National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for basic organic chemicals

  1. Basic Chemical Safety and Laboratory Survival Skills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    1 Basic Chemical Safety and Laboratory Survival Skills For anyone working in Georgia Tech Laboratories Deborah Wolfe-Lopez Laboratory and Chemical Safety Manager Georgia Tech EHS 404-382-2964 2010 #12 Hazardous Chemical Protection and Right to Know Law (RTK) RTK is the Georgia State Equivalent of the Federal

  2. Chemical Organization Theory as a Theoretical Base for Chemical Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittrich, Peter

    Chemical Organization Theory as a Theoretical Base for Chemical Computing NAOKI MATSUMARU, FLORIAN-07743 Jena, Germany http://www.minet.uni-jena.de/csb/ Submitted 14 November 2005 In chemical computing- gramming chemical systems a theoretical method to cope with that emergent behavior is desired

  3. Basics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintock andBasics Basics ALICE users

  4. Basics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintock andBasics Basics ALICE

  5. Basics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintock andBasics Basics ALICEBasics

  6. Basics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintock andBasics Basics

  7. Basics of Chemical Kinetics -1 Rate of reaction = rate of disappearance of A =

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert, Réka

    reactions: Forward Reaction Backward Reaction CBA + 2 CBA + 2 CBA + 2 CBA + 2 #12;Basics of Chemical], [C] CBA + #12;Ex. 1 Determine the relation between the reaction rates and the reaction flux. Assume conservation. Hint: think of the reaction as a complex formation CBA + ]B][A[k dt ]C[d =]B][A[k dt ]B[d dt ]A

  8. Chemical Organizations in a Toy Model of the Political System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittrich, Peter

    Chemical Organizations in a Toy Model of the Political System Peter Dittrich1 and Lars Winter2,3 1 social phenomena, we discuss in this paper, whether and how the metaphor of a chemical reaction network of the political system inspired by Luhmann, we demonstrate how chemical organization theory can be applied and can

  9. A Topological Approach to Chemical Organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Peter F.

    The Santa Fe Institute, 1399 Hyde Park Rd., Santa Fe NM 87501 Abstract Large chemical reaction networks. This abstract representation in turn suggest to explore the chemical meaning of well-established topological.g. in the Chemical Abstract Machine [7]. A wide variety of different computa- tional paradigms has been used

  10. Organization-Oriented Chemical Programming Peter Dittrich and Naoki Matsumaru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittrich, Peter

    dittrich/naoki@minet.uni-jena.de Abstract Chemical information processing posseses a variety of valuable of the chemical species present) and abstracts from quantita- tive change (i.e., a change in concentrationOrganization-Oriented Chemical Programming Peter Dittrich and Naoki Matsumaru Friedrich Schiller

  11. Reasoning and Representation: the Sketching of Organic Chemical Reaction Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchese, Francis

    Reasoning and Representation: the Sketching of Organic Chemical Reaction Mechanisms Position paper of sketching chemical reaction mechanisms in order to reason-out the structural transformations that convert. The general chemical reaction patterns of oxidation-reduction, functional group transfer, hydrolysis

  12. Carbon allocation among tree organs: A review of basic processes and representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    allocation coefficients; (ii) models based on growth rules, including functional balance or "goal allocation is a key component in function- al-structural tree models (FSTMs). In the short term, parReview Carbon allocation among tree organs: A review of basic processes and representation

  13. Membrane-Organized Chemical Photoredox Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurst, James K.

    2014-09-18

    This project has three interrelated goals relevant to solar water photolysis, which are to develop: (1) vesicle-organized assemblies for H2 photoproduction that utilize pyrylium and structurally related compounds as combined photosensitizers and cyclic electroneutral transmembrane electron carriers; (2) transmembrane redox systems whose reaction rates can be modulated by light; and (3) homogeneous catalysts for water oxidation. . In area (1), initial efforts to photogenerate H2 from vectorially-organized vesicles containing occluded colloidal Pt and commonly available pyrylium ions as transmembrane redox mediators were unsuccessful. New pyrylium compounds with significantly lower reduction potentials have been synthesized to address this problem, their apparent redox potentials in functioning systems have been now evaluated by using a series of occluded viologens, and H2 photoproduction has been demonstrated in continuous illumination experiments. In area (2), spirooxazine-quinone dyads have been synthesized and their capacity to function as redox mediators across bilayer membranes has been evaluated through continuous photolysis and transient spectrophotometric measurements. Photoisomerization of the spiro moiety to the ring-open mero form caused net quantum yields to decrease significantly, providing a basis for photoregulation of transmembrane redox. Research on water oxidation (area 3) has been directed at understanding mechanisms of catalysis by cis,cis-[(bpy)2Ru(OH2)]2O4+ and related polyimine complexes. Using a variety of physical techniques, we have: (i) identified the redox state of the complex ion that is catalytically active; (ii) shown using 18O isotopic labeling that there are two reaction pathways, both of which involve participation of solvent H2O; and (iii) detected and characterized by EPR and resonance Raman spectroscopies new species which may be key intermediates in the catalytic cycle.

  14. Identification and quantification of organic chemicals in supplemental fuel blends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salter, F.

    1996-12-31

    Continental Cement Company, Inc. (Continental) burns waste fuels to supplement coal in firing the kiln. It is to be expected that federal and state agencies want an accounting of the chemicals burned. As rules and regulations become more plentiful, a company such as Continental must demonstrate that it has made a reasonable attempt to identify and quantify many specific organic compounds. The chemicals on the SARA 313 list can change frequently. Also the number and concentrations of compounds that can disqualify a material from consideration as a supplemental fuel at Continental continues to change. A quick and reliable method of identifying and quantifying organics in waste fuel blends is therefore crucial. Using a Hewlett-Packard 5972 GC/MS system Continental has developed a method of generating values for the total weight of compounds burned. A similar procedure is used to verify that waste streams meet Continental`s acceptance criteria.

  15. Apparatus for sensing volatile organic chemicals in fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hughes, Robert C.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Kottenstette, Richard; Patel, Sanjay V.

    2005-06-07

    A chemical-sensing apparatus is formed from the combination of a chemical preconcentrator which sorbs and concentrates particular volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) and one or more chemiresistors that sense the VOCs after the preconcentrator has been triggered to release them in concentrated form. Use of the preconcentrator and chemiresistor(s) in combination allows the VOCs to be detected at lower concentration than would be possible using the chemiresistor(s) alone and further allows measurements to be made in a variety of fluids, including liquids (e.g. groundwater). Additionally, the apparatus provides a new mode of operation for sensing VOCs based on the measurement of decay time constants, and a method for background correction to improve measurement precision.

  16. Harnessing Chemical Raman Enhancement for Understanding Organic Adsorbate Binding on Metal Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zayak, Alexey

    2014-01-01

    P. J. ; Neaton, J. B. Chemical Raman Enhancement of OrganicJ. ; Zhao, K. ; Zhang, Z. Chemical contribution to Surface-the Molecule-Surface chemical coupling in SERS. J. Am. Chem.

  17. Microwave separation of organic chemicals from mixed hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.A.; Albano, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    The feasibility of utilizing the differential heating characteristics of microwave energy (MW) to aid in the chemical extraction and separation process of hazardous organic compounds from mixed hazardous waste, was studied at the INEL. The long-term objective of this work was to identify a practical method of separating or enhancing the separation process of organic hazardous waste components from mixed waste using microwave (MW) frequency radiation. Methods using MW energy for calcination, solidification, and drying of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities is becoming more attractive. In order to study the effectiveness of MW heating, samples of several organic chemicals simulating those which may be found at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL were exposed to MW energy. Vapor collection and analysis was performed as a function of time, signal frequency, and MW power throughout the process. Signal frequencies ranging from 900 MHz t 8000 MHz were used. Although the signal frequency bandwidth of the selectivity was quite broad, for the material tested an indication of the frequency dependence in the selectivity of MW heating was given. Greater efficiency in terms of energy used and time required was observed. The relatively large electromagnetic field intensities generated at the resonant frequencies which were supported by the cavity sample holder demonstrated the use of cavity resonance to aid in the process of differential heating.

  18. Microwave separation of organic chemicals from mixed hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.A.; Albano, R.K.

    1992-08-01

    The feasibility of utilizing the differential heating characteristics of microwave energy (MW) to aid in the chemical extraction and separation process of hazardous organic compounds from mixed hazardous waste, was studied at the INEL. The long-term objective of this work was to identify a practical method of separating or enhancing the separation process of organic hazardous waste components from mixed waste using microwave (MW) frequency radiation. Methods using MW energy for calcination, solidification, and drying of radioactive waste from nuclear facilities is becoming more attractive. In order to study the effectiveness of MW heating, samples of several organic chemicals simulating those which may be found at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex at the INEL were exposed to MW energy. Vapor collection and analysis was performed as a function of time, signal frequency, and MW power throughout the process. Signal frequencies ranging from 900 MHz t 8000 MHz were used. Although the signal frequency bandwidth of the selectivity was quite broad, for the material tested an indication of the frequency dependence in the selectivity of MW heating was given. Greater efficiency in terms of energy used and time required was observed. The relatively large electromagnetic field intensities generated at the resonant frequencies which were supported by the cavity sample holder demonstrated the use of cavity resonance to aid in the process of differential heating.

  19. Mechanical-chemical coupling and self-organization in mudstones.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, Jason E.; Dewers, Thomas A.

    2010-06-01

    Shales and other mudstones are the most abundant rock types in sedimentary basins, yet have received comparatively little attention. Common as hydrocarbon seals, these are increasingly being targeted as unconventional gas reservoirs, caprocks for CO{sub 2} sequestration, and storage repositories for waste. The small pore and grain size, large specific surface areas, and clay mineral structures lend themselves to rapid reaction rates accompanying changes in stress, pressure, temperature and chemical conditions. Under far from equilibrium conditions, mudrocks display a variety of spatio-temporal self-organized phenomena arising from the nonlinear coupling of mechanics with chemistry. Beginning with a detailed examination of nano-scale pore network structures in mudstones, we discuss the dynamics behind such self-organized phenomena as pressure solitons, chemically-induced flow self focusing and permeability transients, localized compaction, time dependent well-bore failure, and oscillatory osmotic fluxes as they occur in clay-bearing sediments. Examples are draw from experiments, numerical simulation, and the field. These phenomena bear on the ability of these rocks to serve as containment barriers.

  20. Organization-Oriented Chemical Programming Naoki Matsumaru,Peter Kreyssig, Peter Dittrich (2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dittrich, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Matsumaru, Peter Kreyssig and Peter Dittrich chemical abstract machine (CHAM) [6]; P-Systems [31] stressing(preprint) Organization-Oriented Chemical Programming Naoki Matsumaru,Peter Kreyssig, Peter. Dittrich, P. Kreyssig. Organization-Oriented Chemical Programming. In: C. Muller- Schloer, H. Schmeck, T

  1. THE VOMERONASAL ORGAN IS REQUIRED FOR THE MALE MOUSE MEDIAL AMYGDALA RESPONSE TO CHEMICAL-COMMUNICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    , FL 32306-4295, USA Abstract--Many species use chemical signals to convey in- formation relevantTHE VOMERONASAL ORGAN IS REQUIRED FOR THE MALE MOUSE MEDIAL AMYGDALA RESPONSE TO CHEMICAL chemical signals may be detected by the vomeronasal organ, which sends projections to the accessory

  2. Programming Self-Organizing Systems with the Higher-Order Chemical Language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fradet, Pascal

    @irisa.fr Received on 17th March 2006 In a chemical language, computation is viewed as abstract mo- lecules reacting in an abstract chemical solution. Data can be seen as molecules and operations as chemical reactions: if someProgramming Self-Organizing Systems with the Higher-Order Chemical Language JEAN-PIERRE BAN ^ATRE1

  3. Basic theory and methods of dosimetry for use in risk assessment of genotoxic chemicals. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrenberg, L.; Granath, F.

    1992-12-31

    This project is designed to be theoretical, with limited experimental input. The work then would have to be directed towards an identification of problems, with an emphasis on the potential ability of molecular/biochemical methods to reach a solution, rather than aiming at solutions of the problems. In addition, the work is dependent on experimental work within parallel projects. Initially, projects running at this laboratory were strongly tied up with practical matters, such as the development of monitoring methods for specific exposures, with limited resources for basic research. As sketched in the scientific report below, section 4 the meaningfulness of molecular/biochemical methods and their potential contribution to the problem of dsk estimation has to be seen against a broad overview of this problem and current efforts to solve it. This overview, given as a brief summary in section 3, shows the necessity of combining different fields of research, holding them together by strictly quantitative aspects.

  4. The aging of organic aerosol in the atmosphere : chemical transformations by heterogeneous oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Sean Herbert

    2013-01-01

    The immense chemical complexity of atmospheric organic particulate matter ("aerosol") has left the general field of condensed-phase atmospheric organic chemistry relatively under-developed when compared with either gas-phase ...

  5. Magnetoreological Fluid Template for Basic Studies of Mechanical-Chemical Effects During Polishing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miao, C.; Bristol, K. M.; Marino, A.E.; Shafrir, S.N.; DeGroote, J.E.; Jacobs, S.D.

    2008-01-07

    We developed a new magnetorheological (MR) fluid for studying the relative contributions of mechanics and chemistry in polishing hard materials. The base carrier fluid is a mixture of two non-aqueous liquids. At conventional carbonyl iron (CI) magnetic particle concentrations, removal rates with this formulation were unacceptably low for the polycrystalline optical ceramic aluminum oxynitride (ALON). We overcame this problem by creating a high magnetic solids concentration suspension consisting of blend of large and small CI particles. Our test bed for experiments was a magnetorheological finishing (MRF) spot-taking machine (STM) that can only polish spots into a non-rotating part. We demonstrated that, using this new MR fluid formation, we could substantially increase peak removal rates on ALON with small additions of nonmagnetic, nanodiamond abrasives. Material removal with this fluid was assumed to be predominately driven by mechanics. With the addition of small amounts of DI water to the base fluid containing nanodiamonds, the peak removal rate showed an additional increase, presumably due to the altered fluid rheology and possibly chemical interactions. In this paper we describe the difficult fluid viscosity issues that were addressed in creating a viable, high removal rate, non-aqueous MR fluid template that could be pumped in the STM for several days of experiments.

  6. Degradation of organic chemicals with titanium ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Tunesi, Simonetta (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Madison, WI)

    1991-01-01

    Complex organic molecules, such as polychlorinated biphenyls can be degraded on porous titanium ceramic membranes by photocatalysis under ultraviolet light.

  7. Degradation of organic chemicals with titanium ceramic membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, M.A.; Tunesi, S.; Xu, Q.

    1991-07-30

    Complex organic molecules, such as polychlorinated biphenyls can be degraded on porous titanium ceramic membranes by photocatalysis under ultraviolet light. 3 figures.

  8. LANL organic analysis detection capabilities for chemical and biological warfare agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ansell, G.B.; Cournoyer, M.E.; Hollis, K.W.; Monagle, M.

    1996-12-31

    Organic analysis is the analytical arm for several Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) research programs and nuclear materials processes, including characterization and certification of nuclear and nonnuclear materials used in weapons, radioactive waste treatment and waste certification programs. Organic Analysis has an extensive repertoire of analytical technique within the group including headspace gas, PCBs/pesticides, volatile organics and semivolatile organic analysis. In addition organic analysis has mobile labs with analytic capabilities that include volatile organics, total petroleum hydrocarbon, PCBs, pesticides, polyaromatic hydrocarbons and high explosive screening. A natural extension of these capabilities can be applied to the detection of chemical and biological agents,

  9. Polymer and carbon nanotube materials for chemical sensors and organic electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Fei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01

    This thesis details the development of new materials for high-performance chemical sensing as well as organic electronic applications. In Chapter 2, we develop a chemiresistive material based on single-walled carbon nanotubes ...

  10. Chemical characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater : structure, cycling, and the role of biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quan, Tracy M. (Tracy Michelle), 1977-

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this thesis is to investigate three different areas relating to the characterization of dissolved organic matter (DOM): further determination of the chemical compounds present in high molecular weight DOM ...

  11. Organic Rankine Cycles for the Petro-Chemical Industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, R. K.; Colosimo, D. D.

    1979-01-01

    considered to the limits of economic feasibility. However, both economic and technical feasibility limit the use of waste heat flows with conventional approaches in the 250 F to 350 F range. A packaged organic Rankine power cycle can technically...

  12. Analysis of the atmospheric distribution, sources, and sinks of oxygenated volatile organic chemicals based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    chemicals based on measurements over the Pacific during TRACE-P H. B. Singh,1 L. J. Salas,1 R. B. Chatfield measurements of a large number of oxygenated volatile organic chemicals (OVOC) were carried out in the Pacific of OVOC is comparable to that of methane and far exceeds that of NMHC. A comparison of these data

  13. Organic chemical aging mechanisms: An annotated bibliography. Waste Tank Safety Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuels, W.D.; Camaioni, D.M.; Nelson, D.A.

    1993-09-01

    An annotated bibliography has been compiled of the potential chemical and radiological aging mechanisms of the organic constituents (non-ferrocyanide) that would likely be found in the UST at Hanford. The majority of the work that has been conducted on the aging of organic chemicals used for extraction and processing of nuclear materials has been in conjunction with the acid or PUREX type processes. At Hanford the waste being stored in the UST has been stabilized with caustic. The aging factors that were used in this work were radiolysis, hydrolysis and nitrite/nitrate oxidation. The purpose of this work was two-fold: to determine whether or not research had been or is currently being conducted on the species associated with the Hanford UST waste, either as a mixture or as individual chemicals or chemical functionalities, and to determine what areas of chemical aging need to be addressed by further research.

  14. Measuring indigenous photosynthetic organisms to detect chemical warefare agents in water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, Elias; Sanders, Charlene A.

    2005-11-15

    A method of testing water to detect the presence of a chemical or biological warfare agent is disclosed. The method is carried out by establishing control data by providing control water containing indigenous organisms but substantially free of a chemical and a biological warfare agent. Then measuring photosynthetic activity of the control water with a fluorometer to obtain control data to compare with test data to detect the presence of the chemical or agent. The test data is gathered by providing test water comprising the same indigenous organisms as contained in the control water. Further, the test water is suspected of containing the chemical or agent to be tested for. Photosynthetic activity is also measured by fluorescence induction in the test water using a fluorometer.

  15. Basic Services, Low-Income Settlements and the Local State: How Collectively-Organized Initiatives Redress Inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Gregory Scott

    2015-01-01

    Addressing poverty and inequality; new forms of urbanto address basic service inequalities (Government of India,Initiatives Redress Inequalities A dissertation submitted in

  16. A BASIC GUIDE TO CHEMICAL & BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING AT UA Much of the information included in this handout can be found at che.eng.ua.edu click on undergraduate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    1 A BASIC GUIDE TO CHEMICAL & BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING AT UA 20142015 Much.eng.ua.edu) #12;3 CHEMICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 2010-2012 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG (For students Chemistry I (N) 4 CHE 125 Introduction to Chemical Engineering 1 ENGR 111 Engineering the Future 1 EN 101

  17. P-230 / X. Yu P-230: Novel Electrical-Chemically Polished Stainless Steel Anode Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    roughness reached 1.93nm. Then Organic Light Emission Devices (OLEDs) were fabricated on it with Alq3 under better condition. Keywords: electrical-chemically polishing, stainless steel, OLEDs, lighting 1. Introduction One big advantage for OLEDs being used as lighting source is: its emitted light could be tuned

  18. Evaluation of a robust, diimide-based, porous organic polymer (POP) as a high-capacity sorbent for representative chemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of a robust, diimide-based, porous organic polymer (POP) as a high-capacity sorbent A previously described porous organic polymer (NU-POP-1) was evaluated against four representative chemical an activated, impregnated carbon. The ability to remove the highly volatile toxic chemicals ammonia

  19. Thursday, January 27, 2011 and Tuesday, February 1 These two lectures are on some basics of chemical reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    of chemical reaction rate theory, as applied to the atmosphere. This information is not found in many-71 (lifetimes and cycles) Chapter 9 ­ page 140-143 (see, especially, Table 9.1) #12;Bimolecular Reactions Typically, there are two types of reactions between molecules in the atmosphere that concern us

  20. Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mowry, Curtis Dale (Albuquerque, NM); Thornberg, Steven Michael (Peralta, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A system for on-line quantitative monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) includes pressure reduction means for carrying a gaseous sample from a first location to a measuring input location maintained at a low pressure, the system utilizing active feedback to keep both the vapor flow and pressure to a chemical ionization mode mass spectrometer constant. A multiple input manifold for VOC and gas distribution permits a combination of calibration gases or samples to be applied to the spectrometer.

  1. Revisiting benzene cluster cations for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide and select volatile organic compounds

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, M. J.; Zoerb, M. C.; Campbell, N. R.; Zimmermann, K. J.; Blomquist, B. W.; Huebert, B. J.; Bertram, T. H.

    2015-10-01

    Benzene cluster cations were revisited as a sensitive and selective reagent ion for the chemical ionization of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and a select group of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Laboratory characterization was performed using both a new set of compounds (i.e. DMS, ?-caryophyllene) as well as previously studied VOCs (i.e., isoprene, ?-pinene). Using a field deployable chemical ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (CI-ToFMS), benzene cluster cations demonstrated high sensitivity (> 1 ncps ppt?1) to DMS, isoprene, and ?-pinene standards. Parallel measurements conducted using a chemical-ionization quadrupole mass spectrometer, with a weaker electric field, demonstrated that ion-molecule reactions likely proceed through amore »combination of ligand-switching and direct charge transfer mechanisms. Laboratory tests suggest that benzene cluster cations may be suitable for the selective ionization of sesquiterpenes, where minimal fragmentation (R2=0.80) over a wide range of sampling conditions.« less

  2. III-nitride quantum cascade detector grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Yu, E-mail: yusong@princeton.edu; Huang, Tzu-Yung; Badami, Pranav; Gmachl, Claire [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 (United States); Bhat, Rajaram; Zah, Chung-En [Corning Incorporated, Corning, New York 14831 (United States)

    2014-11-03

    Quantum cascade (QC) detectors in the GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N material system grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition are designed, fabricated, and characterized. Only two material compositions, i.e., GaN as wells and Al{sub 0.5}Ga{sub 0.5}N as barriers are used in the active layers. The QC detectors operates around 4??m, with a peak responsivity of up to ?100??A/W and a detectivity of up to 10{sup 8} Jones at the background limited infrared performance temperature around 140?K.

  3. Method of making AlInSb by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Biefeld, Robert M. (Albuquerque, NM); Allerman, Andrew A. (Albuquerque, NM); Baucom, Kevin C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A method for producing aluminum-indium-antimony materials by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This invention provides a method of producing Al.sub.X In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials by MOCVD wherein an Al source material, an In source material and an Sb source material are supplied as a gas to a heated substrate in a chamber, said Al source material, In source material, and Sb source material decomposing at least partially below 525.degree. C. to produce Al.sub.x In.sub.1-x Sb crystalline materials wherein x is greater than 0.002 and less than one.

  4. How Soil Organic Matter Composition Controls Hexachlorobenzene-Soil-Interactions: Adsorption Isotherms and Quantum Chemical Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ashour; Kühn, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Hazardous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) interact in soil with the soil organic matter (SOM) but this interaction is insufficiently understood at the molecular level. We investigated the adsorption of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on soil samples with systematically modified SOM. These samples included the original soil, the soil modified by adding a hot water extract (HWE) fraction (soil+3 HWE and soil+6 HWE), and the pyrolyzed soil. The SOM contents increased in the order pyrolyzed soil soil soil+3 HWE soil+6 HWE. For the latter three samples this order was also valid for the HCB adsorption. The pyrolyzed soil adsorbed more HCB than the other samples at low initial concentrations, but at higher concentrations the HCB adsorption became weaker than in the samples with HWE addition. This adsorption behaviour combined with the differences in the chemical composition between the soil samples suggested that alkylated aromatic, phenol, and lignin monomer compounds contributed most to the HC...

  5. Formation and aging of secondary organic aerosol from toluene: changes in chemical composition, volatility, and hygroscopicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K. M.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2015-07-24

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx under different oxidizing conditions. The effects of the oxidizing condition on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility, and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state (OSc), and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased duringmore »photo-oxidation, and the final OA OSc ranged from -0.29 to 0.16 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have a significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.« less

  6. Improved sensor selectivity for chemical vapors using organic thin-film transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, James Edward

    2012-01-01

    2012, American Chemical Society 3.1 Abstract Air-stablethe American Chemical Society 4.1 Abstract Direct selectiveChemical Vapor Detection Abstract

  7. Studies on the chemical synthesis and characterization of lead oxide nanoparticles with different organic capping agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arulmozhi, K. T., E-mail: arulsheelphy@gmail.com [Physics Wing (DDE), Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India - 608 002 (India); Mythili, N. [Department of Physics, Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India - 608 002 (India)] [Department of Physics, Annamalai University, Tamil Nadu, India - 608 002 (India)

    2013-12-15

    Lead oxide (PbO) nanoparticles were chemically synthesized using Lead (II) acetate as precursor. The effects of organic capping agents such as Oleic acid, Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic acid (EDTA) and Cetryl Tri Methyl Butoxide (CTAB) on the size and morphology of the nanoparticles were studied. Characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform-Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Photoluminescence (PL) Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) were used to analyse the prepared nanoparticles for their physical, structural and optical properties. The characterization studies reveal that the synthesized PbO nanoparticles had well defined crystalline structure and sizes in the range of 25 nm to 36 nm for capping agents used and 40 nm for pure PbO nanoparticles.

  8. A BASIC GUIDE TO CHEMICAL & BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING AT UA Much of the information included in this handout can be found at che.eng.ua.edu click on undergraduate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    151 Fundamental Engineering Graphics 1 __ 15 Second Semester BSC 114 Principles of Biology I (N) 3 CH Chemical Engineering Laboratory 2 CHE 354 Chemical Reactor Design 3 CH 237 Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 2 Calculus I (MA) 4 __ 15 Second Semester BSC 114 Principles of Biology I (N) 3 CH 102 General Chemistry II

  9. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apel, Eric; Emmons, L.; Karl, Thomas G.; Flocke, Frank M.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, Sasha; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, Alan; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, Dirk; Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, Teresa; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Knapp, David; Sive, B.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Springston, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Ortega, John V.; Voss, Paul B.; Blake, D. R.; Baker, Angela K.; Warneke, Carsten; Welsh-Bon, Daniel; de Gouw, Joost A.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, Renyi; Rudolph, Jochen; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D.

    2010-01-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on March 18 and the NCAR C130 one day later on March 19. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the March 19 plume and to help interpret the OH reactivity in the downwind plume. The model results generally showed good agreement with experimental results for the total VOC OH reactivity downwind and gave insight into the distributions of VOC chemical classes downwind. A box model with detailed gas phase chemistry (NCAR Master Mechanism), initialized with concentrations observed at one of the ground sites in the MCMA, was used to examine the expected evolution of specific VOCs over a 1-2 day period. The models clearly supported the experimental evidence for NMHC oxidation leading to the formation of OVOCs downwind, which then become the primary fuel for ozone production far away from the MCMA.

  10. Chemical evolution of volatile organic compounds in the outflow of the Mexico City Metropolitan area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apel, E.; Springston, S.; Karl, T.; Emmons, L.; Flocke, F.; Hills, A. J.; Madronich, S.; Lee-Taylor, J.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Richter, D., Tie, X.; Mauldin, L.; Campos, T.; Sive, B.; Kleinman, L.; Springston, S., Zaveri, R.; deGouw, J.; Zheng, J.; Zhang, R.; Rudolph, J.; Junkermann, W.; Riemer, D. D.

    2009-11-01

    The volatile organic compound (VOC) distribution in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) and its evolution as it is uplifted and transported out of the MCMA basin was studied during the 2006 MILAGRO/MIRAGE-Mex field campaign. The results show that in the morning hours in the city center, the VOC distribution is dominated by non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) but with a substantial contribution from oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs), predominantly from primary emissions. Alkanes account for a large part of the NMHC distribution in terms of mixing ratios. In terms of reactivity, NMHCs also dominate overall, especially in the morning hours. However, in the afternoon, as the boundary layer lifts and air is mixed and aged within the basin, the distribution changes as secondary products are formed. The WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry) model and MOZART (Model for Ozone and Related chemical Tracers) were able to reproduce the general features of the daytime cycle of the VOC OH reactivity distribution showing that NMHCs dominate the distribution except in the afternoon hours and that the VOC OH reactivity peaks in the early morning due to high morning emissions from the city into a shallow boundary layer. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models showed higher reactivity than the experimental data during the nighttime cycle, perhaps indicating problems with the modeled nighttime boundary layer height. In addition, a plume was studied in which air was advected out of the MCMA and intercepted downwind with the DOE G1 on 18 March and the NCAR C130 one day later on 19 March. A number of identical species measured aboard each aircraft gave insight into the chemical evolution of the plume as it aged and was transported as far as 1000 km downwind. Ozone and many OVOCs were photochemically produced in the plume. The WRF-Chem and MOZART models were used to examine the spatial and temporal extent of the 19 March plume and to help interpret the OH reactivity in the downwind plume. The model results generally showed good agreement with experimental results for the total VOC OH reactivity downwind and gave insight into the distributions of VOC chemical classes downwind. A box model with detailed gas phase chemistry (NCAR Master Mechanism), initialized with concentrations observed at one of the ground sites in the MCMA, was used to examine the expected evolution of specific VOCs over a 1-2 day period. The models clearly supported the experimental evidence for NMHC oxidation leading to the formation of OVOCs downwind, which then become the primary fuel for ozone production far away from the MCMA.

  11. Emission and absorption cross-sections of an Er:GaN waveguide prepared with metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Q.; Dahal, R.; Feng, I. W.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Hui, Rongqing

    2011-01-01

    We repost the characterization of emission and absorption cross-sections in an erbium-doped GaN waveguide prepared by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The emission cross-section was obtained with the Füchtbauer–Ladenburg equation based...

  12. Chemical Composition of Gas-Phase Organic Carbon Emissions from Motor Vehicles and Implications for Ozone Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Allen

    Chemical Composition of Gas-Phase Organic Carbon Emissions from Motor Vehicles and Implications gasoline and diesel vehicles via two methods. First we use speciated measurements of exhaust emissions from-based, single vehicle dynamometer testing, and on-road measurements in roadway tunnels.3-12 Emission factors

  13. Thermoelectric properties of lattice-matched AlInN alloy grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilchrist, James F.

    Thermoelectric properties of lattice-matched AlInN alloy grown by metal organic chemical vapor Seebeck coefficient and resistance measurement system for thermoelectric materials in the thin disk geometry Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 025101 (2012) High-temperature thermoelectric properties of Cu1­xInTe2

  14. Stress-induced chemical detection using flexible metal-organic frameworks.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Hesketh, Peter J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Gall, Kenneth A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Choudhury, A. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Pikarsky, J. (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Andruszkiewicz, Leanne (Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA); Houk, Ronald J. T.; Talin, Albert Alec (National Institute of Standards & Technology, Gaithersburg, MD)

    2009-09-01

    In this work we demonstrate the concept of stress-induced chemical detection using metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) by integrating a thin film of the MOF HKUST-1 with a microcantilever surface. The results show that the energy of molecular adsorption, which causes slight distortions in the MOF crystal structure, can be efficiently converted to mechanical energy to create a highly responsive, reversible, and selective sensor. This sensor responds to water, methanol, and ethanol vapors, but yields no response to either N{sub 2} or O{sub 2}. The magnitude of the signal, which is measured by a built-in piezoresistor, is correlated with the concentration and can be fitted to a Langmuir isotherm. Furthermore, we show that the hydration state of the MOF layer can be used to impart selectivity to CO{sub 2}. We also report the first use of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy to characterize the structure of a MOF film. We conclude that the synthetic versatility of these nanoporous materials holds great promise for creating recognition chemistries to enable selective detection of a wide range of analytes. A force field model is described that successfully predicts changes in MOF properties and the uptake of gases. This model is used to predict adsorption isotherms for a number of representative compounds, including explosives, nerve agents, volatile organic compounds, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons. The results show that, as a result of relatively large heats of adsorption (> 20 kcal mol{sup -1}) in most cases, we expect an onset of adsorption by MOF as low as 10{sup -6} kPa, suggesting the potential to detect compounds such as RDX at levels as low as 10 ppb at atmospheric pressure.

  15. Accountable Care Organizations - The Basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieser, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Alexis Lieser, MD CAL/ACEP Advocacy Fellow, Sacramento, CAof Emergency Physicians (Cal/ACEP), California Medicalminimum standards. Cal/ACEP has actively opposed this idea

  16. A comparison of the chemical sinks of atmospheric organics in the gas and aqueous phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, S. A; Nizkorodov, S. A

    2012-01-01

    for the set of rele- vant organic compounds. Introductionatmospherically rele- vant compounds. In the absence of

  17. Photocatalytic and chemical oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. Progress report for FY97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, D.M.; Bryant, D.L.; Reinsch, V.

    1997-09-30

    'The background for the project is briefly reviewed and the work done during the nine months since funding was received is documented. Work began in January, 1997. A post doctoral fellow joined the team in April. The major activities completed this fiscal year were: staffing the project, design of the experimental system, procurement of components, assembly of the system. preparation of the Safe Operating Procedure and ES and H compliance, pressure testing, establishing data collection and storage methodology, and catalyst preparation. Objective The objective of the project is to develop new chemistry for the removal of organic contaminants from supercritical carbon dioxide. This has application in processes used for continuous cleaning and extraction of parts and waste materials. A secondary objective is to increase the fundamental understanding of photocatalytic chemistry. Cleaning and extraction using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}) can be applied to the solution of a wide range of environmental and pollution prevention problems in the DOE complex. Work is being done that explores scCO{sub 2} in applications ranging from cleaning contaminated soil to cleaning components constructed from plutonium. The rationale for use of scCO{sub 2} are based on the benign nature, availability and low cost, attractive solvent properties, and energy efficient separation of the extracted solute from the solvent by moderate temperature or pressure changes. To date, R and D has focussed on the methods and applications of the extraction steps of the process. Little has been done that addresses methods to polish the scCO{sub 2} for recycle in the cleaning or extraction operations. In many applications it will be desirable to reduce the level of contamination from that which would occur at steady state operation of a process. This proposal addresses chemistry to achieve that. This would be an alternative to removing a fraction of the contaminated scCO{sub 2} for disposal and using makeup scCO{sub 2}. A chemical polishing operation can reduce the release of CO{sub 2} from the process. It can also reduce the consumption of reagents that may be used in the process to enhance extraction and cleaning. A polishing operation will also reduce or avoid formation of an additional waste stream. Photocatalytic and other photochemical oxidation chemistry have not been investigated in scCO{sub 2}. The large base of information for these reactions in water, organic solvents, or air suggest that the chemistry will work in carbon dioxide. There are compelling reasons to believe that the properties of scCO{sub 2} should increase the performance of photocatalytic chemistry over that found in more conventional fluid phases.'

  18. Energy Reductions Due to Cosolvent Addition to Near Critical CO2 Extraction of Organic Chemicals from Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kingsley, G.; Moses, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    DUE TO COSOLVENT ADDITION TO NEAR CRITICAL CO EXTRACTION OF 2 . ORGANIC CHEMICALS FROM WATER GEORGE KINGSLEY, JOHN M. MOSES, CRITICAL FLUID SYSTEMS, INC. CA}lliRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS Near-critical carbon dioxide was used in conjunction... the organic is solvated into the solvent, it must be separated fran that solvent. Once again we are faced with an energy intensive distillation. It is here that the use of con:iensed gases, also known as critical fluids, can make liquid-liquid extraction...

  19. The breakthrough time and permeation rate of three organic chemicals for selected glove combinations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binion, Pete Edwin

    1992-01-01

    rates and breakthrough times were determined for the five different glove combinations versus three test chemicals using the Miran-lA infrared analyzer in a closed loop system. The polymers tested were natural rubber (NR), polyvinyl chloride (PVC... time and permeation rate when tested against three different challenge chemicals. PVC gloves with nitrile liners appeared to provide the most protection time against breakthrough for all three chemicals. The PVC gloves showed excellent resistance...

  20. Engineering the magnetic properties of hybrid organic-ferromagnetic interfaces by molecular chemical functionalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lazic, Predrag

    We have performed systematic first-principles calculations to tailor the magnetic properties at a hybrid organic-ferromagnetic interface by adsorbing organic molecules containing ?(p[subscript z]) electrons onto a magnetic ...

  1. Effects of polymethylmethacrylate-transfer residues on the growth of organic semiconductor molecules on chemical vapor deposited graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kratzer, Markus Teichert, Christian; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Kidambi, Piran R.; Matkovi?, Aleksandar; Gaji?, Radoš; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Weatherup, Robert S.; Hofmann, Stephan

    2015-03-09

    Scalably grown and transferred graphene is a highly promising material for organic electronic applications, but controlled interfacing of graphene thereby remains a key challenge. Here, we study the growth characteristics of the important organic semiconductor molecule para-hexaphenyl (6P) on chemical vapor deposited graphene that has been transferred with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) onto oxidized Si wafer supports. A particular focus is on the influence of PMMA residual contamination, which we systematically reduce by H{sub 2} annealing prior to 6P deposition. We find that 6P grows in a flat-lying needle-type morphology, surprisingly independent of the level of PMMA residue and of graphene defects. Wrinkles in the graphene typically act as preferential nucleation centers. Residual PMMA does however limit the length of the resulting 6P needles by restricting molecular diffusion/attachment. We discuss the implications for organic device fabrication, with particular regard to contamination and defect tolerance.

  2. Testing of a model to estimate vapor concentration of various organic chemicals. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakalyar, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    A model developed by Dr. Parker C. Reist to predict the build-up and decay rates of vapor concentrations following a chemical spill and clean-up was tested. The chemicals tested were: acetone, butyl acetate, ethyl acetate, hexane, methylene chloride, methyl ethyl ketone, and toluene. The evaporation rates of these chemicals were determined both by prediction, using a model developed by I. Kawamura and D. Mackay, and empirically and these rates were used in the Reist model. Chamber experiments were done to measure actual building-up and decay of vapor concentrations for simulated spills and simulated clean-up.

  3. Oxidative chemical vapor deposition of semiconducting polymers and their use In organic photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borrelli, David Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) have received significant interest for their potential low cost, high mechanical flexibility, and unique functionalities. OPVs employing semiconducting polymers in the photoactive layer have ...

  4. A study of the tropospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broekhuizen, Keith Edward, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms and kinetics of reactions important to the troposphere have been investigated using a high pressure, turbulent, discharge-flow technique coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The ability to ...

  5. ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS – FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddalena, Randy L.

    2008-01-01

    of four chemicals (styrene, tetradecane, pentadecane and theTwo of the compounds (styrene and acetaldehyde) had similarToluene Ethylbenzene p-Xylene Styrene Propyl-benzene 1,3,5-

  6. Project Profile: Hybrid Organic Silicone HTF Utilizing Endothermic Chemical Reactions for Latent Heat Storage

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, under an ARRA CSP Award, is developing a thermally stable, working heat transfer fluid (HTF) that is integrated with chemical reactions as a methodology to store large amounts of latent heat.

  7. Detailed Chemical Characterization of Unresolved Complex Mixtures (UCM) in Atmospheric Organics: Insights into Emission Sources, Atmospheric Processing and Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Arthur W. H.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed Chemical Characterization of Unresolved Complex1,5,6 Berkeley, CA, USA Chemical Sciences Division, LawrenceCIRES), University of NOAA Chemical Sciences Division,

  8. Aging of secondary organic aerosol from small aromatic VOCs. Changes in chemical composition, mass yield, volatility and hygroscopicity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hildebrandt Ruiz, L.; Paciga, A. L.; Cerully, K.; Nenes, A.; Donahue, N. M.; Pandis, S. N.

    2014-12-12

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) is transformed after its initial formation, but this chemical aging of SOA is poorly understood. Experiments were conducted in the Carnegie Mellon environmental chamber to form and transform SOA from the photo-oxidation of toluene and other small aromatic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of NOx. The effects of chemical aging on organic aerosol (OA) composition, mass yield, volatility and hygroscopicity were explored. Higher exposure to the hydroxyl radical resulted in different OA composition, average carbon oxidation state OSC) and mass yield. The OA oxidation state generally increased duringmore »photo-oxidation, and the final OA OS C ranged from -0.29 to 0.45 in the performed experiments. The volatility of OA formed in these different experiments varied by as much as a factor of 30, demonstrating that the OA formed under different oxidizing conditions can have significantly different saturation concentration. There was no clear correlation between hygroscopicity and oxidation state for this relatively hygroscopic SOA.« less

  9. Polymers via chemical vapor deposition and their application to organic photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Miles Clark

    2012-01-01

    There is emerging interest in the ability to fabricate organic photovoltaics (OPVs) on flexible, lightweight substrates, which could lower the cost of installation and enable new form factors for deployment. However, ...

  10. Oxidative and initiated chemical vapor deposition for application to organic electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Sung Gap

    2009-01-01

    Since the first discovery of polymeric conductors in 1977, the research area of "organic electronics" has grown dramatically. However, methods for forming thin films comprised solely of conductive polymers are limited by ...

  11. Methods of chemical analysis for organic waste constituents in radioactive materials: A literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clauss, S.A.; Bean, R.M.

    1993-02-01

    Most of the waste generated during the production of defense materials at Hanford is presently stored in 177 underground tanks. Because of the many waste treatment processes used at Hanford, the operations conducted to move and consolidate the waste, and the long-term storage conditions at elevated temperatures and radiolytic conditions, little is known about most of the organic constituents in the tanks. Organics are a factor in the production of hydrogen from storage tank 101-SY and represent an unresolved safety question in the case of tanks containing high organic carbon content. In preparation for activities that will lead to the characterization of organic components in Hanford waste storage tanks, a thorough search of the literature has been conducted to identify those procedures that have been found useful for identifying and quantifying organic components in radioactive matrices. The information is to be used in the planning of method development activities needed to characterize the organics in tank wastes and will prevent duplication of effort in the development of needed methods.

  12. Chemical Sciences Division - CSD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CSD Chemical Sciences Division CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links Research Areas Research Highlights Organization Contacts Publications Awards Employment...

  13. Ultra-narrow ferromagnetic resonance in organic-based thin films grown via low temperature chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, H.; Harberts, M.; Adur, R.; Hammel, P. Chris; Johnston-Halperin, E., E-mail: ejh@physics.osu.edu, E-mail: epstein@physics.osu.edu [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1117 (United States); Lu, Y. [Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1173 (United States); Epstein, A. J., E-mail: ejh@physics.osu.edu, E-mail: epstein@physics.osu.edu [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1117 (United States); Department of Chemistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1173 (United States)

    2014-07-07

    We present the growth of thin films of the organic-based ferrimagnetic semiconductor V[TCNE]{sub x} (x???2, TCNE: tetracyanoethylene) via chemical vapor deposition. Under optimized growth conditions, we observe a significant increase in magnetic homogeneity, as evidenced by a Curie temperature above 600?K and sharp magnetization switching. Further, ferromagnetic resonance studies reveal a single resonance with full width at half maximum linewidth of 1.4?G, comparable to the narrowest lines measured in inorganic magnetic materials and in contrast to previous studies that showed multiple resonance features. These characteristics are promising for the development of high frequency electronic devices that take advantage of the unique properties of this organic-based material, such as the potential for low cost synthesis combined with low temperature and conformal deposition on a wide variety of substrates.

  14. Controlling charge transport in blue organic light-emitting devices by chemical functionalization of host materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polikarpov, Evgueni; Koech, Phillip K.; Wang, Liang; Swensen, James S.; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Rainbolt, James E.; Von Ruden, Amber L.; Gaspar, Daniel J.; Padmaperuma, Asanga B.

    2011-01-18

    Generation of white light from OLEDs for general lighting applications requires a highly efficient blue component. However, a stable and power efficient blue OLED component with simple device architecture remains a significant challenge partly due to lack of appropriate host materials. Here we report the photophysical and device properties of ambipolar host phosphine oxide based materials. In this work, we studied the effect of the structural modification made to phosphine oxide-based hosts on the charge balance. We observed significant changes in charge transport within the host occurred upon small modifications to their chemical structure. As a result, an alteration of the chemical design of these materials allows for the control of charge balance of the OLED.

  15. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vernon, Stanley M. (Wellesley, MA)

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  16. Old and stable soil organic matter is not necessarily chemically recalcitrant: Implications for modeling concepts and temperature sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleber, M.; Nico, P.S.; Plante, A.; Filley, T.; Kramer, M.; Swanston, C.; Sollins, P.

    2010-03-01

    Soil carbon turnover models generally divide soil carbon into pools with varying intrinsic decomposition rates. Although these decomposition rates are modified by factors such as temperature, texture, and moisture, they are rationalized by assuming chemical structure is a primary controller of decomposition. In the current work, we use near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in combination with differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and alkaline cupric oxide (CuO) oxidation to explore this assumption. Specifically, we examined material from the 2.3-2.6 kg L{sup -1} density fraction of three soils of different type (Oxisol, Alfisol, Inceptisol). The density fraction with the youngest {sup 14}C age (Oxisol, 107 years) showed the highest relative abundance of aromatic groups and the lowest O-alkyl C/aromatic C ratio as determined by NEXAFS. Conversely, the fraction with the oldest C (Inceptisol, 680 years) had the lowest relative abundance of aromatic groups and highest O-alkyl C/aromatic C ratio. This sample also had the highest proportion of thermally labile materials as measured by DSC, and the highest ratio of substituted fatty acids to lignin phenols as indicated by CuO oxidation. Therefore, the organic matter of the Inceptisol sample, with a {sup 14}C age associated with 'passive' pools of carbon (680 years), had the largest proportion of easily metabolizable organic molecules with low thermodynamic stability, whereas the organic matter of the much younger Oxisol sample (107 years) had the highest proportion of supposedly stable organic structures considered more difficult to metabolize. Our results demonstrate that C age is not necessarily related to molecular structure or thermodynamic stability, and we suggest that soil carbon models would benefit from viewing turnover rate as codetermined by the interaction between substrates, microbial actors, and abiotic driving variables. Furthermore, assuming that old carbon is composed of complex or 'recalcitrant' compounds will erroneously attribute a greater temperature sensitivity to those materials than they may actually possess.

  17. The Statistical Evolution of Multiple Generations of Oxidation Products in the Photochemical Aging of Chemically Reduced Organic Aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, Kevin R.; Smith, Jared D.; Kessler, Sean; Kroll, Jesse H.

    2011-10-03

    The heterogeneous reaction of hydroxyl radicals (OH) with squalane and bis(2-ethylhexyl) sebacate (BES) particles are used as model systems to examine how distributions of reactionproducts evolve during the oxidation of chemically reduced organic aerosol. A kinetic model of multigenerational chemistry, which is compared to previously measured (squalane) and new(BES) experimental data, reveals that it is the statistical mixtures of different generations of oxidation products that control the average particle mass and elemental composition during thereaction. The model suggests that more highly oxidized reaction products, although initially formed with low probability, play a large role in the production of gas phase reaction products.In general, these results highlight the importance of considering atmospheric oxidation as a statistical process, further suggesting that the underlying distribution of molecules could playimportant roles in aerosol formation as well as in the evolution of key physicochemical properties such as volatility and hygroscopicity.

  18. ZnO light-emitting diode grown by plasma-assisted metal organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, W.Z.; Ye, Z.Z.; Zeng, Y.J.; Zhu, L.P.; Zhao, B.H.; Jiang, L.; Lu, J.G.; He, H.P.; Zhang, S.B. [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2006-04-24

    We report a breakthrough in fabricating ZnO homojunction light-emitting diode by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Using NO plasma, we are able to grow p-type ZnO thin films on n-type bulk ZnO substrates. The as-grown films on glass substrates show hole concentration of 10{sup 16}-10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} and mobility of 1-10 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Room-temperature photoluminescence spectra reveal nitrogen-related emissions. A typical ZnO homojunction shows rectifying behavior with a turn-on voltage of about 2.3 V. Electroluminescence at room temperature has been demonstrated with band-to-band emission at I=40 mA and defect-related emissions in the blue-yellow spectrum range.

  19. Chemical and isotopic kinetics of sulfate reduction by organic matter under hydrothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiser, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of nonbacterial sulfate reduction by organic matter in geologic environments. Sulfate is reduced by dextrose under acidic conditions at temperatures of 230-270 C. Reaction products include sulfide and organic-sulfur compounds; sulfite, thiosulfate and elemental sulfur were not detected. The rate law for the initial one- or two-electron reduction of sulfate at 250C is first-order in bisulfate and about one-half-order in initial dextrose concentration, and shows a very strong dependence on pH. The kinetics of sulfate reduction by fructose at 250C are virtually the same. The lack of sulfate reduction by formaldehyde, methanol, ethanol and acetic acid at 250 C indicates that the reducing power of dextrose and fructose cannot be attributed to carbonyl, carboxyl or hydroxyl functional groups. The form of the rate law for sulfate reduction by dextrose and the presence of an induction period rather suggest that the initial reduction of sulfate occurs with free radicals derived from the thermal decomposition of the hexoses or their alteration products. The inferred sulfate-reduction reaction mechanism suggest that aqueous sulfate may be reduced to sulfide in geologic environments such as deep sedimentary basins. The observed acid-catalysis of the reaction in the laboratory may be supplanted by clay-mineral catalysis in geologic environments. Sulfur isotopes are fractionated during the reduction of sulfate by dextrose under hydrothermal conditions. Computer simulations of the isotopic evolution of the experiments suggest that sulfate-sulfide isotopic exchange largely controls the isotopic composition of sulfate and sulfide. The extent of isotopic fractionation due solely to sulfate reduction thus cannot be determined from the experiments

  20. ALDEHYDE AND OTHER VOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICAL EMISSIONS IN FOUR FEMA TEMPORARY HOUSING UNITS ? FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salazar, Olivia; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Apte, Michael G.

    2008-05-04

    Four unoccupied FEMA temporary housing units (THUs) were studied to assess their indoor emissions of volatile organic compounds including formaldehyde. Measurement of whole-THU VOC and aldehyde emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of floor area) for each of the four THUs were made at FEMA's Purvis MS staging yard using a mass balance approach. Measurements were made in the morning, and again in the afternoon in each THU. Steady-state indoor formaldehyde concentrations ranged from 378 mu g m-3 (0.31ppm) to 632 mu g m-3 (0.52 ppm) in the AM, and from 433 mu g m-3 (0.35 ppm) to 926 mu g m-3 (0.78 ppm) in the PM. THU air exchange rates ranged from 0.15 h-1 to 0.39 h-1. A total of 45 small (approximately 0.025 m2) samples of surface material, 16 types, were collected directly from the four THUs and shipped to Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The material samples were analyzed for VOC and aldehyde emissions in small stainless steel chambers using a standard, accurate mass balance method. Quantification of VOCs was done via gas chromatography -- mass spectrometry and low molecular weight aldehydes via high performance liquid chromatography. Material specific emission factors (mu g h-1 per m2 of material) were quantified. Approximately 80 unique VOCs were tentatively identified in the THU field samples, of which forty-five were quantified either because of their toxicological significance or because their concentrations were high. Whole-trailer and material specific emission factors were calculated for 33 compounds. The THU emission factors and those from their component materials were compared against those measured from other types of housing and the materials used in their construction. Whole THU emission factors for most VOCs were typically similar to those from comparative housing. The three exceptions were exceptionally large emissions of formaldehyde and TMPD-DIB (a common plasticizer in vinyl products), and somewhat elevated for phenol. Of these three compounds, formaldehyde was the only one with toxicological significance at the observed concentrations. Whole THU formaldehyde emissions ranged from 173 to 266 mu g m-2 h 1 in the morning and 257 to 347 mu g m-2 h-1 in the afternoon. Median formaldehyde emissions in previously studied site-built and manufactured homes were 31 and 45 mu g m-2 h-1, respectively. Only one of the composite wood materials that was tested appeared to exceed the HUD formaldehyde emission standard (430 mu g/m2 h-1 for particleboard and 130 mu g/m2 h-1 for plywood). The high loading factor (material surface area divided by THU volume) of composite wood products in the THUs and the low fresh air exchange relative to the material surface area may be responsible for the excessive concentrations observed for some of the VOCs and formaldehyde.

  1. APPLICATION OF STIR BAR SORPTIVE EXTRACTION TO ANALYSIS OF VOLATILE AND SEMIVOLATILE ORGANIC CHEMICALS OF POTENTIAL CONCERN IN SOLIDS AND AQUEOUS SAMPLES FROM THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FRYE JM; KUNKEL JM

    2009-03-05

    Stir bar sorptive extraction was applied to aqueous and solid samples for the extraction and analysis of organic compounds from the Hanford chemicals of potential concern list, as identified in the vapor data quality objectives. The 222-S Laboratory analyzed these compounds from vapor samples on thermal desorption tubes as part of the Hanford Site industrial hygiene vapor sampling effort.

  2. The conversion of solar energy to the chemical energy of organic compounds is a complex process that includes electron transport and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehleringer, Jim

    The conversion of solar energy to the chemical energy of organic compounds is a complex process of stress are covered in Chapter 26. The impact of the environment on photosynthesis is of interest to plant on environmental conditions is also important to agronomists because plant productivity, and hence crop yield, de

  3. In situ metal-organic chemical vapor deposition atomic-layer deposition of aluminum oxide on GaAs using trimethyaluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In situ metal-organic chemical vapor deposition atomic-layer deposition of aluminum oxide on Ga 26 June 2008; published online 21 July 2008 In situ atomic-layer deposition ALD of Al2O3 on p­4 Recently, many ex situ methods such as atomic-layer deposition ALD of high-k on GaAs have achieved success

  4. Basic Chemical Principles 1: Reaction Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    ][O] Net O 3 +O #3; NOx ! 2O 2 #15; K 1 and K 2 are rate constants #15; Rate-determining step: often be lost through many channels: 1. Fluorescence (light emission) 2. Collisional deactivation #12; 3. Energy

  5. PARKING AND BACKING BASICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    PARKING AND BACKING BASICS BACK TO BASICS: YOUR KEYS TO SAFE DRIVING DRIVE SAFELY WORK WEEK in parking lots. Safe parking and backing is an important basic for all driver groups to master. GET BASICS GOT KIDS OR GRANDKIDS? ·It is estimated that backing over pedestrians causes 45% of non- traffic

  6. Basics of Photometry Photometry: Basic Questions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    Basics of Photometry #12;Photometry: Basic Questions · How do you identify objects in your image type of object you're studying? #12;#12;#12;Topics 1. General Considerations 2. Stellar Photometry 3. Galaxy Photometry #12;I: General Considerations 1. Garbage in, garbage out... 2. Object Detection 3

  7. Vegetable GardenVegetable Gardengg BasicsBasics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    mulch Add complete fertilizer right at planting time (4-6-8 or 6-6-6) #12;Preparing SoilPreparing Soil chests Plastic bags Plastic bags Barrels and drums #12;Other ContainersOther Containers #12;Grow BoxesOrganic Gardening Certification required (if selling produce) Composting Mulching No synthetic chemicals (pesticides

  8. Chemical Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesca Matteucci

    2007-04-05

    In this series of lectures we first describe the basic ingredients of galactic chemical evolution and discuss both analytical and numerical models. Then we compare model results for the Milky Way, Dwarf Irregulars, Quasars and the Intra-Cluster- Medium with abundances derived from emission lines. These comparisons allow us to put strong constraints on the stellar nucleosynthesis and the mechanisms of galaxy formation.

  9. Effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time, and seed particles on secondary organic aerosol chemical composition and yield

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lambe, A. T.; Chhabra, P. S.; Onasch, T. B.; Brune, W. H.; Hunter, J. F.; Kroll, J. H.; Cummings, M. J.; Brogan, J. F.; Parmar, Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; et al

    2015-03-18

    We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) continuous flow reactor and several environmental chambers. In the flow reactor, SOA precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2.0 × 108 to 2.2 × 1010 molec cm-3 over exposure times of 100 s. In the environmental chambers, precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2 × 106 to 2 × 107 molec cm-3 over exposure times of several hours. The OH concentration in themore »chamber experiments is close to that found in the atmosphere, but the integrated OH exposure in the flow reactor can simulate atmospheric exposure times of multiple days compared to chamber exposure times of only a day or so. In most cases, for a specific SOA type the most-oxidized chamber SOA and the least-oxidized flow reactor SOA have similar mass spectra, oxygen-to-carbon and hydrogen-to-carbon ratios, and carbon oxidation states at integrated OH exposures between approximately 1 × 1011 and 2 × 1011 molec cm-3 s, or about 1–2 days of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. This observation suggests that in the range of available OH exposure overlap for the flow reactor and chambers, SOA elemental composition as measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer is similar whether the precursor is exposed to low OH concentrations over long exposure times or high OH concentrations over short exposure times. This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of sulfate seed particles on isoprene SOA yield measurements was examined in the flow reactor. The studies show that seed particles increase the yield of SOA produced in flow reactors by a factor of 3 to 5 and may also account in part for higher SOA yields obtained in the chambers, where seed particles are routinely used.« less

  10. Basic First Aid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoessow, Courtney

    2005-09-30

    Keep this list handy so you'll know how to give basic first aid to treat cuts, heat exhaustion, and other accidents and injuries.

  11. Effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time, and seed particles on secondary organic aerosol chemical composition and yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lambe, A. T.

    We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) continuous ...

  12. Basic principle of superconductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian De Cao

    2009-11-10

    The basic principle of superconductivity is suggested in this paper. There have been two vital wrong suggestions on the basic principle, one is the relation between superconductivity and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and another is the relation between superconductivity and pseudogap.

  13. Basic Microfluidic Lithographic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentiss, Mara

    CHAPTER 2 Basic Microfluidic and Soft Lithographic Techniques Sindy K.Y. Tang and George M in these devices are based on those developed for microfluidics used in biochemical anal- ysis. This chapter describes the basic ideas of microfluidics. We first summarize the materials most commonly used

  14. Chemical inducible promoter used to obtain transgenic plants with a silent marker and organisms and cells and methods of using same for screening for mutations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zuo, Jianru (New York, NY); Chua, Nam-Hai (Scarsdale, NY)

    2007-06-12

    Disclosed is a chemically inducible promoter for transforming plants or plant cells with genes which are regulatable by adding the plants or cells to a medium containing an inducer or by removing them from such medium. The promoter is inducible by a glucocorticoid, estrogen or inducer not endogenous to plants. Such promoters may be used with any plant genes that can promote shoot regeneration and development to induce shoot formation in the presence of a glucocorticoid, estrogen or inducer. The promoter may be used with antibiotic or herbicide resistance genes or other genes which are regulatable by the presence or absence of a given inducer. Also presented are organisms or cells comprising a gene wherein the natural promoter of the gene is disrupted and the gene is placed under the control of a transgenic inducible promoter. These organisms and cells and their progeny are useful for screening for conditional gain of function and loss of function mutations.

  15. Basics of Dusty Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignatov, A.M. [Prokhorov Institute of General Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, ul. Vavilova 38, Moscow, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2005-01-15

    The paper presents an introductory review of the basic physical processes in dusty plasmas. The topics to be addressed are dust charging, forces acting on dust grains, interaction between dust grains, and dust-plasma structures.

  16. Biomass Basics Webinar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) is hosting a Biomass Basics Webinar on August 27, 2015, from 4:00-4:40pm EDT. This webinar will provide high school students and teachers with background...

  17. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    ) Principles of probability and statistics, random variables and random functions. Application to chemical) CHE 442 Chemical Reactor Analysis (3, Fa) Basic concepts of chemical kinetics and chemical reactor to Separation Pro- cesses (3, Sp) Use of equilibrium phase relations and principles of material and energy

  18. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Introduction to Separation Processes (3, Sp) Use of equilibrium phase relations and principles of material by petition only. 405 Applications of Probability and Statistics for Chemical Engineers (3, Fa) Principles Chemical Reactor Analysis (3, Fa) Basic concepts of chemical kinetics and chemical reactor design

  19. Simple Linear Regression Basic Ideas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simple Linear Regression Basic Ideas Some Examples Least Squares Statistical View of Least Squares of Least Squares #12;Simple Linear Regression Basic Ideas Some Examples Least Squares Basic Ideas Suppose #12;Simple Linear Regression Basic Ideas Some Examples Least Squares Basic Ideas Suppose we have two

  20. Energy Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Basics Energy Basics Below is information about the student activitylesson plan from your search. Grades K-4, 5-8 Subject Energy Basics Summary Students will complete a...

  1. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive flexible metal substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, P. Rathi, M.; Gao, Y.; Yao, Y.; Selvamanickam, V.; Zheng, N.; Ahrenkiel, P.; Martinez, J.

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate heteroepitaxial growth of single-crystalline-like n and p-type doped GaAs thin films on inexpensive, flexible, and light-weight metal foils by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Single-crystalline-like Ge thin film on biaxially textured templates made by ion beam assisted deposition on metal foil served as the epitaxy enabling substrate for GaAs growth. The GaAs films exhibited strong (004) preferred orientation, sharp in-plane texture, low grain misorientation, strong photoluminescence, and a defect density of ?10{sup 7?}cm{sup ?2}. Furthermore, the GaAs films exhibited hole and electron mobilities as high as 66 and 300?cm{sup 2}/V-s, respectively. High mobility single-crystalline-like GaAs thin films on inexpensive metal substrates can pave the path for roll-to-roll manufacturing of flexible III-V solar cells for the mainstream photovoltaics market.

  2. Evaluation of GaN substrates grown in supercritical basic ammonia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saito, Makoto; Yamada, Hisashi; Iso, Kenji; Sato, Hitoshi; Hirasawa, Hirohiko; Kamber, Derrick S.; Hashimoto, Tadao; Baars, Steven P. den; Speck, James S.; Nakamura, Shuji [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2009-02-02

    GaN crystals grown by the basic ammonothermal method were investigated for their use as substrates for device regrowth. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the substrates contained multiple grains while secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) revealed a high concentration of hydrogen, oxygen, and sodium. Despite these drawbacks, the emission from the light emitting diode structures grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on both the c-plane and m-plane epitaxial wafers was demonstrated. The SIMS depth profiles showed that the diffusion of the alkali metal from the substrate into the epitaxial film was small, especially in the m-direction.

  3. Notes on basic algebraic geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-06-16

    Jun 16, 2008 ... Notes on basic algebraic geometry ...... Having discovered the basic equation ..... back to a rational function on X. Thus we get a nonzero ...

  4. Managing chemicals safety: Putting it all together

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    Businesses that use hazardous chemicals can prevent accidents--if they have the right information. It's up to industry, large and small, to manage chemicals safely. But an effective, integrated approach to prevention involves a whole network of other players, too: fire and emergency services, trade associations, labor organizations, professional societies, government at all levels, insurance companies and financial lenders, the environmental community and other public interest groups, and the media. Sharing information across this network is what makes prevention work. The publication is one piece of that information mosaic. It shows owners and managers of smaller enterprises how to get started in chemical safety management. It gives basic definitions and describes the benefits. It suggests initial steps and recommends sources and resources for additional information.

  5. Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

  6. Intellectual Patent Basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Intellectual Property Patent Basics Roland W. Norris Pauley Petersen Kinne & Erickson 2800 W;Introduction Intellectual property: Patents Trademarks Copyrights Trade Secrets #12;What is a Patent? A right For the term of the patent 20 years from date of filing of earliest related patent or application #12;A

  7. Cost Sharing Basics Definitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Cost Sharing Basics Definitions Some funding agencies require the grantee institution the project costs. Cost sharing is defined as project costs not borne by the sponsor. Cost sharing funds may resources or facilities. If the award is federal, only acceptable non-federal costs qualify as cost sharing

  8. CLIMATE PRODUCTS Basic Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE PRODUCTS Basic Climatology Colorado Climate Center Funding provided by NOAA Sectoral the computer or a telephone system Data are collected by the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), where) The original observations relate to WEATHER, not CLIMATE. But if we look at this information over a much longer

  9. WEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WEATHER HAZARDS Basic Climatology Colorado Climate Center Funding provided by NOAA Sectoral) Wildfires (Jun 02) Recent Declared Disasters in Colorado No Map from FEMA provided #12;National Weather and Warnings Outlook Indicates that hazardous weather may develop ­ useful to those who need considerable

  10. Nuclear Reactions Some Basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilfoyle, Jerry

    Nuclear Reactions Some Basics I. Reaction Cross Sections #12;Common Units in Nuclear Physics sphere: = (4r2)/r2 = 4 (sr)steradians r A 2 = (r)radians r s = r A O s r O #12;Types of Nuclear Reactions · When a particle strikes a nucleus, the resulting interaction is referred to as a "nuclear

  11. Removal of organic and inorganic sulfur from Ohio coal by combined physical and chemical process. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attia, Y.A.; Zeky, M.El.; Lei, W.W.; Bavarian, F.; Yu, S.

    1989-04-28

    This project consisted of three sections. In the first part, the physical cleaning of Ohio coal by selective flocculation of ultrafine slurry was considered. In the second part, the mild oxidation process for removal of pyritic and organic sulfur.was investigated. Finally, in-the third part, the combined effects of these processes were studied. The physical cleaning and desulfurization of Ohio coal was achieved using selective flocculation of ultrafine coal slurry in conjunction with froth flotation as flocs separation method. The finely disseminated pyrite particles in Ohio coals, in particular Pittsburgh No.8 seam, make it necessary to use ultrafine ({minus}500 mesh) grinding to liberate the pyrite particles. Experiments were performed to identify the ``optimum`` operating conditions for selective flocculation process. The results indicated that the use of a totally hydrophobic flocculant (FR-7A) yielded the lowest levels of mineral matters and total sulfur contents. The use of a selective dispersant (PAAX) increased the rejection of pyritic sulfur further. In addition, different methods of floc separation techniques were tested. It was found that froth flotation system was the most efficient method for separation of small coal flocs.

  12. Basic Solar Energy Research in Japan (2011 EFRC Forum)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Domen, Kazunari (University of Tokyo)

    2012-03-14

    Kazunari Domen, Chemical System Engineering Professor at the University of Tokyo, was the second speaker in the May 26, 2011 EFRC Forum session, "Global Perspectives on Frontiers in Energy Research." In his presentation, Professor Domen talked about basic solar energy research in Japan. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  13. Vacuum Basics & PumpsVacuum Basics & PumpsVacuum Basics & PumpsVacuum Basics & Pumps Ref: CLC notes (JHU)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Kai

    Vacuum Basics & PumpsVacuum Basics & PumpsVacuum Basics & PumpsVacuum Basics & Pumps Ref: CLC notes (JHU) Some graphs courtesy of KJLesker, Edwards, Veeco #12;I. VacuumI. Vacuum 1 atm= 760 torr = 1.0132 bar = 1.013x105 Pa = 14.7 psi Rough Vacuum (RV) 1 torr ­ 760 torrg ( ) Medium Vacuum (MV) 10-5 torr

  14. Basic Energy Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintock and PrincipalBasic Energy

  15. NREL: Learning - Hydrogen Basics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJessework usesof EnergyY-12Working withPhoto of theSolarHydrogen Basics

  16. Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences Program | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Program The Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences (CSGB) activities at...

  17. Low-temperature growth and orientational control in RuO{sub 2} thin films by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, G.R.; Wang, A.; Foster, C.M.; Vetrone, J.; Patel, J.; Wu, X.

    1996-08-01

    For growth temperatures in the range of 275 C to 425 C, highly conductive RuO{sub 2} thin films with either (110)- or (101)-textured orientations have been grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on both SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) and Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si(001) substrates. Both the growth temperature and growth rate were used to control the type and degree of orientational texture of the RuO{sub 2} films. In the upper part of this growth temperature range ({approximately} 350 C) and at a low growth rate (< 30 {angstrom}/min.), the RuO{sub 2} films favored a (110)-textured. In contrast, at the lower part of this growth temperature range ({approximately} 300 C) and at a high growth rate (> 30 {angstrom}/min.), the RuO{sub 2} films favored a (101)-textured. In contrast, a higher growth temperatures (> 425 C) always produced randomly-oriented polycrystalline films. For either of these low-temperature growth processes, the films produced were crack-free, well-adhered to the substrates, and had smooth, specular surfaces. Atomic force microscopy showed that the films had a dense microstructure with an average grain size of 50--80 nm and a rms. surface roughness of {approximately} 3--10 nm. Four-probe electrical transport measurements showed that the films were highly conductive with resistivities of 34--40 {micro}{Omega}-cm ({at} 25 C).

  18. Introduction Basics of gravity theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    Introduction Basics of gravity theory Actions and Field Equations Phenomenology Discussion;Introduction Basics of gravity theory Actions and Field Equations Phenomenology Discussion and Conclusions Victoria U of Wellington - Feb 2nd 2009 #12;Introduction Basics of gravity theory Actions and Field

  19. Coding theory basics Toric codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, John B.

    Coding theory basics Toric codes Tools from the toric world Higher-dimensional polytopes. Little Toric Varieties in Coding Theory #12;Coding theory basics Toric codes Tools from the toric world(!) John B. Little Toric Varieties in Coding Theory #12;Coding theory basics Toric codes Tools from

  20. f-Element Ion Chelation in Highly Basic Media - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paine, R.T.

    2000-12-12

    A large body of data has been collected over the last fifty years on the chemical behavior of f-element ions. The ions undergo rapid hydrolysis reactions in neutral or basic aqueous solutions that produce poorly understood oxide-hydroxide species; therefore, most of the fundamental f-element solution chemistry has allowed synthetic and separations chemists to rationally design advanced organic chelating ligands useful for highly selective partitioning and separation of f-element ions from complex acidic solution matrices. These ligands and new examples under development allow for the safe use and treatment of solutions containing highly radioactive species. This DOE/EMSP project was undertaken to address the following fundamental objectives: (1) study the chemical speciation of Sr and lanthanide (Ln) ions in basic aqueous media containing classical counter anions found in waste matrices; (2) prepare pyridine N-oxide phosphonates and phosphonic acids that might act as selective chelator s for Ln ions in model basic pH waste streams; (3) study the binding of the new chelators toward Ln ions and (4) examine the utility of the chelators as decontamination and dissolution agents under basic solution conditions. The project has been successful in attacking selected aspects of the very difficult problems associated with basic pH solution f-element waste chemistry. In particular, the project has (1) shed additional light on the initial stages of Ln ion sol-gel-precipitate formulation under basic solution conditions; (2) generated new families of pyridine phosphonic acid chelators; (3) characterized the function of the chelators and (4) examined their utility as oxide-hydroxide dissolution agents. These findings have contributed significantly to an improved understanding of the behavior of Ln ions in basic media containing anions found in typical waste sludges as well as to the development of sludge dissolution agents. The new chelating reagents are easily made and could be prepared in quantities suitable for large scale decontamination and dissolution processes involving sludges. Further studies will be required to assess specific performance in actinide ion bearing wastes.

  1. 1998 Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackerman, J.P.; Einziger, R.E.; Gay, E.C.; Green, D.W.; Miller, J.F.

    1999-08-06

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1998 are presented.

  2. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials and electrified interfaces. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1997 are presented.

  3. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL REACTOR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palanki, Srinivas

    methane to generate hydrogen, are analyzed. In particular, basic chemical engineering principles with oxygen to generate electrical power which drives an electric motor. A brief description of the two main for automotive ap- plications, using methane as a fuel, are analyzed. Basic chemical engineering principles

  4. Project Profile: Hybrid Organic Silicone HTF Utilizing Endothermic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hybrid Organic Silicone HTF Utilizing Endothermic Chemical Reactions for Latent Heat Storage Project Profile: Hybrid Organic Silicone HTF Utilizing Endothermic Chemical Reactions...

  5. Nanostructured Basic Catalysts: Opportunities for Renewable Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conner, William C; Huber, George; Auerbach, Scott

    2009-06-30

    This research studied and developed novel basic catalysts for production of renewable chemicals and fuels from biomass. We focused on the development of unique porous structural-base catalysts zeolites. These catalysts were compared to conventional solid base materials for aldol condensation, that were being commercialized for production of fuels from biomass and would be pivotal in future biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals. Specifically, we had studied the aldolpyrolysis over zeolites and the trans-esterification of vegetable oil with methanol over mixed oxide catalysts. Our research has indicated that the base strength of framework nitrogen in nitrogen substituted zeolites (NH-zeolites) is nearly twice as strong as in standard zeolites. Nitrogen substituted catalysts have been synthesized from several zeolites (including FAU, MFI, BEA, and LTL) using NH3 treatment.

  6. Environmental Education: Back to Basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoss, Frederick W.

    1994-01-01

    to the topic of environmental education, and has greatlyEnvironmental Education: Back to Basics Frederick W. Stoss environmental education. These resources are

  7. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    of equilibrium phase relations and principles of material and energy balance for design, operation of Probability and Statistics for Chemical Engineers (3, Fa) Principles of probability and statistics, random to Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering (3, Fa) (Enroll in BME 410) CHE 442 Chemical Reactor Analysis (3, Fa) Basic

  8. Health Care Basics: Choosing the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    2012 Health Care Basics: Choosing the Best Option for Your Health "Creating A More Educated Georgia" #12;Health Care Basics 2 Medical Options for Plan Year 2012 The University System of Georgia's Plan of Regents will offer the following health care options: · Blue Choice HMO · Kaiser Permanente HMO · HSA Open

  9. Louisiana Tech University Some Basic Facts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    Louisiana Tech University Some Basic Facts 2005 - 2009 #12;LOUISIANA TECH UNIVERSITY Some Basic..........................................................................................................................30 Feeder High Schools

  10. Louisiana Tech University Some Basic Facts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    Louisiana Tech University Some Basic Facts 2006 - 2010 #12;LOUISIANA TECH UNIVERSITY Some Basic..........................................................................................................................30 Feeder High Schools

  11. Louisiana Tech University Some Basic Facts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    Louisiana Tech University Some Basic Facts 2004 - 2008 #12;LOUISIANA TECH UNIVERSITY Some Basic...........................................................................................................29 Feeder High Schools

  12. Louisiana Tech University Some Basic Facts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    Louisiana Tech University Some Basic Facts 2007 - 2011 #12;LOUISIANA TECH UNIVERSITY Some Basic..........................................................................................................................30 Feeder High Schools

  13. Institutional Change Basics for Sustainability | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Institutional Change Basics for Sustainability Institutional Change Basics for Sustainability Institutional change integrates technology, policy, and behavior to make new...

  14. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Introduction to Separation Processes (3, Sp) Use of equilibrium phase relations and principles of material by petition only. 405 Applications of Probability and Statistics for Chemical Engineers (3, Fa) Principles Chemical Reactor Analysis (4, Fa) Basic concepts of chemical kinetics and chemical reactor design

  15. Chemical leukoderma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Reilly, Kathryn E; Patel, Utpal; Chu, Julie; Patel, Rishi; Machler, Brian C

    2011-01-01

    the first report, to date, of chemical leukoderma that wasreview on biological, chemical and clinical aspects. Pigment4. Briganti S, et al. Chemical and instrumental approaches

  16. Export Control Basics Updated on May 15, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    Export Control Basics Updated on May 15, 2014 #12;Your Logo What are Export Controls? U.S. laws is the purpose of the Regulations? Your Logo Implement foreign policy goals and objectives Restrict exports of weapons of mass destruction (chemical, biological, nuclear) Prevent terrorism Restrict exports of goods

  17. Subscriber access provided by University Libraries | University of Notre Dame Organic Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    Subscriber access provided by University Libraries | University of Notre Dame Organic Letters in paint strippers and removers.4 The homologue, 1,2-dichloroethane, is produced in much larger amounts

  18. Chemical Reactor Analysis and Optimal Digestion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jumars, Pete

    derived from basic principles o f chemical reactor analysis and design Deborah L. Penry and Peter in terms of chemical reactor components and then use principles of reactor design to identify variablesJ 310 Chemical Reactor Analysis and Optimal Digestion An optimal digestion theory can be readily

  19. Cosmic Particle Acceleration: Basic Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. W. Jones

    2000-12-22

    Cosmic-rays are ubiquitous, but their origins are surprisingly difficult to understand. A review is presented of some of the basic issues common to cosmic particle accelerators and arguments leading to the likely importance of diffusive shock acceleration as a general explanation. The basic theory of diffusive shock acceleration is outlined, followed by a discussion of some of the key issues that still prevent us from a full understanding of its outcomes. Some recent insights are mentioned at the end that may help direct ultimate resolution of our uncertainties.

  20. Chemical reactivities of ambient air samples in three Southern California communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    and A.K. Cho. 2012. The chemical biology of naphthoquinonesinvolvement of organic chemicals and oxidative stress. Curr.www.tandfonline.com/loi/uawm20 Chemical reactivities of

  1. Vehicle Battery Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Battery Basics November 22, 2013 - 1:58pm Addthis Vehicle Battery Basics Batteries are essential for electric drive technologies such as hybrid electric vehicles...

  2. BASIC TOOLS FOR COMPUTING IN MULTIGRADED RINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    BASIC TOOLS FOR COMPUTING IN MULTIGRADED RINGS MARTIN KREUZER the useful characteristics of basic tools and some of the more advanced, and less frequently used, tools

  3. Basic energy properties of electrolytic solutions database. ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Basic energy properties of electrolytic solutions database. Viscosity, thermal conductivity, density, enthalpy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Basic energy properties...

  4. Basic Research Needs: Catalysis for Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Alexis T.; Gates, Bruce C.; Ray, Douglas; Thompson, Michael R.

    2008-03-11

    The report presents results of a workshop held August 6-8, 2007, by DOE SC Basic Energy Sciences to determine the basic research needs for catalysis research.

  5. Health Care Buildings : Basic Characteristics Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Basic Characteristics Tables Buildings and Size Data by Basic Characteristics for Health Care Buildings Number of Buildings (thousand) Percent of Buildings Floorspace (million...

  6. Harmonic Morphisms -Basics Sigmundur Gudmundsson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gudmundsson, Sigmundur

    Harmonic Morphisms - Basics Sigmundur Gudmundsson Department of Mathematics Faculty of Science Lund University Sigmundur.Gudmundsson@math.lu.se March 11, 2014 #12;Harmonic Maps in Gaussian Geometry Harmonic Maps in Riemannian Geometry Outline 1 Harmonic Maps in Gaussian Geometry Holomorphic Functions in One

  7. Topics in Basic Maser Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moshe Elitzur

    2001-05-11

    This review covers some of the developments in basic theory of astronomical masers over the past ten years. Topics included are the effects of three dimensional geometry and polarization, with special emphasis on the differences between maser and non-maser radiation.

  8. RESEARCH PROJECTS A Basic research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    25 7 RESEARCH PROJECTS A Basic research SOFT SENSOR METHODS TO IMPROVE COMPETENCE OF INDUSTRIAL, Oulu University Duration of the project: 2000-2004 The aim is to improve the competence of industrial. #12;26 B Energy and process automation INTERACTION BETWEEN WOOD AND DEFIBRATION MEDIA IN GRINDING

  9. Nighttime chemical evolution of aerosol and trace gases in a power plant plume: Implications for secondary organic nitrate and organosulfate aerosol formation, NO? radical chemistry, and N?O? heterogeneous hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaveri, Rahul A.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Brechtel, Fred J.; Gilles, Marry K.; Hubbe, John M.; Jayne, J. T.; Kleinman, Lawrence I.; Laskin, Alexander; Madronich, Sasha; Onasch, Timothy B.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Springston, Stephen R.; Thornton, Joel A.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2010-06-22

    Chemical evolution of aerosols and trace gases in the Salem Harbor power plant plume was monitored with the DOE G-1 aircraft on the night of July 30-31, 2002. Quasi-Lagrangian sampling in the plume at increasing downwind distances/processing times was guided by a constant-volume tetroon that was released near the power plant at sunset. While no evidence of fly ash particles was found, concentrations of particulate organics, sulfate, and nitrate were higher in the plume than in the nearby background air. These species were internally mixed and the particles were acidic, suggesting that particulate nitrate was in the form of organic nitrate. The enhanced particulate organic and nitrate masses in the plume were inferred to be as secondary organic aerosol, possibly formed from the NO3 radical-initiated oxidation of isoprene and other trace organic gases in the presence of acidic sulfate particles. The enhanced particulate sulfate concentrations observed in the plume were attributed to direct emissions of gaseous SO3/H2SO4 from the power plant. Furthermore, concentration of nucleation mode particles was significantly higher in the plume than in background air, suggesting that some of the emitted H2SO4 had nucleated to form new particles. Spectromicroscopic analyses of particle samples suggested that some sulfate was likely in the form of organosulfates. Constrained Lagrangian model analysis of the aircraft and tetroon observations showed that heterogeneous hydrolysis of N2O5 was negligibly slow. These results have significant implications for several scientific and regulatory issues related to the impacts of power plant emissions on atmospheric chemistry, air quality, visibility, and climate.

  10. Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Introduction to Separation Processes (3, Sp) Use of equilibrium phase relations and principles of material by petition only. 405 Applications of Probability and Statistics for Chemical Engineers (3, Fa) Principles 226. #12;41 CHEMICAL & MATERIALS SCIENCE 442 Chemical Reactor Analysis (4, Fa) Basic concepts

  11. Regulations and Basic Information Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Regulations and Basic Information Table of Contents Safe and Effective Use.) for Various Quantities of Water

  12. Chemical process hazards analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

  13. The NIEHS Superfund basic research and training program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, B. [National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Superfund Basic Research and Training Program; Blackard, B. [Technology Planning and Management Corp., Durham, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) Superfund Basic Research and Training Program (SBRP) was established in 1986 by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA). This is a unique program of basic research and training grants directed towards understanding, assessing and attenuating the adverse effects on human health resulting from exposure to hazardous substances. The research findings from this program are being used by state, local, and federal agencies, private organizations and industry in making decisions related to the management of hazardous substances. Many innovative technologies for detecting, assessing and reducing toxic materials in the environment have been developed as a result of funding by the SBRP. To assist grantees, the SBRP has developed a technology transfer strategy designed to handle the unique problems associated with transferring multidisciplinary technology from basic research to applied research.

  14. INCOMPATIBLE CHEMICAL LIST PRUDENT PRACTICES FOR HANDLING CHEMICALS IN LABORATORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhongfei "Mark"

    of Incompatible Chemicals CHEMICAL IS INCOMPATIBLE WITH Acetic Acid Chromic acid, nitric acid, hydroxyl compounds, finely divided organic or combustible materials Chromic acid and chromium trioxide Acetic acid Acetylene, fulminic acid, ammonia Nitrates Sulfuric acid Nitric acid (concentrated) Acetic acid, aniline

  15. The Basicity of Texas Soils. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1929-01-01

    mixture of nitrate of soda and sulphate of ammonia in proper proportions will not affect the acidity of the soil. THE BASICITY OF TEXAS SOILS 7 The importance of these characteristics of sulphate of ammonia and nitrate of soda depencls upon various... to the effect of fertilizer an the reaction of soils. Some fertilizer materials, such as sulphate of ammonia, have a tendency to cause the soil to become acid. Sulphate ,of ammonia reacts with the replaceable bases in the soil silicates; the ammonia replaces...

  16. Hydropower Basics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (JournalvivoHighHussein Khalil HusseinH2FASTCELLHydrogenation ofBasics

  17. Biofuels Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETO QuizResults in First Algae SurfboardBasics »

  18. Biopower Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETO QuizResults in FirstJuneBiomassBiopower Basics

  19. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    CHEM 6471 CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings 9:35 ­ 10:55 am, Tuesday and Thursday of October 22-26 Textbooks Molecular Thermodynamics by D.A McQuarrie and J.D. Simon, University Science Books the laws of classical thermodynamics and some of their chemical applications. It also covers basic

  20. Small Space Heater Basics | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Small Space Heater Basics Small Space Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 10:38am Addthis Small space heaters, also called portable heaters, are typically used when the main heating...

  1. BACK TO BASICS: YOUR KEYS TO SAFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    BACK TO BASICS: YOUR KEYS TO SAFE DRIVING FINE-TUNE THE FUNDAMENTALS DRIVE SAFELY WORK WEEK: FRIDAY an occasional refresher. In fact, most company fleet safety programs emphasize basic skills and defensive

  2. Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quartly, Graham

    Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea: Part 1 - In situ sensors G. D. Quartly, T. H. Guymer-320 #12;#12;Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea: Part 1 ± In situ sensors G. D. Quartly, T. H

  3. Basic Research Needs for the Hydrogen Economy

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use was held May 13-15, 2003 to assess the basic research needs to assure a secure energy future. This report is based on t

  4. University of North Carolina Basic Spending Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    University of North Carolina Wilmington Basic Spending Guidelines by Fund Source July 1, 2009 University of North Carolina Wilmington Basic Spending Guidelines by Fund Source #12;1 Table of Contents July

  5. Basic Instructor Training | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Basic Instructor Training Basic Instructor Training January 22, 2015 - 5:54pm Addthis The Emergency Operations Training Academy, NA 40.2, Readiness and Training, Albuquerque, NM is...

  6. Biomass Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-04-01

    Biomass Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy. This document provides general information about bioenergy and its creation and potential uses.

  7. Civil Defence Manual of Basic Training volume II: Basic methods of protection against high explosive missiles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous

    1949-01-01

    H0ME OFFICE CIVIL DEFENCE Manual of Basic Training VOLUME II BASIC METHODS OF PROTECTION AGAINST HIGH EXPLOSIVE MISSILES PAMPHLET No 5

  8. United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI) 1991-2012 and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathai, A M; Balogh, W R

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains an overview and summary on the achievements of the United Nations basic space science initiative in terms of donated and provided planetariums, astronomical telescopes, and space weather instruments, particularly operating in developing nations. This scientific equipment has been made available to respective host countries, particularly developing nations, through the series of twenty basic space science workshops, organized through the United Nations Programme on Space Applications since 1991. Organized by the United Nations, the European Space Agency (ESA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States of America, and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the basic space science workshops were organized as a series of workshops that focused on basic space science (1991-2004), the International Heliophysical Year 2007 (2005-2009), and the International Space Weather Initiative (2010-2012) proposed by the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Spac...

  9. New Thermodynamic Paradigm of Chemical Equilibria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Zilbergleyt

    2011-10-28

    The paper presents new thermodynamic paradigm of chemical equilibrium, setting forth comprehensive basics of Discrete Thermodynamics of Chemical Equilibria (DTd). Along with previous results by the author during the last decade, this work contains also some new developments of DTd. Based on the Onsager's constitutive equations, reformulated by the author thermodynamic affinity and reaction extent, and Le Chatelier's principle, DTd brings forward a notion of chemical equilibrium as a balance of internal and external thermodynamic forces (TdF), acting against a chemical system. Basic expression of DTd is the chemical system logistic map of thermodynamic states that ties together energetic characteristics of chemical reaction, occurring in the system, the system shift from "true" thermodynamic equilibrium (TdE), and causing that shift external thermodynamic forces. Solutions to the basic map are pitchfork bifurcation diagrams in coordinates "shift from TdE - growth factor (or TdF)"; points, corresponding to the system thermodynamic states, are dwelling on its branches. The diagrams feature three typical areas: true thermodynamic equilibrium and open equilibrium along the thermodynamic branch before the threshold of its stability, i.e. bifurcation point, and bifurcation area with bistability and chaotic oscillations after the point. The set of solutions makes up the chemical system domain of states. The new paradigm complies with the correspondence principle: in isolated chemical system external TdF vanish, and the basic map turns into traditional expression of chemical equilibrium via thermodynamic affinity. The theory binds together classical and contemporary thermodynamics of chemical equilibria on a unique conceptual basis. The paper is essentially reworked and refocused version of the earlier preprint on the DTd basics, supplemented with new results.

  10. CHEMICAL SEPARATION OF WATER B.E. Adebona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    District of Columbia, University of the

    ................................................................................. Organics ......................................................................................... Organic pathogens to complex organic substances. The chemical industry during the last twenty-five years has, chlorophenols, etc.), paints, pesticides and other toxic substances are discharged into man's environment

  11. ENGINEERED ELECTRODES AND ELECTRODE-ORGANIC INTERFACES FOR HIGH-EFFICIENCY ORGANIC PHOTOVOLTAICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobin J. Marks; R.P.H. Chang; Tom Mason; Ken Poeppelmeier; Arthur J. Freeman

    2008-11-13

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells offer the ultimate promise of low cost, readily manufacturable, and durable solar power. While recent advances have led to cells with impressive performance levels, OPV cells have yet to break the double-digit efficiency barrier. Further gains in efficiency and durability, to that competitive with high-performance inorganic photovoltaics will require breakthroughs in transparent electrode and interfacial materials science and engineering. This project involved an integrated basic research effort carried out by an experienced and highly collaborative interdisciplinary team to address in unconventional ways, critical electrode-interfacial issues underlying OPV performance--controlling band offsets between transparent electrodes and organics, addressing current loss/leakage problems at interfaces, enhancing adhesion, interfacial stability, and device durability while minimizing cost. It synergistically combined materials and interfacial reagent synthesis, nanostructural and photovoltaic characterization, and high level quantum theory. The research foci were: 1) understanding of/development of superior transparent electrode materials and materials morphologies--i.e., better matched electronically and chemically to organic active layers, 2) understanding-based development of inorganic interfacial current-collecting/charge-blocking layers, and 3) understanding-based development of self-assembled adhesion/current-collecting/charge-blocking/cross-linking layers for high-efficiency OPV interfaces. Pursing the goal of developing the fundamental scientific understanding needed to design, fabricate, prototype and ultimately test high-efficiency OPV cells incorporating these new concepts, we achieved a record power conversion efficiency of 5.2% for an organic bulk-heterjunction solar cell.

  12. Chemical & Engineering News Serving the chemical, life sciences and laboratory worlds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leigh, David A.

    Chemical & Engineering News Serving the chemical, life sciences and laboratory worlds Science benzaldehyde foothold (green). Under basic conditions, the walker's hydrazide foot is tethered, and the sulfide was not understood in atomic detail. Instead, biological walking motors delivered conceptual inspiration to those

  13. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Objective Chemical Engineers of chemicals. This lesson introduces students to one component of chemical engineering: food processing, and a chemical engineer 2. How chemical engineers are involved in food production 3. That chemical engineers need

  14. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1991-07-02

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed. The sensors comprise a mechanochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment. They are operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical response. 9 figures.

  15. Vacuum pyrolysis of waste tires with basic additives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Xinghua; Wang Tiejun Ma Longlong; Chang Jie

    2008-11-15

    Granules of waste tires were pyrolyzed under vacuum (3.5-10 kPa) conditions, and the effects of temperature and basic additives (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, NaOH) on the properties of pyrolysis were thoroughly investigated. It was obvious that with or without basic additives, pyrolysis oil yield increased gradually to a maximum and subsequently decreased with a temperature increase from 450 deg. C to 600 deg. C, irrespective of the addition of basic additives to the reactor. The addition of NaOH facilitated pyrolysis dramatically, as a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 48 wt% was achieved at 550 deg. C without the addition of basic additives, while a maximal pyrolysis oil yield of about 50 wt% was achieved at 480 deg. C by adding 3 wt% (w/w, powder/waste tire granules) of NaOH powder. The composition analysis of pyrolytic naphtha (i.b.p. (initial boiling point) {approx}205 deg. C) distilled from pyrolysis oil showed that more dl-limonene was obtained with basic additives and the maximal content of dl-limonene in pyrolysis oil was 12.39 wt%, which is a valuable and widely-used fine chemical. However, no improvement in pyrolysis was observed with Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} addition. Pyrolysis gas was mainly composed of H{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, C{sub 2}H{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Pyrolytic char had a surface area comparable to commercial carbon black, but its proportion of ash (above 11.5 wt%) was much higher.

  16. Basic category theory -Monads Gouter des doctorants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    Basic category theory - Monads Gouter des doctorants Jérémy Dubut LSV, ENS Cachan Friday, 3rd April, 2015 Jérémy Dubut (LSV, ENS Cachan) Basic category theory - Monads Friday, 3rd April, 2015 1 / 8 #12.bind(f y, g)) Jérémy Dubut (LSV, ENS Cachan) Basic category theory - Monads Friday, 3rd April, 2015 2 / 8

  17. Basic category theory -Limits Gouter des doctorants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    Basic category theory - Limits Gouter des doctorants Jérémy Dubut LSV, ENS Cachan Friday, 3rd April, 2015 Jérémy Dubut (LSV, ENS Cachan) Basic category theory - Limits Friday, 3rd April, 2015 1 / 8 #12 not necessarily exist Jérémy Dubut (LSV, ENS Cachan) Basic category theory - Limits Friday, 3rd April, 2015 2 / 8

  18. National Laboratory] Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Achievements of structural genomics Terwilliger, Thomas C. Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological Science Biological Science Abstract Not...

  19. Electric-Drive Vehicle Basics (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-04-01

    Describes the basics of electric-drive vehicles, including hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, all-electric vehicles, and the various charging options.

  20. Engineering Organization Chart Assistant Dean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Engineering Organization Chart Fall `12 Assistant Dean Outreach & Recruiting Matthew Cavalli and Geological Engineering Joseph Hartman Chair, Petroleum Engineering Steve Benson Chair, Electrical Engineering Forrest Ames (interim) Chair, Mechanical Engineering Matthew Cavalli Chair, Chemical Engineering Mike Mann

  1. Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quartly, Graham

    Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea: Part 2 - Space-borne sensors G. D. Quartly, T. H. Guymer-366 & ii #12;#12;Back to basics: Measuring rainfall at sea: Part 2 ­ Space-borne sensors G. D. Quartly, T are present the measure- ment will correspond to the cloud-top tem- peratures (see Fig. 1, back cover

  2. Patent Information Basics Andrea Twiss-Brooks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ober, Carole

    Patent Information Basics Andrea Twiss-Brooks Bibliographer for Chemistry, Physics, Geophysical Patent Information Basics What are patents? Where do patents come from? Where will I see patent references? How do I find the full text of a patent? Where to go for more information? #12;11/30/2006Page 3

  3. 1 Internet Basics evolution of the web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschelde, Jan

    Outline 1 Internet Basics evolution of the web IP addresses and URLs client/server and HTTP 2 and the internet L-18 23 February 2015 1 / 29 #12;networking and the internet markup languages 1 Internet Basics in browser 5 Summary + Assignments Intro to Computer Science (MCS 260) networking and the internet L-18 23

  4. BASICS IP PC104 Security Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BASICS IP PC104 Security Policy Version: 1.2 Vocality International Ltd. Revision Date: 1 June 2012 revision. #12;Vocality International Ltd. Document Version 1.1 BASICS IP PC104 Security Policy Page 2 of 21 ........................................................................................................................................ 9 5 Identification and Authentication Policy

  5. Fuel cell electrolyte membrane with basic polymer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, James M.; Pham, Phat T.; Frey, Matthew H.; Hamrock, Steven J.; Haugen, Gregory M.; Lamanna, William M.

    2012-12-04

    The present invention is an electrolyte membrane comprising an acid and a basic polymer, where the acid is a low-volatile acid that is fluorinated and is either oligomeric or non-polymeric, and where the basic polymer is protonated by the acid and is stable to hydrolysis.

  6. Introduction 1. Motivation and Basic Concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    . Modern physics changed this view, to some extent, by making the observer a much more active participantChapter 1 Introduction Topics : 1. Motivation and Basic Concepts 2. Mathematical Formulation underlying the analysis and design of control systems. #12;C.C. Remsing 3 1.1 Motivation and Basic Concepts

  7. Fuel cell electrolyte membrane with basic polymer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, James M. (Saint Paul, MN); Pham, Phat T. (Little Canada, MN); Frey, Matthew H. (Cottage Grove, MN); Hamrock, Steven J. (Stillwater, MN); Haugen, Gregory M. (Edina, MN); Lamanna, William M. (Stillwater, MN)

    2010-11-23

    The present invention is an electrolyte membrane comprising an acid and a basic polymer, where the acid is a low-volatile acid that is fluorinated and is either oligomeric or non-polymeric, and where the basic polymer is protonated by the acid and is stable to hydrolysis.

  8. Chemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lowell, J.R. Jr.; Edlund, D.J.; Friesen, D.T.; Rayfield, G.W.

    1992-06-09

    Sensors responsive to small changes in the concentration of chemical species are disclosed, comprising a mechanicochemically responsive polymeric film capable of expansion or contraction in response to a change in its chemical environment, either operatively coupled to a transducer capable of directly converting the expansion or contraction to a measurable electrical or optical response, or adhered to a second inert polymeric strip, or doped with a conductive material. 12 figs.

  9. Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. )

    1992-04-01

    This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

  10. Microsoft Office for Mac 2011 tutorial: Outlook basics 1 Outlook basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microsoft Office for Mac 2011 tutorial: Outlook basics 1 Outlook basics Outlook is a powerful...................................................................................................................... 2 2. Explore the Outlook user interface. · Create a calendar event. Requirements · Outlook for Mac 2011 · E-mail account information (for example

  11. What Questions Do You Have About 'Energy Basics'?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Basics is a resource to help answer all of your "basic" questions about energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies.

  12. Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    . Example of a flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) (from the Center-inch OLED television coming on the market this fall (from LG) !" + 0-vibration couplings Luminescent materials Basic concepts of light absorption

  13. CSC418 / CSCD18 / CSC2504 Basic Lighting and Reflection 8 Basic Lighting and Reflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    CSC418 / CSCD18 / CSC2504 Basic Lighting and Reflection 8 Basic Lighting and Reflection Up things, on the lighting that illuminates the scene, and on the interaction of light with the objects in the scene. Some of the basic qualitative properties of lighting and object reflectance that we need

  14. ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009 OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT & REGISTRATION INFORMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009 OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT & REGISTRATION INFORMATION ACT Basic Training ­ May 8, 2009 PURPOSE: The ACT Basic Training is designed to help staff who are new to Assertive Community Treatment

  15. Chemical Technology Division progress report for the period April 1, 1985 to December 31, 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-08-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development efforts conducted in the Chemical Technology Division (Chem Tech) during the period April 1, 1985, through December 31, 1986. The following major areas are covered in the discussion: nuclear and chemical waste management, environmental control technology, basic science and technology, biotechnology research, transuranium-element processing, Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs, radioactive materials production, computer/engineering applications, fission energy, environmental cleanup projects, and various other work activities. As an appendix, the Administrative Summary presents a comprehensive compilation of publications, oral presentations, awards and recognitions, and patents of Chem Tech staff members during this report period. An organization chart, a staffing level and financial summary, and lists of seminars and Chem Tech consultants for the period are also included to provide additional information. 78 figs., 40 tabs.

  16. 5.111 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceyer, Sylvia Teresse

    Introduction to chemistry, with emphasis on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. Introduction to the chemistry of ...

  17. Controlling the Morphology of Polymer and Fullerene Blends in Organic Photovoltaics Through Sequential Processing and Self-Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguirre, Jordan C.

    2015-01-01

    photogeneration in organic solar cells,” Chemical Reviews,recombination in organic solar cells,” Progress in Polymeropen-circuit voltage of organic solar cells,” J. Phys. Chem.

  18. Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-December 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-06-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-December 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

  19. Analysis of two basic variables of timeout 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zella, William Francis

    1974-01-01

    ANALYSIS OF TWO BASIC VARIABLES OF TIMEOUT A Thesis WILLIAM FRANCIS ZELLA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AaM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August l974 Major Subjects... Psychology ANALYSI QF TWQ BASIC VARIABLES CF TINEQU '. A Thesis V/ILLIAM FRANCIS ZELLA Approved as to s+yle and content bye Chairman of Commi, ee Head of De artment) (Membe Member) Member ABSTRACT Analysis of Two Basic Variables of Timeout. (August...

  20. Chemical Engineering Division research highlights, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burris, L.; Webster, D. S.; Barney, D. L.; Cafasso, F. A.; Steindler, M. J.

    1980-06-01

    In 1979, CEN conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-temperature, rechargeable lithium/iron sulfide batteries for electric vehicles and electric utility load leveling; (2) ambient-temperature batteries - improved lead-acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron - for electric vehicles; (3) molten carbonate fuel cells for use by electric utilities; (4) coal technology - mainly fluidized-bed combustion of coal in the presence of SO/sub 2/ sorbent of limestone; (5) heat- and seed- recovery technology for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic systems; (6) solar energy collectors and thermal energy storage; (7) fast breeder reactor chemistry research - chemical support of reactor safety studies, chemistry of irradiated fuels, and sodium technology; (8) fuel cycle technology - reprocessing of nuclear fuels, management of nuclear wastes, geologic migration studies, and proof-of-breeding studies for the Light Water Breeder Reactor; (9) magnetic fusion research - lithium processing technology and materials research; and (10) basic energy sciences - homogeneous catalysis, thermodynamics of inorganic and organic materials, environmental chemistry, electrochemistry, and physical properties of salt vapors. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of these areas.

  1. Basic Research Needs for Countering Terrorism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, W.; Michalske, T.; Trewhella, J.; Makowski, L.; Swanson, B.; Colson, S.; Hazen, T.; Roberto, F.; Franz, D.; Resnick, G.; Jacobson, S.; Valdez, J.; Gourley, P.; Tadros, M.; Sigman, M.; Sailor, M.; Ramsey, M.; Smith, B.; Shea, K.; Hrbek, J.; Rodacy, P.; Tevault, D.; Edelstein, N.; Beitz, J.; Burns, C.; Choppin, G.; Clark, S.; Dietz, M.; Rogers, R.; Traina, S.; Baldwin, D.; Thurnauer, M.; Hall, G.; Newman, L.; Miller, D.; Kung, H.; Parkin, D.; Shuh, D.; Shaw, H.; Terminello, L.; Meisel, D.; Blake, D.; Buchanan, M.; Roberto, J.; Colson, S.; Carling, R.; Samara, G.; Sasaki, D.; Pianetta, P.; Faison, B.; Thomassen, D.; Fryberger, T.; Kiernan, G.; Kreisler, M.; Morgan, L.; Hicks, J.; Dehmer, J.; Kerr, L.; Smith, B.; Mays, J.; Clark, S.

    2002-03-01

    To identify connections between technology needs for countering terrorism and underlying science issues and to recommend investment strategies to increase the impact of basic research on efforts to counter terrorism.

  2. Hydrogen Fuel Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Basics August 19, 2013 - 5:45pm Addthis Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not widely...

  3. Hydropower Resource Basics | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Water Power Technologies Office. Addthis Related Articles Hydropower Technology Basics Glossary of Energy-Related Terms DOE Launches High-Tech Research Buoys to Advance U.S....

  4. Chemical Occurrences

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Classification of Chemical Occurrence Reports into the following four classes: Occurrences characterized by serious energy release, injury or exposure requiring medical treatment, or severe environmental damage, Occurrences characterized by minor injury or exposure, or reportable environmental release, Occurrences that were near misses including notable safety violations and Minor occurrences.

  5. Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    provides links to each partner's participating organizations. Argonne National Laboratory Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division Center for Nanoscale Materials Energy Systems...

  6. TCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    actinide chemistry, with a focus on coordination and organometallic uranium chemistry. Paula ColavitaTCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology" Trinity College Clive Williams, Dean of Chemistry. Research areas include supramolecular organic and inorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry

  7. Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberto, J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Gibala, R.; Zinkle, S.; Miller, J.R.; Pimblott, S.; Burns, C.; Raymond, K.; Grimes, R.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Clark, S.; Ewing, R.; Wagner, A.; Yip, S.; Buchanan, M.; Crabtree, G.; Hemminger, J.; Poate, J.; Miller, J.C.; Edelstein, N.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Gruzalski, G.; Michaels, G.; Morss, L.; Peters, M.; Talamini, K.

    2006-10-01

    The global utilization of nuclear energy has come a long way from its humble beginnings in the first sustained nuclear reaction at the University of Chicago in 1942. Today, there are over 440 nuclear reactors in 31 countries producing approximately 16% of the electrical energy used worldwide. In the United States, 104 nuclear reactors currently provide 19% of electrical energy used nationally. The International Atomic Energy Agency projects significant growth in the utilization of nuclear power over the next several decades due to increasing demand for energy and environmental concerns related to emissions from fossil plants. There are 28 new nuclear plants currently under construction including 10 in China, 8 in India, and 4 in Russia. In the United States, there have been notifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of intentions to apply for combined construction and operating licenses for 27 new units over the next decade. The projected growth in nuclear power has focused increasing attention on issues related to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste, the proliferation of nuclear weapons technologies and materials, and the sustainability of a once-through nuclear fuel cycle. In addition, the effective utilization of nuclear power will require continued improvements in nuclear technology, particularly related to safety and efficiency. In all of these areas, the performance of materials and chemical processes under extreme conditions is a limiting factor. The related basic research challenges represent some of the most demanding tests of our fundamental understanding of materials science and chemistry, and they provide significant opportunities for advancing basic science with broad impacts for nuclear reactor materials, fuels, waste forms, and separations techniques. Of particular importance is the role that new nanoscale characterization and computational tools can play in addressing these challenges. These tools, which include DOE synchrotron X-ray sources, neutron sources, nanoscale science research centers, and supercomputers, offer the opportunity to transform and accelerate the fundamental materials and chemical sciences that underpin technology development for advanced nuclear energy systems. The fundamental challenge is to understand and control chemical and physical phenomena in multi-component systems from femto-seconds to millennia, at temperatures to 1000?C, and for radiation doses to hundreds of displacements per atom (dpa). This is a scientific challenge of enormous proportions, with broad implications in the materials science and chemistry of complex systems. New understanding is required for microstructural evolution and phase stability under relevant chemical and physical conditions, chemistry and structural evolution at interfaces, chemical behavior of actinide and fission-product solutions, and nuclear and thermomechanical phenomena in fuels and waste forms. First-principles approaches are needed to describe f-electron systems, design molecules for separations, and explain materials failure mechanisms. Nanoscale synthesis and characterization methods are needed to understand and design materials and interfaces with radiation, temperature, and corrosion resistance. Dynamical measurements are required to understand fundamental physical and chemical phenomena. New multiscale approaches are needed to integrate this knowledge into accurate models of relevant phenomena and complex systems across multiple length and time scales.

  8. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1990 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for coal- fired magnetohydrodynamics and fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for a high-level waste repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, concentrating plutonium solids in pyrochemical residues by aqueous biphase extraction, and treating natural and process waters contaminated by volatile organic compounds; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 66 refs., 69 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. CHEMICAL STORAGE SEGREGATION GUIDELINES In order to store chemicals properly, they must be segregated based on the associated hazard. Never

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    or plastic secondary container. Organic acids ­ Acetic acid, trichloroacetic acid, lactic acid Flammable ­ WATER REACTIVE CHEMICAL - Sodium metal, potassium metal, lithium metal, lithium aluminum hydride

  10. The Chemical Table: An Open Dialog between Visualization and Design Francis T. Marchese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchese, Francis

    for the organization of information in general. Chemical tables and charts are visual representations of chemical a historical context to investigate the purpose of chemical tables and charts, and suggests reasons why the two years ago as a tool to organize and visualize chemical reactivity, these tables have evolved

  11. Optical Basicity and Nepheline Crystallization in High Alumina Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Winschell, Abigail E.

    2011-02-25

    The purpose of this study was to find compositions that increase waste loading of high-alumina wastes beyond what is currently acceptable while avoiding crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) on slow cooling. Nepheline crystallization has been shown to have a large impact on the chemical durability of high-level waste glasses. It was hypothesized that there would be some composition regions where high-alumina would not result in nepheline crystal production, compositions not currently allowed by the nepheline discriminator. Optical basicity (OB) and the nepheline discriminator (ND) are two ways of describing a given complex glass composition. This report presents the theoretical and experimental basis for these models. They are being studied together in a quadrant system as metrics to explore nepheline crystallization and chemical durability as a function of waste glass composition. These metrics were calculated for glasses with existing data and also for theoretical glasses to explore nepheline formation in Quadrant IV (passes OB metric but fails ND metric), where glasses are presumed to have good chemical durability. Several of these compositions were chosen, and glasses were made to fill poorly represented regions in Quadrant IV. To evaluate nepheline formation and chemical durability of these glasses, quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and the Product Consistency Test were conducted. A large amount of quantitative XRD data is collected here, both from new glasses and from glasses of previous studies that had not previously performed quantitative XRD on the phase assemblage. Appendix A critically discusses a large dataset to be considered for future quantitative studies on nepheline formation in glass. Appendix B provides a theoretical justification for choice of the oxide coefficients used to compute the OB criterion for nepheline formation.

  12. Opportunities for discovery: Theory and computation in Basic Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Bruce; Kirby, Kate; McCurdy, C. William

    2005-01-01

    II. The Unity of Theory and Computation in the Basic Energy29 THEORY AND COMPUTATION IN BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES III V.Why Invest Now in Theory and Computation in the Basic Energy

  13. GEORGIA TECH RESEARCH CORPORATION BASIC RESEARCH MASTER AGREEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    1 GEORGIA TECH RESEARCH CORPORATION BASIC RESEARCH MASTER AGREEMENT Effective Date: ________________ Basic Research Master Agreement Number: ______________ THIS BASIC RESEARCH MASTER AGREEMENT is made that authorizes performance of specific research under this Master Agreement. Task Orders shall use the sample

  14. Criticality safety basics, a study guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. L. Putman

    1999-09-01

    This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates.

  15. Operationalization of Basic Observables in Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    This novel approach to the foundation of the physical theory begins with thought experiments on measurement practice like Einstein for relativistic Kinematics. For a similar foundation of Dynamics one can start from Hermann von Helmholtz analysis of basic measurements. We define energy, momentum and mass from elemental ordering relations for "capability to execute work" and "impact" in a collision and apply Helmholtz program for quantification. From simple pre-theoretic (principle of inertia, impossibility of Perpetuum Mobile, relativity principle) and measurement methodical principles we derive all fundamental equations of Mechanics. We explain the mathematical formalism from the operationalization of basic observables.

  16. FEMA: Family Basic Disaster Supplies There are six basics you should stock in your home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    directions below on filling the container with water. If you choose to use your own storage containers the bottle to the top with regular tap water. If the tap water has been commercially treated from a waterFEMA: Family Basic Disaster Supplies There are six basics you should stock in your home: Water

  17. HTML Just the Basics Page 1 of 6 HTML Just the Basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    Tags Webpages are made of HTML tags placed around text to tell the web browser how to display itHTML Just the Basics Page 1 of 6 HTML Just the Basics Index of Commonly Used Tags Bold, 6 and runs on way past where you intended, check for a missing end tag. When you first learn HTML

  18. Chemical Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecoveryplanning CareerNationalCNMSTHEmaterials |Chemical

  19. Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery Flow cytometry aids basic cell biology research and drug discovery Life Technologies Corporation and LANL have...

  20. DOE Selects Seven Contractors for Waste Treatment Basic Ordering...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Selects Seven Contractors for Waste Treatment Basic Ordering Agreements DOE Selects Seven Contractors for Waste Treatment Basic Ordering Agreements June 4, 2015 - 12:00pm Addthis...

  1. Clean Energy Finance Guide (Chapter 5: Basic Concepts for Clean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Energy Finance Guide (Chapter 5: Basic Concepts for Clean Energy Unsecured Lending and Loan Loss Reserve Funds) Clean Energy Finance Guide (Chapter 5: Basic Concepts for...

  2. Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power August 20, 2013 - 4:45pm Addthis Photo of numerous...

  3. Guidance on Basic Best Practices in Management of Energy Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    on Basic Best Practices in Management of Energy Performance Buildings Guidance on Basic Best Practices in Management of Energy Performance Buildings Building energy management best...

  4. Electricity Grid Basics Webinar Presentation Slides and Text...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Electricity Grid Basics Webinar Presentation Slides and Text Version Electricity Grid Basics Webinar Presentation Slides and Text Version Download presentation slides and a text...

  5. OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements for Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Programs and Related Matters; 29 CFR 1960 OSHA Rulemaking on Basic Program Elements...

  6. High Harmonic Generation Basic Techniques & Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    High Harmonic Generation Basic Techniques & Challenges C. Michael R. Greaves #12;Regimes-cycle laser fields #12;Outline · Optical Field Atomic Ionization · High Harmonic Generation (HHG-rays · References #12;Optical Field Atomic Ionization · Harmonics are generated by the tunneling, transport

  7. Basic Fourier Series Academic Resource Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Basic Fourier Series Academic Resource Center Workshop for BME by: Neha Bansal #12;Agenda · Fourier Series · Trigonometric Fourier Series · Compact Trigonometric Fourier Series · Examples o Square Waves o Sawtooth Waves · References #12;Fourier Series · A periodic function f(t) can be represented by an infinite

  8. Molecular Biology Basics Planning Restriction Enzyme Digests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aris, John P.

    Molecular Biology Basics Planning Restriction Enzyme Digests A. Checklist: Buffer type Addition of BSA Optimum temperature Number of units of enzyme B. Plan to digest DNA with an "excess" of enzyme activity. Plan for the "excess" to be divided between time of digestion and number of units of enzyme

  9. BACK TO BASICS: YOUR KEYS TO SAFE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschner, Denise

    BACK TO BASICS: YOUR KEYS TO SAFE DRIVING BUCKLE UP! Seat belts should never have time off DRIVE the back seat to the front seat.4 ·The back is the best place for pets. According to AAA, similar. Never place the shoulder portion under your arm or behind your back! ·Drivers should sit with at least

  10. Hunter Outlook Web App Program Basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    Hunter ­ Outlook Web App #12;Program Basics · To Log In to Outlook Web App (OWA): o Open up your accessing your Outlook account: o OWA will typically default to the light version when it detects a mobile, click the Use the light version of Outlook Web App check box. o Enter your e-mail address and password

  11. Line geometry and electromagnetism I: basic structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. H. Delphenich

    2013-09-11

    Some key notions of line geometry are recalled, along with their application to mechanics. It is then shown that most of the basic structures that one introduces in the pre-metric formulation of electromagnetism can be interpreted directly in terms of corresponding concepts in line geometry. The results are summarized in a table.

  12. NPTEL Syllabus Basic Electrical Circuits -Video course

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnapura, Nagendra

    with an introduction to basic linear elements used in electrical circuits. Mesh and node analysis for systematic analysis of large circuits will be studied. Fundamental circuit theorems and their use in analysis steady state analysis for simple analysis of such circuits will be studied. The concepts of power

  13. Sam Madden Basically Everyone Except My Bank

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    Sam Madden Physicists Biologists Basically Everyone Except My Bank #12;· Benefit(DBMS) DBMS? · DBMS setup & boundary crossings painful ­ Especially if you have to do it multiple times! MATLAB a fleet of 40 cabs on Boston streets · Pipeline ­ Raw data in DBMS ­ Trajectories with Matlab ­ Queries

  14. Cyber Security Basic Defenses and Attack Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    37 38 39 40 41 4273 MTC 4 Cyber Security Basic Defenses and Attack Trends Alvaro A. Cárdenas, Tanya for a successful defense. Cyber security is the branch of security dealing with digital or information technology.1 This chapter presents a selected overview on topics in cyber security. 1. Throughout the chapter, we use

  15. ACCEPTANCE OF OFFER BASIC SCIENCE FACULTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACCEPTANCE OF OFFER BASIC SCIENCE FACULTY 2015 - 2016 By accepting this appointment I represent of the letter of offer, I fail to satisfy the above requirements, I understand that this letter of offer obtained if it is required as a condition of my employment. This offer and my acceptance are subject

  16. Cellular Automata: Basic Intro Professor Leigh Tesfatsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Cellular Automata: Basic Intro Professor Leigh Tesfatsion Economics Dept., Iowa State University What are Cellular Automata (CA)? Illustrative Examples: · John Conway's Game of Life · Schelling (2005), and Prof. Lars-Erik Cederman (2005). #12;What are Cellular Automata? #12;Illustrations of Simple

  17. (Basic properties of coals and other solids)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-25

    This report discusses basic properties of bituminous, subbituminous, and lignite coals. Properties of coal liquids are also investigated. Heats of immersion in strong acids are found for Pittsburgh {number sign}8, Illinois {number sign}6, and Wyodak coals. Production of coal liquids by distillation is discussed. Heats of titration of coal liquids and coal slurries are reported. (VC)

  18. Event simulation for colliders - A basic overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Reuschle

    2014-11-26

    In this article we will discuss the basic calculational concepts to simulate particle physics events at high energy colliders. We will mainly focus on the physics in hadron colliders and particularly on the simulation of the perturbative parts, where we will in turn focus on the next-to-leading order QCD corrections.

  19. Derived critical loci I -Basics Gabriele Vezzosi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vezzosi, Gabriele

    Derived critical loci I - Basics Gabriele Vezzosi Dipartimento di Sistemi ed Informatica Universit`a di Firenze Italy Notes ­ September 2011 Contents 1 Introduction 1 2 Koszul complexes and derived zero . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 2.2 Affine derived zero loci . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2

  20. A unified algorithm for predicting partition coefficients for PBPK modeling of drugs and environmental chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peyret, Thomas [DSEST, Universite de Montreal, Canada H3T 1A8 (Canada); Poulin, Patrick [Consultant, 4009 rue Sylvia Daoust, Quebec City, Quebec, G1X 0A6 (Canada); Krishnan, Kannan, E-mail: kannan.krishnan@umontreal.ca [DSEST, Universite de Montreal, H3T 1A8 (Canada)

    2010-12-15

    The algorithms in the literature focusing to predict tissue:blood PC (P{sub tb}) for environmental chemicals and tissue:plasma PC based on total (K{sub p}) or unbound concentration (K{sub pu}) for drugs differ in their consideration of binding to hemoglobin, plasma proteins and charged phospholipids. The objective of the present study was to develop a unified algorithm such that P{sub tb}, K{sub p} and K{sub pu} for both drugs and environmental chemicals could be predicted. The development of the unified algorithm was accomplished by integrating all mechanistic algorithms previously published to compute the PCs. Furthermore, the algorithm was structured in such a way as to facilitate predictions of the distribution of organic compounds at the macro (i.e. whole tissue) and micro (i.e. cells and fluids) levels. The resulting unified algorithm was applied to compute the rat P{sub tb}, K{sub p} or K{sub pu} of muscle (n = 174), liver (n = 139) and adipose tissue (n = 141) for acidic, neutral, zwitterionic and basic drugs as well as ketones, acetate esters, alcohols, aliphatic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons and ethers. The unified algorithm reproduced adequately the values predicted previously by the published algorithms for a total of 142 drugs and chemicals. The sensitivity analysis demonstrated the relative importance of the various compound properties reflective of specific mechanistic determinants relevant to prediction of PC values of drugs and environmental chemicals. Overall, the present unified algorithm uniquely facilitates the computation of macro and micro level PCs for developing organ and cellular-level PBPK models for both chemicals and drugs.

  1. The Creation of a French Basic Nuclear Installation - Description of the Regulatory Process - 13293

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahe, Carole [CEA Marcoule - BP17171 - 30207 Bagnols-Sur-Ceze (France)] [CEA Marcoule - BP17171 - 30207 Bagnols-Sur-Ceze (France); Leroy, Christine [CEA Cadarache - 13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)] [CEA Cadarache - 13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2013-07-01

    CEA is a French government-funded technological research organization. It has to build a medium-level waste interim storage facility because the geological repository will not be available until 2025. This interim storage facility, called DIADEM, has to be available in 2017. These wastes are coming from the research facilities for spent fuel reprocessing and the dismantling of the most radioactive parts of nuclear facilities. The CEA handles the waste management by inventorying the needs and updating them regularly. The conception of the facility is mainly based on this inventory. It provides quantity and characteristics of wastes and it gives the production schedule until 2035. Beyond mass and volume, main characteristics of these radioactive wastes are chemical nature, radioisotopes, radioactivity, radiation dose, the heat emitted, corrosive or explosive gas production, etc. These characteristics provide information to study the repository safety. DIADEM mainly consists of a concrete cell, isolated from the outside, wherein stainless steel welded containers are stored, stacked in a vertical position in the racks. DIADEM is scheduled to store three types of 8 mm-thick, stainless steel cylindrical containers with an outside diameter 498 mm and height from 620 to 2120 mm. DIADEM will be a basic nuclear installation (INB in French) because of overall activity of radioactive substances stored. The creation of a French basic nuclear installation is subject to authorization according to the French law No. 2006-686 of 13 June 2006 on Transparency and Security in the Nuclear Field. The authorization takes into account the technical and financial capacities of the licensee which must allow him to conduct his project in compliance with these interests, especially to cover the costs of decommissioning the installation and conduct remediation work, and to monitor and maintain its location site or, for radioactive waste disposal installations, to cover the definitive shut-down, maintenance and surveillance expenditure. The authorization is issued by a decree adopted upon advice of the French Nuclear Safety Authority and after a public enquiry. In accordance with Decree No. 2007-1557 of November 2, 2007, the application is filed with the ministries responsible for nuclear safety and the Nuclear Safety Authority. It consists of twelve files and four records information. The favorable opinion of the Nuclear Safety Authority on the folder is required to start the public inquiry. Once the public inquiry is completed, the building permit is issued by the prefect. (authors)

  2. Polyethylene passive samplers for measuring hydrophobic organic chemical concentrations in sediment porewaters and their use in predicting bioaccumulation in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) from sites near Boston, MA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Loretta A. (Loretta Ana)

    2010-01-01

    In order to determine the hazards posed by hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediment beds, the following areas of research were explored: (1) the use of polyethylene (PE) sheets as passive sampling devices in ...

  3. Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meetings Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators" is scarcely older than for one or two dozen people grew to include nearly a hundred. Chemical accelerators is a name sug- gested by one of us for devices that produce beams of chemically interesting species at relative kinetic

  4. DOE Office of Science Funded Basic Research at NREL that Impacts Photovoltaic Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deb, S. K.

    2005-01-01

    The DOE Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, supports a number of basic research projects in materials, chemicals, and biosciences at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that impact several renewable energy technologies, including photovoltaics (PV). The goal of the Material Sciences projects is to study the structural, optical, electrical, and defect properties of semiconductors and related materials using state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical techniques. Specific projects involving PV include: ordering in III-V semiconductors, isoelectronic co-doping, doping bottlenecks in semiconductors, solid-state theory, and computational science. The goal of the Chemical Sciences projects is to advance the fundamental understanding of the relevant science involving materials, photochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, nanoscale chemistry, and catalysis that support solar photochemical conversion technologies. Specific projects relating to PV include: dye-sensitized TiO2 solar cells, semiconductor nanostructures, and molecular semiconductors. This presentation will give an overview of some of the major accomplishments of these projects.

  5. Organic aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Kong, Fung-Ming (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-01-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonsticky gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  6. Organic aerogel microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayer, S.T.; Kong, F.M.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1999-06-01

    Organic aerogel microspheres are disclosed which can be used in capacitors, batteries, thermal insulation, adsorption/filtration media, and chromatographic packings, having diameters ranging from about 1 micron to about 3 mm. The microspheres can be pyrolyzed to form carbon aerogel microspheres. This method involves stirring the aqueous organic phase in mineral oil at elevated temperature until the dispersed organic phase polymerizes and forms nonstick gel spheres. The size of the microspheres depends on the collision rate of the liquid droplets and the reaction rate of the monomers from which the aqueous solution is formed. The collision rate is governed by the volume ratio of the aqueous solution to the mineral oil and the shear rate, while the reaction rate is governed by the chemical formulation and the curing temperature.

  7. Common Organizational Structures within Two Chemical Flip-Flops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinze, Thomas

    Engineering Dublin City University, Dublin 9, Ireland Abstract. Chemical information processing foundCommon Organizational Structures within Two Chemical Flip-Flops Naoki Matsumaru1 , Thorsten Lenser1 molecular interactions. Here, we follow an approach that applies chemical organization theory to bridge

  8. Chiral perturbation theory: a basic introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Moussallam

    2004-09-01

    Chiral perturbation theory is a very general expansion method which can be applied to any dynamical system which has continuous global symmetries and in which the ground state breaks some of these spontaneously. In these lectures we explain at a basic level and in detail how such symmetries are identified in the case of the QCD Lagrangian and describe the steps which are involved in practice in the construction of a low-energy effective theory for QCD.

  9. Photovoltaic Silicon Cell Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCTCriticalEnergySilicon Cell Basics

  10. Basic Energy Sciences Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy and Forest ServicePowerOrderBasic Energy

  11. Biomass Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Researchof Energy|Make FuelsBioindustryWBSBiomass 2014Basics:

  12. Hydrogen Production Basics | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelB IMSofNewsletterGuidingUpdate WebinarProduction Basics Hydrogen

  13. DOE Office of Basic Sciences: An Overview of Basic Research Activities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    & Publications Basic Energy Sciences Overview Progress from DOE EF RC: Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion Center (S3TEC ) Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier Research...

  14. A FIRST ORDER PROJECTION-BASED TIME-SPLITTING SCHEME FOR COMPUTING CHEMICALLY REACTING FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A FIRST ORDER PROJECTION-BASED TIME-SPLITTING SCHEME FOR COMPUTING CHEMICALLY REACTING FLOWS, surface catalytic reactors for methane to methanol conversion and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process ANDREAS PROHL1 Abstract. The simulation of chemically reacting ows in speci#12;c situations is a basic

  15. A FIRST ORDER PROJECTIONBASED TIMESPLITTING SCHEME FOR COMPUTING CHEMICALLY REACTING FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A FIRST ORDER PROJECTION­BASED TIME­SPLITTING SCHEME FOR COMPUTING CHEMICALLY REACTING FLOWS catalytic reactors for methane to methanol conversion and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process modeling ANDREAS PROHL 1 Abstract. The simulation of chemically reacting flows in specific situations is a basic

  16. Book Chapter Microbial Fuel Cells: Electricity Generation from Organic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gu, Tingyue

    oxygen demand (BOD) sensors, bioremediation, hydrogen production and electricity generation (Logan Book Chapter Microbial Fuel Cells: Electricity Generation from Organic Wastes by Microbes Kun) are bioreactors that convert chemical energy stored in the bonds of organic matters into electricity through

  17. Fermilab | About | Organization | Fermilab Organization | Explanation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Symbols Line Organization: sectors, divisions, sections Line Organization Matrix Organization: centers, projects and programs utilizing resources spanning the entire...

  18. Chemical technology division: Annual technical report 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1987 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-performance batteries--mainly lithium-alloy/metal sulfide and sodium/sulfur; (2) aqueous batteries (lead-acid, nickel/iron, etc.); (3) advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate or solid oxide electrolytes; (4) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (5) methods for the electromagnetic continuous casting of steel sheet and for the purification of ferrous scrap; (6) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (7) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor, and waste management; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for liquids and vapors at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; the thermochemistry of various minerals; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be the major user of the technical support provided by the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at ANL. 54 figs., 9 tabs.

  19. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1989 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including high-performance batteries (mainly lithium/iron sulfide and sodium/metal chloride), aqueous batteries (lead-acid and nickel/iron), and advanced fuel cells with molten carbonate and solid oxide electrolytes: (2) coal utilization, including the heat and seed recovery technology for coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics plants and the technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for recovery of energy from municipal waste and techniques for treatment of hazardous organic waste; (4) nuclear technology related to a process for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste and for producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium targets, the recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in a sodium-cooled fast reactor (the Integral Fast Reactor), and waste management; and (5) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also has a program in basic chemistry research in the areas of fluid catalysis for converting small molecules to desired products; materials chemistry for superconducting oxides and associated and ordered solutions at high temperatures; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, high-temperature superconductivity, and catalysis; and the geochemical processes responsible for trace-element migration within the earth's crust. The Division continued to be administratively responsible for and the major user of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  20. Among the major applications of pervaporation membrane processes, organic separation from organic/water mixtures is becoming increasingly important. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Among the major applications of pervaporation membrane processes, organic separation from organic referred to as "silicone rubber", exhibiting excellent film-forming ability, thermal stability, chemical for Engineering of Matter, Transport and Energy #12;

  1. MC-CAM Research Topics Organic LEDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    materials with highly- controlled microstructures Next generation optical storage media Products based applications Novel conjugated polymers and high-conductivity organics Nanostructured materials with unique electronic, magnetic, and optical properties Chemically modified fullerenes and fullerene devices Materials

  2. DOE Office of Basic Sciences: An Overview of Basic Research Activities...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chemical Transformations Nanoscience and Electron Microscopy Centers X-Ray and Neutron Scattering Facilities Scientific User Facilities Division Materials Sciences and...

  3. Identification of chemical hazards for security risk analysis activities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaeger, Calvin Dell

    2005-01-01

    The presentation outline of this paper is: (1) How identification of chemical hazards fits into a security risk analysis approach; (2) Techniques for target identification; and (3) Identification of chemical hazards by different organizations. The summary is: (1) There are a number of different methodologies used within the chemical industry which identify chemical hazards: (a) Some develop a manual listing of potential targets based on published lists of hazardous chemicals or chemicals of concern, 'expert opinion' or known hazards. (b) Others develop a prioritized list based on chemicals found at a facility and consequence analysis (offsite release affecting population, theft of material, product tampering). (2) Identification of chemical hazards should include not only intrinsic properties of the chemicals but also potential reactive chemical hazards and potential use for activities off-site.

  4. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Curriculum Notes 2013-2014 1. Chemical engineering students must complete not included in the required chemical engineering curriculum. All technical electives are subject to approval be in chemical engineering. 2. Chemical engineering students must complete a minimum of 18 credits in the Social

  5. Annual report, Basic Sciences Branch, FY 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. Seven technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL's in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, Solid-State Spectroscopy, and Superconductivity. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

  6. NREL: Learning - Geothermal Electricity Production Basics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial Toolkit The Geospatial ToolkitElectricity Production Basics

  7. Photovoltaic System Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCTCriticalEnergySilicon CellSystem Basics

  8. Basic ReseaRch DiRections

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReporteeo | National Nucleara min [TypeCommittee on theiBasic

  9. Basic Plasma Science | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery ActTools toBadging, Badge Office Badging,Basic Plasma

  10. Hydrogen Safety Basics | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuelB IMSofNewsletterGuidingUpdate WebinarProduction BasicsHydrogenSafety

  11. Biodiesel Fuel Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETO Quiz -Technologies forBigBiodiesel Fuel Basics

  12. Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I DueBETO QuizResults in FirstJuneBiomass Resource Basics

  13. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Digg FindPortsas aEthanolAFDC PrintableHybridBasics to

  14. Laser induced chemical reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orel, Ann E.

    2010-01-01

    the simplest prototype chemical reaction, and since it is soLASER ENHANCEMENT OF CHEMICAL REACTIONS A. B. C. D. E.Laser Inhibition of Chemical Reaction Effect of Isotopic

  15. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Chung-cheng (Irvine, CA); Sui, Guodong (Los Angeles, CA); Elizarov, Arkadij (Valley Village, CA); Kolb, Hartmuth C. (Playa del Rey, CA); Huang, Jiang (San Jose, CA); Heath, James R. (South Pasadena, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Los Angeles, CA); Quake, Stephen R. (Stanford, CA); Tseng, Hsian-rong (Los Angeles, CA); Wyatt, Paul (Tipperary, IE); Daridon, Antoine (Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH)

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  16. Sandia Energy - Chemical Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Dynamics Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Chemical Dynamics Chemical DynamicsAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:45:37+00:00...

  17. ITP Chemicals: Chemical Industry of the Future: New Biocatalysts...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemical Industry of the Future: New Biocatalysts: Essential Tools for a Sustainable 21st Century Chemical Industry ITP Chemicals: Chemical Industry of the Future: New...

  18. Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes ICEHT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...

  19. Chemical Industry Corrosion Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-02-01

    Improved Corrosion Management Could Provide Significant Cost and Energy Savings for the Chemical Industry. In the chemical industry, corrosion is often responsible for significant shutdown and maintenance costs.

  20. Enhanced Chemical Cleaning

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Renee H. Spires Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Project Manager July 29, 2009 Tank Waste Corporate Board 2 Objective Provide an overview of the ECC process...

  1. Bio-Based Product Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biomass Bio-Based Product Basics Bio-Based Product Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:19pm Addthis Almost all of the products we currently make from fossil fuels can also be made from...

  2. Air-Source Heat Pump Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Basics Air-Source Heat Pump Basics August 19, 2013 - 11:03am Addthis Air-source heat pumps transfer heat between the inside of a building and the outside air. How Air-Source...

  3. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat...

  4. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAboutOrganizingOrganizing

  5. On Teaching the Basics of Complexity Theory \\Lambda Oded Goldreich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldreich, Oded

    On Teaching the Basics of Complexity Theory \\Lambda Oded Goldreich Department of Computer Science a good perspective on the basic notions and results of complexity theory, because these are of funda for teaching the basics of complexity theory. The two most important suggestions were already mentioned above

  6. Coding theory basics Evaluation codes from algebraic varieties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, John B.

    Coding theory basics Evaluation codes from algebraic varieties Interlude ­ counting rational points theory basics Evaluation codes from algebraic varieties Interlude ­ counting rational points on varieties Cubic surfaces and codes Outline 1 Coding theory basics 2 Evaluation codes from algebraic varieties 3

  7. Illustration: Sean Kelly Back to basics for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, W. Stephen

    Illustration: Sean Kelly Back to basics for the "division clueless" DECEMBER 6, 2010 | BY LISA research in algebraic topology to question basic math education. At two well- regarded private schools to only 31 percent of the 2006 students. As another experiment, Wilson gave a short test of basic math

  8. PROCESSING TIP . . . BACK TO BASICS: REVISITING BLOOD COLLECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navara, Kristen

    MAY 2009 PROCESSING TIP . . . BACK TO BASICS: REVISITING BLOOD COLLECTION Technological advances it is often a good idea to periodically step back from the small details and revisit the basics. One of these pollution prevention basics is blood collection. The potential impact of blood on poultry processing

  9. Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    #12;Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH Prepared in cooperation with the North Carolina., 1983, Basic ground-water hydrology: U .S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 2220, 86 p. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publications Data Heath, Ralph C . Basic ground-water hydrology (Geological Survey

  10. Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers: ZB, TU, GS Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of x-ray producing

  11. CHEMICAL & BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK 8/24/2011 RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    . The curriculum, which builds on chemistry, biology, mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering science, culminates in professional applications in which theory is tempered by engineering art and economic1 CHEMICAL & BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK 8/24/2011 RENSSELAER

  12. CHEMICAL & BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK 8/24/2010 RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salama, Khaled

    . The curriculum, which builds on chemistry, biology, mathematics, basic sciences, and engineering science, culminates in professional applications in which theory is tempered by engineering art and economic1 CHEMICAL & BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK 8/24/2010 RENSSELAER

  13. Organic Superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Mielke

    2009-02-27

    Intense magnetic fields are an essential tool for understanding layered superconductors. Fundamental electronic properties of organic superconductors are revealed in intense (60 tesla) magnetic fields. Properties such as the topology of the Fermi surface and the nature of the superconducting order parameter are revealed. With modest maximum critical temperatures~13K the charge transfer salt organic superconductors prove to be incredibly valuable materials as their electronically clean nature and layered (highly anisotropic) structures yield insights to the high temperature superconductors. Observation of de Haas-van Alphen and Shubnikov-de Haas quantum oscillatory phenomena, magnetic field induced superconductivity and re-entrant superconductivity are some of the physical phenomena observed in the charge transfer organic superconductors. In this talk, I will discuss the nature of organic superconductors and give an overview of the generation of intense magnetic fields; from the 60 tesla millisecond duration to the extreme 1000 tesla microsecond pulsed magnetic fields.

  14. Basics of Low-temperature Refrigeration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alekseev, A

    2014-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of the principles of low temperature refrigeration and the thermodynamics behind it. Basic cryogenic processes - Joule-Thomoson process, Brayton process as well as Claude process - are described and compared. A typical helium laboratory refrigerator based on Claude process is used as a typical example of a low-temperature refrigeration system. A description of the hardware components for helium liquefaction is an important part of this paper, because the design of the main hardware components (compressors, turbines, heat exchangers, pumps, adsorbers, etc.) provides the input for cost calculation, as well as enables to estimate the reliability of the plant and the maintenance expenses. All these numbers are necessary to calculate the economics of a low temperature application.

  15. ACAA fly ash basics: quick reference card

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-07-01

    Fly ash is a fine powdery material created when coal is burned to generate electricity. Before escaping into the environment via the utility stacks, the ash is collected and may be stored for beneficial uses or disposed of, if necessary. The use of fly ash provides environmental benefits, such as the conservation of natural resources, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions and eliminating the needed for ash disposal in landfills. It is also a valuable mineral resource that is used in construction and manufacturing. Fly ash is used in the production of Portland cement, concrete, mortars and stuccos, manufactured aggregates along with various agricultural applications. As mineral filler, fly ash can be used for paints, shingles, carpet backing, plastics, metal castings and other purposes. This quick reference card is intended to provide the reader basic source, identification and composition, information specifically related to fly ash.

  16. Chemical Abundances in 35 Metal-Poor Stars. I. Basic Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong-Deok Lee; Sang-Gak Lee; Kang-Min Kim

    2008-05-30

    We carried out a homogeneous abundance study for various elements, including $\\alpha$-elements, iron peak elements and $n$-capture elements for 35 metal-poor stars with a wide metallicity range ($-3.0\\lesssim$[Fe/H]$\\lesssim-0.5$). High-resolution ($R\\simeq30$k), high signal-to-noise($S/N\\geq110$) spectra with a wavelength range of 3800 to 10500 \\AA using the Bohyunsan Optical Echelle Spectrograph (BOES). Equivalent widths were measured by means of the Gaussian-fitting method for numerous isolated weak lines of elements. Atmospheric parameters were determined by a self-consistent LTE analysis technique using Fe I and Fe II lines. In this study, we present the EWs of lines and atmospheric parameters for 35 metal-poor stars.

  17. Glossary of terms Basic feasible solutions: A basic solution which is nonnegative.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, David

    is made). For example, suppose that a gasoline is made by blending two types of crude oil, type A and type, then the leaving variable is the basic variable chosen is the one with the smallest index. Blending constraint: For a product made from a "blend" of different items, a constraint such that the percentage of one or more

  18. Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valerie L. Putman

    2012-08-01

    This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

    This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

    For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know …).

    INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

  19. Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The division is one of ten LBL research divisions. It is composed of individual research groups organized into 5 scientific areas: chemical physics, inorganic/organometallic chemistry, actinide chemistry, atomic physics, and chemical engineering. Studies include structure and reactivity of critical reaction intermediates, transients and dynamics of elementary chemical reactions, and heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis. Work for others included studies of superconducting properties of high-{Tc} oxides. In FY 1994, the division neared completion of two end-stations and a beamline for the Advanced Light Source, which will be used for combustion and other studies. This document presents summaries of the studies.

  20. Chemical Management Contacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Contacts for additional information on Chemical Management and brief description on Energy Facility Contractors Group

  1. NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Technology Basics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines light on771/6/14 Contact:News ReleasesChemicalPilotDataResearchTechnology

  2. PINS chemical identification software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caffrey, Augustine J.; Krebs, Kennth M.

    2004-09-14

    An apparatus and method for identifying a chemical compound. A neutron source delivers neutrons into the chemical compound. The nuclei of chemical elements constituting the chemical compound emit gamma rays upon interaction with the neutrons. The gamma rays are characteristic of the chemical elements constituting the chemical compound. A spectrum of the gamma rays is generated having a detection count and an energy scale. The energy scale is calibrated by comparing peaks in the spectrum to energies of pre-selected chemical elements in the spectrum. A least-squares fit completes the calibration. The chemical elements constituting the chemical compound can be readily determined, which then allows for identification of the chemical compound.

  3. Microbial Biogeochemistry Chemical reactions occurring in the environment mediated by microbial communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Microbial Biogeochemistry Chemical reactions occurring in the environment mediated by microbial communities Outline · Metabolic Classifications. · Winogradsky columns, Microenvironments. · Redox Reactions Chemical (Chemotrophs) Inorganic (Chemolithotrophs) Aerobic (majority) Anaerobic (few) Organic

  4. Summaries of FY 1979 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The purpose of this report is to help those interested in research supported by the Department of Energy's Division of Chemical Sciences, which is one of six Divisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. Chemists, physicists, chemical engineers and others who are considering the possibility of proposing research for support by this Division wll find the booklet useful for gauging the scope of the program in basic research, and the relationship of their interests to the overall program. These smmaries are intended to provide a rapid means for becoming acquainted with the Chemical Sciences program for members of the scientific and technological public, and interested persons in the Legislative and Executive Branches of the Government, in order to indicate the areas of research supported by the Division and energy technologies which may be advanced by use of basic knowledge discovered in this program. Scientific excellence is a major criterion applied in the selection of research supported by Chemical Sciences. Another important consideration is the identifying of chemical, physical and chemical engineering subdisciplines which are advancing in ways which produce new information related to energy, needed data, or new ideas.

  5. REVIEW OF ALTERNATIVE ENHANCED CHEMICAL CLEANING OPTIONS FOR SRS WASTE TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, M.; Koopman, D.

    2009-08-01

    A literature review was conducted to support the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan for Alternative Enhanced Chemical Cleaning (AECC) for sludge heel removal funded as part of the EM-21 Engineering and Technology program. The goal was to identify potential technologies or enhancements to the baseline oxalic acid cleaning process for chemically dissolving or mobilizing Savannah River Site (SRS) sludge heels. The issues with the potentially large volume of oxalate solids generated from the baseline process have driven an effort to find an improved or enhanced chemical cleaning technology for the tank heels. This literature review builds on a previous review conducted in 2003. A team was charged with evaluating the information in these reviews and developing recommendations of alternative technologies to pursue. The new information in this report supports the conclusion of the previous review that oxalic acid remains the chemical cleaning agent of choice for dissolving the metal oxides and hydroxides found in sludge heels in carbon steel tanks. The potential negative impact of large volumes of sodium oxalate on downstream processes indicates that the amount of oxalic acid used for chemical cleaning needs to be minimized as much as possible or the oxalic acid must be destroyed prior to pH adjustment in the receipt tank. The most straightforward way of minimizing the volume of oxalic acid needed for chemical cleaning is through more effective mechanical cleaning. Using a mineral acid to adjust the pH of the sludge prior to adding oxalic acid may also help to minimize the volume of oxalic acid used in chemical cleaning. If minimization of oxalic acid proves insufficient in reducing the volume of oxalate salts, several methods were found that could be used for oxalic acid destruction. For some waste tank heels, another acid or even caustic treatment (or pretreatment) might be more appropriate than the baseline oxalic acid cleaning process. Caustic treatment of high aluminum sludge heels may be appropriate as a means of reducing oxalic acid usage. Reagents other than oxalic acid may also be needed for removing actinide elements from the tank heels. A systems engineering evaluation (SEE) was performed on the various alternative chemical cleaning reagents and organic oxidation technologies discussed in the literature review. The objective of the evaluation was to develop a short list of chemical cleaning reagents and oxalic acid destruction methods that should be the focus of further research and development. The results of the SEE found that eight of the thirteen organic oxidation technologies scored relatively close together. Six of the chemical cleaning reagents were also recommended for further investigation. Based on the results of the SEE and plan set out in the TTQAP the following broad areas are recommended for future study as part of the AECC task: (1) Basic Chemistry of Sludge Dissolution in Oxalic Acid: A better understanding of the variables effecting dissolution of sludge species is needed to efficiently remove sludge heels while minimizing the use of oxalic acid or other chemical reagents. Tests should investigate the effects of pH, acid concentration, phase ratios, temperature, and kinetics of the dissolution reactions of sludge components with oxalic acid, mineral acids, and combinations of oxalic/mineral acids. Real waste sludge samples should be characterized to obtain additional data on the mineral phases present in sludge heels. (2) Simulant Development Program: Current sludge simulants developed by other programs for use in waste processing tests, while compositionally similar to real sludge waste, generally have more hydrated forms of the major metal phases and dissolve more easily in acids. Better simulants containing the mineral phases identified by real waste characterization should be developed to test chemical cleaning methods. (3) Oxalic Acid Oxidation Technologies: The two Mn based oxidation methods that scored highly in the SEE should be studied to evaluate long term potential. One of the AOP's

  6. Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganization Chart Organization Charts

  7. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout EventsOrganizing

  8. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAboutOrganizing Committee

  9. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAboutOrganizing

  10. Nucleosynthesis Basics and Applications to Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. -K. Thielemann; T. Rauscher; C. Freiburghaus; K. Nomoto; M. Hashimoto; B. Pfeiffer; K. -L. Kratz

    1998-02-06

    This review concentrates on nucleosynthesis processes in general and their applications to massive stars and supernovae. A brief initial introduction is given to the physics in astrophysical plasmas which governs composition changes. We present the basic equations for thermonuclear reaction rates and nuclear reaction networks. The required nuclear physics input for reaction rates is discussed, i.e. cross sections for nuclear reactions, photodisintegrations, electron and positron captures, neutrino captures, inelastic neutrino scattering, and beta-decay half-lives. We examine especially the present state of uncertainties in predicting thermonuclear reaction rates, while the status of experiments is discussed by others in this volume (see M. Wiescher). It follows a brief review of hydrostatic burning stages in stellar evolution before discussing the fate of massive stars, i.e. the nucleosynthesis in type II supernova explosions (SNe II). Except for SNe Ia, which are explained by exploding white dwarfs in binary stellar systems (which will not be discussed here), all other supernova types seem to be linked to the gravitational collapse of massive stars (M$>$8M$_\\odot$) at the end of their hydrostatic evolution. SN1987A, the first type II supernova for which the progenitor star was known, is used as an example for nucleosynthesis calculations. Finally, we discuss the production of heavy elements in the r-process up to Th and U and its possible connection to supernovae.

  11. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January--March 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1997. Created in March 1997 when the CTD Chemical Development and Energy Research sections were combined, the Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within seven major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, and Biotechnology Research. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described in the report, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  12. Chemical vapor deposition of organosilicon and sacrificial polymer thin films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casserly, Thomas Bryan

    2005-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) produced films for a wide array of applications from a variety of organosilicon and organic precursors. The structure and properties of thin films were controlled by varying processing ...

  13. Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A.K.

    1993-07-01

    Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

  14. Computer Aided Chemical Engineering CHEN 3600 Spring 2010 Course Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashurst, W. Robert

    Computer Aided Chemical Engineering CHEN 3600 Spring 2010 Course Outcomes Course outcomes define subject material essential to the course is covered as well as detailing the degree of mastery expected functions (basic math, advanced math, logical, text, time/date, random number generation) to solve general

  15. Computer Aided Chemical Engineering CHEN 3600 Course Outcomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashurst, W. Robert

    and general engineering problems. 7. Employ basic programming concepts including programming structuresComputer Aided Chemical Engineering CHEN 3600 Course Outcomes Course outcomes define the desired subject material essential to the course is covered as well as detailing the degree of mastery expected

  16. Chemical composition, mineral content and cholesterol levels of some regular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Note Chemical composition, mineral content and cholesterol levels of some regular and reduced from cow's milk, were analyzed for basic nutrients (water, protein, fat, ash and lactose), cholesterol and selected minerals (Na, Ca, K, Mg, P and Zn). The moisture contents of Labneh (78.6 g·100 g-1 ) and Double

  17. Comparison of secondary organic aerosol formed with an aerosol flow reactor and environmental reaction chambers: effect of oxidant concentration, exposure time and seed particles on chemical composition and yield

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lambe, A. T.; Chhabra, P. S.; Onasch, T. B.; Brune, W. H.; Hunter, J. F.; Kroll, J. H.; Cummings, M. J.; Brogan, J. F.; Parmar, Y.; Worsnop, D. R.; et al

    2014-12-02

    We performed a systematic intercomparison study of the chemistry and yields of SOA generated from OH oxidation of a common set of gas-phase precursors in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) continuous flow reactor and several environmental chambers. In the flow reactor, SOA precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2.0×108 to 2.2×1010 molec cm-3 over exposure times of 100 s. In the environmental chambers, precursors were oxidized using OH concentrations ranging from 2×106 to 2×107 molec cm-3 over exposure times of several hours. The OH concentration in the chamber experiments is close to that found in the atmosphere, butmore »the integrated OH exposure in the flow reactor can simulate atmospheric exposure times of multiple days compared to chamber exposure times of only a day or so. A linear correlation analysis of the mass spectra (m=0.91–0.92, r2=0.93–0.94) and carbon oxidation state (m=1.1, r2=0.58) of SOA produced in the flow reactor and environmental chambers for OH exposures of approximately 1011 molec cm-3 s suggests that the composition of SOA produced in the flow reactor and chambers is the same within experimental accuracy as measured with an aerosol mass spectrometer. This similarity in turn suggests that both in the flow reactor and in chambers, SOA chemical composition at low OH exposure is governed primarily by gas-phase OH oxidation of the precursors, rather than heterogeneous oxidation of the condensed particles. In general, SOA yields measured in the flow reactor are lower than measured in chambers for the range of equivalent OH exposures that can be measured in both the flow reactor and chambers. The influence of sulfate seed particles on isoprene SOA yield measurements was examined in the flow reactor. The studies show that seed particles increase the yield of SOA produced in flow reactors by a factor of 3 to 5 and may also account in part for higher SOA yields obtained in the chambers, where seed particles are routinely used.« less

  18. Autonomous Energy Transducer: Proposition, Example, Basic Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoko Nakagawa; Kunihiko Kaneko

    2003-09-22

    We propose a concept of autonomous energy transducer at a molecular scale, where output is produced with small input energy, of the same order of the thermal energy, without restriction of magnitude or timing of input, and without any control after the input. As an example that satisfies these requisites, a dynamical systems model with several degrees of freedom is proposed, which transduces input energy to output motion on the average. It is shown that this transduction is robust and the coupling between the input and output is generally loose. How this transducer works is analyzed in terms of dynamical systems theory, where chaotic dynamics of the internal degrees of freedom, as well as duration of active state which is self-organized with the energy flow, is essential. We also discuss possible relationships to enzyme dynamics or protein motors.

  19. Basic research needs to assure a secure energy future. A report from the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-02-01

    This report has highlighted many of the possible fundamental research areas that will help our country avoid a future energy crisis. The report may not have adequately captured the atmosphere of concern that permeated the discussions at the workshop. The difficulties facing our nation and the world in meeting our energy needs over the next several decades are very challenging. It was generally felt that traditional solutions and approaches will not solve the total energy problem. Knowledge that does not exist must be obtained to address both the quantity of energy needed to increase the standard of living world-wide and the quality of energy generation needed to preserve the environment. In terms of investments, it was clear that there is no single research area that will secure the future energy supply. A diverse range of economic energy sources will be required--and a broad range of fundamental research is needed to enable these. Many of the issues fall into the traditional materials and chemical sciences research areas, but with specific emphasis on understanding mechanisms, energy related phenomena, and pursuing novel directions in, for example, nanoscience and integrated modeling. An important result from the discussions, which is hopefully apparent from the brief presentations above, is that the problems that must be dealt with are truly multidisciplinary. This means that they require the participation of investigators with different skill sets. Basic science skills have to be complemented by awareness of the overall nature of the problem in a national and world context, and with knowledge of the engineering, design, and control issues in any eventual solution. It is necessary to find ways in which this can be done while still preserving the ability to do first-class basic science. The traditional structure of research, with specific disciplinary groupings, will not be sufficient. This presents great challenges and opportunities for the funders of the research that must be done. For example, the applied research programs in the DOE need a greater awareness of the user facilities and an understanding of how to use them to solve their unique problems. The discussions reinforced what all of the participants already knew: the issue of energy security is of major importance both for the U.S. and for the world. Furthermore, it is clear that major changes in the primary energy sources, in energy conversion, and in energy use, must be achieved within the next fifty years. This time scale is determined by two drivers: increasing world population and increasing expectations of that population. Much of the research and development currently being done are concerned with incremental improvements in what has been done in the immediate past; and it is necessary to take this path because improvements will be needed across the board. These advances extend the period before the radical changes have to be made; however, they will not solve the underlying, long-range problem. The Subpanel recommends that a major program be funded to conduct a multidisciplinary research program to address the issues to ensure a secure energy future for the U.S. It is necessary to recognize that this program must be ensured of a long-term stability. It is also necessary that a management and funding structure appropriate for such an approach be developed. The Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences is well positioned to support this initiative by enhancement of their already world-class scientific research programs and user facilities.

  20. Detter, John C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory] Basic Biological

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    State of the Art for Autonomous Detection Systems using Genomic Sequencing Detter, John C. Los Alamos National Laboratory Basic Biological Sciences(59) Biological Science...

  1. Lecture 13 Numerical integration: basics Weinan E1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Tiejun

    @pku.edu.cn No.1 Science Building, 1575 #12;Motivations and ideas Basic techniques Extrapolation algorithm |I(f) - Ih(f)| Chp

  2. Safety, Codes and Standards - Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Safety, Codes & Standards Basics Safe Use of Hydrogen Codes...

  3. ORISE: Collaboration with the CDC yields Radiation Basics Made...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is Making a Difference Radiation Basics Made Simple, the first in a series of online training modules developed by the Radiation Studies Branch (RSB) of the Centers for...

  4. Technical Assistance Project (TAP) Revolving Loan Funds: Basics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project (TAP) Revolving Loan Funds: Basics and Best Practices Presentation by Texas LoanSTAR Manager Theresa Sifuentes from the Texas State Energy Conservation Office...

  5. Chemical Industry Bandwidth Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-01

    The Chemical Bandwidth Study provides a snapshot of potentially recoverable energy losses during chemical manufacturing. The advantage of this study is the use of "exergy" analysis as a tool for pinpointing inefficiencies.

  6. Chemicals Industry Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1996-12-01

    Chemical industry leaders articulated a long-term vision for the industry, its markets, and its technology in the groundbreaking 1996 document Technology Vision 2020 - The U.S. Chemical Industry. (PDF 310 KB).

  7. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  8. CHEMICAL SIGNALS IN THE SEA: MARINE ALLELOCHEMICS AND EVOLUTION1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CHEMICAL SIGNALS IN THE SEA: MARINE ALLELOCHEMICS AND EVOLUTION1 .J. S. KITTREDGE,2 FRANCIS T. TAKAHASHI,:1 ,JAMES LINDSEY,' AND REUB~;N LASKER'> ABSTRACT Ohservations in ~hemi~al ecology suggest between organ- isms was probably by means of chemical agents. This interaction involved both conflict

  9. Marine Chemical Ecology: A Science Born of Scuba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlik, Joseph

    Marine Chemical Ecology: A Science Born of Scuba Joseph R. Pawlik, Charles D.Amsler, Raphael Ritson chemists have been interested in the novel chemical structures and biological activities of marine natural by diverse marine organisms. Chemi- cal ecology, the study of the natural ecological functions

  10. Phase of atmospheric secondary organic material affects its reactivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the reactivity of atmospheric SOM particles. atmospheric chemistry chemical aging organic aerosol collectionPhase of atmospheric secondary organic material affects its reactivity Mikinori Kuwata and Scot T of atmospheric organic particles among solid, semisolid, and liquid phases is of keen current scientific interest

  11. Sediment-Water Distribution of Organic Contaminants in Aquatic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gobas, Frank

    Sediment-Water Distribution of Organic Contaminants in Aquatic Ecosystems: The Role of Organic The distribution between sediments and water plays a key role in the food-chain transfer of hydrophobic organic chemicals. Current models and assessment methods of sediment-water distribution predominantly rely

  12. MECS 2006- Chemicals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Manufacturing Energy and Carbon Footprint for Chemicals Sector (NAICS 325) with Total Energy Input, October 2012 (MECS 2006)

  13. Significance of Isotopically Labile Organic Hydrogen in Thermal Maturation of Organic Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arndt Schimmelmann; Maria Mastalerz

    2010-03-30

    Isotopically labile organic hydrogen in fossil fuels occupies chemical positions that participate in isotopic exchange and in chemical reactions during thermal maturation from kerogen to bitumen, oil and gas. Carbon-bound organic hydrogen is isotopically far less exchangeable than hydrogen bound to nitrogen, oxygen, or sulfur. We explore why organic hydrogen isotope ratios express a relationship with organic nitrogen isotope ratios in kerogen at low to moderate maturity. We develop and apply new techniques to utilize organic D/H ratios in organic matter fractions and on a molecular level as tools for exploration for fossil fuels and for paleoenvironmental research. The scope of our samples includes naturally and artificially matured substrates, such as coal, shale, oil and gas.

  14. Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . .

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Servatius, Brigitte

    Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . . Realization 2d Zeolites Finite Zeolites The Layer . . . Holes University (Brigitte Servatius -- WPI) #12;Chemical Zeolites Combinatorial . . . Realization 2d Zeolites. Chemical Zeolites · crystalline solid · units: Si + 4O Si O O O O · two covalent bonds per oxygen #12

  15. Department of Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Developing Leaders of Innovation Department of Chemical Engineering #12;At the University of Virginia, we educate students in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering, giving them.Va. Department of Chemical Engineering benefit from a modern academic curriculum and state

  16. Equilibrium Chemical Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tatsuo Shibata; Shin-ichi Sasa

    1997-10-30

    An equilibrium reversible cycle with a certain engine to transduce the energy of any chemical reaction into mechanical energy is proposed. The efficiency for chemical energy transduction is also defined so as to be compared with Carnot efficiency. Relevance to the study of protein motors is discussed. KEYWORDS: Chemical thermodynamics, Engine, Efficiency, Molecular machine.

  17. HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, George M.

    HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY PHD PROGRAM 2013-2014 Student Handbook #12;Program Contacts at the beginning of each semester. Laboratory Rotations Students in the Chemical Biology Program are expected an interest in having Chemical Biology Program Students in their labs. Students may rotate in the labs

  18. Annual Report 2000. Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colson, Steven D.; McDowell, Robin S.

    2001-04-15

    This annual report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program in the year 2000, one of six research programs at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) - a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is meeting the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding by 1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; 2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes relevant to environmental chemistry; and 3) developing state-of-the-art research and analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in natural and contaminated systems.

  19. Basic science research to support the nuclear material focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boak, J. M. (Jeremy M.); Eller, P. Gary; Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

  20. Basic Science Research to Support the Nuclear Materials Focus Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.; Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. G.

    2002-02-26

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

  1. Chemical Emissions of Residential Materials and Products: Review of Available Information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willem, Henry; Singer, Brett

    2010-09-15

    This report is prepared in the context of a larger program whose mission is to advance understanding of ventilation and indoor air quality in U.S. homes. A specific objective of this program is to develop the scientific basis ? through controlled experiments, monitoring and analysis ? for health risk-based ventilation standards. Appropriate and adequate ventilation is a basic element of a healthy home. Ventilation provides outdoor air and in the process removes indoor odors and contaminants including potentially unhealthful chemicals emitted by indoor materials, products and activities. Ventilation traditionally was assured to occur via infiltration of outdoor air through cracks and other leakage pathways in the residential building envelope. As building air tightness is improved for energy efficiency, infiltration can be reduced to inadequate levels. This has lead to the development of standards requiring mechanical ventilation. Though nominally intended to ensure acceptable indoor air quality, the standards are not explicitly tied to health risk or pollutant exposure targets. LBNL is currently designing analyses to assess the impact of varying ventilation standards on pollutant concentrations, health risks and energy use. These analyses require information on sources of chemical pollutant emissions, ideally including emission rates and the impact of ventilation on emissions. Some information can be obtained from recent studies that report measurements of various air contaminants and their concentrations in U.S. residences. Another way to obtain this information is the bottom-up approach of collecting and evaluating emissions data from construction and interior materials and common household products. This review contributes to the latter approach by summarizing available information on chemical emissions from new residential products and materials. We review information from the scientific literature and public sources to identify and discuss the databases that provide information on new or low-emission materials and products. The review focuses on the primary chemical or volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from interior surface materials, furnishings, and some regularly used household products; all of these emissions are amenable to ventilation. Though it is an important and related topic, this review does not consider secondary pollutants that result from reactions of ozone and unsaturated organics bound to or emitted from material surfaces. Semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) have been largely excluded from this review because ventilation generally is not an effective way to control SVOC exposures. Nevertheless, health concerns about exposures to SVOCs emitted from selected materials warrant some discussion.

  2. X-ray photon-in/photon-out methods for chemical imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marcus, Matthew A.

    2010-03-24

    Most interesting materials in nature are heterogeneous, so it is useful to have analytical techniques with spatial resolution sufficient to resolve these heterogeneities.This article presents the basics of X-ray photon-in/photon-out chemical imaging. This family of methods allows one to derive images reflectingthe chemical state of a given element in a complex sample, at micron or deep sub-micron scale. X-ray chemical imaging is relatively non-destructiveand element-selective, and requires minimal sample preparation. The article presents the basic concepts and some considerations of data takingand data analysis, along with some examples.

  3. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    V. , Ed. , Safety in the Chemical Laboratory. J. Chem.£d. Amer/can Chemical Society. Easlon. PA. 18042. Vol. Lof Laboratory Safety. the Chemical Rubber Company Cleveland.

  4. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiu, Anne; Sturmfels, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    strongly-connected chemical reaction, and the compu- tationcredited. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks Referencesto persistence analysis in chemical reaction networks. In:

  5. KH Computational Physics-2015 Basic Numerical Algorithms Ordinary differential equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    KH Computational Physics- 2015 Basic Numerical Algorithms Ordinary differential equations The set(xl) at certain points xl. Kristjan Haule, 2015 ­1­ #12;KH Computational Physics- 2015 Basic Numerical Algorithms purpose routine · Numerov's algorithm: ¨y = f(t)y(t) ( for Schroedinger equation) · Verlet algorithm: ¨y

  6. REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE ON BASIC EDUCATION IN NIGERIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    June 2014 REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE ON BASIC EDUCATION IN NIGERIA Issues of access, quality, equity and impact Sara Humphreys with Lee Crawfurd #12;Review of the literature on basic education in Nigeria EDOREN ­ Education Data, Research and Evaluation in Nigeria i Acknowledgements Thanks are due to many individuals who

  7. Title: Ontario Base Map (OBM) [Ontario Basic Mapping] Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Ontario Base Map (OBM) [Ontario Basic Mapping] Data Creator / Copyright Owner: Ontario/A Publication Date: N/A Coverage Date(s): N/A Updates: N/A Abstract: In 1975, the Ontario Basic Mapping (OBM) Program was created to provide a common geographic database for the Province of Ontario. This OBM program

  8. Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Pengcheng

    Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 Protocol Title: Training for Sealed Source Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers: ZB, TU, GS Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

  9. Modular Termination of Basic Narrowing and Equational Unification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escobar, Santiago

    constraint solving [4, 5], partial evaluation [6], and model checking [17], among others. TerminationModular Termination of Basic Narrowing and Equational Unification Mar´ia Alpuente Santiago Escobar steps to a set of unblocked (or basic) positions. In this work, we study the modularity of termination

  10. BESAC Subcommittee Workshop Report 20-Year Basic Energy Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, David William

    BESAC Subcommittee Workshop Report on 20-Year Basic Energy Sciences Facilities Roadmap Co Labs/Lucent (BESAC) Gabrielle Long, NIST (BESAC) Gerhard Materlik, Diamond Light Source Ltd. Les Price (U. of CA San Diego) 8:15am - 8:30am Introduction from BES Pat Dehmer, Basic Energy Sciences 8:30am

  11. Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering June 2015 #12;Wyss Institute Chemical Hygiene Plan TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 POLICY..........................................................................................2 2.1 CHEMICAL HYGIENE OFFICER

  12. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout Events

  13. Organizing Committee

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams for Large-scaleOrganizationAbout

  14. Molecular mechanism of hydrocarbons binding to the metal–organic framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Xiuquan; Wick, Collin D.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, B. Peter; Dang, Liem X.

    2011-01-07

    The adsorption and diffusivity of methane, ethane, n-butane, n-hexane and cyclohexane in a metal organic framework (MOF) with the organic linker tetrakis[4-(carboxyphenyl)oxamethyl]methane, the metal salt, Zn2+, and organic pillar, 4,4’-bipyridin was studied using molecular dynamics simulations. For the n-alkanes, the longer the chain, the lower the free energy of adsorption, which was attributed to a greater number of contacts between the alkane and MOF. Cyclohexane had a slightly higher adsorption free energy than n-hexane. Furthermore, for cyclo- and n-hexane, there were no significant differences in adsorption free energies between systems with low to moderate loadings. The diffusivity of the n-alkanes was found to strongly depend on chain length with slower diffusion for longer chains. Cyclohexane had no effective diffusion, suggesting that the selectivity the MOF has towards n-hexane over cyclohexane is the result of kinetics instead of energetics. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for DOE.

  15. Removal of basic nitrogen compounds from hydrocarbon liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA)

    1985-01-01

    A method is provided for reducing the concentration of basic nitrogen compounds in hydrocarbonaceous feedstock fluids used in the refining industry by providing a solid particulate carbonaceous adsorbent/fuel material such as coal having active basic nitrogen complexing sites on the surface thereof and the coal with a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock containing basic nitrogen compounds to facilitate attraction of the basic nitrogen compounds to the complexing sites and the formation of complexes thereof on the surface of the coal. The adsorbent coal material and the complexes formed thereon are from the feedstock fluid to provide a hydrocarbonaceous fluid of reduced basic nitrogen compound concentration. The coal can then be used as fuel for boilers and the like.

  16. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1999-11-01

    This reports summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1999. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within eight major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included column loading of cesium from Melton Valley Storage Tank supematants using an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate. A second task was to design and construct a continuously stirred tank reactor system to test the Savannah River-developed process of small-tank tetraphenylborate precipitation to remove cesium, strontium, and transuranics from supematant. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed, including issues such as pipeline plugging and viscosity measurements. Investigation of solution conditions required to dissolve Hanford saltcake was also continued. MSRE Remediation Studies focused on recovery of {sup 233}U and its transformation into a stable oxide and radiolysis experiments to permit remediation of MSRE fuel salt. In the area of Chemistry Research, activities included studies relative to molecular imprinting for use in areas such as selective sorption, chemical sensing, and catalysis, as well as spectroscopic investigation into the fundamental interaction between ionic solvents and solutes in both low- and high-temperature ionic liquids. In the area of Separations and Materials Synthesis, fundamental studies explored the use of electromagnetic fields to enhance transport processes in multiphase separations; investigated nucleation and particle growth for the synthesis, characterization, application, and processing of ultrafine particles; and examined the use of electric fields to modify phase equilibria in multiphase separations processes. Other efforts involved enhanced oxidation of organic pollutants in aqueous solutions by applying electric fields to form microbubbles and the use of electric fields to improve distillation efficiency. Research was also directed toward the use of ozonation to treat water-soluble organics, the application of electrical and acoustic methods to remediate aerosol problems, and the development of improved means of decontamination using aqueous surfactant cleaners. Fluid Structure and Properties included molecular-based studies of systems with supercritical solvents, a multi-institutional initiative to develop a molecular understanding of reverse miscelles in supercritical carbon dioxide through experimentation and molecular simulation calculations, and molecular-based prediction of the structure and properties of long-chain molecules undergoing shear flow.

  17. Impurity Profiling of a Chemical Weapon Precursor for Possible Forensic Signatures by Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry and Chemometrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoggard, Jamin C.; Wahl, Jon H.; Synovec, Robert E.; Mong, Gary M.; Fraga, Carlos G.

    2010-01-15

    In this work we present the feasibility of using analytical chemical and chemometric methodologies to reveal and exploit the organic impurity profiles from commercial dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP) samples to illustrate the type of forensic information that may be obtained from chemical-attack evidence. Using DMMP as a model compound for a toxicant that may be used in a chemical attack, we used comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography mass spectrometric detection (GC × GC-TOFMS) to detect and identify trace organic impurities in six samples of commercially acquired DMMP. The GC x GC-TOFMS data were analyzed to produce impurity profiles for all six DMMP samples using 29 analyte impurities. The use of PARAFAC for the mathematical resolution of overlap GC x GC peaks ensured clean spectra for the identification of many of the detected analytes by spectral library matching. The use of statistical pairwise comparison revealed that there were trace impurities that were quantitatively similar and different among five of the six DMMP samples. Two of the DMMP samples were revealed to have identical impurity profiles by this approach. The use of nonnegative matrix factorization proved that there were five distinct DMMP sample types as illustrated by the clustering of the multiple DMMP analyses into 5 distinct clusters in the scores plots. The two indistinguishable DMMP samples were confirmed by their chemical supplier to be from the same bulk source. Sample information from the other chemical suppliers supported that the other five DMMP samples were likely from different bulk sources. These results demonstrate that the matching of synthesized products from the same source is possible using impurity profiling. In addition, the identified impurities common to all six DMMP samples provide strong evidence that basic route information can be obtained from impurity profiles. In addition, impurities that may be unique to the sole bulk manufacturer of DMMP were found in some of the DMMP samples.

  18. 2. Basic Operation of Image Express Utility 2.0 2. Basic Operation of Image Express Utility 2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milgram, Paul

    20 2. Basic Operation of Image Express Utility 2.0 2. Basic Operation of Image Express Utility 2.0 This section explains the following three cases as examples of operating Image Express Utility 2.0. (1 functions of Image Express Utility 2.0, refer to "1-1. What You Can Do with User Supportware 6" ( page 5). 2

  19. Decrease of Entropy and Chemical Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fang Chang

    2008-07-01

    The chemical reactions are very complex, and include oscillation, condensation, catalyst and self-organization, etc. In these case changes of entropy may increase or decrease. The second law of thermodynamics is based on an isolated system and statistical independence. If fluctuations magnified due to internal interactions exist in the system, entropy will decrease possibly. In chemical reactions there are various internal interactions, so that some ordering processes with decrease of entropy are possible on an isolated system. For example, a simplifying Fokker-Planck equation is solved, and the hysteresis as limit cycle is discussed.

  20. Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

    2013-01-08

    The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

  1. COBRA: A Computational Brewing Application for Predicting the Molecular Composition of Organic Aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    COBRA: A Computational Brewing Application for Predicting the Molecular Composition of Organic to their complex and dynamic chemical composition. We introduce a novel Computational Brewing Application (COBRA

  2. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  3. Chemical Cleaning Program Review

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Chemical Cleaning Program Review Neil Davis Deputy Program Manager Waste Removal & Tank Closure July 29, 2009 SRR-STI-2009-00464 2 Contents Regulatory drivers Process overview...

  4. Apparatus for chemical synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-05-10

    A method and apparatus for forming a chemical hydride is described and which includes a pseudo-plasma-electrolysis reactor which is operable to receive a solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further includes a cathode and a movable anode, and wherein the anode is moved into and out of fluidic, ohmic electrical contact with the solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further, when energized produces an oxygen plasma which facilitates the formation of a chemical hydride in the solution.

  5. Sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to minerals and low-organic-carbon aquifer sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimaldi, Gabriel Orlando

    1999-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms and major geochemical factors ics. controlling the sorption of nontoxic organic chemicals (NOC) to mineral surfaces in low-organic-carbon soils and sediments remain unclear. The objectives of this research were to study...

  6. Chemical Weapons Convention Requirements Part 745page 1 Export Administration Regulations September 28, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Daniel

    Chemical Weapons Convention Requirements Part 745­page 1 Export Administration Regulations September 28, 2001 §745.1 ADVANCE NOTIFICATION AND ANNUAL REPORT OF ALL EXPORTS OF SCHEDULE 1 CHEMICALS the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) not less than 30 days in advance of every export

  7. 2/Donald M. Knutson-Abstract: Biological and chemical control agents for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2/Donald M. Knutson- Abstract: Biological and chemical control agents for control of dwarfZinclrocarpon g i l i i i , dwarf mistletoe, biological control, chemical control. INTRODUCTION Forest managers organisms and with chemicals that can be applied to infected trees and which selectively kill the dwarf

  8. "Kinetics of Chemical Reactions in Environmental Systems: Research Needs and Challenges"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    "Kinetics of Chemical Reactions in Environmental Systems: Research Needs and Challenges" Donald(oid)s, nutrients, radionuclides, and organic chemicals have shown that reaction rates are initially rapid followed by a slow approach to a steady state. The rapid reaction has been ascribed to chemical reactions and film

  9. Immobilizing Highly Catalytically Active Pt Nanoparticles inside the Pores of Metal-Organic Framework: A Double Solvents Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aijaz, Arshad; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Choi, Young Joon; Tsumori, Nobuko; Ronnebro, Ewa; Autrey, Thomas; Shioyama, Hiroshi; Xu, Qiang

    2012-08-29

    Ultrafine Pt nanoparticles were successfully immobilized inside the pores of a metal-organic framework MIL-101 without deposition of Pt nanoparticles on the external surfaces of framework by using a 'double solvents' method. The resulting Pt@MIL-101 composites with different Pt loadings represent the first highly active MOF-immobilized metal nanocatalysts for catalytic reactions in all three phases: liquid-phase ammonia borane hydrolysis; solid-phase ammonia borane thermal dehy-drogenation and gas-phase CO oxidation. The observed excellent catalytic performances are at-tributed to the small Pt nanoparticles within the pores of MIL-101. 'We are thankful to AIST and METI for financial support. TA & AK are thankful for support from the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. PNNL is operated by Battelle.'

  10. Apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMurtrey, Ryan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moor, Kenneth S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shook, G. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID); Moses, John M. (Dedham, MA); Barker, Donna L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for extraction of chemicals from an aquifer remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating aquifers contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

  11. Method and system for extraction of chemicals from aquifer remediation effluent water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McMurtrey, Ryan D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ginosar, Daniel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moor, Kenneth S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Shook, G. Michael (Idaho Falls, ID); Barker, Donna L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-01-01

    A method and system for extraction of chemicals from an groundwater remediation aqueous effluent are provided. The extraction method utilizes a critical fluid for separation and recovery of chemicals employed in remediating groundwater contaminated with hazardous organic substances, and is particularly suited for separation and recovery of organic contaminants and process chemicals used in surfactant-based remediation technologies. The extraction method separates and recovers high-value chemicals from the remediation effluent and minimizes the volume of generated hazardous waste. The recovered chemicals can be recycled to the remediation process or stored for later use.

  12. Basics of F-theory from the Type IIB Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralph Blumenhagen

    2010-02-15

    These short lecture notes provide an introduction to some basic notions of F-theory with some special emphasis on its relation to Type IIB orientifolds with O7/O3-planes.

  13. Tutorial: The Basics of SAXS Data Analysis | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tutorial: The Basics of SAXS Data Analysis Thursday, November 17, 2011 - 1:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Dr. Alexander V. Shkumatov, Biological Small Angle...

  14. The Basics of Water Waves Theory for Analogue Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Germain Rousseaux

    2012-03-14

    This chapter gives an introduction to the connection between the physics of water waves and analogue gravity. Only a basic knowledge of fluid mechanics is assumed as a prerequisite.

  15. ICF basics, NIF and IFE Mark C. Herrmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICF basics, NIF and IFE Mark C. Herrmann Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Special Thanks force balanced by g) · Magnetic (pressure force balanced by B2) · NIF= National Ignition Facility d = 1

  16. Astronomy 2291 Basic Astrophysics & Planetary Astronomy Autumn Semester 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaudi, B. Scott

    , I ask that everyone please observe these basic rules of classroom etiquette: Use of cell phones of Newtonian gravity and optics as applied to astronomy 3. Electromagnetic radiation and interaction of light

  17. BASIC TERM LIFE INSURANCE ANTHEM LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 35 - BASIC TERM LIFE INSURANCE ANTHEM LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY Maximum Benefits The amount of life and your family is important, especially in the event of a death or accident. Therefore, the CHEIBA Trust

  18. Overcoming the Exciton Diffusion Bottleneck in Organic Photovoltaic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Overcoming the Exciton Diffusion Bottleneck in Organic Photovoltaic Cells May 20, 2009 at 3pm36-428 Russell J.Holmes Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science,...

  19. Basic notions of dense matter physics: applications to astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Celebonovic

    2006-03-02

    The aim of this paper is to present basic notions of dense matter physics and some of its applications to geophysics and astronomy.Topics covered in the paper include:basic observational data,fun- damental ideas of static high pressure experiments, notions of theoretical dense matter physics, and finally some details about theoretical work on dense matter physics and its astronomical applications in Serbia.

  20. Organic lateral heterojunction devices for vapor-phase chemical detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, John C., 1980-

    2009-01-01

    As the U.S. is engaged in battle overseas, there is an urgent need for the development of sensors for early warning and protection of military forces against potential attacks. On the battlefields, improvised explosive ...

  1. Chemical and Physical Investigation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakao, Shunsuke

    2012-01-01

    Saunders, R. W. : Atmospheric Chemistry of Iodine, Chemicalmodelling: a review, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 5,emerging issues, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9, 5155-

  2. Chemical and Physical Investigation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakao, Shunsuke

    2012-01-01

    from the photooxidation of isoprene, 1,3-butadiene, and2,3-dimethyl-1,3- butadiene under high NOx conditions,and 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene) was investigated under high

  3. Chemical anchoring of organic conducting polymers to semiconducting surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, A.J.; Honda, K.

    1984-01-01

    According to the present invention, an improved method of coating electrodes with conductive polymer films and/or preselected catalysts is provided. The charge conductive polymer is covalently or coordinatively attached to the electrode surface to strengthen the adhesion characteristics of the polymer to the electrode surface or to improve charge conductive properties between the conductive polymer and the electrode surface. Covalent or coordinative attachment is achieved by a number of alternative methods including covalently or coordinatively attaching the desired monomer to the electrode by means of a suitable coupling reagent and, thereafter, electrochemically polymerizing the monomer in situ.

  4. Chemical anchoring of organic conducting polymers to semiconducting surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frank, Arthur J. (Lakewood, CO); Honda, Kenji (Wheatridge, CO)

    1984-01-01

    According to the present invention, an improved method of coating electrodes with conductive polymer films and/or preselected catalysts is provided. The charge-conductive polymer is covalently or coordinatively attached to the electrode surface to strengthen the adhesion characteristics of the polymer to the electrode surface or to improve charge-conductive properties between the conductive polymer and the electrode surface. Covalent or coordinative attachment is achieved by a number of alternative methods including covalently or coordinatively attaching the desired monomer to the electrode by means of a suitable coupling reagent and, thereafter, electrochemically polymerizing the monomer in situ.

  5. Chemical and Physical Investigation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakao, Shunsuke

    2012-01-01

    from the photooxidation of isoprene, 1,3-butadiene, and 2,3-dimethyl-1,3- butadiene under high NOx conditions, Atmos.and 2,3-dimethyl-1,3-butadiene) was investigated under high

  6. Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Simonson, Robert J. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2010-09-21

    A non-planar, tortuous path chemical preconcentrator has a high internal surface area having a heatable sorptive coating that can be used to selectively collect and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a sorptive support structure having a tortuous flow path. The tortuosity provides repeated twists, turns, and bends to the flow, thereby increasing the interfacial contact between sample fluid stream and the sorptive material. The tortuous path also provides more opportunities for desorption and readsorption of volatile species. Further, the thermal efficiency of the tortuous path chemical preconcentrator is comparable or superior to the prior non-planar chemical preconcentrator. Finally, the tortuosity can be varied in different directions to optimize flow rates during the adsorption and desorption phases of operation of the preconcentrator.

  7. Engineering microbes for efficient production of chemicals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gong, Wei; Dole, Sudhanshu; Grabar, Tammy; Collard, Andrew Christopher; Pero, Janice G; Yocum, R Rogers

    2015-04-28

    This present invention relates to production of chemicals from microorganisms that have been genetically engineered and metabolically evolved. Improvements in chemical production have been established, and particular mutations that lead to those improvements have been identified. Specific examples are given in the identification of mutations that occurred during the metabolic evolution of a bacterial strain genetically engineered to produce succinic acid. This present invention also provides a method for evaluating the industrial applicability of mutations that were selected during the metabolic evolution for increased succinic acid production. This present invention further provides microorganisms engineered to have mutations that are selected during metabolic evolution and contribute to improved production of succinic acid, other organic acids and other chemicals of commercial interest.

  8. PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    1 PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering Bylaws Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering College of Engineering and Architecture Approved by Voiland School facultyD Chemical Engineering, MS Chemical Engineering B. Discipline: Edgar, et al.1 provide a succinct description

  9. Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July--September 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jubin, R.T.

    1998-07-01

    This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July--September 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

  10. Summaries of FY 1982 research in the chemical sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1982-09-01

    The purpose of this booklet is to help those interested in research supported by the Department of Energy's Division of Chemical Sciences, which is one of six Divisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. These summaries are intended to provide a rapid means for becoming acquainted with the Chemical Sciences program to members of the scientific and technological public and interested persons in the Legislative and Executive Branches of the Government. Areas of research supported by the Division are to be seen in the section headings, the index and the summaries themselves. Energy technologies which may be advanced by use of the basic knowledge discovered in this program can be seen in the index and again (by reference) in the summaries. The table of contents lists the following: photochemical and radiation sciences; chemical physics; atomic physics; chemical energy; separation and analysis; chemical engineering sciences; offsite contracts; equipment funds; special facilities; topical index; institutional index for offsite contracts; investigator index.

  11. Photochemical deterioration of the organic/metal contacts in organic optoelectronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Qi; Williams, Graeme; Aziz, Hany; Tsui Ting

    2012-09-15

    We study the effect of exposure to light on a wide range of organic/metal contacts that are commonly used in organic optoelectronic devices and found that irradiation by light in the visible and UV range results in a gradual deterioration in their electrical properties. This photo-induced contact degradation reduces both charge injection (i.e., from the metal to the organic layer) and charge extraction (i.e., from the organic layer to the metal). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements reveal detectable changes in the interface characteristics after irradiation, indicating that the photo-degradation is chemical in nature. Changes in XPS characteristics after irradiation suggests a possible reduction in bonds associated with organic-metal complexes. Measurements of interfacial adhesion strength using the four-point flexure technique reveal a decrease in organic/metal adhesion in irradiated samples, consistent with a decrease in metal-organic bond density. The results shed the light on a new material degradation mechanism that appears to have a wide presence in organic/metal interfaces in general, and which likely plays a key role in limiting the stability of various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic light emitting devices, organic solar cells, and organic photo-detectors.

  12. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    CMT is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. It conducts R&D in 3 general areas: development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, materials chemistry of electrified interfaces and molecular sieves, and the theory of materials properties. It also operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at ANL and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1996 are presented.

  13. Basic Notions Main Theorems Voting Systems Proofs Summary Two Simple Ways to Rig an Election

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponomarenko, Vadim

    Basic Notions Main Theorems Voting Systems Proofs Summary Two Simple Ways to Rig an Election;Basic Notions Main Theorems Voting Systems Proofs Summary Outline Basic Notions Main Theorems Voting Systems Proofs Summary #12;Basic Notions Main Theorems Voting Systems Proofs Summary Basics Candidates, C

  14. Advanced Chemical Heat Pumps Using Liquid-Vapor Reactions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirol, L.

    1987-01-01

    HEAT PUMPS USING LIQUID-VAPOR REACTIONS LANCE KIROL Senior Program Specialist Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Idaho Falls, Idaho . ABSTRACT Chemical heat pumps utilizing liquid-vapor reactions can be configured in forms analogous... to electric drive vapor-compression heat pumps and heat activated absorption heat pumps. Basic thermodynamic considerations eliminate some heat pumps and place restrictive working fluid requirements on others, but two thermodynam ically feasible systems...

  15. ITP Chemicals: Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A Powerful Tool for Identifying Process Inefficiencies in the U.S. Chemical Industry, Industrial Technologies Program, DRAFT Summary...

  16. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.; Bomstad, Theresa M.; Sorini-Wong, Susan S.; Wong, Gregory K.

    2011-03-01

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  17. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Laramie, WY); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY)

    2009-02-10

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  18. The Path to Sustainable Nuclear Energy. Basic and Applied Research Opportunities for Advanced Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finck, P.; Edelstein, N.; Allen, T.; Burns, C.; Chadwick, M.; Corradini, M.; Dixon, D.; Goff, M.; Laidler, J.; McCarthy, K.; Moyer, B.; Nash, K.; Navrotsky, A.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Peterson, P.; Sackett, J.; Sickafus, K. E.; Tulenko, J.; Weber, W.; Morss, L.; Henry, G.

    2005-09-01

    The objective of this report is to identify new basic science that will be the foundation for advances in nuclear fuel-cycle technology in the near term, and for changing the nature of fuel cycles and of the nuclear energy industry in the long term. The goals are to enhance the development of nuclear energy, to maximize energy production in nuclear reactor parks, and to minimize radioactive wastes, other environmental impacts, and proliferation risks. The limitations of the once-through fuel cycle can be overcome by adopting a closed fuel cycle, in which the irradiated fuel is reprocessed and its components are separated into streams that are recycled into a reactor or disposed of in appropriate waste forms. The recycled fuel is irradiated in a reactor, where certain constituents are partially transmuted into heavier isotopes via neutron capture or into lighter isotopes via fission. Fast reactors are required to complete the transmutation of long-lived isotopes. Closed fuel cycles are encompassed by the Department of Energy?s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), to which basic scientific research can contribute. Two nuclear reactor system architectures can meet the AFCI objectives: a ?single-tier? system or a ?dual-tier? system. Both begin with light water reactors and incorporate fast reactors. The ?dual-tier? systems transmute some plutonium and neptunium in light water reactors and all remaining transuranic elements (TRUs) in a closed-cycle fast reactor. Basic science initiatives are needed in two broad areas: ? Near-term impacts that can enhance the development of either ?single-tier? or ?dual-tier? AFCI systems, primarily within the next 20 years, through basic research. Examples: Dissolution of spent fuel, separations of elements for TRU recycling and transmutation Design, synthesis, and testing of inert matrix nuclear fuels and non-oxide fuels Invention and development of accurate on-line monitoring systems for chemical and nuclear species in the nuclear fuel cycle Development of advanced tools for designing reactors with reduced margins and lower costs ? Long-term nuclear reactor development requires basic science breakthroughs: Understanding of materials behavior under extreme environmental conditions Creation of new, efficient, environmentally benign chemical separations methods Modeling and simulation to improve nuclear reaction cross-section data, design new materials and separation system, and propagate uncertainties within the fuel cycle Improvement of proliferation resistance by strengthening safeguards technologies and decreasing the attractiveness of nuclear materials A series of translational tools is proposed to advance the AFCI objectives and to bring the basic science concepts and processes promptly into the technological sphere. These tools have the potential to revolutionize the approach to nuclear engineering R&D by replacing lengthy experimental campaigns with a rigorous approach based on modeling, key fundamental experiments, and advanced simulations.

  19. Safety Issues Chemical Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Issues · Chemical Storage ·Store in compatible containers that are in good condition to store separately. #12;Safety Issues · Flammable liquid storage -Store bulk quantities in flammable storage cabinets -UL approved Flammable Storage Refrigerators are required for cold storage · Provide

  20. Fuzzy Chemical Abstract Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syropoulos, Apostolos

    2009-01-01

    Fuzzy set theory opens new vistas in computability theory and here I show this by defining a new computational metaphor--the fuzzy chemical metaphor. This metaphor is an extension of the chemical metaphor. In particular, I introduce the idea of a state of a system as a solution of fuzzy molecules, that is molecules that are not just different but rather similar, that react according to a set of fuzzy reaction rules. These notions become precise by introducing fuzzy labeled transition systems. Solutions of fuzzy molecules and fuzzy reaction rules are used to define the general notion of a fuzzy chemical abstract machine, which is a {\\em realization} of the fuzzy chemical metaphor. Based on the idea that these machines can be used to describe the operational semantics of process calculi and algebras that include fuzziness as a fundamental property, I present a toy calculus that is a fuzzy equivalent of the $\\pi$-calculus.

  1. Chemical Processing White Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    hydrogen from hydrocarbon mixtures, and propylene from propane, and if scaled up, could cut the cost fibers as a platform," says Sankar Nair, a professor in the School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

  2. 219-S chemical compatibility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOODWIN, L.D.

    1999-08-31

    This document consists of tables of the materials that make up the ''wetted'' parts of the 219-S waste handling facility and a combination of manufacturer lists of chemicals that are not recommended.

  3. ChEGSA constitution second draft 10/14/2008 Article 1 -Name and Purpose of the Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    Section 1: The name of the organization shall be the Chemical Engineering Graduate Student Association Chemical Engineering graduate students, and to provide a forum for communication between the Chemical Engineering graduate student body and Chemical Engineering departmental faculty and staff. Article 2

  4. Chemical Hygiene Michigan State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    Chemical Hygiene Plan Michigan State University Environmental Health and Safety Engineering 2014 #12;ii Michigan State University Chemical Hygiene Plan Table of Contents 1.0 SCOPE.................................................................................................... 1 1.4 HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL DEFINITIONS

  5. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    IUPAC) or the Chemical Abstracts Service (CA,S} -'lee ofTerms CAS Number Chemical Abstract Service registry number,is indicated. CAS Number: Chemical Abstract Service registry

  6. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Program of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Program of Study Research Facilities Financial Aid Applying Correspondence The Department of Chemical Engineering and Biological Engineering has well-established programs at both area of chemical engineering and include both fundamental and applied topics. The Department has

  7. Management Principles for Nonproliferation Organizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazar, Sarah L.; Hund, Gretchen

    2012-03-06

    This paper identifies business models and six management principles that can be applied by a nonproliferation organization to maximize the value and effectiveness of its products. The organizations responsible for reducing the nuclear proliferation threat have experienced a substantial growth in responsibility and visibility since the September 11 attacks. Since then, the international community has witnessed revelations of clandestine nuclear facilities, nuclear black markets, periodic nuclear tests, and a resurgence of interest by countries worldwide in developing nuclear capabilities. The security environment will likely continue to evolve in unexpected ways since most of the proliferation threats with which the world will be forced to contend remain unforeseen. To better prepare for and respond to this evolving security environment, many nonproliferation organizations are interested in finding new or better ways to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of their operations. Of course, all organizations, whether they are market driven or non-profit, must operate effectively and efficiently if they are to succeed. Indeed, as this study demonstrates, many of the management principles that this study recommends can help all organizations succeed. However, this study pays particular attention to nonproliferation organizations because of the mission they are responsible for fulfilling. Nonproliferation organizations, including nonproliferation programs that operate within a larger national security organization, are responsible for reducing the threat of nuclear, chemical and biological weapons. These organizations have an enduring mandate from the public and the international community not to fail in the completion of their mission for failure could have detrimental impacts on international security, public health and the environment. Moreover, the public expects nonproliferation organizations and programs to fulfill their mission, even when resources are limited. They are expected to anticipate and react quickly to prevent a potential threat while staying accountable to their public stakeholders, many of whom remain unaware of the very threats the organization is trying to address. When budgets are flush, it is easy to believe that money will solve all problems; but during times of economic hardship, managers must rely on creative and cost-effective management approaches to implement their missions. Fortunately, managers of nonproliferation organizations can draw on a wealth of research on organizational design and culture to help them identify the management strategies most appropriate for them. Such research can help nonproliferation managers think about their own organizational structures and cultures and adapt accepted management principles to their unique organizational mission. This analytical process is not straight forward, as some managers may find themselves taking risks that others might not take, such as making ostensibly risky investments for the common good, or supporting creative thinking to help mission accomplishment. Some management principles that are relatively straightforward for other organizations may be difficult to envision and implement in a nonproliferation organization. Therefore, the goal of this study is to help nonproliferation managers identify management principles that can be implemented in a nonproliferation organization and, in the process, help maximize the value of the organization's products and effectiveness of its mission.

  8. Static SIMS Analysis of Carbonate on Basic Alkali-bearing Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groenewold, Gary Steven; Gianotto, Anita Kay; Cortez, Marnie Michelle; Appelhans, Anthony David; Olsen, J.E.; Shaw, A. D.; Karahan, C.; Avci, R.

    2003-02-01

    Carbonate is a somewhat enigmatic anion in static secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) because abundant ions containing intact CO32- are not detected when analyzing alkaline-earth carbonate minerals common to the geochemical environment. In contrast, carbonate can be observed as an adduct ion when it is bound with alkali cations. In this study, carbonate was detected as the adduct Na2CO3·Na+ in the spectra of sodium carbonate, bicarbonate, hydroxide, oxalate, formate and nitrite and to a lesser extent nitrate. The appearance of the adduct Na2CO3·Na+ on hydroxide, oxalate, formate and nitrite surfaces was interpreted in terms of these basic surfaces fixing CO2 from the ambient atmosphere. The low abundance of Na2CO3·Na+ in the static SIMS spectrum of sodium nitrate, compared with a significantly higher abundance in salts having stronger conjugate bases, suggested that the basicity of the conjugate anions correlated with aggressive CO2 fixation; however, the appearance of Na2CO3·Na+ could not be explained simply in terms of solution basicity constants. The oxide molecular ion Na2O+ and adducts NaOH·Na+ and Na2O·Na+ also constituted part of the carbonate spectral signature, and were observed in spectra from all the salts studied. In addition to the carbonate and oxide ions, a low-abundance oxalate ion series was observed that had the general formula Na2-xHxC2O4·Na+, where 0 < x < 2. Oxalate adsorption from the laboratory atmosphere was demonstrated but the oxalate ion series also was likely to be formed from reductive coupling occurring during the static SIMS bombardment event. The remarkable spectral similarity observed when comparing the sodium salts indicated that their surfaces shared common chemical speciation and that the chemistry of the surfaces was very different from the bulk of the particle. Copyright © 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Basic and Equivariant Cohomology in Balanced Topological Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Zucchini

    1998-04-14

    We present a detailed algebraic study of the N=2 cohomological set--up describing the balanced topological field theory of Dijkgraaf and Moore. We emphasize the role of N=2 topological supersymmetry and $sl(2,R)$ internal symmetry by a systematic use of superfield techniques and of an $sl(2,R)$ covariant formalism. We provide a definition of N=2 basic and equivariant cohomology, generalizing Dijkgraaf's and Moore's, and of N=2 connection. For a general manifold with a group action, we show that: $i$) the N=2 basic cohomology is isomorphic to the tensor product of the ordinary N=1 basic cohomology and a universal $sl(2,R)$ group theoretic factor: $ii$) the affine spaces of N=2 and N=1 connections are isomorphic.

  10. Philadelphia University Faculty of Science Department of Basic Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Chemical Reactions Enthalpy · Enthalpy of Reactions · Thermochemical Equations 6.5 Calorimetry Specific Reactions 6.3 Introduction to Thermodynamics The First Law of Thermodynamics · Work and Heat 6.4 Enthalpy Enthalpy of Formation and Reaction The Direct Method · The Indirect Method (8), (9)Ch. 14 Chemical Kinetics

  11. Ordered organic-organic multilayer growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R; Lunt, Richard R

    2015-01-13

    An ordered multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure is formed by depositing at least two layers of thin film crystalline organic materials successively wherein the at least two thin film layers are selected to have their surface energies within .+-.50% of each other, and preferably within .+-.15% of each other, whereby every thin film layer within the multilayer crystalline organic thin film structure exhibit a quasi-epitaxial relationship with the adjacent crystalline organic thin film.

  12. Outline History Basic Theory Research Future Accelerators References Brief Overview of Wakefield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budker, Dmitry

    Outline History Basic Theory Research Future Accelerators References Brief Overview of Wakefield Overview of Wakefield Acceleration #12;Outline History Basic Theory Research Future Accelerators References of Wakefield Acceleration #12;Outline History Basic Theory Research Future Accelerators References Wakefield

  13. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiu, Anne; Sturmfels, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    source are credited. Siphons in Chemical Reaction Networksalgorithms for minimal siphons in Petri nets based on placewe characterize the minimal siphons of a chemical reaction

  14. Guidelines to improve airport preparedness against chemical and biological terrorism.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Donna M.; Price, Phillip N. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Gordon, Susanna P.; Gadgil, Ashok (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA)

    2005-05-01

    Guidelines to Improve Airport Preparedness Against Chemical and Biological Terrorism is a 100-page document that makes concrete recommendations on improving security and assessing vulnerable areas and helps its readers understand the nature of chemical and biological attacks. The report has been turned over to Airports Council International (ACI) and the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE), two organizations that together represent the interests of thousands of airport personnel and facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  15. PROJECT PROFILE: Stable Perovskite Solar Cells via Chemical Vapor Deposition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This project is focused on novel approaches to remove risk related to the development of hybrid perovskite solar cells (HPSCs). Researchers will synthesize a new and chemically stable hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite that eliminates decomposition of the absorber layer upon exposure to water vapor, which is a chief obstacle to widespread use of HPSC technology. They will also demonstrate a unique and industrially-scalable chemical vapor deposition method without halides or iodine, which are the main contributors to perovskite degradation.

  16. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

    1995-01-01

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

  17. Volatile organic compound sensing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

    1995-08-29

    Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

  18. Validation of chemical and non-chemical antimicrobial interventions applied pre- and post-chilling to reduce microbial populations in broiler carcasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molina, Veronica Alejandra

    2009-05-15

    chemical rinses such as chlorine/chlorine dioxide, ozonated or electrolyzed water, tri-sodium phosphate, acidified calcium sulfate, and organic acid rinses with or without surfactants. Significant bacterial attachment and accumulation occurs during...

  19. Research: Science and Education www.JCE.DivCHED.org Vol. 83 No. 1 January 2006 Journal of Chemical Education 127

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talanquer, Vicente A.

    chemical engineering textbooks and courses may discuss equations of state in further detail, their main and illustrate how it can be used to derive basic equations of state for a variety of systems. General Formalism

  20. Chemical Engineering Is Chemical Engineering right for me?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Chemical Engineering Is Chemical Engineering right for me? If you are interested in the uses and processes surrounding the engineering of new and raw materials, a degree in Chemical Engineering may be well suited to you. The Chemical Engineering degree programme will focus on the development of products

  1. Comment about UV regularization of basic commutators in string theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yu. Kamenshchik; I. M. Khalatnikov; M. Martellini

    1998-06-24

    Recently proposed by Hwang, Marnelius and Saltsidis zeta regularization of basic commutators in string theories is generalized to the string models with non-trivial vacuums. It is shown that implementation of this regularization implies the cancellation of dangerous terms in the commutators between Virasoro generators, which break Jacobi identity.

  2. 10mg Basic v5.4 Refold Master

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    .4 Page 1 Table of Contents Introduction .................................. 2 ­ 3 Kit Contents Basic v 5.4 Page 4 Kit Contents ­ Ready for Use A ­ Denaturation buffer (4.9 ml) 110 mM Tris, 8.8 M Urea collection tubes (x16) D ­ Protein protection agent (blue, 1100 µl) 100X stock of NV10, dissolved in water E

  3. SECURITY BASICS FOR MOBILE DEVICES UNH IT SECURITY, DECEMBER 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SECURITY BASICS FOR MOBILE DEVICES UNH IT SECURITY, DECEMBER 2011 Choose brands and models of mobile devices that have the options referenced below. Use all available security options that your or sensitive university information in un-approved off-campus services, such as public cloud based services

  4. Basics of Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    Agilent Basics of Measuring the Dielectric Properties of Materials Application Note #12;Contents 2 the dielectric properties of materials. Agilent measure- ment instruments, such as network analyzers, LCR meters......................................................................................32 #12;Introduction Every material has a unique set of electrical characteristics that are dependent

  5. Douglas Guardino Understanding the Basics of Using C18 Compiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Douglas Guardino Understanding the Basics of Using C18 Compiler The purpose of this project was to understand how to use the C18 compiler with MPLAB. This was achieved by reproducing a simple program from the MPLAB C18 Compiler Getting Started. This was done as a control. The code in the book was assumed

  6. ANALYZER BASICS WHAT IS AN FFT SPECTRUM ANALYZER?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    ANALYZER BASICS 2-1 WHAT IS AN FFT SPECTRUM ANALYZER? The SR760 FFT Spectrum Analyzer takes a time on a spectrum analyzer, the harmonic frequencies and amplitudes are displayed with amazing clarity. Another just the total noise amplitude. On a spectrum analyzer, the noise as a function of frequency

  7. Network Analyzer Basics This presentation covers the principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    one-box) testers VSA Vector signal analyzer SA Spectrum analyzer VNA Vector signal analyzer TG/SA Tracking generator/spectrum analyzer SNA Scalar network analyzer NF Mtr. Noise-figure meter Imped. AnAgilent Network Analyzer Basics #12;2 Abstract This presentation covers the principles of measuring

  8. POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Polymer Approaches to Basic Questions in Biology"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    POLYMER PROGRAM SEMINAR "Polymer Approaches to Basic Questions in Biology" Prof. Dennis E. Discher, biology is filled with remarkable polymeric structures that motivate mimicry with goals of both clarifying and exploiting biological principles. Filamentous viruses have inspired our development and computations of worm

  9. Understanding Data Basics and Ethical Use of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding Data Basics and Ethical Use of Data Summer Undergraduate Research Program June 10, 2015 Natsuko Nicholls, Ph.D. nnatsuko@vt.edu #12;Important Questions about Data 1. What is data? 2. Why is data important for research? 3. What does your data look like? 4. What is research ethics and how does

  10. Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research · Basic Energy Sciences · Biological and Environmental Research · Fusion Energy Sciences · High Energy Physics · Nuclear Physics What my students Code ­http://code.google.com/p/net-almanac/ ­Beta release this week #12;Contact Information Jon Dugan

  11. Lung, Artificial: Basic Principles and Current Applications William J. Federspiel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Federspiel, William J.

    Lung, Artificial: Basic Principles and Current Applications William J. Federspiel Kristie A. Henchir University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, U.S.A. INTRODUCTION Artificial lungs currently of the lung, which is to oxygenate the blood and remove carbon dioxide. Current artificial lungs are also

  12. Export Control Basics The Johns Hopkins University Community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Ed

    Export Control Basics for The Johns Hopkins University Community Export Controls at JHU address Introduction to Export Controls and to contact JHU's Export Control Officer whenever they expect to be involved with any of these issues: Frank Barker, Export Control Officer Wyman Park Center W-400 410-516-0415 fwb

  13. Scripted Artificially Intelligent Basic Online Tactical Simulation Jesse D. Phillips+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dascalu, Sergiu

    Scripted Artificially Intelligent Basic Online Tactical Simulation Jesse D. Phillips+ Roger V.+ Department of Computer Science and Engineering+ CAVCaM University of Nevada, Reno Desert Research Institute of the concepts. This paper presents details of the idea, specification, design, and functionality of the Scripted

  14. A Roadmap for Bridging Basic and Applied Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeff

    A Roadmap for Bridging Basic and Applied Research in Forensic Entomology J.K. Tomberlin,1 R. Mohr,1 sciences to develop a stronger scientific foundation. We suggest a roadmap for decomposition ecology to interpret entomological evidence collected from crime scenes. By following the proposed roadmap, a bridge

  15. Basic Notation and Background Chi-Kwong Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Chi-Kwong

    and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, USA; Department of Mathematics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan Let Mn be the set (vector space/algebra) of n � n matrices. (a) One can perform A + B, AB and µA for A, B Mn and µ C. (b) One can compute the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of A Mn. Chi-Kwong Li Basic

  16. Accounting Basic Terms and Concepts 1FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    Accounting Basic Terms and Concepts 1FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY Office of the Controller There are a few things you need to understand in order to make sense of the OMNI General Ledger and the accounting reports. What is a General Ledger? A listing of the accounts for your department or project (or the entire

  17. On the Role of Basic Design Concepts in Behaviour Structuring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Sinderen, Marten

    On the Role of Basic Design Concepts in Behaviour Structuring Dick A.C. Quartel1 , Luís Ferreira to repre- sent behaviour structure, the structuring of the design process, and the definition of design concepts facilitate the designer to conceive, structure and refine the essential characteristics

  18. On the Role of Basic Design Concepts in Behaviour Structuring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pires, Luís Ferreira

    On the Role of Basic Design Concepts in Behaviour Structuring Dick A.C. Quartel1 , Luís Ferreira to repre- sent behaviour structure, the structuring of the design process, and the definition of design facilitate the designer to conceive, structure and refine the essential characteristics of a system

  19. School of Basic Biomedical Sciences College of Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    School of Basic Biomedical Sciences College of Medicine M.D./Ph.D PROGRAM ACADEMIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES #12;Objective: The combined M.D./Ph.D. program within the College of Medicine at the University will make major contributions via translational medicine to enhance the diagnosis and treatment of human

  20. PATENT LAW BASICS 1. What is a Patent?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PATENT LAW BASICS 1. What is a Patent? A patent is an agreement between an inventor and the government, granting the inventor the right, for a limited period, to exclude others from making, using is "to promote the progress of science and the useful arts..." While an inventor may financially benefit

  1. Tutorial on seismic interferometry: Part 1 --Basic principles and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tutorial on seismic interferometry: Part 1 -- Basic principles and applications Kees Wapenaar1 , Deyan Draganov1 , Roel Snieder2 , Xander Campman3 , and Arie Verdel3 ABSTRACT Seismic interferometry is the retrieval of seismic surface-wave responses from ambient noise and the subsequent tomographic determination

  2. National toxicology program chemical nomination and selection process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkirk, J.K.

    1990-12-31

    The National Toxicology Program (NTP) was organized to support national public health programs by initiating research designed to understand the physiological, metabolic, and genetic basis for chemical toxicity. The primary mandated responsibilities of NTP were in vivo and vitro toxicity testing of potentially hazardous chemicals; broadening the spectrum of toxicological information on known hazardous chemicals; validating current toxicological assay systems as well as developing new and innovative toxicity testing technology; and rapidly communicating test results to government agencies with regulatory responsibilities and to the medical and scientific communities. 2 figs.

  3. Future steelmaking technologies and the role of basic research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-12-31

    The steel industry is going through a technological revolution which will not only change how steel is produced but, also, the entire structure of the industry. The drivers for the new or improved technologies, including reduction in capital requirements, possible shortages in raw materials such as coke and low residual scrap, environmental concerns and customer demands are briefly examined. The current status of research and development in the US and selected international producers was examined. As expected, it was found that the industry`s research capabilities have been greatly reduced. Furthermore, less than half of the companies which identified a given technology as critical have significant R and D programs addressing the technology. Examples of how basic research aided in process improvements in the past are given. The examples include demonstrating how fundamentals of reaction kinetics, improved nitrogen control, thermodynamics of systems helped reduce nozzle clogging and fluid flow studies reduced defects in casting. However, in general, basic research did not play a major role in processes previously developed, but helped understanding and aided optimization. To have a major impact, basic research must be focused and be an integral part of any new process development. An example where this has been done successfully is the AISI Direct Ironmaking and Waste Oxide Recycle Projects in which fundamental studies on reduction, slag foaming, and post combustion reactions have led to process understanding, control and optimization. Industry leaders recognize the value and need for basic research but insist it be truly relevant and done with industry input. From these examples the lessons learned on how to make basic research more effective are discussed.

  4. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, S.P.

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser is disclosed for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 {micro}m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (ca. 200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments. 4 figs.

  5. Micromachined chemical jet dispenser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-03-02

    A dispenser for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 .mu.m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (.about.200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments.

  6. Method of manipulating the chemical properties of water to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawthorne, Steven B. (Grand Forks, ND); Miller, David J. (Grand Forks, ND); Yang, Yu (Greenville, NC); Lagadec, Arnaud Jean-Marie (Grand Forks, ND)

    1999-01-01

    The method of the present invention is adapted to manipulate the chemical properties of water in order to improve the effectiveness of a desired chemical process. The method involves heating the water in the vessel to subcritical temperatures between 100.degree. to 374.degree. C. while maintaining sufficient pressure to the water to maintain the water in the liquid state. Various physiochemical properties of the water can be manipulated including polarity, solute solubility, surface tension, viscosity, and the disassociation constant. The method of the present invention has various uses including extracting organics from solids and semisolids such as soil, selectively extracting desired organics from nonaqueous liquids, selectively separating organics using sorbent phases, enhancing reactions by controlling the disassociation constant of water, cleaning waste water, and removing organics from water using activated carbon or other suitable sorbents.

  7. Chemical Engineering and Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Chemical Engineering and Materials Science COLLEGE of ENGINEERING DepartmentofChemicalEngineering-credit EDGE Engineering Entrepreneur Certificate Program is a great addition to a chemical engineering t engineering.wayne.edu/che #12;What is chemical engineering? Imagine saving the lives of pediatric patients

  8. A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    levels of risk similar to those for industrial activities (e.g., chemical, mining, transportation). The key U.S. limit for occupational exposure to radiation is 5 rems...

  9. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colson, S.D.

    1995-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program was organized as a major component of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. Our program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces, and (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage. This research effort was initiated in 1989 and will continue to evolve over the next few years into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems, such as well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules; and studies of complex systems found in the environment (multispecies, multiphase solutions; solid/liquid, liquid/liquid, and gas/surface interfaces; colloidal dispersions; ultrafine aerosols; and functioning biological systems). The success of this program will result in the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces, and more generally in condensed media, that is comparable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for predictions of macroscopic chemical behavior in condensed and heterogeneous media, adding significantly to the value of field-scale environmental models, the prediction of short- and long-term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other problems related to the primary missions of the DOE.

  10. Organic Photovoltaics Philip Schulz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Field Effect Transistors Organic Light Emitting Diodes Organic Solar Cells .OFET, OTFT .RF-ID tag 1977 ­ Conductivity in polymers 1986 ­ First heterojunction OPV 1987 ­ First organic light emitting diode (OLED) 1993 ­ First OPV from solution processing 2001 ­ First certified organic solar cell with 2

  11. Departmental Organization and Management

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-06-10

    Effective immediately, the Departmental organization structure reflected in the chart at Attachment 1 has been approved.

  12. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-07-24

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  13. NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-26

    NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

  14. CHEMPHYSCHEM 2001, 2, 361 366 WILEY-VCH-Verlag GmbH, D-69451 Weinheim, 2001 1439-4235/01/02/06 $ 17.50+.50/0 361 Inducing Single-Molecule Chemical Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hla, Saw-Wai

    -4235/01/02/06 $ 17.50+.50/0 361 Inducing Single-Molecule Chemical Reactions with a UHV-STM: A New Dimension for Nano decade. Recent achievements in inducing all of the basic steps of a chemical reaction with the STM elementary chemical reaction steps on surfaces. Prospects for future oppor- tunities of single

  15. Year 1 Progress Report Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network Administration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rehr, John J.

    2012-08-02

    This document reports progress on the project “Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network Administration,” which is supported by DOE BES Grant DE-FG02-02ER45990 MOD 08. As stated in the original proposal, the primary goal of this project is to carry out the scientific administrative responsibilities for the Computational Materials and Chemical Sciences Network (CMCSN) of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. These responsibilities include organizing meetings, publishing and maintaining CMCSN’s website, publishing a periodic newsletter, writing original material for both the website and the newsletter, maintaining CMCSN documentation, editing scientific documents, as needed, serving as liaison for the entire Network, facilitating information exchange across the network, communicating CMCSN’s success stories to the larger community and numerous other tasks outside the purview of the scientists in the CMCSN. Given the dramatic increase in computational power, advances in computational materials science can have an enormous impact in science and technology. For many of the questions that can be addressed by computation there is a choice of theoretical techniques available, yet often there is no accepted understanding of the relative strengths and effectiveness of the competing approaches. The CMCSN fosters progress in this understanding by providing modest additional funding to research groups which engage in collaborative activities to develop, compare, and test novel computational techniques. Thus, the CMCSN provides the “glue” money which enables different groups to work together, building on their existing programs and expertise while avoiding unnecessary duplication of effort. This includes travel funding, partial postdoc salaries, and funding for periodic scientific meetings. The activities supported by this grant are briefly summarized below.

  16. Video Article Continuously-Stirred Anaerobic Digester to Convert Organic Wastes into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    Video Article Continuously-Stirred Anaerobic Digester to Convert Organic Wastes into Biogas: System, Bioenergy, Biogas, Methane, Organic Waste, Methanogenesis, Energy Crops, Date Published: // Citation: Usack Wastes into Biogas: System Setup and Basic Operation. J. Vis. Exp. (), e3978, DOI : 10

  17. Microfabricated electrochemiluminescence cell for chemical reaction detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA); Hsueh, Yun-Tai (Davis, CA); Smith, Rosemary L. (Davis, CA)

    2003-01-01

    A detector cell for a silicon-based or non-silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The detector cell is an electrochemiluminescence cell constructed of layers of silicon with a cover layer of glass, with spaced electrodes located intermediate various layers forming the cell. The cell includes a cavity formed therein and fluid inlets for directing reaction fluid therein. The reaction chamber and detector cell may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The ECL cell may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

  18. Spin gauge theory of the first generation ; 2, basic theory of strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, J S R

    1984-01-01

    Spin gauge theory of the first generation ; 2, basic theory of strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions

  19. Chapter 1. Basic Interest Theory. Manual for SOA Exam FM/CAS Exam 2.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arcones, Miguel A.

    1/52 Chapter 1. Basic Interest Theory. Manual for SOA Exam FM/CAS Exam 2. Chapter 1. Basic Interest Exam FM/CAS Exam 2. #12;2/52 Chapter 1. Basic Interest Theory. Section 1.1. Amount and accumulation;3/52 Chapter 1. Basic Interest Theory. Section 1.1. Amount and accumulation functions. Interest When money

  20. EE 204.3 (3L-1.5P) Basic Electronics and Electrical Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    inductor and capacitor transient circuits, basic generator and motor principles, basic transformerEE 204.3 (3L-1.5P) Basic Electronics and Electrical Power Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Fall 2014 Description: This is a basic course on electrical topics for non-electrical engineering

  1. Recombinant transfer in the basic genome of E. coli

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dixit, Purushottam; Studier, F. William; Pang, Tin Yau; Maslov, Sergei

    2015-07-07

    An approximation to the ~4-Mbp basic genome shared by 32 strains of E. coli representing six evolutionary groups has been derived and analyzed computationally. A multiple-alignment of the 32 complete genome sequences was filtered to remove mobile elements and identify the most reliable ~90% of the aligned length of each of the resulting 496 basic-genome pairs. Patterns of single bp mutations (SNPs) in aligned pairs distinguish clonally inherited regions from regions where either genome has acquired DNA fragments from diverged genomes by homologous recombination since their last common ancestor. Such recombinant transfer is pervasive across the basic genome, mostly betweenmore »genomes in the same evolutionary group, and generates many unique mosaic patterns. The six least-diverged genome-pairs have one or two recombinant transfers of length ~40–115 kbp (and few if any other transfers), each containing one or more gene clusters known to confer strong selective advantage in some environments. Moderately diverged genome pairs (0.4–1% SNPs) show mosaic patterns of interspersed clonal and recombinant regions of varying lengths throughout the basic genome, whereas more highly diverged pairs within an evolutionary group or pairs between evolutionary groups having >1.3% SNPs have few clonal matches longer than a few kbp. Many recombinant transfers appear to incorporate fragments of the entering DNA produced by restriction systems of the recipient cell. A simple computational model can closely fit the data. As a result, most recombinant transfers seem likely to be due to generalized transduction by co-evolving populations of phages, which could efficiently distribute variability throughout bacterial genomes.« less

  2. Basics of turbulence computation for magnetically confined plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Bruce D. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2008-05-14

    The ideas of low frequency dynamics driven by pressure gradients in magnetised plasmas are outlined. Fluid, gyrofluid, and gyrokinetic models are defined. Basic computational methods including coordinate representations are reviewed and a list of criteria for well posed cases is given. The consequences of nonlinearity vis-a-vis instabilities are shown. Other topics used as examples are scale separation, the self consistent equilibrium, and interaction with large scale flows.

  3. A basic result on the integral for birthdeath Markov processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in changing the death rate or state n, ¯ n , from n¯ to (n \\Gamma 1)¯. The other approximation consists(t) be a birth­death process on a subset of N = 0; 1;2; :::, with birth and death rates â?? i ; and ¯ iA basic result on the integral for birth­death Markov processes Carlos M. Hern'andez­Su'arez CGIC

  4. Chemical and enzymatic tools to study proteins in their native cellular environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Jennifer Zhengzheng

    2013-01-01

    A detailed understating of living systems requires methods to probe molecular processes in cells and whole organisms. A set of technologies that combines chemical and genetic probes have been developed to address the need ...

  5. Oxidative chemical vapor deposition of conductive polymers for use in novel photovoltaic device architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howden, Rachel M. (Rachel Mary)

    2013-01-01

    The conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene), (PEDOT), deposited via oxidative chemical vapor deposition (oCVD) has been investigated for use in organic electronic devices. The oCVD process as well as the ...

  6. A method for using polyethylene passive samplers to measure polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon chemical activity in sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Loretta A. (Loretta Ana)

    2005-01-01

    In order to aid in the determination of the hazards posed by hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediment beds, a method for the use of polyethylene (PE) sheets as passive sampling devices for measuring chemical ...

  7. Continuous-flow study and scale-up of conventionally difficult chemical processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaborenko, Nikolay

    2010-01-01

    Microfluidic systems provide valuable tools for exploring, studying, and optimizing organic syntheses. The small scales and fast transport rates allow for faster experiments and lower amounts of chemicals to be used, ...

  8. College of Engineering and Computer Science Chemical Engineering Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Chilukuri K.

    College of Engineering and Computer Science Chemical Engineering Name Fall 2010 SUID La & Matrix Algebra MAT204 3 SCIENCES (29) CHE106 General Chemistry 1 SCC201 3 CHE107 General Chemistry Lab 1 SCC201 1 CHE116 General Chemistry 2 SCC202 3 CHE117 General Chemistry Lab 2 SCC202 1 CHE275 Organic

  9. Partitioning of Nanoparticles into Organic Phases and Model Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Posner, J.D.; Westerhoff, P.; Hou, W-C.

    2011-08-25

    There is a recognized need to understand and predict the fate, transport and bioavailability of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in aquatic and soil ecosystems. Recent research focuses on either collection of empirical data (e.g., removal of a specific NP through water or soil matrices under variable experimental conditions) or precise NP characterization (e.g. size, degree of aggregation, morphology, zeta potential, purity, surface chemistry, and stability). However, it is almost impossible to transition from these precise measurements to models suitable to assess the NP behavior in the environment with complex and heterogeneous matrices. For decades, the USEPA has developed and applies basic partitioning parameters (e.g., octanol-water partition coefficients) and models (e.g., EPI Suite, ECOSAR) to predict the environmental fate, bioavailability, and toxicity of organic pollutants (e.g., pesticides, hydrocarbons, etc.). In this project we have investigated the hypothesis that NP partition coefficients between water and organic phases (octanol or lipid bilayer) is highly dependent on their physiochemical properties, aggregation, and presence of natural constituents in aquatic environments (salts, natural organic matter), which may impact their partitioning into biological matrices (bioaccumulation) and human exposure (bioavailability) as well as the eventual usage in modeling the fate and bioavailability of ENPs. In this report, we use the terminology "partitioning" to operationally define the fraction of ENPs distributed among different phases. The mechanisms leading to this partitioning probably involve both chemical force interactions (hydrophobic association, hydrogen bonding, ligand exchange, etc.) and physical forces that bring the ENPs in close contact with the phase interfaces (diffusion, electrostatic interactions, mixing turbulence, etc.). Our work focuses on partitioning, but also provides insight into the relative behavior of ENPs as either "more like dissolved substances" or "more like colloids" as the division between behaviors of macromolecules versus colloids remains ill-defined. Below we detail our work on two broadly defined objectives: (i) Partitioning of ENP into octanol, lipid bilayer, and water, and (ii) disruption of lipid bilayers by ENPs. We have found that the partitioning of NP reaches pseudo-equilibrium distributions between water and organic phases. The equilibrium partitioning most strongly depends on the particle surface charge, which leads us to the conclusion that electrostatic interactions are critical to understanding the fate of NP in the environment. We also show that the kinetic rate at which particle partition is a function of their size (small particles partition faster by number) as can be predicted from simple DLVO models. We have found that particle number density is the most effective dosimetry to present our results and provide quantitative comparison across experiments and experimental platforms. Cumulatively, our work shows that lipid bilayers are a more effective organic phase than octanol because of the definable surface area and ease of interpretation of the results. Our early comparison of NP partitioning between water and lipids suggest that this measurement can be predictive of bioaccumulation in aquatic organisms. We have shown that nanoparticle disrupt lipid bilayer membranes and detail how NP-bilayer interaction leads to the malfunction of lipid bilayers in regulating the fluxes of ionic charges and molecules. Our results show that the disruption of the lipid membranes is similar to that of toxin melittin, except single particles can disrupt a bilayer. We show that only a single particle is required to disrupt a 150 nm DOPC liposome. The equilibrium leakage of membranes is a function of the particle number density and particle surface charge, consistent with results from our partitioning experiments. Our disruption experiments with varying surface functionality show that positively charged particles (poly amine) are most disruptive, consistent with in in vitro toxic

  10. Chemical Technology Division progress report, April 1, 1983-March 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    The status of the following programs is reported: fission energy; nuclear and chemical waste management; environmental control technology; basic science and technology; biotechnology programs; transuranium-element processing; Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs; Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project; radioactive materials production; computer 1 engineering applications; and miscellanous programs.

  11. Are Organic Foods Safer or Healthier Than Conventional Alternatives? A Systematic Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Changlu

    irradiation or chemical food additives and are not grown from genetically modified organisms (6, 8Are Organic Foods Safer or Healthier Than Conventional Alternatives? A Systematic Review Crystal of organic foods are unclear. Purpose: To review evidence comparing the health effects of or- ganic

  12. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Graduation Checklist Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Graduation Checklist Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering College of Engineering For Students Graduating in Calendar Year 2014 (Co-op students graduating in Calendar Year 2015

  13. Appendix H. Chemicals Appendix H. Chemicals H-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation materials), asbestos

  14. Appendix B: Chemicals Appendix B: Chemicals B-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people materials used for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation

  15. Appendix G. Chemicals Appendix G. Chemicals G-3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    . Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses for the construction of homes may contain chemicals such as formaldehyde (in some insulation materials), asbestos

  16. The Periodic Table as a Part of the Periodic Table of Chemical Compounds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2011-01-01

    The numbers of natural chemical elements, minerals, inorganic and organic chemical compounds are determined by 1, 2, 3 and 4-combinations of a set 95 and are respectively equal to 95, 4,465, 138,415 and 3,183,545. To explain these relations it is suggested the concept of information coefficient of proportionality as mathematical generalization of the proportionality coefficient for any set of positive numbers. It is suggested a hypothesis that the unimodal distributions of the sets of information coefficients of proportionality for atomic weights of chemical elements of minerals and chemical compounds correspond to unimodal distributions of the above sets for combination of 2, 3 and 4 atomic weights of 95 natural chemical elements. The expected values of symmetrized distributions of information coefficients of proportionality sets for atomic weights of minerals and chemical compounds are proposed to be used to define chemical compounds, like atomic weights define chemical elements. Variational series of the e...

  17. Mixed crystal organic scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zaitseva, Natalia P; Carman, M Leslie; Glenn, Andrew M; Hamel, Sebastien; Hatarik, Robert; Payne, Stephen A; Stoeffl, Wolfgang

    2014-09-16

    A mixed organic crystal according to one embodiment includes a single mixed crystal having two compounds with different bandgap energies, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source, wherein the signal response signature does not include a significantly-delayed luminescence characteristic of neutrons interacting with the organic crystal relative to a luminescence characteristic of gamma rays interacting with the organic crystal. According to one embodiment, an organic crystal includes bibenzyl and stilbene or a stilbene derivative, the organic crystal having a physical property of exhibiting a signal response signature for neutrons from a radioactive source.

  18. B.S. in Chemical Science The Chemical Science degree is designed for students who plan programs in fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    or CHM 1050, 1050L; 1051, 1051L Analytical Chemistry CHM 3120 & 3120L; 4130 & 4130L Organic Chemistry CHM in fields related to chemistry and who would benefit by a strong background in chemistry. Examples. This degree is not intended as a chemical preparation for people who wish to do work directly in Chemistry

  19. Pion-capture probabilities in organic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.F.; Lewis, C.A.; O'Leary, K.

    1982-06-01

    Experimental results are presented for atomic-capture probabilities of negative pions in organic molecules. The data are analyzed in terms of atomic and molecular models. This analysis shows that the Fermi-Teller law (Z law) and its modifications do not give an adequate description of the data, but that a mesomolecular model together with hydrogen transfer contains the features essential to fit the data. Clear evidence is given for chemical effects in the pion-capture process.

  20. ChBE 4505/4525 Chemical Process Design/Biochemical Process Design Basic Curriculum and Learning Outcomes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    Outcomes. Credit: 3-0-3 Instructor: Matthew J. Realff Textbook: Product & Process Design Principles, Third Edition, Wiley 2009. W.D. Seider, J.D. Seader, D.R. Lewin, S. Widagdo, Catalog Description: Principles Phen. II (ChBE 3210), Kinetics & Reactor Design (ChBE 4300), and separation processes (ChBE 3225

  1. CHEMICAL ACTIONS OF IONIZING RADIATION ON OLIGOPEPTIDE DERIVATIVES OF GLYCINE IN THE NEUTRAL (ZWITTERION) AND BASIC FORMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrison, W.M.

    2010-01-01

    REFERENCES 1. k. M. Garrison, Radiation Induced Reactions ofRev. 3 305 (1972). 2. W. M. Garrison, Radiation Chemistry ofJ. Holian, and W. M. Garrison, Radiation Chemistry of the o-

  2. Uncertainties in Galactic Chemical Evolution Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Côté, Benoit; O'Shea, Brian W; Herwig, Falk; Pignatari, Marco; Jones, Samuel; Fryer, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We use a simple one-zone galactic chemical evolution model to quantify the uncertainties generated by the input parameters in numerical predictions, for a galaxy with properties similar to those of the Milky Way. We compiled several studies from the literature to gather the current constraints for our simulations regarding the typical value and uncertainty of seven basic parameters, which are: the lower and upper mass limit of the stellar initial mass function (IMF), the slope of the high-mass end of the stellar IMF, the slope of the delay-time distribution function of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), the number of SNe Ia per solar mass formed, the total stellar mass formed, and the initial mass of gas of the galaxy. We derived a probability distribution function to express the range of likely values for every parameter, which were then included in a Monte Carlo code to run several hundred simulations with randomly selected input parameters. This approach enables us to analyze the predicted chemical evolution of ...

  3. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  4. Bridged polysilsesquioxanes. Highly porous hybrid organic-inorganic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loy, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Properties of Organic Materials Dept.; Shea, K.J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-07-01

    This contribution reviews a new family of inorganic-organic hybrid materials that are assembled by sol-gel polymerization of polyfunctional molecular building blocks. These bridged polysilsesquioxanes are three-dimensional network materials that are distinguished by incorporation of an organic fragment as an integral component of the network. The intimate association of the organic and inorganic phase, a true molecular composite, coupled with the variability of the organic component, permits engineering of both chemical and physical properties of the material. The paper reviews bridged polysilsesquioxanes, arylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes, alkylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes; and their applications.

  5. Chemical Transformations in Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    ) as a byproduct. Methane "Swamp gas" Natural Greenhouse Gas CH4 Release (mg C/m2 d) Bogs (150) Marshes (90 associated with breakdown of organic C and nitrogenous waste and for respiration! NOTE: Microbial populations. CO2 + H2O H2CO3 Reduction of Ferric Iron Hydroxides #12;3 Nitrogen Transformations First e- Acceptor

  6. Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricks Editor, R.

    2009-01-01

    Radioactive Hazardous or Other Location LBL On-Site Bldgs.hazardous chemicals usedin the laboratory: and (v} The locationhazardous chemicals are present: and. (irl}The location and

  7. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  8. Organic photovoltaics and concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mapel, Jonathan King

    2008-01-01

    The separation of light harvesting and charge generation offers several advantages in the design of organic photovoltaics and organic solar concentrators for the ultimate end goal of achieving a lower cost solar electric ...

  9. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  10. Submitting Organization Sandia National ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    processes like sputter deposition and chemical vapor deposition (CVD), which require high temperature andor high vacuum. A simpler and less expensive process is needed, and we...

  11. Research in the chemical sciences. Summaries of FY 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    This summary book is published annually to provide information on research supported by the Department of Energy`s Division of Chemical Sciences, which is one of four Divisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. These summaries provide the scientific and technical public, as well as the legislative and executive branches of the Government, information, either generally or in some depth, about the Chemical Sciences program. Scientists interested in proposing research for support will find the publication useful for gauging the scope of the present basic research program and it`s relationship to their interests. Proposals that expand this scope may also be considered or directed to more appropriate offices. The primary goal of the research summarized here is to add significantly to the knowledge base in which existing and future efficient and safe energy technologies can evolve. As a result, scientific excellence is a major criterion applied in the selection of research supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, but another important consideration is emphasis on science that is advancing in ways that will produce new information related to energy.

  12. Programmability of Chemical Reaction Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    Programmability of Chemical Reaction Networks Matthew Cook1 , David Soloveichik2 , Erik Winfree2 Chemical Reaction Networks (SCRNs), a for- mal model that considers a set of chemical reactions acting Logic Circuits, Vector Addition Systems, Petri Nets, Gate Implementability, Primitive Recursive

  13. Nonlinear chemical dynamics Francesc Sagusa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    Nonlinear chemical dynamics Francesc Saguésa and Irving R. Epsteinb a Departament de Química Física March 2003 The interdisciplinary field of nonlinear chemical dynamics has grown significantly in breadth an overview of some of the key results of nonlinear chemical dynamics, with emphasis on those areas most

  14. CHEMICAL LABORATORY SAFETY AND METHODOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    CHEMICAL LABORATORY SAFETY AND METHODOLOGY MANUAL August 2013 #12;ii Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince-Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 6472 Biological the safe use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

  15. Qualitative Theory and Chemical Explanation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weisberg, Michael

    Abstract Roald Hoffmann and other theorists claim that we we ought to use highly idealized chemical modelsQualitative Theory and Chemical Explanation Michael Weisberg Stanford University February 15, 2003 ("qualitative models") in order to in- crease our understanding of chemical phenomena, even though other models

  16. 48 Chemical Engineering Education Incorporating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hesketh, Robert

    48 Chemical Engineering Education Incorporating GREEN ENGINEERING Into a Material and Energy prob- lems in chemical engineering. Problems of the type that can be used to motivate the student-mail: wilkes@umich.edu), Chemical Engineering Department, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109

  17. Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopyof Chemical Reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zewail, Ahmed

    Ultrafast Laser Spectroscopyof Chemical Reactions - Joseph L. Kneeand AhmedH. Zewail California of chemical physics is to understand how chemi- cal reactions complete their journey from reactants to prod at the molecular level. The making of new bonds (and the breaking of old ones) in elementary chemical reactions

  18. Organic photosensitive devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rand, Barry P; Forrest, Stephen R

    2013-11-26

    The present invention generally relates to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices. More specifically, it is directed to organic photosensitive optoelectronic devices having a photoactive organic region containing encapsulated nanoparticles that exhibit plasmon resonances. An enhancement of the incident optical field is achieved via surface plasmon polariton resonances. This enhancement increases the absorption of incident light, leading to a more efficient device.

  19. Integral Operators Basic in Random Fields Estimation Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Kozhevnikov; Alexander G. Ramm

    2004-05-03

    The paper deals with the basic integral equation of random field estimation theory by the criterion of minimum of variance of the error estimate. This integral equation is of the first kind. The corresponding integra$ operator over a bounded domain $\\Omega $ in ${\\Bbb R}^{n}$ is weakly singular. This operator is an isomorphism between appropriate Sobolev spaces. This is proved by a reduction of the integral equ$ an elliptic boundary value problem in the domain exterior to $\\Omega .$ Extra difficulties arise due to the fact that the exterior boundary value problem should be solved in the Sobolev spaces of negative order.

  20. Theory of asymptotic operation. A summary of basic principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fyodor V. Tkachov

    1998-11-23

    This summary of several talks given in 1990-1993 discusses the problem of asymptotic expansions of multiloop Feynman diagrams in masses and external momenta - a central problem in perturbative quantum field theory. Basic principles of the theory of asymptotic operation -- the most powerful tool for that purpose -- are discussed. Its connection with the conventional methods is explained (the BPHZ theory, the method of leading logarithmic approximation etc.). The problem of non-euclidean asymptotic regimes is discussed as well as ways of its solution.