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1

THE INTRACONTINENTAL BASINS (ICONS) ATLAS APPLICATIONS IN EASTERN AUSTRALIA PESA Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium III Sydney, 1417 September, 2008 275  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE INTRACONTINENTAL BASINS (ICONS) ATLAS ­ APPLICATIONS IN EASTERN AUSTRALIA PESA Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium III Sydney, 14­17 September, 2008 275 The IntraCONtinental basinS (ICONS) atlas of intracontinental basins (ICONS atlas), using freely available global and regional datasets. Firstly, we are trying

Müller, Dietmar

2

Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas-Louisiana- Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin Appalachian Basin Wind River Basin Eastern Shelf NW Shelf Abo Sussex-Shannon Muddy J Mesaverde- Lance-Lewis Medina/Clinton-Tuscarora Bradford-Venango-Elk Berea-Murrysville Piceance Basin Bossier Williston Basin Ft Worth Basin Davis Bighorn Basin Judith River- Eagle Permian Basin Anadarko Basin Denver Basin San Juan Basin North-Central Montana Area Uinta Basin Austin Chalk Codell-Niobrara Penn-Perm Carbonate Niobrara Chalk Dakota Morrow Mesaverde Thirty- One Cleveland Ozona Canyon Wasatch- Mesaverde Red Fork Mesaverde Granite Wash Stuart City-Edwards Bowdoin- Greenhorn Travis Peak Olmos Cotton Valley Vicksburg Wilcox Lobo Pictured Cliffs Cretaceous Cretaceous-Lower Tertiary Mancos- Dakota Gilmer Lime Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States

3

Sequence stratigraphic and sedimentologic analysis of the Permian San Andres Formation (upper Leonardian-lower Guadalupian), Northwest Shelf, Permian Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 1958). The Tobosa Basin was the site of dominantly shallow water deposition until the late Paleozoic (Hills, 1972; Hills, 1984). Collision between Gondwana and the southern margin of North America caused reactivation of older zones of weakness during...) was deposited on carbonate platforms around Permian Basin region and is an extensive hydrocarbon reservoir in this area. The San Andres Formation on the Northwest Shelf is well exposed in southeastern New Mexico and West Texas. This study establishes sequence...

Beserra, Troy Brett

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

4

AUSTRALIAN-ANTARCTIC RIFTING PESA Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium III Sydney, 1417 September, 2008 271  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUSTRALIAN-ANTARCTIC RIFTING PESA Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium III Sydney, 14­17 September Bight region to chron 20 farther to the west (Sayers et al. 2001; Colwell et al. 2006). Alternatively

Müller, Dietmar

5

Hydrocarbon potential of Spearfish Formation in eastern Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

More than 36 million bbl of oil have been produced from stratigraphic traps in sandstones of the Triassic-Jurassic Spearfish Formation in the eastern part of the Williston basin. Newburg field has produced 32 million bbl of oil and Waskada field, discovered in 1980, is estimated to have over 10 million bbl of oil in reserves. A binocular microscopic and petrographic examination of cores from each of the fields has revealed considerable differences in the characteristics of producing sandstones. Cores and sample cuttings from 30 wells in the US and Canada form the basis for this comparison of the two fields. The Spearfish Formation consists of porous, permeable, well-sorted, very fine-grained sandstones with a sucrosic dolomite matrix that are interbedded with impermeable sandstones, siltstones, and shale. The environment of deposition is believed to be the intertidal zone (tidal flat). Sediments of the Spearfish Formation were deposited by a transgressive sea on an eroded Mississippian carbonate section. Oil found in the Spearfish sandstones is derived from the Mississippian.

Dodge C.J.N.; Reid, F.S.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium IVBrisbane, QLD, 1014 September, 2012 1 1 Earthbyte Group, School of Geosciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium IVBrisbane, QLD, 10­14 September, 2012 1 1 Earthbyte Group Australian Bight section. Here, we use two datasets derived from seismic refraction data to investigate framework for studying the petroleum systems within basins that developed as a result of continental

Müller, Dietmar

7

Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The principal research effort for Phase 1 (Concept Development) of the project has been data compilation; determination of the tectonic, depositional, burial, and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin; basin modeling (geohistory, thermal maturation, hydrocarbon expulsion); petroleum system identification; comparative basin evaluation; and resource assessment. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, and regional cross sections have been prepared. Structure, isopach and formation lithology maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and burial history, thermal maturation history, and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs include Upper Jurassic and Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies; shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies; and carbonate shoal, shelf and reef facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring during the Early to Late Cretaceous. The geohistory of the North Louisiana Salt Basin is comparable to the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin with the major difference being the elevated heat flow the strata in the North Louisiana Salt Basin experienced in the Cretaceous due primarily to reactivation of upward movement, igneous activity, and erosion associated with the Monroe and Sabine Uplifts. Potential undiscovered reservoirs in the North Louisiana Salt Basin are Triassic Eagle Mills sandstone and deeply buried Upper Jurassic sandstone and limestone. Potential underdeveloped reservoirs include Lower Cretaceous sandstone and limestone and Upper Cretaceous sandstone.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

8

Lower Permian facies of the Palo Duro Basin, Texas: depositional systems, shelf-margin evolution, paleogeography, and petroleum potential  

SciTech Connect

A Palo geological study suggests that potential hydrocarbon reservoirs occur in shelf-margin carbonates, delta-front sandstones, and fan-delta arkoses. Zones of porous (greater than 10 percent) dolomite are concentrated near shelf margins and have configurations similar to productive Lower Permian shelf-margin trends in New Mexico. Delta-front sandstones (log-computed porosity of 18 to 25 percent) are similar to producing deltaic sandstones of Morris Buie-Blaco Fields in North-Central Texas. Porous (18 percent) fan-delta sandstones along the south flank of the Amarillo Uplift may form reservoirs similiar to that of the Mobeetie Field on the north side of the Amarillo Uplife in Wheeler County, Texas. Potential hydrocarbon source beds occur in slope and basinal environments. Total organic carbon generally ranges from 1 to 2.3 percent by weight and averages 0.589 percent by weight.

Handford, C.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been data compilation and the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin and basin modeling and petroleum system identification. In the first nine (9) months of Year 2, the research focus was on the determination of the burial and thermal maturation histories, and during the remainder of the year the emphasis has basin modeling and petroleum system identification. Existing information on the North Louisiana Salt Basin has been evaluated, an electronic database has been developed, regional cross sections have been prepared, structure and isopach maps have been constructed, and burial history, thermal maturation history and hydrocarbon expulsion profiles have been prepared. Seismic data, cross sections, subsurface maps and related profiles have been used in evaluating the tectonic, depositional, burial and thermal maturation histories of the basin. Oil and gas reservoirs have been found to be associated with salt-supported anticlinal and domal features (salt pillows, turtle structures and piercement domes); with normal faulting associated with the northern basin margin and listric down-to-the-basin faults (state-line fault complex) and faulted salt features; and with combination structural and stratigraphic features (Sabine and Monroe Uplifts) and monoclinal features with lithologic variations. Petroleum reservoirs are mainly Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous fluvial-deltaic sandstone facies and Lower Cretaceous and Upper Cretaceous shoreline, marine bar and shallow shelf sandstone facies. Cretaceous unconformities significantly contribute to the hydrocarbon trapping mechanism capacity in the North Louisiana Salt Basin. The chief petroleum source rock in this basin is Upper Jurassic Smackover lime mudstone beds. The generation of hydrocarbons from Smackover lime mudstone was initiated during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary. Hydrocarbon expulsion commenced during the Early Cretaceous and continued into the Tertiary with peak expulsion occurring mainly during the Late Cretaceous.

Ernest A. Mancini; Donald A. Goddard; Ronald K. Zimmerman

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

10

High?frequency acoustic propagation measurements during solitary wave events on the eastern continental shelf edge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High?frequency environmental acoustics studies were conducted during July 1993 on the continental shelf edge east of New Jersey. Internal solitons previously observed in this region near the shelf/slope front propagate in packets usually in the summer seasonal thermocline and have been associated with anomalous low frequency sound propagation. Acoustic pings were collected using a towed sled instrumented with sonar arrays. Synoptic measurements to characterize the solitons including sound velocity profiles sampled every 10 min over a tidal cycle and moored data including current temperature and conductivity. Acoustic measurements were taken during sled tows parallel to the bottom bathymetry normal to the propagation direction over a region determined from bottom cores to be nearly homogeneous fine sand. Measurements were taken using the sled as a source for backscattermeasurements and also using moored acoustic sources and the sled based transducers as receivers. The observed solitons had amplitudes of approximately 10 m and periods of several minutes. The backscatter variability during soliton events was observed to approximately 1020 dB and will be compared to modeled predictions based on environmental data.

Edward R. Levine; Richard R. Shell; Michael R. Medeiros

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-BOE.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eastern Great Basin By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Eastern Great Basin By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 6,600 pixels, file size: 17.82 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Eastern Great Basin By 2001 BOE Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Nevada File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:58, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 17:58, 20 December 2010 5,100 × 6,600 (17.82 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

12

Geologic Controls of Hydrocarbon Occurrence in the Appalachian Basin in Eastern Tennessee, Southwestern Virginia, Eastern Kentucky, and Southern West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments of a three-year program to investigate the geologic controls of hydrocarbon occurrence in the southern Appalachian basin in eastern Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southern West Virginia. The project: (1) employed the petroleum system approach to understand the geologic controls of hydrocarbons; (2) attempted to characterize the P-T parameters driving petroleum evolution; (3) attempted to obtain more quantitative definitions of reservoir architecture and identify new traps; (4) is worked with USGS and industry partners to develop new play concepts and geophysical log standards for subsurface correlation; and (5) geochemically characterized the hydrocarbons (cooperatively with USGS). Third-year results include: All project milestones have been met and addressed. We also have disseminated this research and related information through presentations at professional meetings, convening a major workshop in August 2003, and the publication of results. Our work in geophysical log correlation in the Middle Ordovician units is bearing fruit in recognition that the criteria developed locally in Tennessee and southern Kentucky are more extendible than anticipated earlier. We have identified a major 60 mi-long structure in the western part of the Valley and Ridge thrust belt that has been successfully tested by a local independent and is now producing commercial amounts of hydrocarbons. If this structure is productive along strike, it will be one of the largest producing structures in the Appalachians. We are completing a more quantitative structural reconstruction of the Valley and Ridge and Cumberland Plateau than has been made before. This should yield major dividends in future exploration in the southern Appalachian basin. Our work in mapping, retrodeformation, and modeling of the Sevier basin is a major component of the understanding of the Ordovician petroleum system in this region. Prior to our undertaking this project, this system was the least understood in the Appalachian basin. This project, in contrast to many if not most programs undertaken in DOE laboratories, has a major educational component wherein three Ph.D. students have been partially supported by this grant, one M.S. student partially supported, and another M.S. student fully supported by the project. These students will be well prepared for professional careers in the oil and gas industry.

Hatcher, Robert D

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

13

Model for deposition of bedded halite in a shallow shelf setting, San Andres Formation, Palo Duro Basin, Texas panhandle  

SciTech Connect

Existing depositional models for evaporites do not adequately describe facies relationships, halite fabrics, and trace element geochemistry of halite from the Permian San Andres Formation. Interbedding of anhydritic halite and mudstone with disrupted bedding records alternation between marine-dominated brine pool and subaerial environments. Chevron structures and hopper crystal cumulates in the halite indicate subaqueous deposition. Abundant anhydrite partings within halite, which thicken and become interbedded with marine shelf carbonates to the south, demonstrate the facies equivalence and physical connection of evaporite and marine environments. Maintenance of marine character in trace element profiles through halite sequences documents the episodic influx of marine water. Haloturbated structure in mudstone interbeds within the halite is produced by displacive growth of halite within mudstone and dissolution and collapse of this halite as ground-water chemistry fluctuates in response to conditions of alternating desiccation and wetting. Karst features cutting the halite also imply subaerial exposure. Mapping of the fine-scale sedimentary structures, geochemical signature, and insoluble component mineralogy of halite sequences indicates that the brine pool environment extended over areas in excess of 100 km/sup 2/. Sabkha, salina, playa, and deep water basin models of halite-precipitating environments do not satisfactorily describe the shallow marine shelf depositional environment of the San Andres halite.

Hovorka, S.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Geothermal energy resource investigations in the Eastern Copper River Basin, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This report consists of a review of the geological, geochemical and geophysical data available for the Eastern Copper River basin with emphasis on the mud volcanoes, and the results of geophysical and geochemical studies carried out in the summers of 1982 and 1984. The purpose was to determine if there are geothermal energy resources in the Copper River Basin. The Eastern Copper River basin is situated on the flanks of a major volcano, Mt. Drum, which was active as late as 200,000 years ago and which is thought to have retained significant amounts of residual heat at high levels. Mt. Wrangell, farther to the east, has been volcanically active up to the present time. The 1982 geophysical and geochemical surveys located three principal areas of possible geothermal interest, one near Tazlina and two near the Klawasi mud volcanoes. The intensive survey work of 1984 was concentrated on those areas. We have integrated the results of soil helium, soil mercury, gravity, aeromagnetic, electrical, self-potential, and controlled-source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) surveys to evaluate the geothermal potential of the areas studied. 36 figs.

Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Summary of Age-Dating Analysis in the Fenner Basin, Eastern Mojave Desert, California  

SciTech Connect

Stable isotopes of oxygen (oxygen-18) and hydrogen (deuterium) in water were measured to determine recharge sources for Fenner Basin groundwater. The deuterium and oxygen-18 signatures (reported as {delta}D and {delta}{sup 18}O values) ranged from -11.9 to -9.3 per mil. The more negative values originate from high elevation recharge in the New York Mountains and were also observed in the northern and eastern parts of the groundwater basin. less negative values were observed in the Providence Mountains along the western part of the basin. Groundwater collected in the Fenner Gap (i.e. Project Area) had signatures between -10.6 and -10.9 per mil, suggesting a mixture of recharge from both northern, western, and probably local recharge areas in the basin. The annual contribution of groundwater recharge to Fenner Gap from the Clipper, Marble, and Old Woman mountains is still inconclusive due to lack of isotopic data. Isotopic signatures of mean annual precipitation collected by Friendman and others (1992) at Mitchell Caverns, as well as recently recharged groundwater in the Providence and New York mountains, are similar to the isotopic values in Fenner Gap groundwater. This indicates that this groundwater has a Holocene age (less than 10,000 years old), since groundwater recharged during the Pleistocene had isotopic signatures significantly more negative than today due to past global cooling.

Davisson, M.L.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Estimating Annual Precipitation in the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California  

SciTech Connect

Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Previous attempts to create precipitation-elevation functions in western Nevada have been difficult and result in large uncertainty. In the WRD data analysis, the effect of geographic scale on the precipitation-elevation function was overlooked. This contributed to an erroneous Maxey-Eakin recharge estimate.

Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-gas.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Great Basin By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Great Basin By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 6,600 pixels, file size: 17.82 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Eastern Great Basin By 2001 Gas Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Nevada File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:59, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 17:59, 20 December 2010 5,100 × 6,600 (17.82 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

18

File:EIA-Eastern-GreatBasin-liquids.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Great Basin By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Great Basin By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(5,100 × 6,600 pixels, file size: 17.82 MB, MIME type: application/pdf) Description Eastern Great Basin By 2001 Liquids Reserve Class Sources Energy Information Administration Authors Samuel H. Limerick; Lucy Luo; Gary Long; David F. Morehouse; Jack Perrin; Robert F. King Related Technologies Oil, Natural Gas Creation Date 2005-09-01 Extent Regional Countries United States UN Region Northern America States Utah, Nevada File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 17:59, 20 December 2010 Thumbnail for version as of 17:59, 20 December 2010 5,100 × 6,600 (17.82 MB) MapBot (Talk | contribs) Automated bot upload

19

A Calibrated Maxey-Eakin Curve for the Fenner Basin of the Eastern Mojave Desert, California  

SciTech Connect

Metropolitan Water District (MWD) of southern California and Cadiz Inc. investigated the feasibility of storing Colorado River water in groundwater aquifers of the eastern Mojave Desert as a future drought mitigation strategy. This culminated in the public release of the Cadiz Groundwater Storage and Dry-Year Supply program Draft EIR, which included pilot percolation studies, groundwater modeling, and precipitation/runoff analysis in the Fenner groundwater basin, which overlies the proposed storage site. The project proposes to store and withdrawal Colorado River water over a 50-year period, but will not exceed the natural replenishment rates of the groundwater basin. Several independent analyses were conducted to estimate the rates of natural groundwater replenishment to the Fenner Groundwater Basin, which was included in the Draft EIR. The US Geologic Survey, Water Resources Division (WRD) officially submitted comments during public review and concluded that the natural groundwater replenishment rates calculated for the Draft EIR were too high. In the WRD review, they provided a much lower recharge calculation based on a Maxey-Eakin estimation approach. This approach estimates annual precipitation over an entire basin as a function of elevation, followed by calibration against annual recharge rates. Recharge rates are estimated on the basis that some fraction of annual precipitation will recharge, and that fraction will increase with increasing elevation. This results in a hypothetical curve relating annual groundwater recharge to annual precipitation. Field validation of recharge rates is critical in order to establish credibility to any estimate. This is due to the fact that the Maxey-Eakin model is empirical. An empirical model is derived from practical experience rather than basic theory. Therefore, a validated Maxey-Eakin model in one groundwater basin does not translate to a different one. In the WRD's Maxey-Eakin model, they used a curve calibrated against three locations in western Nevada and applied it to the Fenner Basin. It is of particular importance to note that all three of the WRD's location are west of longitude 116{sup o}W, where annual precipitation is significantly lower. Therefore, The WRD's Maxey-Eakin curve was calibrated to a drier climate, and its application to the Fenner Basin lacks credibility.

Davisson, M.L.; Rose, T.P.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Applying the basin model: Assessing habitat suitability of young-of-the-year demersal fishes on the New York Bight continental shelf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The extent to which young-of-the-year (YOY) fish habitats become saturated with new recruits has remained relatively unevaluated for temperate, demersal, continental shelf fishes. MacCall's [1990. Dynamic Geography of Marine Fish Populations. Washington Sea Grant Program, University of Washington Press, Seattle, Washington] basin model was used as a framework for examining the dynamics of an assemblage of recently settled fishes in relation to available microhabitat on the New York Bight continental shelf (USA). For four abundant species (three flatfish, one merlucciid hake), density-specific patterns of microhabitat selection, spatial dispersion and overall cross-shelf habitat use were investigated using a research submersible over three cross-shelf transects during the late summer settlement season. Typically, recruits that saturated YOY habitats (>1ind/m2) were randomly distributed within underwater transects and formed weak associations with specific microhabitats. At lower densities (<1ind/m2), recruit spacing tended toward nonrandom (clumped/even) with increasing significant affinities for ecologically important substrates (i.e. Limanda ferruginea, sand wave crests/low shell hash). For Citharichthys arctifrons, clumping appeared to increase with complexity of the habitat. Several less-abundant species (i.e. Urophycis chuss, Tautogolabrus adspersus) formed tight associations with rare habitat features and may consequently encounter the greatest bottleneck for space during the benthic/pelagic transition. Although restricted by the scale of observation, these results begin to elucidate the mechanisms by which habitat quality and quantity moderate recruitment on the continental shelf.

Mark C. Sullivan; Robert K. Cowen; Kenneth W. Able; Michael P. Fahay

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Exploration applications of a transgressive tidal-flats model to Mississippian Midale carbonates, eastern Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

Midale (Mississippian) production was first indicated in 1953 in Saskatchewan, Canada. The unit was initially defined in the subsurface as the carbonate interval between the top of the Frobisher Anhydrite and the base of the Midale Anhydrite. This same nomenclature is used in this paper. In 1953, Midale production was found on the US side of the Williston basin in Bottineau County, North Dakota. Later exploration extended Midale production westward into Burke County, North Dakota, in 1955. Cumulative production from the Midale is approximately 660 million bbl with 640 million from the Canadian side of the Williston basin. Initially, hydrocarbon entrapment in the Midale was believed to be controlled by the Mississippian subcrop, with the Burke County production controlled by low-relief structural closure. Petrographic examination of cores and cuttings from the Midale in both Saskatchewan, Canada, and Burke and Bottineau Counties, North Dakota, indicates that production is controlled by facies changes within the unit. Stratigraphic traps are formed by the lateral and vertical changes from grain-supported facies deposited in tidal-channel, subtidal-bar, or beach settings; seals are formed by mud-rich sediments. Use of a transgressive carbonate tidal-flats model best explains current production patterns and indicates substantial potential for additional production in eastern North Dakota and South Dakota.

Porter, L.A.; Reid, F.S.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Potential for new stratigraphic play in Mississippian Midale anhydrite, eastern Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

Midale (Mississippian) production was first indicated in 1953 in Saskatchewan, Canada. The productive unit was defined initially in the subsurface as the carbonate interval between the top of the Frobisher Anhydrite and the base of the Midale Anhydrite. This same nomenclature is used in this paper. In 1953, Midale production was found on the United States side of the Williston basin in Bottineau County, North Dakota. Later exploration extended Midale production western into Burke County, North Dakota, in 1955. Cumulative production from the Midale is approximately 660 million bbl with 640 million from the Canadian side of the Williston basin. Initially, hydrocarbon entrapment in the Midale was believed to be controlled by the Mississippian subcrop, with the Burke County production controlled by low-relief structural closure. Petrographic examination of cores and cuttings from the Midale in both Saskatchewan, Canada, and Burke and Bottineau Counties, North Dakota, indicates that production is controlled by facies changes within the unit. Use of a transgressive carbonate tidal-flats model best explains current production patterns and indicates substantial potential for additional production in eastern North Dakota and South Dakota.

Porter, L.A.; Reid, F.S.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this project was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (40-80 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvania (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performances, and report associated validation activities.

Chidsey, Thomas C. Jr.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laura L.

2001-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

24

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect

The project's primary objective was to enhance domestic petroleum production by demonstration and transfer of horizontal drilling technology in the Paradox Basin, Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. If this project can demonstrate technical and economic feasibility, then the technique can be applied to approximately 100 additional small fields in the Paradox Basin alone, and result in increased recovery of 25 to 50 million barrels (4-8 million m3) of oil. This project was designed to characterize several shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation, choose the best candidate(s) for a pilot demonstration project to drill horizontally from existing vertical wells, monitor well performance(s), and report associated validation activities.

Chidsey, Jr., Thomas C.; Eby, David E.; Wray, Laural L.

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

25

Exploration applications of a transgressive tidal flats model to Mississippian Midale carbonates, eastern Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

Midale (Mississippian) production was first established in 1953 in Saskatchewan, Canada. The unit was initially defined in the subsurface as the carbonate interval between the top of the Frobisher Anhydrite and the base of the Midale Anhydrite. That nomenclature is used in this report. During 1953, Midale production was found in the United States portion of the Williston basin in Bottineau County, North Dakota. Later exploration extended Midale production westward into Burke County, North Dakota. Cumulative production from the Midale is approximately 660 million bbl, of which 640 million bbl are from Canadian fields. Initially, hydrocarbon entrapment in the Midale was believed to be controlled by the Mississippian subcrop, with the Burke County production controlled by low-relief structural closure. Petrographic examination of cores and cuttings from the Midale in both Saskatchewan, Canada, and Burke and Bottineau Counties, North Dakota, indicates that production is controlled by facies changes within the unit. Stratigraphic traps are formed by the lateral and vertical changes from grain-supported facies deposited in tidal channel, subtidal bar, or beach settings; seals are formed by mud-rich sediments. Use of a transgressive carbonate tidal flats model best explains current production patterns and indicates substantial potential for additional production in eastern North Dakota and South Dakota.

Porter, L.A.; Reid, R.S.R.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Variability of geochemical properties in a microbially dominated coalbed gas system from the eastern margin of the Illinois Basin, USA  

SciTech Connect

This study outlines gas characteristics along the southeastern margins of the Illinois Basin and evaluates regional versus local gas variations in Seelyville and Springfield coal beds. Our findings suggest that high permeability and shallow (100250 m) depths of these Indiana coals allowed inoculation with methanogenic microbial consortia, thus leading to widespread microbial methane generation along the eastern marginal part of the Illinois Basin. Low maturity coals in the Illinois Basin with a vitrinite reflectance Ro~0.6% contain significant amounts of coal gas (~3 m3/t, 96 scf/t) with ?97 vol.% microbial methane. The amount of coal gas can vary significantly within a coal seam both in a vertical seam section as well as laterally from location to location. Therefore sampling of an entire core section is required for accurate estimates of coal gas reserves.

Strapoc, D.; Mastalerz, M.; Schimmelmann, A.; Drobniak, A.; Hedges, S.W.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

27

Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project is basin modeling and petroleum system identification, comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. In the first six (6) months of Year 3, the research focus is on basin modeling and petroleum system identification and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the comparative basin evaluation and resource assessment. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

Ernest A. Mancini; Paul Aharon; Donald A. Goddard; Roger Barnaby

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

28

BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule. The principal objectives of the project are to develop through basin analysis and modeling the concept that petroleum systems acting in a basin can be identified through basin modeling and to demonstrate that the information and analysis resulting from characterizing and modeling of these petroleum systems in the North Louisiana Salt Basin and the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin can be used in providing a more reliable and advanced approach for targeting stratigraphic traps and specific reservoir facies within a geologic system and in providing a refined assessment of undiscovered and underdeveloped reservoirs and associated oil and gas resources.

Ernest A. Mancini

2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

29

BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

Ernest A. Mancini

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

30

BASIN ANALYSIS AND PETROLEUM SYSTEM CHARACTERIZATION AND MODELING, INTERIOR SALT BASINS, CENTRAL AND EASTERN GULF OF MEXICO  

SciTech Connect

The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project is data compilation and the determination of the tectonic and depositional histories of the North Louisiana Salt Basin. In the first three (3) to six (6) months of Year 1, the research focus is on data compilation and the remainder of the year the emphasis is on the tectonic and depositional histories of the basin. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

Ernest A. Mancini

2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

31

Early and Middle Holocene Environments and Capsian Cultural Change: Evidence from the Tlidjne Basin, Eastern Algeria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interdisciplinary investigations from 1973 to1978 at An Misteheyia and Kef Zoura D, two stratified Capsian sites in the Tlidjne Basin, Tebessa Wilaya, Algeria, have shown that palaeoenvironmental changes ce...

Mary Jackes; David Lubell

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stuwe a,*, H. Fritz a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stu¨we a,*, H. Fritz, Austria b Department of Geology, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Received 8 September 2004; received of kilometres of the East- ern Desert of Egypt. Its sedimentary record shows that deposition occurred in two

Fritz, Harald

33

Sedimentation and structure of the continental margin in the vicinity of the Otway Basin, southern Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The continental margin of southern Australia is divisible into four contrasting physiographic provinces on the basis of shelf-break depth and continental slope gradient. These provinces correspond with four structural provinces, which in turn are intimately related to the geology. Zones of relatively stable pre-Mesozoic shallow basement extending out to the shelf edge characterize two of the above provinces, one of which occurs south of Kangaroo Island and the other off Tasmania's northwest coast. In contrast, zones of Mesozoic to Tertiary deep offshore basin formation typify the remaining two provinces, one being situated at the eastern end of the Great Australian Bight and the other along the seaward portion of the Otway Basin. A possible model is presented, based on an assumption of continental rifting and drifting, which explains the structural peculiarities of that portion of the Otway Basin which occurs beneath the present continental shelf and upper slope.

C.C. Von Der Borch; J.R. Conolly; R.S. Dietz

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Transition from alkaline to calc-alkaline volcanism during evolution of the Paleoproterozoic Francevillian basin of eastern Gabon (Western Central Africa)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We report new geochemical data for the volcanic and subvolcanic rocks associated with the evolution of the Francevillian basin of eastern Gabon during Paleoproterozoic times (c. 2.12Ga). Filling of this basin has proceeded through four main sedimentary or volcano-sedimentary episodes, namely FA, FB, FC and FD. Volcanism started during the FB episode being present only in the northern part of the basin (Okondja sub-basin). This volcanism is ultramafic to trachytic in composition and displays a rather constant alkaline geochemical signature. This signature is typical of a within-plate environment, consistent with the rift-setting generally postulated for the Francevillian basin during the FB period. Following FB, the FC unit is 1020m-thick silicic horizon (jasper) attesting for a massive input of silica in the basin. Following FC, the FD unit is a c. 200400m-thick volcano-sedimentary sequence including felsic tuffs and epiclastic rocks. The geochemical signatures of these rocks are totally distinct from those of the FB alkaline lavas. High Th/Ta and La/Ta ratios attest for a calc-alkaline signature and slight fractionation between heavy rare-earth suggests melting at a rather low pressure. Such characteristics are comparable to those of felsic lavas associated with the Taupo zone of New Zealand, a modern ensialic back-arc basin. Following FD, the FE detrital unit is defined only in the Okondja region, probably associated with a late-stage collapse of the northern part of the basin. It is suggested that the alkaline to calc-alkaline volcanic transition reflects the evolution of the Francevillian basin from a diverging to a converging setting, in response to the onset of converging movements in the Eburnean Belt of Central Africa.

Denis Thiblemont; Pascal Bouton; Alain Prat; Jean-Christian Goujou; Monique Tegyey; Francis Weber; Michel Ebang Obiang; Jean Louis Joron; Michel Treuil

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Structurally dependent source rock maturity and kerogen facies, Estancia Basin, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The Estancia basin of central New Mexico is an asymmetric, north-south trending structural depression that originated during the Pennsylvanian. The present-day basin covers 1,600 mi{sup 2} (4,100 km{sup 2}). It is bounded on the east by the late Paleozoic Pedernal uplift, on the west by the Tertiary-age Manzano and Los Pinos Mountains, on the north by the Espanola basin, and on the south by Chupadera Mesa. Depth to Precambrian basement ranges from 9,000 ft (2,700 m) in a narrow graben in the eastern part of the basin to less than 1,500 ft (460 m) on a shelf to the west. Basin fill consists primarily of Pennsylvanian and Wolfcampian sandstones and shales in the graben and sandstones, shales, and marine limestones on the shelf Mature to marginally mature dark-gray to black Pennsylvanian shales are probable source rocks. Thermal Alteration Index ranges from 2.0 to 3.2. Shales become thermally mature with depth in the eastern graben. On the western shelf, shales become mature to the west as a result of increased heating from the Rio Grande rift. Total organic carbon exceeds 0.5% in many shales, sufficient for hydrocarbon generation. Kerogen types are mixed algal, herbaceous, and woody, indicating that gas, or possibly gas mixed with oil, was generated. Kerogens in shales of the eastern graben are entirely continental, gas-prone types. In limestones and shales of the western shelf, kerogens have a mixed marine and continental provenance, indicating that both oil and gas may have been generated on thermally mature parts of the shelf.

Broadhead, R.F. [New Mexico Institute of Mines and Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium IVBrisbane, QLD, 1014 September, 2012 1 Developing a consistent sequence stratigraphy for the Wilkes Land and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bight, Bight Basin, Wilkes Land, Antarctica, seismic stratigraphy, continental margin, conjugate margins) previously identified ten supersequences from Late Jurassic to Holocene in the Bight and Eucla basins. The Bight Basin is a large Jurassic­Cretaceous basin extending from the Leeuwin Fracture Zone in the west

Müller, Dietmar

37

Microbial degradation of sedimentary organic matter associated with shale gas and coalbed methane in eastern Illinois Basin (Indiana), USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular biodegradation indices for extracts from five Pennsylvanian coals and six New Albany Shale (Devonian Mississippian) samples from the eastern part of the Illinois Basin help constrain relationships between the degradation of biomarkers and the generation of coalbed methane and shale gas. Investigation of these gas source rocks of varying thermal maturity from different depths facilitates evaluation of the association of microbial degradation with biogenic gas formation distinct from thermogenic processes. Extensive biodegradation of both aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons is observed in the coal extracts, whereas in shale extracts only short-chain (C15C19) n-alkanes from the shallowest depth appear to be microbially altered with minimal evidence for losses of acyclic isoprenoid alkanes and aromatic hydrocarbons. By contrast, biodegradation of aromatic hydrocarbons, specifically alkylated naphthalenes and phenanthrenes, occurs in coal extracts in concert with losses of n-alkanes attributable to microbial activity. Thus, the progress of hydrocarbon biodegradation in coals differs from the sequence recognized in petroleum where the effects of microbial alteration of aromatic constituents only appear after extensive losses of aliphatic compounds. The extent of hydrocarbon biodegradation in these coals also decreases with depth, as recorded by the ?(nC25nC30) index (i.e. abundance relative to 17?(H), 21?(H)-hopane) among the aliphatic constituents and several aromatic compounds (methyl-, dimethyl-, and trimethylnaphthalenes, phenanthrene, and trimethyl- and tetramethylphananthrenes). However, the depth variations in the distributions of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons in the shale extracts primarily reflect the effects of thermal maturity rather than biodegradation. Overall, variations in the extent and patterns of biomarker biodegradation among coals and shales likely reflect their distinct microbial consortia that can be attributed to differences in (i) surviving microorganisms and inoculations from meteoric water, (ii) the characteristics of the sedimentary organic matter, especially the preponderance of aromatic constituents in coals, and (iii) the accessibility to that substrate through pores and cleats. These results help constrain the processes involved in biodegradation and controls on its extent, which, in turn, assist in recognizing sites favorable for methanogenesis and improved estimates of biogenic gas resources in the Illinois Basin.

Ling Gao; Simon C. Brassell; Maria Mastalerz; Arndt Schimmelmann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Depositional sequences and integrated recovery efficiency forecast models for San Andres and Clearfork Units in the Central Basin Platform and the Northern Shelf, west Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops depositional sequences of the carbonate ramp and the carbonate shelf models for an idealized cycle and multiple cycles of depositions. Based on the developed depositional sequences, the integrated recovery efficiency forecast...

Shao, Hongbin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

39

Subsurface temperature anomalies as a key to petroleum-producing areas in the Cherokee and Forest City Basins, eastern Kansas?  

SciTech Connect

The relation of subsurface temperature to `plain-type fold` structure in the Midcontinent (USA) as an exploration tool has been speculated on for a long time. Structural highs, termed `plains-type folds,` are partly the result of differential compaction of sediments over rigid crystalline fault blocks in the Precambrian basement. In the Midcontinent, bottom-hole temperature (BHT) data, temperatures measured in drillstem tests (DSTs), and structural data are abundant. In the Cherokee and Forest City Basins, we analyzed BHT data by depth and stratigraphic unit (Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle carbonates; Mississippian carbonates; and Perm-Pennsylvanian clastics). By relating the BHTs to DSTs, it was noted that the thermal disturbance inherent in BHT by drilling is minor and comparable within a formation. Also, the signal-noise ratio of BHTs could be improved utilizing the large data set. Although the resulting BHT formation gradients show unexpected values from the thermal conductivity in the carbonates and from the evaluated temperature disturbance by the drilling process, analysis of the BHT spatial pattern shows a coincidence of structural highs and temperature anomalies both in the clastics and in the carbonates. These BHT anomalies are outlined by values higher than the regional temperature trend. We attribute the anomalies partly to the insulation effect of petroleum (which may include the self-generation of heat) and partly to the movement of fluids vertically through the fracture and fault system created in the sedimentary veneer. Numerous examples from the oil- and gas-producing areas in eastern Kansas show that the nature of origin of fluids contained in a porous medium can alter local geothermal conditions.

Merriam, D.F. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Foerster, A. [GeoForschungsZentrum Posdam (Germany)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Subsurface structure of the eastern edge of the Zagros basin as inferred from gravity and satellite data  

SciTech Connect

A data set of 10,505 points of land gravity measurements from southeast Iran obtained from the Bureau Gravimetrique International, combined with Landsat imagery, was used to investigate crustal and Cenozoic lithospheric structure. Interpretation of the Bouguer anomalies reveals three primary structural features. The Zagros Mountain belt is characterized by a progressive decrease in gravity values from -70 mGal near the Persian Gulf to -160 mGal over the structure zone between the Arabian margin and central Iran crustal blocks. The second feature is marked by a backward-L-shaped pair of anomalies that extends from the eastern peripheries of the Zagros basin and wraps around southern Iranian shores. These 15- to 20-km-deep source anomalies, with amplitudes of as much as 10 mGal, are interpreted as intrabasement intrusions demarcating an ancient rift axis. The shallow (6-8)km east-west-trending anomalies are perhaps interbasement uplifts bordered by reverse faults. The third structure, observed on both gravity and Landsat displays, a north-striking eastward-facing topographic escarpment, has a gravity gradient of 0.85 mGal/km, and is right laterally offset approximately 100 km, and is right laterally offset approximately 100 km by the Zagros main recent fault. A comparison of gravity features with surface structures on Thematic Mapper and Landsat Multi-spectral Scanner imagery indicates that a northeast-trending fault system is the result of post-Miocene pervasive transpressive stress coupled with clockwise rotation of underlying basement blocks following the collision of Arabia and Iran. Accommodation structures such as forced folds and {open_quotes}rabbit-ear{close_quotes} anticlines may develop over and on the flanks of the basement blocks, providing remigration and trapping mechanisms for new oil and gas plays.

Bushara, M.N. [ARCO Alaska, Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reference Shelf Reference Shelf Reference Shelf Find reference sources Questions? 505-667-5809 Email Biography Biographies of Women in Science Biography.com Marquis Who's Who NobelPrize.org Nobel Prize Internet Archive Calculators Currency Converter OnlineConversion.com Wolfram|Alpha Computational Knowledge Engine Dictionaries Oxford English Dictionary Merriam-Webster Dictionary DOD Dictionary of Military Terms Encyclopedias Britannica Online Columbia Encyclopedia Wikipedia Grants & Funding DOE Office of Science Grants & Contracts National Science Foundation National Institutes of Health Grants.Gov FedBizOpps.gov Los Alamos Info Los Alamos County Los Alamos Historical Society University of New Mexico - Los Alamos Campus Maps Atlapedia Online Perry-Casteneda Library Map Collection U.S. Gazetteer

42

Divergent/passive margin basins  

SciTech Connect

This book discusses the detailed geology of the four divergent margin basins and establishes a set of analog scenarios which can be used for future petroleum exploration. The divergent margin basins are the Campos basin of Brazil, the Gabon basin, the Niger delta, and the basins of the northwest shelf of Australia. These four petroleum basins present a wide range of stratigraphic sequences and structural styles that represent the diverse evolution of this large and important class of world petroleum basins.

Edwards, J.D. (Shell Oil Company (US)); Santogrossi, P.A. (Shell Offshore Inc. (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Lithostratigraphy and environmental considerations of Cenomanian-Early Turonian shelf carbonates (Rumaila and Mishrif Formations) of Mesopotamian basin, middle and southern Iraq  

SciTech Connect

Rumaila and Mishrif Formations form the major part of the Cenomanian early Turonian deposits of middle and southern Iraq. The Rumaila Formation consists of lithographic chalky limestone at the lower part and marly limestone and marl at the upper part. The formation represents deep off-shelf deposits, whereas the overlying Mishrif Formation is composed of various types of shallow-shelf carbonates such as rudist-bearing patchy reefs and lagoonal and off-shelf limestones. An environmental model is suggested to delineate the stratigraphic relationships between the above mentioned two formations and to correlate them with their equivalents in central Iraq (i.e., Mahilban, Fahad, and Maotsi Formations). The gradational contact between the two formations and the intertonguing with their equivalents are considered to be the most important stratigraphic phenomena.

Sherwani, G.H.M.; Aqrawi, A.A.M.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Facies, stratigraphic architecture, and lake evolution of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Eastern Uinta Basin, Utah.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Lacustrine basin systems have historically been valued for their abundant conventional oil and gas reserves, but they also contain a vast potential for unconventional petroleum (more)

Rosenberg, Morgan Joshua

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Interpretation of subhorizontal crustal reflections by metamorphic and rheologic effects in the eastern part of the Pannonian Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the deep basins has modified this model. Heating up of basin sediments was relatively late...framework of an agreement between MOL Hungarian Oil and Gas Co. and Eotvos Lorand Geophysical...Tectonophysics, 282, 129-145. Fyfe W.S. , Price N.J., Thompson A.B.,1978. Fluids......

Kroly Posgay; Tams Bodoky; Zoltn Hajnal; Tivadar M. Tth; Tams Fancsik; Endre Heged?s; Attila Cs. Kovcs; Ern? Takcs

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Chemostratigraphy And Geochemical Constraints On The Deposition Of The Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, Eastern Montana And Western North Dakota.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Rowe, Harold The late Devonian-early Mississippian Bakken Formation was deposited in a structural-sedimentary intracratonic basin that extends across a large part of modern day North (more)

Maldonado, David Nyrup

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Chemostratigraphy And Geochemical Constraints On The Deposition Of The Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, Eastern Montana And Western North Dakota.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Rowe, Harold The late Devonian-early Mississippian Bakken Formation was deposited in a structural-sedimentary intracratonic basin that extends across a large part of modern day North (more)

Maldonado, David Nyrup

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

A multiple-tracer approach to understanding regional groundwater flow in the Snake Valley area of the eastern Great Basin, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Groundwater in Snake Valley and surrounding basins in the eastern Great Basin province of the western United States is being targeted for large-scale groundwater extraction and export. Concern about declining groundwater levels and spring flows in western Utah as a result of the proposed groundwater withdrawals has led to efforts that have improved the understanding of this regional groundwater flow system. In this study, environmental tracers (?2H, ?18O, 3H, 14C, 3He, 4He, 20Ne, 40Ar, 84Kr, and 129Xe) and major ions from 142 sites were evaluated to investigate groundwater recharge and flow-path characteristics. With few exceptions, ?2H and ?18O show that most valley groundwater has similar ratios to mountain springs, indicating recharge is dominated by relatively high-altitude precipitation. The spatial distribution of 3H, terrigenic helium (4Heterr), and 3H/3He ages shows that modern groundwater (temperatures (NGTs) are generally 111C in Snake and southern Spring Valleys and >11C to the east of Snake Valley and indicate a hydraulic discontinuity between Snake and Tule Valleys across the northern Confusion Range. The combination of \\{NGTs\\} and 4Heterr shows that the majority of Snake Valley groundwater discharges as springs, evapotranspiration, and well withdrawals within Snake Valley rather than continuing northeastward to discharge at either Fish Springs or the Great Salt Lake Playa. The refined understanding of groundwater recharge and flow paths acquired from this multi-tracer investigation has broad implications for interbasin subsurface flow estimates and future groundwater development.

Philip M. Gardner; Victor M. Heilweil

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

HETEROGENEOUS SHALLOW-SHELF CARBONATE BUILDUPS IN THE PARADOX BASIN, UTAH AND COLORADO: TARGETS FOR INCREASED OIL PRODUCTION AND RESERVES USING HORIZONTAL DRILLING TECHNIQUES  

SciTech Connect

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing, vertical, field wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the third project year (April 6 through October 5, 2002). This work included capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, scanning electron microscopy, and pore casting on selected samples from Cherokee and Bug fields, Utah. The diagenetic fabrics and porosity types found at these fields are indicators of reservoir flow capacity, storage capacity, and potential for enhanced oil recovery via horizontal drilling. The reservoir quality of Cherokee and Bug fields has been affected by multiple generations of dissolution, anhydrite plugging, and various types of cementation which act as barriers or baffles to fluid flow. The most significant diagenetic characteristics are microporosity (Cherokee field) and micro-boxwork porosity (Bug field), as shown from porethroat radii histograms, and saturation profiles generated from the capillary pressure/mercury injection analysis, and identified by scanning electron microscopy and pore casting. These porosity types represent important sites for untapped hydrocarbons and primary targets for horizontal drilling. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the Rocky Mountain Section meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, and publications. The project home page was updated for the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Heterogeneous Shallow-Shelf Carbonate Buildups in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado: Targets for Increased Oil Production and Reserves Using Horizontal Drilling Techniques  

SciTech Connect

The Paradox Basin of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to 10 wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels (111,300-318,000 m{sup 3}) of oil per field and a 15 to 20 percent recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will not be recovered from these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Several fields in southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado are being evaluated as candidates for horizontal drilling and enhanced oil recovery from existing vertical wells based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling case studies. Geological characterization on a local scale is focused on reservoir heterogeneity, quality, and lateral continuity, as well as possible reservoir compartmentalization, within these fields. This study utilizes representative cores, geophysical logs, and thin sections to characterize and grade each field's potential for drilling horizontal laterals from existing development wells. The results of these studies can be applied to similar fields elsewhere in the Paradox Basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois Basins, and the Midcontinent region. This report covers research activities for the first half of the fourth project year (April 6 through October 5, 2003). The work included (1) analysis of well-test data and oil production from Cherokee and Bug fields, San Juan County, Utah, and (2) diagenetic evaluation of stable isotopes from the upper Ismay and lower Desert Creek zones of the Paradox Formation in the Blanding sub-basin, Utah. Production ''sweet spots'' and potential horizontal drilling candidates were identified for Cherokee and Bug fields. In Cherokee field, the most productive wells are located in the thickest part of the mound facies of the upper Ismay zone, where microporosity is well developed. In Bug field, the most productive wells are located structurally downdip from the updip porosity pinch out in the dolomitized lower Desert Creek zone, where micro-box-work porosity is well developed. Microporosity and micro-box-work porosity have the greatest hydrocarbon storage and flow capacity, and potential horizontal drilling target in these fields. Diagenesis is the main control on the quality of Ismay and Desert Creek reservoirs. Most of the carbonates present within the lower Desert Creek and Ismay have retained a marine-influenced carbon isotope geochemistry throughout marine cementation as well as through post-burial recycling of marine carbonate components during dolomitization, stylolitization, dissolution, and late cementation. Meteoric waters do not appear to have had any effect on the composition of the dolomites in these zones. Light oxygen values obtained from reservoir samples for wells located along the margins or flanks of Bug field may be indicative of exposure to higher temperatures, to fluids depleted in {sup 18}O relative to sea water, or to hypersaline waters during burial diagenesis. The samples from Bug field with the lightest oxygen isotope compositions are from wells that have produced significantly greater amounts of hydrocarbons. There is no significant difference between the oxygen isotope compositions from lower Desert Creek dolomite samples in Bug field and the upper Ismay limestones and dolomites from Cherokee field. Carbon isotopic compositions for samples from Patterson Canyon field can be divided into two populations: isotopically heavier mound cement and isotopically lighter oolite and banded cement. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the annual national convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation, a core workshop, and publications. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey; Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan

2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

51

E-Print Network 3.0 - athabasca basin western Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thelon Basin Boomerang Lake Western Thelon Basin Eastern Thelon... to the world-class uranium-producing Athabasca basin. At present, the Thelon basin is only known to host......

52

Sequence architecture of Lower Cretaceous carbonate shelf, Gulf Coast  

SciTech Connect

Cretaceous carbonate shelves in the Gulf Coast and the Chihuahua trough in Arizona record both eustatic and tectonic events. The Lower Cretaceous Comanche shelf in Texas and Louisiana consists of five major depositional/seismic sequences. The regionally extensive bounding surfaces of each sequence are either drowning unconformities or exposure unconformities. Drowning is inferred where shallow shelf facies are overlain by deeper water pelagic facies. Exposure is inferred where coastal terrigenous facies overlie marine shelf carbonates or paralic clastics. The interval of downlap and maximum flooding may be either a sharp contact that corresponds with the sequence boundary, or may be a gradational interval where deeper facies change to shoaling-upward facies. Medial Albian terrigenous clastics terminated the lower Albian carbonate shelf in the northern part of the Chihuahua trough. Farther south, the carbonate shelf persisted into the middle Albian. In Texas and Louisiana lower and middle Albian shelf margins prograded southward up to 15 km. Low-angle simple sigmoidal sequence geometry (type 1) suggests low-energy areas of the shelf. Steep, complex-oblique sequences (type 2) suggested high-energy areas. During the late Albian, the shelf margin was drowned in many places, and pelagic facies overlie the shelf facies. Rates of sediment accumulation within the low-energy prograding Fredericksburg sequence shelf margin are nearly two times those in the forereef basin and seven times greater than in the updip shoreward portion (8.98 cm/ky.; 4.85 cm/k.y.; 1.28 cm/k.y.). numerous hiatuses probably punctuate the interbedded sand and carbonate section in the updip, nearshore part of the shelf. Even rates in the pelagic shelf of the Washita sequence are greater than in the updip intrashelf Fast Texas embayment (1.69 cm/ky. compared to 1.28 cm/ky-).

Scott, R.W. (Amoco Production Co., Tulsa, OK (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The tectonics of eastern Hispaniola: an investigation into the formation and episodic uplift of the Beata Ridge and the geologic and velocity structure of the Cibao basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Lateral variations in the elastic thickness of the Caribbean plate may be responsible for some of the topography of the Beata Ridge. The Cibao basin in the northern Dominican Republic is investigated using data obtained from a seismic reconnaissance survey...

Boucher, Paul James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

54

Petroleum geology of the Estancia basin, New Mexico: An exploration frontier  

SciTech Connect

The Estancia basin of central New Mexico is an asymmetric, north-south-trending structural depression that originated during the Pennsylvanian. The present-day basin covers 1600 mi[sup 2]. The basin is bounded on the east by the late Paleozoic Pedernal uplift, on the west by the Tertiary Manzano and Los Pinos Mountains, on the north by the Espanola basin, an do the south by Chupadera Mesa. The depth to the Precambrian ranges from 9000 ft in the eastern part of the basin to less than 1500 ft in the western part. Basin fill consists primarily of Pennsylvanian and Wolfcampian (Permian) clastics. The Pennsylvanian section contains significant shelf limestones in the western part of the basin. Forty-three exploratory wells have been drilled in the basin; only 17 have been drilled to Precambrian. Numerous shows of oil and gas have been reported. From the 1930s until the 1960s, CO[sub 2] was produced from lower Pennsylvanian sandstones in two small fields on the western flank of the basin. Dark-gray to black Pennsylvanian shales are probable source rocks. They are mature to marginally mature; TAI values range from less than 2.0 to 3.2. TOC is greater than 0.5% in many of these shales. Kerogen types are mixed amorphous, algal, herbaceous, and woody, indicating that gas, or both gas and oil, may have been generated. Pennsylvanian sandstones are good reservoirs. They are fine- to coarse-grained subarkosic arenites and quartz arenites. Porosity ranges from 10 to 20% in the more porous, coarser-grained sandstones.

Broadhead, R.F. (New Mexico Bureau of Mines Mineral Resources, Socorro, NM (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Baisn and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Costal Plain: Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1997-March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

Part I (Inventory of Existing Data and Information Sources) objectives are to provide improved access to information available in the public domain by inventorying data files and records of the major information repositories in the Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain and making these inventories easily accessible in electronic format. The producers in the region maintain that the accessibility of oil and gas information is the single-most important factor to assist them in finding new hydrocarbon discoveries and in improving production from established fields. The principal investigator continues to discuss the project with geologists for Alabama, Mississippi, and Florida. A subcontract has been executed between the University of Alabama and the Geological Survey of Alabama. A subcontract agreement is under review by the Mississippi Office of Geology. The principal investigator continues to discuss the project with a number of faculty members from departments of geology in the region. A listing of theses and dissertations from the University of Alabama, Auburn University, Mississippi State University, University of Mississippi, University of Southern Mississippi, University of Southwestern Louisiana, and Louisiana State University related to the petroleum geology of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin has been compiled. This list is accessible electronically through the Home Page of the Eastern Gulf Region of the Pertroleum Technology Transfer Council (EGRPTTC) (http://egrpttc.geo.ua.edu).

Mancini, E.A.

1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

56

E-Print Network 3.0 - austrian molasse basin Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

basin Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 The El Mayah molasse basin in the Eastern Desert of Egypt A. Shalaby a,b,*, K. Stuwe a,*, H. Fritz a Summary: The El Mayah molasse basin in the...

57

Biodiversity, Community Structural Shifts, and Biogeography of Prokaryotes within Antarctic Continental Shelf Sediment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...methane seep Guaymas Basin, Mexico 2,000 73 8...seasonally mixed, marine basin Vestfold Hills, Antarctica...research was supported by Australian Research Council large...coastal meromictic marine basin, Vestfold Hills, Eastern...bacteria from the German Bight and their seasonal contributions...

John P. Bowman; Robert D. McCuaig

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Basin Analysis of the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin and Petroleum System Modeling of the Jurassic Smackover Formation, Eastern Gulf Coastal Plain, Final Report and Topical Reports 5-8 on Smackover Petroleum system and Underdevelopment Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The Smackover Formation, a major hydrocarbon-producing horizon in the Mississippi Interior Salt Basin (MISB), conformably overlies the Norphlet Formation and is conformably overlain by the Buckner Anhydrite Member of the Haynesville Formation. The Norphlet-Smackover contact can be either gradational or abrupt. The thickness and lithofacies distribution of the Smackover Formation were controlled by the configuration of incipient paleotopography. The Smackover Formation has been subdivided into three informal members, referred to as the lower, middle and upper members.

Mancini, Ernest A.; Puckett, T. Markham; Parcell, William C.; Llinas, Juan Carlos; Kopaska-Merkel, David C.; Townsend, Roger N.

2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

59

Crosswell seismic imaging in the Permian Basin, West Texas, USA  

SciTech Connect

Crosswell seismic imaging technology has advanced rapidly over the last three years as the processing methods have become more robust, the cost of data acquisition has fallen, and the interwell distances of operation have increased. The Permian Basin of west Texas, USA is proving to be an ideal environment in which to develop this technology because of the relatively low seismic attenuation of the carbonate-dominated lithology, the moderate well spacings in the large number of mature fields, and the unusually high number of reflecting horizons. Current technology permits us to operate in carbonates at well spacings on the order of 2000 ft (650 m) and to image P- and S-wave reflecting horizons on a scale of 8 to 25 ft (2.4 to 7.6 m). Crosswell technology is not limited to carbonates, although the majority of recent applications have been in this environment. We are involved in three separate crosswell experiments in the Permian Basin, each with unique objectives. The first experiment involves a CO{sub 2} pilot project in a Grayburg Formation reservoir on the eastern edge of the Central Basin Platform. Here we are attempting to characterize the reservoir at a scale unobtainable from 3-D surface seismic data and to image CO{sub 2} fronts directly. The second experiment deals with a waterflood in a Middle Clearfork Formation reservoir on the Eastern Shelf, where we are trying to explain the erratic response of adjacent wells to water injection. In the third project we are trying to image the structure and stratigraphy of subtle {open_quotes}anomalies{close_quotes} in 3-D surface seismic images of the Wolfcamp Formation.

Langan, R.T.; Harris, J.M.; Jensen, T.L. [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

60

Nutrient exchange and ventilation of benthic gases across the continental shelf break  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2011; published 28 June 2011. [1] On western margins of ocean basins, such as the eastern continental Current and winds in the Southeast Brazil Bight. Castelao et al. [2004] modeled the int

Mahadevan, Amala

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Rock-water interactions of the Madison Aquifer, Mission Canyon Formation, Williston Basin, North Dakota.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Williston Basin is located in the northern Great Plains of the United States. This area includes eastern Montana, northwestern South Dakota, and western North (more)

Spicer, James Frank

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Cetacean high-use habitats of the northeast United States continental shelf  

SciTech Connect

Results of the Cetacean and Turtle Assessment Program previously demonstrated at a qualitative level that specific areas of the continental shelf waters off the northeastern US coast consistently showed high-density utilization by several cetacean species. They have quantified, on a multispecies basis and with adjustment for level of survey effort, the intensity of habitat use by whales and dolphins, and defined areas of especially high-intensity utilization. The results demonstrate that the area off the northeast US, which is used most intensively as cetacean habitat, is the western margin of the Gulf of Maine, from the Great South Channel to Stellwagen Bank and Jeffreys Ledge. Secondary high-use areas include the continental shelf edge and the region around the eastern end of Georges Bank. High-use areas for piseivorous cetaceans are concentrated mainly in the western Gulf of Maine and secondarily at mid-shelf east of the Chesapeake region, for planktivores in the western Gulf of Maine and the southwestern and eastern portions of Georges Bank, and for teuthivores in the western Gulf of Maine and the southwestern and eastern portions of Georges Bank, and for teuthivores along the edge of the shelf. In general, habitat use by cetaceans is highest in spring and summer, and lowest in fall and winter.

Kenney, R.D.; Winn, H.E.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

NETL: Gasification Systems Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shelf Shelf Gasification Systems Reference Shelf TABLE OF CONTENTS Brochures Conferences and Workshops Gasification Systems Projects National Map Gasification Systems Projects and Performers Gasification Systems Project Portfolio Gasifipedia Multi-phase Flow with Interphase eXchange (MFIX) Patents Program Presentations Project Information Projects Summary Table by State Solicitations Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Technical Presentations & Papers Technology Readiness Assessment (Comprehensive Report | Overview Report) Video, Images & Photos Gasification Plant Databases CD Icon Request Gasification Technologies Information on a CD. Gasification RSS Feed Subscribe to the Gasification RSS Feed to follow website updates. LinkedIn DOE Gasification Program Group Subscribe to the LinkedIn DOE Gasification Program group for more information and discussion.

64

NETL: Carbon Storage - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage Reference Shelf Below are links to Carbon Storage Program documents and reference materials. Each of the 10 categories has a variety of documents posted for easy access to current information - just click on the category link to view all related materials. RSS Icon Subscribe to the Carbon Storage RSS Feed. Carbon Storage Collage 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects Carbon Storage Technology Program Plan Carbon Storage Newsletter Archive Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future CCS Activities Site Screening, Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations

65

Assessment of undiscovered carboniferous coal-bed gas resources of the Appalachian Basin and Black Warrior Basin Provinces, 2002  

SciTech Connect

Coalbed methane (CBM) occurs in coal beds of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian (Carboniferous) age in the Appalachian basin, which extends almost continuously from New York to Alabama. In general, the basin includes three structural subbasins: the Dunkard basin in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and northern West Virginia; the Pocahontas basin in southern West Virginia, eastern Kentucky, and southwestern Virginia; and the Black Warrior basin in Alabama and Mississippi. For assessment purposes, the Appalachian basin was divided into two assessment provinces: the Appalachian Basin Province from New York to Alabama, and the Black Warrior Basin Province in Alabama and Mississippi. By far, most of the coalbed methane produced in the entire Appalachian basin has come from the Black Warrior Basin Province. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Milici, R.C.; Hatch, J.R.

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Geological Modeling of Dahomey and Liberian Basins  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

eastern Ivory Coast, off Benin and western Nigeria, and off the Brazilian conjugates of these areas), while large areas were subjected to transform rifting (northern Sierra Leone, southern Liberia, Ghana and the Brazilian conjugates of these areas...). The future Demerara-Guinea marginal plateaus were also progressively subjected to this new rifting event. Stage 2: In Aptian times, the progress of rifting resulted in the creation of small divergent Basins (off northern Liberia, eastern Ivory Coast, Benin...

Gbadamosi, Hakeem B.

2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

67

NETL: Reference Shelf - Techline Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf Archive Reports 2012: December, 2012 Final Project Report DE-NT0006554 GIS- and Web-based Water Resource Geospatial Infrastructure for Oil Shale Development [PDF-14.6MB] November, 2012 Final Project Report 08121-2902-02 Technologies of the Future for Pipeline Monitoring and Inspection [PDF-2.47MB] November, 2012 Final Project Report 07122-22 Petrophysical Studies of Unconventional Gas Reservoirs Using High-resolution Rock Imaging [PDF-27.7MB] November, 2012 Final Project Report 08122-35 The Environmentally Friendly Drilling Systems Program [PDF-4.33] October, 2012 Final Project Report DE-FE0003537 Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology [PDF-1.91MB] October, 2012 Final Project Report 08123-02 Field Demonstration of Alkaline Surfactant Polymer Floods in Mature Oil Reservoirs Brookshire Dome, Texas [PDF-5.06MB]

68

Neogene stratigraphic relationships within the Nam Con Son Basin, offshore Vietnam resulting from tectonics, eustasy, and sediment flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the East Nam Con Son Basin. Age constraints were assigned to key stratigraphic horizons by correlating sequence boundaries with published sea level curves. Accommodation in the study area is controlled by shelf -edge compaction, rift-related thermal...

Wright, Christine M.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Quantifying the seasonal variations in fluvial and eolian sources of terrigenous material to Cariaco Basin, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Cariaco Basin, Venezuela Aurora C. Elmore a,*, Robert C. Thunell b , Richard Styles b , David Black c, Venezuela a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 27 February 2008 Accepted 10 November 2008 the northern continental shelf of Venezuela and consists of two 1400 m deep sub-basins separated by an 900 m

Meyers, Steven D.

70

The Effects of Rotation and Ice Shelf Topography on Frazil-Laden Ice Shelf Water Plumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Antarctica. In addition, it is found that the model only produces reasonable marine ice formation rates whenThe Effects of Rotation and Ice Shelf Topography on Frazil-Laden Ice Shelf Water Plumes PAUL R of the dynamics and thermodynamics of a plume of meltwater at the base of an ice shelf is presented. Such ice

Feltham, Daniel

71

Deformation, erosion and sedimentation in collisional orogens : case studies from eastern Tibet and southwestern China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation addresses aspects of the tectonics of regions adjacent to the eastern Himalayan syntaxis. The first chapter describes the Tertiary Gonjo basin, includes structural and sedimentologic observations, and ...

Studnicki-Gizbert, Christopher Terrance

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Late Quaternary climate change from delta 13O records of multiple species of planktonic foraminifera: High-resolution records from the Anoxic Cariaco Basin, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Lake Valencia Basin, Venezuela, Ecology, 66, 1279-1295,1954. waters of eastern Venezuela, Bol. Inst. Oceanogr.Los foraminiferos de Venezuela (resumen), Acta Geol. Hisp. ,

Lin, Hui-Ling; Peterson, Larry C; Overpeck, Jonathan T; Trumbore, Susan E; Murray, David W

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Oil and gas entrapment, Louisiana shelf, offshore Gulf Coast region  

SciTech Connect

Oil and gas accumulations in the Louisiana offshore are caused by vertical hydrocarbon migration. Source beds for both thermal gas and oil lie considerably deeper than reservoirs. The required vertical pathways are steeply dipping faults and salt structures (ridges and diapirs). Faults and salt structures indicate the continuing presence of rift structures that began along a normal passive continental margin during the Pennsylvanian. Tectonic trends are northeast, northwest, north, and west-east; they follow well-established regional stress systems. Listric and growth faults commonly are too shallow for vertical hydrocarbon migration and require connection with vertical faults. Vertical oil and gas migration is predictable in its directions. The underlying geological, geophysical, and geochemical processes are understood and are not different from such processes in other productive basins. Secondary salt layers at shallower levels cause interruptions of vertical oil and gas migration; at the same time these interruptions seem to indicate a large future exploration potential on the Louisiana shelf.

Pratsch, J.C.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Where is the North ChinaSouth China block boundary in eastern China?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Where is the North China­South China block boundary in eastern China? Michel Faure, Wei Lin of the North China and South China blocks. The eastern extension of the belt (the Sulu area) consists and the lack of ocean-basin rock shows that the boundary between the North China block and South China block

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

75

The red porgy, Pagrus pagrus, occurs in the eastern Atlantic from the Brit-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

723 The red porgy, Pagrus pagrus, occurs in the eastern Atlantic from the Brit- ish Isles south and Vergara, 1978). In the Gulf of Mexico (GOM), red porgy are usu- ally found near hard-bottom areas off that red porgies are most common over inshore live-bottom habitats and over shelf-edge, rocky-rub- ble

76

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic Framework of the 2005 Keathley Canyon Geologic Framework of the 2005 Keathley Canyon Gas Hydrate Research Well, Northern Gulf of Mexico Authors: D.R. Hutchinson, P.E. Hart, T.S. Collett, K.M. Edwards, and D.C. Twichell, U.S. Geological Survey, and F. Snyder, WesternGeco-Schlumberger. Venue: American Geophysical Union’s 2007 Joint Assembly, Acapulco, Mexico, May 22-25, 2007 (http://www.agu.org/meetings/ja07/ [external site]). Abstract: The project was located in the Casey Basin in the northern Gulf of Mexico at 1,335 m water depth. A grid of 2-D high-resolution multichannel seismic lines around the drill sites, targeted for imaging depths down to at least 1,000 m subbottom, reveals multiple disconformities that bound seven mappable seismic stratigraphic units. A major disconformity in the middle of the units stands out for its angular baselapping geometry. From the seismic and drilling data, three episodes of sedimentary deposition and deformation are inferred. The oldest episode consists of fine-grained muds deposited during a period of relative stability in the basin (Units E, F, and G). A second episode (Units C and D) consists of large vertical displacements associated with infilling and ponding of sediment. This second interval corresponds with intercalated fine and coarse-grained material in the drill hole, which sampled the thin edges of much thicker units. The final episode (Units A and B) occurred during much-subdued vertical displacement. Hemipelagic drape (Unit A) characterizes the modern seafloor deposits. The basin is mostly filled. Its sill is part of a subsiding graben that is only 10-20 m shallower than the deepest point in the basin, indicating that gravity-driven transport would mostly bypass the basin. Contemporary faulting along the basin margins has selectively reactivated an older group of faults. The intercalated sand and mud deposits of Units C and D are tentatively correlated with late Pleistocene deposition derived from the western shelf-edge delta/depocenter of the Mississippi River, which was probably most active from 320 ka to 70 ka (Winker and Booth, 2000). Gas hydrate occurs within near-vertical fractures in Units E and F of the oldest episode. The presence of sand within the gas hydrate stability zone is not sufficient to concentrate gas hydrate, even though dispersed gas hydrate occurs deeper in the fractured mud/clay-rich sections of Units E and F.

77

NETL: Methane Hydrates - Methane Hydrate Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reference Shelf Reference Shelf The Methane Hydrate Reference Shelf was created to provide a repository for information collected from projects funded as part of the National Methane Hydrate R&D Program. As output from the projects is received, it will be reviewed and then placed onto the reference shelf to be available to other methane hydrate researchers. Projects: DOE/NETL Projects : These pages contain detailed information on methane hydrate projects funded through the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Publications: Newsletter | Bibliography | Software | Reports | Program Publications | Photo Gallery Newsletter: Fire in the Ice: A publication highlighting the National Methane Hydrate R&D Program Bibliography: "Project Reports Bibliography"[PDF]: The bibliography lists publications resulting from DOE/NETL-sponsored

78

Multivariate accelerated shelf-life testing: a novel approach for determining the shelf-life of foods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multivariate accelerated shelf-life testing: a novel approach for determining the shelf-lives, accelerated studies have to be conducted and a third parameter has to be estimated: the acceleration factor approach for determining the shelf-life of industrialised food products, the Multivariate Accelerated Shelf

Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

79

Effects of oceanic and atmospheric phenomena on precipitation and flooding in the Manafwa River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation was performed to determine the relationship between certain oceanic and atmospheric phenomena and the precipitation patterns in the Manafwa River Basin of eastern Uganda. Such phenomena are the El Nio ...

Finney, William W., III (William Warner)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

E-Print Network 3.0 - abay basin ethiopia Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Blue Nile) with a Simple Model1 Tammo S. Steenhuis1 Summary: for Nile Basin & Eastern Africa, Addis7 Ababa, Ethiopia,8 5 Department of Natural Resources, ARARI, Bahir... in the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Optics in Eastern Connecticut  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Through a partnership between EASTCONN, a regional educational service center, and Three Rivers Community College, both located in eastern Connecticut, students from 5th grade through...

Magnani, Nancy; Donnelly, Judith

82

Continental Shelf Research 26 (2006) 1524 Geochemical compositions of river and shelf sediments in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental Shelf Research 26 (2006) 15­24 Geochemical compositions of river and shelf sediments in the Yellow Sea: Grain-size normalization and sediment provenance D.I. Lima,?, H.S. Jungb , J.Y. Choic , S 14 November 2005 Abstract The geochemistry of sediment samples from Korean and Chinese rivers

Yang, Shouye

83

E-Print Network 3.0 - alaskan continental shelf Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF THE ALASKAN STREAM ON SHELF CURRENTS... . Climatology Northeastern Gulf Shelf and Ocean Currents Northwestern Gulf, Kodiak Outer Shelf and Alaskan... Comparison with the...

84

Prospects For Electricity Generation In The San Luis Basin, Colorado, Usa |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Prospects For Electricity Generation In The San Luis Basin, Colorado, Usa Prospects For Electricity Generation In The San Luis Basin, Colorado, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Prospects For Electricity Generation In The San Luis Basin, Colorado, Usa Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The San Luis basin is the largest and deepest basin in the Neogene Rio Grande rift, and has many similarities to the basins of the US Basin and Range Province. It is asymmetric with a displacement of as much as 9 km on its eastern margin, and approximately 6.4 km of sedimentary rocks of late Oligocene or younger age in the deepest portion of the basin. Temperature measurements in shallow wells in the northern basin have an average geothermal gradient of 59.0 ± 11.8°C km-1 (± standard

85

NETL: Innovations for Existing Plants - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reference Shelf Reference Shelf Innovations for Existing Plants Reference Shelf Program Overview Overview Publications: IEP, Recent Accomplishments Report - [PDF-1.3MB] (Oct 2007) IEP Roadmap & Program Plan [PDF-1.2MB] (May 2006) DOE/NETL'S Innovations for Existing Plants R&D Program [PDF-42KB] (Feb 2005) Improving the Environmental Performance of Today's Coal-Fired Power Plants This paper provides an overview of the Innovations for Existing Plants (IEP) Program, managed by the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory. IEP develops advanced low-cost environmental control technologies for the existing fleet of coal-fired power plants, specifically focusing on the development of advanced mercury, NOx, PM, and acid gas emission control technology. Research is also directed at the characterization and beneficial use of coal utilization byproducts as well as at emerging electric-utility and water issues.

86

Rapid generation of upwelling at a shelf break caused by buoyancy shutdown  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Model analyses of an along-shelf flow over a continental shelf and slope reveal upwelling near the shelf break. A stratified, initially uniform along-shelf flow undergoes a rapid adjustment with notable differences onshore and offshore of the ...

Jessica Benthuysen; Leif N. Thomas; Steven J. Lentz

87

High-Frequency Internal Waves on the Oregon Continental Shelf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurements of vertical velocity by isopycnal-following, neutrally buoyant floats deployed on the Oregon shelf during the summers of 2000 and 2001 were used to characterize internal gravity waves on the shelf using measurements of vertical ...

Eric A. DAsaro; Ren-Chieh Lien; Frank Henyey

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The application cyclic CO2, often referred to as the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in capital-intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration and Production Inc. and the US Department of Energy have teamed up in a attempt to develop the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations which are light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs that exist throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir.

Boomer, R.J.; Cole, R.; Kovar, M.; Prieditis, J.; Vogt, J.; Wehner, S.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

89

Regional aquifers and petroleum in Williston Basin region of US  

SciTech Connect

At least five major aquifers underlie the northern Great Plains of the US, which includes parts of the Williston basin in Montana and North Dakota. These aquifers form a hydrologic system that extends more than 960 km from recharge areas in the Rocky Mountains to discharge areas in eastern North Dakota and the Canadian Provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. The regional flow system in the aquifers has had a major effect on the chemical composition of ground water within the Williston basin. Hydrodynamic forces may contribute to the accumulation of petroleum within the basin.

Downey, J.S.; Busby, J.F.; Dinwiddie, G.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Geologic setting and natural gas potential of Niobrara formation, Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

Chalk units in the Niobrara Formation (Upper Cretaceous) have potential for generation and accumulation of shallow, biogenic gas in the central and eastern Williston basin. Similar to area of Niobrara gas production in the eastern Denver basin, Niobrara chalks in South and North Dakota were deposited on carbonate ramps sloping westward off the stable eastern platform of the Western Interior seaway. Within the Williston basin, the Niobrara of the western Dakotas, eastern North Dakota, and central South Dakota has different stratigraphic relationships. These three areas can be further subdivided and ranked into six areas that have different exploration potential. The south margin of the Williston basin in central South Dakota is the most attractive exploration area. Niobrara chalk reservoirs, source rocks, and structural traps in the southern Williston basin are similar to those in the eastern Denver basin. Chalk porosities are probably adequate for gas production, although porosity is controlled by burial depth. Organic carbon content of the chalk is high and shows of biogenic gas are reported. Large, low-relief structural features, which could serve as traps, are present.

Shurr, G.W.; Rice, D.D.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Quarterly report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Results of seismic surveys are presented.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 3. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $28.49 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $38.51 $39.67 - 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $20.35 $16.14 $16.64 -9.6 3.1 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $19.64 $19.60 $20.41 1.9 4.2 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $14.02 $16.13 $16.23 7.6 0.6 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $43.43 $40.18 $39.62 -4.5 -1.4

93

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data 4. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, EIA data Basin Destination State 2008 2009 2010 2008-2010 2009-2010 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware $26.24 - W W - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida - $35.10 $35.74 - 1.8 Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana $18.74 $14.70 $14.99 -10.6 1.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $18.09 $17.86 $18.39 0.8 3.0 Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $12.91 $14.70 $14.63 6.4 -0.5 Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire $40.00 $36.62 $35.70 -5.5 -2.5

94

Evaluation of Devonian shale potential in Eastern Kentucky/Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the potential of the Devonian shale as a source of natural gas, the US Department of Energy (DOE) has undertaken the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP). The EGSP is designed not only to identify the resource, but also to test improved methods of inducing permeability to facilitate gas drainage, collection, and production. The ultimate goal of this project is to increase the production of gas from the eastern shales through advanced exploration and exploitation techniques. The purpose of this report is to inform the general public and interested oil and gas operators about EGSP results as they pertain to the Devonian gas shales of the Appalachian basin in eastern Kentucky and Tennessee. Geologic data and interpretations are summarized, and areas where the accumulation of gas may be large enough to justify commercial production are outlined.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Jump to: navigation, search Statute Name Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act Year 1953 Url [[File:|160px|link=]] Description References Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act pdf[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Enacted in 1953, the Outer Continental Lands Act provides for the jurisdiction of the United States over the submerged lands of the outer Continental Shelf, and authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to lease such lands for certain purposes. "It is hereby declared to be the policy of the United States that- (1) the subsoil and seabed of the outer Continental Shelf appertain to the United States and are subject to its jurisdiction, control, and power of disposition as provided in this Act..."

96

Eastern Frequency Response Study  

SciTech Connect

This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43 $0.0294 W - W W - - - 43 $0.0294 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $0.0161 W W W W $0.0216 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $0.0296 $0.0277 $0.0292 $0.0309 $0.0325 $0.0328 $0.0357 $0.0451 $0.0427 4.7 -5.3 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

98

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

$15.49 $13.83 W - W W - - - $15.49 $13.83 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $19.46 W W W W $29.49 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $10.33 $9.58 $10.68 $12.03 $13.69 $14.71 $16.11 $19.72 $20.69 9.1 4.9 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

99

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

$0.0323 $0.0284 W - W W - - - $0.0323 $0.0284 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $0.0146 W W W W $0.0223 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $0.0269 $0.0255 $0.0275 $0.0299 $0.0325 $0.0339 $0.0380 $0.0490 $0.0468 7.2 -4.3 Northern Appalachian Basin Massachusetts W W - - - - - - - - -

100

Regional geologic framework of Neogene-Quaternary deposits, Louisiana continental shelf  

SciTech Connect

The Louisiana Continental Shelf of the northern Gulf Coast Basin is one of the most prolific hydrocarbon provinces in the Nation. Its structural and stratigraphic characteristics were studied by means of a regional network of dip and strike cross sections based on subsurface data from wells penetrating to depths as great as 19,000 ft (5791 m) below mean sea level. The cross sections illustrate a gulfward-thickening wedge of terrigenous clastic Cenozoic deposits that have a complex structural fabric; structures are largely attributed to extensive depositional loading, which result in gravity failure and widespread diapirism. Major structural elements include systems of coast-parallel, syndepositional faults characterized by down-to-basin displacement, sectional thickening on the downthrown side, and increasing stratigraphic throw with depth. Abundant piercement salt domes, as well as numerous post-depositional fold sand gravity fault systems, are also present. The cross-sectional network illustrates the spatial distribution of about 30 chronostratigraphic units ranging in age from early Miocene to late Pleistocene. Regional variations in stratigraphic thickness reflect both coast-parallel and gulfward migrations of the basinal depocenter. Induction-electrical logs indicate the presence of three magnafacies that are defined on the basis of sand-shale proportions. Downdip facies changes to progressively more argillaceous units indicate a gulfward transition from continental to deep-water marine paleoenvironments.

Shideler, G.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Depth and controls of Ca-rhodochrosite precipitation in bioturbated sediments of the Eastern Equatorial Pacific,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Depth and controls of Ca-rhodochrosite precipitation in bioturbated sediments of the Eastern Road, Moss Landing, CA 95039-9647, USA ABSTRACT The occurrence of early diagenetic Ca-rhodochrosite [(Mn,Ca)CO3] is reported in association with `griotte'-type nodular limestones from basinal settings

Gilli, Adrian

102

Distribution of shelf sediments, offshore from Anton Lizardo and the Port of Veracruz, Veracruz, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the reefs, suggesting that, this might be the controlling factor in the shape of the carbonate buildups. ~Ge lo ot th e The Anton Lizardo and Port of Veracruz reef complex- es are located on the eastern margin of the 14, 000 km 2 Veracruz Basin (Tamayo... at the small vil- lage of Boca del Rio, this river drains an area of 3, 627 km and has an annual discharge of 2, 689 million m 2 (Tamayo, 1949) . Rio Papaloapan, the larger of the tw'o rivers, empties into the Gulf of Mexico at the Port of Alvardo 40 km...

Edwards, Goldsborough Serpell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

103

Microbial Community Diversity Associated with Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in Permeable Shelf Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with surface-breaching gas hydrate mounds in the Gulf of Mexico...transport in permeable shelf sands. Cont. Shelf Res. 24...batch cultures, using gas-chromatography and N-15...Middle Atlantic Bight shelf sands. FEMS Microbiol. Ecol...

Evan M. Hunter; Heath J. Mills; Joel E. Kostka

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Basin Destination State  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Basin Basin Destination State 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2001-2009 2008-2009 Northern Appalachian Basin Delaware W W $16.45 $14.29 W - W W - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Florida $21.45 W W W W $28.57 W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Illinois W W - - - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W W W W W W W W W W W Northern Appalachian Basin Kentucky - - W W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $11.39 $10.39 $11.34 $12.43 $13.69 $14.25 $15.17 $18.16 $18.85 6.5 3.8

105

Chapter 6 - Eastern Europe  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the library and information systems of four Eastern European countries. In a survey described in the chapter, four libraries in Eastern Europe returned the questionnaires on the role of national libraries in national and international information systems: (1) Bulgaria, (2) the Czech Socialist Republic, (3) Hungary, and (4) Poland. The USSR was regularly present at the meetings of the Conference and made contributions to the discussions but did not return replies to the questionnaires. As in the case of the British Library, answers were given to the questions from personal experience. A study of the Soviet Library system appeared in 1972 under the title Libraries, Documentation and Bibliography in the USSR, which, despite its inadequacies, is the only survey in English of the Russian library and information system as a whole. The influence of the Lenin Library as a library planning center is very strong throughout Eastern Europe, while the Council of Mutual Economic Assistance has strongly influenced the structure and services in the field of scientific and technical information.

GEORGE CHANDLER

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Subsurface stratigraphy and depositional history of Madison Limestone (Mississippian), Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

Cyclic carbonate-evaporite deposits of the Madison Limestone (Mississippian) in the Williston basin are made up of four main facies. From basin to shelf, the normal facies transition is from offshore deeper water (Lodgepole) facies to crinoidal-algal banks and back-bank fine carbonate, evaporite, and minor terrigenous clastic beds on the shallow shelf. Five major depositional cycles are correlated and mapped on the basis of shaley marker beds identified on gamma-ray-neutron or gamma-ray-sonic logs. The marker beds are interpreted as reworked and redistributed silt and clay-size sediments originally deposited, possibly by eolian processes, on the emergent shelf during low sea level phases of cycle development. From oldest to youngest, the first two cycles are characterized by increasing amounts of crinoidal-bioclastic and oolite-algal carbonates, culminating in the Mission Canyon facies of the middle cycle. The upper two cycles are characterized by increasing amounts of evaporite deposits, culminating in the Charles salt facies of the youngest cycle. Much of the Madison section on the south and east flanks of the basin consists of dolomite. Dolomite content decreased toward the basin center, where a major share of Madison petroleum production is located. Reservoir beds in the oil fields are primarily partially dolomitized oolite-algal or crinoidal-bioclastic bank carbonates. Most of the productive petroleum reservoirs are located in the middle cycles of the Madison.

Peterson, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Water Basins Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Basins Civil Engineering Objective · Connect the study of water, water cycle, and ecosystems with engineering · Discuss how human impacts can effect our water basins, and how engineers lessen these impacts: · The basic concepts of water basins are why they are important · To use a topographic map · To delineate

Provancher, William

108

Mixing in seasonally stratified shelf seas: a shifting paradigm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...continental shelf seas to open-ocean CO2 storage is turbulent mixing of nutrients across...early August). At these locations the seawater density is largely determined by temperature...H.J.W Baar2004Enhanced open ocean storage of CO2 from shelf sea pumping. Science...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

E-Print Network 3.0 - argentinean continental shelf Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OF THE ALASKAN STREAM ON SHELF CURRENTS... . Climatology Northeastern Gulf Shelf and Ocean Currents Northwestern Gulf, Kodiak Outer ... Source: National Oceanic and...

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent continental shelf Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sciences and Ecology 4 Shelf sedimentation on a tectonically active margin: A modern sediment budget for Poverty continental shelf, New Zealand Summary: of the sediment carried by...

111

Depositional environments of the Kodiak Shelf, Alaska  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of these envfronments are created by the bathymetry of tfii s!iel f affec+ing the flow of the shelf waters. Sediment in the re!ighs is characterized by high asti and forami- rifera content, higi poros Ity and low bu', k densi ty. The fine-i;i a in natiif e i i' 'I... and clay. The f'ine-g; ain nature nf tive sed'me!&t of the surf'icfal deposits suogests that. they al e lovi ene!"gy ivii Gniilents, The negative ". opography shelters t'tie sediment in the d pressions from erosion. Iv ACKi'lOWLEDGMENTS The wr1ter...

Burbach, Stuart Peter

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

Proceedings of the North Aleutian Basin information status and research planning meeting.  

SciTech Connect

The North Aleutian Basin Planning Area of the Minerals Management Service (MMS) is a large geographic area with significant ecological and natural resources. The Basin includes most of the southeastern part of the Bering Sea continental shelf including all of Bristol Bay. The area supports important habitat for a wide variety of species and globally significant habitat for birds and marine mammals including federally listed species. Villages and communities of the Alaska Peninsula and other areas bordering or near the Basin rely on its natural resources (especially commercial and subsistence fishing) for much of their sustenance and livelihood. The offshore area of the North Aleutian Basin is considered to have important hydrocarbon reserves, especially natural gas. In 2006, the MMS released a draft proposed program, Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program, 2007-2012 and an accompanying draft programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS). The draft proposed program identified two lease sales proposed in the North Aleutian Basin in 2010 and 2012, subject to restrictions. The area proposed for leasing in the Basin was restricted to the Sale 92 Area in the southwestern portion. Additional EISs will be needed to evaluate the potential effects of specific lease actions, exploration activities, and development and production plans in the Basin. A full range of updated multidisciplinary scientific information will be needed to address oceanography, fate and effects of oil spills, marine ecosystems, fish, fisheries, birds, marine mammals, socioeconomics, and subsistence in the Basin. Scientific staff at Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) were contracted to assist the MMS Alaska Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region in identifying and prioritizing information needs related to the North Aleutian Basin and potential future oil and gas leasing and development activities. The overall approach focused on three related but separate tasks: (1) identification and gathering of relevant literature; (2) synthesis and summary of the literature; and (3) identification and prioritization of information needs. To assist in gathering this information, MMS convened the North Aleutian Basin Information Status and Research Planning Meeting, held in Anchorage, Alaska, from November 28 through December 1, 2006; this report presents a summary of that meeting. The meeting was the primary method used to gather input from stakeholders and identify information needs and priorities for future inventory, monitoring, and research related to potential leasing and oil and gas developments in the North Aleutian Basin.

LaGory, K. E.; Krummel, J. R.; Hayse, J. W.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Stull, E. A.; Gorenflo, L.; Environmental Science Division

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

113

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine-Scale Control of Microbial Communities in Deep Marine Sediments Fine-Scale Control of Microbial Communities in Deep Marine Sediments Fine-Scale Control of Microbial Communities in Deep Marine Sediments that Contain Hydrates and High Concentrations of Methane Authors: Colwell, F. (speaker, Oregon State University), Hangsterfer, A., Brodie, E., Daly, R., Holland, M., Briggs, B., Carini, P., Torres, M., Kastner, M., Long, P., Schaef, H., Delwiche, M., Winters, W., and Riedel, M. Venue: American Geophysical Union’s fall meeting in San Francisco, CA, December 10–14, 2007 (http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm07/ [external site]). Abstract: Deep subseafloor sediments with high concentrations of organic carbon and microbially generated methane contain microbial communities that play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon. However, there remains a limited understanding of the fine (centimeter)-scale sediment properties (e.g., grain size, presence/absence of hydrates) that determine key microbial attributes in deep marine sediments. This project’s objective is to determine the quantity, diversity, and distribution of microbial communities in the context of abiotic properties in gas-rich marine sediments. DNA was extracted from deep marine sediments cored from various continental shelf locations, including offshore India and the Cascadia Margin. Abiotic characterization of the same sediments included grain size analysis, chloride concentrations in sediment pore waters, and presence of hydrates in the sediments as determined by thermal anomalies. As in past studies of such systems, most of the samples yielded low levels of DNA (0.3-1.5 ng/g of sediment). Bacterial DNA appeared to be more easily amplified than archaeal DNA. Initial attempts to amplify DNA using primers specific for the methanogen functional gene, methyl-CoM-reductase, were unsuccessful. Infrequently, cores from relatively shallow sediments (e.g., 0.5 mbsf Leg 204, 1251B-1H) from central (Hydrate Ridge) and northern (offshore Vancouver Island) Cascadia and from India’s eastern margin contained macroscopically visible, pigmented biofilms. One of these biofilms was composed of high concentrations of cell clusters when viewed microscopically. The predominant cells in the Hydrate Ridge biofilm were large (ca. 10 um) cocci, and preliminary characterization of the 16S rDNA amplified and sequenced from this biofilm suggests the prevalence of a microbe with 97% similarity to mycobacteria. These discrete biofilm communities appear to be distinctive relative to the normally sparse distribution of cells in the sediments. By determining how the abiotic properties of deep marine sediments control the numbers and distribution of microbial communities that process organic matter, project researchers hope to provide better parameters for computational models that describe carbon cycling in these systems.

114

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Pacific  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pacific Pacific Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov » Communities » Energy » Data Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Pacific Dataset Summary Description Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics for the Pacific by month and summarized annually. Tags {"Minerals Management Service",MMS,Production,"natural gas",gas,condensate,"crude oil",oil,"OCS production","Outer Continental Shelf",OSC,EIA,"Energy Information Agency",federal,DOE,"Department of Energy",DOI,"Department of the Interior","Pacific "} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility 0 No votes yet Usefulness

115

CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of the Sundown Slaughter Unit (SSU) CO2 Huff- n- Puff (H- n- P) project is to determine the feasibility and practicality of the technology in a waterflooded shallow shelf carbonate environment. Sundown Slaughter Unit is the second demonstration site associated with this project, following the unsuccessful test at Central Vacuum Unit. The ultimate goal will be to develop guidelines based on commonly available data that other operators in the industry can use to investigate the applicability of the process within other fields. The technology transfer objective of the project is to disseminate the knowledge gained through an innovative plan in support of the Department of Energy's (DOE) objective of increasing domestic oil production and deferring the abandonment of shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. Tasks associated with this objective are carried out in what is a timely effort for near- term goals. The goal of this Sundown Slaughter Unit Project is to demonstrate the CO2 Huff- n- Puff process in a waterflooded, light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir within the Permian Basin. The CO2 Huff- n- Puff process is a proven enhanced oil recovery technology for Louisiana- Texas gulf coast sandstone reservoirs. The reader is referred to three Society of Petroleum Engineer (SPE) papers, No. 15502, No. 16720 & No. 20208 for a review of the theory, mechanics of the process, and several case histories. The process has even been shown to be moderately effective in conjunction with steam on heavy California crude oils. Although the technology is proven in gulf coast sandstones, it continues to be a very underutilized enhanced recovery option for carbonates. The goal of this technology demonstration is to gain an overall understanding of the reservoir qualities that influence CO2 Huff- n- Puff production responses within a heterogeneous reservoir such as the shallow shelf carbonate environment of the Sundown Slaughter Unit. A generalized reservoir model was developed and used to determine the importance of various geological and operational influences upon the CO2 Huff- n- Puff process at CVU. The findings at CVU would be applied to the demonstration site at SSU without further simulation studies being conducted at SSU.

John Prieditis; Mark Kovar; Roger Cole; Scott Wehner

1998-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

116

Late Paleozoic depositional controls in the Paradox basin, Colorado and Utah  

SciTech Connect

The Paradox evaporite basin formed during the Desmoinesian to Wolfcampian intracratonic Ancestral Rocky Mountain orogeny in response to the Laurentia-Gondwana collision. Basin subsidence resulted from the southwestward thrusting and probably lateral movement on the Uncompahgre Fault along it's northeastern margin. This created a strongly asymmetrical basin that was similar in geometry to a foreland basin, with the Definace-Zuni and Piute platforms occupying the position of a foreland bulge. The evaporite basin was separated from its southeastern extension, the San Juan Trough, by the northeast-trending Hogback fault zone. An orthogonal pattern of northeast- and northwest-trending basement faults extends from the San Juan Basin into the Paradox Basin and can be shown to have exerted significant control on depositional patterns throughout the Phanerozoic. Paleogeographic and plate reconstructions indicate that the north-south-trending Uncompahgre and Front Range highlands lay at right angles to the prevailing easterly winds--thus removed most of the moisture and produced arid to semiarid conditions throughout the Paradox Basin and San Juan Trough. As many as 35 halite-bearing cycles have been identified in the Desmoinesian Paradox Formation. Each cycle is composed of a transgressive freshening phase and a regressive evaporitic phase with either halite or potash as the final product. All of the evaporite cycles are bounded by unconformities and can be divided into higher order sequences, particularly in the correlative carbonate shelf environments to the southwest.

Huffman, A.C. Jr. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

River Basin Commissions (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes river basin commissions, for the Kankakee, Maumee, St. Joseph, and Upper Wabash Rivers. The commissions facilitate and foster cooperative planning and coordinated...

118

Origin of cratonic basins  

SciTech Connect

Tectonic subsidence curves show that the Illinois, Michigan, and Williston basins formed by initial fault-controlled mechanical subsidence during rifting and by subsequent thermal subsidence. Thermal subsidence began around 525 Ma in the Illinois Basin, 520-460 Ma in the Michigan Basin, and 530-500 Ma in the Williston Basin. In the Illinois Basin, a second subsidence episode (middle Mississippian through Early Permian) was caused by flexural foreland subsidence in response to the Alleghanian-Hercynian orogeny. Past workers have suggested mantle phase changes at the base of the crust, mechanical subsidence in response to isostatically uncompensated excess mass following igneous intrusions, intrusion of mantle plumes into the crust, or regional thermal metamorphic events as causes of basin initiation. Cratonic basins of North America, Europe, Africa, and South America share common ages of formation, histories of sediment accumulation, temporal volume changes of sediment fills, and common dates of interregional unconformities. Their common date of formation suggests initiation of cratonic basins in response to breakup of a late Precambrian supercontinent. This supercontinent acted as a heat lens that caused partial melting of the lower crust and upper mantle followed by emplacement of anorogenic granites during extensional tectonics in response to supercontinent breakup. Intrusion of anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks weakened continental lithosphere, thus providing a zone of localized regional stretching and permitting formation of cratonic basins almost simultaneously over sites of intrusion of these anorogenic granites and other partially melted intrusive rocks.

de V. Klein, G.; Hsui, A.T.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reference Shelf Reference Shelf NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf Solicitations Project Summaries Publications News Releases Software/Databases CDs/DVDs EOR Illustrations Welcome to the NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf. Recently released and in-demand reference materials are available directly from this page using the links below. Online Database of Oil and Natural Gas Research Results Now Available The Knowledge Management Database (KMD) provides easy access to the results of nearly four decades of research supported by the Office of Fossil Energy’s Oil and Natural Gas Program. The database portal provides access to content from dozens of CDs and DVDs related to oil and natural gas research that FE's National Energy Technology Laboratory has published over the years. It

120

Guidelines for commercial off-the-shelf simulation package interoperability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) Simulation Packages (CSPs) are widely used visual interactive modeling environments such as Arena, Anylogic, Flexsim, Simul8, Witness, etc. CSP Interoperability (or distributed simulation) ...

Simon J. E. Taylor; Stephen J. Turner; Steffen Strassburger

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Piecewise Linearization Framework for Retail Shelf Space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Georgia Institute of Technology. Atlanta, GA ... models and to provide a solution procedure that can handle realistic problem sizes and that is flexible enough to be applied to a wide range of shelf space management models. To achieve this,.

2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

122

Rapid Collapse of Northern Larsen Ice Shelf, Antarctica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...result of perturbed mass balance. (Auth.) Antarctic...shelves Larsen ice shelf mass balance Quaternary remote sensing...Development, domestic wastewater treatment is estimated to cover...Worldwide Desalt-ing Plants Inventory (International...

Helmut Rott; Pedro Skvarca; Thomas Nagler

1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

123

Eastern Audits Division  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Work Plan for FY 2014 Work Plan for FY 2014 Eastern Audits Division  Follow-up of the Reindustrialization Program at East Tennessee Technology Park  Audit of the Department's Management of High-Risk Property  Audit of the Department's Efforts to Reduce Mercury Contamination at the Y-12 National Security Complex  Non-conforming Equipment and Parts at the Savannah River Site  Audit of the Department's Facility Contractors' Use of No Bid Subcontracts  Decontamination and Decommissioning Activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory  The Department's Audit Resolution and Follow-up Process  Legacy Management Activities at Selected Sites  Department's Contract Awards Made to Alaska Native Corporation  Readiness of the Saltstone Disposal Facility at the Savannah River Site

124

Basin center - fractured source rock plays within tectonically segmented foreland (back-arc) basins: Targets for future exploration  

SciTech Connect

Production from fractured reservoirs has long been an industry target, but interest in this type play has increased recently because of new concepts and technology, especially horizontal drilling. Early petroleum exploration programs searched for fractured reservoirs from shale, tight sandstones, carbonates, or basement in anticlinal or fault traps, without particular attention to source rocks. Foreland basins are some of the best oil-generating basins in the world because of their rich source rocks. Examples are the Persian Gulf basin, the Alberta basin and Athabasca tar sands, and the eastern Venezuela basin and Orinoco tar sands. Examples of Cretaceous producers are the wrench-faulted La Paz-Mara anticlinal fields, Maracaibo basin, Venezuela; the active Austin Chalk play in an extensional area on the north flank of the Gulf of Mexico continental margin basin; and the Niobrara Chalk and Pierre Shale plays of the central Rocky Mountains, United States. These latter plays are characteristic of a foreland basin fragmented into intermontane basins by the Laramide orogeny. The Florence field, Colorado, discovered in 1862, and the Silo field, Wyoming, discovered in 1980, are used as models for current prospecting and will be described in detail. The technologies applied to fracture-source rock plays are refined surface and subsurface mapping from new log suites, including resistivity mapping; 3D-3C seismic, gravity, and aeromagnetic mapping; borehole path seismic mapping associated with horizontal drilling; fracture mapping with the Formation MicroScanner and other logging tools; measurements while drilling and other drilling and completion techniques; surface geochemistry to locate microseeps; and local and regional lineament discrimination.

Weimer, R.J. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Regional stratigraphy and general petroleum geology, Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

Paleozoic sedimentary rocks in the Northern Great Plains and northern Rocky Mountain region include a sequence of dominantly shallow-water marine carbonate, clastic, and evaporite deposits of Middle Cambrian through Early Permian age. The lower part of the Paleozoic section is a sequence of marine sandstone, shale, and minor limestone, rangeing in age from Middle Cambrian through Middle Ordovician. Some porous sandstone beds occur in this section, mainly in the eastern and southern bordering areas of the Williston basin and Central Montana trough. Upper Ordovician through middle Upper Mississippian rocks are primarily carbonate beds, which contain numerous widespread cyclic interbeds of evaporite and fine-grained clastic deposits. Carbonate mounds or banks were deposited through most of this time in the shallow-water areas of the Williston basin and northern Rocky Mountains. Porous units, mainly dolomite or dolomitic limestone, are common but discontinuous in most of this sequence, and are more widespread in the eastern and southern margins of the Williston basin. Cumulative petroleum production (January 1982) in the United States part of the Williston basin was about 1.1 billion bbl of oil and 1.6 tcf gas. Estimated remaining recoverable reserves are about 400 million bbl of oil and 0.8 tcf gas. U.S. Geological Survey 1980 estimates of undiscovered recoverable oil and gas resources are about 900 million bbl of oil and 3.5 tcf gas.

Peterson, J.A.; Maccary, L.M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

1 Seasonal and successional streamflow response to forest cutting 2 and regrowth in the northwest and eastern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

decades in northwest 7 conifer forest and eastern deciduous forest sites in the United States. We used increases ranged from 2 to 3 mm at deciduous forest 12 sites, to 6 to 8 mm at conifer forest sites. Significant spring surpluses persisted for up 13 to 35 years in conifer forest basins, but winter and spring

Kurapov, Alexander

127

Strontium isotope ratios of the Eastern Paratethys during the Mio-Pliocene transition; Implications for interbasinal connectivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strontium isotope ratios of the Eastern Paratethys during the Mio-Pliocene transition; Implications investigate the biogenically produced carbonates of the Dacian basin for strontium analyses to monitor changes evaluation showed that not all contamination could be removed, but that the strontium content of our samples

Utrecht, Universiteit

128

K-Basins.pub  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 AUDIT REPORT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL OFFICE OF AUDIT SERVICES COMPLETION OF K BASINS MILESTONES APRIL 2002 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman (Signed) Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Completion of K Basins Milestones" BACKGROUND The Department of Energy (Department) has been storing 2,100 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington. The fuel, used in support of Hanford's former mission, is currently stored in canisters that are kept in two enclosed water-filled pools known as the K Basins. The K Basins represent a significant risk to the environment due to their deteriorating condition. In fact, the K East Basin, which is near the Columbia River, has

129

Regional And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range Province,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range Province, And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range Province, Western North America- Evidence For Deep Permeable Pathways Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Regional And Local Trends In Helium Isotopes, Basin And Range Province, Western North America- Evidence For Deep Permeable Pathways Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluids from the western margin of the Basin and Range have helium isotope ratios as high as ~6-7 Ra, indicating a strong mantle melt influence and consistent with recent and current volcanic activity. Moving away from these areas, helium isotope ratios decrease rapidly to 'background' values of around 0.6 Ra, and then gradually decrease toward the east to low values of ~0.1 Ra at the eastern margin of the Basin and

130

Topic A Awardee: Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Awardee: Eastern Interconnection Planning A Awardee: Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative Topic A Awardee: Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) was initiated by a coalition of regional Planning Authorities. These Planning Authorities are entities listed on the NERC compliance registry as Planning Authorities and represent the entire Eastern Interconnection. The EIPC was founded to be a broad-based, transparent collaborative process among all interested stakeholders: State and Federal policy makers Consumer and environmental interests Transmission Planning Authorities Market participants generating, transmitting or consuming electricity within the Eastern Interconnection. The EIPC will provide a grass-roots approach which builds upon the regional

131

Chattanooga Eagle Ford Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Western Gulf TX-LA-MS Salt Basin Uinta Basin Devonian (Ohio) Marcellus Utica Bakken*** Avalon- Bone Spring San Joaquin Basin Monterey Santa Maria, Ventura, Los Angeles Basins Monterey- Temblor Pearsall Tuscaloosa Big Horn Basin Denver Basin Powder River Basin Park Basin Niobrara* Mowry Niobrara* Heath** Manning Canyon Appalachian Basin Antrim Barnett Bend New Albany Woodford Barnett- Woodford Lewis Hilliard- Baxter- Mancos Excello- Mulky Fayetteville Floyd- Neal Gammon Cody Haynesville- Bossier Hermosa Mancos Pierre Conasauga Michigan Basin Ft. Worth Basin Palo Duro Basin Permian Basin Illinois Basin Anadarko Basin Greater Green River Basin Cherokee Platform San Juan Basin Williston Basin Black Warrior Basin A r d m o r e B a s i n Paradox Basin Raton Basin Montana Thrust Belt Marfa Basin Valley & Ridge Province Arkoma Basin Forest

132

CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir. Annual report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The application of cyclic CO{sub 2}, often referred to as the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration & Production Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg/San Andres formation; a light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir within the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir. A significant amount of oil reserves are located in carbonate reservoirs. Specifically, the carbonates deposited in shallow shelf (SSC) environments make up the largest percentage of known reservoirs within the Permian Basin of North America. Many of these known resources have been under waterflooding operations for decades and are at risk of abandonment if crude oil recoveries cannot be economically enhanced. The selected site for this demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico.

Wehner, S.C.; Boomer, R.J.; Cole, R.; Preiditus, J.; Vogt, J.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states and other stakeholders in the Eastern Interconnection identify geographic areas suitable for the development of clean energy resources (natural gas, sequestration or utilitization locations for C02 from coal, nuclear, and renewable) which can potentially provide significant amounts of new electric power generation.

134

Revised fusulinid biostratigraphic zonation and depositional sequence correlation, subsurface Permian basin  

SciTech Connect

Current revisions in fusulinid zonation enable them to subdivide the fossiliferous Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian section in the Permian basin into more biostratigraphic zones than the older scheme of R.V. Hollingsworth, each zone of shorter temporal duration than has previously been recognized. The identification of distinct fusulinid assemblage subzones within the absolute chronology of radiometric dating provides the basis for these stratigraphic subdivisions. The Atoka is divided into five assemblage subzones, each with an approximate duration of 1.0 m.y. In the Strawn, five subzones each of about 0.8 m.y. duration are recognized within the Cherokee; the three subzones in the Marmaton are each of 0.67 m.y. duration. Within Canyon and Cisco shelf carbonate sections are presently recognized seven and six subzones, respectively; the approximate duration of each is 0.33 and 1.03 m.y. The shelf Wolfcamp section is divisible into seven subzones, each of about 2.36 m.y. span. The entire Leonard shelf section comprises six subzones, each of about 1.83 m.y. duration; three subzones are presently recognized in the lower Leonard and three cumulatively in the middle and upper Leonard sections. These biostratigraphic subzones correspond to single or composite sediment packages (parasequences) that can be correlated regionally from shelf into basinal strata, using wireline log and conventional and processed seismic sections. Such packages comprise parts of individual depositional sequences as recognized by seismic-stratigraphic interpretations. Carbonate (various shelf and foreshelf detrital facies) and sandstone reservoirs occur within individual subzones within these sequences and can be readily defined and mapped by subsurface facies studies.

Reid, A.M.; Reid, S.T.; Mazzullo, S.J.; Robbins, S.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Seasonal Mean Circulation on the Irish Shelf { A Model-Generated Climatology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seasonal Mean Circulation on the Irish Shelf { A Model-Generated Climatology Daniel R. Lynch and interpret the climatological mean circulation in these waters, with emphasis on the Irish Shelf

136

Ocean Currents and Sea Surface Heights Estimated across the West Florida Shelf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The across-shelf structures of the ocean circulation and the associated sea surface height (SSH) variability are examined on the west Florida shelf (WFS) for the 3-yr interval from September 1998 to December 2001. Five sets of characteristic ...

Yonggang Liu; Robert H. Weisberg

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Dynamics of ice shelf rift propagation and iceberg calving inferred from geodetic and seismic observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ice at the base of the ice shelf could produce a thicknessthat may produce larger amounts of marine ice near one riftice shelf com- bined with large Antarctic storm systems can produce

Bassis, Jeremy N.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

E-Print Network 3.0 - amery ice shelf Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

enhance basal ice shelf melting around Antarctica Summary: to the absence of local ISM cooling. Only at the Amery ice shelf (AIS) is our ISM one order of magnitude higher... and...

139

Analysis of the Ross Ice Shelf Airstream Forcing Mechanisms Using Self-Organizing Maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Ross Ice Shelf airstream (RAS), a prominent transport mechanism of cold, continental air to the north, is the most common wind pattern over the Ross Ice Shelf, Antarctica. The forcing mechanisms of the RAS include katabatic drainage, mesoscale ...

Melissa A. Nigro; John J. Cassano

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Overview of the structural geology and tectonics of the Central Basin Platform, Delaware Basin, and Midland Basin, West Texas and New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The structural geology and tectonics of the Permian Basin were investigated using an integrated approach incorporating satellite imagery, aeromagnetics, gravity, seismic, regional subsurface mapping and published literature. The two primary emphases were on: (1) delineating the temporal and spatial evolution of the regional stress state; and (2) calculating the amount of regional shortening or contraction. Secondary objectives included delineation of basement and shallower fault zones, identification of structural style, characterization of fractured zones, analysis of surficial linear features on satellite imagery and their correlation to deeper structures. Gandu Unit, also known as Andector Field at the Ellenburger level and Goldsmith Field at Permian and younger reservoir horizons, is the primary area of interest and lies in the northern part of Ector county. The field trends northwest across the county line into Andrews County. The field(s) are located along an Ellenburger thrust anticline trap on the eastern margin of the Central Basin Platform.

Hoak, T. [Kestrel Geoscience, Littleton, CO (United States); Sundberg, K. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Ortoleva, P. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Petroleum exploration of Winnipegosis Formation in north-central North Dakota (Williston basin)  

SciTech Connect

The Winnipegosis Formation (Middle Devonian) in north-central Dakota has the greatest potential for large oil reserves in the Williston basin. The Winnipegosis carbonate (50 to 325 ft thick) was deposited in the southeast end of the Elk Point restricted sea. During Winnipegosis deposition, the Williston basin could be divided into two distinct environments: (1) a deep starved basin with accompanying pinnacle reefs separated by interreef, laminated limestone and (2) a surrounding carbonate shelf. Within the carbonate shelf are patch reefs, banks, and tidal flats. Overlying the Winnipegosis carbonate is the Prairie Formation, which has a basal anhydrite (0 to 70 ft thick) and an overlying salt (0 to 650 ft thick). These were deposited in a regressive phase of the Elk Point sea and act as seals for Winnipegosis oil entrapment. Currently, oil production from the Winnipegosis in the Williston basin is from stratigraphic traps and from small structures on the carbonate shelf. The most significant accumulation to date is Temple field, in which 11 wells produce from +/- 20 ft of Winnipegosis dolomite. The pinnacle reef environment has potential for significant oil reserves from 250-ft thick reefs covering 160 ac or less. Two pinnacle reefs have had free-oil recoveries from thin pay zones. The Rainbow/Zama fields in northwest Alberta have an ultimate reserve of more than 1 billion bbl of oil from Keg River reefs, which are correlative and similar to the Winnipegosis reefs in North Dakota. The strong seismic reflection that originates from the Winnipegosis-Prairie evaporite interface provides an excellent means of detecting Winnipegosis reefs. Amplitude of the Winnipegosis reflection is reduced dramatically over the reefs. The resulting dim spot is one criteria used in identifying reefs.

Guy, W.J. Jr.; Braden, K.W.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10'' to 20'' API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Permian Basin (Texas and New Mexico)  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Permian Basin of West Texas and Southeastern New Mexico is made up of the Midland, Delaware, Val Verde, and Kerr Basins; the Northwestern, Eastern, and Southern shelves; the Central Basin Platform, and the Sheffield Channel. The present day Permian Basin was one sedimentary basin until uplift and subsidence occurred during Pennsylvanian and early Permian Age to create the configuration of the basins, shelves, and platform of today. The basin has been a major light oil producing area served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and limited sour crude oil. Limited resources of heavy oil (10`` to 20`` API gravity) occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Permian and Cretaceous Age. The largest cumulative heavy oil production comes from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Trinity Group. Permian heavy oil is principally paraffinic and thus commands a higher price than asphaltic California heavy oil. Heavy oil in deeper reservoirs has solution gas and low viscosity and thus can be produced by primary and by waterflooding. Because of the nature of the resource, the Permian Basin should not be considered a major heavy oil producing area.

Olsen, D.K.; Johnson, W.I.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Meeting targets Eastern Europe investment fears  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increased cooperation in environment, markets, and investment between Western European and Eastern European chemical industries will lead to sustainable economic development in Eastern Europe, according to speakers at a conference sponsored by the United ...

PATRICIA LAYMAN

1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

145

Rapid Collapse of Northern Larsen Ice Shelf, Antarctica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ice shelf, even these small forces due to wind may play a role, as may the effects of wind on ocean circulation. An increased probability...calving events during peri-ods of persistent offshore winds and air tempera-tures above 0 C has been...

Helmut Rott; Pedro Skvarca; Thomas Nagler

1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

146

Gas exploration beyond the shelf break; an oceanographic challenge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of Bergen, Norway 4 Christian Michelsen Research, Bergen, Norway 5 Norsk Hydro Research Center), intermediate scale (4 km grid resolution) and small scale (O(1 m) grid resolution). The currents at the shelf at small scale it is thus not only necessary to resolve small scale variations, such as bottom topography

Thiem, ?yvind

147

Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation provides a high-level overview of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study process, scenarios, tools, and goals.

Bloom, A.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Fractures in the Barnett Shale in the Delaware Basin Natural Fractures in the Barnett Shale in the Delaware Basin Natural Fractures in the Barnett Shale in the Delaware Basin, Pecos Co. West Texas: comparison with the Barnett Shale in the Fort Worth Basin Authors: Julia F. W. Gale Venue: West Texas Geological Society Symposium, in Midland, Texas September 10-12, 2008. http://www.wtgs.org [external site] Abstract: This study describes the several sets of natural fractures in a Barnett Shale core from Pecos County, including partly open fractures, fractures associated with chert layers and early, deformed fractures. These are compared with fractures previously described in the Barnett Shale in the Fort Worth Basin. The basic fracture attributes are discussed in terms of their implications for hydraulic fracture treatments. The steep, narrow, calcite-sealed fractures that are present in many Barnett cores in the Fort Worth Basin are important because of their likely tendency to reactivate during hydraulic fracture treatments. Larger open fractures are possibly present, clustered on the order of several hundred feet apart. In the core studied from the Delaware Basin there is evidence that a greater number of narrower fractures may be open. Thus, their importance for completions may be rather different than those in the Fort Worth Basin

149

Assessing the influence of diagenesis on reservoir quality: Happy Spraberry Field, Garza County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation (Lower Leonardian) on the Eastern Shelf of the Midland Basin. Reservoir facies include oolitic- to-skeletal grainstones and packstones, rudstones and in situ Tubiphytes bindstones. Depositional environments vary from open marine reefs to shallow...

Mazingue-Desailly, Vincent Philippe Guillaume

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

150

Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

- The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

Faulds, James E.

151

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Comparing the Depositional Characteristics of the Oil-Shale-Rich Mahogany and R-6 Zones of the Uinta and Piceance Creek Basins Authors: Danielle Lehle and Michael D. Vanden Berg, Utah Geological Survey. Venue: Economic Geology of the Rocky Mountain Region session, May 11, 2009, Geological Society of America-Rocky Mountain Section annual meeting, Orem, Utah, May 11-13, 2009. http://www.geosociety.org/sectdiv/rockymtn/09mtg/index.htm [external site] Abstract: The upper Green River formation’s oil shale deposits located within the Uinta Basin of Utah and the Piceance Creek Basin of Colorado contain remarkably similar stratigraphic sequences despite being separated by the Douglas Creek arch. Individual horizons, as well as individual beds, can be traced for hundreds of miles within and between the two basins. However, changes in the topography-controlled runoff patterns between the basins, as well as changes in localized climate conditions throughout upper Green River time, created significant differences between basin-specific deposits. These variations affected the richness and thickness of each oil shale zone, resulting in basin-specific preferred extraction techniques (i.e., in-situ in Colorado and mining/retort in Utah). Colorado’s oil-shale resource was mapped and quantified by the USGS in the late 1970s, whereas this study is the first attempt at quantifying Utah’s overall resource by specific oil shale horizon. This presentation focuses on the Mahogany zone (MZ) and the stratigraphically lower R-6 zone; subsequent work will define other important horizons.

152

CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in a light oil shallow shelf carbonate reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The application of cyclic CO{sub 2}, often referred to as the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO{sub 2} H-n-P process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration and Production Inc. and the US Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO{sub 2} Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations, a light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoir that exists throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir. The selected site for this demonstration project is the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico. The goals of the project are the development of guidelines for cost-effective selection of candidate reservoirs and wells, along with estimating recovery potential. This project has two defined budget periods. The first budget period primarily involves tasks associated with reservoir analysis and characterization, characterizing existing producibility problems, and reservoir simulation of the proposed technology. The final budget period covers the actual field demonstration of the proposed technology. Technology transfer spans the entire course of the project. This report covers the concluding tasks performed under the second budget period.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Preliminary geology of eastern Umtanum Ridge, South-Central Washington  

SciTech Connect

The basalt stratigraphy and geologic structures of eastern Umtanum Ridge have been mapped and studied in detail to help assess the feasibility of nuclear waste terminal storage on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Eastern Umtanum Ridge is an asymmetric east-west-trending anticline of Columbia River basalt that plunges 5 degrees eastward into the Pasco Basin. Geologic mapping and determination of natural remanent magnetic polarity and chemical composition reveal that flows of the Pomona and Umatilla Members (Saddle Mountains Basalt), Priest Rapids and Frenchman Springs Members (Wanapum Basalt), and Grande Ronde Basalt were erupted as fairly uniform sheets. The Wahluke and Huntzinger flows (Saddle Mountains Basalt) fill a paleovalley cut into Wanapum Basalt. No evidence was found to indicate Quaternary-age movement on any structures in the map area. The basalt strata on the south limb of the Umtanum anticline display relatively little tectonic deformation since Miocene-Pliocene time. Thus, the buried south flank of Umtanum Ridge may provide an excellent location for a nuclear waste repository beneath the Hanford Site.

Goff, F.E.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf NETL Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf E&P Focus Newsletter Banner The oil and gas exploration and production R&D newsletter, E&P Focus, highlights the latest developments in R&D being carried out by NETL. E&P Focus promotes the widespread dissemination of research results among all types of oil and gas industry stakeholders: producers, researchers, educators, regulators, and policymakers. Each issue provides up-to-date information regarding extramural projects managed under the Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil’s traditional oil and gas program, the EPAct Section 999 Program administered by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America (RPSEA), and in-house oil and gas research carried out by NETL’s Office of Research and Development.

155

Data Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Basin Data Basin Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Data Basin Agency/Company /Organization: Conservation Biology Institute Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: databasin.org/ Data Basin Screenshot References: Data Basin [1] Overview "Data Basin is an innovative, online system that connects users with spatial datasets, tools, and expertise. Individuals and organization can explore and download a vast library of datasets, upload their own data, create and publish projects, form working groups, and produce customized maps that can be easily shared. The building blocks of Data Basin are: Datasets: A dataset is a spatially explicit file, currently Arcshape and ArcGrid files. These can be biological, physical, socioeconomic, (and

156

ALBATROSS EXPEDITION TO THE EASTERN PACIFIC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...two spits. The depth of the basin within this area with from 25...lagoon seems to form a western basin where the depth varies from...similar but shallower and flat basin exists, off the northern end...triangle which makes a deep bight open-ing westward to such...

1905-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

157

EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basin Electric Power Cooperative EA-64 Basin Electric Power Cooperative Order authorizing Basin Electric Power Cooperative to export electric energy to Canada EA-64 Basin Electric...

158

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins` heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas` liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Feasibility study of heavy oil recovery in the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of a series of publications assessing the feasibility of increasing domestic heavy oil production. Each report covers select areas of the United States. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins cover most of the depositional basins in the Midwest and Eastern United States. These basins produce sweet, paraffinic light oil and are considered minor heavy oil (10{degrees} to 20{degrees} API gravity or 100 to 100,000 cP viscosity) producers. Heavy oil occurs in both carbonate and sandstone reservoirs of Paleozoic Age along the perimeters of the basins in the same sediments where light oil occurs. The oil is heavy because escape of light ends, water washing of the oil, and biodegradation of the oil have occurred over million of years. The Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois, and Michigan basins' heavy oil fields have produced some 450,000 bbl of heavy oil of an estimated 14,000,000 bbl originally in place. The basins have been long-term, major light-oil-producing areas and are served by an extensive pipeline network connected to refineries designed to process light sweet and with few exceptions limited volumes of sour or heavy crude oils. Since the light oil is principally paraffinic, it commands a higher price than the asphaltic heavy crude oils of California. The heavy oil that is refined in the Midwest and Eastern US is imported and refined at select refineries. Imports of crude of all grades accounts for 37 to >95% of the oil refined in these areas. Because of the nature of the resource, the Appalachian, Black Warrior, Illinois and Michigan basins are not expected to become major heavy oil producing areas. The crude oil collection system will continue to degrade as light oil production declines. The demand for crude oil will increase pipeline and tanker transport of imported crude to select large refineries to meet the areas' liquid fuels needs.

Olsen, D.K.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Ramzel, E.B.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Structural and stratigraphic evolution of Shira Mountains, central Ucayali Basin, Peru  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interbedded with the Pozo Shale and Sand of Eocene - Oligocene age (Perupetro, 2003). It is widely distributed throughout the basin especially in the eastern flank. The Late Paleocene ? Early Eocene is represented by the continental red beds... of the Yahuarango Formation (Rojas, 2002). After the Middle Eocene isostatic rebound, a generalized orogenic loading stage in the Andes induced subsidence in the foreland area, resulting in a marine incursion and the deposition of the Pozo Shale formation...

Sanchez Alvarez, Jaime Orlando

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Monomethylmercury concentrations on the eastern Texas-Louisiana shelf during the formation, peak, and disappearance of hypoxia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of monomethylmercury (MMHg) concentrations in the water and sediment of the hypoxic zone in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico was conducted on several cruises between April 2004 and May 2005. Surface water MMHg concentrations were low...

Keach, Sara Elizabeth

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

162

ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS MODEL  

SciTech Connect

The advanced Chemistry Basin Model project has been operative for 48 months. During this period, about half the project tasks are on projected schedule. On average the project is somewhat behind schedule (90%). Unanticipated issues are causing model integration to take longer then scheduled, delaying final debugging and manual development. It is anticipated that a short extension will be required to fulfill all contract obligations.

William Goddard III; Lawrence Cathles III; Mario Blanco; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Petroleum basin studies  

SciTech Connect

This book reviews the tectonic setting, basin development and history of exploration of a number of selected petroleum provinces located in a variety of settings in the Middle East, North Sea, Nigeria, the Rocky Mountains, Gabon and China. This book illustrates how ideas and models developed in one area may be applied to other regions. Regional reviews and the reassessment of petroleum provinces are presented.

Shannon, P.M. (Univ. College, Dublin (IE)); Naylor, D. (Westland Exploration Ltd., Dublin (IE))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Caribbean basin framework, 3: Southern Central America and Colombian basin  

SciTech Connect

The authors recognize three basin-forming periods in southern Central America (Panama, Costa Rica, southern Nicaragua) that they attempt to correlate with events in the Colombian basin (Bowland, 1984): (1) Early-Late Cretaceous island arc formation and growth of the Central American island arc and Late Cretaceous formation of the Colombian basin oceanic plateau. During latest Cretaceous time, pelagic carbonate sediments blanketed the Central American island arc in Panama and Costa Rica and elevated blocks on the Colombian basin oceanic plateau; (2) middle Eocene-middle Miocene island arc uplift and erosion. During this interval, influx of distal terrigenous turbidites in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks the uplift and erosion of the Central American island arc. In the Colombian basin, turbidites fill in basement relief and accumulate to thicknesses up to 2 km in the deepest part of the basin. In Costa Rica, sedimentation was concentrated in fore-arc (Terraba) and back-arc (El Limon) basins; (3) late Miocene-Recent accelerated uplift and erosion of segments of the Central American arc. Influx of proximal terrigenous turbidites and alluvial fans in most areas of Panama, Costa Rica, and the Colombian basin marks collision of the Panama arc with the South American continent (late Miocene early Pliocene) and collision of the Cocos Ridge with the Costa Rican arc (late Pleistocene). The Cocos Ridge collision inverted the Terraba and El Limon basins. The Panama arc collision produced northeast-striking left-lateral strike-slip faults and fault-related basins throughout Panama as Panama moved northwest over the Colombian basin.

Kolarsky, R.A.; Mann, P. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect

The DOE-funded Advanced Chemistry Basin model project is intended to develop a public domain, user-friendly basin modeling software under PC or low end workstation environment that predicts hydrocarbon generation, expulsion, migration and chemistry. The main features of the software are that it will: (1) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter kinetic parameters for different maturity indicators; (2) afford users the most flexible way to choose or enter compositional kinetic parameters to predict hydrocarbon composition (e.g., gas/oil ratio (GOR), wax content, API gravity, etc.) at different kerogen maturities; (3) calculate the chemistry, fluxes and physical properties of all hydrocarbon phases (gas, liquid and solid) along the primary and secondary migration pathways of the basin and predict the location and intensity of phase fractionation, mixing, gas washing, etc.; and (4) predict the location and intensity of de-asphaltene processes. The project has be operative for 36 months, and is on schedule for a successful completion at the end of FY 2003.

William Goddard; Mario Blanco; Lawrence Cathles; Paul Manhardt; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang

2002-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

166

Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This one-page, two-sided fact sheet provides an overview of the Eastern Renewable Generation and Integration Study process.

Not Available

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

,"Year",,"Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Region, 1990 through 2004 " ,"(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Year",,"Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid" ,,,"Contiguous...

168

E-Print Network 3.0 - american continental shelf Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Bay-shaped Shelf, submitted. Zhang, Y, J... . Part III: Interaction between the Offshore Current and the ... Source: Rodgers, Keith - Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic...

169

Susquehanna River Basin Compact (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation enables the state's entrance into the Susquehanna River Basin Compact, which provides for the conservation, development, and administration of the water resources of the...

170

Bisbee basin and its bearing on Late Mesozoic Paleogeographic and paleotectonic relations between Cordilleran and Caribbean regions  

SciTech Connect

The Bisbee Group and its correlatives in southern Arizona, the New Mexico panhandle, and adjacent parts of Mexico are composed dominantly of Lower Cretaceous nonmarine, marginal marine, and shallow marine deposits, but apparently also include upper Upper Jurassic and lower Upper Cretaceous strata. Farther west, in southwestern Arizona and southeastern California, lithologically similar nonmarine strata of the McCoy Mountains Formation and its correlatives occupy the same general stratigraphic position as the Bisbee Group, but are poorly dated and may be older. The rifted Bisbee basin was a northwestern extension of the Chihuahua Trough, a late Mesozoic arm of the Gulf of Mexico depression. Basal zones of the Bisbee Group were deposited as alluvial fans marginal to active fault blocks during the rift phase of basin development, and are intercalated locally with lavas and ignimbrites. Subsequent thermotectonic subsidence of thinned crust beneath the Bisbee basin allowed intertonguing fluvial, lacustrine, deltaic, strandline, and marine shelf facies to invade the basin and bury the foundered fault-block topography. The upper Lower Cretaceous (Aptian-Albian) Mural Limestone was deposited during the phase of maximum transgression. Differing sandstone petrofacies of quartzose, arkosic, and volcaniclastic character reflect derivation of clastic detritus from varied sources bordering the Bisbee basin. The Bisbee basin and Chihuahua Trough developed in relation to Jurassic opening of the Gulf of Mexico, and were associated with changing plate configurations and motions throughout the Mesoamerican region.

Dickinson, W.R.; Klute, M.; Swift, P.N.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Geological characterization and statistical comparison of outcrop and subsurface facies: Shannon shelf sand ridges: Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this research is to develop a methodology for constructing accurate quantitative models of reservoir heterogeneities. The resulting models are expected to improve predictions of flow patterns, spatial distribution of residual oil after secondary and tertiary recovery operations, and ultimate oil recovery. The purpose of this study is to provide preliminary evaluation of the usefulness of outcrop information in characterizing analogous reservoirs and to develop research techniques necessary for model development. The Shannon Sandstone, a shelf sand ridge deposit in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, was studied. Sedimentologic and petrophysical features of an outcrop exposure of the High-Energy Ridge-Margin facies (HERM) within the Shannon were compared with those from a Shannon sandstone reservoir in Teapot Dome field. Comparisons of outcrop and subsurface permeability and porosity histograms, cumulative distribution functions, correlation lengths and natural logarithm of permeability versus porosity plots indicate a strong similarity between Shannon outcrop and Teapot Dome HERM facies petrophysical properties. Permeability classes found in outcrop samples can be related to crossbedded zones and shaley, rippled, and bioturbated zones. Similar permeability classes related to similar sedimentologic features were found in Teapot Dome field. The similarities of outcrop and Teapot Dome petrophysical properties, which are from the same geologic facies but from different depositional episodes, suggest that rocks deposited under similar depositional processes within a given deposystem have similar reservoir properties. The results of the study indicate that the use of quantitative outcrop information in characterizing reservoirs may provide a significant improvement in reservoir characterization. 17 refs., 5 tabs.

Jackson, S.; Szpakiewicz, M.; Tomutsa, L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Stratigraphy and depositional environments of Cherokee group (Desmoinesian, middle Pennsylvanian), Central Cherokee basin, southeast Kansas  

SciTech Connect

Correlation from geophysical well logs of radioactive black shales, which extend throughout the basin and into the Sedgwick and Forest City basins, provided the basis for division of the Cherokee Group into 11 stratigraphic intervals. Black shale units below the Fort Scott Limestone and Verdigris Limestone, and above the Tebo coal are the most extensive and easily recognizable markers. The Tebo marker might be considered as a possible boundary between the Krebs and Cabaniss Formations owing to lateral extensiveness, mappability, and stratigraphic location near a distinct lithologic change. Cross sections indicate that the basin subsided during deposition of the Krebs Formation. Stratigraphic intervals in the overlying Cabaniss formation are relatively uniform in thickness, suggesting little or no subsidence during deposition. Onlap upon the Nemaha ridge occurred during Krebs and much of Cabaniss deposition. Stratigraphic markers that overlap the ridge and extend into the Sedgwick basin indicate one depositional province. Core, well-log, and well-sample studies show that lithologic characteristics within the basin appear similar to outcrop features. Basin strata are dominated by shales and sandstones with interbedded coals and thin limestones. Net-sandstone isolith maps reveal the presence of a deltaic complex characterized by both stacking and offset of major sandstone bodies. The amount of limestone significantly increases along the eastern flank of the Nemaha ridge.

Staton, M.D.; Brady, L.L.; Walton, A.W.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The staircase structure of the Southern Brazilian Continental Shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show some evidences that the Southeastern Brazilian Continental Shelf (SBCS) has a devil's staircase structure, with a sequence of scarps and terraces with widths that obey fractal formation rules. Since the formation of these features are linked with the sea level variations, we say that the sea level changes in an organized pulsating way. Although the proposed approach was applied in a particular region of the Earth, it is suitable to be applied in an integrated way to other Shelves around the world, since the analyzes favor the revelation of the global sea level variations.

M. S. Baptista; L. A. Conti

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

174

Regional Slip Tendency Analysis of the Great Basin Region  

SciTech Connect

Slip and dilation tendency on the Great Basin fault surfaces (from the USGS Quaternary Fault Database) were calculated using 3DStress (software produced by Southwest Research Institute). Slip and dilation tendency are both unitless ratios of the resolved stresses applied to the fault plane by the measured ambient stress field. - Values range from a maximum of 1 (a fault plane ideally oriented to slip or dilate under ambient stress conditions) to zero (a fault plane with no potential to slip or dilate). - Slip and dilation tendency values were calculated for each fault in the Great Basin. As dip is unknown for many faults in the USGS Quaternary Fault Database, we made these calculations using the dip for each fault that would yield the maximum slip or dilation tendency. As such, these results should be viewed as maximum slip and dilation tendency. - The resulting along?fault and fault?to?fault variation in slip or dilation potential is a proxy for along fault and fault?to?fault variation in fluid flow conduit potential. Stress Magnitudes and directions were calculated across the entire Great Basin. Stress field variation within each focus area was approximated based on regional published data and the world stress database (Hickman et al., 2000; Hickman et al., 1998 Robertson?Tait et al., 2004; Hickman and Davatzes, 2010; Davatzes and Hickman, 2006; Blake and Davatzes 2011; Blake and Davatzes, 2012; Moeck et al., 2010; Moos and Ronne, 2010 and Reinecker et al., 2005). The minimum horizontal stress direction (Shmin) was contoured, and spatial bins with common Shmin directions were calculated. Based on this technique, we subdivided the Great Basin into nine regions (Shmin <070, 070140). Slip and dilation tendency were calculated using 3DStress for the faults within each region using the mean Shmin for the region. Shmin variation throughout Great Basin are shown on Figure 3. For faults within the Great Basin proper, we applied a normal faulting stress regime, where the vertical stress (sv) is larger than the maximum horizontal stress (shmax), which is larger than the minimum horizontal stress (sv>shmax>shmin). Based on visual inspection of the limited stress magnitude data in the Great Basin, we used magnitudes such that shmin/shmax = .527 and shmin/sv= .46. These values are consistent with stress magnitude data at both Dixie Valley (Hickman et al., 2000) and Yucca Mountain (Stock et al., 1985). For faults within the Walker Lane/Eastern California Shear Zone, we applied a strike?slip faulting stress, where shmax > sv > shmin. Upon visual inspection of limited stress magnitude data from the Walker Lane and Eastern California Shear zone, we chose values such that SHmin/SHmax = .46 and Shmin/Sv= .527 representative of the region. Results: The results of our slip and dilation tendency analysis are shown in Figures 4 (dilation tendency), 5 (slip tendency) and 6 (slip tendency + dilation tendency). Shmin varies from northwest to east?west trending throughout much of the Great Basin. As such, north? to northeast?striking faults have the highest tendency to slip and to dilate, depending on the local trend of shmin. These results provide a first order filter on faults and fault systems in the Great Basin, affording focusing of local?scale exploration efforts for blind or hidden geothermal resources.

James E. Faulds

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

Sedimentology of gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

The Eastern Gas Shales Project (1976-1981) of the US DOE has generated a large amount of information on Devonian shale, especially in the western and central parts of the Appalachian Basin (Morgantown Energy Technology Center, 1980). This report summarizes this information, emphasizing the sedimentology of the shales and how it is related to gas, oil, and uranium. This information is reported in a series of statements each followed by a brief summary of supporting evidence or discussion and, where interpretations differ from our own, we include them. We believe this format is the most efficient way to learn about the gas-bearing Devonian shales of the Appalachian Basin and have organized our statements as follows: paleogeography and basin analysis; lithology and internal stratigraphy; paleontology; mineralogy, petrology, and chemistry; and gas, oil, and uranium.

Potter, P.E.; Maynard, J.B.; Pryor, W.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Why is Eastern Redcedar a Hazardous Fuel? Homes built the destruction of fire-tolerant trees if a wildfire moves through the area. Creating fuel breaks (such ignite it. · When ERC grows in forests and wood- lands, it acts as a ladder fuel to allow fire to climb

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

177

Eastern Box Turtle Terrapene carolina carolina  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eastern Box Turtle Terrapene carolina carolina * * * * * * * Adult male Eastern Box turtle. See.uga.edu/srel/outreach.htm shell). Females have brown eyes and a flat plastron. Box turtles are true omnivores, feeding the turtle to close up very tightly. This feature provides great protection from raccoons, foxes and other

Georgia, University of

178

Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean...

179

Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project...

180

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Shelf?break tidally induced environmental influences on acoustic propagation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Continuous wave propagation in the 100500 Hz band in littoral regions depends upon both time?dependent oceanography and bathymetry. The environmental influences interact nonlinearly in the acoustical time variation especially since the diurnal tidesurface height changes creates time?dependent total water depth. A submesoscale hydrodynamic model developed by Shen and Evans is used with tidal forcing and a simple shelf?break bathymetry to produce surface height variation and internal wave activity due to internal tide in a stratified ocean environment. A three?dimensional parabolic equation acoustic model is used to acoustically probe this environment at various bearings relative to the shelf break and the resulting internal tidal dynamics. In particular the acoustical results are examined for three?dimensional effects such as horizontal refraction. First the influence of bathymetry alone is shown and then compared to the full environment due to hydrodynamic action. The relative influences will then be compared by various measures such as modal decomposition acoustic energy summed over depth and signal gain degradation. [This research is sponsored by the ONR.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

OPTICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER DURING A BLOOM ON THE WEST FLORIDA SHELF.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-member with oligotrophic seawater. INTRODUCTION Remote-sensing studies of the Gulf of Mexico using historical data from characteristics of CDOM on the West Florida Shelf. MATERIALS AND METHODS Water samples were collected on board the R/V Suncoaster at selected stations in the area of the West Florida Shelf during March, 1995 (Fig. 1

Gilbes, Fernando

183

Ice-shelf collapse from subsurface warming as a trigger for Heinrich events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Antarctica, the resulting ice-shelf loss and attendant HSIS acceleration would produce a Heinrich eventIce-shelf collapse from subsurface warming as a trigger for Heinrich events Shaun A. Marcotta,1-discharge events from the Hudson Strait Ice Stream (HSIS) of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, referred to as Heinrich

Schmittner, Andreas

184

Ice shelf-ocean interactions in a general circulation model : melt-rate modulation due to mean flow and tidal currents.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Interactions between the ocean circulation in sub-ice shelf cavities and the overlying ice shelf have received considerable attention in the context of observed changes in (more)

Dansereau, Veronique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The principal research effort for Year 1 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Smackover petroleum system characterization and modeling. The necessary software applications have been acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

Ernest A. Mancini

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

186

Basin Analysis and Petroleum System Characterization and Modeling, Interior Salt Basins, Central and Eastern Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect

The principal research effort for Year 2 of Phase 2 (Concept Demonstration) of the project is Mesozoic (Bossier) petroleum system characterization and modeling and refined resource assessment. The necessary software applications have been acquired to accomplish this work. No major problems have been encountered to date, and the project is on schedule.

Ernest A. Mancini

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

KE Basin Sludge Flocculant Testing  

SciTech Connect

In the revised path forward and schedule for the K Basins Sludge Retrieval and Disposal Project, the sludge in K East (KE) Basin will be moved from the floor and pits and transferred to large, free-standing containers located in the pits (so as to isolate the sludge from the basin). When the sludge is pumped into the containers, it must settle fast enough and clarify sufficiently that the overflow water returned to the basin pool will not cloud the water or significantly increase the radiological dose rate to the operations staff as a result of increased suspended radioactive material. The approach being evaluated to enhance sludge settling and speed the rate of clarification is to add a flocculant to the sludge while it is being transferred to the containers. In February 2004, seven commercial flocculants were tested with a specific K Basin sludge simulant to identify those agents that demonstrated good performance over a broad range of slurry solids concentrations. From this testing, a cationic polymer flocculant, Nalco Optimer 7194 Plus (7194+), was shown to exhibit superior performance. Related prior testing with K Basin sludge and simulant in 1994/1996 had also identified this agent as promising. In March 2004, four series of jar tests were conducted with 7194+ and actual KE Basin sludge (prepared by combining selected archived KE sludge samples). The results from these jar tests show that 7194+ greatly improves settling of the sludge slurries and clarification of the supernatant.

Schmidt, Andrew J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Muzatko, Danielle S.; Gano, Sue

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

188

Williston basin Seislog study  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of Seislog (trade name) processing and interpretation of an east-west line in the North Dakota region of the Williston basin. Seislog processing involves inversion of the seismic trace data to produce a set of synthetic sonic logs. These resulting traces, which incorporate low-frequency velocity information, are displayed in terms of depth and isotransit times. These values are contoured and colored, based on a standard stratigraphic color scheme. The section studied is located just north of a dual producing oil pool from zones in the Ordovician Red River and Devonian Duperow Formations. A sonic log from the Long Creek 1 discovery well was digitized and filtered to match the frequency content of the original seismic data. This allows direct comparison between units in the well and the pseudosonic log (Seislog) trace nearest the well. Porosity development and lithologic units within the lower Paleozoic stratigraphic section can be correlated readily between the well and Seislog traces. Anomalous velocity zones within the Duperow and Red River Formations can be observed and correlated to producing intervals in the nearby wells. These results emphasize the importance of displaying inversion products that incorporate low-frequency data in the search for hydrocarbons in the Williston basin. The accumulations in this region are local in extent and are difficult to pinpoint by using conventional seismic data or displays. Seislog processing and displays provide a tested method for identification and delineation of interval velocity anomalies in the Red River and Duperow stratigraphic sections. These techniques can significantly reduce risks in both exploration and delineation drilling of these types of targets.

Mummery, R.C.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Coordinated study of the Devonian black shale in the Illinois Basin: Illinois, Indiana, and western Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of the resource potential of the Devonian shales, called the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) was begun. A study of the stratigraphy, structure, composition, and gas content of the Devonian shale in the Illinois Basin was undertaken by the State Geological Surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky, under contract to the U.S. DOE as a part of the EGSP. Certain additional data were also developed by other research organizations (including Monsanto Research Corporation-Mound Facility and Battelle-Columbus Laboratory) on cores taken from the Illinois Basin. This report, an overview of geological data on the Illinois basin and interpretations of this data resulting from the EGSP, highlights areas of potential interest as exploration targets for possible natural gas resources in the Devonian shale of the basin. The information in this report was compiled during the EGSP from open file data available at the three State Geological surveys and from new data developed on cores taken by the DOE from the basin specifically for the EGSP. The organically richest shale is found in southeastern Illinois and in most of the Indiana and Kentucky portions of the Illinois Basin. The organic-rich shales in the New Albany are thickest near the center of the basin in southeastern Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and adjacent parts of Kentucky portions of the Illinois Basin. The organic-rich shales in the New Albany are thickest near the center of the basin in southeastern Illinois, southwestern Indiana, and adjacent parts of Kentucky. Natural fractures in the shale may aid in collecting gas from a large volume of shale. These fractures may be more abundant and interconnected to a greater degree in the vicinity of major faults. Major faults along the Rough Creek Lineament and Wabash Valley Fault System cross the deeper part of the basin.

Lineback, J.A.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

E-Print Network Topics: E  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dakota eastern north greenland eastern north pacific eastern north sea eastern oil shale eastern oil shales eastern ordos basin eastern ovarian cancer eastern overthrust belt...

191

NETL Smart Grid Implementation Strategy (SGIS) - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smart Grid Implementation Strategy (SGIS) Smart Grid Implementation Strategy (SGIS) Reference Shelf Smart Grid Introduction Articles-Examples of articles are publications in newsletters, journals, magazines, and conference proceedings. Results from DOE's ARRA Smart Grid Program Success Stories in DOE's ARRA Smart Grid Program Dodrill, Keith and Steven Bossart, Charging the Nation: West Virginia's Vast Power Portfolio, Summer 2011, West Virginia Executive Magazine, p. 27-29. Bossart, Steven. The Smart Grid: Transforming Electricity's Distribution. West Virginia Executive, Summer 2009 (p. 99-101). Bossart, Steven J and Keith, Dodrill, The ARRA Invests in West Virginia's Future, West Virginia Executive Magazine, Energy 2011 edition, p. 25 Bossart, Steve, and Ryan Egidi, Materials Research for Smart Grid

192

AES Eastern Energy LP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eastern Energy LP Eastern Energy LP Jump to: navigation, search Name AES Eastern Energy LP Place New York Utility Id 134 Utility Location Yes Ownership W NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO NY Yes Operates Generating Plant Yes Activity Generation Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=AES_Eastern_Energy_LP&oldid=408926" Categories:

193

Randolph Eastern School Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Randolph Eastern School Corporation Randolph Eastern School Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Randolph Eastern School Corporation Facility Randolph Eastern School Corporation Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Performance Services Energy Purchaser AEP - Indiana Michigan Power Location Union City IL Coordinates 40.21004828°, -84.82192039° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.21004828,"lon":-84.82192039,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

194

On Cyclonic Tracks over the Eastern Mediterranean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, an updated and extended climatology of cyclonic tracks affecting the eastern Mediterranean region is presented, in order to better understand the Mediterranean climate and its changes. This climatology includes intermonthly ...

Helena A. Flocas; Ian Simmonds; John Kouroutzoglou; Kevin Keay; Maria Hatzaki; Vicky Bricolas; Demosthenes Asimakopoulos

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Thermodynamics of Eastern Mediterranean Rainfall Variability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This note focuses on thermodynamic changes caused by Eastern Mediterranean (EM) subsidence anomalies. Subsidence anomalies are shown to modulate EM-wide stability with respect to moist ascent. Additionally, convective available potential energy (...

Gidon Eshel; Brian F. Farrell

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Saline Water Disposal in the Uinta Basin, Utah Authors: Michael D. Vanden Berg, Stephanie Carney, Michael D. Laine, Craig D. Morgan, Utah Geological Survey; and Paul B. Anderson, consulting geologist. Venue: Poster Session: Responsible Development, Sustainability, and Climate Science—Groundwater and Site Remediation, June 9, 2009, American Association of Petroleum Geologists annual meeting, Denver, CO, June 7 to 10, 2009. http://www.aapg.org/denver/ [external site] Abstract: Saline water disposal is the single most pressing issue with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of Utah. Conventional oil and gas fields in the basin provide 67% of Utah’s total crude oil production and 71% of Utah’s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 175% in the last 10 years. As petroleum production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of fresh water sources. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that petroleum and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. Researchers have begun efforts to re-map the base of the moderately saline aquifer within the Uinta Basin using more robust data and more sophisticated GIS techniques than previous efforts. Below this base, they believe that saline water can be injected without damage to the overlying freshwater reservoirs. Water chemistry data are being collected from wells of operators and governmental agencies. These ground-truth data are supplemented with water chemistry information calculated from geophysical logs. In addition to the new GIS-based map, the researchers are constructing cross sections showing the stratigraphic position of the moderately saline to very saline transition and its relationship to potential seals and disposal zones in the Uinta Basin. A potentially suitable disposal zone for large volume saline water disposal is the fresh to slightly saline Bird’s-Nest aquifer. This aquifer is located in the oil shale zone of the Green River formation’s Parachute Creek member and is 200 to 300 ft above the kerogen-rich Mahogany zone. A significant concern is that saline water disposal into the Bird’s-Nest by conventional gas producers may hinder oil shale development by creating unforeseen economic and technical hurdles. With increased saline water disposal, the water quality in the Bird’s-Nest could degrade and create additional water disposal problems for oil shale development companies. Researchers have examined this aquifer in outcrop, core, and geophysical logs and have gained a better understanding of its areal extent, thickness, and zones of differing water chemistry

197

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Produced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead Produced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead Produced Water Treatment Using Gas Hydrate Formation at the Wellhead Authors: John and Deidre Boysen Venue: International Petroleum and Biofuels Environmental Conference, November 11-13, 2008, Albuquerque, NM cese@utulsa.edu Abstract: Economic and efficient produced water management is complex. Produced waters contain mixtures of organic and inorganic compounds, including heavy metals. Many of these constituents interfere with treatment processes that are selective for other constituents. Further, the concentrations of organic and inorganic constituents vary widely with location and producing formation. In addition, regulations related to discharge and beneficial uses vary from state to state, basin-to-basin and well location to well location.

198

Rivanna River Basin Commission (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Rivanna River Basin Commission is an independent local entity tasked with providing guidance for the stewardship and enhancement of the water quality and natural resources of the Rivanna River...

199

Coal Supply Basin Destination State  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Implicit Price Deflators for Gross Domestic Product, as published by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis. For the composition of coal basins, refer to the definition of...

200

GRR/Section 19-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process 9-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 19-CO-h - Denver Basin and Designated Basin Permitting Process 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Colorado Ground Water Commission Colorado Division of Water Resources Regulations & Policies CRS 37-90-107 Application for Use of Ground Water 2 CCR 410-1 Rules and Regulations for the Management and Control of Designated Ground Water Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf 19COHDenverBasinAndDesignatedBasinPermittingProcess.pdf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Lateral Drilling and Completion Technologies for Shallow-Shelf Carbonates of the Red River and Ratcliffe Formations, Williston Basin  

SciTech Connect

Luff Exploration Company (LEC) focused on involvement in technologies being developed utilizing horizontal drilling concepts to enhance oil- well productivity starting in 1992. Initial efforts were directed toward high-pressure lateral jetting techniques to be applied in existing vertical wells. After involvement in several failed field attempts with jetting technologies, emphasis shifted to application of emerging technologies for drilling short-radius laterals in existing wellbores and medium-radius technologies in new wells. These lateral drilling technologies were applied in the Mississippi Ratcliffe and Ordovician Red River formations at depths of 2590 to 2890 m (8500 to 9500 ft) in Richland Co., MT; Bowman Co., ND; and Harding Co., SD.

David Gibbons; Larry A. Carrell; Richard D. George

1997-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

202

Disposal of produced waters: Undergrown injection option in the Black Warrior Basin  

SciTech Connect

The disposal of large volumes of water produced simultaneously with coal-bed methane is a costly, environmentally sensitive problem. Underground injection into deeper, naturally fractured, low-porosity formations is feasible provided that the total dissolved solids level of these formation waters comply with Environmental Protection Agency guidelines. Greater fracture density in proximity to structures formed by Appalachian and Ouachita tectonism, along with a higher total dissolved solids level in both the production and injection formation waters, occurs in the eastern, southern, and northern margins of the coal-bed methane (CBM) area of the Black Warrior basin in Alabama. Injection permeability is developed where fractures intersect formations with suitable lithologies and thickness. Initial results indicate that the lower Pottsville sands, which thicken to the south, have the highest initial injection potential, although these sands appear dirty and tight on the logs. Normal faulting and matrix porosity, in addition to fracturing, may increase permeability in this formation. In the shallower, northern edge of the CBM area, thin-bedded Mississippian sands with high porosity, such as the Hartzelle, may be present. Injection potential also occurs in the fractured Devonian chert and silecous carbonate lithologies in the Upper Silurian where they thicken to the southwest, and in sandy carbonate lithologies in the undifferentiated Silurian and Ordovician at the eastern margin of the overthrust. The Cambrian-Ordovician Knox Formation has injection potential in a 6-mi wide zone at the eastern margin of the basin, where the upper Knox is dolomitized below the unconformity.

Ortiz, I.; Weller, T.F.; Anthony, R.V. (United Energy Development Consultants, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Dziewulski, D. (BioIndustrial Technologies, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Lorenzen, J. (ResTech, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Frantz, J.H. Jr. (S.A. Holditch Associates, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Depositional systems and petroleum potential, Mesaverde Formation southeastern Wind River basin, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Depositional environments and systems of the Wind River basin Mesaverde Formation were interpreted from an analysis of outcrops along the Casper arch and Rattlesnake Hills anticline and cores and wireline logs from the adjacent subsurface. The Fales Sandstone and Parkman Sandstone/unnamed middle member are deposits of eastward progradational, wave-dominated strand-plain and deltaic complexes. Basal portions of the Fales Sandstone and the Parkman Sandstone are composed of a thickening- and coarsening-upward sandstone sequence whose facies represent storm-dominated inner-shelf and wave-dominated shore-zone environments. Facies sequences in the upper Fales Sandstone interval and the unnamed middle member are interpreted as deposits of lower coastal plain (marshes, bay fills, distributary channels, and crevasse splays) and upper coastal plain (alluvial channels, crevasse splays and fine-grained flood basin) sequences. The Teapot Sandstone is interpreted as an alluvial deposit. Analysis of facies sequences in the Teapot suggests a change in fluvial style, from braided-belt deposits along the southwest flank to meander-belt deposits along the northeast flank of the basin. These fluvial systems fed the Teapot deltas to the east. Stratigraphic plays for oil and gas include alluvial valley fills and point-bar deposits in the Teapot Sandstone, storm-dominated shelf sands in the upper Cody Shale and the Fales and Parkman Sandstones, and a transgressive barrier-bar sequence in the upper Fales Sandstone. Laterally continuous shore-zone sandstones may form combination traps where pinch-outs occur on structure.

Hippe, D.J.; Needham, D.W.; Ethridge, F.G.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Multivariate Modeling of 3D9C Data for Constructing a Static Reservoir Model of Algal Mounds in the Paradox Basin, CO Authors: Paul La Pointe, FracMan Technology Group, Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, WA; Robert D. Benson, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO; and Claudia Rebne, Legacy Energy, Denver, CO. Venue: American Association of Petroleum Geologists/Rocky Mountain Section Annual Meeting in Snowbird, UT, October 7-9, 2007. Abstract: A 3D9C survey was carried out over a 6 square mile portion of the Roadrunner and Towaoc fields on the Ute Mountain Ute reservation in southwestern Colorado. This survey was jointly funded by DOE and the Southern Ute tribe’s Red Willow Corporation to promote development of Ismay algal mound plays in the Paradox Basin within Ute Mountain Tribal lands and elsewhere in the Paradox Basin. Multicomponent data were utilized to better delineate the external mound geometry as well as to estimate internal mound reservoir parameters such as matrix permeability, saturation, and porosity. Simple cross-plotting of various multicomponent attributes against reservoir properties did not provide the desired predictive accuracy, in part due to sub-optimal frequency content in components derived from the shear wave data. However, a multivariate statistical analysis greatly improved the predictive accuracy. These multivariate regressions were then used to prescribe reservoir properties for a static reservoir model, which in turn formed the basis for a dynamic reservoir simulation model of the project area to assess the usefulness of the multivariate relations developed. This poster presentation will illustrate the workflow used to carry out the multivariate modeling, key maps of the reservoir properties that were derived, the static model, and results from the dynamic simulation used to assess the usefulness of the approach. Results from wells drilled based on the seismic data also will be presented.

205

K Basins Sludge Treatment Process | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K Basins Sludge Treatment Process K Basins Sludge Treatment Process Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download K Basins Sludge Treatment Process Summary - K...

206

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download K Basins Sludge Treatment Project...

207

Watershed Activity 1 Region: Eastern Coastlines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, estuaries, and tidal marshes, to the colder reaches and rocky coastline of Maine, each of these landscapes flat, extending a long way into the water. 3. Tape the lid to the basin on one edge, so that it opens

208

Estimation of ice shelf melt rate in the presence of a thermohaline staircase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We observed diffusive-convection favorable thermohaline staircases directly beneath George VI Ice Shelf, Antarctica. A thermohaline staircase is one of the most pronounced manifestations of double-diffusive convection. Cooling and freshening of ...

Satoshi Kimura; Keith W. Nicholls; Emily Venables

209

The SISO CSPI PDG standard for commercial off-the-shelf simulation package interoperability reference models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years discrete-event simulation has been used to analyze production and logistics problems in manufacturing and defense. Commercial-off-the-shelf Simulation Packages (CSPs), visual interactive modelling environments such as Arena, Anylogic, ...

Simon J. E. Taylor; Navonil Mustafee; Steffen Strassburger; Stephen J. Turner; Malcolm Y. H. Low; John Ladbrook

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Remote sensing of submerged objects and geomorphology in continental shelf waters with acoustic waveguide scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The long range imaging of submerged objects, seafloor and sub-seafloor geomorphology in continental shelf waters using an active sonar system is explored experimentally and theoretically. A unified model for 3-D object ...

Ratilal, Purnima, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent shelf waters Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the cavity beneath an ice... ); freezing occurs because warm waters in contact with the ice-shelf base undergo cooling and freshening... of the fluxes of heat and fresh water...

212

Sediment resuspension over a continental shelf during Hurricanes Edouard and Hortense  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment resuspension over a continental shelf during Hurricanes Edouard and Hortense G. C. Chang physical and optical measurements have captured sediment resuspension associated with two hurricanes. Sediment resuspension associated with Hurricane Edouard was forced by combined current and wave processes

Chang, Grace C.

213

Aspects of the physical control of phytoplankton dynamics over the Southern California Bight continental shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

shelf . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.6 Internal tide energyFigure 2.8: Internal tide energy and nitrate fluxes. Panelsthe peak internal tide energy. Figure 2.10: HFIW dissipation

Lucas, Andrew J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Horizontal internal-tide fluxes supportelevated phytoplankton productivity overthe inner continental shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The semidiurnal internal-tide energy flux was onshore over1 Cross-shelf internal-tide energy (J e ), heat (J q ),coherent with the internal-tide energy flux and heat flux (

Lucas, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The effect of cross-shelf topography on a pelagic ecosystem response to upwelling favourable winds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is positive offshore, v is positive towards the north and is positive upwards (normal to sigma surfaces scale grid with cross shelf profiles used for the 2D simulations. Biological parameter values

Baird, Mark

216

Evidence for the Hudson River as the dominant source of sand on the US Atlantic Shelf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... only rare honey-yellow axinite grains found on the outer shelf of the middle Atlantic bight could be traced to specific sources in New Jersey6. Ilmenite, however, is one ... ) (Table 2).

Dennis A. Darby

1990-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Continental Shelf Research 25 (2005) 22612272 Foraminiferal shells in sediment traps: Implications of biogenic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the adjacent shelf or resuspension from the underlying sea floor. r 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved by tidal motions and the resuspension of particles by waves in the coastal zone (Lafuente et al., 1999

Lin, Andrew Tien-Shun

218

Continental Shelf Research 22 (2002) 911922 Influence of the Portuguese Bend landslide on the character of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of material preserved on the shelf. Toward that end, we characterized offshore sediment by physical outfall of the Joint Water Pollution Control Plant (JWPCP). The JWPCP processes waste-water influent from

219

The transition zone between the oceanic and shelf regimes around Antarctica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To better understand and describe the Antarctic Slope Front at the Antarctic continental slope, the water masses near Antarctica are examined and their spatial distributions are described. Antarctic Surface Water over the Antarctic shelf regime...

Kim, Seong-Joong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

220

Red River play, Gulf Canada deal boost Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

High levels of activity in the Williston basin are assured this year with an expanding horizontal drilling play for oil in Ordovician Red River. The Red River play, like the Mississippian Lodgepole mound play, is centered in North Dakota. But the Red River play is much larger, extending into eastern Montana and northwestern South Dakota. More than 500 Red River B wells have been staked. One of the most recent companies to position itself in both plays is Gulf Canada Resources Ltd. The company forged an agreement with the Assiniboine and Sioux Indian tribes. The agreement initially provides Gulf access to about 800,000 acres on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, mostly in Roosevelt County, Mont., on the western slope of the Williston basin. Under an option, Gulf`s access could later expand to cover the reservation`s remaining 1.3 million acres. The paper discusses the extent of the Red River play, and Gulf Canada`s role in its development.

NONE

1997-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Some dynamics of carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in the marine shelf environment of the Mississippi Fan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SOME DYNAMICS OF CARBON, NITROGEN AND PHOSPHORUS IN THE MARINE SHELF ENVIRONMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI FAN A Thesis by DANIEL WAYNE ARMSTRONG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1974 Major Subject: Chemical Oceanography SOME DYNAMICS OF CARBON NITROGEN, AND PHOSPHORUS IN THE MARINE SHELF ENVIRONMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI FAN A Thesis by DANIEL WAYNE ARMSTRONG Approved as to style...

Armstrong, Daniel Wayne

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) More Documents & Publications Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Letter from Deputy Secretary Poneman to Clean Line Energy Regarding the Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Under Section 1222 of EPAct 2005 (April 5, 2012) 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Southwestern Area Power Administration

223

Development and distribution of Rival reservoirs in central Williston basin, western North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The Mississippian Rival (Nesson) beds in the central Williston basin, North Dakota, are a limestone to evaporite regressive sequence. Progradation of the depositional system produced several distinct shallowing-upward genetic units. Cyclicity in Rival beds was produced by periodic fluctuations in sea level. Rival oil reservoirs are porous and permeable packstones and grainstones. The dominant allochems in these reservoir rocks are peloids and skeletal and algal fragments. These sediments were deposited along carbonate shorelines and within algal banks that developed basinward of shorelines. The trapping mechanism along shorelines is a lithofacies change from limestone to anhydride. Algal banks are locally productive along paleostructural trends where bathymetric shallowing produced shoals dominated by the Codiacean alga Ortonella. Algal banks are flanked by impermeable carbonate mudstones and wackestones deposited in interbank and protected shelf environments. Two distinct Rival bank trends occur in the central basin: a northwest-southeast trend in McKenzie and Williams Counties, North Dakota, parallel with the Cedar Creek anticline, and a northeast-southwest trend along the Nesson anticline and the northeast flank of the basin, parallel with the Weldon-Brockton fault trend.

Hendricks, M.L.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Statistical Analysis and Dynamic Visualization of Travis Peak Production in the Eastern Texas Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nitrogen oxide emissions. This recently happened in Colorado according to the Washington Post, giving more consideration to using natural gas. As natural gas becomes more popular there is a need to understand the production patterns and observable trends...

Ayanbule, Babafemi O.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

225

Burial history and thermal evolution of the northern and eastern Saharan basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...geologic and geographic features in Africa. Figure 2 Map of geothermic degrees gamma (in meters per degree Celsius), Saharan platform...georef;2003074942 2003-074942 Economic geology, geology of energy sources American Association of Petroleum Geologists Tulsa...

M. Makhous; Yu. I. Galushkin

226

Wave energy potential in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. An integrated 10-year study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a more active development began only after the rapid increase of the prices of oil-dependent fuels Article history: Received 30 July 2013 Accepted 25 March 2014 Available online Keywords: Wave energy mitigation and adaptation, the shadow of the recent economic crisis that directly affected the oil- dependent

Georgiou, Georgios

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - annecy basin eastern Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geosciences 44 Mass movement-induced fold-and-thrust belt structures in unconsolidated sediments in Lake Lucerne (Switzerland) Summary: plains, the wedges of massflow...

228

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Devonian and Mississippian Mudrock systems in Texas: Contrasts and Commonalities Devonian and Mississippian Mudrock systems in Texas: Contrasts and Commonalities Devonian and Mississippian Mudrock systems in Texas: Contrasts and Commonalities Authors: Ruppel, Stephen C. and Robert G. Loucks, Bureau of Economic Geology, Jackson School of GeoSciences, University of Texas at Austin Venue: West Texas Geological Society Symposium, in Midland, Texas September 10-12, 2008. http://www.wtgs.org [external site] Abstract: The Devonian Woodford and Mississippian Barnett formations document a long (approximately 70-80 million year) period of clay-rich sedimentation along the southern margin of the Laurentian paleocraton during the middle Paleozoic. As might be expected, these rocks display many general similarities, for example in thickness, mineralogy, organic carbon content, thermal maturity, organic matter type, etc. Both also display conspicuous and systematic changes in composition from more proximal to more distal areas. However, our studies of more than 75 cores across the Permian and Ft. Worth Basins demonstrate that dissimilarities between the two systems are perhaps even more common than similarities. Many of the differences can be related to paleogeography, basin hydrography, and global sea level.

229

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Coalbed Methane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coalbed Methane Production and Reclamation Field Tour Coalbed Methane Production and Reclamation Field Tour Coalbed Methane Production and Reclamation Field Tour Author: John Wheaton, Montana Tech of the University of Montana, Butte, MT. Venue: The tour will be conducted starting in Gillette, WY, and extend along the northern Powder River Basin, on June 3, 2007, under the auspices of the American Society for Mining and Reclamation (http://ces.ca.uky.edu/asmr/ [external site]). Abstract: This field tour will emphasize successful reclamation in an alternative type of coal industry in the Powder River Basin: coalbed methane. The tour will leave Gillette, WY, at 7:30 a.m., Sunday, June 3, 2007, and travel to Sheridan, WY, and back, touring coalbed methane production areas. Stops will include active drilling and producing areas to learn about the footprint and approach to development of coalbed methane. Reclamation includes drilling pads and linear trenching for water and gas pipelines. Produced-water management is a major expense and concern. Among the water management options we plan to see are stock-watering facilities, infiltration ponds, irrigation sites, and water treatment facilities. A landowner will join us and be able to answer questions from the ranching perspective for part of the tour. Lunches are included in the price of the tour.

230

Eastern Illinois Elec Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eastern Illinois Elec Coop Eastern Illinois Elec Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name Eastern Illini Electric Co-op Place Illinois Utility Id 5585 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle Yes Alt Fuel Vehicle2 Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png (RATE SCHEDULE 1)GENERAL SERVICE - SINGLE-PHASE Commercial (RATE SCHEDULE 18)LARGE SERVICE - SINGLE-PHASE - 400 AMP OR GREATER Commercial (RATE SCHEDULE 18)LARGE SERVICE - SINGLE-PHASE - LESS THAN 400 AMP Commercial (RATE SCHEDULE 20: ELECTRIC HEAT)OPTIONAL SERVICE - SINGLE-PHASE Commercial

231

Great Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Great Basin Great Basin Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Great Basin Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.609920257001,"lon":-114.0380859375,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

232

The stratigraphy of selected Mission Canyon wireline log markers, US portion of the Williston basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The Mission Canyon Formation along the northeast flank of the US Williston basin has been informally subdivided into intervals (members) based on wireline log markers. Wireline log responses of the markers are produced by both lithologic changes and radioactive elements present within these thin stratigraphic intervals. The wireline markers were originally described as transgressive events. Detailed stratigraphic analyses of the Sherwood and State A markers indicate they were deposited during progradation and sea level stillstand. A typical facies tract from east to west within the Sherwood marker contains anhydrites and anhydritic dolomites deposited in sabkha environments; patterned dolomudstones along shoreline trends (the Sherwood argillaceous marker); and limestones in shoaling environments along the Mission Canyon shelf (Sherwood gamma marker). During stillstand, brines produced in sabkha environments (east of the Sherwood shoreline) were enriched in magnesium and potassium. These brines migrated basinward first, dolomitizing mudstones. These brines were magnesium depleted by the time they reached shoals along the shelf. Potassium, however, remained in the system and is present within the marker along the shelf, as shown by a slight increase in API units on Spectrologs.

Hendricks, M.L. (Hendricks and Associates, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Denver Basin Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Map Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Denver Basin Map Abstract This webpage contains a map of the Denver Basin. Published Colorado...

234

Coos Bay Field Gulf Coast Coal Region Williston Basin Illinois  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Juan Basin C e n t r a l A p p a l a c h i a n B a s i n Michigan Basin Greater Green River Basin Black Warrior Basin North Central Coal Region Arkoma Basin Denver Basin...

235

Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hydrogeochemical Indicators for Great Basin Geothemal Resources presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

236

Estimation of lignite reserve in the Kalburcayiri field, Kangal basin, Sivas, Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper addresses a case study on global estimation of lignite reserve in the Kalburcayiri field from the SivasKangal basin, which is one of the most productive lignite basins in eastern Anatolia, Turkey. The two lignite seams, which were developed in a fresh-water lacustrine depositional environment during the Pliocene time, are currently being exploited in the Kalburcayiri open-cast mine for feed coal to a power plant with 300-MW capacity. Tonnage, thickness and quality parameters (ash yield, total sulphur content, and calorific value) of the lignite are variables considered in this study. The global estimates of these variables together with 95% confidence limits are obtained using the approximation principle of global estimation. A random stratified grid is fitted to available boreholes; the variograms for thickness and lignite quality parameters are estimated and modeled. The models are used in calculating estimation error variances that will later be used in constructing 95% confidence intervals for the true values.

A.Erhan Tercan; Ali Ihsan Karayigit

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Comparison of high-pressure CO2 sorption isotherms on Eastern and Western US coals  

SciTech Connect

Accurate estimation of carbon dioxide (CO2) sorption capacity of coal is important for planning the CO2 sequestration efforts. In this work, we investigated sorption and swelling behavior of several Eastern and Western US coal samples from the Central Appalachian Basin and from San Juan Basin. The CO2 sorption isotherms have been completed at 55C for as received and dried samples. The role of mineral components in coal, the coal swelling, the effects of temperature and moisture, and the error propagation have been analyzed. Changes in void volume due to dewatering and other factors such as temporary caging of carbon dioxide molecules in coal matrix were identified among the main factors affecting accuracy of the carbon dioxide sorption isotherms. The (helium) void volume in the sample cells was measured before and after the sorption isotherm experiments and was used to build the volume-corrected data plots.

Romanov, V.; Hur, T.-B.; Fazio, J.; Howard, B

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Understanding Recent Eastern Horn of Africa Rainfall Variability and Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations and sea surface temperature (SST)-forced ECHAM5 simulations are examined to study the seasonal cycle of eastern Africa rainfall and its SST sensitivity during 19792012, focusing on interannual variability and trends. The eastern Horn ...

Brant Liebmann; Martin P. Hoerling; Chris Funk; Ileana Blad; Randall M. Dole; Dave Allured; Xiaowei Quan; Philip Pegion; Jon K. Eischeid

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study: Initial Results (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

This poster presents an overview of the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study, which aims to answer critical questions about the future of the Eastern Interconnection under high levels of solar and wind generation penetration.

Bloom, A.; Townsend, A.; Hummon, M.; Weekley, A.; Clark, K.; King, J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) Impact Week Meeting |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) Impact Week Meeting United South and Eastern Tribes (USET) Impact Week Meeting February 9, 2015 6:00AM EST to February 12, 2015 3:00PM EST...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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241

Atlas of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Atlas of the Columbia River Basin Oregon State University Computer-Assisted Cartography Course & GEOVISUALIZATION GROUP UNIVERSITY #12;2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin FOREWORDAtlas, Montana, Nevada, Wyoming, and Utah. 2013 Oregon State University Atlas of the Columbia River Basin

Jenny, Bernhard

242

LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter WM LAND USE AND OWNERSHIP, WILLISTON BASIN By T.T. Taber and S.A. Kinney In U.S. Geological........................................WM-1 Map Information for the Williston Basin Land Use And Land Cover Map.........................................................WM-2 Map Information for the Williston Basin Subsurface Ownership map

243

Study of gas production potential of New Albany Shale (group) in the Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect

The New Albany Shale (Devonian and Mississippian) is recognized as both a source rock and gas-producing reservoir in the Illinois basin. The first gas discovery was made in 1885, and was followed by the development of several small fields in Harrison County, Indiana, and Meade County, Kentucky. Recently, exploration for and production of New Albany gas has been encouraged by the IRS Section 29 tax credit. To identify technology gaps that have restricted the development of gas production form the shale gas resource in the basin, the Illinois Basin Consortium (IBC), composed of the Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky geological surveys, is conducting a cooperative research project with the Gas Research Institute (GRI). An earlier study of the geological and geochemical aspects of the New Albany was conducted during 1976-1978 as part of the Eastern Gas Shales Project (EGSP) sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE). The current IBC/GRI study is designed to update and reinterpret EGSP data and incorporate new data obtained since 1978. During the project, relationships between gas production and basement structures are being emphasized by constructing cross sections and maps showing thickness, structure, basement features, and thermal maturity. The results of the project will be published in a comprehensive final report in 1992. The information will provide a sound geological basis for ongoing shale-gas research, exploration, and development in the basin.

Hasenmueller, N.R.; Boberg, W.S.; Comer, J.; Smidchens, Z. (Indiana Geological Survey, Bloomington (United States)); Frankie, W.T.; Lumm, D.K. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (United States)); Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, J.D. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

A model for determining shelf life, estimating terminal body composition, yield grade and quality grade of feedlot cattle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as to style and content by: F. M. Byers (Chairman of Co m ttee) James McGrann (Member) ~&~& G. T. Schelling (Member) December 1986 ABSRACT A Model for Determining Shelf Life, Estimating Terminal Body Composition, Yield Grade and Quality Grade... of Feedlot Cattle. (December 1985) Richard Jay Perry, B, S. , Texas AlkM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. F, M. Byers A model for determining shelf life and estimating carcass fat (kg), yield grade and quality grade was developed. Shelf...

Perry, Richard Jay

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

NILE BASIN INITIATIVE Claire Stodola  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Climate Change #12;Upstream states · Low water needs Downstream states · High water needs #12;Historical #12;Research Question How has the Nile Basin Initiative influenced the riparian states' management states 1959 ­ Still only BILATERAL 1960s to 1990s - Increasing frustration by upstream states #12;What

New Hampshire, University of

246

Tropical forests: Include Congo basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... 478, 378381; 2011). But their meta-analysis of 138 studies overlooks the Congo basin, the second-largest continuous area of rainforest in the world; moreover, only ... the lack of recent and accessible legacy data for this region. The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), which contains 98 million hectares of rainforest (60% of the ...

Hans Verbeeck; Pascal Boeckx; Kathy Steppe

2011-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

247

GOLF COURSES FRASER RIVER BASIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

practices (BMP's) for golf courses, entitled Greening your BC Golf Course. A Guide to Environmental. It also summarizes conditions and practices in the Fraser Basin, reviews best management practices.C. Prepared by: UMA ENVIRONMENTAL A Division of UMA Engineering Ltd. Burnaby, B.C. March 1996 #12;THIRD PARTY

248

Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1996  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil-in-place will result in additional oil production by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

Sippel, M.A.; Carrell, L.A.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Annual report, June 10, 1995--June 9, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in Red River and Ratcliffe shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing three-dimensional and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with extended-reach jetting lance and other ultra-short-radius lateral technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil in place will result in additional oil recovery by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

Carrell, L.A.; Sippel, M.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) today announced that its diverse array of stakeholders has reached consensus on the final set of "resource expansion futures" to be studied as part of the electric system transmission planning effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release More Documents & Publications Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations October 2011 - Interconnection-Wide Transmission Planning Processes 2012 National Electric Transmission Congestion Study - Philadelphia Workshop EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Interconnection-Wide Planning

251

THE ADVANCED CHEMISTRY BASINS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

In the next decades, oil exploration by majors and independents will increasingly be in remote, inaccessible areas, or in areas where there has been extensive shallow exploration but deeper exploration potential may remain; areas where the collection of data is expensive, difficult, or even impossible, and where the most efficient use of existing data can drive the economics of the target. The ability to read hydrocarbon chemistry in terms of subsurface migration processes by relating it to the evolution of the basin and fluid migration is perhaps the single technological capability that could most improve our ability to explore effectively because it would allow us to use a vast store of existing or easily collected chemical data to determine the major migration pathways in a basin and to determine if there is deep exploration potential. To this end a the DOE funded a joint effort between California Institute of Technology, Cornell University, and GeoGroup Inc. to assemble a representative set of maturity and maturation kinetic models and develop an advanced basin model able to predict the chemistry of hydrocarbons in a basin from this input data. The four year project is now completed and has produced set of public domain maturity indicator and maturation kinetic data set, an oil chemistry and flash calculation tool operable under Excel, and a user friendly, graphically intuitive basin model that uses this data and flash tool, operates on a PC, and simulates hydrocarbon generation and migration and the chemical changes that can occur during migration (such as phase separation and gas washing). The DOE Advanced Chemistry Basin Model includes a number of new methods that represent advances over current technology. The model is built around the concept of handling arbitrarily detailed chemical composition of fluids in a robust finite-element 2-D grid. There are three themes on which the model focuses: chemical kinetic and equilibrium reaction parameters, chemical phase equilibrium, and physical flow through porous media. The chemical kinetic scheme includes thermal indicators including vitrinite, sterane ratios, hopane ratios, and diamonoids; and a user-modifiable reaction network for primary and secondary maturation. Also provided is a database of type-specific kerogen maturation schemes. The phase equilibrium scheme includes modules for primary and secondary migration, multi-phase equilibrium (flash) calculations, and viscosity predictions.

William Goddard; Peter Meulbroek; Yongchun Tang; Lawrence Cathles III

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

252

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation on Considerations for Evaluating Coalbed Methane Infiltration Pond Sites Presentation on Considerations for Evaluating Coalbed Methane Infiltration Pond Sites Considerations for Evaluating Coalbed Methane Infiltration Pond Sites Based on Site Studies in the Powder River Basin of Montana and Wyoming Author: John Wheaton, Montana Tech of the University of Montana, Butte, MT. Venue: American Society for Mining and Reclamation’s 24th annual meeting in Gillette, WY, June 2-7, 2007 (http://ces.ca.uky.edu/asmr/ [external site]). Abstract: Significant volumes of ground water are produced in association with coalbed methane (CBM) production in the Powder River Basin in Montana and Wyoming. This water must be managed in a manner that is both economical and sensitive to the semi-arid agricultural area of southeastern Montana and northeastern Wyoming. Infiltration ponds are one of the primary methods of handling produced water and have been in use in Montana and Wyoming for several years. A solid conceptual framework allows for the selection of infiltration pond sites that maximize impoundment life and minimize impacts. The ponds have several advantages in that they require a low initial investment and can help recharge the shallow ground-water system, which makes the produced water available for future uses. However, as the infiltrated water moves through the shallow weathered bedrock, a series of chemical reactions typically take place (primarily dissolution and oxidation), which temporarily increase the TDS due primarily to increases in Mg, Na, and SO4. As the available salts are removed along the ground-water flow path, the concentrations of dissolved constituents tend to decrease. Preliminary interpretations of data suggest that saturated paste extract analyses and lithologic investigations may be used to predict the types of changes in water quality that can occur. The fate and transport of the dissolved salts is controlled to a great extent by the rate of infiltration and the duration of saturated flow from the ponds. The rate of infiltration can be severely reduced as the clays in the pond floor and underlying material are exposed to the high-SAR produced water, which causes dispersion and reduced vertical hydraulic conductivity. Order of magnitude decreases in vertical hydraulic conductivity have been observed, which represents a trade-off. The changes will effectively decrease the volume of water that can be managed via an individual pond. However, the mobilized salts may be effectively sequestered by reduced ground-water flow, substantially reducing the temporal and geographic extent of impacts.

253

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Sequestration Potential of the North Michigan Silurian Reef CO2 Sequestration Potential of the North Michigan Silurian Reef CO2 Sequestration Potential of the North Michigan Silurian Reef Authors: Brian Toelle, Chaoqing Yang (speaker), and Tracee Imai, Schlumberger Ltd. Venue: Eastern Section of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists 2007 Annual Meeting, Lexington, KY, September 16–18, 2007 (http://www.uky.edu/KGS/esaapg07/ [external site]). Abstract: The Northern Silurian Reef trend of the Michigan Basin was developed within the stratigraphic unit historically referred to as the Niagaran Brown. Within the past few years this unit was renamed the Guelph Formation. Over 700 reefs make up this trend, with some of these being over 300 acres in size and having produced more than 5 million barrels of oil. Estimates of the total amount of hydrocarbons produced for the entire trend have been reported to be as much as nearly a half a billion barrels. The U.S. Department of Energy has funded a study of an ongoing enhanced oil recovery project being conducted on a reef within this trend and entailing CO2 injection. The Charlton 30/31 reef, located in Otsego County, MI, like many other reefs in the play, was discovered and developed during the 1970s and 1980s. This field has completed its primary production phase, during which six wells produced 2.6 million of the field’s estimated 7 million barrels of oil in place. This reservoir is characterized as a low-porosity, low-permeability limestone matrix with irregular dolomitized intervals providing a secondary network of higher porosity and permeability, which controls fluid flow throughout the reservoir. The estimated average porosity in this reef is just slightly over 6 percent. As part of this study, the reservoir attributes identified at the Charlton 30/31 reef were extended to the entire Northern Reef Trend in order to determine its CO2 sequestration capacity. Additionally, the potential oil recovery has been estimated.

254

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Gas and Oil in Utah: Potential, New Discoveries, and Hot Plays Author: Thomas C. Chidsey, Petroleum Section Chief, Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT. Venue: International Oil Scouts Association’s 84th annual meeting, Stein Eriksen Lodge, Park City, UT, June 17–20, 2007, (http://www.oilscouts.com/index-main.html [external site]). Abstract: Utah’s natural gas and oil exploration history extends back more than 100 years, fluctuating greatly due to discoveries, price trends, and changing exploration targets. During the boom period of the early 1980s, activity peaked at over 500 wells per year. After slowing in the 1990s, drilling activity has again increased, reaching an all-time peak of 1,058 wells spudded and over 2,000 APDs (application for permit to drill) filed in 2006. This increase in activity has been spurred by high prices for both natural gas and oil and by the perception that Utah is highly prospective and underexplored. In recent years, the proportion of new wells exploring for gas has increased greatly. Total cumulative natural gas production from Utah fields now exceeds 8 Tcf. Recent successful drilling has been expanding reserves by about 10 percent per year, one of the highest rates of gas reserves increase in the country. Although gas production from some fields declined during the late 1990s, two factors caused overall gas production to increase. The development of coalbed natural gas (CBNG) accumulations in the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone play, in particular Drunkards Wash field in central Utah, has increased the State’s annual gas production by 20–30 percent. Also, deeper exploratory and development drilling in the eastern and southern Uinta Basin during the past 5 years has led to discoveries of substantial gas accumulations in tight-sand reservoirs of the Tertiary Wasatch Formation, Cretaceous Mesaverde Group, and Jurassic Entrada and Wingate Sandstones. Significant potential exists for other coalfields (Book Cliffs, Sego, and Wasatch Plateau) around the Uinta Basin to yield CBNG, and the extent of deeper conventional and tight-gas plays remains to be explored. In addition, shale gas reservoirs in the Mississippian Manning Canyon Shale, Pennsylvanian Hermosa Group, and Cretaceous Mancos Shale of central, southeastern, and northeastern Utah, respectively, have tremendous untapped potential. Utah oilfields have produced a cumulative total of 1.3 billion barrels (bbl) of oil. Although annual production decreased from a peak of 41 million bbl in 1985 to 13 million bbl in 2003, the trend has since reversed, and 2005 production reached nearly 17 million bbl. A component (about one-third of the increase) of this turnaround has been the 2004 discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah thrust belt, or "Hingeline." This new field has already produced 3 million bbl of Mississippian-sourced oil from the Jurassic Navajo Sandstone in a thrusted anticline formed during the Sevier orogeny. This new oil play is the focus of extensive leasing and exploration activity—comparable to the late 1970s and early 1980s in the Utah-Wyoming salient of the thrust belt to the north.

255

Critical Question #4: What are the Best Off-the-Shelf HVAC Solutions for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Question #4: What are the Best Off-the-Shelf HVAC Critical Question #4: What are the Best Off-the-Shelf HVAC Solutions for Low-Load, High-Performance Homes and Apartments? Critical Question #4: What are the Best Off-the-Shelf HVAC Solutions for Low-Load, High-Performance Homes and Apartments? What is currently in the market? What are the limitations of these systems? What are the desired specifications for these systems? What are the realistic space conditioning loads of these high-performance homes and apartments? cq4_forced_air_systems_walker.pdf cq4_simplified_space_cond_prahl.pdf cq4_ground_heat_exchanger_im.pdf More Documents & Publications Track C - Market-Driven Research Solutions Track B - Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes Energy Storage & Power Electronics 2008 Peer Review - Power Electronics

256

Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Gulf of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gulf of Gulf of Mexico Energy Data Apps Maps Challenges Resources Blogs Let's Talk Energy Beta You are here Data.gov » Communities » Energy » Data Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics - Gulf of Mexico Dataset Summary Description Federal Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production Statistics for the Gulf of Mexico by month and summarized annually. Tags {"Minerals Management Service",MMS,Production,"natural gas",gas,condensate,"crude oil",oil,"OCS production","Outer Continental Shelf",OSC,EIA,"Energy Information Agency",federal,DOE,"Department of Energy",DOI,"Department of the Interior","Gulf of Mexico"} Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data Utility

257

Geology of interior cratonic sag basins  

SciTech Connect

Interior cratonic sag basins are thick accumulations of sediment, generally more or less oval in shape, located entirely in the interiors of continental masses. Some are single-cycle basins and others are characterized by repeated sag cycles or are complex polyhistory basins. Many appear to have developed over ancient rift systems. Interior cratonic sag basins are typified by a dominance of flexural over fault-controlled subsidence, and a low ratio of sediment volume to surface area of the basin. The Baltic, Carpentaria, Illinois, Michigan, Parana, Paris, and Williston basins are examples of interior cratonic sag basins. Tectonics played a dominant role in controlling the shapes and the geometries of the juxtaposed packets of sedimentary sequences. While the mechanics of tectonic control are not clear, evidence suggests that the movements are apparently related to convergence of lithospheric plates and collision and breakup of continents. Whatever the cause, tectonic movements controlled the freeboard of continents, altering base level and initiating new tectono-sedimentologic regimes. Sag basins situated in low latitudes during their development commonly were sites of thick carbonates (e.g., Illinois, Michigan, Williston, and Paris basins). In contrast, siliciclastic sedimentation characterized basins that formed in higher latitudes (e.g., Parana and Carpentaria basins). Highly productive sag basins are characterized by widespread, mature, organic-rich source rocks, large structures, and good seals. Nonproductive basins have one or more of the following characteristics: immature source rocks, leaky plumbing, freshwater flushing, and/or complex geology due to numerous intrusions that inhibit mapping of plays.

Leighton, M.W.; Eidel, J.J.; Kolata, D.R.; Oltz, D.F. (Illinois Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Characterization of Nonequilibrium Sorption of Gasoline Components by Surfactant-Modified Zeolite Authors: Joshua A. Simpson and Robert S. Bowman, New Mexico Technological University, Socorro, NM Venue: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society in Santa Fe, NM, June 3–7, 2007 (http://www.clays.org/home/HomeAnnualMeeting.html [external site]). Abstract: Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been shown to effectively remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) from water generated during oil and natural gas production (produced water). The BTEX sorption isotherms are linear and noncompetitive, suggesting that the removal mechanism is partitioning into the surfactant’s hydrophobic bilayer formed on SMZ. Even though BTEX sorption in batch systems is rapid, chemical equilibrium models do not accurately describe BTEX transport through packed beds of SMZ. Comparison with transport of a nonreactive tracer (tritium) suggests that two-site, diffusive nonequilibrium sorption-desorption controls BTEX transport. We conducted batch experiments with SMZ to determine the nonequilibrium sorption kinetics of each BTEX constituent. The kinetic measurements were used to parameterize a nonequilibrium transport model to predict BTEX removal under varying flow conditions. The accuracy of predictions is being tested using laboratory column experiments with produced water from the San Juan Basin of New Mexico

259

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Differences in Nanopore Development Related to Thermal Maturity in the Mississippian Barnett Shale Differences in Nanopore Development Related to Thermal Maturity in the Mississippian Barnett Shale Differences in Nanopore Development Related to Thermal Maturity in the Mississippian Barnett Shale: Preliminary Results Authors: Robert M. Reed, Robert G. Loucks, Daniel M. Jarvie, and Stephen C. Ruppel Venue: Geological Society of America Annual Meeting in Houston, Texas October 5-9, 2008. http://www.geosociety.org/ [external site]. Abstract: The Mississippian Barnett Shale from the Fort Worth Basin of north-central Texas consists predominantly of dark-colored calcareous and siliceous mudstones. Siliceous mudstones from a range of thermal maturities and burial depths have been examined in order to characterize pores, particularly nanometer-scale pores. Ar-ion-beam milling provides a low-relief surface lacking both topography related to differential hardness and surface damage that occur with mechanical polishing. SEM imaging of ion-milled surfaces allows unambiguous identification of pores down to the nanometer scale.

260

Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 NEWS RELEASE FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE May 23, 2011 Contact: David Whiteley d.a.whiteley@att.net 314-753-6200 Eastern Interconnection Grid Planning Authorities to Study Set of Stakeholder-Identified Electric System Futures The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) today announced that its diverse array of stakeholders has reached consensus on the final set of "resource expansion futures" to be studied as part of the electric system transmission planning effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). "We have taken a major step forward with the stakeholder-defined specifications for the resource futures to be considered in the macroeconomic analysis in Phase I of the Project. The stakeholders are to be congratulated for their hard work in achieving a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Interior the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment OCS EIS/EA BOEM 2013-01140 Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental Shelf Offshore Florida Revised Environmental Assessment Author Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs Published by U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Office of Renewable Energy Programs August 2013 iii FINDING OF NO SIGNIIFCANT IMPACT Lease Issuance for Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing on the Outer Continental

262

Microbial abundance and biomass in sediments of the Texas-Louisiana shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MICROBIAL ABUNDANCF. AND BIOMASS IN SEDIMENTS OF THF. TEXAS-LOUISIANA SHELF A Thesis by MARTA ELIZABETH CRUZ-KAEGI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfiument of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Oceanography MICROBIAL ABUNDANCE AND BIOMASS IN SEDIMENTS OF THE TEXAS-LOUISIANA SHELF A Thesis by MARTA ELIZABETH CRUZ-KAEGI Approved as to style and content by: I $7& Gilberl T. Rowe (Chair...

Cruz-Kaegi, Marta Elizabeth

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Proposed Project: Plains & Eastern Clean Line  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On June 10, 2010, the Department of Energy published in the Federal Register a Request for Proposals (RFP) for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005. In response, Clean Line Energy Partners, LLC submitted an application for its Plains & Eastern Clean Line project. DOE has concluded that Clean Lines proposal was responsive to the RFP, and it is currently under consideration.

264

Ice shelf-ocean interactions in a general circulation model : melt-rate modulation due to mean flow and tidal currents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interactions between the ocean circulation in sub-ice shelf cavities and the overlying ice shelf have received considerable attention in the context of observed changes in flow speeds of marine ice sheets around Antarctica. ...

Dansereau, Vronique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Deep coal resources in the Cherokee Group (middle Pennsylvanian) in eastern Kansas  

SciTech Connect

Evaluation of over 800 gamma-ray/density and gamma-ray/neutron logs run for oil and gas tests in eastern Kansas shows a wide distribution of coal in the Cherokee Group in this area. With nearly 300 million tons (270 million metric tons) of high-volatile bituminous coal produced in southeastern Kansas, this group was important for further evaluation. Studies of the coals in the Cherokee Group too deep to strip mine in the Cherokee basin and the Forest City basin indicate a coal resource of nearly 50 billion tons (45 billion metric tons). This figure represents coal from 27 different coal beds in the three reliability categories of measured, indicated, and inferred. Most of the coal is recognized as thin bedded (< 28 in. or < 70 cm) like most of the coal beds in the outcrop belt in southeastern Kansas. Six coals beds with a total of over 1.4 billion tons (1.3 billion metric tons) of resources are present where coal thicknesses exceed 42 in. (105 cm) in parts of 12 different counties. Resource quantities of the Cherokee Group coal beds were made using Pacer and Garnet software developed for the National Coal Resources Data System (NCRDS) of the US Geological Survey.

Brady, L.L.; Livingston, N.D.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on on Laboratory Testing on Geomechanical Properties of Carbonate Rocks for CO2 Sequestration Authors: Xuejun Zhou (speaker), Zhengwen Zeng, Hong Liu, and Alyssa Boock, University of North Dakota. Venue: 43rd U.S. Rock Mechanics Symposium and 4th U.S.-Canada Rock Mechanics Symposium, Asheville, NC, June 28-July 1, 2009. http://www.armasymposium.org/ [external site] Abstract: The Williston basin of North Dakota is predominated by carbonate successions from Cambrian through Cretaceous, followed by episodic glaciations through Quaternary. Geomechanical characterization of this rock succession is a critical element for understanding the subsurface processes when conducting anthropogenic CO2 sequestration. CO2 sequestration can be divided into two stages. The first is to inject CO2 into the target formation; the second is to keep the injected CO2 in the formation for a designed period of time, e.g., 1,000 years. As rocks behave differently under deep reservoir conditions from how they behave under atmospheric conditions, detailed studies of thermo-hydro-mechanical effects are needed. In this paper, effects of CO2 sequestration on host rock are investigated through combined water-alternative-CO2 injection and tri-axial geomechanical tests. Testing results indicate that rock strength can be decreased significantly after the first stage. In the second stage, which is under static, no-flow conditions, there is no obvious difference in strengths between CO2- and water-saturated rocks. It seems that CO2 saturated rocks even tend to be more competent. This may reveal the different micro-cracking mechanisms caused by different molecular-level properties, such as wettability, etc. Linear Mohr-Coulomb criteria were applied to drained testing results very well but show discrepancies with those of un-drained testing

267

CD-1: Intracratonic Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal conductivity of salt rock, and might provide suitable geothermal reservoirs for district heating.4 Formations encountered in deeper parts of an intracratonic basin...

268

Hack's law of debris-flow basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hack's law was originally derived from basin statistics for varied spatial scales and regions. The exponent value of the law has been shown to vary between 0.47 and 0.70, causing uncertainty in its application. This paper focuses on the emergence of Hack's law from debris-flow basins in China. Over 5,000 debris-flow basins in different regions of China with drainage areas less than 100km2 are included in this study. Basins in the different regions are found to present similar distributions. Hack's law is derived from maximum probability and conditional distributions, suggesting that the law should describe some critical state of basin evolution. Results suggest the exponent value is approximately 0.5. Further analysis indicates that Hack's law is related to other scaling laws underlying the evolution of a basin and that the exponent is not dependent on basin shape but rather on the evolutionary stage. A case study of a well known debris-flow basin further confirms Hack's law and its implications in basin evolution.

Yong LI; Z.Q. YUE; C.F. LEE; R.E. BEIGHLEY; Xiao-Qing CHEN; Kai-Heng HU; Peng CUI

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

NMOSE Basin Guidelines | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OtherOther: NMOSE Basin GuidelinesLegal Abstract The New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (NMOSE) provides links to final rules and administrative guidelines for particular...

270

Tectonic history and analysis of structures in eastern Kansas and western Missouri  

SciTech Connect

Orogenic events in and around the midcontinent in Proterozoic time were responsible for the formation of the dominant master set of younger northeast- and older northwest-trending faults that dominate the structure of the area today. Reactivation of these faults throughout geologic time gave rise to tectonic zones consisting of sets of anastomosing faults or other complex patterns. These zones are likely important in helping to determine the configuration of major uplifts and basins that involve the crust. The Nemaha tectonic zone defines the western boundary of both the Forest City and Cherokee basins, while a structural block delineated by the Chesapeake and Bolivar-Mansfield regional faults coincides with the approximate position of the Bourbon Arch, which is reflected in the thickness of Mississippian carbonate rocks. Rocks of the Ozark uplift began to be uplifted by the end of Maquoketa time. The uplift has historically been described as a landform, rather than a geologic structure. Hence, the extent and the boundaries of the uplift are ill-defined. The northeast-trending line forming the contact between Mississippian and Pennsylvanian rocks is commonly regarded as the western boundary. This boundary coincides with a major tectonic zone, extending northeastward from Oklahoma through Kansas and Missouri into at least southern Iowa. In the Tri-State area of Kansas, Oklahoma, and Missouri the zone is referred to as the Miami trough and features prominently in the localization of major ore deposits. This zone may then also be regarded as the eastern boundary of the Forest City and Cherokee basins.

Berendsen, P.; Wilson, F.W. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Kansas Geological Survey)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Sedimentary coprostanol as an index of sewage addition in Santa Monica Basin, southern California  

SciTech Connect

Sediment cores from Santa Monica Basin and effluent from two major municipal wastewater dischargers in southern California were analyzed for sterols. Specifically the fecal sterols, coprostanols (coprostanol and epicoprostanol), were quantitated to determine the degree of sewage addition to the sediment. Although coprostanols are distributed throughout the Santa Monica Basin sediments in association with fine particles, some stations contain elevated levels, either due to their proximity to the outfalls or because of preferential advection of fine-grained sediments into their location where anoxicity aids in better preservation. The progressive seaward decline of coprostanols relative to total sterols from the outfalls represents dilution of sewage by biogenic sterols. The ratios of coprostanols to dinosterol appears to be a better indicator of the degree of sewage addition. A rapid increase in content of coprostanols from about 1935 coincides with the start of offshore wastewater discharge by JWPCP, the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts on Palos Verdes Shelf. It is estimated that wastewater treatment plants release into southern California Bight 260 metric tons/yr of fecal sterols and 5 {times} 10{sup 4} metric tons/yr of sewage carbon.

Venkatesan, M.I.; Kaplan, I.R. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (USA))

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Progradational sequences in lower Ordovician portion of Deadwood Formation, Williston basin  

SciTech Connect

In the Williston basin, the Cambrian and Ordovician Deadwood Formation can be divided into six informal members based on gamma-ray log characteristics. Members C through F are Early Ordovician (Tremadocian to Arenigian) and consist of three progradational sequences. In ascending order, the sequences consist of (1) a mixed sandstone-limestone lithotype, (2) limestone lithotypes ranging from mudstone to grainstone, (3) bioturbated, peloidal, calcareous, siliciclastic mudstone and siltstone, (4) bioturbated to planar-laminated, peloidal, calcareous siltstone and sandstone, (5) Skolithos-bored, cross-bedded to planar-laminated quartzarenite, (6) bioturbated dolomite and anhydrite-cemented fossiliferous quartz wacke, and (7) silty laminated dolomudstone. The asymmetrical sequences represent progradation of a siliciclastic shoreline, back-barrier lagoon, and intertidal algal flat over a siliciclastic shelf and a distal carbonate shoal. The present distribution of the sequences and individual lithotypes in the Williston basin is a function of the limited eastward advance of the carbonate shoal during transgression, the limited westward advance of the shoreline during progradation, deep shoreface erosion of the previous sequence during rapid transgression, and Middle Ordovician erosion.

Anderson, D.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) Advance Funding and Development Agreement: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project (September 20, 2012) More Documents & Publications Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Proposal for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Letter from Deputy Secretary Poneman to Clean Line Energy Regarding the Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Under Section 1222 of EPAct 2005 (April 5, 2012) EIS-0486: Notice of Intent and Notice of Potential Floodplain and Wetland

274

Transient hydrodynamics within intercratonic sedimentary basins during glacial cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ka B.P.), such as the Williston, Michigan, and Illinois basins. We show that in such basins fluid of the Williston and Alberta basins. Under such con- ditions fluid fluxes in aquifers can be expected

Bense, Victor

275

Wind- and Buoyancy-modulated Along-shore Circulation over the Texas-Louisiana Shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical experiments are used to study the wind- and buoyancy-modulated along-shore circulation over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf inshore of 50-m water depth. Most attention is given to circulation in the non-summer flow regime. A major...

Zhang, Zhaoru

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

276

Continental Shelf Research 21 (2001) 587606 Nutrient enrichment off Port Stephens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental Shelf Research 21 (2001) 587­606 Nutrient enrichment off Port Stephens: the role of the dinoflagellate Noctiluca scintillans occurred off Port Stephens, on the New South Wales (NSW) central coast water into the euphotic zone off Port Stephens. To this end, a regional model of the NSW coast

Oke, Peter

277

Internal tide generation at the continental shelf modelled using a modal decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Internal tide generation at the continental shelf modelled using a modal decomposition: two are required. Using this formulation, we calculate the internal tide generated by a time-periodic barotropic-layer or uniformly stratified. For the two-layer case, we derive expressions for the shoreward and oceanward energy

278

Shelf life modelling for first-expired-first-out warehouse management  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...base for an integrated approach in which front-end...shelf life modelling approaches taken from the post-harvest...a strategic response management system optimizing product...model-based optimization approaches in practice, its success...Agency for Innovation by Science and Technology (IWT...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf carbonates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unravelling the influence of water depth and wave energy on the facies diversity of shelf their production is tied to light and wave energy, carbonate sediments are most effectively produced in shallow processes of storm and wave reworking influence the seabed through submarine erosion and sediment

Purkis, Sam

280

Current separation and upwelling over the southeast shelf of Vietnam in the South China Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

] The high-resolution, unstructured grid Finite-Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) was used to examine-shelf coastal current from the north and northeastward buoyancy-driven and stratified tidal-rectified currents, is capable of reproducing the location and tongue-like offshore distribution of temperature as those seen

Chen, Changsheng

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Role of Cetaceans in the Shelf-Edge Region of the Northeastern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Role of Cetaceans in the Shelf-Edge Region of the Northeastern United States JAMES H. W. HAIN, MARTIN A. M. HYMAN, ROBERT D. KENNEY, and HOWARD E. WINN Introduction Man has been, and continues to be, RI 02881; the present address of J. H. W. Hain is Associated Scientists at Woods Hole, Box 721, Woods

282

Assessing the wind field over the continental shelf as a resource for electric power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the comparison period) that the near-coast phase advantage is obviated. We also find more consistent wind powerAssessing the wind field over the continental shelf as a resource for electric power by Richard W. Garvine1,2 and Willett Kempton1,3,4 ABSTRACT To assess the wind power resources of a large continental

Firestone, Jeremy

283

Inversion Skill for Limited-Area Shelf Modeling { Part I: An OSSE Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and extrapolating the data is judged. A model-generated, shelf-scale climatology serves as Truth for the sampling achieves fast, monotonic convergence. The model successfully reconstructs Truth at the data points, within a large and well-recognized problem in nonlinear state estimation and forecasting, with many consequences

284

New study details glacier ice loss following ice shelf July 25, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Ted #12;Scambos of the NSIDC produced detailed ice loss maps from 2001 to 2009 for the main tributaryNew study details glacier ice loss following ice shelf collapse July 25, 2011 Contact: Anthony Lane UMBC (410) 455-5793 alane@umbc.edu Katherine Leitzell National Snow and Ice Data Center University

Cambridge, University of

285

Ice sheet limits in Norway and on the Norwegian continental shelf Jan Mangerud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice sheet limits in Norway and on the Norwegian continental shelf Jan Mangerud University of Bergen, Department of Geology, Allégt. 41, N-5007 Bergen, Norway Jan.Mangerud@geol.uib.no Introduction Ice sheets and other glaciers have had a spectacular erosional impact on the Norwegian landscape, producing deep fjords

Ingólfsson, ?lafur

286

Atlantic update, July 1986--June 1990: Outer Continental Shelf oil and gas activities  

SciTech Connect

This report describes outer continental shelf oil and gas activities in the Atlantic Region. This edition of the Atlantic Update includes an overview of the Mid-Atlantic Planning Area and a summary of the Manteo Prospect off-shore North Carolina. 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Karpas, R.M.; Gould, G.J.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

From pre-salt sources to post-salt traps: A specific petroleum system in Congo coastal basin  

SciTech Connect

The Bas Congo basin extends from Gabon to Angola and is a prolific oil province where both pre-salt and post salt sources and reservoirs have been found. In the northern part of the basin referred to as the Congo coastal basin, the proven petroleum system is more specific: mature source rocks are found only in pre-salt series whereas by contrast 99 % proven hydrocarbon reserves am located in post-salt traps. Such a system is controlled by the following factors: Source rocks are mostly organic rich shales deposited in a restricted environment developed in a rift prior to the Atlantic Ocean opening; Migration from pre-salt sources to post-salt traps is finalized by local discontinuities of the regional salt layer acting otherwise as a tight seal; Post-salt reservoirs are either carbonates or sands desposited in the evolutive shelf margin developped during Upper Cretaceous; Geometric traps are linked to salt tectonics (mostly turtle-shaped structures); Regional shaly seals are related to transgressive shales best developped during high rise sea level time interval. Stratigraphically, the age of hydrocarbon fields trends are younger and younger from West to East: lower Albian in Nkossa, Upper Albian and lower Cenomanian in Likouala, Yanga, Sendji, Upper Cenomanian in Tchibouela, Turonian in Tchendo, Turanian and Senonian in Emeraude.

Vernet, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Field Evaluation of a Surfactant-Modified Zeolite System for Removal of Organics from Produced Water Authors: Robert S. Bowman, New Mexico Technological University, Socorro, NM; Enid J. Sullivan, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM; and Lynn E. Katz and Kerry A. Kinney, University of Texas, Austin, TX. Venue: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society in Santa Fe, NM, June 3–7, 2007 (http://www.clays.org/home/HomeAnnualMeeting.html [external site]). Abstract: About 2.3 billion cubic meters (600 billion gallons) of wastewater (produced water) is generated each year as a byproduct of oil and gas operations in the continental United States. Disposal of this water represents about 10% of the cost of hydrocarbon production. Inexpensive treatment technologies can lower the cost of disposal and generate higher-quality water for other uses. Surfactant-modified zeolite (SMZ) has been shown to effectively sorb a variety of nonpolar organic compounds from water. SMZ was tested as a medium to remove benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from produced water generated during extraction of coalbed natural gas. BTEX removal is necessary prior to surface discharge of produced waters or as a pretreatment for reverse osmosis. We demonstrated in laboratory column experiments that BTEX-saturated SMZ is readily regenerated by air sparging. There was no loss in BTEX sorption capacity, and a minor decrease in hydraulic conductivity, after 50 sorption/regeneration cycles. Based upon the laboratory results, a pilot-scale produced-water treatment system was designed and tested at a reinjection facility in the San Juan Basin of New Mexico. The SMZ-based system was designed to treat up to 110 liters (30 gallons) of produced water per hour on a continuous basis by running two SMZ columns in series. The system performed as predicted, based on laboratory results, over repeated feed and regeneration cycles during the month-long operation. The BTEX-laden sparge gases were treated with a vapor-phase bioreactor system, resulting in an emissions-free process

289

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Morphology, Distribution, and Genesis of Nanometer-Scale Pores in the Mississippian Barnett Shale Morphology, Distribution, and Genesis of Nanometer-Scale Pores in the Mississippian Barnett Shale Morphology, Distribution, and Genesis of Nanometer-Scale Pores in the Mississippian Barnett Shale Authors: R. M. Reed, R. G. Loucks, D. M. Jarvie, and S. C. Ruppel Venue: 2008 American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Annual Convention and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, April 19-24, 2008 oral session chaired by S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks (http://www.aapg.org) Abstract: The Mississippian Barnett Shale from the Fort Worth Basin of Texas predominantly consists of black, clay-mineral-poor, calcareous and siliceous mudstones. Siliceous mudstones from two wells have been examined to characterize pores. A few primarily intragranular micropores >500 nm in diameter are present but they are isolated and numerically insignificant. Nanometer-scale pores (nanopores) are the dominant pore type. Use of Ar-ion-beam milling provides surfaces without topography related to differential hardness, which are suitable for examination of nanopores. Nanopores are primarily found in three locales within the samples. Carbonaceous grains host the majority of nanopores with many of these grains containing hundreds. Other nanopores are found in bedding-parallel wisps of largely organic matrix material. The remaining, less common, nanopore locale is within extremely fine-grained matrix areas not associated with organic material. Intragranular nanopores tend to be larger, and less regularly shaped than intergranular nanopores; which tend to be more elliptical to elongate, smaller, and less complexly shaped. At least two distinct morphologies of nanopores have formed in carbonaceous grains. In one type, nanopores are more elliptical and do not have a clear distribution pattern. In the other, nanopores are more rectilinear and form parallel linear arrays. This latter pattern may be controlled by original structure in the grains. Median pore diameters vary from grain to grain, but a typical diameter is ~100 nm. Intragranular porosities up to 20.15% have been measured. All intragranular nanopores in carbonaceous grains may result from devolatilization of the organic material during hydrocarbon maturation

290

Notice of Availability of Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Notice of Availability of Plains & Eastern Clean Line Transmission Project Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Public Hearings: Federal Register Notice, Volume 79, No. 242 -...

291

,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2009 " ,"(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid" ,,,"Contiguous...

292

,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2008 " ,"(Megawatts and Percent)" ,"Projected Year Base","Year","Summer",,,"Eastern Power Grid",,,"Texas Power Grid",,,"Western Power Grid" ,,,"Contiguous...

293

CRAD, Engineering - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System...

294

CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A...

295

CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD,...

296

CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Emergency Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section...

297

Refraction Survey At Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northern Basin & Range Region (Heimgartner, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Refraction Survey At Northern Basin &...

298

Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity: Geographic Information System At Northern Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal...

299

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration...

300

Ecology: Drought in the Congo Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... significantly expanded the tropical-forest research programme by focusing on chronic drought in Africa's Congo Basin, a region that has been the subject of much less investigation than the ... optical, microwave and gravity remote-sensing data to evaluate long-term drought response in the Congo Basin (Fig. 1). Annual precipitation in this region is bimodal, and the ...

Jeffrey Q. Chambers; Dar A. Roberts

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

6, 839877, 2006 Mexico City basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emitters of air pollutants leading to negative health effects and environmental degradation. The rate altitude basin with air pollutant concentrations above the health limits most days of the year. A mesoscale-dimensional wind patterns in25 the basin and found that the sea-breeze transports the polluted air mass up the moun

Boyer, Edmond

302

REGIONAL PARADOX FORMATION STRUCTURE AND ISOCHORE MAPS, BLANDING SUB-BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field (figure 1). However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Kevin McClure; Craig D. Morgan; Thomas C. Chidsey Jr.; David E. Eby

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Break-up of the Larsen B Ice Shelf Triggered by Chain-Reaction Drainage of Supraglacial Lakes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ice-shelf thinning) would continue to reduce the critical lake 200 depth necessary to produce ring-type fractures. In addition, increased basal melting leads 201 to substantial cooling of the ice shelf interior [Sergienko et al., 2013], making... Break-up of the Larsen B Ice Shelf Triggered by Chain-Reaction 1 Drainage of Supraglacial Lakes 2 Alison F. Banwell1,2, Douglas R. MacAyeal1 and Olga V. Sergienko3 3 1The Department of Geophysical Sciences, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL...

Banwell, Alison F.; MacAyeal, Douglas R.; Sergienko, Olga V.

2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

304

Gasification characteristics of eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is evaluating the gasification characteristics of Eastern oil shales as a part of a cooperative agreement between the US Department of Energy and HYCRUDE Corporation to expand the data base on moving-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Gasification of shale fines will improve the overall resource utilization by producing synthesis gas or hydrogen needed for the hydroretorting of oil shale and the upgrading of shale oil. Gasification characteristics of an Indiana New Albany oil shale have been determined over temperature and pressure ranges of 1600 to 1900/sup 0/F and 15 to 500 psig, respectively. Carbon conversion of over 95% was achieved within 30 minutes at gasification conditions of 1800/sup 0/F and 15 psig in a hydrogen/steam gas mixture for the Indiana New Albany oil shale. This paper presents the results of the tests conducted in a laboratory-scale batch reactor to obtain reaction rate data and in a continuous mini-bench-scale unit to obtain product yield data. 2 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Lau, F.S.; Rue, D.M.; Punwani, D.V.; Rex, R.C. Jr.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL PAPER Neoproterozoic diamictite in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and Northern Saudi Arabia in Wadi Kareim and Wadi Mobarak in the Eastern Desert of Egypt and the Nuwaybah formation in NW Saudi and extends from Egypt, Israel, and Jordan to Ethiopia and Yemen. The ANS (Fig. 1a) developed during

Stern, Robert J.

306

Hydrocarbon accumulation conditions and exploration direction of Baiyun-Liwan deep water areas in the Pearl River Mouth Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An integrated geologic study was performed in the Baiyun-Liwan deep water areas, Pearl River Mouth Basin, based on the achievements obtained during the past five exploration stages. The following understandings were obtained. (1) The Baiyun Sag has superior source rock conditions and has experienced three tectonic evaluation stages like rifting, rifting-depression and depression. The Wenchang-Enping Fms deposited during the rifting stage have large hydrocarbon generation potentials. During the rifting-depression and depression stages, the deposition in the study area was controlled by the Oligocene and Miocene shelf slope break zones. The Oligocene Zhuhai Fm shallow marine delta-longshore depositional system and the Miocene Zhujiang-Hanjiang Fms deep fan depositional system were formed, and they are the most favorable reservoir-caprock assemblages in the study area. (2) The Hydrocarbon accumulation pattern in the deep waters is different from that in the northern shallow waters. Shelf slope break zone, composite conduction system consisting of structural ridge, fault, sandbody, unconformity and fluid diapir as well as late tectonic movement are the three major factors controlling hydrocarbon migration and accumulation in the study area. (3) The Liwan 3-1 gas field is a typical example. The superior trapping conditions, high-quality reservoirs of delta distributary channel controlled by shelf slope break zone, vertical conduction system consisting of fault and diapir, as well as the overlying massive marine mudstone caprock provide favorable geologic conditions for the formation of large gas fields. Four areas were identified as the targets of gas exploration in the near future: the deep water fan system in the central sag, the structural-stratigraphic traps in the uplifted areas on both sides of the main sag of Baiyun, a series of large structural traps on the fault terrace to the southwest of the main sag, and the ultradeep frontiers in sags such as Liwan to the south of the main sag.

Lin Heming; Shi Hesheng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Topic B Awardee: Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eastern Interconnection States' Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council Topic B Awardee: Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council The Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council (EISPC) is an historic endeavor initially funded by an award from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to a provision of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The goal is to create an unprecedented collaborative among the states in the Eastern Interconnection. Comprised of public utility commissions, Governors' offices, energy offices, and other key government representatives, this collaboration will foster and produce consistent and coordinated direction to the regional and interconnection-level analyses and planning. Significant state input and direction increases the probability that the outputs will be useful to the

308

Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) today announced that its diverse array of stakeholders has reached consensus on the final set of "resource expansion futures" to be studied as part of the electric system transmission planning effort funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative News Release More Documents & Publications Electricity Advisory Committee Meeting Presentations October 2011 - Interconnection-Wide Transmission Planning Processes EAC Recommendations for DOE Action Regarding Interconnection-Wide Planning - June 6, 2013 Application to Export Electric Energy OE Docket No. EA-352 NaturEner Tie

309

Russia's perceptions and misperceptions of the EU Eastern Partnership  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article is devoted to the problem of the reaction to the Eastern Partnership by Russia's both the political establishment and the expert community. The question of reactions to the Eastern Partnership in the target countries has been extensively posed in academic literature. However, the question of Russia's reaction to the Eastern Partnership, one of the most important actors of the region, has been rarely raised by the academic community. A wide array of factors impacted Russian elites' perception of the Eastern Partnership from problematic issues in the EU-Russia relations to the post-Soviet states' political and economic transformation. Studying the dynamics and peculiarities of Russia's perspective on the Eastern Partnership makes it possible to draw meaningful conclusions on the nature of Russia's phobias that fuel its domestic and foreign policy.

Igor Gretskiy; Evgeny Treshchenkov; Konstantin Golubev

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool Now Available | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool Now Available Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool Now Available Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool Now Available May 3, 2013 - 12:08pm Addthis The Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states and other stakeholders in the Eastern Interconnection identify geographic areas suitable for the development of clean energy resources (natural gas, sequestration or utilitization locations for C02 from coal, nuclear, and renewable) which can potentially provide significant amounts of new electric power generation. The EZ Mapping Tool is now available online. EISPC is encouraging states to learn more by participating in demonstration webinars and training sessions on how to apply the tool to their needs and particular areas of interest.

311

Improved recovery demonstration for Williston basin carbonates. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional and multi-component seismic area is being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with extended-reach jetting lance and other ultra-short radius lateral technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil-in-place will result in additional oil production by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Delaware Basin Monitoring Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Delaware Basin Drilling Surveillance Program (DBDSP) is designed to monitor drilling activities in the vicinity of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This program is based on Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements. The EPA environmental standards for the management and disposal of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste are codified in 40 CFR Part 191 (EPA 1993). Subparts B and C of the standard address the disposal of radioactive waste. The standard requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate the expected performance of the disposal system using a probabilistic risk assessment or performance assessment (PA). This PA must show that the expected repository performance will not release radioactive material above limits set by the EPA's standard. This assessment must include the consideration of inadvertent drilling into the repository at some future time.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

315

Entrainment of trace-metal-enriched Atlantic-shelf water in the inflow to the Mediterranean Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... by modified Co-APDC (cobalt-ammonium pyrrolidinedithiocarbamate) co-precipitation5, and analysed by graphite furnace flameless atomic absorption. Cd is enriched in Atlantic surface waters on the Spanish shelf outside ...

Alexander van Geen; Paula Rosener; Edward Boyle

1988-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Cumulative Ecological Effects of Normal Offshore Petroleum Operations Contrasted With Those Resulting From Continental Shelf Oil Spills [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Ecological Effects of Normal Offshore Petroleum Operations Contrasted...Resulting From Continental Shelf Oil Spills [and Discussion...from normal (non-spill) offshore petroleum operations have...studies of spills of crude oil and its refined products...

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

The shallow shelf approximation as a "sliding law" in a thermomechanically coupled ice sheet model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shallow shelf approximation is a better ``sliding law'' for ice sheet modeling than those sliding laws in which basal velocity is a function of driving stress. The shallow shelf approximation as formulated by \\emph{Schoof} [2006a] is well-suited to this use. Our new thermomechanically coupled sliding scheme is based on a plasticity assumption about the strength of the saturated till underlying the ice sheet in which the till yield stress is given by a Mohr-Coulomb formula using a modeled pore water pressure. Using this scheme, our prognostic whole ice sheet model has convincing ice streams. Driving stress is balanced in part by membrane stresses, the model is computable at high spatial resolution in parallel, it is stable with respect to parameter changes, and it produces surface velocities seen in actual ice streams.

Bueler, Ed

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

ARIANNA: A radio detector array for cosmic neutrinos on the Ross Ice Shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARIANNA (The Antarctic Ross Ice Shelf Antenna Neutrino Array) is a proposed 100 km^3 detector for ultra-high energy (above 10^17 eV) astrophysical neutrinos. It will study the origins of ultra-high energy cosmic rays by searching for the neutrinos produced when these cosmic rays interact with the cosmic microwave background. Over 900 independently operating stations will detect the coherent radio Cherenkov emission produced when astrophysical neutrinos with energy above 10^17 eV interact in the Antarctic Ross Ice Shelf. Each station will use 8 log periodic dipole antennas to look for short RF pulses, with the most important frequencies between 80 MHz and 1 GHz. By measuring the pulse polarization and frequency spectrum, the neutrino arrival direction can be determined.

Klein, Spencer R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

ORISE: Delivering Cost Savings and Customer Service with Off-the-Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Savings and Customer Service Cost Savings and Customer Service ORISE delivers Cost Savings and Customer Service with Off-the-Shelf Software The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education's (ORISE) Scientific Peer Review Program is no different than any other organization striving to do more with less in the current economy. With smaller budgets and faster turnaround needed for proposal reviews, utilizing Web-based collaboration tools to share information is necessary. Therefore, the ORISE team built a project tracking and management system with off-the-shelf products-an immediate cost and time-saver. In a recent example involving the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), ORISE conducted an annual merit review-a complete and objective examination of DOE funded projects

320

K Basins isolation barriers summary report  

SciTech Connect

The 105-K East and 105-K West fuel storage basins (105-K Basins) were designed and constructed in the early 1950`s for interim storage of irradiated fuel following its discharge from the reactors. The 105-K- East and 105-K West reactor buildings were constructed first, and the associated storage basins were added about a year later. The construction joint between each reactor building structure and the basin structure included a flexible membrane waterstop to prevent leakage. Water in the storage basins provided both radiation shielding and cooling to remove decay heat from stored fuel until its transfer to the Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Facility for chemical processing. The 105-K West Reactor was permanently shut down in February 1970; the 105-K East Reactor was permanently shut down in February 1971. Except for a few loose pieces, fuel stored in the basins at that time was shipped to the PUREX Facility for processing. The basins were then left idle but were kept filled with water. The PUREX Facility was shut down and placed on wet standby in 1972 while N Reactor continued to operate. When the N Reactor fuel storage basin began to approach storage capacity, the decision was made to modify the fuel storage basins at 105-K East and 105-K West to provide additional storage capacity. Both basins were subsequently modified (105-K East in 1975 and 105-K West in 1981) to provide for the interim handling and storage of irradiated N Reactor fuel. The PUREX Facility was restarted in November 1983 to provide 1698 additional weapons-grade plutonium for the United States defense mission. The facility was shut down and deactivated in December 1992 when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determined that the plant was no longer needed to support weapons-grade plutonium production. When the PUREX Facility was shut down, approximately 2.1 x 1 06 kg (2,100 metric tons) of irradiated fuel aged 7 to 23 years was left in storage in the 105-K Basins pending a decision on final disposition of the material. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1994), also known as the Tri-Party Agreement, commits to the removal of all fuel and sludge from the 105-K Basins by the year 2002.

Strickland, G.C., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Geochemistry studies in Eastern Kentucky. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Presented here are the results of inorganic geochemical studies on well cuttings from fourteen wells in the Big Sandy Gas Field. Both x-ray fluorescence and x-ray diffraction were used in analysis. Resultant mineralic data and elemental data were mapped by computer and by hand for five intervals of Ohio Shale and for the Berea/Bedford sequence. Comparisons of the geochemistry trend maps were made with lithology, structure, thermal maturation, gas open flow, and paleoenvironment. Techniques used included visual map comparison, computer map comparison programs utilizing correlation coefficients based on grid derived data sets, cluster analysis, x-y plots, and r/sup 2/ (coefficient of determination). A limited number of regional maps are included. It is concluded that inorganic geochemical analysis can be useful in: (1) suggesting paleoenvironmental trends; (2) establishing depositional trends; (3) enhancing exploration in terms of setting limits and pinpointing potential areas for hydrocarbon recovery; and (4) identification of likely locations for large gas fields when used with other geological studies. Elemental data analysis is the most accurate, and can be done quickly and inexpensively. It is concluded that the Big Sandy gas field area is a unique stratigraphic-structural gas trap, in which sedimentary factors, depositional basin features, plant evolution and occurrence, and structural elements all played important roles. Combinations of certain of these ingredients in different amounts may exist in other parts of the basin, and thus, suggest areas for hydrocarbon accumulation and potential recovery.

Negus-de Wys, J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Heavy mineral dispersal patterns of the abyssal plain and Louisiana inner shelf of the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEAVY MINERAL DISPERSAL PATTERNS OF THE ABYSSAL PLAIN AND LOUISIANA INNER SHELF OF THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis WALTER RICHARD MOORE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1969 Major Subject: Geological Oceanography HEAVY MINERAL DISPERSAL PATTERNS OF THE ABYSSAL PLAIN AND LOUISIANA INNER SHELF OF THE GULF OF MEXICO A Thesis by WALTER RICHARD MOORE Approved as to style...

Moore, Walter Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

323

Continental shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight. Progress report, 1 June 1979-31 May 1980  

SciTech Connect

The papers included in this progress report summarize some significant developments in understanding the South Atlantic Bight. Some of the results are summarized as follows: Onslow Bay flushing rates can be determined using a model based on an exponential dilution model; eddy induced nitrate flux accounts for most input of new nitrogen into shelf waters; and tarballs in the Gulf Stream are not transported to the nearshore because of an apparent inner shelf density front.

Atkinson, L P

1980-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

324

Geomorphic interpretation of the bathymetry of the Bay of Campeche seaward of the continental shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, is it covers a large seotor of the Gulf~ its study is involved in a number of larger& particularly interesting problems that are ourrently attracting the attention of geologists, Paul Weaver (1950) says about the Oulfc "'Ihe two theories ~ one... enough evidcnoe fram hydrographic surveys and. bottom samples so that he can recommend local areas for test of the two theories~ he will speed the evaluat1on and operating program (of petro- leum development) of the continental shelf with maximum...

Creager, Joe S

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

325

Transport and transfer rates in the waters of the continental shelf. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The goal of govern project is to understand and quantify the processes that the transport and dispersal of energy-related pollutants introduced to the waters of the continental shelf and slope. The report is divided into sections dealing with processes associated with suspended solids; processes associated with sediments sinks for radionuclides and other pollutants; and spreading of water characteristics and species in solution. (ACR)

Biscaye, P.E.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

The petrology and petrography of sediments from the Sigsbee blanket, Yucatan Shelf, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Yucatan Shelf. A detailed petrographic study has revealed ChaC the unit is composed dominantly of planktonic lutite with varying percentages of calcareous pellets, ooids lithic fragments, non-skeletal aggregates, algal fragment ~, tests of benthonic... foraminifera and fragments of shells and skeletons of mollusks, coral, bryozoans and echiuoid. The landward boundary of the unit is a gradation with the adjacent skeletal calcareniCes that occur on the inner shelft the seaward boundary may extend as far...

Williams, Joseph Delano

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

327

Late Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) shallow water hydrocarbon seeps from Snow Hill and Seymour Islands, James Ross Basin, Antarctica  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fossil hydrocarbon seeps are present in latest Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) volcaniclastic shallow shelf sediments exposed on Snow Hill and Seymour Islands, James Ross Basin, Antarctica. The seeps occur in the Snow Hill Island Formation on Snow Hill Island and are manifest as large-sized, cement-rich carbonate bodies, containing abundant thyasirid bivalves and rarer ammonites and solemyid bivalves. These bodies have typical seep cement phases, with ?13C values between ?20.4 and ?10.7 and contain molecular fossils indicative of terrigenous organic material and the micro-organisms involved in the anaerobic oxidation of methane, including methanotrophic archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria. On Seymour Island the seeps occur as micrite-cemented burrow systems in the Lpez de Bertodano Formation and are associated with thyasirid, solemyid and lucinid bivalves, and background molluscan taxa. The cemented burrows also have typical seep cement phases, with ?13C values between ?58.0 and ?24.6. There is evidence from other data that hydrocarbon seepage was a common feature in the James Ross Basin throughout the Maastrichtian and into the Eocene. The Snow Hill and Seymour Island examples comprise the third known area of Maastrichtian hydrocarbon seepage. But compared to most other ancient and modern seep communities, the James Ross Basin seep fauna is of very low diversity, being dominated by infaunal bivalves, all of which probably had thiotrophic chemosymbionts, but which were unlikely to have been seep obligates. Absent from the James Ross Basin seep fauna are typical obligate seep taxa from the Cretaceous and the Cenozoic. Reasons for this may have been temporal, palaeolatitudinal, palaeobathymetric, or palaeoecological.

Crispin T.S. Little; Daniel Birgel; Adrian J. Boyce; J. Alistair Crame; Jane E. Francis; Steffen Kiel; Jrn Peckmann; Duncan Pirrie; Gavyn K. Rollinson; James D. Witts

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

New Ulm field: an example of Cretaceous shelf-slope instability in east Texas  

SciTech Connect

The New Ulm field in Austin County, Texas, is an example of the structural and stratigraphic complexity above the Cretaceous Edwards shelf margin of east Texas. Deep wells and improved seismic data provide documentation of structural patterns and deepwater facies not previously considered in the Gulf Coast reservoir play modeling. Study of the data implies the Late Cretaceous to Eocene section was deposited along a shelf-slope break. Late Cretaceous, pre-Midway sedimentation was affected by structurally induced slope instability, and consequent gravity faulting and slumping resulted in an irregular sea-floor surface. Paleocene Midway sands were carried onto this surface by storm-generated density currents where the uneven topography caused deposition in constructional channels. Continued deposition of the fluvio-deltaic Wilcox on this surface caused faulting and folding by differential compaction. The folds are minor and the faults small and steep, not like the typical large growth faults of the Gulf Coast. Upper Wilcox sediments were progressively less disturbed as the region stabilized. New Ulm field production includes gas from the Midway Formation and oil and gas from the Wilcox Group. Midway reservoirs are stratigraphic, consisting of fluvio-deltaic sandstones within faulted anticlines. This study adds evidence to data describing shelf-slope geology along the Edwards margin. The setting can be a new type of hydrocarbon play in the Gulf Coast.

Pinero, E.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Eastern Maine Electric Coop | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coop Coop Jump to: navigation, search Name Eastern Maine Electric Coop Place Maine Utility Id 5609 Utility Location Yes Ownership C NERC Location NPCC NERC NPCC Yes ISO Other Yes Activity Transmission Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] Energy Information Administration Form 826[2] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png General Service Commercial Industrial Service Industrial Large Commercial Commercial Residential Residential Seasonal Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.0909/kWh Commercial: $0.0771/kWh Industrial: $0.0620/kWh

330

Anisotropic poststack depth migration, eastern Venezuela  

SciTech Connect

It is known that in areas with significant shale content, the isotropic assumption in depth migration is not correct, and this can lead to incorrect depth positioning if not properly accounted for. In this paper, we performed isotropic and anisotropic poststack depth migrations on a dataset from Eastern Venezuela to study the influence of anisotropy over the depth migration process. When interval velocities derived from surface seismic are compared with those velocities from check shots, significant differences are observed specially for depths associated with a thick sequence of shales identified in the area. These differences in interval velocities are used to obtain estimations of the anisotropic constants used in the anisotropic depth migration process. The anisotropic depth-migrated section allows to position correctly in depth known geological markers identified in well logs, while the results in the isotropic depth-migration show some mismatch with the depths obtained from well-log information.

Uzcategui, O.J.; Mujica, D.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Eastern Band of Cherokee Strategic Energy Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians was awarded a grant under the U.S. Department of Energy Tribal Energy Program (TEP) to develop a Tribal Strategic Energy Plan (SEP). The grant, awarded under the First Steps phase of the TEP, supported the development of a SEP that integrates with the Tribes plans for economic development, preservation of natural resources and the environment, and perpetuation of Tribal heritage and culture. The Tribe formed an Energy Committee consisting of members from various departments within the Tribal government. This committee, together with its consultant, the South Carolina Institute for Energy Studies, performed the following activities: Develop the Tribes energy goals and objectives Establish the Tribes current energy usage Identify available renewable energy and energy efficiency options Assess the available options versus the goals and objectives Create an action plan for the selected options

Souther Carolina Institute of energy Studies-Robert Leitner

2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

332

Continental Shelf Research 24 (2004) 10531082 Sub-seasonal to interannual variations of sea surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of spatio-temporal variations of all parameters is observed in a relatively small basin; these variations Monica Bay (SMB) is a semi-enclosed bay within the Southern California Bight (SCB) (Fig. 1). The bottom

Gruber, Nicolas

333

Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 Mark Person*1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Mount Simon, Illinois Basin, CO2, earthquakes, pressure, brine transport69 #12;Page | 3 1. IntroductionPage | 1 Assessment of Basin-Scale Hydrologic Impacts of CO2 Sequestration, Illinois Basin1 2 3 4 sharp-interface models of CO2 injection were constructed for the Illinois49 Basin in which porosity

Gable, Carl W.

334

Death of a carbonate basin: The Niagara-Salina transition in the Michigan basin  

SciTech Connect

The A-O Carbonate in the Michigan basin comprises a sequence of laminated calcite/anhydrite layers intercalated with bedded halite at the transition between normal marine Niagaran carbonates and lower Salina Group evaporites. The carbonate/anhydrite interbeds represent freshing events during initial evaporative concentration of the Michigan basin. Recent drilling in the Michigan basin delineates two distinct regions of A-O Carbonate development: a 5 to 10 m thick sequence of six 'laminites' found throughout most of the western and northern basin and a 10 to 25 m thick sequence in the southeastern basin containing both thicker 'laminates' and thicker salt interbeds. Additionally, potash deposits of the overlying A-1 evaporite unit are restricted to the northern and western basin regions. The distribution of evaporite facies in these two regions is adequately explained by a source of basin recharge in the southeast-perhaps the 'Clinton Inlet' of earlier workers. This situation suggest either that: (1) the source of basin recharge is alternately supplying preconcentrated brine and more normal marine water, or (2) that the basin received at least two distinct sources of water during A-O deposition.

Leibold, A.W.; Howell, P.D. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 1 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 104.0 Beam(m) 3.7 Depth(m) 4.6 Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 1.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Uni-Directional Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach 12' by 12' concrete slabs anchored to flume walls

336

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report Herb G. Sutter Michael Poirier Art W. Etchells Gary Smith Kris Thomas Jim J. Davis Paul Macbeth November 16, 2009 Prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 16, 2009 ii Herbert G. Sutter, Team Lead Date Michael Poirier, Team Member Date Arthur W. Etchells, Team Member Date Gary Smith, Team Member Date Kris Thomas, Team Member Date Jim J. Davis, Team Member Date Paul Macbeth, Team Member Date Signatures 11/09/2009 11/09/2009 11/09/2009 K Basins Sludge Treatment Project Phase 1 Technology Readiness Assessment Report November 16, 2009

337

Alden Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Alden Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Alden Research Laboratory, Inc Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 33.5 Beam(m) 21.3 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Depends on study Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 1.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 1.8 Wave Period Range(s) 1.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Period adjustable electronically, height adjustable mechanically Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Designed as needed using commercially available sand/sediment

338

Progress Update: H4 Basin Concrete Pour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Recovery Act funded project in the H area basin. A concrete ditch built longer than half a mile to prevent contaminated water from expanding and to reduce the footprint on the environment.

None

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

339

Flathead Basin Commission Act of 1983 (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This Act establishes the Flathead Basin Commission, the purpose of which is to protect the Flathead Lake aquatic environment, its waters, and surrounding lands and natural resources. The Commission...

340

The Uinta Basin Case Robert J. Bayer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overburden Tailings Oil Shale Mining Open Pit Underground Ex situ extraction Ex situ thermal conversion EIS for Oil Sands and Oil Shale Ongoing concerns with Basin-wide air quality Wildlife and wildlife

Utah, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Sheets Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sheets Wave Basin Sheets Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sheets Wave Basin Overseeing Organization University of Rhode Island Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 30.0 Beam(m) 3.6 Depth(m) 1.8 Cost(per day) $750(+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2.0 Length of Effective Tow(m) 25.0 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.3 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10 Wave Period Range(s) 3.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Pre-programmed for regular and irregular waves, but wavemaker is capable of any input motion. Wave Direction Uni-Directional

342

Haynes Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Haynes Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (Haynes) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 38.1 Beam(m) 22.9 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $150/hour (excluding labor) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.6 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 3.3 Maximum Wave Length(m) 10.7 Wave Period Range(s) 3.3 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.2 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Directional, irregular, any spectrum, cnoidal or solitary wave Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Stone Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None

343

Canada-USA Salmon Shelf Survival Study, 2007-2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

Historically, salmon stocks from the Columbia River and Snake River formed one of the most valuable fisheries on the west coast of North America. However, salmon and steelhead returns sharply declined during the 1980s and 1990s to reach nearly 1 million fish. Although several factors may be responsible for the decline of Columbia River salmon and steelhead, there is increasing evidence that these drastic declines were primarily attributable to persistently unfavorable ocean conditions. Hence, an understanding of the effects of ocean conditions on salmon production is required to forecast the return of salmon to the Columbia River basin and to assess the efficacy of mitigation measures such as flow regulation on salmon resources in this system. The Canadian Program on High Seas Salmon has been collecting juvenile salmon and oceanographic data off the west coast of British Columbia and Southeast Alaska since 1998 to assess the effects of ocean conditions on the distribution, migration, growth, and survival of Pacific salmon. Here, we present a summary of the work conducted as part of the Canada-USA Salmon Shelf Survival Study during the 2008 fiscal year and compare these results with those obtained from previous years. The working hypothesis of this research is that fast growth enhances the marine survival of salmon, either because fast growing fish quickly reach a size that is sufficient to successfully avoid predators, or because they accumulate enough energy reserves to better survive their first winter at sea, a period generally considered critical in the life cycle of salmon. Sea surface temperature decreased from FY05 to FY08, whereas, the summer biomass of phytoplankton increased steadily off the west coast of Vancouver Island from FY05 to FY08. As in FY07, zooplankton biomass was generally above average off the west coast of Vancouver Island in FY08. Interestingly, phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass were higher in FY08 than was expected from the observed nutrient concentration that year. This suggests nutrients were more effectively by phytoplankton in FY08. In addition, the abundance of lipid-rich northern copepods increased from FY05 to FY08, whereas lipid-poor southern copepods showed the opposite pattern, suggesting that growth conditions were more favorable to juvenile salmon in FY08 than in previous years. However, growth indices for juvenile coho salmon were near the 1998-2008 average, both off the west coast of Vancouver Island and Southeast Alaska, indicating that additional factors beside prey quality affect juvenile salmon growth in the marine environment. Catches of juvenile Chinook, sockeye and chum salmon off the west coast of Vancouver Island in June-July 2008 were the highest on record during summer since 1998, suggesting that early marine survival for the 2008 smolt year was high. Interestingly, the proportion of hatchery fish was high (80-100%) among the juvenile Columbia River Chinook salmon caught off the British Columbia coast during summer, suggest that relatively few wild Chinook salmon are produced in the Columbia River Chinook. In addition, we also recovered two coded-wire tagged juvenile Redfish Lake sockeye salmon in June 2008 off the west coast of British Columbia. As relatively few Redfish Lake sockeye smolts are tagged each year, this also suggests that early marine survival was high for these fish, and may result in a high return in 2009 if they mature at age three, or in 2010 if they mature at age four. To date, our research shows that different populations of Columbia River salmon move to different locations along the coastal zone where they establish their ocean feeding grounds and overwinter. We further show that ocean conditions experienced by juvenile Columbia River salmon vary among regions of the coast, with higher plankton productivity and temperatures off the west coast of Vancouver Island than in Southeast Alaska. Hence, different stocks of juvenile salmon originating from the Columbia River and Snake River are exposed to different ocean conditions and may respond differ

Trudel, Marc; Tucker, Strahan; Morris, John

2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

344

Mineralogy and organic petrology of oil shales in the Sangkarewang formation, Ombilin Basin, West Sumatra, Indonesia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Ombilin Basin, which lies in Sumatra Island, is one of the Tertiary basins in Indonesia. This basin contains a wide variety of rock units, (more)

Fatimah, Fatimah

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Hydrogeological restrictions to saline ground-water discharge in the Red River of the North drainage basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

Discharge of saline water from bedrock aquifers along the eastern margin of the Williston basin is restricted by surficial glacial till and lacustrine deposits in the Red River of the North drainage basin. Water from these aquifers reaches the surface by (1) diffusion; (2) slow, upward seepage along zones of relatively larger hydraulic conductivity in the till and lacustrine deposits; or (3) flow from artesian wells. Ground-water quality varies near the surface because of mixing of water being discharged from bedrock aquifers with shallower ground water in the surficial deposits. Ground-water quality, hydraulic-gradient, and hydraulic-conductivity data obtained from pumped-well and slug tests indicate that flow in the surficial deposits is eastward, but at slow rates because of small hydraulic conductivities. Base-flow and specific-conductance measurements of water in tributaries to the Red River of the North indicate that focused points of ground-water discharge result in substantial increases in salinity in surface water in the northern part of the basin in North Dakota. Core analyses and drillers' logs were used to generalize hydrogeologic characteristics of the deposits in the basin, and a two-dimensional ground-water-flow model was used to simulate the basin's geohydrologic processes. Model results indicate that the ground-water flow paths in the bedrock aquifers and surficial deposits converge, and that water from the bedrock aquifers contributes to the overall increase in ground-water discharge toward the east. Model results are supported by water-quality data collected along an east-west hydrogeologic section.

Strobel, M.L. (Geological Survey, Grand Forks, ND (United States) Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Basin evolution, diagenesis and uranium mineralization in the PaleoproterozicThelon Basin,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basin evolution, diagenesis and uranium mineralization in the PaleoproterozicThelon Basin, Nunavut,Canada Eric E. Hiatt,n Sarah E. Palmer,w1 T. Kurt Kyserw and Terrence K. O'Connorz n Geology Department, University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, Oshkosh,Wisconsin, USA wDepartment of Geological Sciences and Engineering

Hiatt, Eric E.

347

Mixed carbonate-siliciclastic infilling of a Neogene carbonate shelf-valley system: Tampa Bay, West-Central Florida  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The shelf-valley system underlying Tampa Bay, Floridas largest estuary, is situated in the middle of the Neogene carbonate Florida Platform. Compared to well-studied fluvially incised coastal plain valley systems, this shelf-valley system is unique in its karstic origin and its alternating carbonate-siliciclastic infill. A complex record of sea-level changes, paleo-fluvial variability and marine processes have controlled the timing and mechanisms of this compound shelf-valley infill. A dense grid of high-resolution, single-channel seismic data were collected at the mouth of Tampa Bay, in an attempt to define this stratigraphy, determine the controls on deposition, and define the underlying structure of this shelf-valley system. The seismic data were correlated with nearby wells and boreholes for lithologic and age control. Sequence stratigraphic methods were incorporated in order to develop an integrated chronostratigraphy for the depositional infilling of the shelf-valley system. Five seismic sequences were identified. Sequence boundaries generally show erosional truncation and karstification, with downlap of overlying sequences. Structure contour and isopach maps indicate that the Tampa Bay shelf-valley system has remained in essentially the same location since its formation in the early Miocene, although the provenance of sedimentary infill has changed. This change is due to increasing amounts of siliciclastic material during the Neogene. Seismic facies interpretations indicate lower-energy, northward prograding deposition dominated by predominantly carbonate sediments within the lowest Sequence A. Higher energy, siliciclastic fluvio-deltaic deposition within sequences B and C originates to the east and northeast of the shelf-valley system related to a Pliocene pulse of sedimentation onto the Florida Platform. Finally, marine processes (longshore transport, ebb-tidal delta formation) dominate the upper two sequences (D and E), reworking these siliciclastic sediments into a spatially mixed carbonate-siliciclastic depositional setting.

David S Duncan; Stanley D Locker; Gregg R Brooks; Albert C Hine; Larry J Doyle

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Combination of pulsed electric field processing and antimicrobial bottle for extending microbiological shelf-life of pomegranate juice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Pomegranate juice was processed using bench top (7.2L/h flow rate, 35kV/cm field strength, 72s total treatment time) and pilot scale (100L/h flow rate, 35kV/cm field strength, 281s total treatment time) continuous pulsed electric field (PEF) processing systems. The treated juice was packaged in PET bottles or PET bottles coated with potassium sorbate and sodium benzoate, and stored at 4C for 84days. Samples were assessed every 7days for total aerobic bacteria and yeast and mold. Untreated juice had less than one week of shelf-life, while untreated juices in antimicrobial bottles had 56days. Juices treated with PEF alone had a shelf-life of 21days (bench scale) and over 84days (pilot scale). Juices treated with PEF and stored in antimicrobial bottles had a shelf-life over 84days for both scale tests, which significantly extended the microbiological shelf-life of pomegranate juice. Industrial relevance Pulsed electric field (PEF), one of novel non-thermal processing technologies, has been studied intensively worldwide for the last decades. However, most of them were done at laboratory scale and few were at pilot or commercial scale. In addition, PEF processing alone may not provide enough shelf-life of juice as juice industry expects. The work in this paper shows the side-by-side comparison of PEF processing at lab and pilot scales and demonstrates that the combination of PEF with antimicrobial battle packaging significantly extended the shelf-life of juice. The use of a large scale PEF processing system and the combination of antimicrobial packaging provide juice manufacturers an innovate approach for enhancing the safety and extending the shelf-life of juice products.

Tony Z. Jin; Mingming Guo; Ruijin Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Depositional environment of the upper Jurassic Norphlet and Smackover formations, Hatters Pond field, Mobile County, Alabama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, according to Anderson, (19 79) was the Mesozoic shelf edge (Pig. 1). The shelf edge indicates that the Mississippi basin was a shelf basin, The shelf edge persisted through the Jurassic to th Cretaceous where it became an important control..., according to Anderson, (19 79) was the Mesozoic shelf edge (Pig. 1). The shelf edge indicates that the Mississippi basin was a shelf basin, The shelf edge persisted through the Jurassic to th Cretaceous where it became an important control...

Curtis, Robert Frederick

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

350

A major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope ratios in Cenozoic basalts from the Coso Range and surrounding areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: A major lithospheric boundary in eastern California defined by isotope ratios in Cenozoic basalts from the Coso Range and surrounding areas Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Sr and Nd isotope ratios of Miocene-Recent basalts in eastern California, when screened for crustal contamination, vary dramatically and indicate the presence of a major lithospheric boundary that is not obvious from surface geology. Tectonic and geochemical interpretation of this boundary is difficult, however, because there are so many potential

351

Proposed Project: Plains & Eastern Clean Line | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act 2005 » Proposed Project: Plains & Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act 2005 » Proposed Project: Plains & Eastern Clean Line Proposed Project: Plains & Eastern Clean Line On June 10, 2010, the Department of Energy published in the Federal Register a Request for Proposals (RFP) for New or Upgraded Transmission Line Projects Under Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 2005. In response, Clean Line Energy Partners, LLC submitted an application for its Plains & Eastern Clean Line project. DOE has concluded that Clean Line's proposal was responsive to the RFP, and it is currently under consideration. The proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line project (the proposed project) would include an overhead +/- 600 kV direct current electric transmission system and associated facilities with the capacity to deliver approximately

352

Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Technology Development » Transmission Planning » Services » Technology Development » Transmission Planning » Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool Eastern Energy Zones Mapping Tool The Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council (EISPC) has released the Energy Zones (EZ) Mapping Tool, a free, web-based interactive tool that will help states and other stakeholders in the Eastern Interconnection identify geographic areas suitable for the development of clean energy resources (natural gas, sequestration or utilitization locations for C02 from coal, nuclear, and renewable) which can potentially provide significant amounts of new electric power generation. The EZ Mapping Tool is now available online. EISPC is encouraging states to learn more by participating in demonstration webinars and training sessions

353

Geothermal Exploration in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geothermal Exploration in Eastern California Using Aster Thermal Infrared Data Abstract Remote sensing is a cost-effective tool that can be used to cover large areas for the purpose of geothermal exploration. A particular application is the use of satellite thermal infrared (TIR) imagery from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument aboard an orbiting satellite. It can be used to search remotely for elevated surface temperatures, which may be associated with geothermal resources. The study region is in the central part of eastern California, with emphasis on the Coso geothermal field. Nighttime scenes are most

354

Seismic retrofit of precast panel buildings in Eastern Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many countries in Eastern Europe, particularly ones from the former Soviet Bloc, are facing a potential crisis regarding their deteriorating precast panel apartment buildings. These complexes were built using industrial ...

Tzonev, Tzonu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Eddy formation and propagation in the eastern tropical Pacific  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of eddies in the eastern tropical Pacific from TOPEX altimetry data show that there are seasonal and interannual variations in eddy activity. Comparisons between time of eddy formation and corresponding wind data show that not all...

Jhingran, Vikas Gopal

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

356

Aeolian depositional landforms of the south eastern Mojave Desert, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote sensing and photo interpretation techniques are used to describe and map aeolian deposits found along two sediment transport corridors in the south eastern Mojave Desert. The first pathway and associated sand deposits extend eastward from...

Alvis, William Thomas

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Eastern States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Eastern States Coalbed Methane Production (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

358

Drilling results from eastern Long Valley Caldera | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

results from eastern Long Valley Caldera Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors J.L. Smith and R.W. Rex Published American Nuclear Society, 1977 Report Number Energy and Mineral...

359

Topic B Awardee: Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

TheEastern Interconnection States' Planning Council (EISPC) is an historic endeavor initially funded by an award from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to a provision of the...

360

Geothermal significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the eastern Snake  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the eastern Snake significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the eastern Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal significance of magnetotelluric sounding in the eastern Snake River Plain-Yellowstone Region Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Magnetotelluric soundings along a profile extending from the Raft River geothermal area in southern Idaho in Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming reveal a highly anamalous crustal structure involving a conductive zone at depths that range from 18 km in the central part of the eastern Snake River Plain to 7 km beneath the Raft River thermal area and as little as 5 km in Yellowstone. Resistivities in this conductive zone are less than

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361

Anisotropy and spatial variation of relative permeability and lithologic character of Tensleep Sandstone reservoirs in the Bighorn and Wind River basins, Wyoming. Quarterly report, January 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

Work in conjunction with Marathon Oil Company in the Oregon Basin field utilizing Formation MicroImager and Formation MicroScanner logs has been completed. Tensleep outcrops on the western side of the Bighorn Basin are not of the quality necessary to do detailed study of stratification. This made the use of borehole imaging logs, in which stratification can be recognized, particularly attractive for the western side of the Bighorn Basin. The borehole imaging logs were used to determine the dip angle and dip direction of stratification as well as to distinguish different lithologies. It is also possible to recognize erosional bounding surfaces and classify them according to a process-oriented hierarchy. Foreset and bounding surface orientation data was utilized to create bedform reconstructions in order to simulate the distribution of flow-units bounded by erosional surfaces. The bedform reconstructions indicate that the bedforms on the western side of the basin are somewhat different from those on the eastern side of the Bighorn Basin. A report has been submitted to Marathon Oil Company, the principal cost-share subcontractor. Marine dolomitic units initially identified and correlated in the Bighorn Basin have been correlated into the Wind River Basin. Gross and net sand maps have been produced for the entire upper Tensleep in the Bighorn and Wind River Basins, as well as for each of the eolian units identified in the study. These maps indicate an overall thickening of the Tensleep to the west and south. This thickening is a result of both greater subsidence to the west and south and greater differential erosion to the north and east. An article documenting the North Oregon Basin field study will appear in the Gulf Coast Society of Economic Paleontologists and Mineralogists Foundation Conference volume entitled {open_quotes}Stratigraphic Analysis Utilizing Advanced Geophysical, Wireline and Borehole Technology for Petroleum Exploration and Production{close_quotes}.

Dunn, T.L.

1996-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

362

Burial history and thermal evolution of the southern and western Saharan basins: Synthesis and comparison with the eastern and northern Saharan basins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the wells without measured T and Ro data. Figure 2 Map of geothermic degrees gamma (in mC), Saharan platform, contoured at 2...georef;2003074875 2003-074875 Economic geology, geology of energy sources Applied geophysics American Association of Petroleum...

M. Makhous; Yu. I. Galushkin

363

Meteorological teleconnections between the Sahel and the eastern United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

METEOROLOGICAL TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN THE SAHEL AND THE EASTERN UNITED STATES A Thesis by JEFFREY EARL MALAN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1985 Major Subject: Meteorology METEOROLOGICAL TELECONNECTIONS BETWEEN THE SAHEL AND THE EASTERN UNITED STATES A Thesis by JEFFREY EARL MALAN Approved as to style and content by: J hn F. Grif s (Cha rman of Committee) Rudo f J...

Malan, Jeffrey Earl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

364

Developing Generic Dynamic Models for the 2030 Eastern Interconnection Grid  

SciTech Connect

The Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) has built three major power flow cases for the 2030 Eastern Interconnection (EI) based on various levels of energy/environmental policy conditions, technology advances, and load growth. Using the power flow cases, this report documents the process of developing the generic 2030 dynamic models using typical dynamic parameters. The constructed model was validated indirectly using the synchronized phasor measurements by removing the wind generation temporarily.

Kou, Gefei [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Markham, Penn N [ORNL; Liu, Yilu [ORNL

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

RECONNAISSANCE ASSESSMENT OF CO2 SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL IN THE TRIASSIC AGE RIFT BASIN TREND OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GEORGIA, AND NORTHERN FLORIDA  

SciTech Connect

A reconnaissance assessment of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration potential within the Triassic age rift trend sediments of South Carolina, Georgia and the northern Florida Rift trend was performed for the Office of Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This rift trend also extends into eastern Alabama, and has been termed the South Georgia Rift by previous authors, but is termed the South Carolina, Georgia, northern Florida, and eastern Alabama Rift (SGFAR) trend in this report to better describe the extent of the trend. The objectives of the study were to: (1) integrate all pertinent geologic information (literature reviews, drilling logs, seismic data, etc.) to create an understanding of the structural aspects of the basin trend (basin trend location and configuration, and the thickness of the sedimentary rock fill), (2) estimate the rough CO{sub 2} storage capacity (using conservative inputs), and (3) assess the general viability of the basins as sites of large-scale CO{sub 2} sequestration (determine if additional studies are appropriate). The CO{sub 2} estimates for the trend include South Carolina, Georgia, and northern Florida only. The study determined that the basins within the SGFAR trend have sufficient sedimentary fill to have a large potential storage capacity for CO{sub 2}. The deeper basins appear to have sedimentary fill of over 15,000 feet. Much of this fill is likely to be alluvial and fluvial sedimentary rock with higher porosity and permeability. This report estimates an order of magnitude potential capacity of approximately 137 billion metric tons for supercritical CO{sub 2}. The pore space within the basins represent hundreds of years of potential storage for supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} stored in aqueous form. There are many sources of CO{sub 2} within the region that could use the trend for geologic storage. Thirty one coal fired power plants are located within 100 miles of the deepest portions of these basins. There are also several cement and ammonia plants near the basins. Sixteen coal fired power plants are present on or adjacent to the basins which could support a low pipeline transportation cost. The current geological information is not sufficient to quantify specific storage reservoirs, seals, or traps. There is insufficient hydrogeologic information to quantify the saline nature of the water present within all of the basins. Water data in the Dunbarton Basin of the Savannah River Site indicates dissolved solids concentrations of greater than 10,000 parts per million (not potential drinking water). Additional reservoir characterization is needed to take advantage of the SGFAR trend for anthropogenic CO{sub 2} storage. The authors of this report believe it would be appropriate to study the reservoir potential in the deeper basins that are in close proximity to the current larger coal fired power plants (Albany-Arabi, Camilla-Ocilla, Alamo-Ehrhardt, and Jedburg basin).

Blount, G.; Millings, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Fluidized bed retorting of eastern oil shale  

SciTech Connect

This topical report summarizes the conceptual design of an integrated oil shale processing plant based on fluidized bed retorting of eastern New Albany oil shale. This is the fourth design study conducted by Foster Wheeler; previous design cases employed the following technologies: Fluidized bed rotating/combustion of Colorado Mahogany zone shale. An FCC concept of fluidized bed retorting/combustion of Colorado Mahogany zone shale. Directly heated moving vertical-bed process using Colorado Mahogany zone shale. The conceptual design encompasses a grassroots facility which processes run-of-mine oil shale into a syncrude oil product and dispose of the spent shale solids. The plant has a nominal capacity of 50,000 barrels per day of syncrude product, produced from oil shale feed having a Fischer Assay of 15 gallons per ton. Design of the processing units was based on non-confidential published information and supplemental data from process licensors. Maximum use of process and cost information developed in the previous Foster Wheeler studies was employed. The integrated plant design is described in terms of the individual process units and plant support systems. The estimated total plant investment is detailed by plant section and estimates of the annual operating requirements and costs are provided. In addition, process design assumptions and uncertainties are documented and recommendations for process alternatives, which could improve the overall plant economics, are discussed. 12 refs., 17 figs., 52 tabs.

Gaire, R.J.; Mazzella, G.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Processes involved in the origin and accumulation of hydrocarbon gases in the Yuanba gas field, Sichuan Basin, southwest China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Natural gases in the superimposed Sichuan Basin commonly experienced a history of remigration in marine carbonate reservoirs since the late Cretaceous. The reservoir in the Changxing Formation (P2c) in the Yuanba gas field in the Sichuan Basin is characterized by a great burial depth of 62007000m and a high temperature about 165C. The gas dryness is 99.7399.99%, and ?13C values of methane and ethane are?31.0 to?28.9 and?29.9 to?25.6, respectively. The chemical and isotopic compositions of natural gases, abundant reservoir solid bitumen, and high reservoir temperature (maximum to 240C) indicate that the \\{P2c\\} gases are of sapropelic origin and are derived from oil cracking. The paleo-oil layers, recognized by solid bitumen distribution, were mainly developed in high position traps when the paleo-oil accumulated during the early Jurassic. Reconstructed structural evolution shows the northwest was uplifted sharply and southern part dipped gently to the north in the gas field after oil cracking. Fluid potential analyses based on changes in the structural configuration imply that gas should re-migrate mainly to the northwest. The observations that paleo-oil-water contacts are mainly above the present day gas-water contacts in the northwest traps, and are below present day gas-water contacts in the middle and eastern traps also confirm the gas remigration trend. Currently, high gas production wells are mainly located in northwest traps and in high positions in the middle and eastern traps. Systematic analyses on early paleo-oil accumulation and late gas remigration processes can reduce the economic risks associated with natural gas exploration in the northeastern Sichuan Basin.

Pingping Li; Fang Hao; Xusheng Guo; Huayao Zou; Xinya Yu; Guangwei Wang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Focusing future exploration in mature basin: Maturation and migration models integrated with timing of major structural events in Illinois  

SciTech Connect

Exploration risk can be decreased by highgrading areas where the timing of structural events and maturation of source rocks are nearly coincident. Knowledge of migration fairways further aids in focusing exploration. Four burial-history models have been constructed to accommodate (1) a rift-fill sequence in excess of 24,000 ft, (2) a hypothetical Fairfield basin model, (3) a model using a deep well, and (4) a model on the Sparta shelf. These complex models, which use several variables including compaction, thermal conductivity, kerogen kinetics, and multiple unconformities, indicate a possibility for multiple hydrocarbon-generative events and show that linear geothermal gradients are ineffective in explaining maturation in Illinois. Periods of oil generation determined from the models can be compared with known timing of structural events to predict trapping potential. Depths to the oil phase-out zone are also significant. Exploration risk can be reduced in Illinois by using a simple migration model that uses the basal Upper Devonian Sylamore Sandstone in central and western Illinois as a migration conduit and the New Albany Group as a source. Other migration conduits in the basin are discussed including faults associated with structures and fracture systems such as the Wabash Valley fault system.

Oltz, D.F.; Crockett, J.E. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Depositional facies of hydrocarbon reservoirs of upper Cherokee Group, Anadarko basin  

SciTech Connect

The Desmoinesian upper Cherokee Group sequence in the Anadarko basin is the subsurface equivalent of the Cabaniss Group of eastern Oklahoma. This sequence includes the Pink limestone, Skinner sandstone, Verdigris limestone, and Prue sandstone intervals. The upper Skinner sandstone, which has not been well documented, is an important hydrocarbon-producing reservoir in the Anadarko basin. The Skinner sandstone is represented by channel, delta-front-prodelta, and shallow marine facies. Channel facies consist of a primary elongate trend extending 40 mi southeast-northwest across Custer and Roger Mills Counties, Oklahoma. Several small secondary channels trending northeast-southwest were also observed. Active channel-fill sequences in the primary trend exceed 100 ft in thickness and represent the major producing reservoir of the upper Skinner sandstone. Delta-front-prodelta sequences are dominated by shale and interbedded sandstone-shale units. Shallow marine facies consist of massive coarsening-upward units that reach 300 ft in thickness. This facies belt is broad and slightly elongated, approximately 12 mi wide by 20 mi long, and trends northeast-southwest somewhat normal to channel facies orientation. Lithologically, the upper Skinner channel sandstone is feldspathic litharenite with abundant feldspar and quartz overgrowth. Both primary and secondary porosity were observed in the upper Skinner sandstone. Secondary porosity evolved mainly from dissolution of feldspar and lithic fragments. However, extensive cementation in the shallow marine facies has reduced porosity to negligible amounts and consequently reduced reservoir quality.

Puckette, J.O.; Al-Shaieb, Z. (Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Williston in the family of cratonic basins  

SciTech Connect

The Williston basin is one of a clan of subcircular to elliptical elements in the interiors of all cratons; such basins are distinguished by characteristics common to all. In each, the basement consists of continental crust and each basin is surrounded by areas of continental crust. Subsidence rates are typically low, so that conditions near depositional base level prevailed during much of the history of sediment accumulation. Episodic subsidence occurred over time spans of 10/sup 7/-10/sup 8/ years; major episodes of subsidence are broadly concurrent on all cratons. Tectonic tempo and mode of subsidence evolved synchronously on all cratons; therefore, similar isopach and facies patterns (and similar oil or gas maturation, migration, and trap potentials) occur on all cratons. All members of the clan exhibit a range of individual variations imposed by latitude and climate. Intraplate tectonism and volcanism, approach to or distance from source areas, and distribution paths of detrital sediment. Nevertheless, facts and concepts developed by intensive study of basins with high-density documentation (outcrop and subsurface) are commonly applicable to basins such as the Williston, which is in a less mature stage of exploration.

Sloss, L.L.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Geologic model of a small, intraslope basin: Garden Banks 72 field, offshore Louisiana  

SciTech Connect

Garden Banks 72 field is 115 mi off the Louisiana coast and lies near the shelf-slope break in water depths ranging from 450 to 800 ft. During the middle Pleistocene, the area was the site of a small, restricted basin on the upper slope, into which turbidite sandstones were deposited. These sandstones have been slumped, uplifted, and faulted, forming oil and gas traps in the field. Mobil and partners AGIP and Kerr-McGee leased block 72 in 1984. Three wells and two sidetracks have been drilled, discovering oil and gas in middle Pleistocene sandstones. A total of 650 ft of core was cut in two wells. Geologic data in the block have been supplemented by 2-D and 3-D seismic surveys. Trapping mechanisms in the field are both structural and stratigraphic. The structural high is on the southwest flank of a northwest-southeast-trending shale/salt ridge. The middle Pleistocene reservoir sandstones trend northeast, and their seismic signature consists of discontinuous, hummocky reflections; the presence of hydrocarbons in these sandstones causes anomalous seismic responses. Amplitude terminations often cross structural contours, implying stratigraphic pinch-outs. Data from electric logs, seismic, and cores demonstrate that the middle Pleistocene reservoir sandstones are the result of deposition by turbidites into a small, restricted basin. Associated facies identified include channels, levees, and possible sheet (lobe) sandstones. Postdepositional activity has included slumping and reworking by bottom currents (contour currents ). The resulting depositional model for this field can be applied to many of the recent discoveries in the Flexure trend.

Kolb, R.A.; Tuller, J.N.; Link, M.H.; Shanmugam, G.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Ordovician carbonate formation waters in the Illinois Basin: Chemical and isotopic evolution beneath a regional aquitard  

SciTech Connect

Formation waters from carbonate reservoirs in the upper Ordovician Galena Group of the Illinois Basin have been analyzed geochemically to study origin of salinity, chemical and isotopic evolution, and relation to paleohydrologic flow systems. These carbonate reservoirs underlie the Maquoketa Shale Group of Cincinnatian age, which forms a regional aquitard. Cl-Br relations and Na/Br-Cl/Br systematics indicate that initial brine salinity resulted from subaerial evaporation of seawater to a point not significantly beyond halite saturation. Subsequent dilution in the subsurface by meteoric waters is supported by delta D-delta O-18 covariance. Systematic relations between Sr-87/Sr-86 and 1/Sr suggest two distinct mixing events: introduction of a Sr-87 enriched fluid from a siliciclastic source, and a later event which only affected reservoir waters from the western shelf of the basin. The second mixing event is supported by covariance between Sr-87/Sr-86 and concentrations of cations and anions; covariance between Sr and O-D isotopes suggests that the event is related to meteoric water influx. Systematic geochemical relations in ordovician Galena Group formation waters have been preserved by the overlying Maquoketa shale aquitard. Comparison with results from previous studies indicates that waters from Silurian-Devonian carbonate strata evolved in a manner similar to yet distinct from that of the Ordovician carbonate waters, whereas waters from Mississippian-Pennsylvanian strata that overlie the New Albany Shale Group regional aquitard are marked by fundamentally different Cl-Br-Na and Sr isotope systematics. Evolution of these geochemical formation-water regimes apparently has been influenced significantly by paleohydrologic flow systems.

Stueber, A.M. (Illinois Univ., Edwardsville, IL (United States)); Walter, L.M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Annual daylighting performance of a passive optical light shelf in sidelit  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual daylighting performance of a passive optical light shelf in sidelit Annual daylighting performance of a passive optical light shelf in sidelit perimeter zones of commercial buildings Title Annual daylighting performance of a passive optical light shelf in sidelit perimeter zones of commercial buildings Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2013 Authors McNeil, Andrew, and Eleanor S. Lee Keywords bidirectional scattering distribution functions, building energy efficiency, daylighting, Radiance simulations Abstract Sunlight redirecting systems have the potential to significantly offset electric lighting energy use in deep perimeter zones of buildings where the windows are subject to high daylight availability. New Radiance modeling tools have recently been developed and validated, enabling accurate and timely simulation analysis of the annual energy and comfort performance of these optically-complex, anisotropic systems. A parametric study was conducted using these tools to evaluate the performance of a commercially-available passive optical light shelf (OLS) in a 17.4 m deep (57 ft), south-facing open plan office zone in three climates. Daylighting efficiency, discomfort glare, and lighting energy savings with continuous dimming and bi-level switching controls were determined at varying depths within the zone. The OLS decreased lighting energy use significantly throughout the depth of the space and achieved these savings with minimal discomfort glare in the area near the window. Annual lighting energy use intensity was reduced to 1.71-1.82 kWh/ft2-yr (22-27%) over the full depth of the perimeter zone across the three climates modeled (Phoenix, Washington DC, and Minneapolis) compared to a non-daylit zone at 2.34 kWh/ft2-yr. There was a greater occurrence of discomfort glare (3-7% during daytime work hours) if the occupant was in a seated view position looking at the window from the back of the room. The system is passive, needing no adjustment during the day and over the seasons and can be used as a retrofit measure in existing buildings. These results are encouraging and demonstrate how the primary daylit sidelit area can be extended well beyond the defined limits provided by the newly adopted ASHRAE 90.1-2010 code (i.e., 1.0 times the head height of the window).

374

Wind induced circulation on the outer continental shelf of Texas, spring 1982  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

showing current meter moorings and meteorological buoy positions. Cross-section of the Texas shelf along 95'W showing the 9 distribution of the moored instruments used in the spring 1982 study. Time series of wind velocity data from NDBO buoys 42002... time series of Mooring III meter 4 (200 m/400 m). 33 35 37 Figure 13. The autospectra of the u- and v-velocity components of 41 the wind from buoy 42002. Figure 14. The autospectra of the u-components of current velocity 43 from II-2 (86 m...

Beard, Daniel Walker

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

375

Performance of commercial off-the-shelf microelectromechanical systems sensors in a pulsed reactor environment  

SciTech Connect

Prompted by the unexpected failure of piezoresistive sensors in both an elevated gamma-ray environment and reactor core pulse tests, we initiated radiation testing of several MEMS piezoresistive accelerometers and pressure transducers to ascertain their radiation hardness. Some commercial off-the-shelf sensors are found to be viable options for use in a high-energy pulsed reactor, but others suffer severe degradation and even catastrophic failure. Although researchers are promoting the use of MEMS devices in radiation-harsh environment, we nevertheless find assurance testing necessary.

Hobert, Keith Wdwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Heger, Arlen S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Cready, Steven S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida W $38.51 W $140.84 27.3% 134 W 100.0% Florida W $38.51 W $140.84 27.3% 134 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin Georgia - W - W W W - W Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W $16.14 W $63.35 25.5% 1,681 W 88.5% Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $20.69 $19.60 -5.3% $74.23 26.4% 4,845 31.9% 97.7% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan $13.74 $16.13 17.4% $99.82 16.2% 840 32.1% 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W $40.18 W $94.03 42.7% 699 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Jersey W $32.44 W $89.13 36.4% 1,064 W 47.6% Northern Appalachian Basin New York $21.87 $18.86 -13.8% $59.40 31.7% 2,373 49.3% 91.9%

377

Origin Basin Destination State STB EIA STB EIA Northern Appalachian Basin  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware W $28.49 W $131.87 21.6% 59 W 100.0% Delaware W $28.49 W $131.87 21.6% 59 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin Florida W - - - - - - - Northern Appalachian Basin Indiana W $20.35 W $64.82 31.4% 1,715 W 75.9% Northern Appalachian Basin Maryland $19.73 $19.64 -0.4% $81.15 24.2% 4,650 24.8% 99.3% Northern Appalachian Basin Michigan W $14.02 W $76.22 18.4% 713 W 100.0% Northern Appalachian Basin New Hampshire W $43.43 W $90.90 47.8% 499 W 89.6% Northern Appalachian Basin New Jersey W $27.19 W $74.81 36.3% 1,864 W 44.1% Northern Appalachian Basin New York $20.08 $15.26 -24.0% $53.68 28.4% 3,726 39.2% 79.1%

378

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Barnett Shale of the Southern Fort Worth Basin Barnett Shale of the Southern Fort Worth Basin The Barnett Shale of the Southern Fort Worth Basin; Comparison of Depositional Setting, Lithofacies, and Mineralogy with Equivalent Deposits in the Northern Basin Authors: R. G. Loucks and S. C. Ruppel Venue: 2008 American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Annual Convention and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, April 19-24, 2008 (http://www.aapg.org) Abstract: Ongoing studies of outcrops and more than 30 subsurface cores from the Barnett Shale along the southern margin of the Fort Worth Basin (FWB) show both similarities and differences from the better known deposits of the northern part of the basin. Like deposits in the north, southern FWB strata consist predominately of in situ argillaceous siliceous mudstone and thinner beds of calcareous mudstone. In both areas, transported gravity-flow deposits, composed of thin-shelled mollusks are common; crinoid-bearing debris beds are found primarily in the south. Carbonate concretions, phosphatic layers, and diagenetic pyrite are common to both areas. Earlier studies of the northern FWB provided strong evidence that the rocks in this area accumulated in a deeper water basin that was dominantly anoxic. Similar conditions are indicated for the southern FWB, although the presence of a crinoid-rich shallow-water fauna and local bioturbation suggest that this area may have been closer to the basin margin. Bioturbation is commonly located beneath event beds, suggesting gravity-flow transport of shallow-water fauna into deeper water, setting up “doomed pioneer” assemblages. The thickness of the Barnett Shale is generally less in the southern FWB than in the north and thickens to the northeast and east (range: 0 – 160 ft). Mineralogical analysis reveals that silica and clay content in the southern FWB are significantly different from the north (32% and 26% versus 21% and 49%, respectively). Total Organic Content(TOC) is similar in both areas, but maturity is substantially lower in the south (average 0.5% Ro)

379

Sediment Basin Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sediment Basin Flume Sediment Basin Flume Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sediment Basin Flume Overseeing Organization University of Iowa Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 22.7 Beam(m) 5.1 Depth(m) 1.2 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features Two pumps provide up to 18 cfs of flow capacity Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Cameras None Available Sensors Acoustics, Flow, Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability Real-Time Yes Test Services Test Services Yes On-Site fabrication capability/equipment Machine shop, carpenter shop, welding shop, instrumentation and electronics shop

380

Dan Klempel Basin Electric Power Cooperative DOE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dan Dan Klempel Basin Electric Power Cooperative DOE 2009 Congestion Study Workshop Oklahoma City, Oklahoma June 18, 2008 Page 1 of 5 Basin Electric Power Cooperative would like to thank the Department of Energy for this opportunity to share some of our thoughts on transmission congestion issues. Basin Electric is a wholesale power supplier to rural electric cooperatives located in the mid-west and in both the east and west interconnections. Naturally, our generation and transmission facilities also reside in both interconnections so we use asynchronous back-to-back DC facilities to balance loads with resources. With headquarters in Bismarck, North Dakota; we find ourselves in the heart of some of the nations most desirable wind patterns for potential renewable energy development as well as electric energy production from more traditional sources. Lignite coal has been a reliable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Basin 2 Wave Basin 2 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Hinsdale Wave Basin 2 Overseeing Organization Oregon State University Hydrodynamics Length(m) 48.8 Beam(m) 26.5 Depth(m) 2.1 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $3500 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.8 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description Monochromatic waves (cnoidal, Stokes, Airy), solitary waves, user-defined free surface timeseries or board displacement timeseries for random waves Wave Direction Both Simulated Beach Yes Description of Beach Built to client specifications, currently rigid concrete over gravel fill

382

SWP.SanJuanBasin.factsheet0919  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Principal Investigator Reid Grigg/Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Field Test Information: Field Test Name San Juan Basin, New Mexico: Enhanced Coalbed Methane-Sequestration Test Test Location Near Navajo City, New Mexico Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons Source 20,000 - 35,000 tons; CO2 sourced from McElmo Dome, CO ConocoPhillips KinderMorgan CO 2 Company, L.P. Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Summary of Field Test Site and Operations General Geology and Target Reservoirs: The San Juan basin (SJB) is one of the top ranked basins in the world for CO 2 coalbed sequestration because it has: 1) advantageous geology and high methane content; 2) abundant anthropogenic CO

383

Southern Basin and Range Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basin and Range Geothermal Region Basin and Range Geothermal Region Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Southern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Details Areas (0) Power Plants (0) Projects (0) Techniques (0) Map: {{{Name}}} North-south-striking and west-dipping Basin and Range province normal faults form the western edge of the Sierra Madre Occidental plateau in northeastern Sonora. These faults and associated half-grabens extend over a distance of more than 300 km between the San Bernardino basin in the north and the Sahuaripa basin in the south. Active Tectonics of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (Southern Basin and Range Province) and the 3 May 1887 Mw 7.4 Earthquake [1] References ↑ "Active Tectonics of Northeastern Sonora, Mexico (Southern Basin and Range Province) and the 3 May 1887 Mw 7.4 Earthquake"

384

Sources of Atmospheric Moisture for the La Plata River Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The La Plata River basin (LPRB) is the second largest basin of South America and extends over a highly populated and socioeconomically active region. In this study, the spatiotemporal variability of sources of moisture for the LPRB are quantified ...

J. Alejandro Martinez; Francina Dominguez

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Enhancement Project : 1998 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of ''The Grande Ronde Basin Fish Habitat Improvement Project'' is to access, create, improve, protect, and restore reparian and instream habitat for anadromous salmonids, thereby maximizing opportunities for natural fish production within the basin.

McGowan, Vance R.; Powell, Russ M.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Colorado Division of Water Resources Denver Basin Webpage | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Denver Basin Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Division of Water Resources Denver Basin Webpage Abstract This is the...

387

Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Quarterly report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in certain shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Cores from five Red River wells in the Bowman-Harding study area have been examined and described in detail; contracts have been awarded for a 3-D survey in Bowman Co., ND and a 2D, multi-component survey in Richland Co.; extended-time pressure buildup data have been analyzed from two wells which are candidates for jetting-lance completion workovers; a 20-day injectivity test has been completed in the Red River (upper member); a jetting-lance completion program has commenced with one job completed and three more scheduled during April; and reservoir data from three key Red River fields in the Bowman-Harding study area has been researched and accumulated for inclusion in the TORIS database and technology transfer activities.

Carrell, L.A.; Nautiyal, C.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Lateral drilling and completion technologies for shallow-shelf carbonates of the Red River and Ratcliffe Formations, Williston Basin. Topical report, July 1997  

SciTech Connect

Luff Exploration Company (LEC) focused on involvement in technologies being developed utilizing horizontal drilling concepts to enhance oil-well productivity starting in 1992. Initial efforts were directed toward high-pressure lateral jetting techniques to be applied in existing vertical wells. After involvement in several failed field attempts with jetting technologies, emphasis shifted to application of emerging technologies for drilling short-radius lateral in existing wellbores and medium-radius technologies in new wells. These lateral drilling technologies were applied in the Mississippi Ratcliffe and Ordovician Red River formations at depths of 2,590 to 2,890 m in Richland County, MT; Bowman County, ND; and Harding County, SD. In theory, all of the horizontal drilling techniques explored in this project have merit for application fitting specific criteria. From a realistic point of view, the only relatively trouble-free, adequately-proven technology employed was the medium-radius steered motor/MWD technology. The slim-tool steered motor/MWD re-entry technology has been used extensively but appears to still be significantly in developmental stages. This technology will probably always be more troublesome than the technology used to drill new wells because the smaller diameter required for the tools contributes to both design and operational complexities. Although limited mechanical success has been achieved with some of the lateral jetting technologies and the Amoco tools, their predictability and reliability is unproven. Additionally, they appear to be limited to shallow depths and certain rock types. The Amoco technology probably has the most potential to be successfully developed for routinely reliable, field applications. A comparison of the various horizontal drilling technologies investigated is presented.

Carrell, L.A.; George, R.D.; Gibbons, D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

3 Changes to the large marine ecosystem of the Newfoundland-Labrador shelf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary The Grand Banks of Newfoundland and Labrador have been fished since the 1400s, with fleets coming annually from many of the fishing nations of Europe, and by the 1600s, from North America. The Banks and coastal areas were rich and productive, and formed the basis for settlement of coastal areas of Newfoundland and Labrador, despite policies that were intended to deter settlement. Notwithstanding the long history of change, the two most marked fluctuations in biological resources of the Newfoundland Shelf have occurred in the past half century. The first was almost certainly driven by the rapid expansion of distant water fleets during the late 1950s, and the nearly two decades of intensive fishing effort those fleets inflicted on the major fish stocks of the Shelf. Note that "present understanding" is a dynamic factor- different explanations for changes in the dominant fish stocks have been promoted by different researchers at different times, and new relationships continue to emerge as more data sets are brought together.

Jake Rice

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

ARIANNA: A radio detector array for cosmic neutrinos on the Ross Ice Shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARIANNA (The Antarctic Ross Ice Shelf Antenna Neutrino Array) is a proposed 100 km^3 detector for ultra-high energy (above 10^17 eV) astrophysical neutrinos. It will study the origins of ultra-high energy cosmic rays by searching for the neutrinos produced when these cosmic rays interact with the cosmic microwave background. Over 900 independently operating stations will detect the coherent radio Cherenkov emission produced when astrophysical neutrinos with energy above 10^17 eV interact in the Antarctic Ross Ice Shelf. Each station will use 8 log periodic dipole antennas to look for short RF pulses, with the most important frequencies between 80 MHz and 1 GHz. By measuring the pulse polarization and frequency spectrum, the neutrino arrival direction can be determined. In one year of operation, the full array should observe a clear GZK neutrino signal, with different models predicting between 3 and 51 events, depending on the nuclear composition of the cosmic-rays and on the cosmic evolution of their sources.

Spencer R. Klein; for the ARIANNA Collaboration

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Deepening of the ocean mixed layer at the northern Patagonian continental shelf: a numerical study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A possible deepening of the ocean mixed layer was investigated at a selected point of the Patagonian continental shelf where a significant positive wind speed trend was estimated. Using a 1-dimensional vertical numerical model (S2P3) forced by atmospheric data from NCEP/NCAR I reanalysis and tidal constituents from TPXO 7.2 global model on a long term simulation (1979-2011), it was found that the mixed layer thickness presents a significant and positive trend of 10.1 +/- 1.4 cm/yr. Several numerical experiments were carried out in order to evaluate the impact of the different atmospheric variables (surface zonal and latitudinal wind components, air temperature, atmospheric pressure, specific humidity and cloud coverage) considered in this study. As a result it was found that an increase in the wind speed can be considered as the main responsible of the ocean mixed layer deepening at the selected location of the Patagonian continental shelf. A possible increasing in the mixed layer thickness could be directly ...

Zanella, Juan; Pescio, Andres; Dragani, Walter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean B: NE Pacific Basin --Tagging Data Kate Myers, Ph.D. Principal Investigator, High Seas Salmon ocean tagging research on Columbia River salmon and steelhead migrating in the NE Pacific Basin R. Basin in 1995-2004. Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, B

393

Lithosphere structure beneath the Phanerozoic intracratonic basins of North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Four intracratonic basins of North America, the Hudson Bay, Michigan, Illinois and Williston. The Williston and Illinois basins are associated with wide (V200 km) and thin anomalies (V100 km), whereas basin and 270 km beneath the Williston [4,6]. For two ba- sins of similar age located on the same Precam

Kaminski, Edouard

394

BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, WILLISTON BASIN By D.J. Nichols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter WB BIOSTRATIGRAPHY, WILLISTON BASIN By D.J. Nichols in U.S. Geological Survey Professional .........................................................................................................WB-3 Figures WB-1. Biostratigraphic reference sections in the Williston Basin. WB-2. Occurrences. Palynostratigraphic zones of the Paleocene in the Williston Basin composite reference section. WB-4. Distribution

395

Prokaryotic respiration and production in the meso-and bathypelagic realm of the eastern and western North Atlantic basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the relatively short turnover time of the prokaryotic community in the dark ocean (34­54 d), prokaryotic activity, focusing on the food web structur

Herndl, Gerhard

396

Reservoir characterization of the upper Merecure and lower Oficina Formations sands in the Leona Este Field, Eastern Venezuela Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

data. The hydrocarbon trapping mechanism of each studied stratigraphic interval, traditionally known as the "S5", "TU", "TL", "U1U", "U1L", "U2U", "U2MA", "U2MB" and "U2L" sands, includes two components: ? Stratigraphic component: each stratigraphic...

Flores Millan, Maria Carolina

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

397

A 3-D Backstripping Method and its Application to the Eromanga Basin in Central and Eastern Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......geological controls on the quality of the Toolebuc Formation oil shale, Queensland, BMR Research Symposium, Canberra.108-116...geological controls on the quality of the Toolebuc Formation oil shale, Queensland, in Extended Abstracts-Palaeogeography......

Shaohua Zhou

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Seismic and sequence stratigraphy of the eastern Porcupine Basin Supervisors: Professor Patrick Shannon and Professor David Naylor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

progradational deposits, in shallow to deep water, characterise the Lower Cretaceous to Lower Tertiary Shannon and Professor David Naylor Contact: p.shannon@ucd.ie Project Outline A series of pulsed sequence stratigraphic architecture is poorly understood. The project will involve detailed seismic

399

Eastern Australasian Basins Symposium IVBrisbane, QLD, 1014 September, 2012 1 1 School of Earth Sciences, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water may prove commercial for low- enthalpy power generation, for input into current coal-fired plants, in direct-use applications, and highlights the possibility of stand-alone geothermal power generation from production for coal seam gas plays. The Strzelecki Group is also a potential source for tight gas

Sandiford, Mike

400

Mass transfer between eastern Tien Shan and adjacent basins (central Asia): constraints on regional tectonics and topography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......southern Tibet: field observations and...Himalayan sediment production 8 Myr ago despite...relationship with oil and gas distribution...known: (1) the cumulative thickness of these...southern Tibet: field observations and...Himalayan sediment production 8 Myr ago despite...relationship with oil and gas distribution......

Franois Mtivier; Yves Gaudemer

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The application of iodine and magnetic susceptibility surface geochemical surveys in the Lodgepole Play, Eastern Williston Basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The use of surface geochemistry as a first pass exploration tool is becoming more prevalent in petroleum exploration. This is especially true due to the high cost of 2-D and 3-D surveys in defining small targets such as the Waulsortian mounds of the Lodgepole Formation. Surface geochemical surveys are very effective in pinpointing specific target areas for seismic surveying and thus reducing costs. Presented are examples of surface geochemical surveys utilizing magnetic susceptibility and iodine methods in delineating reservoirs in the Lodgepole, Mission Canyon and Red River formations. The types of surveys presented vary from reconnaissance to detail and examples of how to define a grid will be discussed. Surface geochemical surveys can be very effective when the areal extent of the target(s) and the purpose of the survey are clearly defined prior to implementation. By determining which areas have microseepage and which areas do not, surface geochemistry can be a very effective tool in focusing exploration efforts and maximizing exploration dollars.

Tedesco, S.A. [Atoka Geochemical Services Corp., Englewood, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Technologies Reference Shelf - Presentation on The  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin The Devonian Woodford Formation of the Permian Basin: Complex Depositional and Temporal Variations Across an Anaerobic Marine Basin Authors: S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks Venue: 2008 American Association of Petroleum Geologists (AAPG) Annual Convention and Exhibition, San Antonio, TX, April 19-24, 2008 “The Geology of Mudrocks”, session chaired by S. C. Ruppel and R. G. Loucks (http://www.aapg.org) Abstract: The Woodford Formation, a key oil and gas source rock in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico, is part of an extensive, platform marginal, organic-rich, mudrock succession that formed along the southern and western margins of Laurussia during the Devonian and Mississippian. Studies of >35 Woodford cores reveal wide variability in facies, organic content, and mineralogy that can be related to age and paleogeographic setting. Woodford facies include silt-rich mudstones (detrital silica), siliceous mudstones (biogenic silica), calcareous mudstones, and claystones. Recent studies show that facies are partitioned between two temporally distinct successions: a Middle Devonian silt- and carbonate-rich section that is irregularly distributed across the basin, and an Upper Devonian siliceous claystone/mudstone section that is widespread and separated from underlying successions by a significant hiatus. All Woodford rocks contain mixtures of illite, kaolinite, chlorite, and mixed layer clays; total clay and chlorite abundance is lowest in distal Upper Devonian rocks. Although silica content is variable, Upper Devonian mudrocks typically contain more abundant biogenic silica, especially in distal parts of the basin, whereas Middle Devonian rocks are dominated by detrital silica. The two successions display consistent differences in depositional facies. The silt-rich Middle Devonian section is cross-laminated, locally graded, and commonly bioturbated. Upper Devonian mudrocks, by contrast, are dominated by fine-scale, parallel laminations and show no evidence of infaunal activity. These rocks also contain common conodonts, radiolarians, spore bodies, and deep-water brachiopods. The data suggest that the lower Woodford was deposited by deep water, turbid flow, whereas the upper Woodford accumulated under more distal, low energy, poorly oxygenated, hemipelagic conditions

403

Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume II. Palo Duro basin  

SciTech Connect

This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and high variable precipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Area environmental characterization report of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins in the Texas Panhandle. Volume I. Dalhart Basin  

SciTech Connect

This area report describes the environmental characteristics of the Dalhart and Palo Duro basins of the Texas Panhandle portion of the Permian basin. Both basins are rather sparsely populated, and the overall population is decreasing. The economic base is centered on agribusiness and manufacturing. Most of the potentially conflicting land uses in both basins (i.e., parks, historic sites) occupy small land areas, with the exception of a national grassland in the Dalhart and military air training routes in both basins. Ground transportation in the Dalhart basin is adequate, and it is well developed in the Palo Duro basin. In both basins irrigation constitutes the principal water use, and groundwater is the principal source. However, the dominant aquifer, the Ogallala, is being depleted. Both basins consist primarily of grasslands, rangelands, and agricultural areas. No critical terrestrial or aquatic habitats have been identified in the basins, though several endangered, threatened, or rare terrestrial species occur in or near the basins. Aquatic resources in both basins are limited because of the intermittent availability of water and the high salt content of some water bodies. Playa lakes are common, though usually seasonal or rain dependent. The climate of the area is semiarid, with low humidity, relatively high wind speeds, and highly variable prcipitation. Restrictive dispersion conditions are infrequent. National ambient secondary air quality standards for particulates are being exceeded in the area, largely because of fugitive dust, although there are some particulate point sources.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Timing and Tectonic implications of basin inversion in the Nam Con Son Basin and adjacent areas, southern South China Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Malay basins. Contraction in the Western NCS, West Natuna, and Malay basins was accommodated through reactivation of major basin-bounding fault systems that resulted in asymmetric fault-bend folding of syn- and early post-rift strata. Inversion...

Olson, Christopher Charles

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

406

Tobacco vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers Tobacco use vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tobacco vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers 1 Tobacco use vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers: Self-medication in humans? Casey J-546-9257 #12;Tobacco vs. helminths in Congo basin hunter-gatherers 2 Summary

407

OTRC Wave Basin | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OTRC Wave Basin OTRC Wave Basin Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name OTRC Wave Basin Overseeing Organization Texas A&M (OTRC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 45.7 Beam(m) 30.5 Depth(m) 5.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) $300/hour (excluding labor) Special Physical Features 4.6m wide x 9.1m long x 16.8m deep pit with adjustable depth floor in test area Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 0.6 Length of Effective Tow(m) 27.4 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.9 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 4.0 Maximum Wave Length(m) 25 Wave Period Range(s) 4.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.6 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Wavemaking Description GEDAP 3D wave generation software, 48 hinged flap wave generator

408

Upper San Juan Basin Biological Assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the biological assessment. The Colorado Natural Heritage Program began its research by updating its BiologicalUpper San Juan Basin Biological Assessment Colorado State University 8002 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, CO 80523-8002 June 2003 Colorado Natural Heritage Program #12;Southwest Land Alliance Pagosa

409

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: The State of the Columbia River Basin in 2012 07 Northwest Energy Efficiency Achievements, 1978-2011 10 Council undertakes mid-term review of Sixth Power Plan 11 Energy Efficiency met most of the new and Commerce United states House of representatives and Committee on Natural resources United states House

410

The State of the Columbia River Basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Washington. The Act authorized the Council to serve as a comprehensive planning agency for energy policy and fish and wildlife policy in the Columbia River Basin and to inform the public about energy and fish Overview 11 Sixth Northwest Power Plan boosts energy efficiency, renewable energy, Energy efficiency

411

GUNNISON BASIN CLIMATE CHANGE VULNERABILITY ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climate change is already changing ecosystems and affecting people in the southwestern United States, as well as ecosystem services, e.g., water supply. The climate of the Gunnison Basin, Colorado Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest Service, Upper Gunnison River Water Conservancy District, Western

Neff, Jason

412

Summary - K Basins Sludge Treatment Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

K Basin K Basin DOE is Proces the va at Han subsys oxidati objecti of-fact maturi Eleme Techn The as which seven * M * M * Pr * Pr * As The Ele Site: H roject: K P Report Date: A ited States Why DOE ns Sludge Treatme s constructing ss (STP) for re rious sludge st nford. The STP stems: sludge ion, assay, pac ive of the asse t" appraisal of t ty by first ident ents (CTEs) of t ology Readine What th ssessment team was further div CTEs and the Material Mobiliza Material Transfe rocess Chemis rocess Instrum ssay (TRL=2) To view the full T http://www.em.doe. objective of a Tech ements (CTEs), usin Hanford/ORP K Basins Slud Process/STP August 2007 Departmen K Bas E-EM Did This ent Process Flow D a K Basins Slu trieving, treatin treams stored i P is comprised containerizatio ckaging, and dr ssment was to the project's ov

413

K Basin sludge dissolution engineering study  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this engineering study is to investigate the available technology related to dissolution of the K Basin sludge in nitric acid. The conclusion of this study along with laboratory and hot cell tests with actual sludge samples will provide the basis for beginning conceptual design of the sludge dissolver. The K Basin sludge contains uranium oxides, fragments of metallic U, and some U hydride as well as ferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum oxides and hydroxides, windblown sand that infiltrated the basin enclosure, ion exchange resin, and miscellaneous materials. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be conditioned so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System waste acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the underground storage tanks. Sludge conditioning will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and then reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. There will be five distinct feed streams to the sludge conditioning process two from the K East (KE) Basin and three from the K West (KW) Basin. The composition of the floor and pit sludges which contain more iron oxides and sand than uranium is much different than the canister sludges which are composed of mostly uranium oxides. The sludge conditioning equipment will be designed to process all of the sludge streams, but some of the operating parameters will be adjusted as necessary to handle the different sludge stream compositions. The volume of chemical additions and the amount of undissolved solids will be much different for floor and pit sludge than for canister sludge. Dissolution of uranium metal and uranium dioxide has been studied quite thoroughly and much information is available. Both uranium metal and uranium dioxide have been dissolved on a large scale in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in Europe, Japan, and the USA. Ash and sludge containing uranium compounds also have been dissolved in reprocessing or plutonium scrap recovery plants, but only a limited amount of information is available on how the ferric oxyhydroxide, aluminum compounds and silicates in the sand will behave during nitric acid dissolution. Laboratory work with simulants and hot cell work with actual K Basin sludge is in progress to obtain data in these areas.

Westra, A.G.

1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

414

Gravity-driven structures and rift basin evolution: Rio Muni Basin, offshore equatorial West Africa  

SciTech Connect

Offshore Equatorial Guinea, west Africa, gravity-driven nappes, more than 1 km thick and 15 km from head to toe, provide key evidence in reconstructing the late synrift: evolution of this part of the South Atlantic margin basin system. Furthermore, Aptian-Cenomanian carbonate and clastic rocks in the nappes` allochthonous hanging walls are attracting interest as a new exploration play in west Africa. The nappes exhibit a range of geometries that suggest they share many of the same deformation processes as thin-skin thrust and linked extensional fault systems. Not only are these structures significant in their own right, representing a rare example of gravity tectonics in the virtual absence of major halokinesis, but their presence may record an other-wise undetectable process active during the transition from a rift basin to a passive continental margin. A review of Equatorial Guinea in its pre-Atlantic configuration, alongside neighboring basins in Brazil (the Sergipe-Alagoas basin) and Gabon, suggests that gravity gliding was sustained by a relatively steep, westward paleoslope promoted by east-ward offset of the locus of thermal uplift from the rift basin (i.e., a simple shear model of basin formation). In contrast to gravity-driven structures in most postrift settings, the Equatorial Guinea nappes developed at the close of the Aptian-Albian synrift episode in response to a growing bathymetric deep caused by rapid subsidence outpacing restricted sedimentation.

Turner, J.P. [Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) Delaware River Basin Commission (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Systems Integrator Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 1961 State Delaware Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Project Review Section The Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) is a federal-interstate compact government agency that was formed by concurrent legislation enacted in 1961 by the United States and the four basin states (Pennsylvania, New York, New

416

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) Rappahannock River Basin Commission (Virginia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Rappahannock River Basin Commission The Rappahannock River Basin Commission is an independent local entity

417

Seismic stratigraphy and structure of the Progreso Basin, Ecuador  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Watkins Examination of seismic, well log and magnetic data across the Progreso Basin shows that more than 5. 5 km of sediment has been deposited in the basin with a thick sedimentary wedge io the east. The basin, bounded by two prominent normal faults... and the La Cruz fault a small sub-basin l, as been formed with considerable deposition onlv during the iast period of basin developnient. Facies, structurah isochron and velocity maps were produced for each of the five units identified on the seismic...

Goyes Arroyo, Patricio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin (Multiple States) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin's (ICPRB) mission is to enhance, protect, and conserve the water and associated land resources of the Potomac River and its tributaries through regional and interstate

419

Energy Zone Planning Tool for the Eastern United States  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Zone Planning Tool Energy Zone Planning Tool Federal program considering nine clean energy technologies for planning clean energy zones in the eastern United States Argonne's EVS Division and Decision and Information Sciences Division are providing technical support to the Eastern Interconnection States' Planning Council (EISPC) for an Energy Zones study. The EISPC study includes nine types of energy resources to be considered for development of clean energy generation facilities in the U.S. portion of the Eastern Interconnection (see map below). These types are (1) biomass, (2) clean coal technologies with carbon capture and sequestration, (3) geothermal, (4) natural gas, (5) nuclear, (6) solar (photovoltaic and concentrated solar thermal, as well as rooftop photovoltaic solar), (7)

420

National Electric Transmission Congestion Study 2006 Eastern Interconnection Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum To: Poonum Agrawal, David Meyer, U.S. Department of Energy CRA No. D08554-00 From: Prashant Murti, Alex Rudkevich, CRA International Date: Finalized March 13, 2006 Subject: GE MAPS INPUT ASSUMPTIONS: EASTERN INTERCONNECT This memorandum summarizes salient inputs to the CRA locational price forecasting model (GE MAPS). The model geographic footprint encompasses the US portion of the Eastern Interconnect and the Canadian province of Ontario. The analyses simulate the years 2008 and 2011. Primary data sources for the CRA GE MAPS model include the NERC MMWG, the General Electric generation and transmission databases for the Eastern Interconnect, various publications by NERC regions and Independent System Operators, FERC submissions by generation and transmission owners,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Active Faulting in the Coso Geothermal Field, Eastern California | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Faulting in the Coso Geothermal Field, Eastern California Faulting in the Coso Geothermal Field, Eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Active Faulting in the Coso Geothermal Field, Eastern California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: New mapping documents a series of late Quaternary NNE-striking normal faults in the central Coso Range that dip northwest, toward and into the main production area of the Coso geothermal field. The faults exhibit geomorphic features characteristic of Holocene activity, and locally are associated with fumaroles and hydothermal alteration. The active faults sole into or terminate against the brittle-ductile transition zone (BDT) at a depth of about 4 to 5 km. The BDT is arched upward over a volume of crust

422

Northerly surface wind events over the eastern North Pacific Ocean : spatial distribution, seasonality, atmospheric circulation, and forcing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

atmosphere over the eastern Pacific Ocean in summer, volumeover the eastern North Pacific Ocean throughout the year,over the eastern North Pacific Ocean and the western US. A

Taylor, Stephen V.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Multi-scale and Integrated Characterization of the Marcellus Shale in the Appalachian Basin: From Microscopes to Mapping  

SciTech Connect

Historic data from the Department of Energy Eastern Gas Shale Project (ESGP) were compiled to develop a database of geochemical analyses, well logs, lithological and natural fracture descriptions from oriented core, and reservoir parameters. The nine EGSP wells were located throughout the Appalachian Basin and intercepted the Marcellus Shale from depths of 750 meters (2500 ft) to 2500 meters (8200 ft). A primary goal of this research is to use these existing data to help construct a geologic framework model of the Marcellus Shale across the basin and link rock properties to gas productivity. In addition to the historic data, x-ray computerized tomography (CT) of entire cores with a voxel resolution of 240mm and optical microscopy to quantify mineral and organic volumes was performed. Porosity and permeability measurements in a high resolution, steady-state flow apparatus are also planned. Earth Vision software was utilized to display and perform volumetric calculations on individual wells, small areas with several horizontal wells, and on a regional basis. The results indicate that the lithologic character of the Marcellus Shale changes across the basin. Gas productivity appears to be influenced by the properties of the organic material and the mineral composition of the rock, local and regional structural features, the current state of in-situ stress, and lithologic controls on the geometry of induced fractures during stimulations. The recoverable gas volume from the Marcellus Shale is variable over the vertical stratigraphic section, as well as laterally across the basin. The results from this study are expected to help improve the assessment of the resource, and help optimize the recovery of natural gas.

Crandall, Dustin; Soeder, Daniel J; McDannell, Kalin T.; Mroz, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Origin, distribution, and movement of brine in the Permian Basin (U. S. A. ). A model for displacement of connate brine  

SciTech Connect

Na-Cl, halite Ca-Cl, and gypsum Ca-Cl brines with salinities from 45 to >300 g/L are identified and mapped in four hydrostratigraphic units in the Permian Basin area beneath western Texas and Oklahoma and eastern New Mexico, providing spatial and lithologic constraints on the interpretation of the origin and movement of brine. Na-Cl brine is derived from meteoric water as young as 5-10 Ma that dissolved anhydrite and halite, whereas Ca-Cl brine is interpreted to be ancient, modified-connate Permian brine that now is mixing with, and being displaced by, the Na-Cl brine. Displacement fronts appear as broad mixing zones with no significant salinity gradients. Evolution of Ca-Cl brine composition from ideal evaporated sea water is attributed to dolomitization and syndepositional recycling of halite and bittern salts by intermittent influx of fresh water and sea water. Halite Ca-Cl brine in the evaporite section in the northern part of the basin differs from gypsum Ca-Cl brine in the south-central part in salinity and Na/Cl ratio and reflects segregation between halite- and gypsum-precipitating lagoons during the Permian. Ca-Cl brine moved downward through the evaporite section into the underlying Lower Permian and Pennsylvanian marine section that is now the deep-basin brine aquifer, mixing there with pre-existing sea water. Buoyancy-driven convection of brine dominated local flow for most of basin history, with regional advection governed by topographically related forces dominant only for the past 5 to 10 Ma. 71 refs., 11 figs.

Bein, A.; Dutton, A.R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Guide for revegetating coal minesoils in the Eastern United States  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information, recommendations, and guidelines for revegetating land in the Eastern United States that has been disturbed by coal mining. Included are brief descriptions of major coal mining regions in the East, and a discussion of minesoil properties and procedures for sampling, testing, and amending minesoils. Plant species that have been used for revegetating surface-mined lands are identified and described. Selection criteria for plant species and methods and requirements for seeding and planting are explained. Some of the data on tree species used in reforestation were obtained from recent surveys of 30-year-old experimental plantings in several Eastern States.

Vogel, W.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Spatial and Temporal Variability of the M2 Internal Tide Generation and Propagation on the Oregon Shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tide energy onto the Oregon shelf, where it is dissipated, does not vary much with time. ApproximatelySpatial and Temporal Variability of the M2 Internal Tide Generation and Propagation on the Oregon is implemented along the Oregon coast to study average characteristics and intermittency of the M2 internal tide

Kurapov, Alexander

427

Variability in upwelling along the Pacific shelf of Panama and implications for the distribution of nutrients and chlorophyll  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Variability in upwelling along the Pacific shelf of Panama and implications for the distribution, APO, AA 34002-0948, USA b Departamento de Biologi´a Marina y Limnologi´a, Universidad de Panama´, Estafeta Universitaria, Panama´ c Scripps Institute of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA 92093-00244, USA Received

Bermingham, Eldredge

428

www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 302 14 NOVEMBER 2003 1111 Algal Clues to Antarctic Ice Shelf Ages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Perspective by Wolff) present an ice core record of methanesulfonic acid, a species produced by algae livingwww.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 302 14 NOVEMBER 2003 1111 Algal Clues to Antarctic Ice Shelf Ages The naturally high variability of sea ice extent in Antarctica and the short duration of instrumental records

Nori, Franco

429

Horizontal coherence of low-frequency fixed-path sound in a continental shelf region with internal-wave activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal coherence of low-frequency fixed-path sound in a continental shelf region with internal gain, horizontally lagged spatial correlation function, and coherent beam power. These quantities vary variations of three coher- ence measures, horizontal correlation length, array gain, and ratio of actual

430

The effect of antimicrobial agents and modified atmosphere packaging on the microbial shelf life of corn tortillas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IX Experiment ?1: pHa and colorb of corn tortillas pack- aged (and stored) in polyethylene and modified atmos- phere bagsc 76 X Experiment ?1: shelf life of corn tortillas packaged in plastic and MAPa bags and stored at 25' and 4'C...

Tellez-Giron, Alfredo

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Stable Isotope Characterization and Proxy Records of Hypoxia-Susceptible Waters on the Texas-Louisiana Shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the respiration of marine OC at depths equal to and greater than 20 m. delat^18O and delta^13C profiles of Louisiana shelf Conus shells collected in 1972 show no evidence for summer hypoxia. Comparison with modern Conus records reveal a delta^13CDIC reduction...

Strauss, Josiah

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

432

E-Print Network 3.0 - area eastern desert Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in The Netherlands Origin of Late Precambrian Intrusive Carbonates, Eastern Desert of Egypt and Sudan: C, 0 and Sr... carbonates, Eastern Desert of Egypt and Sudan: C, 0 and Sr...

433

E-Print Network 3.0 - area south eastern Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

eastern Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: area south eastern Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Lined Snake Prefer open prairie hillsides,...

434

Higher Taxa in Biodiversity Studies: Patterns from Eastern Pacific Marine Molluscs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Higher Taxa in Biodiversity Studies: Patterns from Eastern Pacific Marine Molluscs K. Roy D. Jablonski...proxy for species-level biodiversity patterns. Here this premise...large database of benthic marine molluscs from the eastern...

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Biogeography and Evolution of Hydrothermal-Vent Fauna in the Eastern Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Hydrothermal-Vent Fauna in the Eastern Pacific Ocean Verena Tunnicliffe The biogeography...the spreading history of mid-ocean ridges. Extensive collections...active ridge systems in the eastern Pacific Ocean provide an opportunity to examine...

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Energy Outlook in Eastern Europe and Central Asia Region | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Outlook in Eastern Europe and Central Asia Region Energy Outlook in Eastern Europe and Central Asia Region Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Outlook in Eastern Europe and Central Asia Region Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Sector: Energy Topics: Market analysis, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Energy Security Resource Type: Publications Website: web.worldbank.org/WBSITE/EXTERNAL/COUNTRIES/ECAEXT/0,,contentMDK:22497 UN Region: Central Asia, "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

437

Regional correlations and reservoir characterization studies of the Pennsylvanian system in the Anadarko Basin area of Western Oklahoma and the Panhandle of Texas  

SciTech Connect

Correlations problems have long existed between the Pennsylvanian marine clastics of the northeastern half of the Anadarko Basin and Shelf and the Pennsylvanian terrigenous washes of the extreme southwestern portion of the Anadarko Basin. These correlation problems have created nomenclature problems resulting in thousands of feet of washes often referred to on completion reports and production records as {open_quotes}granite wash{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Atoka Wash{close_quotes} when much greater accuracy and specificity is both needed and possible. Few detailed cross-sections are available. Regional and field scale cross-sections were constructed which have been correlated well by well and field by field using nearly every deep well drilled in the basin. This process has provided for a high degree of consistency. These cross-sections have greatly diminished the correlation and nomenclature problems within the Anadarko Basin. Certain markers proved to be regionally persistent from the marine clastics into the terrigenous washes making the subdivision of thousands of feet of washes possible. Those of greatest importance were the top of the Marmaton, the Cherokee Marker, the Pink {open_quotes}Limestone{close_quotes} Interval, the top of the Atoka and the top of the Morrow. Once these and other subdivisions were made, production was allocated on a much more definitive basis. Additionally, detailed reservoir characterization of the reservoirs was conducted to include geologic and engineering data. Finally, a {open_quotes}field-specific{close_quotes} reservoir type log was chosen. A series of regional cross-sections will be presented along with the results of reservoir characterization studies conducted on reservoirs within the fields located along the cross-sections. A type log for each reservoir will also be illustrated.

Hendrickson, W.J.; Smith, P.W.; Williams, C.M. [Dwights Energydata Inc., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient. 5 figs.

Bitensky, M.W.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

439

Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method using CO for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. Carbon monoxide is utilized for stabilizing hemoglobin in red blood cells to be stored at low temperature. Changes observed in the stored cells are similar to those found in normal red cell aging in the body, the extent thereof being directly related to the duration of refrigerated storage. Changes in cell buoyant density, vesiculation, and the tendency of stored cells to bind autologous IgG antibody directed against polymerized band 3 IgG, all of which are related to red blood cell senescence and increase with refrigerated storage time, have been substantially slowed when red blood cells are treated with CO. Removal of the carbon monoxide from the red blood cells is readily and efficiently accomplished by photolysis in the presence of oxygen so that the stored red blood cells may be safely transfused into a recipient.

Bitensky, Mark W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Semidiurnal tides in the Laptev Sea Shelf zone in the summer season  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Tidal processes play an important role in the dynamics of shelf circulation in the Laptev Sea. The Unstructured Grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) is used to simulate the tidal dynamics in the Lena Delta region of the Laptev Sea in ice-free barotropic case. The grid element size ranges from 400m to 5km. The major semidiurnal tidal waves M 2 and S 2 are investigated with the M 2 being the most important in generating large sea level amplitudes and currents over shallow areas. A correction to the tidal elevation at the open boundary is proposed, which minimizes the discrepancy between the model prediction and observations. The observations include both recent mooring data and the standard set of tide gauge measurements used in previous studies. The comparison of results to known tidal solutions is carried out. The paper also discusses the residual circulation and energy fluxes and assesses the impact of additional bathymetric information.

V. Fofonova; A. Androsov; S. Danilov; M. Janout; E. Sofina; K. Wiltshire

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Continental Shelf processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight  

SciTech Connect

Progress in studies of the physical processes affecting the oceanography of the South Atlantic Bight is reported. NCSU personnel efforts have been focused on processing and analyzing existing data sets as well as planning and preparing for the Georgia Atlantic Bight Experiment (GABEX-1). Three cruises were conducted between June 1979 and February 1980 for the temperature/pressure recording instruments (June to Oct) and for the deployment of the GABEX I and other arrays. The Onslow Bay data sets extend over four years of observations from the mid- and outer-shelf region. Each mooring cruise has been coordinated with similar mooring deployments off Savannah and off Cape Romain with hydrographic cruises and with interdisciplinary cruises following Gulf Stream filaments and involving biological, chemical and physical oceanographers. The current meter data collected in the Carolina Capes is listed. Preprints and reprints are included.

Pietrafesa, L.J.

1980-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

442

Field evidence in the Koryak Mountains Lake Mainitz region of far eastern Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Field evidence in the Koryak Mountains­ Lake Mainitz region of far eastern Russia supports

Ingólfsson, ?lafur

443

Shelf and deep-sea sedimentary environments and physical benthic disturbance regimes: A review and synthesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Physical disturbances of the seafloor play a key role in ecosystem function and are postulated to exert control over spatial patterns of biodiversity. This review investigates the role of natural physical sedimentological processes that occur in shelf, slope and abyssal environments that also act as disturbances to benthic ecosystems and which, under certain circumstances, give rise to benthic disturbance regimes. Physical sedimentological processes can cause both press (process that causes a disturbance by acting over a timespan that is intolerable to benthos) and pulse (process that causes a disturbance by exceeding a threshold above which benthos are unable to remain attached to the seabed or are buried under rapidly deposited sediment) types of disturbance. On the continental shelf, pulse-type disturbances are due to temperate and tropical storm events, and press-type of disturbances identified here are due to the migration of bedforms and other sand bodies, and sustained periods of elevated turbidity caused by seasonally reversing wind patterns. On the continental slope and at abyssal depths, pulse-type disturbances are due to slumps, turbidity currents; benthic storms may cause either press or pulse type disturbances. A possible press-type of disturbance identified here is inter-annual changes in abyssal bottom current speed and/or direction. It is concluded that: 1) physical sedimentary disturbance regimes may characterize as much as 10% of the global ocean floor; 2) multidisciplinary research programs that integrate oceanography, sedimentology and benthic ecology to collect time series observational data sets are needed to study disturbance regimes; and 3) predictive habitat suitability modeling must include disturbance regime concepts, along with other biophysical variables that define the fundamental niches of marine species, in order to advance.

Peter T. Harris

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

MITAS-2009 Expedition, U.S. Beaufort Shelf and SlopeLithostratigraphy Data Report  

SciTech Connect

The volume of methane released through the Arctic Ocean to the atmosphere and its potential role in the global climate cycle have increasingly become the focus of studies seeking to understand the source and origin of this methane. In 2009, an international, multi-disciplinary science party aboard the U.S. Coast Guard icebreaker Polar Sea successfully completed a trans-U.S. Beaufort Shelf expedition aimed at understanding the sources and volumes of methane across this region. Following more than a year of preliminary cruise planning and a thorough site evaluation, the Methane in the Arctic Shelf/Slope (MITAS) expedition departed from the waters off the coast of Barrow, Alaska in September 2009. The expedition was organized with an international shipboard science team consisting of 33 scientists with the breadth of expertise necessary to meet the expedition goals. NETL researchers led the expeditions initial core processing and lithostratigraphic evaluations, which are the focus of this report. This data report is focused on the lithostratigraphic datasets from the recovered vibra cores and piston cores. Operational information about the piston and vibra cores such as date acquired, core name, total length, water depth, and geographic location is provided. Once recovered, gas samples were immediately collected from cores. In addition, each core was run through the Geotek multi-sensor core logger for magnetic susceptibility, P-wave velocity, resistivity, and gamma-density measurements (Rose et al., 2010). After the samples and measurements were completed, the cores were split into working and archive halves. Visual core descriptions of the archive half was completed for each core. Samples for shipboard smear slides, coarse fractions, and XRD analyses were collected, as well as corresponding samples for post-cruise grain size analysis from the working half of each core. Line scan images of the split core surfaces were collected post-expedition. The methods used to characterize the lithostratigraphy of the recovered cores are described.

Rose, K.; Johnson, J.E.; Phillips, S.C.; Smith, J.; Reed, A.; Disenhof, C.; Presley, J.

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

445

Shannon Sandstone in Wyoming: A shelf-ridge complex reinterpreted as lowstand shoreface deposits  

SciTech Connect

The Shannon Sandstone (Campanian) of Wyoming was formerly interpreted as two stacked shelf-ridge complexes. Sand was believed to have been transported from a time-equivalent shoreline 110-150 km to the west and reworked or molded into ridges at the depositional site. The authors show that this time-equivalent shoreline section at Lucerne, Wyoming, consists of not one shoreface sandbody, but two superimposed. They are both storm-dominated, and the lower one terminates in beach facies capped by root traces. There must have been a rise in relative sea level of at least 14m to make accommodation space for the second shoreface sandbody. In the Slat Creek area and the adjacent subsurface Teapot Dome, there are two sandier-upward facies successions. In the lower succession there are abrupt vertical facies contacts between offshore bioturbated sandstones, thicker hummocky cross-stratified sandstones, and coarser cross-bedded sandstones. There is also evidence that the cross-bedded sandstones rest erosively on underlying facies. The trace fauna in the sandstones includes Macaronichnum segregatis, Rosselia socialis, and Ophiomorpha. The M. segregatis suggests a foreshore or upper-shoreface depositional environment, and R. socialis indicates a lower to middle shoreface; neither are characteristic of a shelf-ridge complex. The abrupt and probably erosive facies contacts, along with the trace fauna, suggest that the cross-bedded sandstones in this succession represent a shoreface deposit that formed during a stage of actively falling relative sea level. Overlying muddy bioturbated sandstones indicate that shoreface deposition was terminated by a transgression. The upper sandier-upward succession contains facies and trace fauna similar to those of the lower succession, and is also interpreted as a prograding shoreface.

Walker, R.G.; Bergman, K.M. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Geology)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Intraseasonal Eastern Pacific Precipitation and SST Variations in a GCM Coupled to a Slab Ocean Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intraseasonal Eastern Pacific Precipitation and SST Variations in a GCM Coupled to a Slab Ocean-Schubert convection to a slab ocean model (SOM) improves the simulation of eastern Pacific convection during and ocean make eastern Pacific low-level circulation anomalies more complex in the SOM simulation than

Maloney, Eric

447

Intraseasonal Eastern Pacific Precipitation and SST Variations in a GCM Coupled to a Slab Ocean Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intraseasonal Eastern Pacific Precipitation and SST Variations in a GCM Coupled to a Slab Ocean­Schubert convection to a slab ocean model (SOM) improves the simulation of eastern Pacific convection during and ocean make eastern Pacific low­level circulation anomalies more complex in the SOM simulation than

Maloney, Eric

448

Late Quaternary variability of sedimentary nitrogen isotopes in the eastern South Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Late Quaternary variability of sedimentary nitrogen isotopes in the eastern South Pacific Ocean), Late Quaternary variability of sedimentary nitrogen isotopes in the eastern South Pacific Ocean) in the water columns of the Arabian Sea (AS) and the eastern North and South Pacific oceans (ENP; ESP) holds

Demouchy, Sylvie

449

Benthic nutrient regeneration and high rate of primary production in continental shelf waters (reply)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... bottom regeneration is important. Also we have had the opportunity of studying the New York Bight, the area from which our original data were obtained, on two more recent occasions6 ... on KNORR cruise 68 in August, 1977.) In a silty clay of the Christiaensen Basin we measured a regeneration rate of 24mgNm2d1 (ref. 6), whereas in the coarse ...

G. T. ROWE

1978-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

450

EIS-0390: Eastern Plains Transmission Project, Colorado and Kansas.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EIS is for Western Area Power Administration's proposal to participate with Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, Inc. (Tri-State), to construct the proposed Eastern Plains Transmission Project (Project). Westerns participation with Tri-State would be in exchange for capacity rights on the transmission lines.

451

AN UPDATE ON REFORM IN EASTERN EUROPE AND RUSSIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN UPDATE ON REFORM IN EASTERN EUROPE AND RUSSIA Jeffrey Sachs ABSTRACT: The paper reviews the experience of Poland and Russia with economic reform, with occasional comparison to China's experience. The author argues that macroeconomic chaos in Poland and Russia preceded reform and was allayed by reform

452

MSU EASTERN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER NDSU WILLISTON RESEARCH EXTENSION CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MSU EASTERN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER NDSU WILLISTON RESEARCH EXTENSION CENTER 2006 AGRICULTURAL://www.sidney.ars.usda.gov/state/ North Dakota State University Williston Research Extension Center 14120 Hwy 2 Williston, ND 58801 (701 may have been more or less. Weather Summary Williston, nd Precipitation Temperature Month 2006 Avg

Dyer, Bill

453

MSU EASTERN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER NDSU WILLISTON RESEARCH EXTENSION CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MSU EASTERN AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH CENTER NDSU WILLISTON RESEARCH EXTENSION CENTER 2007 AGRICULTURAL Dakota State University Williston Research Extension Center 14120 Hwy 2 Williston, ND 58801 (701) 774-4315 Fax: (701) 774-4307 E-mail: NDSU.Williston.REC@.ndsu.edu http

Dyer, Bill

454

Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study Solar Dataset (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory produced solar power production data for the Eastern Renewable Generation Integration Study (ERGIS) including "real time" 5-minute interval data, "four hour ahead forecast" 60-minute interval data, and "day-ahead forecast" 60-minute interval data for the year 2006. This presentation provides a brief overview of the three solar power datasets.

Hummon, M.

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Sustainable Energy Fund of Central Eastern Pennsylvania | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Central Eastern Pennsylvania of Central Eastern Pennsylvania Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Sustainable Energy Fund of Central Eastern Pennsylvania Name Sustainable Energy Fund of Central Eastern Pennsylvania Address 968 Postal Road Place Allentown, Pennsylvania Zip 18109 Region Northeast - NY NJ CT PA Area Product Financing for renewable energy and various research services Phone number (610) 264-4440 Website http://www.thesef.org/ Coordinates 40.645174°, -75.441442° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.645174,"lon":-75.441442,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

456

Distribution of size-fractionated particulate trace metals collected by bottles and in-situ pumps in the Gulf of MaineScotian Shelf and Labrador Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The distribution of size-fractionated particulate trace metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Cu, V, and Co) was investigated in the Gulf of MaineScotian Shelf and Labrador Sea by collection of particulate matter using water bottles (Go-flo) and large volume in-situ pumps (Challenger Oceanic Systems and Services). Trace metal procedural filter blanks for Poretics membrane filters (0.4- and 10 ?m pore size) and Nitex screens (53 ?m mesh size) were sufficiently low that metal concentrations could be measured reliably. These results validate the use of Challenger Oceanics Systems and Services in-situ pumps for collection of particulate trace metals (Al, Fe, Mn, Pb, Cu, V, and Co) in shelf, slope, and open ocean Atlantic waters. In the Gulf of MaineScotian Shelf and Labrador Sea, trace metal concentrations per volume filtered generally decrease with increasing particle size for all metals. In the upper 250 m of slope waters of the Gulf of MaineScotian Shelf and in the Labrador Sea, trace metal concentrations in all particle sizes are lower than in shelf waters. Higher particulate metal concentrations in shelf waters are consistent with an increase in the supply of these trace metals with proximity to continental sources. In addition, an increase in particulate trace metal concentrations in shelf waters with depth is attributed to an input from resuspended sediment.

Sarah E. Weinstein; S.Bradley Moran

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Hydrocarbon potential of basins along Australia's southern margin  

SciTech Connect

Seven discrete sedimentary basins are recognized along the southern margin of the Australian continent; namely, from east to west, the Gippsland, Bass, Sorell, Otway, Duntroon, Bight, and Bremer. All formed since the Late Jurassic in response to the separation of Australia and Antarctica, and to the opening of the Tasman Sea. Only the Gippsland basin, which has proved initial oil reserves exceeding 3.6 billion barrels, is a prolific oil province. The search for oil in the other basins has been virtually fruitless despite many similarities between these basins and the Gippsland in terms of stratigraphy and structural geology. Rift and drift components are discernible in the sedimentary successions of all basins but the precise tectonic controls on respective basin formation remain conjectural. The lack of drilling success in the Bremer, Bight, Duntroon, Otway, and Sorell basins has been attributed mainly to the paucity of mature, oil-prone source rocks. The common occurrence of stranded bitumens along the entire coastline, however, indicates oil generation. The Bass and Gippsland basins are both characterized by excellent oil-prone source rocks developed in Late Cretaceous to Early Tertiary sediments. Limited exploration success in the Bass basin is due to poorer reservoir development. The Gippsland basin is at a mature stage of exploration whereas the other basins are moderately to very sparsely explored. Consequently, there is a comparable potential for undiscovered hydrocarbons in all basins. Success in the under-explored basins will come only to those prepared to challenge the perception of low prospectivity. Many play types remain to be tested by the drill.

Willink, R.J. (SAGASCO Resources Limited, Adelaide (Australia))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Why Sequencea Near-Shore Anoxic Basin?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Near-Shore Anoxic Basin? a Near-Shore Anoxic Basin? Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs; areas of low dissolved oxygen concentrations) play a major role in biogeochemical cycling within the world's oceans. They are major sinks for nitrogen and sources for the gases carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide. Microbially mediated biological activity associated with these systems affects the productivity of the deep blue sea and the balance of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Thus, studies aimed at evaluating the phylogenetic variation and metabolic capacity of microbial communities within these systems have great promise to enhance our understanding of the patterns and processes that drive global biogeochemical phenomena in both aquatic and atmospheric compartments of the biosphere. To this end, JGI and

459

Mississippian Lodgepole Play, Williston Basin: A review  

SciTech Connect

Waulsortian-type carbonate mud mounds in the lower Mississippian Lodgepole formation (Bottineau interval, Madison Group) comprise an important new oil play in the Williston basin with strong regional potential. The play is typified by wells capable of producing 1000-2500 bbl of oil per day and by reserves that have as much as 0.5-3.0 million bbl of oil per well. Currently centered in Stark County, North Dakota, along the southern flank of the basin, the play includes 38 wells, with 21 producers and 6 new fields. Initial discovery was made at a Silurian test in Dickinson field, traditionally productive from Pennsylvanian sands. The largest pool discovered to date is Eland field, which has 15 producers and estimated total reserves of 12-15 million bbl. This report summarizes geologic, well-log, seismic, and production data for this play, which promises to expand considerably in the years to come.

Montgomery, S.L. [Petroleum Consultant, Seattle, WA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Hydrothermal circulation in an anisotropic sedimentary basin: Application to the Okinawa back arc basin  

SciTech Connect

The authors explore the pattern of two-dimensional convection in an highly anisotropical porous medium. This physical situation is relevant to passive margin sedimentary basins consisting of interbedded coarse-grained pervious and shale matrix. They show that permeability anisotropies of the order of 10{sup 2}-10{sup 4} allow for long convective cells, of aspect ratio greater than 10, but that a combination of this parameter with a slight slope of the order of a few percent of the sedimentary layers is required to stabilize these long cells. As an example, they present the Okinawa basin, an active submarine back arc basin, with a sedimentary thickness of about 2 km and a heat flow profile across this basin, varying from 32 to 232 mWm{sup {minus}2} over a distance of 30 km. It is shown that this heat flow variation is difficult to explain with conductive mechanisms only but is well reproduced by different convective models relying on permeability anisotropy plus slope. Although the insufficient thermal and structural constraints did not allow them to build a unique model, the whole set of possible fits to the heat flow data may restrict the mean hydraulic parameters of the basin. A vertical permeability of a few tens of milidarcy and an anisotropy greater than 100 are required to produce the expected stable and active large-scale circulation. It is suggested in conclusion that this type of circulation might be active in oil- or oil-forming element migration.

Genthon, P.; Rabinowicz, M. (Groupe de Recherches de Geodesie, Spatiale (France)); Foucher, J.P.; Sibuet, J.C. (Inst. Francais de Recherches pour l'Exploitation de la Mer, Plouzane (France))

1990-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basin eastern shelf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

K Basin sludge treatment process description  

SciTech Connect

The K East (KE) and K West (KW) fuel storage basins at the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site contain sludge on the floor, in pits, and inside fuel storage canisters. The major sources of the sludge are corrosion of the fuel elements and steel structures in the basin, sand intrusion from outside the buildings, and degradation of the structural concrete that forms the basins. The decision has been made to dispose of this sludge separate from the fuel elements stored in the basins. The sludge will be treated so that it meets Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) acceptance criteria and can be sent to one of the double-shell waste tanks. The US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office accepted a recommendation by Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., to chemically treat the sludge. Sludge treatment will be done by dissolving the fuel constituents in nitric acid, separating the insoluble material, adding neutron absorbers for criticality safety, and reacting the solution with caustic to co-precipitate the uranium and plutonium. A truck will transport the resulting slurry to an underground storage tank (most likely tank 241-AW-105). The undissolved solids will be treated to reduce the transuranic (TRU) and content, stabilized in grout, and transferred to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) for disposal. This document describes a process for dissolving the sludge to produce waste streams that meet the TWRS acceptance criteria for disposal to an underground waste tank and the ERDF acceptance criteria for disposal of solid waste. The process described is based on a series of engineering studies and laboratory tests outlined in the testing strategy document (Flament 1998).

Westra, A.G.

1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

462

Heat Flow in the Hungarian Basin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the basin is deep and the gradient is between 40 and 45 C/km. This geothermal low may be characterized by 1-4-1-6 [jical/cm2 sec except if ... is about 1*5 sec can bo considered as the Western boundary of the Hungarian geothermal anomaly, since heat flow diminishes from that line in the north-west direction to ...

T. BOLDIZSR

1964-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

463

Water-related Issues Affecting Conventional Oil and Gas Recovery and Potential Oil-Shale Development in the Uinta Basin, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Saline water disposal is one of the most pressing issues with regard to increasing petroleum and natural gas production in the Uinta Basin of northeastern Utah. Conventional oil fields in the basin provide 69 percent of Utah?s total crude oil production and 71 percent of Utah?s total natural gas, the latter of which has increased 208% in the past 10 years. Along with hydrocarbons, wells in the Uinta Basin produce significant quantities of saline water ? nearly 4 million barrels of saline water per month in Uintah County and nearly 2 million barrels per month in Duchesne County. As hydrocarbon production increases, so does saline water production, creating an increased need for economic and environmentally responsible disposal plans. Current water disposal wells are near capacity, and permitting for new wells is being delayed because of a lack of technical data regarding potential disposal aquifers and questions concerning contamination of freshwater sources. Many companies are reluctantly resorting to evaporation ponds as a short-term solution, but these ponds have limited capacity, are prone to leakage, and pose potential risks to birds and other wildlife. Many Uinta Basin operators claim that oil and natural gas production cannot reach its full potential until a suitable, long-term saline water disposal solution is determined. The enclosed project was divided into three parts: 1) re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer in the Uinta Basin, 2) creating a detailed geologic characterization of the Birds Nest aquifer, a potential reservoir for large-scale saline water disposal, and 3) collecting and analyzing water samples from the eastern Uinta Basin to establish baseline water quality. Part 1: Regulators currently stipulate that produced saline water must be disposed of into aquifers that already contain moderately saline water (water that averages at least 10,000 mg/L total dissolved solids). The UGS has re-mapped the moderately saline water boundary in the subsurface of the Uinta Basin using a combination of water chemistry data collected from various sources and by analyzing geophysical well logs. By re-mapping the base of the moderately saline aquifer using more robust data and more sophisticated computer-based mapping techniques, regulators now have the information needed to more expeditiously grant water disposal permits while still protecting freshwater resources. Part 2: Eastern Uinta Basin gas producers have identified the Birds Nest aquifer, located in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation, as the most promising reservoir suitable for large-volume saline water disposal. This aquifer formed from the dissolution of saline minerals that left behind large open cavities and fractured rock. This new and complete understanding the aquifer?s areal extent, thickness, water chemistry, and relationship to Utah?s vast oil shale resource will help operators and regulators determine safe saline water disposal practices, directly impacting the success of increased hydrocarbon production in the region, while protecting potential future oil shale production. Part 3: In order to establish a baseline of water quality on lands identified by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as having oil shale development potential in the southeastern Uinta Basin, the UGS collected biannual water samples over a three-year period from near-surface aquifers and surface sites. The near-surface and relatively shallow groundwater quality information will help in the development of environmentally sound water-management solutions for a possible future oil shale and oil sands industry and help assess the sensitivity of the alluvial and near-surface bedrock aquifers. This multifaceted study will provide a better understanding of the aquifers in Utah?s Uinta Basin, giving regulators the tools needed to protect precious freshwater resources while still allowing for increased hydrocarbon production.

Michael Vanden Berg; Paul Anderson; Janae Wallace; Craig Morgan; Stephanie Carney

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

464