sequences are well exposed there on shore. Depositional and structural histories for these rocks are similar in both the Gulf of Mexico and Gulf of Suez, and a careful comparison suggests new play concepts for the Gulf of Mexico. The post-evaporite sequences of the Gulf of Suez are also similar to the Norphlet and Smackover Formations of the Gulf of Mexico, although Smackover equivalents are currently being deposited in the Gulf of Suez. Comparisons between the two rift systems indicate that a clearer understanding of the structural setting of the Gulf of Mexico at the time of deposition of the Norphlet and Smackover should lead to better exploration plays for these syntectonic formations.

  11. Intrashelf basins: A geologic model for source-bed and reservoir facies deposition within carbonate shelves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, G. Jr. (Sauid Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intrashelf basins (moats, inshore basins, shelf basins, differentiated shelf, and deep-water lagoons of others) are depressions of varying sizes and shapes that occur within tectonically passive and regionally extensive carbonate shelves. Intrashelf basins grade laterally and downdip (seaward) into shallow-water carbonates of the regional shelf, are separated from the open marine basin by the shelf margin, and are largely filled by fine-grained subtidal sediments having attributes of shallow- and deeper water sedimentation. These basins are commonly fringed or overlain by carbonate sands, reefs, or buildups. These facies may mimic those that occur along the regional shelf margin, and they can have trends that are at a high angle to that of the regional shelf. Intrashelf basins are not intracratonic basins. The history of most intrashelf basins is a few million to a few tens of million of years. Examples of intrashelf basins are known throughout the Phanerozoic; the southern portion of the Holocene Belize shelf is a modern example of an intrashelf basin. Two types of intrashelf basins are recognized. Coastal basins pass updip into coastal clastics of the craton with the basin primarily filled by fine clastics. Shelf basins occur on the outer part of the shelf, are surrounded by shallow-water carbonate facies, and are filled by peloidal lime mud, pelagics, and argillaceous carbonates. Intrashelf basins are commonly the site of organic-rich, source-bed deposition, resulting in the close proximity of source beds and reservoir facies that may fringe or overlie the basin. Examples of hydrocarbon-charged reservoirs that were sourced by an intrashelf basin include the Miocene Bombay High field, offshore India; the giant Jurassic (Arab-D) and Cretaceous (Shuaiba) reservoirs of the Arabian Shelf; the Lower Cretaceous Sunniland trend, South Florida basin; and the Permian-Pennsylvanian reservoirs surrounding the Tatum basin in southeastern New Mexico.

  12. Silurian of Illinois basin - a carbonate ramp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, G.W.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Silurian of the Illinois basin has classically been defined as a shelf-basin sequence. According to the shelf-basin model, the Illinois basin is a deep-water basin in the extreme southern part (southern Illinois-Tennessee), with a slope in the south (Illinois-Indiana) and a shelf extending from central Illinois and Indiana northeast to the Michigan basin. Reef buildups are in a continuous trend along the shelf break. However, the author proposes that the silurian of the Illinois basin represents a carbonate ramp. The down-ramp position is located in southern Illinois and grades into deeper water environments south of Illinois. In this environment, reef buildups would form in the late Alexandrian of early St. Clair, and would begin in the down-ramp position. Therefore, using the new model, reef buildups are expected throughout the basin, rather than being confined to an imaginary shelf break. This model would facilitate exploration in southern Illinois, Indiana, and western Kentucky for reefal hydrocarbon deposits. A ramp model is indicated for the Illinois basin because: (1) the basin lacks a shelf-slope break; (2) the facies sequence is compatible with a ramp environment and incompatible with a shelf-slope environment; (3) discontinuous reef trends are typical of a ramp environment; and (4) facies changes and slope are gradual, extending over hundreds of miles as expected in a ramp environment. Modern carbonate models border on ocean basins. However, the Illinois basin is a cratonic basin, which may have affected the depositional environments. How much that environment differed from present-day models is unknown.

  13. Submarine geomorphology of Eastern Ross Sea and Sulzberger Bay, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepley, Larry Kent

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SUBMARINE GEOMORPHOLOGY OF EASTERN ROSS SEA AND SULZBERGER BAY, ANTARCTICA A Thocis By Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A 6 H Universicy in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE lanum...- ': Bsfhpeotrg l. Outer Snelf ?. ? Q ? ~elf =Bepr eeoione 3. inner Shelf 4~ B id gee S ed haunts l. Antaratic Uorine Sedhaento B seclhnents of Eastern Rom ssa - suleborgsr Boy Dissuasion Outer Shelf a. Ihwtstio, Xsostatio, snd Qlaoia1 Sister@ b. ?h igin...

  14. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Baisn and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain: Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1997-March 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.

    1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Part I (Inventory of Existing Data and Information Sources) objectives are to provide improved access to information available in the public domain by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain and making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format. The producers in the region maintain that the accessibility of oil and gas information is the single-most important factor to assist them in finding new hydrocarbon discoveries and in improving production from established fields. The principal investigator continues to discuss the project with geologists for Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida. A subcontract has been executed between the University of Alabama and the Geological Survey of Alabama. A subcontract agreement is under review by the Mississippi Office of Geology. The principal investigator continues to discuss the project with a number of faculty members from departments of geology in the region. A listing of theses and dissertations from the University of Alabama, Auburn University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, University of Southern Mississippi, University of Southwestern Louisiana, and Louisiana State University related to the petroleum geology of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been compiled. This list is accessible electronically through the Home Page of the Eastern Gulf Region of the Pertroleum Technology Transfer Council (EGRPTTC) (http://egrpttc.geo.ua.edu).

  15. Upper Jurassic carbonate/evaporite shelf, south Alabama and west Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, B.R.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The association of Upper Jurassic carbonates and evaporites in south Alabama and west Florida defines a brining upward and inward sequence that is indicative of deposition on an increasingly evaporitic marine shelf. Structural features that bound this evaporitic shelf were the Pensacola arch, the South Mississippi platform, and the State Line flexure. Paleo-drainage of the surrounding highlands also affected shelf salinities as fresh waters were funneled into the Covington and Manila Embayments. During the Late Jurassic, marine carbonates and evaporites of the Smackover and Lower Haynesville (Buckner) Formations were deposited over Middle Jurassic Norphlet clastics that accumulated in arid continental and marginal-marine environments. Initially, Smackover carbonate deposition was pervasive across the shallow shelf. Later, as a result of increasing water salinities, contemporaneous precipitation of central-shelf evaporites and basin-edge carbonates occurred. Maximum restriction of the basin and the culmination of subaqueous deposition resulted in the formation of a basin-wide lower Haynesville salt unit. The overlying upper Haynesville strata represents a shift to subaerial environments. Application of a shelf-basin evaporite model explains the spatial and temporal lithologic relationships observed within the study area. Onlap of evaporites over porous carbonates, due to brining-upward processes, suggest that large-scale stratigraphic traps exist within the Smackover Formation in a sparsely explored part of the basin.

  16. atacama basin northern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tucker 2007-02-02 44 BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: of selected Tertiary coal beds...

  17. Holocene stratigraphy of the Alabama inner continental shelf: Influence of shelf sand ridges on determining lithofacies architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, D.J.; Parker, S.J. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States). Energy and Coastal Geology Div.)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface and subsurface distribution of lithofacies from Holocene sediments of the AL inner continental shelf was determined from a series of 59 vibracores and associated surface sediment grab sediments. Five Holocene lithofacies composed of 12 discrete microfacies were delineated based on grain size, color, sedimentary structures, shell content, and fabric of samples. These lithofacies include: (1) Graded Shelly Sand Lithofacies; (2) Clean Sand Lithofacies; (3) Dirty Sand Lithofacies; (4) Biogenic Sediment Lithofacies; and (5) Muddy Sediment Lithofacies. These represent four major depositional environments: The Shelf Sand Sheet Environment (lithofacies 1 and 2); the Sand Ridge Environment (lithofacies 1, 2, and 3); the Bay/Lagoon Environment (lithofacies 3, 4 and 5); and the Muddy Shelf Environment (lithofacies 5). East of the Main Pass of Mobile Bay, the seafloor is composed of a clean Shelf Sand Sheet with oblique shelf sand ridges; Clean Sand and Graded Shelly Sand are the dominant surface sediment types. Coarse shell beds that grade up to quartz sand units (total thickness 0.1 to 3+m) interpreted as tempestites comprise most of the upper portion of the ridges. West of the Pass, the muddier lithofacies (3 and 5) dominate surface samples. Microfacies at depth represent the early Holocene transgressive systems tract; these include the Muddy Shelf Depositional Environment and the filled estuaries and bays of the flooded Pleistocene fluvial valleys represented by the Bay/Lagoon Depositional Environment. The AL inner shelf provides an excellent model of the variability of sedimentation mode in time and space during deposition of a transgressive systems tract. Development of the palimpsest sand sheet/ridge complex progressed on the eastern shelf due to shut off of sediment influx, westward longshore currents, and episodic incidence of major hurricanes. On the western shelf a patchy distribution of muddier sediments developed from input of floodwaters from Mobile Bay.

  18. The tectonics of eastern Hispaniola: an investigation into the formation and episodic uplift of the Beata Ridge and the geologic and velocity structure of the Cibao basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucher, Paul James

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with previous work (Worzell and Ewing, 1948; Edgar et al. , 1971; Fox and Heezen, 1975; Case et al. , 1990) classifying the Caribbean lithosphere as transitional in nature, in contrast to typical Pacific Ocean lithosphere. The Clbao Basin The basis... -19 0A) Pli. 14. Three-Dimensional Vivum ef:the ~ ~ 27 DISCUSSION Elastic Thickness Crustal thicknesses for the Caribbean region have long been understood to be higher than normal. Data collected by Worzel and Ewing (1948) and Edgar et al. (1971...

  19. Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Final Report and Topical Reports 5-8 on Smackover Petroleum system and Underdevelopment Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, Ernest A.; Puckett, T. Markham; Parcell, William C.; Llinas, Juan Carlos; Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Townsend, Roger N.

    2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Smackover Formation, a major hydrocarbon-producing horizon in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin (MISB), conformably overlies the Norphlet Formation and is conformably overlain by the Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. The Norphlet-Smackover contact can be either gradational or abrupt. The thickness and lithofacies distribution of the Smackover Formation were controlled by the configuration of incipient paleotopography. The Smackover Formation has been subdivided into three informal members, referred to as the lower, middle and upper members.

  20. Rock-water interactions of the Madison Aquifer, Mission Canyon Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spicer, James Frank

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Williston Basin is located in the northern Great Plains of the United States. This area includes eastern Montana, northwestern South Dakota, and western North Dakota. The stratigraphy and geologic history of this basin are well understood...

  1. 4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    OSD 4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf M. R. Price Title Page published in Ocean Science Discussions are under open-access review for the journal Ocean Science Ice-shelf ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica from oxygen isotope ratio measurements M. R. Price 1

  2. Paleoceanographic interpretations of the Pleistocene sediments from the Eastern Equatorial Pacific-ODP Hole 677B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Yee-Hwa

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (CONTINUED) Page 91 91 VITA 95 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page Location of ODP Site 677 in the Panama Basin, south ol the Costa Rica Rift, Bathymetry of the Panama Basin and adjacent equatorial Pacific. 10 Major components of the surface circulation... in the eastern equalorial Pacific. 13 Distribution of the main surface water masses in the eastern Pacific Ocean. 14 5. Bottom water circulation in the Panama Basin. 6. Standard curve for calcium carbonate analysis. 16 22 Nannofossil biostratigraphy...

  3. CentralBasin Matador Arch Eastern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Oil & Gas Fields By 2006 Proved Reserves MAP DATE 2-10-2008 DATA SOURCES Top 100 oil & gas fields list from "US Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves, 2006 Annual Report", Energy Information Administration (EIA). When a field is on both the top 100 oil and top 100 gas lists

  4. Assessment of undiscovered carboniferous coal-bed gas resources of the Appalachian Basin and Black Warrior Basin Provinces, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milici, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

    2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed methane (CBM) occurs in coal beds of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) age in the Appalachian basin, which extends almost continuously from New York to Alabama. In general, the basin includes three structural subbasins: the Dunkard basin in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and northern West Virginia; the Pocahontas basin in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia; and the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi. For assessment purposes, the Appalachian basin was divided into two assessment provinces: the Appalachian Basin Province from New York to Alabama, and the Black Warrior Basin Province in Alabama and Mississippi. By far, most of the coalbed methane produced in the entire Appalachian basin has come from the Black Warrior Basin Province. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  5. Gas exploration and oceanography beyond the shelf break

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thiem, yvind

    are presented. Objective To investigate the shelf and the shelf-slope processes outside the Norwegian coast

  6. Deformation, erosion and sedimentation in collisional orogens : case studies from eastern Tibet and southwestern China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studnicki-Gizbert, Christopher Terrance

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation addresses aspects of the tectonics of regions adjacent to the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. The first chapter describes the Tertiary Gonjo basin, includes structural and sedimentologic observations, and ...

  7. Shelf circulation patterns off Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rider, Kelly Elizabeth

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    . Because of the limited knowledge of the oceanography of this region, the magnitude and direction of the drift were unexpected, hampering clean up efforts. This lack of information prompted the initiation of a joint industry project (JIP) to gain a... better understanding of the shelf currents offshore Nigeria. The study area defined in the JIP includes the rivers in and near the Niger Delta and the shallow-water region (to approximately 100-m depths) off the coast of Nigeria, roughly extending from...

  8. Late Pleistocene Environmental Change in Eastern Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego A Limnogeological Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    11 Late Pleistocene Environmental Change in Eastern Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, sedimentological and geochemical results from several lacustrine basins in eastern Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego of the audacious De Geer's students was Carl Caldenius, who went to Patagonia and ­ as mentioned in several

  9. Where is the North ChinaSouth China block boundary in eastern China?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Where is the North ChinaSouth China block boundary in eastern China? Michel Faure, Wei Lin of the North China and South China blocks. The eastern extension of the belt (the Sulu area) consists and the lack of ocean-basin rock shows that the boundary between the North China block and South China block

  10. Interannual variability of summer biochemical enhancement in relation to mesoscale eddies at the shelf break in the vicinity of the Pribilof Islands,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interannual variability of summer biochemical enhancement in relation to mesoscale eddies the 1300-km-long eastern shelf break accompanied by a mesoscale eddy field (Okkonen, 2001a). Eddies occur., 2002). Mesoscale eddies, which penetrate to depths of at least 1000 m (Roden, 1995; Mizobata et al

  11. Augmented Shelf: Digital Enrichment of Library Shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    Augmented Shelf: Digital Enrichment of Library Shelves Eike Kleiner1 , Benjamin Schfer2;Augmented Shelf: Digital Enrichment of Library Shelves 2 yon 2007) and Augmented Reality (Azuma 1997) a prototype1 was designed which supports users browsing the physical shelves enriched with digital functions

  12. Mesozoic evolution of northeast African shelf margin, Libya and Egypt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aadland, R.K.; Schamel, S.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present tectonic features of the northeast African shelf margin between the Nile delta and the Gulf of Sirte are products of (1) precursory late Paleozoic basement arches, (2) early Mesozoic rifting and plate separation, and (3) Late Cretaceous structural inversion. The 250 km-wide and highly differentiated Mesozoic passive margin in the Western Desert region of Egypt is developed above a broad northwest-trending Late Carboniferous basement arch. In northeastern Libya, in contrast, the passive margin is restricted to just the northernmost Cyrenaica platform, where subsidence was extremely rapid in the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. The boundary between the Western Desert basin and the Cyrenaica platform is controlled by the western flank of the basement arch. In the middle Cretaceous (100-90 Ma), subsidence accelerated over large areas of the Western desert, further enhancing a pattern of east-west-trending subbasins. This phase of rapid subsidence was abruptly ended about 80 Ma by the onset of structural inversion that uplifted the northern Cyrenaica shelf margin and further differentiated the Western Desert subbasin along a northeasterly trend.

  13. ELSEVIER Earth and Planetary Science Letters 163 (1998) 6981 Chronology of the late Turolian deposits of the Fortuna basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    deposits of the Fortuna basin (SE Spain): implications for the Messinian evolution of the eastern Betics of the mammal-bearing alluvial fan­fan delta sequences of the Fortuna basin (SE Spain) has yielded an accurate.8 and 5.7 Ma), the Fortuna basin records the sedimentation of alluvial­palustrine deposits over a confined

  14. Sheetflow fluvial processes in a rapidly subsiding basin, Altiplano plateau, Bolivia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horton, Brian K.

    Sheetflow fluvial processes in a rapidly subsiding basin, Altiplano plateau, Bolivia BRIAN A continuously for >100 km along the eastern limb of the Corque syncline in the high Altiplano plateau of Bolivia

  15. Tectonic setting and origin of the Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, W.A.; Whiting, B.M. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin has a triangular outline that is framed by the Ouachita thrust belt on the southwest, the Appalachian thrust belt on the southeast, and the North American craton on the north. The stratigraphy of the Black Warrior basin includes two distinct parts: a Cambrian-Mississippian passive-margin carbonate-shelf succession, and a Mississippian-Pennsylvanian clastic succession, the lower (Mississippian) part of which grades northeastward into a carbonate-shelf facies. The provenance and dispersal system of the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian clastic deposits have been interpreted in four different ways, each of which has significantly different implications for origin of the basin: (1) Ouachita orogenic source and northeastward prograding; (2) Alabama Appalachian orogenic source and northwestward prograding; (3) Georgia-tennessee Appalachian orogenic source and westward prograding; and (4) cratonic source and southward prograding. Subsidence history determined from calculations of decompacted thickness indicates that (1) the Black Warrior basin is an orogenic foreland basin related primarily to the Ouachita thrust load on the southwest; (2) later emplacement of the Alabama Appalachian thrust belt modified the southeastern side of the Ouachita-related Black Warrior foreland basin; and (3) a separate foreland basin, representing the southern end of the Appalachian foreland basin, formed in response to the Georgia-Tennessee Appalachian thrust load. The previously used criteria do not necessarily support a unique interpretation, but synthesizing these data with subsidence history leads to the conclusion that the Black Warrior basin is a tectonically driven, orogenic foreland basin dominated by Ouachita thrusting and modified by Appalachian thrusting.

  16. Trace fossil assemblages in selected shelf sandstones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Locke, Kathleen Ann

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and decreasing marine 1nfluence. Individual trace fossil types are more abundant and show a greater d1versity 1n the delta-margin facies; several large, vert1cal crab(?) burrows are P ascot a d th bi g is do 1 t d by ~Ohio o h In the shelf sequences, mostly... ~Zoo h os, f d ly i th iddl -to. outer and outer shelf sequences. Continued study of trace fossils should provide more specific information than the general shelf locations described above. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The completion of this thesis marks...

  17. Seismic reprocessing, interpretation and petroleum prospectivity of the East Cano Rondon Area, Llanos Basin, Colombia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molina, German D

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Llanos Basin, in Eastern Colombia, is the major oil-producing province in the country. In recent years, exploration in this basin has been focused towards plays in the Llanos foothills, where proven thrust traps present the possibility of large...

  18. Mid-Continent basin: a reappraisal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J.R.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the largest unevaluated basins in the Mid-Continent is the Salina basin in Kansas and its extension into eastern Nebraska. The purpose of this study is to update all older data, reconstruct new maps, and reappraise the potential for further exploration. The last comprehensive publications on the area were in 1948 and 1956. The Salina basin includes 12,700 mi/sup 2/ (33,000 km/sup 2/) in north-central Kansas, and approximately 7000 mi/sup 2/ (18,000 km/sup 2/) in east-central Nebraska. The basin is delineated by the zero isopach of Mississippian rocks bordering the basin. The Central Kansas uplift borders the basin on the southwest and Nemaha ridge on the east; the southern limit is an ill-defined saddle in the vicinity of T17S. Boundaries of the Nebraska basin are less well defined, but the axis of the basin trends directly north from the Kansas border along the boundary of Ts10 and 11W, to 41/sup 0/N lat., and then bifurcates to the northwest toward the Siouxiana arch and northeast for an unknown distance. Conventional structure maps have been constructed on several horizons, and a series of cross sections depicts anomalous structures. Recent gravity, magnetic, and seismic reflection profiling also provide information on basement tectonics which may influence structures in the younger sediments. Basement depth ranges from 600 ft (180 m) on the northeast Nemaha ridge boundary of the basin, to a depth of 4750 ft (1450 m) or -3000 ft (-915 m) below sea-level datum in Jewell County; therefore, there may be an approximate total of 10,000 mi/sup 3/ (42,000 km/sup 3/ of sediments for future exploration.

  19. Epibenthic invertebrates and fishes of the continental shelf of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Jabr, Abdulrahman Mohammad

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    provinces that are considered to be geologically distinct (Kennedy 1976): 1). The Gulf of Mexico Basin, 2). The northeast Gulf of Mexico, 3). The South Florida continental shelf and slope, 4). Campeche Bank, 5), The Style and format follow Contributions...V V Vill 9 15 15 19 70 72 74 APPENDIX 7. . APPENDIX 8. . APPENDIX 9. . APPENDIX 10. VITA Page 81 91 101 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE Page Geological provinces in the Gulf of Mexico. . . Study area in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico...

  20. Neogene stratigraphic relationships within the Nam Con Son Basin, offshore Vietnam resulting from tectonics, eustasy, and sediment flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Christine M.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of this project include: 1) Characterization of modern seafloor channel morphology and distribution on the shelf, slope and basin floor in areas dominated by clastic deposition in an effort to distinguish between fluvial channels, incised valley, slope... with locations of fluvial channels, incised valleys, canyons and turbidite channels in order to evaluate sediment dispersal since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). These data were used to investigate the areal extent and distribution of LGM shelf, slope...

  1. Evolution of the Apalachicola basin (northeastern Gulf of Mexico) during the Jurassic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, L.M.; Buffler, R.T. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A grid of multichannel seismic correlated with well data defines four Jurassic seismic sequences in the Apalachicola basin of the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. These sequences, which developed in response to basin architecture, sea level fluctuations, sediment supply, and salt movement document the depositional history of the basin during the Jurassic. Evaporation of water entering the basin resulted in deposition of the (Callovian ) Louann Salt sequence. The Louann generally lacks internal reflections, except updip where discontinuous parallel-divergent reflections probably represent interbedding of salt with clastics around the basin margin. The updip limit of thick salt coincides with a basement hinge line. The second sequence contains rocks of the Norphlet and Smackover formations. Norphlet clastics were deposited during a sea level rise. As the transgression continued, Oxfordian Smackover carbonates were deposited and upward shoaling occurred as sea level reached a stillstand. Smackover carbonates prograded over a shallow shelf, and buildups occurred over salt structures, basement highs, and basement hinge lines. The sequence thickens locally into growth faults associated with salt movement. During deposition of the Kimmeridgian Haynesville sequence, clastics entered the basin updip and carbonate deposition continued downdip. Growth faulting continued and a prominent shelf margin was established. Coarse fluvial and deltaic sediments of the Tithonian-earliest Berriasian Cotton Valley group comprise the final sequence. The Knowles Limestone records a transgression toward the end of the sequence. Progradation of the Knowles and establishment of a prominent shelf margin set the foundation for development of the overlying Lower Cretaceous margin.

  2. Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 10, Basin analysis, formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Aleutian Trench and the Bering Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four major areas with inferred gas hydrates are the subject of this study. Two of these areas, the Navarin and the Norton Basins, are located within the Bering Sea shelf, whereas the remaining areas of the Atka Basin in the central Aleutian Trench system and the eastern Aleutian Trench represent a huge region of the Aleutian Trench-Arc system. All four areas are geologically diverse and complex. Particularly the structural features of the accretionary wedge north of the Aleutian Trench still remain the subjects of scientific debates. Prior to this study, suggested presence of the gas hydrates in the four areas was based on seismic evidence, i.e., presence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). Although the disclosure of the BSRs is often difficult, particularly under the structural conditions of the Navarin and Norton basins, it can be concluded that the identified BSRs are mostly represented by relatively weak and discontinuous reflectors. Under thermal and pressure conditions favorable for gas hydrate formation, the relative scarcity of the BSRs can be attributed to insufficient gas supply to the potential gas hydrate zone. Hydrocarbon gas in sediment may have biogenic, thermogenic or mixed origin. In the four studied areas, basin analysis revealed limited biogenic hydrocarbon generation. The migration of the thermogenically derived gases is probably diminished considerably due to the widespread diagenetic processes in diatomaceous strata. The latter processes resulted in the formation of the diagenetic horizons. The identified gas hydrate-related BSRs seem to be located in the areas of increased biogenic methanogenesis and faults acting as the pathways for thermogenic hydrocarbons.

  3. Jurassic petroleum trends in eastern Gulf Coastal Plain and central and eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Bearden, B.L.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three Jurassic petroleum trends can be delineated in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida, and in the central and eastern Gulf of Mexico. These trends are recognized by characteristic petroleum traps, reservoirs, and hydrocarbon types. The source for the Jurassic hydrocarbons is Smackover algal mudstones. The Jurassic oil trend includes the area north of the regional peripheral fault systems in the tri-state area, and extends into the area north of the Destin anticline. Traps are basement highs and salt anticlines, with Smackover grainstones and dolostones and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones as reservoirs. This trend has potential for Jurassic oil accumulations in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The Jurassic oil and gas-condensate trend includes the onshore area between the regional peripheral fault systems and Wiggins arch and extends into the area of the Destin anticline. Traps are basement highs, salt related anticlines, and extensional faults. Cotton Valley fluvial-deltaic sandstones, Haynesville carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones, Smackover grainstones, packstones, dolostones, and marine sandstones, and Norphlet marine, eolian, and wadi sandstones serve as reservoirs. This trend contains most of the Jurassic fields in the eastern Gulf coastal plain. The trend has high potential for significant petroleum accumulations in the eastern Gulf of Mexico. The Jurassic deep natural gas trend includes the onshore area south of the Wiggins arch and extends into the Mississippi-Alabama shelf. Traps are faulted salt anticlines with basement highs as potential traps. Cotton Valley deltaic-strandplain sandstones and Norphlet eolian sandstones are the reservoirs. Several gas discoveries below 20,000 ft have been made in this trend in Mississippi and offshore Alabama. The trend has excellent potential for major gas accumulations in coastal Alabama and central Gulf of Mexico.

  4. Lithostratigraphy and paleoenvironmental reconstructions for Devonian strata in the Michigan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, W.B. III (Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo, MI (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Devonian strata in the Michigan Basin are represented by variably thick sequences of open shelf, tidal flat and sabhka carbonates, interbedded with basin-centered and sabhka evaporites (anhydrite and halite). Although there are isolated outcrops around the margins of the basin, the lithofacies relationships of these strata can be best studied from subsurface data of cores, wireline logs, and drill cutting samples. This database is compiled from over 25,000 oil and gas wells that enter or entirely penetrate Devonian strata in Michigan. Most of the strata in the Michigan Basin Devonian are part of the Kaskaskia cratonic depositional sequence (Sloss, 1963). The sequence begins with the southeast to northwest transgression of a quartz arenite (Sylvania Ss.) sandstone facies onto a weathered, cherty carbonate (Bois Blanc Fm.) surface developed on Lower Devonian strata exposed during the post-Tippecanoe unconformity. With rising sea level, the basin sediments became dominated by open shelf, biohermal and locally restricted lagoon carbonates (Amherstberg Fm.). Much of the Middle Devonian is represented by thick basin-centered sabhka and salina evaporates and restricted-environment carbonates (Lucas Fm.). These interbedded and laterally gradational evaporite/carbonate facies are cyclic, showing gradual salinity changes during accumulation. Stratigraphically important K-Bentonite marker beds are prevalent in this part of the Michigan section. Overlying this restricted sequence are again open shelf, biohermal, and local restricted sabhka carbonate deposits (Dundee Fm.). Thin, but widespread and eastwardly thickening, terrigenous shales and mudstones are intercalated within another shelf carbonate package (Traverse Group). Devonian deposits in the Michigan Basin are capped by thick black shales and interbedded carbonates (Antrim Fm.).

  5. Blended Shelf: Reality-based Presentation and Exploration of Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiterer, Harald

    Blended library; shelf browsing; digital library ACM Classification Keywords H.5.2. [InformationBlended Shelf: Reality-based Presentation and Exploration of Library Collections Abstract We location of the library. Blended Shelf offers a 3D visualization of library collections

  6. Shelves in ePrints Soton Creating a shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sbester, Andrs

    Shelves in ePrints Soton Creating a shelf 1. Log into ePrints and select Manage Shelves towards top Shelf button to create further shelves. When you are ready to make your shelf publicly visible click shelves 1. In the depoit process, click on the Shelves button (prior to the Deposit button

  7. Continental Shelf Research 26 (2006) 194205 Characterizing the deep insular shelf coral reef habitat of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    (Gardner et al., 2003). Pollution, sedimentation, hurricanes and coral disease are all contributors and acoustic sensing (Singh et al., 2004). The Seabed was tested over the insular shelf slope off southwestern

  8. Ice Shelf Water plume flow beneath Filchner-Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feltham, Daniel

    the thinning of Pine Island Glacier in West Antarctica and the collapse of parts of the Larsen Ice Shelf temperature variation is called the ``ice pump'' [Lewis and Perkin, 1983; Jenkins and Bombosch, 1995]. [5

  9. Basin analysis in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leighton, M.W. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Haney, D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (USA)); Hester, N. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 1989, the Illinois State Geological Survey and the Indiana and Kentucky Geological surveys formed the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC) for the purpose of advancing the geologic understanding of the Illinois basin and of developing basin-wide studies for the assessment and wise development of the Illinois basin energy, mineral, and water resources. Cooperative efforts include work on the AAPG Interior Cratonic Sag Basin volume, Springfield coal study, Paducah CUSMAP study in cooperation with the US Geological Survey, Illinois Basin Cross Section Project, Geologic Society of America Coal Division field trip and workshop on Lower Pennsylvanian geology, workshops in basin analysis, and the Tri-State Committee on correlations in the Pennsylvanian System of the Illinois Basin. A network of 16 regional surface to basement cross sections portraying the structural and stratigraphic framework of the total sedimentary section of the entire basin is in preparation. Based on more than 140 of the deepest wells with wireline logs, the sections will show formation boundaries and gross lithofacies of the entire stratigraphic column. A set of basin-wide maps shows structure, thickness, and coal quality of the economically important Springfield coal seam. These maps were generated from recently joined computerized databases of the three member surveys of IBC. A unified stratigraphic nomenclature of the Pennsylvanian System is being developed, including seven new members and seven new formation names. The goal is to simplify, standardize, and gradually improve the stratigraphic terminology to be used in the Illinois basin.

  10. Evolutionary sequences and hydrocarbon potential of Kenya sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cregg, A.K. (Western Atlas International, Inc., Carrollton, TX (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kenya basins have evolved primarily through extension related to episodic continental rifting. In eastern Kenya, thick accumulations of sediments formed within grabens during the prerift phase (Precambrian to Carboniferous) of the Gondwana breakup. Synrift sedimentation (Late Carboniferous to Middle Jurassic) occurred within a north-south rift system, which included the Mandera basin, South Anza basin, and Lamu embayment. During the Early Jurassic, a marine transgression invaded the margins of the eastern Kenya rift basins, resulting in the deposition of platform carbonates and shales. A Callovian-aged salt basin formed in the offshore regions of the Lamu embayment. Intermittent tectonic activity and eustatic sea-level changes controlled sedimentation, which produced marine shales, carbonates or evaporites, and fluvio-deltaic to lacustrine sandstones. From the Early Cretaceous to recent, continental sediments were deposited within the North Anza and Turkana basins. These fluvial-lacustrine sediments are similar to the Lower Cretaceous sequences that have produced oil in the Mesozoic Sudanese Abu Gabra rift. Although exploration activities began in the early 1950s, significant occurrences of potential reservoir, source, and seal lithologies as well as trapping configurations remain in many areas. Favorable structures and sequences of reservoir sandstones and carbonates overlain by potentially sealing lacustrine or marine shales, evaporites, or volcanics have been noted. Potential source beds are believed to be present within shales of the lacustrine or marine depositional environments.

  11. Structural evolution and petroleum productivity of the Baltic basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmishek, G.F. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Baltic basin is an oval depression located in the western part of the Russian craton; it occupies the eastern Baltic Sea and adjacent onshore areas. The basin contains more than 5,000 m of sedimentary rocks ranging from latest Proterozoic to Tertiary in age. These rocks consist of four tectonostratigraphic sequences deposited during major tectonic episodes of basin evolution. Principal unconformities separate the sequences. The basin is underlain by a rift probably filled with Upper Proterozoic rocks. Vendian and Lower Cambrian rocks (Baikalian sequence) form two northeast-trending depressions. The principal stage of the basin development was during deposition of a thick Middle Cambrian-Lower Devonian (Caledonian) sequence. This stage was terminated by the most intense deformations in the basin history. The Middle Devonian-Carboniferous (Hercynian) and Permian-Tertiary (Kimmerian-Alpine) tectonic and depositional cycles only slightly modified the basin geometry and left intact the main structural framework of underlying rocks. The petroleum productivity of the basin is related to the Caledonian tectonostratigraphic sequence that contains both source rocks and reservoirs. However, maturation of source rocks, migration of oil, and formation of fields took place mostly during deposition of the Hercynian sequence.

  12. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  13. Tectonic control for evaporite formation in the Eastern Betics (Tortonian; Spain)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Tectonic control for evaporite formation in the Eastern Betics (Tortonian; Spain) Wout Krijgsman a for the Venta de la Virgen section by integration of biostratigraphic, magnetostratigraphic and isotopic dating for the emergence of a threshold that finally led to evaporite formation in the Fortuna basin. © 2006 Elsevier B

  14. FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GF FRAMEWORK GEOLOGY OF FORT UNION COAL IN THE EASTERN ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By R.M. Flores,1 A.M. Ochs,2 and L.R. Bader1 in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1625-A 1 U.S. Geological Survey 2 Consultant, U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, Colorado 1999

  15. Sedimentological evolution of the Emine and Kamchia basins, eastern Bulgaria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suttill, Hannah L.

    2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Mountain belts are inherently asymmetric, defined by the sense of plate subduction. The resultant orogen can be divided into peripheral and retro-arc wedges with the retro-wedge overlying the overthrust plate. Modelling ...

  16. Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Laboun, A.A.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strikingly correlative sequences of sediments composed of sandstones, siltstones, shales, and thin argillaceous carbonate beds are present, practically everywhere, underlying the Late Permian carbonates in the Greater Arabian basin. The Greater Arabian basin as defined here occupies the broad Arabian Shelf that borders the Arabian shield. This basin is composed of several smaller basins. These clastics are exposed as thin bands and scattered small exposures in several localities around the margins of the basin. The Permo-Carboniferous clastics are represented by the Unayzah Formation of Arabia, the Doubayat Group of Syria, the Hazro Formation of southeast Turkey, the Ga'arah Formation of Iraq, the Faraghan Formation of southwest Iran, and the Haushi Group of Oman. A Late Carboniferous-Early Permian age is assigned to these clastics because they contain fossil plants and palynomorphs. These sediments represent time-transgressive fluctuating sea deposits following a phase of regional emergence, erosion, and structural disturbance which preceded the Permian transgression. The basal contact of these clastics is marked by a well-pronounced angular unconformity with various older units, ranging in age from early Carboniferous to late Precambrian. This regional unconformity is probably related to the Hercynian movements. The upper contact is conformable with the Permian carbonates. The porous sandstones of the Permo-Carboniferous sediments are important hydrocarbon exploration targets. These reservoir rocks sometimes overlie mature source rocks and are capped by shales, marls, and tight carbonates. Significant quantities of hydrocarbons are contained in these reservoirs in different parts of the Greater Arabian basin.

  17. Exploration limited since '70s in Libya's Sirte basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, D. (Thomas and Associates, Hastings (United Kingdom))

    1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Esso Standard made the first Libyan oil discovery in the western Ghadames basin in 1957. The Atshan-2 well tested oil from Devonian sandstones, and the play was a continuation of the Paleozoic trend found productive in the neighboring Edjeleh region of eastern Algeria. Exploration in the Sirte basin began in earnest in 1958. Within the next 10 years, 16 major oil fields had been discovered, each with recoverable reserves greater than 500 million bbl of oil. Libya currently produces under OPEC quota approximately 1.4 million b/d of oil, with discovered in-place reserves of 130 billion bbl of oil. The paper describes the structural framework, sedimentary basins of Libya, the Sirte basin, petroleum geology, play types, source rocks, generation and migration of hydrocarbons, oil reserves, potential, and acreage availability.

  18. Clay mineralogy of surface sediments as a tool for deciphering river contributions to the Cariaco Basin (Venezuela)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Clay mineralogy of surface sediments as a tool for deciphering river contributions to the Cariaco the Cariaco Basin continental shelf and Orinoco delta was investigated in order to constrain the clay was studied using a geo-statistical approach that allows drawing representative clay-mineral distribution maps

  19. Basement rift control on oil production in eastern Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavson, J.B.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved understanding of the central North American rift system (CNARS) offers a new interpretation of the basement structure in certain parts of the Mid-Continent. In eastern Kansas, basement structure can be shown to control oil production from some producing fields. Structural control includes rotated blocks along faults created by horst and graben tectonics typically associated with rift zones. A distinctive gravity signature, the Mid-Continent geophysical anomaly (MGA) is related directly to the CNARS and provides good data for interpretation of the basement structure. Some oil fields can be correlated directly with gravity-interpreted basement structure. Aeromagnetic and Landsat information, combined with the gravity data, further define exploration targets along the general trend of basement features. Migration of thermally matured hydrocarbons into pre-Pennsylvanian, rift generated traps in the ancestral north Kansas basin is postulated. The Nemaha ridge subsequently divided that basin into two smaller basins, the present Salina and Forest City basins. Several exploration targets could exist in this area, with the Arbuckle, Simpson, and Viola units being primary targets. The source of hydrocarbons also may lie in the deep but distant Anadorko basin. An additional totally untested hydrocarbons potential exists in the deep Precambrian/Cambrian sedimentary subbasins created along the flanks of the CNARS. Recent data points to sedimentary columns with depths of approximately 15,000 ft (4500 m) which might be hosts to gas reserves similar to the Rome trough potential of the Appalachian region.

  20. Water Basins Civil Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important To use a topographic map To delineate

  1. atlantic bight shelf: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ( Geosciences Websites Summary: baroclinic circulation in estuary-plume-shelf systems: I. Formulation and skill assessment Yinglong Zhang:Nagesh PAGN:Uday SCAN:v4soft...

  2. Depositional environments of the Kodiak Shelf, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burbach, Stuart Peter

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sinall amounts of ash. Sills separa+i;g the Trough and Ba:al Trough environments and possfble shelf edge currents are responsible ror the !ow concentrations of' ash. The Local Bank Depression sedir. ;ents are glacial till cove ed by fine-grain ash... os ity. Clay Minora'logy Uoicanic Ash Deposits Sedimentary Struci;ures. DISCUSS IOI'i Tro;! qh, Iiain Bank Basal T~ough. Local Bank Denression CONCLUSIONS. SELECTED I". EFERENCES. APPENDIII I ?2 2? 17 32 35 an 41 nq 45 4B 4B Cg...

  3. CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark Kovar; Scott Wehner

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of cyclic CO2, often referred to as the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital-intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration & Production Inc. and the U. S. Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations which are light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs that exist throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir. A significant amount of oil reserves are located in carbonate reservoirs. Specifically, the carbonates deposited in shallow shelf (SSC) environments make up the largest percentage of known reservoirs within the Permian Basin of North America. Many of these known resources have been under waterflooding operations for decades and are at risk of abandonment if crude oil recoveries cannot be economically enhanced 1,2 . The selected sites for this demonstration project are the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico and the Sundown Slaughter Field in Hockley County, Texas. Miscible CO2 flooding is the process of choice for enhancing recovery of light oils 3 and already accounts for over 12% of the Permian Basin?s daily production.4 There are significant probable reserves associated with future miscible CO2 projects. However, many are marginally economic at current market conditions due to large up-front capital commitments for a peak response, which may be several years in the future. The resulting negative cash-flow is sometimes too much for an operator to absorb. The CO2 Huff-n-Puff process is being investigated as a near-term option to mitigate the negative cash-flow situation--allowing acceleration of inventoried miscible CO2 projects when coupled together. The CO2 Huff-n-Puff process is a proven enhanced oil recovery technology in Louisiana-Texas Gulf-coast sandstone reservoirs 5,6 . Application seems to mostly confine itself to low pressure sandstone reservoirs 7 . The process has even been shown to be moderately effective in conjunction with steam on heavy California crude oils 8,9 . A review of earlier literature 5,10,11 provides an excellent discussion on the theory, mechanics of the process, and several case histories. Although the technology is proven in light oil sandstones, it continues to be a very underutilized enhanced recovery option for carbonates. However, the theories associated with the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process are not lithology dependent. It was anticipated that this project would show that the application of the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in shallow shelf carbonates could be economically implemented to recover appreciable volumes of light oil. The goals of the project were the development of guidelines for cost-effective selection of candidate reservoirs and wells, along with estimating recovery potential.

  4. Basin center - fractured source rock plays within tectonically segmented foreland (back-arc) basins: Targets for future exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimer, R.J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production from fractured reservoirs has long been an industry target, but interest in this type play has increased recently because of new concepts and technology, especially horizontal drilling. Early petroleum exploration programs searched for fractured reservoirs from shale, tight sandstones, carbonates, or basement in anticlinal or fault traps, without particular attention to source rocks. Foreland basins are some of the best oil-generating basins in the world because of their rich source rocks. Examples are the Persian Gulf basin, the Alberta basin and Athabasca tar sands, and the eastern Venezuela basin and Orinoco tar sands. Examples of Cretaceous producers are the wrench-faulted La Paz-Mara anticlinal fields, Maracaibo basin, Venezuela; the active Austin Chalk play in an extensional area on the north flank of the Gulf of Mexico continental margin basin; and the Niobrara Chalk and Pierre Shale plays of the central Rocky Mountains, United States. These latter plays are characteristic of a foreland basin fragmented into intermontane basins by the Laramide orogeny. The Florence field, Colorado, discovered in 1862, and the Silo field, Wyoming, discovered in 1980, are used as models for current prospecting and will be described in detail. The technologies applied to fracture-source rock plays are refined surface and subsurface mapping from new log suites, including resistivity mapping; 3D-3C seismic, gravity, and aeromagnetic mapping; borehole path seismic mapping associated with horizontal drilling; fracture mapping with the Formation MicroScanner and other logging tools; measurements while drilling and other drilling and completion techniques; surface geochemistry to locate microseeps; and local and regional lineament discrimination.

  5. River Basin Commissions (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

  6. Geochemical anomalies in the surface media over the Phoenix Deposit, Athabasca Basin Ressources naturelles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    naturelles Canada Natural Resources Canada Targeted Geoscience Initiative 4: Increasing Deep Exploration River Property, host of Denison Mine's Phoenix uranium deposit, is situated near the southeastern rim of the Eastern Athabasca Basin: Implications for Uranium Drift Prospecting. Written communication. Gamelin, C

  7. Oil plays in Smackover reservoirs of the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M.; Tew, B.H.; Kopaskamerkel, D.C.; Mann, S.D. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five Smackover (Upper Jurassic, Oxfordian) oil plays can be delineated in the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain. These include the basement ridge play, the regional peripheral fault trend play, the Mississippi interior salt basin play, the Mobile graben fault system play, and the Wiggins arch complex play. Plays are recognized by basinal position, relationships to regional structural features, and characteristic petroleum traps. Within two plays, subplays can be distinguished based on oil gravities and reservoir characteristics. Reservoirs are distinguished primarily by depositional setting and diagenetic overprint. The geology and petroleum characteristics of these plays are discussed.

  8. K Basin safety analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porten, D.R.; Crowe, R.D.

    1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this accident safety analysis is to document in detail, analyses whose results were reported in summary form in the K Basins Safety Analysis Report WHC-SD-SNF-SAR-001. The safety analysis addressed the potential for release of radioactive and non-radioactive hazardous material located in the K Basins and their supporting facilities. The safety analysis covers the hazards associated with normal K Basin fuel storage and handling operations, fuel encapsulation, sludge encapsulation, and canister clean-up and disposal. After a review of the Criticality Safety Evaluation of the K Basin activities, the following postulated events were evaluated: Crane failure and casks dropped into loadout pit; Design basis earthquake; Hypothetical loss of basin water accident analysis; Combustion of uranium fuel following dryout; Crane failure and cask dropped onto floor of transfer area; Spent ion exchange shipment for burial; Hydrogen deflagration in ion exchange modules and filters; Release of Chlorine; Power availability and reliability; and Ashfall.

  9. Regulations Related to the Outer Continental Shelf Moratoria and Implications of Not Renewing the Moratoria (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From 1982 through 2008, Congress annually enacted appropriations riders prohibiting the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior from conducting activities related to leasing, exploration, and production of oil and natural gas on much of the federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). Further, a separate executive ban (originally put in place in 1990 by President George H.W. Bush and later extended by President William J. Clinton through 2012) also prohibited leasing on the OCS, with the exception of the Western Gulf of Mexico, portions of the Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico, and Alaska. In combination, those actions prohibited drilling along the Atlantic and Pacific coasts, in the eastern Gulf of Mexico, and in portions of the central Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act of 2006 (Public Law 109-432) imposed yet a third ban on drilling through 2022 on tracts in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico that are within 125 miles of Florida, east of a dividing line known as the Military Mission Line, and in the Central Gulf of Mexico within 100 miles of Florida.

  10. antarctic ice shelf: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    export over the continental shelf of the west Antarctic Peninsula Ken O. Buesseler,1 cylindrical traps and the flux proxy 234 Th indi- cate more than an order of magnitude...

  11. Interdisciplinary ocean process studies on the New England shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    ), Shelfbreak Primer, and Synthetic Aperture Sonar (SAS) Primer con- ducted a number of coordinated field Site The study region was the New England shelf (Plate 1). The site of CMO was the "Mud Patch

  12. Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states and other stakeholders in the Eastern Interconnection identify geographic areas suitable for the development of clean energy resources (natural gas, sequestration or utilitization locations for C02 from coal, nuclear, and renewable) which can potentially provide significant amounts of new electric power generation.

  13. Technology transfer equipment qualification methodology for shelf life determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, J.W. [Wyle Labs., Huntsville, AL (United States)] [Wyle Labs., Huntsville, AL (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discussions with a number of Nuclear Utilities revealed that equipment qualified for 10 to 40 years in the harsh environment of the plant was being assigned shelf lives of only 5 to 10 years in the benign environment of the warehouse, and then the materials were being trashed. One safety-related equipment supplier was assigning a 10-year qualified life, from date of shipment, with no recognition of the difference in the aging rate in the plant vs. that in the warehouse. Many suppliers assign shelf lives based on product warranty considerations rather than actual product degradation. An EPRI program was initiated to evaluate the methods used to assign shelf lives and to adapt the Arrhenius methodology, used in equipment qualification, to assign technically justifiable shelf lives. Temperature is the main factor controlling shelf life; however, atmospheric pressure, humidity, ultraviolet light, ozone and other atmospheric contaminants were also considered. A list of 70 representative materials was addressed in the program. All of these were found to have shelf lives of 14 years to greater than 60 years, except for 19 items. For 18 of these items, there was no data available except for the manufacturer`s recommendation.

  14. Variability of bottom water domes and geostrophic currents in the eastern Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gottlieb, Erik S

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    entering Georges Bas- in, the slope water mixes with the endemic, less-dense bottom water (Hopkins and Gar- field, 1979). The newly formed bottom water accumulates in Georges Basin, resulting in an upward doming of the interface (found between 50 and 200...VARIABILITY OF BOTTOM WATER DOMES AND GEOSTROPHIC CURRENTS IN THE EASTERN GULF OF MAINE A Thesis by ERIK SAUL GQTTLIEB Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree...

  15. Cross-shelf circulation and momentum and heat balances over the inner continental shelf near Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fewings, Melanie Rinn

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water circulation and evolution of water temperature over the inner continental shelf are investigated using observations of water velocity, temperature, density, and bottom pressure; surface gravity waves; wind stress; ...

  16. Sediment infill within rift basins: Facies distribution and effects of deformation: Examples from the Kenya and Tanganyika Rifts, East Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tiercelin, J.J.; Lezzar, K.E. (Universite de Bretagne Occidentale, Brest (France)); Richert, J.P. (Elf Aquitaine, Pau (France))

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil is known from lacustrine basins of the east African rift. The geology of such basins is complex and different depending on location in the eastern and western branches. The western branch has little volcanism, leading to long-lived basins, such as Lake Tanganyika, whereas a large quantity of volcanics results in the eastern branch characterized by ephemeral basins, as the Baringo-Bogoria basin in Kenya. The Baringo-Bogoria basin is a north-south half graben formed in the middle Pleistocene and presently occupied by the hypersaline Lake Bogoria and the freshwater Lake Baringo. Lake Bogoria is fed by hot springs and ephemeral streams controlled by grid faults bounding the basin to the west. The sedimentary fill is formed by cycles of organic oozes having a good petroleum potential and evaporites. On the other hand, and as a consequence of the grid faults, Lake Baringo is fed by permanent streams bringing into the basin large quantities of terrigenous sediments. Lake Tanganyika is a meromictic lake 1470 m deep and 700 km long, of middle Miocene age. It is subdivided into seven asymmetric half grabens separated by transverse ridges. The sedimentary fill is thick and formed by organic oozes having a very good petroleum potential. In contrast to Bogoria, the lateral distribution of organic matter is characterized by considerable heterogeneity due to the existence of structural blocks or to redepositional processes.

  17. Colored dissolved organic matter dynamics across the shelf-basin interface in the western Arctic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Laodong

    Ocean were examined by three-dimensional excitation/emission matrix (3-D EEM) spectroscopy. CDOM was confined to the upper halocline layer (salinity of $33.1). This layer had distinctive 3-D EEM fingerprints

  18. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and...

  19. K Basin Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PECH, S.H.

    2000-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Final Safety Analysis Report. This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  20. K Basins Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEBB, R.H.

    1999-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the methodology used in conducting the K Basins Hazard Analysis, which provides the foundation for the K Basins Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-WM-SAR-062, Rev.4). This hazard analysis was performed in accordance with guidance provided by DOE-STD-3009-94, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Safety Analysis Reports and implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Report.

  1. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Terriary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. Eby; Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    1998-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO -) 2 flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. Two activities continued this quarter as part of the geological and reservoir characterization of productive carbonate buildups in the Paradox basin: (1) diagenetic characterization of project field reservoirs, and (2) technology transfer.

  2. Stratigraphic cross sections of Upper Cretaceous rocks across San Juan basin, northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molenaar, C.M.; Baird, J.K. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upper Cretaceous rocks of the San Juan basin, which are as much as 6,500 ft (1,980 m) thick, comprise a classic sequence of intertonguing marine and nonmarine facies. Geophysical logs from closely spaced drill holes throughout most of the basin provide data for detailed correlations of the rock units, which can be made by using numerous time marker beds within the marine shale sections. These marker beds provide a time framework for construction of cross sections that show (1) diachronism and stratigraphic rise of shoreface sandstone bodies associated with the four major transgressions and regressions of the Western Interior seaway within the basin, (2) shelf to very low-angle slope (< 0.25{degree}) to basinal topography, (3) Coniacian (basal Niobrara) unconformity, (4) low-amplitude paleostructural features, and (5) low-relief differential compaction features associated with lateral heterogeneities in sand-shale sections.

  3. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

  4. Analysis of coal and coal bed methane resources of Warrior basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wicks, D.E.; McFall, K.S.; Malone, P.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Warrior basin in Alabama is the most active area in the US producing natural gas from coal beds. As of 1986, 300 coal-bed methane wells were producing from eight degasification fields, mainly from the Pennsylvanian coal seams along the eastern margin of the basin. Despite difficult market conditions, drilling and expansion are continuing. A detailed geologic analysis of Warrior basin coal-bed methane targets the areas of the basin that show the most promise for future gas production. The geologic analysis is based on extensive well and core data and basin-wide correlations of the Pennsylvanian coal groups. Four detailed cross sections were constructed, correlating the target coal groups in the basin, namely the Cobb, Pratt, Mary Lee, and Black Creek. They estimate that the Warrior basin contains nearly 20 tcf of in-place coal-bed methane, mainly in three of the target coal groups - the Pratt, Mary Lee, and Black Creek coals, with 4, 7, and 8 tcf, respectively. The east-central area of the basin contains the greatest volume of natural gas resource due to its concentration of thicker, higher ranked coals with high gas content. The geologic analysis also provided the underlying framework for the subsequent engineering analysis of economically recoverable gas reserves. For example, analysis of structure and tectonics showed the east-central area to be promising for gas recovery due to its proximity to the Appalachian structural front and consequent structural deformation and permeability enhancement.

  5. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10`` to 20`` API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

  6. Ordovician platform, slope, and basin facies in subsurface of southern North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alberstadt, L.P.; Colvin, G.; Sauve, J.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ordovician carbonates of the Nashville dome and Ozark dome regions have long been considered typical shelf deposits. In the subsurface to the south, in the Black Warrior basin, Mississippi Embayment, and Arkoma basin, these shelf carbonate units changed facies. The most significant change is the occurrence of a thick limestone unit characterized by a faunal and floral assemblage of Nuia, Girvanella (isolated long strands), Sphaerocodium, a delicate stacked-chambered organism (.algal), and sponge spicules and sponge mudstone clumps. In ascending order, the complete Ordovician sequence consists of: a lower dolostone, the Nuia-sponge limestone, a dolostone, and a limestone. The upper part of this four-fold sequence changes character westward into the Arkoma basin. The lower two units maintain their character for long distances along depositional strike and occur in parts of the Appalachians as far north as Newfoundland, and on the opposite side of the continent in Nevada. The Nuia-sponge assemblage is a distinctive petrographic marker and seems to be a persistent Ordovician rock and fossil assemblage of widespread occurrence. In Nevada, it occurs on the surface where it is associated with slump and slide features that suggest that it is an outer shelf or upper slope deposit. Coeval carbonates in the Ouachita Mountains are different and show indications of being deep water (basinal). Biostratigraphic evidence indicates that the succession in the subsurface is continuous; the regional Lower Ordovician-Middle Ordovician unconformity is absent. The Lower Ordovician-Middle Ordovician boundary falls near the top of the Nuia-sponge mudstone unit and not at the top of the underlying thick dolostone unit.

  7. Hydrocarbon potential of the Lamu basin of south-east Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyagah, K.; Cloeter, J.J.; Maende, A. (National Oil Corp. of Kenya, Nairobi (Kenya))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lamu basin occupies the coastal onshore and offshore areas of south-east Kenya. This fault bounded basin formed as a result of the Paleozoic-early Mesozoic phase of rifting that developed at the onset of Gondwana dismemberment. The resultant graben was filled by Karroo (Permian-Early Jurassic) continental siliciclastic sediments. Carbonate deposits associated with the Tethyan sea invasion, dominate the Middle to Late Jurassic basin fill. Cessation of the relative motion between Madagascar and Africa in the Early Cretaceous, heralded passive margin development and deltaic sediment progradation until the Paleogene. Shallow seas transgressed the basin in the Miocene when another carbonate regime prevailed. The basin depositional history is characterized by pulses of transgressive and regressive cycles, bounded by tectonically enhanced unconformities dividing the total sedimentary succession into discrete megasequences. Source rock strata occur within Megasequence III (Paleogene) depositional cycle and were lowered into the oil window in Miocene time, when the coastal parts of the basin experienced the greatest amount of subsidence. The tectono-eustatic pulses of the Tertiary brought about source and reservoir strata into a spatial relationship in which hydrocarbons could be entrapped. A basement high on the continental shelf has potential for Karroo sandstone and Jurassic limestone reservoirs. Halokinesis of Middle Jurassic salt in Miocene time provides additional prospects in the offshore area. Paleogene deltaic sands occur in rotated listric fault blacks. A Miocene reef Play coincides with an Eocene source rock kitchen.

  8. Hydrocarbon potential of the Lamu basin of south-east Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyagah, K.; Cloeter, J.J.; Maende, A. [National Oil Corp. of Kenya, Nairobi (Kenya)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lamu basin occupies the coastal onshore and offshore areas of south-east Kenya. This fault bounded basin formed as a result of the Paleozoic-early Mesozoic phase of rifting that developed at the onset of Gondwana dismemberment. The resultant graben was filled by Karroo (Permian-Early Jurassic) continental siliciclastic sediments. Carbonate deposits associated with the Tethyan sea invasion, dominate the Middle to Late Jurassic basin fill. Cessation of the relative motion between Madagascar and Africa in the Early Cretaceous, heralded passive margin development and deltaic sediment progradation until the Paleogene. Shallow seas transgressed the basin in the Miocene when another carbonate regime prevailed. The basin depositional history is characterized by pulses of transgressive and regressive cycles, bounded by tectonically enhanced unconformities dividing the total sedimentary succession into discrete megasequences. Source rock strata occur within Megasequence III (Paleogene) depositional cycle and were lowered into the oil window in Miocene time, when the coastal parts of the basin experienced the greatest amount of subsidence. The tectono-eustatic pulses of the Tertiary brought about source and reservoir strata into a spatial relationship in which hydrocarbons could be entrapped. A basement high on the continental shelf has potential for Karroo sandstone and Jurassic limestone reservoirs. Halokinesis of Middle Jurassic salt in Miocene time provides additional prospects in the offshore area. Paleogene deltaic sands occur in rotated listric fault blacks. A Miocene reef Play coincides with an Eocene source rock kitchen.

  9. Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Evolution of Extensional Basins and Basin and Range Topography West of Death Valley California...

  10. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, A.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides a high-level overview of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study process, scenarios, tools, and goals.

  11. Geology, exploration status of Uruguay's sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goso, C.; Santa Ana, H. de (Administracion Nacional de Combustibles, Alcohol y Portland (Uruguay))

    1994-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This article attempts to present the geological characteristics and tectonic and sedimentary evolution of Uruguayan basins and the extent to which they have been explored. Uruguay is on the Atlantic coast of South America. The country covers about 318,000 sq km, including offshore and onshore territories corresponding to more than 65% of the various sedimentary basins. Four basins underlie the country: the Norte basin, the Santa Lucia basin, the offshore Punta del Este basin, and the offshore-onshore Pelotas-Merin basin. The Norte basin is a Paleozoic basin while the others are Mesozoic basins. Each basin has been explored to a different extent, as this paper explains.

  12. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Faulds, James E.

    - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  13. Seismic stratigraphy and quaternary evolution of the New York Bight Inner Continental Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lotto, Linda L

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the New York Bight Apex on the U. S. Atlantic inner continental shelf were analyzed to develop a better understanding of the Quaternary evolution of this inner continental shelf environment. Interpretation of the subbottom data reveals several...

  14. Structural deformation in the offshore Santa Maria basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willingham, C.R. (Explorametrics, Carpinteria, CA (United States)); Heck, R.G. (R.G. Heck and Associates, Carpinteria, CA (United States)); Rietman, J.M. (Rietman Consultants, Santa Ana, CA (United States))

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors divide the offshore Santa Maria basin into the southern, central, and northern provinces based on the pattern, style, and timing of late Cenozoic deformation. From their analyses of over 2,000 km of CDP seismic data and offshore well data they prepared time structure contour maps for three basin-wide unconformities: top of basement, top of Miocene, and the unconformity between early and late Pliocene chronostratigraphic units. Isochron maps were constructed between these horizons and between the early/late Pliocene unconformity and the sea floor to evaluate timing of the deformation. All maps were converted to depth and isopach values based on a three-dimensional velocity model. The regional structure contour and isopach maps show that the offshore Santa Maria basin is characterized by localized crustal shortening orthogonal to the Pacific/North America plate margin and indications of post-Miocene to recent lateral slip along the eastern basin boundary, the San Simeon/Hosgri fault system.

  15. Seasonal Export of South Atlantic and Mid-Atlantic Bight Shelf Waters at Cape Hatteras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savidge, Dana

    Seasonal Export of South Atlantic and Mid-Atlantic Bight Shelf Waters at Cape Hatteras Dana K 31411 Abstract Studies of Middle Atlantic Bight (MAB) shelf water export to the open ocean at Cape SAB shelf water to the Cape Hatteras, which must also be exported to the open ocean. In the following

  16. Coastal Trapped Waves Generated By Hurricane Andrew on the Texas-Louisiana Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearce, Stuart

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Texas-Louisiana Shelf Circulation and Transport Study featured moorings that covered the shelf during 1992 to 1994, and captured the oceanic response on the shelf to category 4 Hurricane Andrew in August of 1992. Eighty-one current meters...

  17. Depositional setting of the Jurassic Haynesville seismic sequence in the Apalachicola Basin, northeastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, L.M.; Buffler, R.T. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (USA))

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic and well data from the northeastern Gulf of Mexico were used to define the seismic stratigraphy, geologic history, and depositional setting of the Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) Haynesville sequence in the Apalachicola basin. The data show that Haynesville clastic sedimentation updip was coeval with Haynesville carbonate deposition downdip. The regional Jurassic seismic stratigraphic framework includes, in ascending order, the Louann Salt Norphlet-Smackover, Haynesville, and Cotton Valley sequences. In the vicinity of Destin dome, wells have penetrated Haynesville sandstones, shales, and anhydrites. These clastics correlate with low amplitude, low-continuity reflections that characterize the Haynesville over a broad area updip. Similar reflections within the overlying (Tithonian-earliest Berriasian) Cotton Valley clastic sequence make seismic definition of the top Haynesville sequence boundary difficult updip. As Haynesville clastics are replaced by carbonates downdip, a high amplitude reflection marks the top of the sequence. Haynesville carbonates conformably overlie (Oxfordian) Smackover carbonates in the basin center, and the lower sequence boundary cannot be defined where disrupted by growth faults associated with early movement of the (Callovian ) Louann Salt. Sigmoid clinoforms document Haynesville shelf margin development Seismic facies also include oblique clinoforms that prograde eastward into the basin from the Southern Platform and Middle Ground Arch. No wells penetrate this facies. Mapping of the seismic facies and correlation with well data suggest a depositional setting for the Haynesville sequence in which influx of terrigenous clastics probably derived from adjacent land areas to the north and northeast filled a broad lagoon behind a carbonate shelf margin.

  18. Retail Shelf-life Characteristics of Dry-aged Beef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulbrich, Carson

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    counts, lactic acid bacteria, and yeast and mold counts. Surface discoloration (P = 0.007) and fat discoloration (P < 0.0001) of steaks increased as aging period and retail steak shelf-life day increased. Also, off-odor development increased (P < 0...

  19. INFORMATION QUALITY: HOW GOOD ARE OFF-THE-SHELF DBMS?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weske, Mathias

    INFORMATION QUALITY: HOW GOOD ARE OFF-THE-SHELF DBMS? Felix Naumann Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin: Commercial database management systems (DBMS) have come a long way with re- spect to efficiency and more to store large amounts of data and intuitive query languages to ac- cess the data; popular DBMS also

  20. CETACEAN HIGHUSE HABITATS OF THE NORTHEAST UNITED STATES CONTINENTAL SHELF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to offshore oil and gas resource development. Twenty-six species of ceta- ceans were observed during the study of whales, dolphins, and sea turtles inhabiting the northeast shelf for input to decision-making relative species approach to the analysis of such multispecies phenomena has certain limitations. One cannot simply

  1. Hybrid Rossby-shelf modes in a laboratory Onno Bokhove

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    provided via the Ekman pumping and suction due to an oscillating rigid lid. Various forcing strengths have. The laboratory ocean consists of a deeper ocean, ac- commodating basin scale Rossby modes, and a coastal step exchange associated with hybrid modes between shallow coastal seas and deep ocean basins. 1 #12

  2. Evaluation of the eastern gas shales in Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate the potential of the Devonian shale as a source of natural gas, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP). The EGSP is designed not only to identify the resource, but also to test improved methods of inducing permeability to facilitate gas drainage, collection, and production. The ultimate goal of this project is to increase the production of gas from the eastern shales through advanced exploration and exploitation techniques. The purpose of this report is to inform the general public and interested oil and gas operators about EGSP results as they pertain to the Devonian gas shales of the Appalachian basin in Pennsylvania. Geologic data and interpretations are summarized and areas where the accumulation of gas may be large enough to justify commercial production are outlined. Because the data presented in this report are generalized and not suitable for evaluation of specific sites for exploration, the reader should consult the various reports cited for more detail and discussion of the data, concepts, and interpretations presented.

  3. Cenozoic basin development in Hispaniola

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, P.; Burke, K.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four distinct generations of Cenozoic basins have developed in Hispaniola (Haiti and Dominican Republic) as a result of collisional or strike-slip interactions between the North America and Caribbean plates. First generation basins formed when the north-facing Hispaniola arc collided with the Bahama platform in the middle Eocene; because of large post-Eocene vertical movements, these basins are preserved locally in widely separated areas but contain several kilometers of arc and ophiolite-derived clastic marine sediments, probably deposited in thrust-loaded, flexure-type basins. Second generation basins, of which only one is exposed at the surface, formed during west-northwesterly strike-slip displacement of southern Cuba and northern Hispaniola relative to central Hispaniola during the middle to late Oligocene; deposition occurred along a 5-km (3-mi) wide fault-angle depression and consisted of about 2 km (1 mi) of submarine fan deposits. Third generation basins developed during post-Oligocene convergent strike-slip displacement across a restraining bend formed in central Hispaniola; the southern 2 basins are fairly symmetrical, thrust-bounded ramp valleys, and the third is an asymmetrical fault-angle basin. Fourth generation basins are pull-aparts formed during post-Miocene divergent strike-slip motion along a fault zone across southern Hispaniola. As in other Caribbean areas, good source rocks are present in all generations of basins, but suitable reservoir rocks are scarce. Proven reservoirs are late Neogene shallow marine and fluvial sandstones in third generation basins.

  4. Cyclic transgressive and regressive sequences, Paleocene Suite, Sirte basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abushagur, S.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Farrud lithofacies represent the main reservoir rock of the Ghani oil field and Western Concession Eleven of the Sirte basin, Libya. Eight microfacies are recognized in the Farrud lithofacies in the Ghani field area: (1) bryozoan-bioclastic (shallow, warm, normal marine shelf deposits); (2) micrite (suggesting quiet, low-energy conditions such as may have existed in a well-protected lagoon); (3) dasycladacean (very shallow, normal marine environment); (4) bioclastic (very shallow, normal marine environment with moderate to vigorous energy); (5) mgal (very shallow, normal marine environment in a shelf lagoon); (6) pelletal-skeletal (deposition within slightly agitated waters of a sheltered lagoon with restricted circulation); (7) dolomicrite (fenestrate structures indicating a high intertidal environment of deposition); and (8) anhydrite (supratidal environment). The Paleocene suite of the Farrud lithofacies generally shows a prograding, regressive sequence of three facies: (1) supratidal facies, characterized by nonfossiliferous anhydrite, dolomite, and dolomitic pelletal carbonate mudstone; (2) intertidal to very shallow subtidal facies, characterized by fossiliferous, pelletal, carbonate mudstone and skeletal calcarenite; and (3) subtidal facies, characterized by a skeletal, pelletal, carbonate mudstone. Source rocks were primarily organic-rich shales overlying the Farrud reservoir rock. Porosity and permeability were developed in part by such processes as dolomitization, leaching, and fracturing in the two progradational, regressive carbonate facies. Hydrocarbons were trapped by a supratidal, anhydrite cap rock.

  5. Sources and distribution of coarse silts on the South Texas continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisp, Jeffery Arlan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    inshore of the mid-shelf. Curray (1960I believed 13 that hurricane waves were responsible for sediment movement on the outer shelf, but McGrail (1983) disputed this. Currents on the outer shelf are known to reach velocities as high as 75 cm/sec (Mc...Grail, 1983), and internal waves may be important in the entrainment of sediment on the shelf edge, so that hurricane waves need not be invoked to explain sediment transport at the outer shelf. Sediment transport can not be quantified at any place...

  6. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

  7. Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

  8. Facies analysis, sea level history, and platform evolution of Jurassic Smackover Formation, Conecuh basin, Escambia County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esposito, R.A. Jr.; King, D.T. Jr.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Smackover Formation (Jurassic, Oxfordian) in the Conecuh basin, Escambia County, Alabama, is divided into six carbonate sedimentary facies. In approximate stratigraphic order, they are (1) intertidal algal mudstone, (2) basinal carbonate mudstone and calcareous shale, (3) graded slope packstone and wackestone, (4) Tubiphytes-bearing, slope debris-flow grainstone and packstone, (5) distal-ramp wackestone, and (6) shoal-produced oolitic grainstone. Facies correlation and synthesis, using 11 key drill cores, show that the Smackover platform was profoundly affected by two rapid sea level rises during the Oxfordian transgression, as well as the late Oxfordian regression. The first rapid rise drowned in the inherited Norphlet clastic ramp, including the Smackover intertidal algal mudstone (facies 1). Subsequently, a Tubiphytes-rimmed shelf developed and its bypass-margin slope deposits (facies 3 and 4) and coeval basinal facies (facies 2) prograded in the basin. The second rapid sea level rise drowned the rimmed shelf, creating a distally steepened ramp. Facies developed on the ramp were distal-ramp deposits (facies 5) and higher energy updip oolitic shoals (facies 6). The late Oxfordian rapid regression caused widespread progradation of the oolitic shoals and coeval sabkha facies of the overlying Buckner anhydrite.

  9. Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Canyon sandstones, Central Midland Basin, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, James Winston

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Irion Counties indicate that Canyon sandstones in Irion County are younger than Canyon sandstones at Jameson field. Canyon sandstones at Brooks field in eastern Irion County (Fig. I) occur above the Fli ppen basinal shale "marker" (Elton, Rodgers... with the underly1ng shale is sharp; 7017 ft. 25 Fig. 9 Sedimentary structures in Canyon "A" sandstones, Union Texas Petroleum Sugg 4-1, Burnt Rock field, Lucky Canyon area, Irion County, Texas. Boldface letters (lower left) refer to photographs; small...

  10. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This one-page, two-sided fact sheet provides an overview of the Eastern Renewable Generation and Integration Study process.

  11. Ross Ice Shelf in situ radio-frequency ice attenuation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor Barrella; Steven Barwick; David Saltzberg

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have measured the in situ average electric field attenuation length for radio-frequency signals broadcast vertically through the Ross Ice Shelf. We chose a location, Moore Embayment, south of Minna Bluff, known for its high reflectivity at the ice-sea interface. We confirmed specular reflection and used the return pulses to measure the average attenuation length from 75-1250 MHz over the round-trip distance of 1155 m. We find the average electric field attenuation length to vary from 500 m at 75 MHz to 300 m at 1250 MHz, with an experimental uncertainty of 55 to 15 m. We discuss the implications for neutrino telescopes that use the radio technique and include the Ross Ice Shelf as part of their sensitive volume.

  12. Oil and gas developments in eastern and northwestern Colorado in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ligrani, L.D.; Adams, C.W.; Nibbelink, K.A.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling activity in eastern and northwestern Colorado was up approximately 10% from 1,430 wells in 1983 to 1,589 wells in 1984. This increase in total wells drilled resulted mainly from development activity. The success rate for the 488 exploratory wells drilled in 1984 was 24%, down about 7% from the 1983 level of 31%. Activity in eastern Colorado focused on Pennsylvanian and Mississippian rocks along the Las Animas arch and northern Hugoton embayment. Drilling for Cretaceous formations in the Denver basin increased with much of the new activity centered around the Codell sandstone and Niobrara Formation near Greeley. Significant new Niobrara production was established in northern Weld County. In the San Luis Valley of south-central Colorado, oil shows were reported for the first time in the Cretaceous Dakota Formation beneath volcanic rocks.

  13. Oil and gas developments in eastern and northwestern Colorado in 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ligrani, L.D.; Adams, C.W.; Nibbelink, K.A.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling activity in eastern and northwestern Colorado was up approximately 10% from 1430 wells in 1983 to 1589 wells in 1984. This increase in total wells drilled resulted mainly from development activity. The success rate for the 488 exploratory wells drilled in 1984 was 24%, down about 7% from the 1983 level of 31%. Activity in eastern Colorado focused on Pennsylvanian and Mississippian rocks along the Las Animas arch and northern Hugoton embayment. Drilling for Cretaceous formations in the Denver basin increased with much of the new activity centered around the Codell sandstone and Niobrara Formation near Greeley. Significant new Niobrara production was established in northern Weld County. In the San Luis Valley of south-central Colorado, oil shows were reported for the first time in the Cretaceous Dakota Formation beneath volcanic rocks. 1 figure, 2 tables.

  14. Stratigraphy and depositional environments of Cherokee group (Desmoinesian, middle Pennsylvanian), Central Cherokee basin, southeast Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staton, M.D.; Brady, L.L.; Walton, A.W.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlation from geophysical well logs of radioactive black shales, which extend throughout the basin and into the Sedgwick and Forest City basins, provided the basis for division of the Cherokee Group into 11 stratigraphic intervals. Black shale units below the Fort Scott Limestone and Verdigris Limestone, and above the Tebo coal are the most extensive and easily recognizable markers. The Tebo marker might be considered as a possible boundary between the Krebs and Cabaniss Formations owing to lateral extensiveness, mappability, and stratigraphic location near a distinct lithologic change. Cross sections indicate that the basin subsided during deposition of the Krebs Formation. Stratigraphic intervals in the overlying Cabaniss formation are relatively uniform in thickness, suggesting little or no subsidence during deposition. Onlap upon the Nemaha ridge occurred during Krebs and much of Cabaniss deposition. Stratigraphic markers that overlap the ridge and extend into the Sedgwick basin indicate one depositional province. Core, well-log, and well-sample studies show that lithologic characteristics within the basin appear similar to outcrop features. Basin strata are dominated by shales and sandstones with interbedded coals and thin limestones. Net-sandstone isolith maps reveal the presence of a deltaic complex characterized by both stacking and offset of major sandstone bodies. The amount of limestone significantly increases along the eastern flank of the Nemaha ridge.

  15. Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the...

  16. Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

  17. Sedimentology of gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Potter, P.E.; Maynard, J.B.; Pryor, W.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eastern Gas Shales Project (1976-1981) of the US DOE has generated a large amount of information on Devonian shale, especially in the western and central parts of the Appalachian Basin (Morgantown Energy Technology Center, 1980). This report summarizes this information, emphasizing the sedimentology of the shales and how it is related to gas, oil, and uranium. This information is reported in a series of statements each followed by a brief summary of supporting evidence or discussion and, where interpretations differ from our own, we include them. We believe this format is the most efficient way to learn about the gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin and have organized our statements as follows: paleogeography and basin analysis; lithology and internal stratigraphy; paleontology; mineralogy, petrology, and chemistry; and gas, oil, and uranium.

  18. Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

  19. Bottom-up and top-down controls of walleye pollock (Theragra chalcogramma) on the Eastern Bering Sea shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ladd, Carol

    . Furthermore, a dome-shaped relationship between pollock survival and summer wind mixing at the early juvenile- erate levels of wind mixing, but a decrease in feeding success at high levels of wind mixing. Top-to- recruit survival could be accounted for by predation mortality at the early juvenile stage (age-1

  20. Monomethylmercury concentrations on the eastern Texas-Louisiana shelf during the formation, peak, and disappearance of hypoxia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keach, Sara Elizabeth

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of monomethylmercury (MMHg) concentrations in the water and sediment of the hypoxic zone in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico was conducted on several cruises between April 2004 and May 2005. Surface water MMHg concentrations were low...

  1. Literature and information related to the natural resources of the North Aleutian Basin of Alaska.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stull, E.A.; Hlohowskyj, I.; LaGory, K. E.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The North Aleutian Basin Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) is a large geographic area with significant natural resources. The Basin includes most of the southeastern part of the Bering Sea Outer Continental Shelf, including all of Bristol Bay. The area supports important habitat for a wide variety of species and globally significant habitat for birds and marine mammals, including several federally listed species. Villages and communities of the Alaska Peninsula and other areas bordering or near the Basin rely on its natural resources (especially commercial and subsistence fishing) for much of their sustenance and livelihood. The offshore area of the North Aleutian Basin is considered to have important hydrocarbon reserves, especially natural gas. In 2006, the MMS released a draft proposed program, 'Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program, 2007-2012' and an accompanying draft programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS). The draft proposed program identified two lease sales proposed in the North Aleutian Basin in 2010 and 2012, subject to restrictions. The area proposed for leasing in the Basin was restricted to the Sale 92 Area in the southwestern portion. Additional EISs will be needed to evaluate the potential effects of specific lease actions, exploration activities, and development and production plans in the Basin. A full range of updated multidisciplinary scientific information will be needed to address oceanography, fate and effects of oil spills, marine ecosystems, fish, fisheries, birds, marine mammals, socioeconomics, and subsistence in the Basin. Scientific staff at Argonne National Laboratory were contracted to assist MMS with identifying and prioritizing information needs related to potential future oil and gas leasing and development activities in the North Aleutian Basin. Argonne focused on three related tasks: (1) identify and gather relevant literature published since 1996, (2) synthesize and summarize the literature, and (3) identify and prioritize remaining information needs. To assist in the latter task, MMS convened the North Aleutian Basin Information Status and Research Planning Meeting (the Planning Meeting) in Anchorage, Alaska, from November 28 through December 1, 2006. That meeting and its results are described in 'Proceedings of the North Aleutian Basin Information Status and Research Planning Meeting' (the Planning Meeting report)1. Citations for recent literature (1996-2006) to support an assessment of the impacts of oil and gas development on natural, cultural, and socioeconomic resources in the North Aleutian Basin were entered in a database. The database, a series of Microsoft Excel spreadsheets with links to many of the reference materials, was provided to MMS prior to the Planning Meeting and was made available for participants to use during the meeting. Many types of references were identified and collected from the literature, such as workshop and symposium proceedings, personal web pages, web pages of government and nongovernmental organizations, EISs, books and articles reporting research results, regulatory documents, technical reports, newspaper and newsletter articles, and theses and dissertations. The current report provides (1) a brief overview of the literature; (2) descriptions (in tabular form) of the databased references, including geographic area covered, topic, and species (where relevant); (3) synopses of the contents of the referenced documents and web pages; and (4) a full citation for each reference. At the Planning Meeting, subject matter experts with research experience in the North Aleutian Basin presented overviews of the area's resources, including oceanography, fish and shellfish populations, federal fisheries, commercial fishery economics, community socioeconomics, subsistence, seabirds and shorebirds, waterfowl, seals and sea lions, cetaceans, sea otters, and walruses. These presentations characterized the status of the resource, the current state of knowledge on the topic, and information needs related to an assessment of

  2. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frohne, K.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Boswell, R. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  3. Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Homes built the destruction of fire-tolerant trees if a wildfire moves through the area. Creating fuel breaks (such ignite it. When ERC grows in forests and wood- lands, it acts as a ladder fuel to allow fire to climb

  4. Fourier grain-shape analysis of quartz sand from the eastern and central Santa Barbara Littoral Cell, southern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, R.A.; Osborne, R.H. (Univ. of South California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shape composition of detrital quartz grains from the medium sand fraction of 61 samples collected from the eastern and central Santa Barbara Littoral Cell was determined using Fourier analysis. Nine sample sets were obtained by various organizations from the shoreface (0 to [minus]9 m MLLW) of beaches, rivers, coastal cliffs and dunes as well as the inner continental shelf ([minus]16 to [minus]23 m MLLW) between June, 1969 and March, 1992. The Ventura and Santa Clara River samples are statistically homogeneous with respect to quartz grain shape. Littoral and inner shelf samples from the Ventura area are composed principally of resedimented sand from the Ventura and Santa Clara Rivers, but also contain sand from an unidentified source exposed on the adjacent inner shelf. No statistically significant change in the grain-shape composition of upper shoreface (0 m MLLW) samples in the Ventura area occurs within the observed sample sets, which represent a period of 23 years. Seasonal variation within the Ventura area is marked by an increase in the abundance of more elongate grains on the upper shoreface during the summer months, and a decrease in the abundance of such grains during the oceanographic winter. The increase in more elongate grains during the summer most likely reflects the onshore transport of shelf-derived grains through ridge and runnel systems, whereas the decrease in the abundance of such grains reflects mixing with pre-existing backshore sand containing more equate grains during winter storms. The selective transport of more elongate grains is evidenced by the enrichment of such grains within Ventura Harbor ([minus]7 m MLLW).

  5. Advanced Chemistry Basins Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

    2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

  6. Cyclic transgressive and regressive sequences and their association with hydrocarbons, Sirte Basin, Libya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abushagar, S.A.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sirte basin was developed in north Africa between the Tethys Sea and the Saharan shield during Late Cretaceous time and was the site of mixed siliciclastic and carbonate deposition throughout the Tertiary. A series of bioclastic limestones and shales was deposited around the basin rim. Shales were confined to the low-energy zones in the basin, whereas carbonates were deposited on the shelf areas. The Farrud Formation (equivalent to the Beda Formation in the central part) is the main reservoir for oil found in the western portion of the basin. The faunal assemblages and lithologies recognized in this formation apparently reflect a very shallow marine depositional environment. Source rocks are developed in organic-rich, transgressive shales (Dahra and Hagfa). Moldic, fenestral, and intraparticle porosities are the most common types recognized in the carbonate reservoirs of the Farrud Formation. Permeability is developed in part by processes such as dolomitization, leaching, and fracturing in the two progradational, regressive carbonate cycles, resulting in the exceptional Ghani field reservoirs. Hydrocarbons were trapped in these reservoirs due to the presence of a supratidal anhydrite cap rock.

  7. RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Caldwell

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

  8. Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany OilInformationPre-TaxShelf Lands Act Jump to:

  9. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Smackover petroleum system characterization and modeling. The necessary software applications have been acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  10. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modelling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Smackover petroleum system characterization and modeling. The necessary software applications have been acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  11. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 2 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Mesozoic (Bossier) petroleum system characterization and modeling and refined resource assessment. The necessary software applications have been acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  12. Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal research effort for Year 1 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Smackover petroleum system characterization and modeling. The necessary software applications are in the process of being acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

  13. K-Basins design guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roe, N.R.; Mills, W.C.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the design guidelines is to enable SNF and K Basin personnel to complete fuel and sludge removal, and basin water mitigation by providing engineering guidance for equipment design for the fuel basin, facility modifications (upgrades), remote tools, and new processes. It is not intended to be a purchase order reference for vendors. The document identifies materials, methods, and components that work at K Basins; it also Provides design input and a technical review process to facilitate project interfaces with operations in K Basins. This document is intended to compliment other engineering documentation used at K Basins and throughout the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. Significant provisions, which are incorporated, include portions of the following: General Design Criteria (DOE 1989), Standard Engineering Practices (WHC-CM-6-1), Engineering Practices Guidelines (WHC 1994b), Hanford Plant Standards (DOE-RL 1989), Safety Analysis Manual (WHC-CM-4-46), and Radiological Design Guide (WHC 1994f). Documents (requirements) essential to the engineering design projects at K Basins are referenced in the guidelines.

  14. Geology of eastern Smith Lake ore trend, Grants mineral belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ristorcelli, S.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sandstones in the Brushy Basin Member of the Morrison Formation (Jurassic) are the ore-bearing horizons of the eastern Smith Lake area. The Brushy Basin Member in this district consists of three sandstones with interbedded mudstones. Only the lower two sandstones contain ore. The sandstones are fine to coarse grained, well rounded, and arkosic, representing continental stream sediments. The lower sandstone contains rollfront ore. The redox interface is laterally extensive and well defined, extending at least 7 mi (11 km) west of the Bluewater fault zone. The ore generally occurs at the redox boundary but occasionally will be up to 1500 ft (450 m) updip. Limonitic alteration, where present, is downdip from the hematitic zone and is 100-1,500 ft (30 to 450 m) wide. The middle sandstone contains both trend ore and roll-front ore. The trend ore occurs downdip from the redox front in unoxidized ground. The redox front in the middle sand is also laterally extensive but displays a wedge shape, rather than a C shape. The clay assemblages of the two types of ore are different: the trend ore occurs in sands with the pore spaces filled with kaolinite; the roll-front ore is associated with altered illite-montmorillonite as grain coatings. Hematitic alteration is asociated with the latter. A second stage of kaolinite coats the illite-montmorillonite. Two periods of mineralization are suggested, but no absolute dates are known. The trend ore is the oldest (Jurassic) and is similar to the ore found in unoxidized ground elsewhere in the Grants region. The rollfront ore could be Laramide or post-Laramide because of its association with local Laramide structures.

  15. Jurassic sequence stratigraphy of the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain: Applications to hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tew, B.H.; Mancini, E.A.; Mink, R.M. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on regional stratigraphic and sedimentologic data, three unconformity-bounded depositional sequences associated with cycles of relative sea-level change and coastal onlap are recognized for Jurassic strata in the eastern Gulf Coastal Plain area. These sequences are designated, in ascending order, the LZAGC (Lower Zuni A Gulf Coast)-3.1, the LZAGC-4.1, and the LZAGC-4.2 sequences and include Callovian through Kimmeridgian Stage strata. An understanding of the relationship of Jurassic reservoirs to sequence stratigraphy can serve as an aid to hydrocarbon exploration in the eastern gulf area. The most extensive and productive Jurassic hydrocarbon reservoirs in the study area occur within the progradational, regressive highstand deposits of the LZAGC-3.1 and LZAGC-4.1 depositional sequences. For example, the majority of Norphlet sandstone reservoirs in the onshore and offshore Alabama area are interpreted to have accumulated in eolian dune, interdune, and wadi (fluvial) depositional environments, which occurred in association with the highstand regressive system of the LZAGC-3.1 sequence. The most important Smackover reservoirs generally consist of partially to completely dolomitized ooid and peloid packstones and grainstones in the upper portion of the unit. These reservoirs occur in subtidal to supratidal, shoaling-upward carbonate mudstone to grainstone cycles in the highstand regressive system of the LZAGC-4.1 sequence. In addition, minor reservoirs that are discontinuous and not well developed are associated with the shelf margin and transgressive systems of the LZAGC-4.1.

  16. Operational Performance of Sedimentation Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bleything, Matthew D.

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    and sludge pumps and clog pipes. (Lee, 2007) Composition of grit varies widely, with moisture content ranging from 13 to 63 percent, and volatile content ranging from 1 to 56 percent. The specific gravity of clean grit particles may be as high as 2... for unobstructed flow of the inlet water into the basin when the basin was almost full to capacity with sediment. The outlet of the sediment basin is an oil/water separator. This is for oil leaks and spills from the plant island. The design called...

  17. Carbonate depositional environments and facies of the shelf margin and outer shelf, Lower Cretaceous Sligo Formation, south Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkland, Brenda Lee

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -resistant reefs of the Sligo Formation. The Permian Capitan reef complex in southeastern New Mexico is an ancient analog for low-lying rudist banks and shoal deposits of the Sligo Formation. Porosity in rocks of the Sligo shelf margin is largely secondary.... I am very grateful to Tenneco for their financial support over the course of this study; I wish to thank Mr. R. D. Beardsly for his assistance in obtaining this support. Mr. Edward H. McGlasson of Mobil Producing Texas and New Mexico generously...

  18. Distribution of Clay Minerals in Lower Cook Inlet and Kodiak Shelf Sediment, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution of Clay Minerals in Lower Cook Inlet and Kodiak Shelf Sediment, Alaska James R. llein-five surface samples from lower Cook Inlet and forty-three from Kodiak shelf, Alaska, were analyzed for clay percentages of clay minerals. This is because modern ocean currents vigorously rework surficial sediment

  19. The ventilation of near-bottom shelf waters in the North-Western Black Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Georgy

    The ventilation of near-bottom shelf waters in the North-Western Black Sea Georgy Shapiro, Fred of these areas to be ventilated by horizontal ex- changes during that period is assessed by a long-term time however be ventilated horizontally with deep-sea waters through isopycnal exchanges across the shelf break

  20. WAVE-SEDIMENT INTERACTION ON A MUDDY SHELF A. Sheremet1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheremet, Alexandru

    WAVE-SEDIMENT INTERACTION ON A MUDDY SHELF A. Sheremet1 , A. J. Mehta2 , and J. M. Kaihatu3-induced wave dissipation and 3- wave interactions on wave evolution over muddy environments. The model is used to simulate wave conditions typical for a muddy shallow shelf. Mud-induced long-wave dissipation introduces

  1. How ice shelf morphology controls basal melting Christopher M. Little,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppenheimer, Michael

    temperature, circulation, and mixing in the open ocean and the coupling of this external forcing to the sub shelf base, ice shelf morphology plays a critical role in linking external, subsurface heat sources idealized ice shelves, forced with subsurface ocean temperatures ranging from 2.0C to 1.5C. In the sub

  2. The distribution and optical response of particles on the continental shelf and their relationship to cross-isopycnal mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakey, Joshua C.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationships of optics, particles, and hydrography to shelf mixing processes were analyzed on a mid-continental shelf south of New England. The objectives were to characterize the types, sizes and sources of particles ...

  3. Disposal of produced waters: Undergrown injection option in the Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, I.; Weller, T.F.; Anthony, R.V. (United Energy Development Consultants, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Dziewulski, D. (BioIndustrial Technologies, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Lorenzen, J. (ResTech, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Frantz, J.H. Jr. (S.A. Holditch Associates, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposal of large volumes of water produced simultaneously with coal-bed methane is a costly, environmentally sensitive problem. Underground injection into deeper, naturally fractured, low-porosity formations is feasible provided that the total dissolved solids level of these formation waters comply with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. Greater fracture density in proximity to structures formed by Appalachian and Ouachita tectonism, along with a higher total dissolved solids level in both the production and injection formation waters, occurs in the eastern, southern, and northern margins of the coal-bed methane (CBM) area of the Black Warrior basin in Alabama. Injection permeability is developed where fractures intersect formations with suitable lithologies and thickness. Initial results indicate that the lower Pottsville sands, which thicken to the south, have the highest initial injection potential, although these sands appear dirty and tight on the logs. Normal faulting and matrix porosity, in addition to fracturing, may increase permeability in this formation. In the shallower, northern edge of the CBM area, thin-bedded Mississippian sands with high porosity, such as the Hartzelle, may be present. Injection potential also occurs in the fractured Devonian chert and silecous carbonate lithologies in the Upper Silurian where they thicken to the southwest, and in sandy carbonate lithologies in the undifferentiated Silurian and Ordovician at the eastern margin of the overthrust. The Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Formation has injection potential in a 6-mi wide zone at the eastern margin of the basin, where the upper Knox is dolomitized below the unconformity.

  4. Alabama successes spur interest in eastern Gulf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redden, J.

    1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shallow waters of the eastern fringe of the Gulf of Mexico are becoming a world-class offshore gas play. Spurred by the success ratio offshore Alabama, the water off Mississippi and Florida are drawing intense interest as oil companies attempt to extend the prolific Norphlet formation. Sitting at the heart of the recent interest in the eastern Gulf are the state and federal waters off Alabama. Exploration and drilling activity in the area are discussed.

  5. Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

  6. Influence of the Atchafalaya River on recent evolution of the chenier-plain inner continental shelf, northern Gulf of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    distribution on the inner shelf and patterns of shoreline accretion and retreat on the chenier plain. Mudflat

  7. Exploration in Jurassic of North Mafla, eastern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemmer, D.A.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploration in North Mafla focuses on general categories of prospects, potential reservoirs and their associated facies, and seismic modeling of available well control. Jurassic prospects in North Mafla can be classified into four general categories: (1) basement-related structures: (2) closures associated with the Pensacola-Destin peripheral fault trend, (3) salt anticlines, and (4) prospects associated with the interregional structural highs. Each of these categories can be related to documented, predictable, and repeated patterns of hydrocarbon accumulations in east Texas, north Louisiana, Mississippian, Alabama, and Florida. The primary objectives in North Mafla are the Jurassic Smackover carbonates and Norphlet sands at depths ranging rom 15,000 to 25,000 ft. Major gas accumulations in the Norphlet around Mobile Bay are separated from thicker sequences of Norphlet sands in the De Soto Salt basin by the offshore extension of the Pensacola arch. Seismic geometries suggest that Smackover high-energy carbonates may have been deposited on the crest of some of these thick Norphlet sands. Seismic modeling indicates that a high-amplitude, laterally continuous event associated with a Norphlet-Louann Salt contact is dependent on the presence of Pine Hill anhydrite member of the Louann Salt. In addition, seismic reflection geometries indicate that the Norphlet sandstone thickens from +/- 300 ft on the eastern flank of the Destin Dome to nearly 1000 ft nearby. Although drilling in the lightly explored Norch Mafla area has yielded few substantive results to date, the elements necessary for significant hydrocarbon accumulations are known to exist.

  8. Study of Reservoir Heterogencities and Structural Features Affecting Production in the Shallow Oil Zone, Eastern Elk Hills Area, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janice Gillespie

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Late Neogene (Plio-Pleistocene) shallow marine strata of the western Bakersfield Arch and Elk Hills produce hydrocarbons from several different reservoirs. This project focuses on the shallow marine deposits of the Gusher and Calitroleum reservoirs in the Lower Shallow Oil Zone (LSOZ). In the eastern part of the study area on the Bakersfield Arch at North and South Coles Levee field and in two wells in easternmost Elk Hills, the LSOZ reservoirs produce dry (predominantly methane) gas. In structurally higher locations in western Elk Hills, the LSOZ produces oil and associated gas. Gas analyses show that gas from the eastern LSOZ is bacterial and formed in place in the reservoirs, whereas gas associated with oil in the western part of the study area is thermogenic and migrated into the sands from deeper in the basin. Regional mapping shows that the gas-bearing LSOZ sands in the Coles Levee and easternmost Elk Hills area are sourced from the Sierra Nevada to the east whereas the oil-bearing sands in western Elk Hills appear to be sourced from the west. The eastern Elk Hills area occupied the basin depocenter, farthest from either source area. As a result, it collected mainly low-permeability offshore shale deposits. This sand-poor depocenter provides an effective barrier to the updip migration of gases from east to west. The role of small, listric normal faults as migration barriers is more ambiguous. Because our gas analyses show that the gas in the eastern LSOZ reservoirs is bacterial, it likely formed in-place near the reservoirs and did not have to migrate far. Therefore, the gas could have been generated after faulting and accumulated within the fault blocks as localized pools. However, bacterial gas is present in both the eastern AND western parts of Elk Hills in the Dry Gas Zone (DGZ) near the top of the stratigraphic section even though the measured fault displacement is greatest in this zone. Bacterial gas is not present in the west in the deeper LSOZ which has less measured fault displacement. The main difference between the DGZ and the LSOZ appears to be the presence of a sandpoor area in the LSOZ in eastern Elk Hills. The lack of permeable migration pathways in this area would not allow eastern bacterial gas to migrate farther updip into western Elk Hills. A similar sand-poor area does not appear to exist in the DGZ but future research may be necessary to verify this.

  9. Beta diversity of angiosperms in temperate floras of eastern Asia and eastern North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peet, Robert K.

    LETTER Beta diversity of angiosperms in temperate floras of eastern Asia and eastern North America The diversity of a region reflects both local diversity and the turnover of species (beta diversity) between, we calculated beta diversity as the slope of the relationship between the log of species similarity

  10. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jr., Chidsey, Thomas C.; Allison, M. Lee

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced- oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  11. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey Jr., Thomas C.

    2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox Basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-(CO2-) miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  12. Tectonic Setting and Characteristics of Natural Fractures in MesaVerde and Dakota Reservoirs of the San Juan Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LORENZ,JOHN C.; COOPER,SCOTT P.

    2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cretaceous strata that fill the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico and southwestern Colorado were shortened in a generally N-S to NN13-SSW direction during the Laramide orogeny. This shortening was the result of compression of the strata between southward indentation of the San Juan Uplift at the north edge of the basin and northward to northeastward indentation of the Zuni Uplift from the south. Right-lateral strike-slip motion was concentrated at the eastern and western basin margins of the basin to form the Hogback Monocline and the Nacimiento Uplift at the same time, and small amounts of shear may have been pervasive within the basin as well. Vertical extension fractures, striking N-S to NNE-SSW with local variations (parallel to the Laramide maximum horizontal compressive stress), formed in both Mesaverde and Dakota sandstones under this system, and are found in outcrops and in the subsurface of the San Juan Basin. The immature Mesaverde sandstones typically contain relatively long, irregular, vertical extension fractures, whereas the quartzitic Dakota sandstones contain more numerous, shorter, sub-parallel, closely spaced, extension fractures. Conjugate shear planes in several orientations are also present locally in the Dakota strata.

  13. On the wave energy potential of Western Black Sea shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galabov, Vasko

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study we evaluate the approaches to estimate the wave energy potential of the western Black Sea shelf with numerical models. For the purpose of our evaluation and due to the lack of long time series of measurements in the selected area of the Black Sea, we compare the modeled mean wave power flux output from the SWAN wave model with the only available long term measurements from the buoy of Gelendzhik for the period 1997-2003 (with gaps). The forcing meteorological data for the numerical wave models for the selected years is extracted from the ERA Interim reanalysis of ECMWF (European Centre for Medium range Forecasts). For the year 2003 we also compare the estimated wave power with the modeled by SWAN, using ALADIN regional atmospheric model winds. We try to identify the shortcomings and limitations of the numerical modeling approach to the evaluation of the wave energy potential in Black Sea.

  14. Potential alternative energy technologies on the Outer Continental Shelf.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Environmental Assessment

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical memorandum (TM) describes the technology requirements for three alternative energy technologies for which pilot and/or commercial projects on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) are likely to be proposed within the next five to seven years. For each of the alternative technologies--wind, wave, and ocean current--the TM first presents an overview. After each technology-specific overview, it describes the technology requirements for four development phases: site monitoring and testing, construction, operation, and decommissioning. For each phase, the report covers the following topics (where data are available): facility description, electricity generated, ocean area (surface and bottom) occupied, resource requirements, emissions and noise sources, hazardous materials stored or used, transportation requirements, and accident potential. Where appropriate, the TM distinguishes between pilot-scale (or demonstration-scale) facilities and commercial-scale facilities.

  15. Lateral Drilling and Completion Technologies for Shallow-Shelf Carbonates of the Red River and Ratcliffe Formations, Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Gibbons; Larry A. Carrell; Richard D. George

    1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Luff Exploration Company (LEC) focused on involvement in technologies being developed utilizing horizontal drilling concepts to enhance oil- well productivity starting in 1992. Initial efforts were directed toward high-pressure lateral jetting techniques to be applied in existing vertical wells. After involvement in several failed field attempts with jetting technologies, emphasis shifted to application of emerging technologies for drilling short-radius laterals in existing wellbores and medium-radius technologies in new wells. These lateral drilling technologies were applied in the Mississippi Ratcliffe and Ordovician Red River formations at depths of 2590 to 2890 m (8500 to 9500 ft) in Richland Co., MT; Bowman Co., ND; and Harding Co., SD.

  16. Fuel storage basin seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanjilal, S.K.; Winkel, B.V.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105-KE and 105-KW Fuel Storage Basins were constructed more than 35 years ago as repositories for irradiated fuel from the K East and K West Reactors. Currently, the basins contain irradiated fuel from the N Reactor. To continue to use the basins as desired, seismic adequacy in accordance with current US Department of Energy facility requirements must be demonstrated. The 105-KE and 105-KW Basins are reinforced concrete, belowground reservoirs with a 16-ft water depth. The entire water retention boundary, which currently includes a portion of the adjacent reactor buildings, must be qualified for the Hanford Site design basis earthquake. The reactor building interface joints are sealed against leakage with rubber water stops. Demonstration of the seismic adequacy of these interface joints was initially identified as a key issue in the seismic qualification effort. The issue of water leakage through seismicly induced cracks was also investigated. This issue, coupled with the relatively complex geometry of the basins, dictated a need for three-dimensional modeling. A three-dimensional soil/structure interaction model was developed with the SASSI computer code. The development of three-dimensional models of the interfacing structures using the ANSYS code was also found to be necessary. 8 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Paleotectonic controls on reservoir distribution in Phosphoria formation and related strata, Bighorn basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean, J.S.; Inden, R.F.; Sturm, S.D.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porosity development and reservoir distribution in the Permian rocks of the Bighorn basin were strongly controlled by the first- and second-order paleotectonic elements active in the Wyoming shelf. First-order elements, including the Greybull arch, Bighorn high, and an extension of the Yellowstone high, defined the basin geometry and regional paleogeography, influenced the distribution of clastic vs. carbonate lithofacies, and controlled the areal extent and degree of porosity enhancing dolomitization. Second-order tectonic features, related to drape and/or movement along syndepositional basement fault systems, also influenced patterns of Permian sedimentation by providing localized sites of differential subsidence and subtle but persistent paleobathymetric relief. Among the most significant exploration targets in the basin are the trends of peritidal and restricted marine reservoirs in the Franson and Ervay Members. Porous dolomites in these facies developed within and adjacent to two separate shoaling trends. Contrary to popular belief, these trends do not represent true carbonate shorelines. Rather, they define a fairway of discontinuous island-peninsula complexes bounded on the west by more open-marine carbonates and on the east by a broad, restricted lagoon or salina filled with subaqueous evaporites and siliciclastics. The trends of the peritidal facies are centered over underlying tectonic elements. The relatively unexplored fairway in the Franson Member is centered over a northwest-trending extension of the Yellowstone high. Equivalent facies in the Ervay are offset to the east, paralleling the faulted western margin of the ancestral Bighorn high.

  18. Comparison of high-pressure CO2 sorption isotherms on Eastern and Western US coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanov, V; Hur, T -B; Fazio, J; Howard, B

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate estimation of carbon dioxide (CO2) sorption capacity of coal is important for planning the CO2 sequestration efforts. In this work, we investigated sorption and swelling behavior of several Eastern and Western US coal samples from the Central Appalachian Basin and from San Juan Basin. The CO2 sorption isotherms have been completed at 55C for as received and dried samples. The role of mineral components in coal, the coal swelling, the effects of temperature and moisture, and the error propagation have been analyzed. Changes in void volume due to dewatering and other factors such as temporary caging of carbon dioxide molecules in coal matrix were identified among the main factors affecting accuracy of the carbon dioxide sorption isotherms. The (helium) void volume in the sample cells was measured before and after the sorption isotherm experiments and was used to build the volume-corrected data plots.

  19. Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states...

  20. Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south central Kyrgyzstan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bookhagen, Bodo

    Basin width control of faulting in the Naryn Basin, south central Kyrgyzstan Joseph K. Goode,1 the controls on this intramontane basin deformation, we study the Naryn Basin of south central Kyrgyzstan central Kyrgyzstan, Tectonics, 30, TC6009, doi:10.1029/2011TC002910. 1. Introduction [2] Deformation

  1. Statistical Analysis and Dynamic Visualization of Travis Peak Production in the Eastern Texas Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayanbule, Babafemi O.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    , integrating data from various sources. This research will attempt to do just that for wells producing from the Travis Peak formation. Using data from HPDI L.L.C., (www.hpdi.com) a visual representation was created for the areal distribution of peak gas rates...

  2. File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,Size of thisAppalach3-eastPA-BOE.pdf,600 ×6,600 ×

  3. File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,Size of thisAppalach3-eastPA-BOE.pdf,600 ×6,600 ×Nevada

  4. File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to: navigation,Size of thisAppalach3-eastPA-BOE.pdf,600 ×6,600 ×Nevada

  5. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Initial Results (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloom, A.; Townsend, A.; Hummon, M.; Weekley, A.; Clark, K.; King, J.

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This poster presents an overview of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study, which aims to answer critical questions about the future of the Eastern Interconnection under high levels of solar and wind generation penetration.

  6. alabama eastern gulf: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The angiosperm flora of eastern Asia (EAS) is roughly twice as rich as that of eastern North America (ENA), in spite of similar area and climate. Using provincestate-level...

  7. Study of gas production potential of New Albany Shale (group) in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasenmueller, N.R.; Boberg, W.S.; Comer, J.; Smidchens, Z. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (United States)); Frankie, W.T.; Lumm, D.K. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, J.D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) is recognized as both a source rock and gas-producing reservoir in the Illinois basin. The first gas discovery was made in 1885, and was followed by the development of several small fields in Harrison County, Indiana, and Meade County, Kentucky. Recently, exploration for and production of New Albany gas has been encouraged by the IRS Section 29 tax credit. To identify technology gaps that have restricted the development of gas production form the shale gas resource in the basin, the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC), composed of the Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky geological surveys, is conducting a cooperative research project with the Gas Research Institute (GRI). An earlier study of the geological and geochemical aspects of the New Albany was conducted during 1976-1978 as part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The current IBC/GRI study is designed to update and reinterpret EGSP data and incorporate new data obtained since 1978. During the project, relationships between gas production and basement structures are being emphasized by constructing cross sections and maps showing thickness, structure, basement features, and thermal maturity. The results of the project will be published in a comprehensive final report in 1992. The information will provide a sound geological basis for ongoing shale-gas research, exploration, and development in the basin.

  8. The Climate of the South Platte Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Climate of the South Platte Basin Colorado Climate Center http://climate.atmos.colostate.edu #12;Key Features of the Climate of the South Platte Basin #12;Temperature Cold winters Hot summers #12;Precipitation Monthly Average Precipitation for Selected Sites in the South Platte Basin 0.00 0

  9. Geological Modeling of Dahomey and Liberian Basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gbadamosi, Hakeem B.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is to study two Basins of the Gulf of Guinea (GoG), namely the Dahomey and the Liberian Basins. These Basins are located in the northern part of the GoG, where oil and gas exploration has significantly increased...

  10. Supplementary information on K-Basin sludges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MAKENAS, B.J.

    1999-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three previous documents in this series have been published covering the analysis of: K East Basin Floor and Pit Sludge, K East Basin Canister Sludge, and K West Basin Canister Sludge. Since their publication, additional data have been acquired and analyses performed. It is the purpose of this volume to summarize the additional insights gained in the interim time period.

  11. Evidence for Gassy Sediments on the Inner Shelf of SE Korea From Geoacoustic Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Gwang H. Lee 6 , Young K. Seo 5 1 * Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, University of Hawaii, P.O.S.T. Bldg Properties; Attenuation; Biodegradation; Bubbles; Core Analysis; Gassy Sediments; SE Korea Shelf #12

  12. Wind induced circulation on the outer continental shelf of Texas, spring 1982

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beard, Daniel Walker

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    current meters were put into the water along the 95'W meridian near the shelf break. Each taut-line mooring consisted of an anchor, acoustic releases, floatation devices, and Hydroproduct's 550 Savonius type recording current meters. In addition, some...

  13. Sediment resuspension over a continental shelf during Hurricanes Edouard and Hortense

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    Sediment resuspension over a continental shelf during Hurricanes Edouard and Hortense G. C. Chang physical and optical measurements have captured sediment resuspension associated with two hurricanes. Sediment resuspension associated with Hurricane Edouard was forced by combined current and wave processes

  14. Shelf-derived iron inputs drive biological productivity in the southern Drake Passage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as large as inputs from mineral dust. Sediment resuspension events [Luther and Wu, 1997; Johnson et al al., 2004] lead to higher concentrations in coastal and shelf waters. It appears that in the Southern

  15. Continental Shelf Research 22 (2002) 18871895 Morphological modelling of intertidal mudflats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogg, Andrew

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continental Shelf Research 22 (2002) 18871895 Morphological modelling of intertidal mudflats currents on an intertidal mudflat. The model is integrated numerically to determine the long mudflats; Intertidal sedimentation; Mathematical models; Morphodynamics 1. Introduction The systematic

  16. Seafloor ripples created by waves from hurricane Ivan on the west Florida shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowers, Colleen Marie

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have shown that the presence of sand ripples on the seabed improves sonar detection of buried mines at sub-critical angles. Sidescan sonar data of ripples off on the west Florida shelf were collected as part ...

  17. Remote sensing of submerged objects and geomorphology in continental shelf waters with acoustic waveguide scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratilal, Purnima, 1971-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long range imaging of submerged objects, seafloor and sub-seafloor geomorphology in continental shelf waters using an active sonar system is explored experimentally and theoretically. A unified model for 3-D object ...

  18. Mesozoic evolution of the northeast African shelf margin, Libya and Egypt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aadland, R.K.; Schamel, S.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present tectonic features of the northeast African shelf margin between the Nile delta and the Gulf of Sirte are products of (1) precursory late Paleozoic basement arches, (2) early Mesozoic rifting and plate separation, and (3) Late Cretaceous structural inversion. Isopach and structural maps, cross sections, and sediment accumulation (geohistory) curves constructed from 89 wells in the Western Desert and 27 wells in northeastern Libya depict the structural and stratigraphic development of the northeast African shelf margin.

  19. Surface sediment analysis of five carbonate banks on the Texas continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Susanne E

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SURFACE SEDIMENT ANALYSIS OF FIVE CARBONATE BANKS ON THE TEXAS CONTINENTAL SHELF A Thesis by Susanne E. Cunningham Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AcM University In partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... Member Member December 1977 ABSTRACT SURFACE SEDIMENT ANALYSIS OF FIVE CARBONATE BANKS ON THE TEXAS CONTINENTAL SHELF (December 1977) Susanne E. Cunningham, B, S. , Indiana University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. William Bryant The five...

  20. Origin and distribution of sand types, northeastern U.S. Atlantic continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leschak, Pamela

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the northeastern U. S. Atlantic continental shelf during the maximum advance of the Laurentide ice sheet in the late Pleistocene. . . . . . 18 Summary map of surface tidal currents and bottom current flow on the northeastern U. S. Atlantic conti- nental shelf... is very irregular and consists of a series of large, northwest-trending tidal ridges separated by flat-floored troughs (Stewart and Jordan, 1964; Uchupi, 1968). The southern half of the bank's surface is a smooth, featureless plain that slopes gently...

  1. Genetic classification of petroleum basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demaison, G.; Huizinga, B.J.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rather than relying on a descriptive geologic approach, this genetic classification is based on the universal laws that control processes of petroleum formation, migration, and entrapment. Petroleum basins or systems are defined as dynamic petroleum-generating and concentrating physico-chemical systems functioning on a geologic space and time scale. A petroleum system results from the combination of a generative subsystem (or hydrocarbon kitchen), essentially controlled by chemical processes, and a migration-entrapment subsystem, controlled by physical processes. The generative subsystem provides a certain supply of petroleum to the basin during a given geologic time span. The migration-entrapment subsystem receives petroleum and distributes it in a manner that can lead either to dispersion and loss or to concentration of the regional charge into economic accumulations. The authors classification scheme for petroleum basins rests on a simple working nomenclature consisting of the following qualifiers: (1) charge factor: undercharged, normally charged, or supercharged, (2) migration drainage factor: vertically drained or laterally drained, and (3) entrapment factor: low impedance or high impedance. Examples chosen from an extensive roster of documented petroleum basins are reviewed to explain the proposed classification.

  2. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Annual report, June 10, 1995--June 9, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrell, L.A.; Sippel, M.A.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in Red River and Ratcliffe shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing three-dimensional and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with extended-reach jetting lance and other ultra-short-radius lateral technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil in place will result in additional oil recovery by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

  3. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston basin carbonates. Annual report, June 10, 1994--June 9, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, M.; Zinke, S.; Magruder, G.; Eby, D.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in Red River and Ratcliffe shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing three-dimensional and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with extended-reach jetting lance and other ultra-short-radius lateral technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil in place will result in additional oil recovery by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

  4. Aragonite crusts and pisolites beneath dolomitic tepees, Lake MacLeod evaporate basin, Western Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Handford, C.R.; Kendall, A.C.; Dunham, J.B.; Logan, B.W.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research currently being conducted by the Sedimentology and Marine Geology Group, under Brian W. Logan at the University of Western Australia, has recently concentrated on Lake MacLeod, a 2000 km/sup 2/ (770 mi/sup 2/) coastal salina on the western coast of Australia. This work has shown that this evaporite basin, which is 3 to 4 m (10 to 13 ft) below sea level, is separated from the Indian Ocean by a topographic barrier, but seawater under hydrostatic head, seeps freely through the barrier and discharges from several vents and springs in a carbonate mud flat at the north end of the basin. From there, seawater flows slowly across the basin, evaporating and depositing carbonate, gypsum, and ephemeral halite. About 10 to 12 m (33 to 39 ft) of evaporites have been deposited in the past 5300 years. In July 1982, the authors visited the carbonate mud flats and discovered abundant aragonite pisolites and botryoidal-mammillary crusts of fibrous aragonite cement beneath lily-pad tepee slabs of cemented protodolomite. Thick aragonite crusts cover both the undersides of lily-pad slabs and the lithified floors of tepees. Crusts covering the floors are more botryoidal and consist of both aragonite nubs and mounds (0.2 to 2.5 cm, 0.08 to 1 in., in diameter), and a few scattered, loose pisolites, several millimeters in diameter. The manner in which crusts, pisolites, and tepees occur at Lake MacLeod raises the possibility that they and their ancient counterparts from the Permian basin share a common origin. Perhaps Permian pisolites and aragonite crusts formed beneath cemented slabs of peritidal sediments in tepees bathed by marine water which seeped across exposed portions of the shelf crest.

  5. Application of Advanced Exploration Technologies for the Development of Mancos Formation Oil Reservoirs, Jicarilla Apache Indian Nation, San Juan Basin, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, Scott; Billingsley, Randy

    2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to: (1) develop an exploration rationale for the Mancos shale in the north-eastern San Juan basin; (2) assess the regional prospectivity of the Mancos in the northern Nation lands based on that rationale; (3) identify specific leads in the northern Nation as appropriate; (4) forecast pro-forma production, reserves and economics for any leads identified; and (5) package and disseminate the results to attract investment in Mancos development on the Nation lands.

  6. Grain shape variations in late pleistocene and holocene fluvial and shelf sands in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico, and the relationship to source and shelf paleogeography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Katrina Diane

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -1044. Curray, J. R. , 1960, Sediments and history of Holocene transgression, continental shelf, northwest Gulf of Mexico: in Shepard, F. P. , F. B. Phleger, and T. H. van Andel, eds. Recent sediments, north- west Gulf of Mexico: Amer. Assoc. Petrol. Geol...

  7. THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

    2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

  8. Geologic assessment of natural gas from coal seams in the Warrior Basin, Alabama. Topical report, September 1985-September 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFall, K.S.; Wicks, D.E.; Kuuskraa, V.A.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a detailed geologic assessment of the coal deposits in the Warrior Basin area that have high potential for natural gas from coal seams. The estimate of the natural gas in place in the four major coal groups is 19.8 trillion cubic feet. Although the bulk of the gas in place is in the deeper areally extensive Black Creek and Mary Lee coal groups, the more shallow Pratt coal group also shows good potential for coal seam gas. The most concentrated areas of methane in place are in the eastern portion of the Warrior Basin. These areas coincide with thick accumulations of high rank coals and their associated higher gas contents. These areas also appear to have been structurally altered, leading to enhanced permeability to gas and water. Thus, the eastern portions of the basin appear more favorable for coalbed methane production due to high gas contents, attractive coal thicknesses, closely-spaced coal cleats and joints, and moderate depths to the coal horizons.

  9. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  10. Coal stratigraphy of deeper part of Black Warrior basin in Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, W.A.; Womack, S.H.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Warrior coal field of Alabama is stratigraphically in the upper part of the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation and structurally in the eastern part of the Black Warrior foreland basin. The productive coal beds extend southwestward from the mining area downdip into the deeper part of the Black Warrior structural basin. Because the deep part of the basin is beyond the limits of conventional coal exploration, study of the stratigraphy of coal beds must rely on data from petroleum wells. Relative abundance of coal can be stated in terms of numbers of beds, but because of the limitations of the available data, thicknesses of coals presently are not accurately determined. The lower sandstone-rich coal-poor part of the Pottsville has been interpreted as barrier sediments in the mining area. To the southwest in the deeper Black Warrior basin, coal beds are more numerous within the sandstone-dominated sequence. The coal-productive upper Pottsville is informally divided into coal groups each of which includes several coal beds. The Black Creek, Mary Lee, and Utley coal groups are associated with northeast-trending delta-distributary sandstones. The areas of most numerous coals also trend northeastward and are laterally adjacent to relatively thick distributary sandstones, suggesting coal accumulation in backswamp environments. The most numerous coals in the Pratt coal group are in an area that trends northwestward parallel with and southwest of a northwest-trending linear sandstone, suggesting coal accumulation in a back-barrier environment. Equivalents of the Cobb, Gwin, and Brookwood coal groups contain little coal in the deep part of the Black Warrior basin.

  11. Southern Rockies: eastern and northwestern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolson, J.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploratory drilling in eastern and northwestern Colorado closely paralleled that of 1979. Success factors, however, were higher, partially due to a greater number of marginal well completions following the increase in oil prices. Thirty-seven percent more exploratory wells were completed in 1980 than in 1979. Statewide exploratory success was 28.8% and the development well success rate was 78.3%, compared to 20.8% and 73.4%, respectively, in 1979. Cretaceous sandstones remained the primary target in northwestern and central Colorado. Shallow Niobrara gas provided the main play in eastern Colorado. Southeastern Colorado was the site of significant exploration and development drilling in Pennsylvanian Morrow trends. 1 figure, 3 tables.

  12. Oil and gas developments in eastern and northwestern Colorado in 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziegler, J.R.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploratory drilling in eastern and northwestern Colorado increased from 423 wells in 1980 to 696 wells in 1981. The success rate for exploratory wells increased from 28.8% in 1980 to 32.5% in 1981. Development drilling increased from 678 wells in 1980 to 885 wells in 1981. In the Denver basin, 527 exploratory wells were drilled during 1981 with a success rate of 31.3%. In northwestern Colorado, 100 exploratory wells were drilled with a success rate of 48.0%, and in southeastern Colorado 69 exploratory wells had an 18.8% success rate. Total drilling in the area was up 44% from 1980 with 1581 wells drilled in 1981. The overall success rate increased from 40.7% in 1980 to 59.4% in 1981. In the Denver basin, the greatest number of discoveries was made in the Lower Cretaceous Muddy J sandstone. Lower Cretaceous Muddy D sandstone, Upper Cretaceous Sussex sandstone, Codell sandstone, and Niobrara Chalk were also primary objectives. Cretaceous objectives were the primary targets in northwestern Colorado, and Pennsylvanian Morrow sandstones were the primary objectives in southeastern Colorado.

  13. Influence of Permian salt dissolution on distribution of shallow Niobrara gas fields, eastern Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldham, D.W.; Smosna, R.A. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface analysis of Permian salt and related strata in the shallow Niobrara gas area on the eastern flank of the Denver basin reveals that the location of faulted anticlines which produce gas from porous chalk is related to the occurrence of six Nippewalla Group (Leonardian) salt zones. Salt distribution is controlled by the configuration of evaporate basins during the Leonardian, truncation at a sub-Jurassic unconformity (which has completely removed Guadalupian salts), and post-Jurassic subsurface dissolution. Significant dissolution took place in response to Laramide orogeny and subsequent eastward regional groundwater flow within the Lyons (Cedar Hills) Sandstone aquifer. Initially, dissolution occurred along a regional facies change from sandstone to salt. Solution collapse allowed for cross-formational flow and removal of younger salts. Shallow Niobrara gas fields are situated above salt outliers or along regionally updip salt edges. No significant Niobrara production exists in areas where salt is absent. Structural relief across fields is related to Leonardian thickness variations, rather than subsalt offset. Seismic data reveal abrupt Leonardian thinning at the regionally updip limit of Eckley field, which has produced over 33 BCFG. Thickness of residual salt may be important in controlling the amount of gas trapped within the Niobrara. Where thick salts are preserved, structural relief is greater, the gas-water transition zone is thicker, and gas saturation is higher at the crests of faulted anticlines.

  14. Developments in eastern and northwestern Colorado in 1979. [Tabular data and map

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Root, M.R.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploratory drilling in eastern and northwestern Colorado decreased from 574 wells in 1978 to 427 in 1979. The success rate for exploratory wells increased from 12.5% in 1978 to 20.8% in 1979. Development drilling decreased from 653 wells in 1978 to 594 in 1979. In the Denver basin, 312 exploratory wells were drilled during 1979 with 16.0% success. In northwestern Colorado, 68 exploratory wells were drilled with 47.1% success. Southeastern Colorado had a 14.9% success from 47 exploratory wells drilled. Total drilling in the area decreased from 1227 wells in 1978 to 1021 in 1979. The overall success rate increased from 47.5% in 1978 to 51.4% in 1979. Lower Cretaceous Muddy D and J sandstones, Upper Cretaceous Sussex and Shannon sandstones, and Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Chalk were the primary objectives in the Denver basin. Cretaceous and Tertiary units were the main targets in northwestern Colorado, and Paleozoic strata remained the objective in southeastern Colorado.

  15. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Class II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, Thomas C.

    2000-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by field demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced-oil-recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels (23,850,000-31,800,000 m{sup 3}) of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place within the Navajo Nation, San Juan County, Utah.

  16. Tectonic history and analysis of structures in eastern Kansas and western Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berendsen, P.; Wilson, F.W. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Kansas Geological Survey)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orogenic events in and around the midcontinent in Proterozoic time were responsible for the formation of the dominant master set of younger northeast- and older northwest-trending faults that dominate the structure of the area today. Reactivation of these faults throughout geologic time gave rise to tectonic zones consisting of sets of anastomosing faults or other complex patterns. These zones are likely important in helping to determine the configuration of major uplifts and basins that involve the crust. The Nemaha tectonic zone defines the western boundary of both the Forest City and Cherokee basins, while a structural block delineated by the Chesapeake and Bolivar-Mansfield regional faults coincides with the approximate position of the Bourbon Arch, which is reflected in the thickness of Mississippian carbonate rocks. Rocks of the Ozark uplift began to be uplifted by the end of Maquoketa time. The uplift has historically been described as a landform, rather than a geologic structure. Hence, the extent and the boundaries of the uplift are ill-defined. The northeast-trending line forming the contact between Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks is commonly regarded as the western boundary. This boundary coincides with a major tectonic zone, extending northeastward from Oklahoma through Kansas and Missouri into at least southern Iowa. In the Tri-State area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri the zone is referred to as the Miami trough and features prominently in the localization of major ore deposits. This zone may then also be regarded as the eastern boundary of the Forest City and Cherokee basins.

  17. Regional stratigraphy, depositional environments, and tectonic framework of Mississippian clastic rocks between Tuscumbia and Bangor Limestones in Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higginbotham, D.R.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed correlations in the subsurface and outcrop of northern Alabama document that Mississippian clastic rocks between the Tuscumbia and Bangor Limestones are thickest along a band across the northern and eastern parts of the Black Warrior basin. The interval thins markedly southeastward across a northeast-trending line in Monroe County, Mississippi, and Lamar County, Alabama, from more than 350 ft to less than 150 ft. The thickness distribution suggests synsedimentary differential subsidence of crustal blocks. The northeast-trending block boundary in the Black Warrior basin nearly parallels an interpreted northeast-trending late Precambrian rift segment farther southeast. The northwest-striking boundary closely parallels an interpreted northwest-trending transform fault farther southwest. The block boundaries are interpreted as basement faults that originated during late Precambrian rifting. Subsequently, the older faults were reactivated by convergenced during the Mississippian, simultaneously with the initial dispersal of clastic sediment into the Black Warrior foreland basin.

  18. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  19. Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Stephen V.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    atmosphere over the eastern Pacific Ocean in summer, volumeover the eastern North Pacific Ocean: Spatial distribution,winds over the eastern North Pacific Ocean in spring and

  20. Clastic facies and diagenesis, Lewis-Evans interval in Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleaves, A.W.; Bat, D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface maps of the Lewis and Evans sandstone-facies tracts (Chester Group) on the northern shelf of the Black Warrior basin document two distinct deltaic depositional systems, each having a source area from the Mid-Dontinent interior. Within the Lewis genetic interval, six dip-elongate, river-dominated, cratonic delta lobes comprise the principal coarse-grained clastic units. However, in the higher Evans interval, five strike-elongate (cuspate) wave-dominated lobes are present on the northwestern rim of the basin. Petrographic evidence from four Mississippi cores associated with delta-plain and delta-front facies in the two sandstone unites indicates a dominance of monocrystalline quartz and chert rock fragments and a relative absence of orogenic indicators such as polycrystalline quartz, muscovite, and metamorphic rock fragments. Porosity development results largely from the formation of moldic secondary porosity and enlarged intergranular porosity. Primary porosity is occluded by the precipitation of quartz overgrowths and early calcite cement. Secondary moldic porosity was generated through the dissolution of feldspars and shale fragments. Enlarged intergranular porosity resulted from the dissolution of detrital illite matrix. Secondary porosity itself is partially occluded by authigenic kaolinite and illite, as well as by late-stage pyrite and dolomite.

  1. Geology of the undeveloped oil and gas fields of Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milton, J.D. [CalResources LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Edwards, E.B. [ Ogle & Heck, Carpinteria, CA (United States); Heck, R.G. [Ogle & Heck, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Two prominent subsurface structural features of the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin are the Hosgri fault system and the associated anticlinal fold trend. Exploratory drilling and 3D seismic mapping have delineated a series of oil and gas fields along this trend which underlie four federal units and one non-unitized lease. The units are named after local geography and are called the Lion Rock, Point Sal, Purisima Point and Santa Maria Units. The individual lease, OCS P-0409, overlies the San Miguel field. The Hosgri fault system trends northwest-southeast and effectively forms the eastern boundary of the oil and gas province. Lying semi-parallel with the fault are several anticlinal culminations which have trapped large volumes of oil and gas in the fractured Montery Formation. The Monterey is both source and reservoir rock, averaging 300 meters n thickness throughout the Central Basin. Development of the Monterey Formation as a reservoir rock was through diagensis and tectonism with resulting porosities-from 15 to 20% and permeability up to one Darcy. These parameters coupled with a high geothermal gradient facilitate the inflow rates of the viscous Monterey oil. Some 24 exploration and delineation wells have been drilled in this area and tested at rates ranging from a few hundred to several thousand barrels per day. Estimated oil reserves in the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin total approximately 1 billion barrels.

  2. Geology of the undeveloped oil and gas fields of Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milton, J.D. (CalResources LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States)); Edwards, E.B. ( Ogle Heck, Carpinteria, CA (United States)); Heck, R.G. (Ogle Heck, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)) (and others)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two prominent subsurface structural features of the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin are the Hosgri fault system and the associated anticlinal fold trend. Exploratory drilling and 3D seismic mapping have delineated a series of oil and gas fields along this trend which underlie four federal units and one non-unitized lease. The units are named after local geography and are called the Lion Rock, Point Sal, Purisima Point and Santa Maria Units. The individual lease, OCS P-0409, overlies the San Miguel field. The Hosgri fault system trends northwest-southeast and effectively forms the eastern boundary of the oil and gas province. Lying semi-parallel with the fault are several anticlinal culminations which have trapped large volumes of oil and gas in the fractured Montery Formation. The Monterey is both source and reservoir rock, averaging 300 meters n thickness throughout the Central Basin. Development of the Monterey Formation as a reservoir rock was through diagensis and tectonism with resulting porosities-from 15 to 20% and permeability up to one Darcy. These parameters coupled with a high geothermal gradient facilitate the inflow rates of the viscous Monterey oil. Some 24 exploration and delineation wells have been drilled in this area and tested at rates ranging from a few hundred to several thousand barrels per day. Estimated oil reserves in the Central Offshore Santa Maria Basin total approximately 1 billion barrels.

  3. Microbial abundance and biomass in sediments of the Texas-Louisiana shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cruz-Kaegi, Marta Elizabeth

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MICROBIAL ABUNDANCF. AND BIOMASS IN SEDIMENTS OF THF. TEXAS-LOUISIANA SHELF A Thesis by MARTA ELIZABETH CRUZ-KAEGI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfiument of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Oceanography MICROBIAL ABUNDANCE AND BIOMASS IN SEDIMENTS OF THE TEXAS-LOUISIANA SHELF A Thesis by MARTA ELIZABETH CRUZ-KAEGI Approved as to style and content by: I $7& Gilberl T. Rowe (Chair...

  4. Bathymetric records of marine shelled mollusca from the northeastern shelf of Yucatan, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treece, Granvil D

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee: Dr. Harold W. Harry Micromolluscs consisting of 189 species of gastropods and 149 species of pelecypods from 11 samples ranging from 15 to 260 fathoms along the northeastern Campeche Shelf and upper continental elope of Yucatan are reported...), the Caribbean Sea, the Bahamas, Bermuda and part of the Atlantic coast of the United States. The sampled area lies along the Yucatan Strait and to the north and west thereof, on the edge of the broad Campeche shelf (Map 1). The Yucatan Strait lies between...

  5. Dense water formation on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea: 1. Direct observations of brine rejection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    Dense water formation on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea: 1. Direct observations of brine 2004; accepted 21 April 2004; published 1 July 2004. [1] Dense Shelf Water (DSW) formation due to brine this period. The density increase terminated abruptly in late February, while the active brine rejection

  6. AFI8/05 Fieldwork Report, 2008/09 Season Present and Future Stability of Larsen C Ice Shelf (SOLIS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    1 AFI8/05 Fieldwork Report, 2008/09 Season Present and Future Stability of Larsen C Ice Shelf and predict the future stability of the Larsen C ice shelf using a combination of numerical ice flow hypothesis of the SOLIS project is the premise that ice mechanical heterogeneities influence critically rates

  7. Seasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope in the southeastern Weddell Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport of cold, fresh surface waters onto the continental shelf. Offshore, the warmer, saltier Warm DeepSeasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope masses and transport in the region. Rapid fluctuations in temperature and salinity throughout the year

  8. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.; Lorenz, D.M.; Culham, W.E.

    1997-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide- (CO{sub 2}-) flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  9. Increased Oil Production and Reserves Utilizing Secondary/Tertiary Recovery Techniques on Small Reservoirs in the Paradox Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, M. Lee; Chidsey, Jr., Thomas

    1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to about 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million bbl of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-(CO-) flood 2 project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  10. Ice shelf-ocean interactions in a general circulation model : melt-rate modulation due to mean flow and tidal currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dansereau, Vronique

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions between the ocean circulation in sub-ice shelf cavities and the overlying ice shelf have received considerable attention in the context of observed changes in flow speeds of marine ice sheets around Antarctica. ...

  11. Timing and Tectonic implications of basin inversion in the Nam Con Son Basin and adjacent areas, southern South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Christopher Charles

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nam Con Son (NCS) Basin, located offshore of SE Vietnam, is one of several Tertiary rift basins that formed during initial Eocene(?)-Oligocene rifting. Following cessation of rifting at the end of Oligocene time, these basins were subjected...

  12. A Population Study of the Gray Squirrel in Eastern Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodrum, Phil D.

    1940-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................ Acknowledgments 32 Summary and Conclusions ......................................... 32 .................................................. Literature Cited 34 POPULA'I'ION STUDY OF THE GRAY SQUIRREL, SCIURUS CAROLINENSIS CAROLINEN- SIS, IN EASTERN TEXAS PHIL...

  13. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study: Executive Summary...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Study: Executive Summary and Project Overview Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study: Executive Summary and Project Overview This study evaluates the future operational...

  14. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study -- Preliminary Findings: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbus, D.; Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Schuerger, M.; Zavadil, B.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study, the development of wind datasets, the transmission analysis, and the results of wind integration analysis for four scenarios.

  15. Geothermal Exploration in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    library Report: Geothermal Exploration in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared Data Abstract Remote sensing is a cost-effective tool that can be used to cover large...

  16. Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool Now Available | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Addthis The Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states...

  17. Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) (Revised)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EWITS was designed to answer questions about technical issues related to a 20% wind energy scenario for electric demand in the Eastern Interconnection.

  18. CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

  19. area sichuan basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area has been extensively unknown authors 59 outside the Pachitea River Basin, Peru CiteSeer Summary: At a superficial look, the Pachitea river basin gives the impression...

  20. area tarim basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    area has been extensively unknown authors 65 outside the Pachitea River Basin, Peru CiteSeer Summary: At a superficial look, the Pachitea river basin gives the impression...

  1. area groundwater basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    concerning aspects of petroleum geochemistry in the basin, especially in determining source rock(s) in the western part of this basin. It has been speculated that Ngimbang...

  2. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  3. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

  4. urricane activity in the Atlantic basin increased

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with levels in the 1970s and 1980s. For example, the accumulated cyclone energy (ACE) index in the Atlantic of disturbances. Bottom: annual number (AugOct) of North Atlantic basin hurricanes (19802005). See figures 2, is a crucial question for the future outlook of hurricane activity in the basin. It is difficult to distinguish

  5. The State of the Columbia River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish and wildlife issues and involve Energy, Fish, Wildlife: The State of the Columbia River Basin, 2013

  6. 6, 839877, 2006 Mexico City basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    emitters of air pollutants leading to negative health effects and environmental degradation. The rate altitude basin with air pollutant concentrations above the health limits most days of the year. A mesoscale-dimensional wind patterns in25 the basin and found that the sea-breeze transports the polluted air mass up the moun

  7. Oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roohi, M.; Aburawi, R.M. [Waha Oil Co., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sirte Basin is an asymmetrical cratonic basin, situated in the north-central part of Libya. It covers an area of over 350,000km{sup 2} and is one of the most prolific oil-producing basins in the world. Sirte Basin is divided into large NW-SE trending sub-parallel platforms and troughs bounded by deep seated syndepositional normal faults. A very unique combination of thick sediments with rich source rocks in the troughs vs. thinner sediments with prolific reservoir rocks on the platforms accounts for the productivity of the basin. Analysis of oil migration pattern in the Sirte Basin will certainly help to discover the remaining reserves, and this can only be achieved if the important parameter of structural configuration of the basin at the time of oil migration is known. The present paper is an attempt to analyse the time of oil migration, to define the structural picture of the 4 Basin during the time of migration and to delineate the most probable connecting routes between the hydrocarbon kitchens and the oil fields.

  8. Sedimentary basins of the late Mesozoic extensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Cari

    17 Sedimentary basins of the late Mesozoic extensional domain of China and Mongolia S.A. Graham,* T Mongolia was extended during the Late Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. As noted by various authors (Li et al in southern Mongolia (Lamb and Badarch, 1997), a crushed late Paleozoic flysch basin along the ChinaMongolia

  9. Environmental Regulation Impacts on Eastern Interconnection Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markham, Penn N [ORNL; Liu, Yilu [ORNL; Young II, Marcus Aaron [ORNL

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, recent environmental regulations will likely result in the removal of nearly 30 GW of oil and coal-fired generation from the power grid, mostly in the Eastern Interconnection (EI). The effects of this transition on voltage stability and transmission line flows have previously not been studied from a system-wide perspective. This report discusses the results of power flow studies designed to simulate the evolution of the EI over the next few years as traditional generation sources are replaced with environmentally friendlier ones such as natural gas and wind.

  10. Eastern Maine Electric Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrictInformation Ireland)EastEastern Iowa

  11. Eastern Illinois Elec Coop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazel Crest, Illinois: Energy ResourcesRutherford,Eastern Illinois Elec Coop

  12. BLM Eastern States Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia: EnergyAvignon, France: Energy ResourcesBurley Field Office JumpEastern

  13. Geology of Alabama's Black Warrior Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Holmes, J.W.; Shepard, B.K.

    1983-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin of northwestern Alabama continues to be an exciting area for oil and gas exploration. Several potential pay zones and a variety of petroleum traps in the basin resulted in a large number of successful test wells, helping to make the basin one of the more attractive areas for continued exploration in the US. The Upper Mississippian sandstone reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin are the primary exploration targets, with the Carter and Lewis sandstones being the most prolific producers. These sanstones exhibit considerable lateral and vertical variability and no apparent regional trends for porosity and permeability development. Determining the depositional environments of the Carter and Lewis sandstones should enhance petroleum exploration in the basin by helping to identify reservoir geometry, areal extent, and quality. To date, the Carter sandstones has produced more than 700,000 bbl of oil and 100 billion CR of gas; the Lewis sandstone, over 5000 bbl of oil and 12 billion CF of gas.

  14. VENTURA BASIN LOS ANGELES BASIN CENTRAL COASTAL BASIN W Y T

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14TotalTheE. Great Basin Oil and Gas Fields 2004VENTURA

  15. Dense water formation on the northwestern shelf of the Okhotsk Sea: 2. Quantifying the transports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Lynne D.

    the rate of formation of Dense Shelf Water (DSW) due to brine rejection on the Okhotsk Sea northwestern- mediate water (NPIW) [Talley, 1991, 1993; Yasuda, 1997]. The initial overturn is driven by brine rejection ice formation and brine rejection into underlying waters. Newly formed DSW is advected by the large

  16. Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf carbonates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf their production is tied to light and wave energy, carbonate sediments are most effectively produced in shallow energy regime to be reliable indicators of facies type when considered in isolation. Consid- ered

  18. Modeling of ecosystem processes on the Oregon shelf during the 2001 summer upwelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, Jian-Ping

    Modeling of ecosystem processes on the Oregon shelf during the 2001 summer upwelling Y. H. Spitz 2005; accepted 19 August 2005; published 22 October 2005. [1] Three-dimensional ecosystem response-based ecosystem model coupled to a high-resolution circulation model. We investigate, in particular, the influence

  19. Instruments and Methods New technique for access-borehole drilling in shelf glaciers using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Instruments and Methods New technique for access-borehole drilling in shelf glaciers using lightweight drills V. ZAGORODNOV,1 S. TYLER,2 D. HOLLAND,3 A. STERN,3 L.G. THOMPSON,1 C. SLADEK,2 S. KOBS,2 J. This paper describes a new, environmentally friendly drilling technique for making short- and long

  20. Construction of a Taxonomy for Requirements Engineering Commercial-Off-The-Shelf Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala, Claudia

    Construction of a Taxonomy for Requirements Engineering Commercial-Off-The-Shelf Components Claudia://www.lsi.upc.edu/~gessi ABSTRACT This article presents a procedure for constructing a taxonomy of COTS products in the field of Requirements Engineering (RE). The taxonomy and the obtained information reach transcendental benefits

  1. Annual daylighting performance of a passive optical light shelf in sidelit perimeter zones of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annual daylighting performance of a passive optical light shelf in sidelit perimeter zones Government or any agency thereof or The Regents of the University of California. #12;1 Annual daylighting use in deep perimeter zones of buildings where the windows are subject to high daylight availability

  2. The Network Pump is a Govern-ment off-the-shelf (GOTS) High As-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Network Pump® is a Govern- ment off-the-shelf (GOTS) High As- surance "One-Way" Guard that ena of acknowledgement. The Network Pump® implements a NRL- patented algorithm that statistically modulates the delay Pump® works with any operating system on any hardware platform that supports a TCP/IP network. NRL

  3. New study details glacier ice loss following ice shelf July 25, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    of several ice shelves in Antarctica led to acceleration of the glaciers that feed into them. CombiningNew study details glacier ice loss following ice shelf collapse July 25, 2011 Contact: Anthony Lane further demonstrates how important ice shelves are to Antarctic glaciers.' Shuman is lead author

  4. Continental Shelf Research 26 (2006) 13601374 Characterizing chaotic dispersion in a coastal tidal model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCasce, Joseph H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lyapunov exponents; Norwegian coast; Tidal currents 1. Introduction The coastal shelf is an important of Mathematics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1053, 0316 Blindern, Norway c Norwegian Meteorological Institute, P to study dispersion and mixing in a model in the Norwegian Trondheim fjord. We focus on the tidally driven

  5. Ice sheet limits in Norway and on the Norwegian continental shelf Jan Mangerud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, ?lafur

    Ice sheet limits in Norway and on the Norwegian continental shelf Jan Mangerud University of Bergen, Department of Geology, Allégt. 41, N-5007 Bergen, Norway Jan.Mangerud@geol.uib.no Introduction Ice sheets the author will briefly review present knowledge of the glacial history of Norway. The recon- struction

  6. Assessing the wind field over the continental shelf as a resource for electric power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Assessing the wind field over the continental shelf as a resource for electric power by Richard W. Garvine1,2 and Willett Kempton1,3,4 ABSTRACT To assess the wind power resources of a large continental for the comparison period) that the near-coast phase advantage is obviated. We also find more consistent wind power

  7. UNIVERSITY Of HAWAII UBR.ARY BENTHIC-PELAGIC COUPLING ON THE ANTARCTIC CONTINENTAL SHELF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    ) shelfexperiences highly seasonal fluxes of particulate organic carbon following the retreat of winter sea-ice, resulting in deposition of labile food for benthic detritivores (i.e., "benthic-pelagic coupling"). A time shelf, and consequences for benthic ecology. Impacts on microbial biomass, persistence of labile organic

  8. DDE in Sediments of the Palos Verdes Shelf, California: In Situ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of DDT discharged process wastes into the sewers of Los Angeles County. Roughly 870­1450 t of DDT were on the continental shelf and slope. The most abundant DDT compound in the sediments, p,p-DDE, is degrading. Introduction In 1947 the world's largest producer of technical DDT, Montrose Chemical Corporation, began

  9. Wind- and Buoyancy-modulated Along-shore Circulation over the Texas-Louisiana Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhaoru

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical experiments are used to study the wind- and buoyancy-modulated along-shore circulation over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf inshore of 50-m water depth. Most attention is given to circulation in the non-summer flow regime. A major...

  10. Sediment accumulation patterns and fine-scale strata formation on the Waiapu River shelf, New Zealand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Michael C.

    such that only an estimated ~23% (ranging between 17 and 38%) of the fluvial load was retained on the shelf profiles, suggesting that multiple transport processes influenced fine-scale strata formation. Layers a significant fraction of a small river's annual load (Milliman and Syvitski, 1992; Farnsworth and Milliman

  11. On verifying ATL transformations using `off-the-shelf' SMT solvers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    On verifying ATL transformations using `off-the-shelf' SMT solvers Fabian Bttner1 , Marina Egea2 by using SMT solvers, e.g. Z3 and Yices. 1 Introduction In Model-Driven Engineering (MDE), models, and the use of automatic decision procedures for Satisfiability Modulo Theories problems in SMT solvers

  12. Continental Shelf Research 24 (2004) 20292043 A conceptual model for river water and sediment dispersal in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washburn, Libe

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continental Shelf Research 24 (2004) 20292043 A conceptual model for river water and sediment and Beardsley, 1995; Geyer et al., 1996), while its sediment is dispersed primarily by bottom bound- ary layer dispersal in the Santa Barbara Channel, California Jonathan A. Warricka,, Leal A.K. Mertesb , Libe

  13. Eddy-resolving simulations of the Fimbul Ice Shelf cavity circulation: Basal melting and exchange with open ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilly, Jonathan

    that govern the heat supply to ice shelves in the Eastern Weddell Sea. The simulations confirm the low melt

  14. Impacts of Increased Access to Oil & Natural Gas Resources in the Lower 48 Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2007)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis was updated for Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (AEO): Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). The OCS is estimated to contain substantial resources of crude oil and natural gas; however, some areas of the OCS are subject to drilling restrictions. With energy prices rising over the past several years, there has been increased interest in the development of more domestic oil and natural gas supply, including OCS resources. In the past, federal efforts to encourage exploration and development activities in the deep waters of the OCS have been limited primarily to regulations that would reduce royalty payments by lease holders. More recently, the states of Alaska and Virginia have asked the federal government to consider leasing in areas off their coastlines that are off limits as a result of actions by the President or Congress. In response, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior has included in its proposed 5-year leasing plan for 2007-2012 sales of one lease in the Mid-Atlantic area off the coastline of Virginia and two leases in the North Aleutian Basin area of Alaska. Development in both areas still would require lifting of the current ban on drilling.

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, Robert J.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Northern Saudi Arabia in Wadi Kareim and Wadi Mobarak in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and the Nuwaybah formation in NW Saudi and extends from Egypt, Israel, and Jordan to Ethiopia and Yemen. The ANS (Fig. 1a) developed during

  16. Flux of energy and essential elements through the continental shelf ecosystem. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1981-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    There are three distinct but not mutually exclusive areas of research in this contract, studies of intrusions of the west wall of the Gulf Stream onto the outer continental shelf, studies of the flux of materials across nearshore density fronts, and advances in understanding of the planktonic food web of the continental shelf. Studies of frontal events on the outer and inner continental shelf involve distinctive physical and chemical regimes and have proven to require distinctive biological approaches. The studies of the food web run through our work on both of the frontal regimes, but certain aspects have become subjects in their own right. We have developed a simulation model of the flux of energy through the continental shelf food web which we believe to be more realistic than previous ones of its type. We have examined several of the many roles of dissolved organic compounds in sea water which originate either from release by phytoplankton, digestive processes or metabolites of zooplankton, or extracellular digestion of microorganisms. Methods have been developed under this contract to measure both the chelating capacity of naturally occurring organic materials and the copper concentration in the water. It has been possible to characterize the effects, both toxic and stimulatory, of copper on photosynthesis of naturally occurring phytoplankton populations. It is possible to characterize in considerable detail the course of biological events associated with meanders of the Gulf Stream. We are now in a position to explain the limits to biological productivity of the outer continental shelf of the southeastern US and the reasons why that biological production moves through the food web in the characteristic way that it does.

  17. INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES UTILIZING SECONDARY/TERTIARY RECOVERY TECHNIQUES ON SMALL RESERVOIRS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from shallow-shelf carbonate buildups or mounds within the Desert Creek zone of the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field at a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. Five fields in southeastern Utah were evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide (CO{sub 2})-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. Geological characterization on a local scale focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity as well as possible compartmentalization within each of the five project fields. The Desert Creek zone includes three generalized facies belts: (1) open-marine, (2) shallow-shelf and shelf-margin, and (3) intra-shelf, salinity-restricted facies. These deposits have modern analogs near the coasts of the Bahamas, Florida, and Australia, respectively, and outcrop analogs along the San Juan River of southeastern Utah. The analogs display reservoir heterogeneity, flow barriers and baffles, and lithofacies geometry observed in the fields; thus, these properties were incorporated in the reservoir simulation models. Productive carbonate buildups consist of three types: (1) phylloid algal, (2) coralline algal, and (3) bryozoan. Phylloid-algal buildups have a mound-core interval and a supra-mound interval. Hydrocarbons are stratigraphically trapped in porous and permeable lithotypes within the mound-core intervals of the lower part of the buildups and the more heterogeneous supramound intervals. To adequately represent the observed spatial heterogeneities in reservoir properties, the phylloid-algal bafflestones of the mound-core interval and the dolomites of the overlying supra-mound interval were subdivided into ten architecturally distinct lithotypes, each of which exhibits a characteristic set of reservoir properties obtained from outcrop analogs, cores, and geophysical logs. The Anasazi and Runway fields were selected for geostatistical modeling and reservoir compositional simulations. Models and simulations incorporated variations in carbonate lithotypes, porosity, and permeability to accurately predict reservoir responses. History matches tied previous production and reservoir pressure histories so that future reservoir performances could be confidently predicted. The simulation studies showed that despite most of the production being from the mound-core intervals, there were no corresponding decreases in the oil in place in these intervals. This behavior indicates gravity drainage of oil from the supra-mound intervals into the lower mound-core intervals from which the producing wells' major share of production arises. The key to increasing ultimate recovery from these fields (and similar fields in the basin) is to design either waterflood or CO{sub 2}-miscible flood projects capable of forcing oil from high-storage-capacity but low-recovery supra-mound units into the high-recovery mound-core units. Simulation of Anasazi field shows that a CO{sub 2} flood is technically superior to a waterflood and economically feasible. For Anasazi field, an optimized CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total 4.21 million barrels (0.67 million m3) of oil representing in excess of 89 percent of the original oil in place. For Runway field, the best CO{sub 2} flood is predicted to recover a total of 2.4 million barrels (0.38 million m3) of oil representing 71 percent of the original oil in place. If the CO{sub 2} flood performed as predicted, it is a financially robust process for increasing the reserves in the many small fields in the Paradox Basin. The results can be applied to other fields in the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent.

  18. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  19. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  20. Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

  1. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew G. Cole; George B. Asquith; Jose I. Guzman; Mark D. Barton; Mohammad A. Malik; Shirley P. Dutton; Sigrid J. Clift

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this Class III project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of clastic reservoirs in basinal sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost-effective way to recover more of the original oil in place by strategic infill-well placement and geologically based enhanced oil recovery. The study focused on the Ford Geraldine unit, which produces from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). Reservoirs in this and other Delaware Mountain Group fields have low producibility (average recovery <14 percent of the original oil in place) because of a high degree of vertical and lateral heterogeneity caused by depositional processes and post-depositional diagenetic modification. Outcrop analogs were studied to better interpret the depositional processes that formed the reservoirs at the Ford Geraldine unit and to determine the dimensions of reservoir sandstone bodies. Facies relationships and bedding architecture within a single genetic unit exposed in outcrop in Culberson County, Texas, suggest that the sandstones were deposited in a system of channels and levees with attached lobes that initially prograded basinward, aggraded, and then turned around and stepped back toward the shelf. Channel sandstones are 10 to 60 ft thick and 300 to 3,000 ft wide. The flanking levees have a wedge-shaped geometry and are composed of interbedded sandstone and siltstone; thickness varies from 3 to 20 ft and length from several hundred to several thousands of feet. The lobe sandstones are broad lens-shaped bodies; thicknesses range up to 30 ft with aspect ratios (width/thickness) of 100 to 10,000. Lobe sandstones may be interstratified with laminated siltstones.

  2. Geochemistry studies in Eastern Kentucky. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negus-de Wys, J.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented here are the results of inorganic geochemical studies on well cuttings from fourteen wells in the Big Sandy Gas Field. Both x-ray fluorescence and x-ray diffraction were used in analysis. Resultant mineralic data and elemental data were mapped by computer and by hand for five intervals of Ohio Shale and for the Berea/Bedford sequence. Comparisons of the geochemistry trend maps were made with lithology, structure, thermal maturation, gas open flow, and paleoenvironment. Techniques used included visual map comparison, computer map comparison programs utilizing correlation coefficients based on grid derived data sets, cluster analysis, x-y plots, and r/sup 2/ (coefficient of determination). A limited number of regional maps are included. It is concluded that inorganic geochemical analysis can be useful in: (1) suggesting paleoenvironmental trends; (2) establishing depositional trends; (3) enhancing exploration in terms of setting limits and pinpointing potential areas for hydrocarbon recovery; and (4) identification of likely locations for large gas fields when used with other geological studies. Elemental data analysis is the most accurate, and can be done quickly and inexpensively. It is concluded that the Big Sandy gas field area is a unique stratigraphic-structural gas trap, in which sedimentary factors, depositional basin features, plant evolution and occurrence, and structural elements all played important roles. Combinations of certain of these ingredients in different amounts may exist in other parts of the basin, and thus, suggest areas for hydrocarbon accumulation and potential recovery.

  3. Death of a carbonate basin: The Niagara-Salina transition in the Michigan basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leibold, A.W.; Howell, P.D. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The A-O Carbonate in the Michigan basin comprises a sequence of laminated calcite/anhydrite layers intercalated with bedded halite at the transition between normal marine Niagaran carbonates and lower Salina Group evaporites. The carbonate/anhydrite interbeds represent freshing events during initial evaporative concentration of the Michigan basin. Recent drilling in the Michigan basin delineates two distinct regions of A-O Carbonate development: a 5 to 10 m thick sequence of six 'laminites' found throughout most of the western and northern basin and a 10 to 25 m thick sequence in the southeastern basin containing both thicker 'laminates' and thicker salt interbeds. Additionally, potash deposits of the overlying A-1 evaporite unit are restricted to the northern and western basin regions. The distribution of evaporite facies in these two regions is adequately explained by a source of basin recharge in the southeast-perhaps the 'Clinton Inlet' of earlier workers. This situation suggest either that: (1) the source of basin recharge is alternately supplying preconcentrated brine and more normal marine water, or (2) that the basin received at least two distinct sources of water during A-O deposition.

  4. Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the First Steps phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribes plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: Develop the Tribes energy goals and objectives Establish the Tribes current energy usage Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives Create an action plan for the selected options

  5. Hardgrove grindability study of Powder River Basin and Appalachian coal components in the blend to a midwestern power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padgett, P.L.; Hower, J.C. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Five coals representing four distinct coal sources blended at a midwestern power station were subjected to detailed analysis of their Hardgrove grindability. The coals are: a low-sulfur, high volatile A bituminous Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal (Pike County, KY); a medium-sulfur, high volatile A bituminous Pittsburgh coal (southwestern PA); a low-sulfur, subbituminous Wyodak coal from two mines in the eastern Powder River Basin (Campbell County, WY). The feed and all samples processed in the Hardgrove grindability test procedure were analyzed for their maceral and microlithotype content. The high-vitrinite Pittsburgh coal and the relatively more petrographically complex Upper Elkhorn No. 3 coal exhibit differing behavior in grindability. The Pittsburgh raw feed, 16x30 mesh fraction (HGI test fraction), and the {minus}30 mesh fraction (HGI reject) are relatively similar petrographically, suggesting that the HGI test fraction is reasonably representative of the whole feed. The eastern Kentucky coal is not as representative of the whole feed, the HGI test fraction having lower vitrinite than the rejected {minus}30 mesh fraction. The Powder River Basin coals are high vitrinite and show behavior similar to the Pittsburgh coal.

  6. Coal rank trends in eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.C.; Trinkle, E.J.

    1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Examination of coal rank (by vitrinite maximum reflectance) for eastern Kentucky coals has revealed several regional trends. Coal rank varies from high volatile C (0.5% R/sub max/) to medium volatile bituminous (1.1% R/sub max/), and generally increases to the southeast. One east-west-trending rank high and at least four north-south-trending rank highs interrupt the regional increase. The east-west-trending rank high is associated with the Kentucky River faults in northeastern Kentucky. It is the only rank high clearly associated with a fault zone. The four north-south-trending rank highs are parallel with portions of major tectonic features such as the Eastern Kentucky syncline. Overall, though, the association of north-south-trending rank highs with tectonic expression is not as marked as that with the anomaly associated with the Kentucky River faults. It is possible that the rank trends are related to basement features with subdued surface expression. Rank generally increases with depth, and regional trends observed in one coal are also seen in overlying and underlying coals. The cause of the regional southeastward increase in rank is likely to be the combined influence of greater depth of burial and proximity to late Paleozoic orogenic activity. The anomalous trends could be due to increased depth of burial, but are more likely to have resulted from tectonic activity along faults and basement discontinuities. The thermal disturbances necessary to increase the coal rank need not have been great, perhaps on the order of 10-20/sup 0/C (18-36/sup 0/F) above the metamorphic temperatures of the lower rank coals.

  7. Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

  8. September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    September 2012 BASIN RESEARCH AND ENERGY GEOLOGY STATE UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK at BINGHAMTON research programs in geochemistry, sedimentary geology, or Earth surface processes with the potential the position, visit the Geological Sciences and Environmental Studies website (www.geology

  9. River Basins Advisory Commissions (South Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Catawba/Wateree and Yadkin/Pee Dee River Basins Advisory Commissions are permanent public bodies jointly established by North and South Carolina. The commissions are responsible for assessing...

  10. Flathead Basin Commission Act of 1983 (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes the Flathead Basin Commission, the purpose of which is to protect the Flathead Lake aquatic environment, its waters, and surrounding lands and natural resources. The Commission...

  11. Petroleum potential of the Libyan sedimentary basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammuda, O.S.; Sbeta, A.M.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contrary to prevailing opinion, all Libyan sedimentary basins and the Al-Jabal Al-Akhdar platform contain prolific petroleum accumulations with very high prospectivity. A systematic review of the types of traps and pays in this central part of the southern Mediterranean province reveals great variability in reservoir and source rock characteristics. The reservoir rocks are of almost all geologic ages. The thick source rock sequences also vary in nature and organic content. The organic-rich facies have accumulated in intracratonic and passive margin basins or in marginal seas. Most of the oil discovered thus far in these basins is found in large structural traps. Future discoveries of stratigraphic traps or small structural traps will require intensified efforts and detailed studies using up-to-date multidisciplinary techniques in sedimentary tectonics, biostratigraphic facies analysis, and geochemical prospecting in order to develop a better understanding of these basins, thus improving their prospectivity.

  12. K-Basins S/RIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.J.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is a list of the Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES{ampersand}H) and Safeguards and Security (SAS) standards/requirements applicable to the K Basins facility.

  13. The Uinta Basin Case Robert J. Bayer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Overburden Tailings Oil Shale Mining Open Pit Underground Ex situ extraction Ex situ thermal conversion EIS for Oil Sands and Oil Shale Ongoing concerns with Basin-wide air quality Wildlife and wildlife

  14. K-Basins S/RIDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, D.J.

    1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Standards/Requirements Identification Document(S/RID) is a list of the Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) and Safeguards and Security (SAS) standards/requirements applicable to the K Basins facility

  15. Late devonian carbon isotope stratigraphy and sea level fluctuations, Canning Basin, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, N P; Sumner, Dawn Y.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reef, Canning Basin, Western Australia. Palaeontology 43,the Canning Basin, Western Australia. In: Loucks, R.G. ,Canning Basin, Western Australia. Ph.D Thesis, University of

  16. Application of lactic acid in combination with melanosis inhibitors to improve shelf life of Texas brown shrimp (Penaeus aztecus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benner, Ronald Allen

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shelf life of fresh shrimp stored on ice is limited by two factors: melanosis (blackspot) and microbial spoilage. In this study L-lactic acid was tested, alone and in combination with sodium bisulfite and 4-hexylresorcinol, ...

  17. Prediction of continental shelf sediment transport using a theoretical model of the wave-current boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goud, Margaret R

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an application of the Grant-Madsen-Glenn bottom boundary layer model (Grant and Madsen, 1979; Glenn and Grant, 1987) to predictions of sediment transport on the continental shelf. The analysis is a ...

  18. Phytoplankton distributions and species composition across the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during two flow regimes of the Mississippi River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bontempi, Paula Susan

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phytoplankton abundance and species composition were examined over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during May 1992 and May 1993, as part of a phytoplankton diversity study funded by the Office of Naval Research. ...

  19. The shallow shelf approximation as a "sliding law" in a thermomechanically coupled ice sheet model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bueler, Ed

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shallow shelf approximation is a better ``sliding law'' for ice sheet modeling than those sliding laws in which basal velocity is a function of driving stress. The shallow shelf approximation as formulated by \\emph{Schoof} [2006a] is well-suited to this use. Our new thermomechanically coupled sliding scheme is based on a plasticity assumption about the strength of the saturated till underlying the ice sheet in which the till yield stress is given by a Mohr-Coulomb formula using a modeled pore water pressure. Using this scheme, our prognostic whole ice sheet model has convincing ice streams. Driving stress is balanced in part by membrane stresses, the model is computable at high spatial resolution in parallel, it is stable with respect to parameter changes, and it produces surface velocities seen in actual ice streams.

  20. Gas generation over plutonium oxides in the 94-1 shelf-life surveillance program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, J. M. (John M.); Harradine, D. M. (David M.); Hill, D. D. (Dallas D.); McFarlan, James T.; Padilla, D. D. (Dennis D.); Prenger, F. Coyne; Veirs, D. K. (Douglas Kirk); Worl, L. A. (Laura A.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is embarking upon a program to store large quantities of plutonium-bearing materials for up to fifty years. The Los Alamos National Laboratory Shelf Life Project was established to bound the behavior of plutonium-bearing material meeting the DOE 3013 Standard. The shelf life study monitors temperature, pressure and gas composition over oxide materials in a limited number of large-scale 3013 inner containers and in many small-scale containers. For the large-scale study, baseline plutonium oxides, oxides exposed to high-humidity atmospheres, and oxides containing chloride salt impurities are planned. The first large-scale container represents a baseline and contains dry plutonium oxide prepared according to the 3013 Standard. This container has been observed for pressure, temperature and gas compositional changes for less than a year. Results indicate that no detectable changes in pressure and gas composition are observed.

  1. Break-up of the Larsen B Ice Shelf Triggered by Chain-Reaction Drainage of Supraglacial Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banwell, Alison F.; MacAyeal, Douglas R.; Sergienko, Olga V.

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    , USA. 4 2 Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. 5 3The Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences Program, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, USA. 6 The explosive disintegration of the Larsen B Ice Shelf poses two unresolved... length to ice thickness) that are less than the critical value (~0.6) 26 necessary for capsize (and thus ice-shelf disintegration through capsize-liberated energy) 27 [MacAyeal et al., 2003; 2011; Burton et al., 2012]. Second, although multiple studies...

  2. Hot water decontamination of beef carcasses to increase microbiological safety and shelf-life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barakate, Michelle Lee

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : -:r . ~ &:: ? ri:~ 4 c:r l, &, ?a??. . ' ' !"-' &! ~i i 4?'&. " ~ li r, '?Pil ril i '. ' rl iit'~'. ~a', '. ''+, I";= t I t h( ii il HOT WATER DECONTAMINATION OF BEEF CARCASSES TO INCREASE MICROBIOLOGICAL SAFETY AND SHELF-LIFE A Thesis... by MICHELLE LEE BARKATE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Food Science and Technology HOT WATER DECONTAMINATION...

  3. The petrology and petrography of sediments from the Sigsbee blanket, Yucatan Shelf, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Joseph Delano

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by; {Chairman of Committee (Head of Department May, 1963 858I18 ABSTRACT The Sigsbse blanket 1 ~ ~ lithologically distinct unit of the Holocene to Recent sediment mantle which covers the outer shag and continental elope provinces... of the Yucatan Shelf. A detailed petrographic study has revealed ChaC the unit is composed dominantly of planktonic lutite with varying percentages of calcareous pellets, ooids lithic fragments, non-skeletal aggregates, algal fragment ~, tests of benthonic...

  4. The transition zone between the oceanic and shelf regimes around Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seong-Joong

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Worth D, No in, Jr. (Co-Chair of Committee) Thomas Whitworth 111 (Co-Chair of Committee) Daren B, H. Cline (Member) David A. Brooks (Head of Department) August 1995 Major Subject...: Oceanography ABSTRACT The Transition Zone between the Oceanic and Shelf Regimes around Antarctica. (August 1995) Seong-Joong Kim, B. S. , Chungnam National Universtty Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. Worth D. Nowlin, Jr. Dr. Thomas Whitworth 111...

  5. Wind induced circulation on the outer continental shelf of Texas, spring 1982

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beard, Daniel Walker

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the record is offshore, to the southeast. On the 29th of March, in the wake of strong northeast winds, the current shifted to the west. In general, the westward direction was maintained throughout the deployment period. However, there was one occurrence... WIND INDUCED CIRCULATION ON THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF OF TEXAS, SPRING 1982 A Thesis by DANIEL WALKER BEARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AE M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  6. Cryptic structural trends revealed by Cenozoic sedimentation on the Malta-Sicily shelf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedley, H.M. (Univ. of Hull (England))

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fault control of sedimentation patterns affects upper Miocene carbonate deposition. Fault trends, northeasterly or northwesterly, appear to exert major controls on sedimentation and represent the principal fractures seen on geologic maps of the islands. Evidence, however, shows a regionally persistent north-south facies alignment apparent throughout the Cenozoic. A reactivated Mesozoic basement fracture pattern is thought to control this alignment. Probable mesozoic sedimentation controls and facies distributions on the Malta shelf thus influence trap generation and hydrocarbon migration.

  7. Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy, sedimentology, and foreland basin evolution: Black Warrior basin, Alabama and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hines, R.A.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carboniferous clastic-wedge stratigraphy and sedimentology in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama and Mississippi indicate deposition in an evolving foreland basin flanking the Appalachian-Ouachita fold-thrust belt. The strata reflect specific responses to foreland basin subsidence, orogenic activity, sediment supply, and dispersal systems. Definition of the regional stratigraphy of the clastic wedge provides for interpretation of the foreland basin subsidence history by enabling quantitative reconstruction of regional compaction and subsidence profiles. Comparison of the interpreted subsidence history with model profiles of foreland basin subsidence (predicted from loading and flexure of continental lithosphere) allows evaluation of mechanical models in terms of observed clastic-wedge sedimentology and stratigraphy. Mechanical modeling of foreland basin subsidence predicts formation of a flexural bulge that migrates cratonward ahead of the subsiding foreland basin during loading. In the Black Warrior basin, local stratigraphic thins, pinch-outs, and areas of marine-reworked sediments suggest migration of the flexural bulge. Comparison of flexural bulge migration with thermal maturation history allows evaluation of timing of stratigraphic trapping mechanisms with respect to onset of hydrocarbon generation.

  8. RECONNAISSANCE ASSESSMENT OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL IN THE TRIASSIC AGE RIFT BASIN TREND OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND NORTHERN FLORIDA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blount, G.; Millings, M.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reconnaissance assessment of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration potential within the Triassic age rift trend sediments of South Carolina, Georgia and the northern Florida Rift trend was performed for the Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This rift trend also extends into eastern Alabama, and has been termed the South Georgia Rift by previous authors, but is termed the South Carolina, Georgia, northern Florida, and eastern Alabama Rift (SGFAR) trend in this report to better describe the extent of the trend. The objectives of the study were to: (1) integrate all pertinent geologic information (literature reviews, drilling logs, seismic data, etc.) to create an understanding of the structural aspects of the basin trend (basin trend location and configuration, and the thickness of the sedimentary rock fill), (2) estimate the rough CO{sub 2} storage capacity (using conservative inputs), and (3) assess the general viability of the basins as sites of large-scale CO{sub 2} sequestration (determine if additional studies are appropriate). The CO{sub 2} estimates for the trend include South Carolina, Georgia, and northern Florida only. The study determined that the basins within the SGFAR trend have sufficient sedimentary fill to have a large potential storage capacity for CO{sub 2}. The deeper basins appear to have sedimentary fill of over 15,000 feet. Much of this fill is likely to be alluvial and fluvial sedimentary rock with higher porosity and permeability. This report estimates an order of magnitude potential capacity of approximately 137 billion metric tons for supercritical CO{sub 2}. The pore space within the basins represent hundreds of years of potential storage for supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} stored in aqueous form. There are many sources of CO{sub 2} within the region that could use the trend for geologic storage. Thirty one coal fired power plants are located within 100 miles of the deepest portions of these basins. There are also several cement and ammonia plants near the basins. Sixteen coal fired power plants are present on or adjacent to the basins which could support a low pipeline transportation cost. The current geological information is not sufficient to quantify specific storage reservoirs, seals, or traps. There is insufficient hydrogeologic information to quantify the saline nature of the water present within all of the basins. Water data in the Dunbarton Basin of the Savannah River Site indicates dissolved solids concentrations of greater than 10,000 parts per million (not potential drinking water). Additional reservoir characterization is needed to take advantage of the SGFAR trend for anthropogenic CO{sub 2} storage. The authors of this report believe it would be appropriate to study the reservoir potential in the deeper basins that are in close proximity to the current larger coal fired power plants (Albany-Arabi, Camilla-Ocilla, Alamo-Ehrhardt, and Jedburg basin).

  9. Reading the Lontars: Endangered Literary Practices of Lombok, Eastern Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin, Peter

    2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sasaks of Lombok island, eastern Indonesia, have a literary tradition of writing manuscripts on palm leaves (lontar) in a manner similar to that of the Balinese (Rubinstein 2000), and historically, the Javanese. Lombok today remains only one...

  10. Paper # XXX Topic: Reaction Kinetics Eastern State Fall Technical Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knyazev, Vadim D.

    Paper # XXX Topic: Reaction Kinetics 1 Eastern State Fall Technical Meeting Chemical & Physical 1017 s-1 #12;Paper # XXX Topic: Reaction Kinetics 2 and activation energy values close to the C-C bond

  11. Advanced Unit Commitment Strategies in the United States Eastern Interconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meibom, P.; Larsen, H. V.; Barth, R.; Brand, H.; Tuohy, A.; Ela, E.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project sought to evaluate the impacts of high wind penetrations on the U.S. Eastern Interconnection and analyze how different unit commitment strategies may affect these impacts.

  12. Characterization of maize testing locations in eastern and southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maideni, Francis W.

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ???????..?...?.??. 15 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION ??????????..??. 26 SUMMARY????????????????????... 52 III PHENOTYPIC AND GENETIC ANALYSIS OF MAIZE TESTING EVALUATIONS IN EASTERN AND SOUTHERN AFRICA????????????.?..................................... 94... INTRODUCTION????????????.???..??? 94 REVIEW OF LITERATURE????????..???.??.. 96 MATERIALS AND METHODS???????..?...?.??.. 98 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION ???........................................ 100 SUMMARY??????????????????????. 158 IV...

  13. Characterization of maize testing locations in eastern and southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maideni, Francis W.

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The region of eastern and southern Africa is very diverse in environments and agronomic practices. The region has one of the highest per capita consumption of maize (Zea mays. L), which is predominantly produced by smallholder ...

  14. A reservoir management strategy for multilayered reservoirs in eastern Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinel Diaz, Arnaldo Leopoldo

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reservoir management strategy has been developed for a field located in eastern Venezuela. The field contains deep, high pressure, multilayer reservoirs. A thorough formation evaluation was accomplished using the log data, core data, PVT data...

  15. Seismic retrofit of precast panel buildings in Eastern Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzonev, Tzonu

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many countries in Eastern Europe, particularly ones from the former Soviet Bloc, are facing a potential crisis regarding their deteriorating precast panel apartment buildings. These complexes were built using industrial ...

  16. Developing Generic Dynamic Models for the 2030 Eastern Interconnection Grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kou, Gefei [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Markham, Penn N [ORNL; Liu, Yilu [ORNL

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) has built three major power flow cases for the 2030 Eastern Interconnection (EI) based on various levels of energy/environmental policy conditions, technology advances, and load growth. Using the power flow cases, this report documents the process of developing the generic 2030 dynamic models using typical dynamic parameters. The constructed model was validated indirectly using the synchronized phasor measurements by removing the wind generation temporarily.

  17. Canada-USA Salmon Shelf Survival Study, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudel, Marc; Tucker, Strahan; Morris, John

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Historically, salmon stocks from the Columbia River and Snake River formed one of the most valuable fisheries on the west coast of North America. However, salmon and steelhead returns sharply declined during the 1980s and 1990s to reach nearly 1 million fish. Although several factors may be responsible for the decline of Columbia River salmon and steelhead, there is increasing evidence that these drastic declines were primarily attributable to persistently unfavorable ocean conditions. Hence, an understanding of the effects of ocean conditions on salmon production is required to forecast the return of salmon to the Columbia River basin and to assess the efficacy of mitigation measures such as flow regulation on salmon resources in this system. The Canadian Program on High Seas Salmon has been collecting juvenile salmon and oceanographic data off the west coast of British Columbia and Southeast Alaska since 1998 to assess the effects of ocean conditions on the distribution, migration, growth, and survival of Pacific salmon. Here, we present a summary of the work conducted as part of the Canada-USA Salmon Shelf Survival Study during the 2008 fiscal year and compare these results with those obtained from previous years. The working hypothesis of this research is that fast growth enhances the marine survival of salmon, either because fast growing fish quickly reach a size that is sufficient to successfully avoid predators, or because they accumulate enough energy reserves to better survive their first winter at sea, a period generally considered critical in the life cycle of salmon. Sea surface temperature decreased from FY05 to FY08, whereas, the summer biomass of phytoplankton increased steadily off the west coast of Vancouver Island from FY05 to FY08. As in FY07, zooplankton biomass was generally above average off the west coast of Vancouver Island in FY08. Interestingly, phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass were higher in FY08 than was expected from the observed nutrient concentration that year. This suggests nutrients were more effectively by phytoplankton in FY08. In addition, the abundance of lipid-rich northern copepods increased from FY05 to FY08, whereas lipid-poor southern copepods showed the opposite pattern, suggesting that growth conditions were more favorable to juvenile salmon in FY08 than in previous years. However, growth indices for juvenile coho salmon were near the 1998-2008 average, both off the west coast of Vancouver Island and Southeast Alaska, indicating that additional factors beside prey quality affect juvenile salmon growth in the marine environment. Catches of juvenile Chinook, sockeye and chum salmon off the west coast of Vancouver Island in June-July 2008 were the highest on record during summer since 1998, suggesting that early marine survival for the 2008 smolt year was high. Interestingly, the proportion of hatchery fish was high (80-100%) among the juvenile Columbia River Chinook salmon caught off the British Columbia coast during summer, suggest that relatively few wild Chinook salmon are produced in the Columbia River Chinook. In addition, we also recovered two coded-wire tagged juvenile Redfish Lake sockeye salmon in June 2008 off the west coast of British Columbia. As relatively few Redfish Lake sockeye smolts are tagged each year, this also suggests that early marine survival was high for these fish, and may result in a high return in 2009 if they mature at age three, or in 2010 if they mature at age four. To date, our research shows that different populations of Columbia River salmon move to different locations along the coastal zone where they establish their ocean feeding grounds and overwinter. We further show that ocean conditions experienced by juvenile Columbia River salmon vary among regions of the coast, with higher plankton productivity and temperatures off the west coast of Vancouver Island than in Southeast Alaska. Hence, different stocks of juvenile salmon originating from the Columbia River and Snake River are exposed to different ocean conditions and may respond differ

  18. Structural and stratigraphic evolution of Shira Mountains, central Ucayali Basin, Peru?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez Alvarez, Jaime Orlando

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ucayali Basin is a Peruvian sub-Andean basin that initially formed during the extensive tectonics of the Early Paleozoic. Originally, the Ucayali Basin was part of a larger basin that extended east of the current ...

  19. Modified Streamflows 1990 Level of Irrigation : Missouri, Colorado, Peace and Slave River Basin, 1928-1989.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.G. Crook Company; United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents data for monthly mean streamflows adjusted for storage change, evaporation, and irrigation, for the years 1928-1990, for the Colorado River Basin, the Missouri River Basin, the Peace River Basin, and the Slave River Basin.

  20. Geochemical Prospecting of Hydrocarbons in Frontier Basins of India* By

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Kumar; D. J. Patil; G. Kalpana; C. Vishnu Vardhan

    India has 26 sedimentary basins with a basinal area of approximately 1.8x 10 6 km 2 (excluding deep waters), out of which seven are producing basins and two have proven potential. Exploration efforts in other basins, called frontier basins are in progress. These basins are characterized by varied geology, age, tectonics, and depositional environments. Hydrocarbon shows in many of these basins are known, and in few basins oil and gas have flowed in commercial /non-commercial quantities. Within the framework of India Hydrocarbon Vision 2025 and New Exploration Licensing Policy, there is a continuous increase in area under active exploration. The asset management concept with multi-disciplinary teams has created a demand for synergic application of risk-reduction technologies, including surface geochemical surveys. National Geophysical Research Institute (NGRI), Hyderabad, India has initiated/planned surface geochemical surveys composed of gas chromatographic and carbon isotopic analyses in few of the frontier basins of India. The adsorbed soil gas data in one of the basins (Saurashtra basin, Gujarat) has shown varied concentrations of CH4 to C4H10. The C1 concentration varies between 3 to 766 ppb and ??C2+, 1 to 543 ppb. This basin has thin soil cover and the Mesozoic sediments (probable source rocks) are overlain by thick cover of Deccan Traps. The scope and perspective of geochemical surveys in frontier basins of India are presented here.

  1. Petrophysical characterization of the Carito Norte, Mulata and Carito fields, Norte de Monagas, Eastern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porras, J.C. [Corpoven, S.A., Puerto La Cruz (Venezuela); De J. Valle, [Amoco Production Company, Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Norte de Monagas trend is located in the Eastern Venezuelan Basin and is characterized by high temperature, high initial pressure and production rates, variable PVT properties, GORs, and asphaltene content, and the presence of a tar mat at the base of the oil column. These reservoirs were petrophysically characterized through the integration of core and log data. Productive sands are composed of very coarse- to medium-grained sands deposited primarily in deltaic to shallow marine environments. These sands are quartz-rich, with clay matrix averaging 3% in the Oligocene and 6% in the Cretaceous. The main difference is the presence of up to 30% feldspars in the Cretaceous. Clay mineralogy is dominated by illitic material in the Cretaceous and by kaolinite in the Oligocene. Post-depositional changes dominated by cementation, mechanical compaction and subsequent dissolution processes have resulted in marked improvement or degradation of the productive characteristics of these reservoirs. Rocks were divided into four petrophysical. categories based on grain size, pore throat radius, porosity and permeability. Mercury saturation vs. mercury saturation over capillary pressure plots show the dominant interconnected pore system which controls flow rates is best defined by 50% saturation. Plots constructed using R50 pore aperture correlation indicate the pore throats to be macro to mega porous. Average log calculated water saturation is 14% compared with estimated from capillary pressure data of 12% at 1200{prime} above free water level, and 15% from relative permeability data. Relative permeability data indicate the rocks behave preferably as water-wet.

  2. Geochemistry of formation waters from the Lower Silurian Clinton Formation (Albion Sandstone), eastern Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanders, L.L. (Illinois Univ., Chicago (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waters of the petroleum-bearing Clinton formation (Albion Sandstone) of eastern Ohio are highly concentrated brines with average total dissolved solids (TDS) of 250,000 ppm. Sodium, calcium, and chloride account for 97% of the TDS. Distribution of divalent metal chlorides (MCl{sub 2}) allows inference of an up-dip paleoflow direction, although present-day flow is probably down-dip paleoflow direction, although present-day flow is probably down-dip. Solute distribution may have been emplaced during early basin development; it thus provides a snapshot of paleoflow. Formation structure alone can not explain MCl{sub 2} trends; they probably also are controlled by regional variation in salt thickness. Major constituent data do not indicate that membrane filtration affected the waters. High bromide content (mean = 1,860 ppm) of the water indicates that they originated from evaporating seawater. They probably are related genetically to the Salina evaporite group. Calculations show that several subsequent diagenetic reactions can account for the observed major ion composition. Recrystallization of aragonite and dolomitization of calcite probably occurred as the waters moved through the big Lime and/or the Packer Shell carbonates. Cation exchange and chlorite formation probably altered water composition during interaction with shales of the Cabot Head formation and within the Clinton. Minor constituents of the waters appear to be controlled by reactions with clays.

  3. Carboniferous tectonic history of the eastern flank of the Ozark dome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, W.J. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed geologic mapping in southwestern Illinois and southeastern Missouri indicates that the eastern flank of the Ozark dome was a low positive area throughout Carboniferous (Mississippian and Pennsylvanian) time. Rock units of this age consistently thin onto the flank of the dome, and are punctuated by numerous disconformities. Effects of shoaling are prominent in Chesterian strata, which change from dominantly subtidal in the proto-Illinois basin to shallow subtidal, intertidal and supratidal on the flank of the dome. Although the dome probably was exposed subaerially for much of Carboniferous time, it contributed little sediment eastward. The exposed rocks were largely carbonates, which weathered by solution. Several long-lived basement structures on the east flank of the Ozarks were active during the Carboniferous. Chief among them were the Lincoln and Waterloo-Dupo anticlines, the Du Quoin monocline, and the Ste. Genevieve fault zone. All are high-angle reverse faults that strike north to northwest, and are overlain by sharp folds in sedimentary cover. Major displacements took place in late Valmeyeran to Atokan time, and addition deformation occurred in Desmoinesian through post-Pennsylvanian time. The compressional deformation probably is a product of the Ouachita orogeny.

  4. Production and turnover of suspended organic detritus in the coastal water of the southeastern continental shelf: Progress report, June 1, 1988--May 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pomeroy, L.R.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of a group cooperative research projects on the southeastern continental shelf, this project is concerned with specific aspects of microbial processes and related phenomena that influence the fate of particulate organic materials naturally produced on the continental shelf. The projects of other grantees encompass the dynamics of the shelf from physical oceanography to biology. The integrated information as a whole will be useful in understanding the potential fate of a variety of energy related pollutants that may be released in continental shelf waters. With a focus on events on the southeastern continental shelf and their boundary conditions (Gulf Stream dynamics; river and estuarine processes), we form an interface between studies of oceanic processes such as GOFS and WOCE, and studies of processes at the land-sea boundary. During this grant year we completed two research cruises on the southeastern continental shelf on R/V Blue Fin, and processed data from previous cruises.

  5. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, M.L.

    1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and technology transfer of an advanced oil recovery technology in the Paradox basin, southeastern Utah. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 150 to 200 million barrels of oil. This project is designed to characterize five shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation and choose the best candidate for a pilot demonstration project for either a waterflood or carbon dioxide-flood project. The field demonstration, monitoring of field performance, and associated validation activities will take place in the Paradox basin within the Navajo Nation. The results of this project will be transferred to industry and other researchers through a petroleum extension service, creation of digital databases for distribution, technical workshops and seminars, field trips, technical presentations at national and regional professional meetings, and publication in newsletters and various technical or trade journals.

  6. Structural and tectonic implications of pre-Mt. Simon strata -- or a lack of such -- in the western part of the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sargent, M.L. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discovery of a pre-Mt. Simon lithic arenite (arkose) in southwestern Ohio has lead to reevaluation of many basement tests in the region. Several boreholes in adjacent states have been reexamined by others and are now believed to bottom in the Middle Run Formation. Seismic-reflection sections in western Ohio and Indiana have indicated pre-Mt. Simon basins filled with layered rocks that are interpreted to be Middle Run, however, the pre-Mt. Simon basins and east of Illinois. Samples from Illinois basement tests were reexamined to determine whether they had encountered similar strata. All reported crystalline-basement tests in Illinois show diagnostic igneous textures and mineralogical associations. Coarsely crystalline samples in cores show intergrown subhedral grains of quartz, microcline, and sodic plagioclase. Medium-crystalline rocks in cuttings samples show numerous examples of micrographic intergrowths of quartz and K-feldspar. This texture cannot be authigenically grown in a sediment and probably could not have survived a single cycle of erosion and deposition. Aphanitic rocks show porphyritic and spherulitic textures that are distinctly igneous and would be destroyed by weathering. Substantial relief on the Precambrian crystalline surface in Illinois is postulated for major structural features like the LaSalle Anticlinorium, the Sparta Shelf, the Ste. Genevieve Fault zone, etc. Paleotopographic relief up to 300 m (1,000 feet) is documented from drilling on the western flank of the basin.

  7. Tectonic Evolution of the Contaya Arch Ucyali Basin, Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro Zelasco, Luis

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Contaya arch is an elongated topographic high that divides the Huallaga, Maranon and Ucayali basins in the Peruvian Amazonian plain. Its position well into the foreland basin and well inland from the main Andean thrust ...

  8. active single basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsidence histories of the Aquitaine Basin (Fig.8c) record a minor ac- celeration in subsidence. The shortening of the Australian plate adjacent to the basin is small (from 2...

  9. annapolis basin area: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    geology of the Bengal Basin in relation to the regional tectonic framework and basin-fill history Geosciences Websites Summary: ; and this was followed by an increase in the...

  10. CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2...

  11. Tectonic Evolution of the Contaya Arch Ucyali Basin, Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarro Zelasco, Luis

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Contaya arch is an elongated topographic high that divides the Huallaga, Maranon and Ucayali basins in the Peruvian Amazonian plain. Its position well into the foreland basin and well inland from the main Andean thrust belt has proven...

  12. Improved Basin Analog System to Characterize Unconventional Gas Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wenyan 1983-

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , the BASIN software is combined with PRISE in the UGRA system to estimate unconventional resource potential in frontier basins. The PRISE software contains information about the resources (conventional gas, conventional oil, shale gas, coalbed methane...

  13. K West basin isolation barrier leak rate test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehurst, R.; McCracken, K.; Papenfuss, J.N.

    1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the procedure for performing the acceptance test on the two isolation barriers being installed in K West basin. This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals.

  14. Evolution of extensional basins and basin and range topography west of Death Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodges, K. V.; McKenna, L. W.; Stock, J.; Knapp, J.; Page, L.; Sternlof, K.; Silverberg, D.; Wust, G.; Walker, J. Douglas

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TECTONICS, VOL. 8, NO. 3, PAGES 453-467, JUNE 1989 EVOLUTION OF EXTENSIONAL BASINS AND BASIN AND RANGE TOPOGRAPHY WEST OF DEATH VALLEY, CALIFORNIA K.V. Hodges, L.W. McKenna, J. Stock , J. Knapp, L. Page, K. Sternlof, D. Silverberg, G. Wrist 2... of the extensional riders in this area indicates that the sole fault dips less than 15NW beneath the Nova Formation [Hodges et al., 1989]. Detailed mapping of the structurally lowest portions of the Nova Basin south of Panamint Butte (Figure 2; K.V. Hodges...

  15. Simplified vibratory characterization of alluvial basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semblat, Jean-Franois; Duval, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the analysis of seismic wave amplification, modal methods are interesting tools to study the modal properties of geological structures. Modal approaches mainly lead to information on such parameters as fundamental frequencies and eigenmodes of alluvial basins. For a specific alluvial deposit in Nice (France), a simplified modal approach involving the Rayleigh method is considered. This approach assumes a set of admissible shape functions for the eigenmodes and allows a fast estimation of the fundamental frequency of the basin. The agreement between modal numerical results and experimental ones is satisfactory. The simplified modal method then appears as an efficient mean for the global vibratory characterization of geological structures towards resonance.

  16. Atlas of major Appalachian basin gas plays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Baranoski, M.T.; Flaherty, K.; Humphreys, M.; Smosna, R.A.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This regional study of gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin has four main objectives: to organize all of the -as reservoirs in the Appalachian basin into unique plays based on common age, lithology, trap type and other geologic similarities; to write, illustrate and publish an atlas of major gas plays; to prepare and submit a digital data base of geologic, engineering and reservoir parameters for each gas field; and technology transfer to the oil and gas industry during the preparation of the atlas and data base.

  17. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Quarterly report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrell, L.A.; Nautiyal, C.

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Cores from five Red River wells in the Bowman-Harding study area have been examined and described in detail; contracts have been awarded for a 3-D survey in Bowman Co., ND and a 2D, multi-component survey in Richland Co.; extended-time pressure buildup data have been analyzed from two wells which are candidates for jetting-lance completion workovers; a 20-day injectivity test has been completed in the Red River (upper member); a jetting-lance completion program has commenced with one job completed and three more scheduled during April; and reservoir data from three key Red River fields in the Bowman-Harding study area has been researched and accumulated for inclusion in the TORIS database and technology transfer activities.

  18. NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

  19. ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK WINTERING AREAS IN BRIDGE CREEK BASIN, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;ASSESSMENT OF LIVESTOCK WINTERING AREAS IN BRIDGE CREEK BASIN, 1996 DOE FRAP 1996-03 Prepared-96.............................................. 22 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Bridge Creek basin livestock wintering area back assessment, 1996 quality in the Bridge Creek basin are assessed. These sites had been inspected in the winter and spring

  20. Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Torgeir Bjørge

    Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway A. SOUCHE*, M. DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological Processes (PGP), University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway basins of western Norway are examples of supradetachment basins that formed in the hanging wall

  1. Exploring Geophyte Use in the Northern Great Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Wild Onion & Balsamroot Gambel Oak Pinyon Pine Salina Wild Rye Sunflower Seed Great Basin Rye IndianExploring Geophyte Use in the Northern Great Basin: nutrient content, handling costs, effects of human settlement, subsistence, and sociopolitical change in Basin/Plateau #12;Problems Geophytes

  2. Erosion and Sedimentation on the Carnegie Ridge, Eastern Equatorial Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Caroline Kelly

    2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carnegie Ridge is an aseismic ridge that bounds the south flank of the Panama Basin. Dynamic sedimentation around Carnegie Ridge is shown by evidence of erosion, dissolution and re-deposition of pelagic sediments where erosive episodes have...

  3. Eastern Equatorial Pacific Ocean Sedimentation: Investigating Constant Flux Proxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ajay 1980-

    2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Age-model derived sediment mass accumulation rates (MARs) are consistently higher than 230Th-normalized MARs in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean during the past 25 ka. The offset, being highest in the Panama Basin, suggests sediment redistribution...

  4. Recent marine ostracodes from the eastern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, R. H.; Coleman, G. L., II

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the ostracode faunas from offshore of the west coast of Florida seem warranted, to include assemblages representative of a back-reef lagoon facies (Florida Bay) and a southern carbonate shallow- shelf facies grading northward near Tampa into a shallow... the importance of organic production of bottom sediments. The quartz content of the off-shore sediments generally increases toward the north, but beach deposits of the southern part of the west coast of Florida are composed almost entirely of quartz grains...

  5. Nannofossil biostratigraphy and paleoceanography of the eastern equatorial Pacific

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zurita Fabre, Guillermo

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Anderson (1978) noted a decrease of the dissolution effect on the calcium carbonate fluctuations, the productivity effect remaining the same. Moore and others (1973) studied the distribution of biogenic sediments in the Panama Basin. They found... no obvious correlation between the productivity pattern of the area and the distribution of calcium carbonate of the surface sediments, and concluded that the calcium carbonate distribution follows the bathymetry (dissolution pattern) of the Panama Basin...

  6. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day River is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States, which is entirely unsupplemented for it's runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the John Day Basin drains over 8,000 square miles, is Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and the basin incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the mainstem John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon, summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The Majority of the John Day Basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in John Day to coordinate basin restoration projects, monitoring, planning, and other watershed restoration activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in John Day, who subcontracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these restoration projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2001, the JDBO and GSWCD continued their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional ten (10) watershed conservation projects. The project types include permanent lay flat diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2001 totaled $572,766.00 with $361,966.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources, such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board (OWEB), and individual landowners.

  7. Reservoir characterization of the upper Merecure and lower Oficina Formations sands in the Leona Este Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Millan, Maria Carolina

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The "S5", "T" and "U1" sands, traditionally described as part of the lower section of the "Oficina" Formation, and the "U2" sand, as part of the upper interval of the "Merecure" Formation, contain the largest oil remaining ...

  8. Reservoir characterization of the upper Merecure and lower Oficina Formations sands in the Leona Este Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Millan, Maria Carolina

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The "S5", "T" and "U1" sands, traditionally described as part of the lower section of the "Oficina" Formation, and the "U2" sand, as part of the upper interval of the "Merecure" Formation, contain the largest oil remaining reserves of the Leona Este...

  9. Fast Track Reservoir Modeling of Shale Formations in the Appalachian Basin. Application to Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    . Bromhal, Natl. Energy Technology Laboratory. Copyright 2010, Society of Petroleum Engineers This paper spatial-temporal database that is efficiently handled with state of the art Artificial Intelligence matching process that uses the FRACGEN/NFFLOW simulator package. This technology, known as Top

  10. Prokaryotic respiration and production in the meso-and bathypelagic realm of the eastern and western North Atlantic basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndl, Gerhard

    that the prokaryotic carbon demand exceeds dissolved organic matter input and surface primary production by 2 orders, focusing on the food web structur

  11. OligoceneMiocene basin evolution in SE Anatolia, Turkey: constraints on the closure of the eastern Tethys gateway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    by major climate changes as well as changing plate configurations. The Middle Miocene Climate Transition and global climate change to a cooler mode, recorded in the Mi3b event (d18 O increase) dated at 13.82 Ma Tethys gateway, the marine connection between the Mediterranean and Indian Ocean. To address this idea

  12. Basin analog approach answers characterization challenges of unconventional gas potential in frontier basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Kalwant

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To continue increasing the energy supply to meet global demand in the coming decades, the energy industry needs creative thinking that leads to the development of new energy sources. Unconventional gas resources, especially those in frontier basins...

  13. Performance of commercial off-the-shelf microelectromechanical systems sensors in a pulsed reactor environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobert, Keith Edwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Heger, Arlen S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccready, Steven S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Prompted by the unexpected failure of piezoresistive sensors in both an elevated gamma-ray environment and reactor core pulse tests, we initiated radiation testing of several MEMS piezoresistive accelerometers and pressure transducers to ascertain their radiation hardness. Some commercial off-the-shelf sensors are found to be viable options for use in a high-energy pulsed reactor, but others suffer severe degradation and even catastrophic failure. Although researchers are promoting the use of MEMS devices in radiation-harsh environment, we nevertheless find assurance testing necessary.

  14. Multi-scale and Integrated Characterization of the Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian Basin: From Microscopes to Mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, Dustin; Soeder, Daniel J; McDannell, Kalin T.; Mroz, Thomas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historic data from the Department of Energy Eastern Gas Shale Project (ESGP) were compiled to develop a database of geochemical analyses, well logs, lithological and natural fracture descriptions from oriented core, and reservoir parameters. The nine EGSP wells were located throughout the Appalachian Basin and intercepted the Marcellus Shale from depths of 750 meters (2500 ft) to 2500 meters (8200 ft). A primary goal of this research is to use these existing data to help construct a geologic framework model of the Marcellus Shale across the basin and link rock properties to gas productivity. In addition to the historic data, x-ray computerized tomography (CT) of entire cores with a voxel resolution of 240mm and optical microscopy to quantify mineral and organic volumes was performed. Porosity and permeability measurements in a high resolution, steady-state flow apparatus are also planned. Earth Vision software was utilized to display and perform volumetric calculations on individual wells, small areas with several horizontal wells, and on a regional basis. The results indicate that the lithologic character of the Marcellus Shale changes across the basin. Gas productivity appears to be influenced by the properties of the organic material and the mineral composition of the rock, local and regional structural features, the current state of in-situ stress, and lithologic controls on the geometry of induced fractures during stimulations. The recoverable gas volume from the Marcellus Shale is variable over the vertical stratigraphic section, as well as laterally across the basin. The results from this study are expected to help improve the assessment of the resource, and help optimize the recovery of natural gas.

  15. Basin Approach to Address Bacterial Impairments in Basins 15, 16, and 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregory, L.; Brown, M.; Hein, K.; Skow, K.; Engling, A.; Wagner, K.; Berthold, A.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), the population throughout the Matagorda Bay watershed are generally rural with dispersed cities. In Basin 15 the two major cities are El Campo and Palacios with a total basin population of 58,682. This produces a population density of approximately 61... between 2010 and 2050 with the exception of Lavaca and Fayette counties. The cities of Palacios, El Campo, Flatonia, Schulenburg, Shiner, Hallettsville, Yoakum, Edna, Victoria, and Port Lavaca, all located within the Matagorda Bay watershed...

  16. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  17. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  18. Summary status of K Basins sludge characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, R.B.

    1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of activities are underway as part of the Spent Nuclear Fuels Project (SNFP) related to the processing and disposing of sludge in the 105-K Basins (K Basins). Efforts to rigorously define data requirements for these activities are being made using the Data Quality Objectives (DQO) process. Summaries of current sludge characterization data are required to both help support this DQO process and to allow continued progress with on-going engineering activities (e.g., evaluations of disposal alternatives). This document provides the status of K Basins sludge characterization data currently available to the Nuclear Fuel Evaluations group. This group is tasked by the SNFP to help develop and maintain the characterization baseline for the K Basins. The specific objectives of this document are to: (1) provide a current summary (and set of references) of sludge characterization data for use by SNFP initiatives, to avoid unnecessary duplication of effort and to support on-going initiatives; (2) submit these data to an open forum for review and comment, and identify additional sources of significant data that may be available; (3) provide a summary of current data to use as part of the basis to develop requirements for additional sludge characterization data through the DQO process; (4) provide an overview of the intended activities that will be used to develop and maintain the sludge characterization baseline.

  19. Introduction THE PALEOPROTEROZOIC Thelon basin, Northwest Territo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiatt, Eric E.

    Geological Evolution and Exploration Geochemistry of the Boomerang Lake Unconformity-type Uranium Prospect a prospective target for uranium exploration. The potential of the western Thelon basin at Boomerang Lake, remains underexplored for uncon- formity-related uranium deposits despite geological similari- ties

  20. Lateral drilling and completion technologies for shallow-shelf carbonates of the Red River and Ratcliffe Formations, Williston Basin. Topical report, July 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrell, L.A.; George, R.D.; Gibbons, D.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Luff Exploration Company (LEC) focused on involvement in technologies being developed utilizing horizontal drilling concepts to enhance oil-well productivity starting in 1992. Initial efforts were directed toward high-pressure lateral jetting techniques to be applied in existing vertical wells. After involvement in several failed field attempts with jetting technologies, emphasis shifted to application of emerging technologies for drilling short-radius lateral in existing wellbores and medium-radius technologies in new wells. These lateral drilling technologies were applied in the Mississippi Ratcliffe and Ordovician Red River formations at depths of 2,590 to 2,890 m in Richland County, MT; Bowman County, ND; and Harding County, SD. In theory, all of the horizontal drilling techniques explored in this project have merit for application fitting specific criteria. From a realistic point of view, the only relatively trouble-free, adequately-proven technology employed was the medium-radius steered motor/MWD technology. The slim-tool steered motor/MWD re-entry technology has been used extensively but appears to still be significantly in developmental stages. This technology will probably always be more troublesome than the technology used to drill new wells because the smaller diameter required for the tools contributes to both design and operational complexities. Although limited mechanical success has been achieved with some of the lateral jetting technologies and the Amoco tools, their predictability and reliability is unproven. Additionally, they appear to be limited to shallow depths and certain rock types. The Amoco technology probably has the most potential to be successfully developed for routinely reliable, field applications. A comparison of the various horizontal drilling technologies investigated is presented.

  1. Title: Hidden economies, future options: trade in non-timber forest products in eastern Indonesia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Hidden economies, future options: trade in non-timber forest products in eastern Indonesia Tenggara (ENT), eastern Indonesia. The study was the outcome of an ACIAR scoping study undertaken through

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - air force eastern Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ) and eastern IO (80E-120E). To consider the monsoon-ocean interaction and the remote ENSO forcing, we... the tropical IO and eastern Pacific is about 1:4, c1>0.25 means...

  3. Differential Attraction of Heliothis subflexa Males to Synthetic Pheromone Lures in Eastern US

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Differential Attraction of Heliothis subflexa Males to Synthetic Pheromone Lures in Eastern US in Eastern US showed that when the acetates were omitted from a 7-component blend in rubber septa, fewer

  4. Concurrent tectonic and climatic changes recorded in upper Tortonian sediments from the Eastern Mediterranean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    evolution in the eastern Mediterranean region. Concurrent tectonic and climatic changes in the MetochiaConcurrent tectonic and climatic changes recorded in upper Tortonian sediments from the Eastern climatic reconstructions reveal substantial changes, especially on the North African continent which

  5. Reference Shelf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently Approved JustificationBio-Inspired Solar

  6. Simulations of hybrid Rossby-shelf modes in a laboratory -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Simulations of hybrid Rossby-shelf modes in a laboratory ocean X Y -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1.06 0.07 0.08 0.1 0.15 frequency azimuthal mode number m Rossby modes shelf modes -1 0 1 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1.0002 -0.0001 -0.0001 y -1 0 1 -1 -0.5 0 0.5 1 0 0 0.0001 0.0001 0.0002 0.0002 0.0004 0.0004 0.0006 0

  7. The Mixed Layer over the Antarctic Continental Shelf 1. Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling, Pearson Building, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    References Continental Shelf cold-saline water strong katabatic winds brine exclusion multi-year pack ice ice-shelf dmix Antarctic bottom water sea ice a) b) Weddell Ross Amundsen Bellinghausen Solar heating) hi TS-lead Ta Tmix Ta TS-ice Tmix (1-i )Ii (0)Fsw (1-i )Ii (0)e-hi Fsw E Entrainment is calculated

  8. Palaeomagnetic data from a Mesozoic Philippine Sea Plate ophiolite on Obi Island, Eastern Indonesia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royal Holloway, University of London

    Palaeomagnetic data from a Mesozoic Philippine Sea Plate ophiolite on Obi Island, Eastern Indonesia exposed on Obi Island, eastern Indonesia. Until the late Neogene, Obi formed part of the southern tectonic history of eastern Indonesia and northern New Guinea has been dominated by the punctuated

  9. Late Quaternary variability of sedimentary nitrogen isotopes in the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Late Quaternary variability of sedimentary nitrogen isotopes in the eastern South Pacific Ocean), Late Quaternary variability of sedimentary nitrogen isotopes in the eastern South Pacific Ocean) in the water columns of the Arabian Sea (AS) and the eastern North and South Pacific oceans (ENP; ESP) holds

  10. Primary production in the eastern tropical Pacific: A review J. Timothy Pennington a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennington, J. Timothy

    , Peru Abstract The eastern tropical Pacific includes 28 million km2 of ocean between 23.5N phytoplankton growth (and nitrogen fixation) over large portions of the open-ocean eastern tropical Pacific Pacific. Seasonal cycles are weak over much of the open-ocean eastern tropical Pacific, although several

  11. Intraseasonal Eastern Pacific Precipitation and SST Variations in a GCM Coupled to a Slab Ocean Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, Eric

    Intraseasonal Eastern Pacific Precipitation and SST Variations in a GCM Coupled to a Slab Ocean-Schubert convection to a slab ocean model (SOM) improves the simulation of eastern Pacific convection during and ocean make eastern Pacific low-level circulation anomalies more complex in the SOM simulation than

  12. Syn-thinning pluton emplacement during Mesozoic extension in eastern Mongolia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Syn-thinning pluton emplacement during Mesozoic extension in eastern Mongolia Yannick Daoudene,1 relationships between deformation and magmatic activity that occurred in the central part of eastern Mongolia of eastern Mongolia. Citation: Daoudene, Y., D. Gapais, G. Ruffet, E. Gloaguen, A. Cocherie, and P. Ledru

  13. Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

  14. Dose reduction improvements in storage basins of spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Fan-Hsiung F.

    1997-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent nuclear fuel in storage basins at the Hanford Site has corroded and contaminated basin water, which has leaked into the soil; the fuel also had deposited a layer of radioactive sludge on basin floors. The SNF is to be removed from the basins to protect the nearby Columbia River. Because the radiation level is high, measures have been taken to reduce the background dose rate to as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) to prevent radiation doses from becoming the limiting factor for removal of the SW in the basins to long-term dry storage. All activities of the SNF Project require application of ALARA principles for the workers. On the basis of these principles dose reduction improvements have been made by first identifying radiological sources. Principal radiological sources in the basin are basin walls, basin water, recirculation piping and equipment. Dose reduction activities focus on cleaning and coating basin walls to permit raising the water level, hydrolasing piping, and placing lead plates. In addition, the transfer bay floor will be refinished to make decontamination easier and reduce worker exposures in the radiation field. The background dose rates in the basin will be estimated before each task commences and after it is completed; these dose reduction data will provide the basis for cost benefit analysis.

  15. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : 2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the nation's second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, Oregon's fourth largest drainage basin, and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, westslope cutthroat, and redband and bull trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. The majority of the John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) formed a partnership with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), which contracts the majority of the construction implementation activities for these projects from the JDBO. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2003, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of their successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional twelve (12) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects include off channel water developments, juniper control, permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Due to funding issues and delays, permitting delays, fire closures and landowner contracting problems, 2 projects were canceled and 7 projects were rescheduled to the 2004 construction season. Project costs in 2003 totaled $115,554.00 with a total amount of $64,981.00 (56%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service Partners in Wildlife Program and individual landowners.

  16. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office : Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report, 2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon. John Day Basin Office.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and the longest containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles--Oregon's third largest drainage basin--and incorporates portions of eleven counties. Originating in the Strawberry Mountains near Prairie City, the John Day River flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring Chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly a basin with national significance. Most all of the entire John Day basin was ceded to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the Basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Using funding from the Bonneville Power Administration, Bureau of Reclamation, and others, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) subcontracts the majority of its construction implementation activities with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of most projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/review, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 2000, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional six watershed conservation projects funded by the BPA. The types of projects include permanent diversions, pump stations, and return-flow cooling systems. Project costs in 2000 totaled $533,196.00 with a total amount of $354,932.00 (67%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration and the remainder coming from other sources such as the BOR, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

  17. AN UPDATE ON REFORM IN EASTERN EUROPE AND RUSSIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN UPDATE ON REFORM IN EASTERN EUROPE AND RUSSIA Jeffrey Sachs ABSTRACT: The paper reviews the experience of Poland and Russia with economic reform, with occasional comparison to China's experience. The author argues that macroeconomic chaos in Poland and Russia preceded reform and was allayed by reform

  18. Diseases of plantation forestry trees in eastern and southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diseases of plantation forestry trees in eastern and southern Africa J. Roux a*, G. Meke b , B are being allocated to the training of forestry staff andtreeimprovement.Theseefforts,aimedatstrengtheningthe forestry business, also embrace research on pests and diseases that might significantly reduce the value

  19. AN ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER-EASTERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AN ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER-EASTERN LAKE ONTARIO BASS FISHERY The St. Lawrence information on the economic importance of the bass fishery, considered by many to be one of the best smallmouth bass fisheries in the world. The economic value of this recreational fishery should be taken

  20. Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study Solar Dataset (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory produced solar power production data for the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (ERGIS) including "real time" 5-minute interval data, "four hour ahead forecast" 60-minute interval data, and "day-ahead forecast" 60-minute interval data for the year 2006. This presentation provides a brief overview of the three solar power datasets.

  1. UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT EASTERN DISTRICT OF MICHIGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT EASTERN DISTRICT OF MICHIGAN SOUTHERN DIVISION COALITION TO DEFEND PARTY, Plaintiffs, v. JENNIFER GRANHOLM, in her official capacity as Governor of the State of Michigan, the REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, the BOARD OF TRUSTEES OF MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY, the BOARD

  2. EIS-0390: Eastern Plains Transmission Project, Colorado and Kansas.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS is for Western Area Power Administration's proposal to participate with Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Inc. (Tri-State), to construct the proposed Eastern Plains Transmission Project (Project). Westerns participation with Tri-State would be in exchange for capacity rights on the transmission lines.

  3. Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT Subsidence in the Michigan basin produced ~5 km of sedimentation over a period of more a plate tectonic framework for the his- tory of the Michigan basin. INTRODUCTION The Michigan basin of the Michigan basin has led to numerous proposals for basin subsidence mechanisms, including thermal contraction

  4. Regional geological assessment of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins relative to potential storage/disposal of radioactive wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomenick, T.F.; Gonzales, S.; Johnson, K.S.; Byerly, D.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thick and regionally extensive sequence of shales and associated clastic sedimentary rocks of Late Devonian and Early Mississippian age has been considered among the nonsalt geologies for deep subsurface containment of high-level radioactive wastes. This report examines some of the regional and basin-specific characteristics of the black and associated nonblack shales of this sequence within the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan basins of the north-central and eastern United States. Principal areas where the thickness and depth of this shale sequence are sufficient to warrant further evaluation are identified, but no attempt is made to identify specific storage/disposal sites. Also identified are other areas with less promise for further study because of known potential conflicts such as geologic-hydrologic factors, competing subsurface priorities involving mineral resources and groundwater, or other parameters. Data have been compiled for each basin in an effort to indicate thickness, distribution, and depth relationships for the entire shale sequence as well as individual shale units in the sequence. Included as parts of this geologic assessment are isopach, depth information, structure contour, tectonic elements, and energy-resource maps covering the three basins. Summary evaluations are given for each basin as well as an overall general evaluation of the waste storage/disposal potential of the Devonian-Mississippian shale sequence,including recommendations for future studies to more fully characterize the shale sequence for that purpose. Based on data compiled in this cursory investigation, certain rock units have reasonable promise for radioactive waste storage/disposal and do warrant additional study.

  5. Geothermal fluid genesis in the Great Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.K.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Early theories concerning geothermal recharge in the Great Basin implied recharge was by recent precipitation. Physical, chemical, and isotopic differences between thermal and non-thermal fluids and global paleoclimatic indicators suggest that recharge occurred during the late Pleistocene. Polar region isotopic studies demonstrate that a depletion in stable light-isotopes of precipitation existed during the late Pleistocene due to the colder, wetter climate. Isotopic analysis of calcite veins and packrat midden megafossils confirm the depletion event occurred in the Great Basin. Isotopic analysis of non-thermal springs is utilized as a proxy for local recent precipitation. Contoured plots of deuterium concentrations from non-thermal and thermal water show a regional, systematic variation. Subtracting contoured plots of non-thermal water from plots of thermal water reveals that thermal waters on a regional scale are generally isotopically more depleted. Isolated areas where thermal water is more enriched than non-thermal water correspond to locations of pluvial Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, suggesting isotopically enriched lake water contributed to fluid recharge. These anomalous waters also contain high concentrations of sodium chloride, boron, and other dissolved species suggestive of evaporative enrichment. Carbon-age date and isotopic data from Great Basin thermal waters correlate with the polar paleoclimate studies. Recharge occurred along range bounding faults. 151 refs., 62 figs., 15 tabs.

  6. Hydrocarbon habitat of the west Netherlands basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jager, J. (Nederlandse Aardolie Maatschappij, Assen (Netherlands)); Doyle, M. (Petroleum Development Oman, Muscat (Oman)); Grantham, P. (KSEPL/Shell Research, Rijswijk (Netherlands)); Mabillard, J. (Shell Nigeria, Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex West Netherlands Basin contains oil and gas in Triassic and Upper Jurassic to Cretaceous clastic reservoir sequences. The understanding has always been that the Carboniferous coal measures have generated only gas and the Jurassic marine Posidonia Shale only oil. However, detailed geochemical analyses show that both source rocks have generated oil and gas. Geochemical fingerprinting established a correlation of the hydrocarbons with the main source rocks. The occurrence of these different hydrocarbons is consistent with migration routes. Map-based charge modeling shows that the main phase of hydrocarbon generation occurred prior to the Late Cretaceous inversion of the West Netherlands Basin. However, along the southwest flank of the basin and in lows between the inversion highs, significant charge continued during the Tertiary. Biodegradation of oils in Jurassic and Cretaceous reservoirs occurred during the earliest Tertiary, but only in reservoirs that were at that time at temperatures of less then 70 to 80[degrees]C, where bacteria could survive. This study shows that also in a mature hydrocarbon province an integrated hydrocarbon habitat study with modern analyses and state-of-the-art technology can lead to a much improved understanding of the distribution of oil and gas in the subsurface. The results of this study will allow a better risk assessment for remaining prospects, and an improved prediction of the type of trapped hydrocarbons in terms of gas, oil, and biodegraded oil.

  7. Exploration trends of the Sirte Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aburawi, R.M. [Waha Oil Co., Tripoli (Libyan Arab Jamahiriya)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wave of intense exploration activity in the Sirte Basin began after the discovery of oil in 1958, and an enormous quantity of hydrocarbon was found in less than ten years. The oil discovery rate has been gradually declining since its peak in the 1960`s, and it is now becoming increasingly difficult and more expensive to find a new reserve. This paper is an attempt to discuss briefly the past exploration cycle, to indicate the present position and to predict the future trend of our activities in the Sirte Basin. The past exploration activities in the Sirte Basin were concentrated along the particular geological trends where the possibilities of finding more reserves are now drastically reduced. Therefore, for the future healthy exploration activities, new ideas are needed to bring about some new favourable areas under further investigation. A new cycle of exploration success will emerge if our exploratory efforts are purposely directed towards the stratigraphic, stratrigraphic/structural traps and subtle type traps, along the migrational pathways and deep plays in the potential oil generative areas.

  8. Alginate-Based Edible Coating to Enhance Quality and Shelf-Life of Fresh-Cut Watermelon (Citrullus Lanatus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sipahi, Rabia

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    of multilayered antimicrobial edible coating on the shelf-life of fresh-cut watermelon while keeping its original attributes for longer, without affecting its sensory properties. A set of solutions containing sodium alginate (0.5, 1, 2% w/w), beta...

  9. Relationships between nutrients and dissolved oxygen concentrations on the Texas-Louisiana shelf during summer of 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lahiry, Sudeshna

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    and biochemical processes occurring there. In April, no hypoxia was observed on the shelf because of water column mixing by winds, even though high discharge occurred from the MARS. Nutrients were abundant in the surface waters but present only in little amounts...

  10. Phytoplankton distributions and species composition across the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during two flow regimes of the Mississippi River

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bontempi, Paula Susan

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was an average flow year for the Mississippi River, were compared with observations from 1993, which was a record flow year. Water samples for phytoplankton determinations were examined at 22 locations on cross-shelf transacts from 90.5' to 94.0'W longitude...

  11. Cross-shelf Exchange Driven by Oscillatory Barotropic Currents over an Isolated Coastal Canyon: Equilibrium Circulation and Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    boundary layer in three distinct horizontal locations: along the upstream limb of the canyon (flux offCross-shelf Exchange Driven by Oscillatory Barotropic Currents over an Isolated Coastal Canyon of dense water by oscillatory barotropic currents incident upon an isolated coastal canyon. The physical

  12. Play Analysis and Digital Portfolio of Major Oil Reservoirs in the Permian Basin: Application and Transfer of Advanced Geological and Engineering Technologies for Incremental Production Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest onshore petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Approximately 1,300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000. Of these significant-sized reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. There are 32 geologic plays that have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs, and each of the 1,300 major reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. The final reservoir shapefile for each play contains the geographic location of each reservoir. Associated reservoir information within the linked data tables includes RRC reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are smaller than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production of >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl [5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]). Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  13. Onset of basin development in the Black Warrior Basin: Evidence from echinoderm biostratigraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waters, J.A. (West Georgia Coll., Carrollton, GA (United States). Dept. of Geology); Maples, C.G. (Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many echinoderm taxa have limited temporal ranges and are potentially significant regional index fossils. Echinoderm endemism and size have limited the utility of echinoderms in biostratigraphy, but in particular situations, echinoderm biostratigraphy has provided the key to timing of geological events. One example is the timing of the onset of basin development in the Black Warrior Basin (BWB), a major Carboniferous foreland basin in Alabama and Mississippi. Physical stratigraphy indicates that basinal development in the BWB began some time during or after deposition of the Tuscumbia Limestone (TL). The TL was deposited on a broad carbonate platform on the southern passive margin of North America. In the BWB, the TL is overlain by the Pride Mountain Formation (PMF), which is a mixed siliciclastic/carbonate unit that prograded into the basin from the west. Northeast of the BWB, on the Warrior platform, the TL is Monteagle Limestone and the PMF have been difficult owing to the lack of biostratigraphic acuity in rocks of this age, which has resulted in mistaken time stratigraphic relationships between the units. The authors have collected echinoderms in the basal limestones in the PMF, which indicates a Gasperian age for all but the lowest 30 cm of the PMF. The Genevievian apparently was a time of nondeposition in the BWB because this lowermost 30 cm of PMF is temporally equivalent to tens of meters of carbonates rocks in the Monteagle Limestone on the Warrior platform. Therefore, the onset of foreland basin development in the BWB can be constrained to early during the Genevievian Stage.

  14. K basins interim remedial action health and safety plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAY, P.T.

    1999-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The K Basins Interim Remedial Action Health and Safety Plan addresses the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), as they apply to the CERCLA work that will take place at the K East and K West Basins. The provisions of this plan become effective on the date the US Environmental Protection Agency issues the Record of Decision for the K Basins Interim Remedial Action, currently planned in late August 1999.

  15. Water Clarity Simulant for K East Basin Filtration Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a simulant formulation intended to mimic the behavior of the suspended solids in the K East (KE) Basin fuel storage pool. The simulant will be used to evaluate alternative filtration apparatus to improve Basin water clarity and to possibly replace the existing sandfilter. The simulant was formulated based on the simulant objectives, the key identified parameters important to filtration, the composition and character of the KE Basin suspended sludge particles, and consideration of properties of surrogate materials.

  16. Dual mechanisms of Laramide structural growth: the Bighorn uplift-Powder River basin transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jenkins, C.D. Jr.; Lisenbee, A.L.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bighorn uplift margin from Buffalo to Dayton, Wyoming, consists of a northern monoclinal domain and a southern fault-segmented domain. The Precambrian basement and overlying Paleozoic-Mesozoic strata have been rotated and folded in the monocline, producing a structural relief of 17,000 ft. Range-directed thrusts, formed by compression in the synclinal hinge of the monocline, are responsible for several second-order structures. The monocline may be transported eastward above a Rich-model thrust in the basement. The southern domain displays up to 20,000 ft of structural relief and consists of contiguous fault-bounded blocks with eastern margins 2 to 9 mi long. The largest and northernmost fault-bounded block, the Precambrian-cored Piney block, was transported eastward along a west-dipping reverse fault. Drilling indicates the fault overlies a vertical Cretaceous-Tertiary section underlain by nearly flat strata below the top of the Cretaceous Parkman Sandstone. Wells drilled through the Precambrian-cored Clear Creek thrust block west of Buffalo suggest a similar structural development. Reverse faulting in the southern domain occurred at a late stage, cutting through the synclinal flexure of the monocline, or occurred contemporaneously with the formation of the monocline to the north. Paleocene and Eocene syntectonic conglomerates underlie and front the range-bounding faults and exhibit basal angular unconformities. An arcuate band of conglomerates on the east side of Mowry basin implies the existence of other thrusts beneath Tertiary strata in the topographic basin, a conclusion reinforced by seismic data.

  17. Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitensky, M.W.

    1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient. 5 figs.

  18. Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitensky, Mark W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient.

  19. Continental Shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pietrafesa, L.J.

    1980-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in studies of the physical processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight is reported. NCSU personnel efforts have been focused on processing and analyzing existing data sets as well as planning and preparing for the Georgia Atlantic Bight Experiment (GABEX-1). Three cruises were conducted between June 1979 and February 1980 for the temperature/pressure recording instruments (June to Oct) and for the deployment of the GABEX I and other arrays. The Onslow Bay data sets extend over four years of observations from the mid- and outer-shelf region. Each mooring cruise has been coordinated with similar mooring deployments off Savannah and off Cape Romain with hydrographic cruises and with interdisciplinary cruises following Gulf Stream filaments and involving biological, chemical and physical oceanographers. The current meter data collected in the Carolina Capes is listed. Preprints and reprints are included.

  20. Preliminary hydrogeologic framework of the Silurian and Devonian carbonate aquifer system in the Midwestern Basins and Arches Region of Indiana, Ohio, Michigan, and Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, G.D. (Geological Survey, Columbus, OH (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aquifer and confining units have been identified; data on the thickness, extent, and structural configuration of these units have been collected; and thickness and structure-contour maps have been generated. Hydrologic information for the confining units and the aquifer also has been compiled. Where present, the confining unit that caps the carbonate aquifer consists of shales of Middle and Upper Devonian age and Lower Mississippian age, however, these units have been eroded from a large part of the study area. The regional carbonate aquifer consists of Silurian and Devonian limestones and dolomites. The rocks that comprise the aquifer in Indiana and northwestern Illinois are grouped into four major stratigraphic units: Brassfield and Sexton Creek Limestones or the Cataract Formation, the Salamonie Dolomite, the Salina Group, and the Detroit River and Traverse Formations or the Muscatatuck Group. In Ohio and southern Michigan the aquifer is grouped into ten stratigraphic units: Brassfield Limestone and Cataract Formation, the Dayton Limestone, the Rochester Shale equivalent, the Lockport Dolomite, the Salina Formation, the Hillsboro Sandstone, the Detroit River Group, the Columbus Limestone, the Delaware Limestone, and the Traverse Formation. The thickness of the carbonate aquifer increases from the contact with the outcropping Ordovician shales in the south-central part of the study area from the contact into the Appalachian Foreland Structural Basin from 0 ft at the contact to more than 700 ft at the eastern boundary of the study area, to more than 1,000 ft beneath Lake Erie and greater than 1,200 ft in southeastern Michigan. At the edge of the Michigan Intercontinental Structural Basin in western Ohio and eastern Indiana, the thickness ranges from 700 to 900 ft. and from 200 ft to 300 ft in south-central Indiana along the northeastern edge of the Illinois Intercontinental Structural Basin.

  1. NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

    2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

  2. A retrospective study of ecosystem effects of the 1976/77 regime shift in the eastern Pacific warm pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilchis, L. Ignacio

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, in the eastern Pacificalbacares and Katsuwonus pelamis, respectively), to drive

  3. INTEGRATED BASIN ANALYSIS OF THE MARCELLUS FORMATION IN THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slingerland, Rudy

    . of the Appalachian Basin requires accurate knowledge of their sedimentological, geochemical, and geomechanical performance is to first quantitatively relate gas content and geomechanical and petrophysical rock

  4. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Biasi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

  5. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  6. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References J. W. Pritchett...

  7. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nw Basin & Range Region (Pritchett, 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

  8. atlantic basin etude: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rifian Corridor Utrecht, Universiteit 7 Prediction of Seasonal Atlantic Basin Accumulated Cyclone Energy from 1 July PHILIP J. KLOTZBACH Geosciences Websites Summary: Prediction of...

  9. analogs permian basin: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Reservoir-analog Modeling of Upper Miocene Shallow-water and Deep-water Carbonate Deposits: Agua Amarga Basin, Southeast Spain. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  10. athabasca basin western: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Von P. 9 Modeling thermal convection in supradetachment basins: example from western Norway Geosciences Websites Summary: . DABROWSKI AND T. B. ANDERSEN Physics of Geological...

  11. appalachian basin exploration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary...

  12. athabasca basin canada: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (more) Stewart, Paul C. 2015-01-01 2 The Dispersion of Radon Above Deeply Buried Uranium Ore: Millennium Deposit, Athabasca Basin, SK , K Hattori1 Geosciences Websites...

  13. alluvial basin numerical: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boyer, Edmond 487 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic...

  14. artesian basins: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 181 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic...

  15. anoxic basin mariager: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boyer, Edmond 215 Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic sedimentary basins as guides for exploration of uranium deposits Geosciences Websites Summary: Mobile Pb-isotopes in Proterozoic...

  16. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  17. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References D. D. Blackwell, K. W. Wisian, M. C. Richards, Mark Leidig, Richard Smith, Jason McKenna (2003) Geothermal Resource Analysis And Structure Of Basin And Range...

  18. Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, John

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report for the Great Basin College Direct Use Geothermal Demonstration Project, outlining the technical aspects of the User Group System.

  19. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    August 2012 Review of Hanford K Basin and Cold Vacuum Drying Facility Found Fuel Multi-Canister Overpack Operations This report provides the results of an independent oversight...

  20. appalachian basin gas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the Danis A. Wiloso; Eddy A. Subroto; Eddy Hermanto 2009-01-01 102 Depositional environment and reservoir morphology of Canyon sandstones, Central Midland Basin, Texas Texas...

  1. Lithium In Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tufas Of The Great Basin- Exploration Implications For Geothermal Energy And Lithium Resources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  2. Numerical Modeling of Transient Basin and Range Extensional Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    behavior of basin and range extensionalgeothermal systems, and particularly, the evolution ofthe system temperature with time. Each modelconsists of two mountain ranges (1 km...

  3. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  4. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  5. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of A Tectonic Geomorphology Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Great Basin, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeographic...

  6. Data Acquisition-Manipulation At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  7. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    David Blackwell, Gary Oppliger (2005) A Map Of Geothermal Potential For The Great Basin, Usa- Recognition Of Multiple Geothermal Environments Additional References Retrieved from...

  8. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Of A Tectonic Geomorphology Study For Geothermal Exploration In The Great Basin, Usa Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleGeographic...

  9. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, POWDER RIVER BASIN, WYOMING AND MONTANA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana (fig. PQ-1) is considered to be "clean coal." For the location

  10. Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional...

  11. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blewittl, Mark F. Coolbaugh, Don Sawatzky, William Holt, James Davis, Richard A. Bennett (2003) Targeting Of Potential Geothermal Resources In The Great Basin From Regional...

  12. M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

  13. M-Area basin closure, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMullin, S.R.; Horvath, J.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M-Area, on the Savannah River Site, processes raw materials and manufactures fuel and target rods for reactor use. Effluent from these processes were discharged into the M-Area settling basin and Lost Lake, a natural wetland. The closure of this basin began in 1988 and included the removal and stabilization of basin fluids, excavation of all contaminated soils from affected areas and Lost Lake, and placement of all materials in the bottom of the emptied basin. These materials were covered with a RCRA style cap, employing redundant barriers of kaolin clay and geosynthetic material. Restoration of excavated uplands and wetlands is currently underway.

  14. Cold test data for equipment acceptance into 105-KE Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Packer, M.J.

    1994-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides acceptance testing of equipment to be installed in the 105-KE Basin for pumping sludge to support the discharge chute barrier doors installation.

  15. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring Activity Date Usefulness useful regional reconnaissance DOE-funding...

  16. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Northern Basin & Range Region (Biasi, Et Al., 2009) Exploration...

  17. ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTIONSIN THE EURASIAN BASIN OF THE ARCTIC OCEAN A THESISSUBMITTEDTO THE GRADUATE Section(1994)cruiseswere analyzed for their aluminum (Al) content; these two data setswere then combined

  18. Variable Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crustal Thickness In The Western Great Basin- A Compilation Of Old And New Refraction Data Abstract Utilizing commercial mine blasts and local earthquakes, as well as a dense...

  19. GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

  20. Western gas sands project. Quarterly basin activities report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing operations in the four primary study areas of the WESP for this period. Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Piceance Basin, and Uinta Basin. (DLC)

  1. Western Gas Sands Project. Quarterly basin activities report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of drilling and testing activities in the four primary study areas of the WGSP: Greater Green River Basin, Northern Great Plains Province, Uinta Basin, and Piceance Basin. (DLC)

  2. Synthesis of organic geochemical data from the Eastern Gas Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zielinski, R.E.; McIver, R.D.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over 2400 core and cuttings samples of Upper Devonian shales from wells in the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins have been characterized by organic geochemical methods to provide a basis for accelerating the exploitation of this unconventional, gas-rich resource. This work was part of a program initiated to provide industry with criteria for locating the best areas for future drilling and for the development of stimulation methods that will make recovery of the resource economically attractive. The geochemical assessment shows that the shale, in much of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins is source rock that is capable of generating enormous quantities of gas. In some areas the shales are also capable of generating large quantities of oil as well. The limiting factors preventing these sources from realizing most of their potential are their very low permeabilities and the paucity of potential reservoir rocks. This geochemical data synthesis gives direction to future selection of sites for stimulation research projects in the Appalachian Basin by pinpointing those areas where the greatest volumes of gas are contained in the shale matrix. Another accomplishment of the geochemical data synthesis is a new estimate of the total resource of the Appalachian Basin. The new estimate of 2500 TCF is 25 percent greater than the highest previous estimates. This gives greater incentive to government and industry to continue the search for improved stimulation methods, as well as for improved methods for locating the sites where those improved stimulation methods can be most effectively applied.

  3. The `Tortonian salinity crisis' of the eastern Betics (Spain) W. Krijgsman aY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    The late Miocene depositional history of the Lorca and Fortuna basins, both occupying an internal position stratigraphy of this regressive sequence which shows that the evaporites of the Lorca and Fortuna basins

  4. Appraisal of the tight sands potential of the Sand Wash and Great Divide Basins. Final report, June 1989--June 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The volume of future tight gas reserve additions is difficult to estimate because of uncertainties in the characterization and extent of the resource and the performance and cost-effectiveness of stimulation and production technologies. Ongoing R&D by industry and government aims to reduce the risks and costs of producing these tight resources, increase the certainty of knowledge of their geologic characteristics and extent, and increase the efficiency of production technologies. Some basins expected to contain large volumes of tight gas are being evaluated as to their potential contribution to domestic gas supplies. This report describes the results of one such appraisal. This analysis addresses the tight portions of the Eastern Greater Green River Basin (Sand Wash and Great Divide Subbasins in Northwestern Colorado and Southwestern Wyoming, respectively), with respect to estimated gas-in-place, technical recovery, and potential reserves. Geological data were compiled from public and proprietary sources. The study estimated gas-in-place in significant (greater than 10 feet net sand thickness) tight sand intervals for six distinct vertical and 21 areal units of analysis. These units of analysis represent tight gas potential outside current areas of development. For each unit of analysis, a ``typical`` well was modeled to represent the costs, recovery and economics of near-term drilling prospects in that unit. Technically recoverable gas was calculated using reservoir properties and assumptions about current formation evaluation and extraction technology performance. Basin-specific capital and operating costs were incorporated along with taxes, royalties and current regulations to estimate the minimum required wellhead gas price required to make the typical well in each of unit of analysis economic.

  5. Ambitious exploration, pipeline project may tap eastern C. I. S

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krueger, W.C. (Jebco Seismic Ltd., London (GB))

    1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on Project Vostok, a vastly ambitious project which will by the end of the century move gas from Eastern Siberia and the Sakhalin area through North and South Korea to Japan. This system will open one of the last available frontiers on earth for exploitation of many diverse natural resources. With the start of such a project, western oil companies can see a return on their investment possibly equal to investment in other more developed areas. Eastern Siberia and the Far East of the former Soviet Union possess huge hydrocarbon and mineral reserves. Their areal extent is 3.2 million sq km, equal to more than 40% of the U.S. land area. The conception of development of the Yakutsk, Irkutsk, and Sakhalin gas fields and mineral and timber resources of the Far East exemplifies a project that encompasses many different organizations and boundaries.

  6. 8 River Basin Closure and Institutional Change in Mexico's LermaChapala Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Christopher

    for irrigation expansion, and the drilling of new wells and the construction of new dams has been prohibited. Moreover, water pollution is serious, with significant wastewater reuse for irrigation within the basin. Lastly, water is being transferred from agriculture to the urban and industrial sectors, without due

  7. The Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Indian Reservation of Oregon John Day Basin Office: FY 1999 Watershed Restoration Projects : Annual Report 1999.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Shawn W.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The John Day River is the second longest free-flowing river in the contiguous United States and one of the few major subbasins in the Columbia River basin containing entirely unsupplemented runs of anadromous fish. Located in eastern Oregon, the basin drains over 8,000 square miles, the fourth largest drainage area in Oregon. With its beginning in the Strawberry Mountains near the town of Prairie City, the John Day flows 284 miles in a northwesterly direction, entering the Columbia River approximately four miles upstream of the John Day dam. With wild runs of spring chinook salmon and summer steelhead, red band, westslope cutthroat, and redband trout, the John Day system is truly one of national significance. The entire John Day basin was granted to the Federal government in 1855 by the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon (Tribes). In 1997, the Tribes established an office in the basin to coordinate restoration projects, monitoring, planning and other watershed activities on private and public lands. Once established, the John Day Basin Office (JDBO) initiated contracting the majority of its construction implementation actions with the Grant Soil and Water Conservation District (GSWCD), also located in the town of John Day. The GSWCD completes the landowner contact, preliminary planning, engineering design, permitting, construction contracting, and construction implementation phases of the projects. The JDBO completes the planning, grant solicitation/defense, environmental compliance, administrative contracting, monitoring, and reporting portion of the program. Most phases of project planning, implementation, and monitoring are coordinated with the private landowners and basin agencies, such as the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and Oregon Water Resources Department. In 1999, the JDBO and GSWCD proposed continuation of a successful partnership between the two agencies and basin landowners to implement an additional eleven (11) watershed conservation projects. The types of projects implemented included installation of infiltration galleries, permanent diversions, pumping stations, and irrigation efficiency upgrades. Project costs in 1999 totaled $284,514.00 with a total amount of $141,628.00 (50%) provided by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the remainder coming from other sources such as the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board, and individual landowners.

  8. Famennian microbial reef facies, Napier and Oscar Ranges, Canning Basin, western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, N P; Sumner, Dawn Y.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geol. Rundsch. , Western Australia: Geologic Maps of theof the Canning basin, Western Australia. West. Aust. Geol.the Canning Basin, Western Australia. In: Stromatolites (Ed.

  9. National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants application for approval to stabilize the 105N Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces-to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin is a reinforced unlined concrete structure 150 feet long, 50 feet wide, and 24 feet deep. The basin is segregated into seven areas sharing a common pool of water; the Discharge/Viewing (``D``) Pit, the fuel segregation pit (including a water tunnel that connects the ``D`` pit and segregation pit), two storage basins designated as North Basin and South Basin, two cask load-out pits, and a fuel examination area. The North Basin floor is entirely covered and the South Basin is partly covered by a modular array of cubicles formed by boron concrete posts and boron concrete panels.

  10. Habitat of oil in the Lindsborg field, Salina basin, north-central Kansas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, K.D. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lindsborg field was discovered in 1938, and is now 14 mi in length and 1-2 mi in width. It has a projected ultimate recovery of 16 MMBO. Three pay zones (5-20 ft thick) produce in the field. The Simpson pay zone (Middle Ordovician) is a well-rounded, quartzitic sandstone that is interpreted to be a paralic, high-energy shelf deposit. The Viola pay (Middle Ordovician) appears to be a dolomitic, lime grainstone but no cores are available to confirm this. The uppermost pay zone, the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa, is a finely laminated, vuggy, cherry dolomite interpreted to have been deposited as a subtidal lime mudstone in a restricted lagoon. The Simpson and Viola pays are structurally trapped in culminations along the crest of the Lindsborg anticline. Although the Maquoketa pay is structurally trapped with the other pay zones in the southern half of the field, its locus of production in the north half of the fields extends 100 ft vertically down the western flank of the anticline. The trapping mechanism is unclear due to lack of core control and modern logging suites, but it may be subtle updip diagenetic change from vuggy to nonvuggy dolomite. The Simpson and Maquoketa oils are geochemically distinct. Both may reflect efficient local source-to-reservoir migration from originally rich but marginally mature Ordovician and Devonian shales that contact each pay zone. If oil in the Lindsborg field is locally generated, the prospectivity of the relatively unproductive and underexplored Salina basin may be enhanced.

  11. Basin scale assessment of gas hydrate dissociation in response to climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.; Cameron-Smith, P.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating climate. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those now occurring in the arctic and those predicted under future climate change scenarios, has only recently been investigated. Field investigations have discovered substantial methane gas plumes exiting the seafloor along the Arctic Ocean margin, and the plumes appear at depths corresponding to the upper limit of a receding gas hydrate stability zone. It has been suggested that these plumes may be the first visible signs of the dissociation of shallow hydrate deposits due to ongoing climate change in the arctic. We simulate the release of methane from oceanic deposits, including the effects of fully-coupled heat transfer, fluid flow, hydrate dissociation, and other thermodynamic processes, for systems representative of segments of the Arctic Ocean margins. The modeling encompasses a range of shallow hydrate deposits from the landward limit of the hydrate stability zone down to water depths beyond the expected range of century-scale temperature changes. We impose temperature changes corresponding to predicted rates of climate change-related ocean warming and examine the possibility of hydrate dissociation and the release of methane. The assessment is performed at local-, regional-, and basin-scales. The simulation results are consistent with the hypothesis that dissociating shallow hydrates alone can result in significant methane fluxes at the seafloor. However, the methane release is likely to be confined to a narrow region of high dissociation susceptibility, defined by depth and temperature, and that any release will be continuous and controlled, rather than explosive. This modeling also establishes the first realistic bounds for methane release along the arctic continental shelf for potential hydrate dissociation scenarios, and ongoing work may help confirm whether climate change is already impacting the stability of the vast oceanic hydrate reservoir.

  12. San Juan Basin EC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt Ltd Jump to:RoscommonSBYSalton SeaBasin EC Jump to: navigation, search NEPA

  13. Sediment Basin Flume | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAir Jump to:ScottsSearchSt. Louis, MissouriBasin

  14. Great Basin Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreat Basin Geothermal

  15. Denver Basin Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE Facility DatabaseMichigan: Energy ResourcesDenair,DennisDenver Basin Map

  16. Guidelines for ground motion definition for the eastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gwaltney, R.C.; Aramayo, G.A.; Williams, R.T.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guidelines for the determination of earthquake ground motion definition for the eastern United States are established here. Both far-field and near-field guidelines are given. The guidelines were based on an extensive review of the current procedures for specifying ground motion in the United States. Both empirical and theoretical procedures were used in establishing the guidelines because of the low seismicity in the eastern United States. Only a few large- to great-sized earthquakes (M/sub s/ > 7.5) have occurred in this region, no evidence of tectonic surface ruptures related to historic or Holocene earthquakes has been found, and no currently active plate boundaries of any kind are known in this region. Very little instrumented data have been gathered in the East. Theoretical procedures are proposed so that in regions of almost no data, a reasonable level of seismic ground motion activity can be assumed. The guidelines are to be used to develop the safe shutdown earthquake (SSE). A new procedure for establishing the operating basis earthquake (OBE) is proposed, in particular for the eastern United States. The OBE would be developed using a probabilistic assessment of the geological conditions and the recurrence of seismic events at a site. These guidelines should be useful in development of seismic design requirements for future reactors. 17 refs., figs., tabs.

  17. Genetic stratigraphic sequence analysis in terrestrial aggrading basin: sequence stratigraphy of Narrabeen Group, Sydney basin, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, S.A.; Galloway, W.E.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of event/sequence stratigraphy concepts over the past 15 years has been one of the most significant contributions to systematic stratigraphic analyses of sedimentary basins. Most of these approaches, however, have not been applied to terrestrial aggradational settings but rather were developed in marginal basin settings where progradational and transgressive units are important components of the sequence framework. The principal objective of sequence definition is the identification of genetic stratigraphic units that share a common paleogeographic, climatic, and tectonic origin. Thus, the basic premise of sequence stratigraphy should be useful in the delineation of the depositional framework for any basin. Criteria were devised to identify three genetic stratigraphic sequences within the Triassic Narrabeen Group of the Sydney basin, an aggrading basin with a terrestrial fill. Individual sequences were chosen to emphasize significant changes in tectonic and climatic conditions, as reflected in the distinguishing characteristics of depositional style, sediment composition, and paleodrainage trends. The Munmorah sequence is characterized by lithic sandstone deposits of an extensive alluvial plain sourced by the New England foldbelt to the northeast. The overlying Bulgo sequence is distinguished by changes in sediment transport direction, lithology, and depositional style. The western Lachlan foldbelt emerged as a source of a quartz-rich braid-plain system. The Bald Hill sequence lies above the Bulgo and consists of sandstones and kaolinitic claystones that were deposited in extensive, highly oxidized alluvial plains that were dissected by numerous small streams. The distinctive mineralogy and depositional style of the Bald Hill deposits suggest climatic and tectonic changes in the Lachlan foldbelt source area.

  18. Analysis of Ignition Testing on K-West Basin Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Abrefah; F.H. Huang; W.M. Gerry; W.J. Gray; S.C. Marschman; T.A. Thornton

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 2100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) discharged from the N-Reactor have been stored underwater at the K-Basins in the 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The spent fuel has been stored in the K-East Basin since 1975 and in the K-West Basin since 1981. Some of the SNF elements in these basins have corroded because of various breaches in the Zircaloy cladding that occurred during fuel discharge operations and/or subsequent handling and storage in the basins. Consequently, radioactive material in the fuel has been released into the basin water, and water has leaked from the K-East Basin into the soil below. To protect the Columbia River, which is only 380 m from the basins, the SNF is scheduled to be removed and transported for interim dry storage in the 200 East Area, in the central portion of the Site. However, before being shipped, the corroded fuel elements will be loaded into Multi-Canister OverPacks and conditioned. The conditioning process will be selected based on the Integrated Process Strategy (IPS) (WHC 1995), which was prepared on the basis of the dry storage concept developed by the Independent Technical Assessment (ITA) team (ITA 1994).

  19. Oil and gas shows in the Salina basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newell, K.D.; Lambert, M.; Berendsen, P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book presents data from drillers' records and other information on the Salina basin wells in north-central Kansas. A listing that includes well name, operator, location, completion date, depth intervals, and formation name for each well is included. A map showing oil and gas fields in the surrounding area and wells drilled within the basin is offered.

  20. Economic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuanlin

    of Petroleum Evaluation Engineers (SPEE) parameters for evaluating Resource Plays 53 Appendix C: Detailed Play to traditional economic impacts, this report includes a petroleum engineering-based analysis that providesEconomic Impact PermianBasin'sOil&GasIndustry #12;The Economic Impact of the Permian Basin's Oil

  1. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    20.69 19.60 -5.3% 74.23 26.4% 4,845 31.9% 97.7% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan 13.74 16.13 17.4% 99.82 16.2% 840 32.1% 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New...

  2. Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    19.73 19.64 -0.4% 81.15 24.2% 4,650 24.8% 99.3% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan W 14.02 W 76.22 18.4% 713 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W...

  3. PALEOZOIC TRACE FOSSILS FROM THE KUFRA BASIN, LIBYA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    PALEOZOIC TRACE FOSSILS FROM THE KUFRA BASIN, LIBYA BRIAN R. TURNER AND MICHAEL J. BENTONPaleozoicsuccessionin the southeastern part ofthe Kufra Basin, Libya, comprises a sequence of sedimentary facies up to 250 m thick THEK u m BASINin southeast Libya (Figure 1)occupiesan area of about 400,000km2and is filled

  4. Seismic stratigraphy and structure of the Progreso Basin, Ecuador

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyes Arroyo, Patricio

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , but magnetic data indicate that basement is about 10 lun deep in the progress Basin and about 3 km deep in neighboring Santa Elena Basin. AKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank the Instituto Oceanogra fico de la Armada del Ecuador for providing funding of my...

  5. Paleogeographic and paleotectonic development of Laramide basins of SW Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstrand, P.M. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Initial Laramide-style deformation in SW Utah began in latest Cretaceous (late Campanian or Maastrichtian) time during deposition of the conglomeratic Canaan Peak Formation (TKcp) which thins onto a broad arch located on the northern Paunsaugunt Plateau (Paunsaugunt upwarp). This NNE-SSW trending upward affected sediment dispersal patterns during the early Paleocene and was the southern basin margin for braided fluvial sediments of the Grand Castle Formation (Tgc). These sediments were shed SE, from the inactive Sevier highlands, as far east as the Table Cliff Plateau. Laramide deformation increased during the late( ) Paleocene, after deposition of the Tgc, with the formation of at least two closed basins. During the late( ) Paleocene, the Johns Valley and Upper Valley anticlines, and Circle Cliff Uplift developed with sediment being shed to the SE, E, and SW into the Pine Hollow basin. During initial development of the Pine Hollow basin, the underlying TKcp and Tgc were reworked into the basal Pine Hollow Formation. Small alluvial fans bounded the basin, grading laterally into low-energy fluvial, playa mudflat, and ephemeral lacustrine environments. The basal Claron Formation represents a broad, closed basin that initially developed during the later Paleocene to the SW of the Pine Hollow basin. The Claron basin was bordered by low relief uplands, fluvial floodplains, and calcrete paleosols to the north and moderate relief uplands to the west and east. Shallow lacustrine deposition occurred to the south. Lacustrine onlap of Laramide structures by middle Eocene suggests cessation of Laramide deformation by this time.

  6. Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Dynamic management of water transfer between two interconnected river basins Francisco Cabo Katrin cause environmental damage in the donor basin. The recipient faces a trade-off between paying the price of the irrigated soil, or demand for water for highly productive activities like tourism), then the existence

  7. Creating a Geologic Play Book for Trenton-Black River Appalachian Basin Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas G. Patchen; Taury Smith; Ron Riley; Mark Baranoski; David Harris; John Hickman; John Bocan; Michael Hohn

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary isopach and facies maps, combined with a literature review, were used to develop a sequence of basin geometry, architecture and facies development during Cambrian and Ordovician time. The main architectural features--basins, sub basins and platforms--were identified and mapped as their positions shifted with time. This is significant because a better understanding of the control of basin geometry and architecture on the distribution of key facies and on subsequent reservoir development in Ordovician carbonates within the Trenton and Black River is essential for future exploration planning. Good exploration potential is thought to exist along the entire platform margin, where clean grainstones were deposited in skeletal shoals from Indiana thorough Ohio and Ontario into Pennsylvania. The best reservoir facies for the development of hydrothermal dolomites appears to be these clean carbonates. This conclusion is supported by observations taken in existing fields in Indiana, Ontario, Ohio and New York. In contrast, Trenton-Black River production in Kentucky and West Virginia has been from fractured, but non-dolomitized, limestone reservoirs. Facies maps indicate that these limestones were deposited under conditions that led to a higher argillaceous content than the cleaner limestones deposited in higher-energy environments along platform margins. However, even in the broad area of argillaceous limestones, clean limestone buildups have been observed in eastern outcrops and, if present and dolomitized in the subsurface, may provide additional exploration targets. Structure and isopach maps developed as part of the structural and seismic study supported the basin architecture and geometry conclusions, and from them some structural control on the location of architectural features may be inferred. This portion of the study eventually will lead to a determination of the timing relative to fracturing, dolomitization and hydrocarbon charging of reservoirs in the Trenton and Black River carbonates. The focus of this effort will shift in the next few months from regional to more detailed structural analyses. This new effort will include topics such as the determination of the source of the hot, dolomitizing fluids that created hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the Black River, and the probable migration paths of these fluids. Faults of suitable age, orientation and location to be relevant for hydrothermal dolomite creation in the Trenton-Black River play will be isolated and mapped, and potential fairways delineated. A detailed study of hydrothermal alteration of carbonate reservoirs was completed and is discussed at length in this report. New ideas that were developed from this research were combined with a literature review and existing concepts to develop a model for the development of hydrothermal dolomite reservoirs in the study area. Fault-related hydrothermal alteration is a key component of this model. Hydrothermal alteration produces a spectrum of features in reservoirs, ranging from leached limestone and microporosity to matrix dolomite, saddle dolomite-lined breccias, zebra fabrics and fractures. Mineralization probably occurred during the pressure drop associated with the rise of fluids up the fault system, and is due to the mixing of hydrothermal fluids with cooler, in situ fluids. Once they began to cool themselves, the hydrothermal fluids, which had a lower pH and higher salinity than formation fluids, were capable of leaching the host limestones. Microporosity is common in leached limestones, and it is likely that it was formed, in some cases, during hydrothermal alteration. Dolomite leaching occurs near the end of the paragenetic sequence, and may significantly enhance porosity. However, leaching of dolomite typically is followed by the precipitation of calcite or anhydrite, which reduces porosity. A final conclusion is that hydrothermal alteration may be more common than previously thought, and some features previously attributed to other processes may be in fact be hydrothermal in origin. Production d

  8. Flexural interpretation of Mississippian stratigraphy in the Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ettensohn, F.R. (Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Geological Science); Pashin, J.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpretation of Mississippian rocks in the Black Warrior basin and adjacent parts of the Appalachian basin using basic viscoelastic flexural models suggests that this sequence of rocks is largely a response to deformational loading and relaxation accompany early phases of Ouachita orogeny. A Kinderhook-Valmeyer unconformity atop the Maury Shale apparently represents an initial tectophase of Ouachita orogeny too distant to affect the basin otherwise. However, a Valmeyer-Chesterian unconformity atop the Tuscumbia, along which the Genevievian Stage is absent or condensed, indicates that a second Ouachita tectophase had become localized along the southwest part of alabama promontory, close enough to generate the Black Warrior foreland basin, fill it with a flexural sequence of sediments, and alter sedimentation patterns in nearby parts of the Appalachian basin.

  9. Effect of electron beam irradiation on quality and shelf-life of Tommy Atkins mango (Mangifera indica l.) and blueberry (Vaccinium corymbsum l.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moreno Tinjaca, Maria Alexandra

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this research was to determine the feasibility of using electron beam irradiation as an alternative disinfestation technology while preserving the overall quality of mangoes, and to verify its suitability for the preservation shelf...

  10. Stratification Limited Vertical Ventilation: Effects of Water-column Stabilities on the Formation of Hypoxia on the Texas-Louisiana Shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Bo

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    extension of hypoxia and vertical DO flux through it. Furthermore, I discussed possible mechanisms causing bottom mixed layer on the continental shelf, including return flow caused by upwelling, inertial motions and tidal currents. Diapycnal diffusivity...

  11. Radioactive air emissions notice of construction for the 105N Basin Stabilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coenenberg, E.T. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 105N Basin (basin) Stabilization will place the basin in a radiologically and environmentally safe condition so that it can be decommissioned at a later date. The basin is in the 105N Building, which is located in the 100N Area. The 100N Area is located in the Northern portion of the Hanford Site approximately 35 miles northwest of the city of Richland, Washington. The basin stabilization objectives are to inspect for Special Nuclear Material (SNM) (i.e., fuel assemblies and fuel pieces), remove the water from the basin and associated pits, and stabilize the basin surface. The stabilization will involve removal of basin hardware, removal of basin sediments, draining of basin water, and cleaning and stabilizing basin surfaces to prevent resuspension of radioactive emissions to the air. These activities will be conducted in accordance with all applicable regulations.

  12. Exploratory shaft conceptual design report: Paradox Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report summarizes the conceptualized design for an exploratory shaft facility at a representative site in the Paradox Basin located in the southeastern part of Utah. Conceptualized designs for other possible locations (Permian Basin in Texas and Gulf Interior Region salt domes in Louisiana and Mississippi) are summarized in separate reports. The purpose of the exploratory shaft facility is to provide access to the reference repository horizon to permit in situ testing of the salt. The in-situ testing is necessary to verify repository salt design parameters, evaluate isotropy and homogeneity of the salt, and provide a demonstration of the constructability and confirmation of the design to gain access to the repository. The fundamental purpose of this conceptual design report is to assure the feasibility of the exploratory shaft project and to develop a reliable cost estimate and realistic schedule. Because a site has not been selected and site-specific subsurface data are not available, it has been necessary to make certain assumptions in order to develop a conceptual design for an exploratory shaft facility in salt. As more definitive information becomes available to support the design process, adjustments in the projected schedule and estimated costs will be required.

  13. Exploratory shaft conceptual design report: Permian Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This conceptual design report summarizes the conceptualized design for an exploratory shaft facility at a representative site in the Permian Basin locatd in the western part of Texas. Conceptualized designs for other possible locations (Paradox Basin in Utah and Gulf Interior Region salt domes in Louisiana and Mississippi) are summarized in separate reports. The purpose of the exploratory shaft facility is to provide access to the reference repository horizon to permit in situ testing of the salt. The in situ testing is necessary to verify repository salt design parameters, evaluate isotropy and homogeneity of the salt, and provide a demonstration of the constructability and confirmation of the design to gain access to the repository. The fundamental purpose of this conceptual design report is to assure the feasibility of the exploratory shaft project and to develop a reliable cost estimate and realistic schedule. Because a site has not been selected and site-specific subsurface data are not available, it has been necessary to make certain assumptions in order to develop a conceptual design for an exploratory shaft facility in salt. As more definitive information becomes available to support the design process, adjustments in the projected schedule and estimated costs will be required.

  14. Assessment of Factors Influencing Effective CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity and Injectivity in Eastern Gas Shales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godec, Michael

    2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Building upon advances in technology, production of natural gas from organic-rich shales is rapidly developing as a major hydrocarbon supply option in North America and around the world. The same technology advances that have facilitated this revolution - dense well spacing, horizontal drilling, and hydraulic fracturing - may help to facilitate enhanced gas recovery (EGR) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage in these formations. The potential storage of CO {sub 2} in shales is attracting increasing interest, especially in Appalachian Basin states that have extensive shale deposits, but limited CO{sub 2} storage capacity in conventional reservoirs. The goal of this cooperative research project was to build upon previous and on-going work to assess key factors that could influence effective EGR, CO{sub 2} storage capacity, and injectivity in selected Eastern gas shales, including the Devonian Marcellus Shale, the Devonian Ohio Shale, the Ordovician Utica and Point Pleasant shale and equivalent formations, and the late Devonian-age Antrim Shale. The project had the following objectives: (1) Analyze and synthesize geologic information and reservoir data through collaboration with selected State geological surveys, universities, and oil and gas operators; (2) improve reservoir models to perform reservoir simulations to better understand the shale characteristics that impact EGR, storage capacity and CO{sub 2} injectivity in the targeted shales; (3) Analyze results of a targeted, highly monitored, small-scale CO{sub 2} injection test and incorporate into ongoing characterization and simulation work; (4) Test and model a smart particle early warning concept that can potentially be used to inject water with uniquely labeled particles before the start of CO{sub 2} injection; (5) Identify and evaluate potential constraints to economic CO{sub 2} storage in gas shales, and propose development approaches that overcome these constraints; and (6) Complete new basin-level characterizations for the CO{sub 2} storage capacity and injectivity potential of the targeted eastern shales. In total, these Eastern gas shales cover an area of over 116 million acres, may contain an estimated 6,000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas in place, and have a maximum theoretical storage capacity of over 600 million metric tons. Not all of this gas in-place will be recoverable, and economics will further limit how much will be economic to produce using EGR techniques with CO{sub 2} injection. Reservoir models were developed and simulations were conducted to characterize the potential for both CO{sub 2} storage and EGR for the target gas shale formations. Based on that, engineering costing and cash flow analyses were used to estimate economic potential based on future natural gas prices and possible financial incentives. The objective was to assume that EGR and CO{sub 2} storage activities would commence consistent with the historical development practices. Alternative CO{sub 2} injection/EGR scenarios were considered and compared to well production without CO{sub 2} injection. These simulations were conducted for specific, defined model areas in each shale gas play. The resulting outputs were estimated recovery per typical well (per 80 acres), and the estimated CO{sub 2} that would be injected and remain in the reservoir (i.e., not produced), and thus ultimately assumed to be stored. The application of this approach aggregated to the entire area of the four shale gas plays concluded that they contain nearly 1,300 Tcf of both primary production and EGR potential, of which an estimated 460 Tcf could be economic to produce with reasonable gas prices and/or modest incentives. This could facilitate the storage of nearly 50 Gt of CO{sub 2} in the Marcellus, Utica, Antrim, and Devonian Ohio shales.

  15. Uinta Basin Oil and Gas Development Air Quality Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Production EASTERN UTAH BLM Proposed Leasing for Oil Shale and Tar Sands Development "Indian Country" Regulatory Authority Controlled by the Tribes and EPA Oil Shale Leasing Tar Sands Leasing "Indian Country

  16. A proposal for federal legislation for the protection and preservation of submerged cultural resources on the outer continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Richard Evans

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Outer Continental Shelf. (August 1978) Richard Evans Hamilton, B. S. , University of Michigan Chairman of Advisory Committee: John L. Seymour This thesis examines English and American court cases to determine the origin and applications of the so.... With these techniques, in 1968 and 1969, archaeo- logists raised and reconstructed an entire fourth-century B. C. merchant vessel sunk off the coast of Kyrenia, Cyprus. Borrowing 5 the technology of the offshore oil industry, in the form of magneto- meters, metal...

  17. Hurricane Andrew's impact on natural gas and oil facilities on the outer continental shelf (interim report as of November 1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniels, G.R.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interim report reviews Hurricane Andrew's impact on Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) natural gas and oil drilling and production facilities. The report provides background on Hurricane Andrew's progression, discusses how OCS operators responded to the storm, summarizes the types of damage to offshore facilies caused by Hurricane Andrew, and discusses Minerals Management Service's continuing damage assessment and repair efforts. The summaries of damage estimates are presented in tables in Appendix 1. A glossary of report terminology is provided in Appendix 2.

  18. Provenance, areal distribution, and contemporary sedimentation of quartz sand and silt types on the mid-atlantic continental shelf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prusak, Deanne

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    been smoothed and rounded by chemical processes. The other source is the sedimentary and crystalline rocks of montane regions of the Mid-Atlantic states, represented by relatively elongate and angular quartz grains with pristine crystalline... than 1% rock fragments and 2'E. heavy minerals of which 70/ is amphibole and garnet (Hubert and Neal, 1967). A higher heavy mineral and rock fragment content is found, however, on the mid-shelf off New Jersey in the vicinity of the alluvial apron...

  19. Effects of marinade and spice application on palatability and shelf life of vacuum-packaged lamb loin chops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strachan, Destiny Nicole

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an inconsistent, unpredictable product with low volume turnover. The increased amount of time lamb spends in the retail case is partially due to its premium price as compared to competing proteins. Jeremiah, Reagan, Smith, and Carpenter (1971) reported... in appearance and quality after 21 days of storage and 3 days of retail display. Reagan, Jeremiah, Smith, and Carpenter (1971), and Smith, Seideman, Savel1, Dill, and Vanderzant (1983) found improvement in retail case shelf life of lamb cuts in vacuum...

  20. Market Research Survey of Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Portable MS Systems for IAEA Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hart, Garret L.; Hager, George J.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Duckworth, Douglas C.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results for the market research survey of mass spectrometers that are deemed pertinent to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) needs and strategic objectives. The focus of the report is on MS instruments that represent currently available (or soon to be) commercial off-the shelf (COTS) technology and weigh less than 400 pounds. A compilation of all available MS instruments (36 COTS and 2 R&D) is presented, along with pertinent information regarding each instrument.