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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Chemically stabilized ionomers containing inorganic fillers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ionomeric polymers that are chemically stabilized and contain inorganic fillers are prepared, and show reduced degradation. The ionomers care useful in membranes and electrochemical cells.

Roelofs, Mark Gerrit

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

2

Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results of a literature review to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate gaseous products produced by the gasification or combustion of coal in fixed-, fluidized-, and entrained-bed gasifiers, direct coal-fired turbines, and pressurized-fluidized-bed combustors. Several impurities, such as H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, and trace metal compounds are generated during coal conversion, and they must be removed from the coal gas or the combustor flue gas to meet environmental standards. The use of membranes to separate these noxious gases is an attractive alternative to their removal by sorbents such as zinc titanate or calcium oxide. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. The U.S. Department of Energy is supporting investigations to develop inorganic membranes for separating hydrogen from coal gas streams and noxious impurities from hot coal- and flue-gas streams. Membrane materials that have been investigated in the past include glass (silica), alumina, zirconia, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt).

Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Basic Chemical Safety and Laboratory Survival Skills  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Reagent bottles, Squirt bottles, spray bottles Label must have name of chemical and hazard information (s handling chemicals Lab coat must cover the wearer to the knees Plastic aprons are allowed only

Gallivan, Martha A.

4

Thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membrane materials. Final report, August 1992--May 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SRI International conducted a theoretical and experimental program to evaluate the long-term thermal and chemical degradation of inorganic membranes that are being developed to separate the gaseous products of coal gasification. A variety of developmental efforts are underway, including a number of projects sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), to improve the selectivity and permeability of porous inorganic membranes. DOE is also sponsoring efforts to extend the use of metallic membranes to new applications. Most developmental efforts have focused on hydrogen separation by inorganic membranes, which may be used to maximize hydrogen production from coal gas or to remove H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3} contaminants via thermal or catalytic decomposition in integrated-gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) systems. Inorganic membranes that have a high separation efficiency and exhibit both thermal and chemical stability would improve the economics of power generation from coal. Membrane materials that have been investigated include glass (silica), alumina, carbon, and metals (Pd and Pt). This report describes inorganic membrane materials, long term membrane exposure tests, membrane permeation tests, coal gasifier exposure tests, conclusions, and recommendations.

Damle, A.S.; Krishnan, G.N.; Sanjurjo, A.; Wood, B.J.; Lau, K.H.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. Study ofJ U Principal[2BasicBasics

6

Alternative Enhanced Chemical Cleaning Basic Studies Results FY09  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the need to close waste storage tanks, chemical cleaning methods are needed for the effective removal of the heels. Oxalic acid is the preferred cleaning reagent for sludge heel dissolution, particularly for iron-based sludge, due to the strong complexing strength of the oxalate. However, the large quantity of oxalate added to the tank farm from oxalic acid based chemical cleaning has significant downstream impacts. Optimization of the oxalic acid cleaning process can potentially reduce the downstream impacts from chemical cleaning. To optimize oxalic acid usage, a detailed understanding of the chemistry of oxalic acid based sludge dissolution is required. Additionally, other acid systems may be required for specific waste components with low solubility in oxalic acid and as a means to reduce oxalic acid usage in general. Solubility tests were conducted using non-radioactive, pure metal phases known to be the primary phases present in High Level Waste sludge. The metal phases studied included the aluminum phases gibbsite and boehmite and the iron phases magnetite and hematite. Hematite and boehmite are expected to be the most difficult iron and aluminum phases to dissolve. These mineral phases have been identified in both SRS and Hanford High Level Waste sludge. Acids evaluated for dissolution included oxalic, nitric, and sulfuric acids. The results of the solubility tests indicate that oxalic and sulfuric acids are more effective for the dissolution of the primary sludge phases. For boehmite, elevated temperature will be required to promote effective phase dissolution in the acids studied. Literature reviews, thermodynamic modeling, and experimental results have all confirmed that pH control using a supplemental proton source (additional acid) is critical for minimization of oxalic acid usage during the dissolution of hematite. These results emphasize the importance of pH control in optimizing hematite dissolution in oxalic acid and may explain the somewhat limited success observed during recent attempts to remove sludge heels from SRS Tanks 5F and 6F using oxalic acid. Additionally, based on the results of the solubility tests conducted, the following conclusions can be drawn: (1) Hematite dissolution in oxalic acid is a stoichiometric process dependant upon the provision of sufficient oxalate molar equivalents to complex the iron and sufficient H{sup +} to promote the dissolution reaction. (2) The optimal utilization of oxalic acid for hematite dissolution requires an additional proton source, such as nitric acid, and a pH of {le} 1. In the absence of a supplemental proton source, greater than stoichiometric amounts of oxalate are required. (3) Magnetite is generally more soluble than hematite in all acids tested. (4) Gibbsite is generally more soluble than the boehmite form of aluminum in all acids tested. (5) The OLI Thermodynamic Model is a useful tool for the prediction of equilibrium iron concentrations, but predictions must be experimentally verified. The OLI model appears to over-predict the solubility of the iron and aluminum phases studied in mineral acids.

Hay, M.; King, W.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

7

Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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8

Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. Study ofJ UBasics Basics STAR users

9

A Mechanistic Study of Chemically Modified Inorganic Membranes for Gas and Liquid Separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report will summarize the progress made during the period August 1, 1993 - October 31, 2010 with support from DOE grant number DE-FG03-93ER14363. The objectives of the research have been to investigate the transport mechanisms in micro- and mesoporous, metal oxide membranes and to examine the relationship between the microstructure of the membrane, the membrane surface chemistry, and the separation performance of the membrane. Examples of the membrane materials under investigation are the microporous silica hollow fiber membrane manufactured by PPG Industries, chemically modified mesoporous oxide membranes, and polymer membranes containing microporous oxides (mixed matrix membranes). Analytical techniques such as NMR, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and gas adsorption were used to investigate membrane microstructure and to probe the chemical interactions occurring at the gas-membrane interface.

Way, J Douglas

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

10

ChBE 4505/4525 Chemical Process Design/Biochemical Process Design Basic Curriculum and Learning Outcomes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of flowsheet synthesis and economic analysis and optimization. A complete design on a chemical process, targeting, tradeoffs. To teach students basic skills in process design;economic evaluation, sizing. Economic evaluation of process designs, applications of a) net present value b) time value of money c

Sherrill, David

11

Accelerating the development of transparent graphene electrodes through basic science driven chemical functionalization.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical functionalization is required to adapt graphenes properties to many applications. However, most covalent functionalization schemes are spontaneous or defect driven and are not suitable for applications requiring directed assembly of molecules on graphene substrates. In this work, we demonstrated electrochemically driven covalent bonding of phenyl iodoniums onto epitaxial graphene. The amount of chemisorption was demonstrated by varying the duration of the electrochemical driving potential. Chemical, electronic, and defect states of phenyl-modified graphene were studied by photoemission spectroscopy, spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy, and water contact angle measurement. Covalent attachment rehybridized some of the delocalized graphene sp2 orbitals to localized sp3 states. Control over the relative spontaneity (reaction rate) of covalent graphene functionalization is an important first step to the practical realization of directed molecular assembly on graphene. More than 10 publications, conference presentations, and program highlights were produced (some invited), and follow-on funding was obtained to continue this work.

Chan, Calvin; Beechem Iii, Thomas Edwin; Ohta, Taisuke; Brumbach, Michael T.; Wheeler, David Roger; Veneman, Alexander; Gearba, I. Raluca; Stevenson, Keith J.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Basic theory and methods of dosimetry for use in risk assessment of genotoxic chemicals. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is designed to be theoretical, with limited experimental input. The work then would have to be directed towards an identification of problems, with an emphasis on the potential ability of molecular/biochemical methods to reach a solution, rather than aiming at solutions of the problems. In addition, the work is dependent on experimental work within parallel projects. Initially, projects running at this laboratory were strongly tied up with practical matters, such as the development of monitoring methods for specific exposures, with limited resources for basic research. As sketched in the scientific report below, section 4 the meaningfulness of molecular/biochemical methods and their potential contribution to the problem of dsk estimation has to be seen against a broad overview of this problem and current efforts to solve it. This overview, given as a brief summary in section 3, shows the necessity of combining different fields of research, holding them together by strictly quantitative aspects.

Ehrenberg, L.; Granath, F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

ARM - Measurement - Inorganic chemical composition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC : XDCResearch Related InformationAciddroplet

14

Basic model Basic model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Early days Basic model Literature Classical literature Bayes pre-MCMC Bayes post-MCMC Basic model systems via latent factors Hedibert Freitas Lopes Booth School of Business University of Chicago Col / 66 #12;Early days Basic model Literature Classical literature Bayes pre-MCMC Bayes post-MCMC Basic

Liu, I-Shih

15

applied inorganic chemistry: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bus.Admin.Public Admin. Chemical Engineering Chem. Eng.Comp. Sci. Chemistry Civil Engineering Heller, Barbara 6 Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined...

16

E-Print Network 3.0 - aqueous chemical growth Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WASTE DISPOSAL AUTHORIZATION Summary: Solvent (Halogenated) BasesCaustic Inorganic Solid Inorganic (Aqueous) Photo Processing Chemicals Paints... Risk & Safety Services...

17

PEGylated Inorganic Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of inorganic nanoparticles in diagnosis and therapy has become a critical component in targeted treatment of diseases. The surface modification of inorganic oxides is important for providing diversity in size, shape, solubility, long term stability and attachment of selective functional groups. PEGylation of surfaces is a key strategic approach for providing stealth characteristics to nanomaterials otherwise identified as foreign materials by human body. The current review describes the role of surface modification of oxides by polyethylene glycol (PEG) in providing versatile characteristics to inorganic oxide nanoparticles with a focus on their biomedical applications. The role of PEG as structure directing agent in synthesis of oxides is also captured in this short review.

Karakoti, Ajay S.; Das, Soumya; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Seal, Sudipta

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

18

Crystallization and functionality of inorganic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this article, we briefly summarized our recent work on the studies of crystallization and functionality of inorganic materials. On the basis of the chemical bonding theory of single crystal growth, we can quantitatively simulate Cu{sub 2}O crystallization processes in solution system. We also kinetically controlled Cu{sub 2}O crystallization process in the reduction solution route. Lithium ion battery and supercapacitor performances of some oxides such as Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} and MnO{sub 2} were shown to elucidate the important effect of crystallization on functionality of inorganic materials. This work encourages us to create novel functionalities through the study of crystallization of inorganic materials, which warrants more chances in the field of functional materials.

Xue, Dongfeng, E-mail: dongfeng@ciac.jl.cn [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Keyan [School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Jun [Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials and Application Technology, Ministry of Education, Faculty of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, 411105 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials and Application Technology, Ministry of Education, Faculty of Materials, Optoelectronics and Physics, Xiangtan University, 411105 (China); Sun, Congting; Chen, Kunfeng [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun 130022 (China); School of Chemical Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Supported inorganic membranes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Supported inorganic membranes capable of molecular sieving, and methods for their production, are provided. The subject membranes exhibit high flux and high selectivity. The subject membranes are substantially defect free and less than about 100 nm thick. The pores of the subject membranes have an average critical pore radius of less than about 5 .ANG., and have a narrow pore size distribution. The subject membranes are prepared by coating a porous substrate with a polymeric sol, preferably under conditions of low relative pressure of the liquid constituents of the sol. The coated substrate is dried and calcined to produce the subject supported membrane. Also provided are methods of derivatizing the surface of supported inorganic membranes with metal alkoxides. The subject membranes find use in a variety of applications, such as the separation of constituents of gaseous streams, as catalysts and catalyst supports, and the like.

Sehgal, Rakesh (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, Charles Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Inorganic membranes: The new industrial revolution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separation systems are a vital part of most industrial processes. These systems account for a large fraction of the capital equipment used and the operating costs of industrial processes. Inorganic membranes have the potential for providing separation systems that can significantly reduce both the capital equipment and operating costs. These separation processes include waste management and recycle as well as the primary production of raw materials and products. The authors are rapidly learning to understand the effect of physical and chemical properties on the different transport mechanisms that occur in inorganic membranes. Such understanding can be expected to provide the information needed to design, engineer and manufacture inorganic membranes to produce very high separation factors for almost any separation function. To implement such a revolution, the authors need to organize a unique partnership between the national laboratories, and industry. The university can provide research to understand the materials and transport mechanisms that produce various separations, the national laboratories the development of an economical fabrication and manufacturing capability, and industry the practical understanding of the operational problems required to achieve inplementation.

Fain, D.E. [Martin Merietta Energy Systems, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Formation of semivolatile inorganic aerosols in the Mexico City Metropolitan Area during the MILAGRO campaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most challenging tasks for chemical transport models (CTMs) is the prediction of the formation and partitioning of the major semi-volatile inorganic aerosol components (nitrate, chloride, ammonium) between the ...

Karydis, V. A.

22

Extracting inorganics from scrap tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scrap tires contain several inorganic moieties in abundances >0.5% which are impregnated into their carbonaceous matrix. These inorganic species are known to produce acid rain, toxic aerosols, and boiler scale and could produce unwanted catalytic effects as well. It is our position that the potential of recycling scrap tires would be considerably enhanced if the inorganics in question - S, Ca, and Zn - were removed prior to attempts to upgrade the carbonaceous matrix. Using non-mechanical methods, we are attempting to cleave the adherence between the co-polymer matrix and to extract the inorganics. The efficiency of our methods is being measured by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometry and by other methods.

Cummings, R.; Wertz, D.L. [Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Large-scale synthesis of inorganic and organic nanomaterials (single-crystalline nanowires and functionalized conducting polymer thin films) together with strategies for large-scale assembly are discussed

24

Combinatorial screening of inorganic and organometallic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Combinatorial synthesis of inorganic or composite materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials or, alternatively, allowing the components to interact to form at least two different materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, nonbiological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Goldwasser, Isy (Palo Alto, CA); Ross, Debra A. (Mountain Ranch, CA); Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Xiang, Xiao-Dong (Danville, CA); Briceno, Gabriel (Baldwin Park, CA); Sun, Xian-Dong (Fremont, CA); Wang, Kai-An (Cupertino, CA)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

26

Preparation and screening of crystalline inorganic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Schultz, Peter G. (La Jolla, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Danville, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Palo Alto, CA); Brice{hacek over (n)}o, Gabriel (Baldwin Park, CA); Sun, Xiao-Dong (Fremont, CA); Wang, Kai-An (Cupertino, CA)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

27

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical...

28

Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2011)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Chemistry 411/611 Inorganic Chemistry (2011) Instructor: Assistant Professor Mathew M. Maye Chemistry", 5th Edition, Freeman Press. Available at SU bookstore. The solution manual is optional. (Suggested for CHE611 Students pursuing Inorganic) Huheey, "Inorganic Chemistry: Principles of Structure

Mather, Patrick T.

29

Inorganic Nanocrystal Bulk Heterojunctions - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Solar Photovoltaic Solar Photovoltaic Find More Like This Return to Search Inorganic Nanocrystal Bulk Heterojunctions Brookhaven National Laboratory Contact BNL About This...

30

Hierarchical Assembly of Inorganic Nanostructure Building Blocks...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanostructure Building Blocks to Octahedral Superstructures – A True Template-Free Self Hierarchical Assembly of Inorganic Nanostructure Building Blocks to Octahedral...

31

The Basicity of Texas Soils.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chemical prob- lems connected with the investigations of cotton root rot being made by the Division of Plant Pathology and Physiology. Lab- oratory methods were needed for estimating the amounts of acid or sulphur required to bring experimental soils... approxi- mately to a desired degree of acidity. Information was needed regarding the amounts of acid or sulphur required to make acid various kinds of soil. This Bulletin discusses the basicity of Texas soils, and the amounts of acid or sulphur...

Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Interfacial Coatings for Inorganic Composite Insulation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic (ceramic) insulation materials are known to have good radiation resistance and desirable electrical and mechanical properties at cryogenic and elevated temperatures. In addition, ceramic materials can withstand the high-temperature reaction cycle used with Nb3Sn superconductor materials, allowing the insulation to be co-processed with the superconductor in a wind-and-react fabrication process. A critical aspect in the manufacture of ceramic-based insulation systems is the deposition of suitable fiber-coating materials that prevent chemical reaction of the fiber and matrix materials, and thus provide a compliant interface between the fiber and matrix, which minimizes the impact of brittle failure of the ceramic matrix. Ceramic insulation produced with CTD-FI-202 fiber interfaces have been found to exhibit very high shear and compressive strengths. However, this material is costly to produce. Thus, the goal of the present work is to evaluate alternative, lower-cost materials and processes. A variety of oxide and polyimide coatings were evaluated, and one commercially available polyimide coating has been shown to provide some improvement as compared to uncoated and de-sized S2 glass.

Hooker, M. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Stewart, M. W.; Grandlienard, S. D.; Kano, K. S. [Composite Technology Development, Inc., Lafayette, CO, 80026 (United States)

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

DESCRIPTIVE TEXT SEA WATER INORGANIC CARBON DATABASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESCRIPTIVE TEXT SEA WATER INORGANIC CARBON DATABASE for the CARBON DIOXIDE INFORMATION OF OCEANOGRAPHY (SIO) I. GENERAL DESCRIPTION The database consists of tables presenting oceanic inorganic carbon, titration (total) alkalinity (database abbreviation: "ALK"), and the 13 C / 12 C isotopic ratio

34

A History of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Forge Shop, Lathe Shop Hydraulics, Steam Engine, Dynamo Machinery Chemistry ­ Inorganic, QualitativeE degrees 1901 Handbook of Chemical Engineering #12;Origins of Chemical Engineering at NC State 1895

Velev, Orlin D.

35

Inorganic Chemistry in Hydrogen Storage and Biomass Catalysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Making or breaking C-H, B-H, C-C bonds has been at the core of catalysis for many years. Making or breaking these bonds to store or recover energy presents us with fresh challenges, including how to catalyze these transformations in molecular systems that are 'tuned' to minimize energy loss and in molecular and material systems present in biomass. This talk will discuss some challenging transformations in chemical hydrogen storage, and some aspects of the inorganic chemistry we are studying in the development of catalysts for biomass utilization.

Thorn, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

36

Chemical Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this series of lectures we first describe the basic ingredients of galactic chemical evolution and discuss both analytical and numerical models. Then we compare model results for the Milky Way, Dwarf Irregulars, Quasars and the Intra-Cluster- Medium with abundances derived from emission lines. These comparisons allow us to put strong constraints on the stellar nucleosynthesis and the mechanisms of galaxy formation.

Francesca Matteucci

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

37

Organic-Inorganic Hetero Junction White Light Emitting Diode.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The purpose of this thesis work is to design and fabricates organic-inorganic hetero junction White Light Emitting Diode (WLED). In this WLED, inorganic material… (more)

Lubuna Beegum, Shafeek

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

acids inorganic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for inorganic synthesis MIT - DSpace Summary: Thin film nanocomposites consisting of inorganic matter embedded within a soft polymeric matrix on the nanometer length scale are an...

39

Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for CSP Plants Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for CSP Plants...

40

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Publications Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries Multifunctional, Inorganic-Filled Separators for Large Format, Li-ion Batteries 2012 DOE Hydrogen...

42

All-Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands and Building Blocks in Chemistry. All-Boron Aromatic Clusters as Potential New Inorganic Ligands and Building Blocks in...

43

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical issues surrounding nuclear power production and waste...

44

NSF/DOE Thermoelectric Partnership: Inorganic-Organic Hybrid...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics NSFDOE Thermoelectric Partnership: Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle...

45

TCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

actinide chemistry, with a focus on coordination and organometallic uranium chemistry. Paula ColavitaTCD-IISc Symposium "Chemistry & Chemical Biology" Trinity College Clive Williams, Dean of Chemistry. Research areas include supramolecular organic and inorganic chemistry and medicinal chemistry

O'Mahony, Donal E.

46

Abbreviations: As(V) Arsenate; As(III) Arsenite; MS Murashige and Skoog; PC Phytochelatin; SOD Superoxide dismutase Fig. 1 Inorganic forms of arsenic most prevalent in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with metal ores of copper, lead and gold. Arsenate (AsV) and arsenite (AsIII) are the most common inorganic smeltering, coal combustion, mine tailings, hide tanning waste, dyes, chemical weapons and arsenic pesticides

Ma, Lena

47

Polygonal model for layered inorganic nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiwalled inorganic nanotubes with circular cross sections must have either an incoherent interface or a large amount of strain. However, nanotubes with a polygonal cross section can have a coherent interface with ...

Tibbetts, Kevin

48

February 11, 1987 I Inorganic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Volume 26 Number 3 February 11, 1987 I Inorganic Chemistry 0 Copyright 1987 by the American uranium phthalocyanine derivatives have been crystallographically (I) (a) Kasuga, K.; Tsutsui, M. Coord

Girolami, Gregory S.

49

Inorganic nanotubes and electro-fluidic devices fabricated therefrom  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nanofluidic devices incorporating inorganic nanotubes fluidly coupled to channels or nanopores for supplying a fluid containing chemical or bio-chemical species are described. In one aspect, two channels are fluidly interconnected with a nanotube. Electrodes on opposing sides of the nanotube establish electrical contact with the fluid therein. A bias current is passed between the electrodes through the fluid, and current changes are detected to ascertain the passage of select molecules, such as DNA, through the nanotube. In another aspect, a gate electrode is located proximal the nanotube between the two electrodes thus forming a nanofluidic transistor. The voltage applied to the gate controls the passage of ionic species through the nanotube selected as either or both ionic polarities. In either of these aspects the nanotube can be modified, or functionalized, to control the selectivity of detection or passage.

Yang, Peidong (Kensington, CA); Majumdar, Arunava (Orinda, CA); Fan, Rong (Pasadena, CA); Karnik, Rohit (Cambridge, MA)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Daylighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Articles Lighting and Daylighting Basics Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Passive Solar Building Design Basics Energy Basics Home Renewable Energy Homes & Buildings Lighting...

51

Basic principle of superconductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The basic principle of superconductivity is suggested in this paper. There have been two vital wrong suggestions on the basic principle, one is the relation between superconductivity and the Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC), and another is the relation between superconductivity and pseudogap.

Tian De Cao

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

52

Basic Microfluidic Lithographic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 2 Basic Microfluidic and Soft Lithographic Techniques Sindy K.Y. Tang and George M in these devices are based on those developed for microfluidics used in biochemical anal- ysis. This chapter describes the basic ideas of microfluidics. We first summarize the materials most commonly used

Prentiss, Mara

53

A BASIC GUIDE TO CHEMICAL & BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING AT UA Much of the information included in this handout can be found at che.eng.ua.edu click on undergraduate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry I (N) 4 CHE 125 Introduction to Chemical Engineering 1 ENGR 111 Engineering the Future 1 EN 101 102 General Chemistry II (N) 4 EN 102 English Composition II (FC) 3 ENGR 141 Engineering Concepts Chemistry I 3 CHE 254 Chemical Engineering Calculations 4 MATH 227 Calculus III (MA) 4 PH 105 General

Carver, Jeffrey C.

54

Appendix G. Chemicals Annual Site Environmental Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix G. Chemicals #12;Annual Site Environmental Report Appendix G. Chemicals G-3 Appendix G chemicals. Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more. Chemicals This appendix presents basic facts about chemicals. The information is intended to be a basis

Pennycook, Steve

55

Alkoxide routes to Inorganic Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An all alkoxide solution chemistry utilizing metal 2-methoxyethoxide complexes in 2-methoxyethanol was used to deposit thin-films of metal oxides on single-crystal metal oxide substrates and on biaxially textured metal substrates. This same chemistry was used to synthesize complex metal oxide nanoparticles. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy was used to study precursor solutions of the alkaline niobates and tantalates. Film crystallization temperatures were determined from x-ray diffraction patterns of powders derived from the metal oxide precursor solutions. Film structure was determined via x-ray diffraction. Film morphology was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Epitaxial thin-films of strontium bismuth tantalate (SrBi{sub 2}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 9}, SBT) and strontium bismuth niobate (SrBi{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 9}, SBN) were deposited on single crystal [1 0 0] magnesium oxide (MgO) buffered with lanthanum manganate (LaMnO{sub 3}, LMO). Epitaxial thin films of LMO were deposited on single crystal [100] MgO via Rf-magnetron sputtering and on single crysal [100] lanthanum aluminate (LaAlO{sub 3}) via the chemical solution deposition technique. Epitaxial thin-films of sodium potassium tantalate (na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}TaO{sub 3}, NKT), sodium potassium niobate (Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}NbO{sub 3}, NKN) and sodium potassium tantalum niobate (Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5}Ta{sub 0.5}O{sub 3}, NKTN) were deposited on single crystal [1 0 0] lanthanum aluminate and [1 0 0] MgO substrates (NKT and NKN) and biaxially textured metal substrates via the chemical solution deposition technique. Epitaxial growth of thin-films of NKT, NKN and NKTN was observed on LAO and Ni-5% W. Epitaxial growth of thin-films of NKN and the growth of c-axis aligned thin-films of NKT was observed on MgO. Nanoparticles of SBT, SBN, NKT and NKN were synthesized in reverse micelles from alkoxide precursor solutions. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron spectroscopy investigations reveal that amorphous nanoparticles ({approx} 5 nm) of SBT and SBN were synthesized. X-ray diffraction investigations reveal that nanoparticles ({approx} nm) of NKT and NKN were also synthesized by this method.

Thomas, George H [ORNL

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Inorganic Plant Nutrients: Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Silicate Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lab 3: Inorganic Plant Nutrients: Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Silicate Introduction Compounds of nitrogen. Silicate can play a regulating role in the growth of such organisms that carry shells of silicate. Most important are diatoms, which may form phytoplankton blooms under conditions of sufficient silicate

Jochem, Frank J.

57

FACULTY POSITION IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FACULTY POSITION IN INORGANIC CHEMISTRY Department of Chemistry Syracuse University The Department of Chemistry at Syracuse University invites applications for a tenure track faculty position at the Assistant Professor level in inorganic chemistry with specialization in materials chemistry (broadly defined

Doyle, Robert

58

Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: October-December 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period October--December 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information. Activities conducted within the area of Hot Cell Operations included efforts to optimize the processing conditions for Enhanced Sludge Washing of Hanford tank sludge, the testing of candidate absorbers and ion exchangers under continuous-flow conditions using actual supernatant from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks, and attempts to develop a cesium-specific spherical inorganic sorbent for the treatment of acidic high-salt waste solutions. Within the area of Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, the problem of solids formation in process solutions from caustic treatment of Hanford sludge was addressed and experimental collaborative efforts with Russian scientists to determine the solidification conditions of yttrium barium, and copper oxides from their melts were completed.

Jubin, R.T.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical objectives of this project are: (a) To (1) define the partitioning of inorganic constituents associated with raw coal particles among products (including vapors, aerosols, and residual char/ash particles) formed under conditions representative of pulverized coal flames as a function of the specific (intrinsic and extrinsic) characteristics of the raw coal and the environment in which the transformations occur; and (2) to characterize the resultant spectrum of products in detail; (b) To elucidate and quantify the fundamental processes (involving basic principles of physics, chemistry, thermodynamics) by which transformations of the inorganic constituents occur; and (c) To develop, based on the information required in a. and b. above, a tractable process model capable of predicting the significant features of the transformation process, most importantly, the distribution and nature of products. This report represents work accomplished in the tenth quarter of performance on the contract. The authors specifically highlight work accomplished: at the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) on developing and constructing a thermophoretic sampling probe, for submicron fume particle sampling; at MIT on (1) completion of the baseline ash particle size distribution measurements for seven program coals (five US and two Australian), and (2) analysis of the fragmentation model results in terms of a closed-form solution for a simplified case; at the University of Arizona, on obtaining detailed ash particle and submicron fume chemistry for four program coals; and at PSI Technology Company (PSIT) on concluding data analysis and describing mineral interaction trends observed during combustion of two program coals. Individual progress reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Boni, A.A.; Helble, J.J.; Srinivasachar, S. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (USA)); Flagan, R.C. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (USA)); Huffman, G.P.; Huggins, F.E. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (USA)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA)); Sarofim, A.F. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined July 31, 2013 The journal Inorganic Chemistry published a special Forum issue on the role of inorganic chemistry in nuclear energy. John Gordon and Argonne National Laboratory collaborated on the work. The DOE Office of Nuclear Energy and the Office

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Ethanol Basics (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethanol is a widely-used, domestically-produced renewable fuel made from corn and other plant materials. More than 96% of gasoline sold in the United States contains ethanol. Learn more about this alternative fuel in the Ethanol Basics Fact Sheet, produced by the U.S. Department of Energy's Clean Cities program.

Not Available

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Intellectual Patent Basics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intellectual Property Patent Basics Roland W. Norris Pauley Petersen Kinne & Erickson 2800 W;Introduction Intellectual property: Patents Trademarks Copyrights Trade Secrets #12;What is a Patent? A right For the term of the patent 20 years from date of filing of earliest related patent or application #12;A

Heller, Barbara

63

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inorganic constituents or ash contained in pulverized coal significantly increase the environmental and economic costs of coal utilization. For example, ash particles produced during combustion may deposit on heat transfer surfaces, decreasing heat transfer rates and increasing maintenance costs. The minimization of particulate emissions often requires the installation of cleanup devices such as electrostatic precipitators, also adding to the expense of coal utilization. Despite these costly problems, a comprehensive assessment of the ash formation and had never been attempted. At the start of this program, it was hypothesized that ash deposition and ash particle emissions both depended upon the size and chemical composition of individual ash particles. Questions such as: What determines the size of individual ash particles What determines their composition Whether or not particles deposit How combustion conditions, including reactor size, affect these processes remained to be answered. In this 6-year multidisciplinary study, these issues were addressed in detail. The ambitious overall goal was the development of a comprehensive model to predict the size and chemical composition distributions of ash produced during pulverized coal combustion. Results are described.

Helble, J.J. (ed.); Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexingt

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Basic Energy Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. Study ofJ U Principal[2 +Basic

65

Basic Energy Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. Study ofJ U Principal[2 +Basic

66

Basic Energy Sciences Reports  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. Study ofJ U Principal[2Basic Energy

67

NREL: Learning - Biofuels Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and Achievements ofLizResults InterpretingBiofuels Basics This

68

Chemical Engineering Division research highlights, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1979, CEN conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) high-temperature, rechargeable lithium/iron sulfide batteries for electric vehicles and electric utility load leveling; (2) ambient-temperature batteries - improved lead-acid, nickel/zinc, and nickel/iron - for electric vehicles; (3) molten carbonate fuel cells for use by electric utilities; (4) coal technology - mainly fluidized-bed combustion of coal in the presence of SO/sub 2/ sorbent of limestone; (5) heat- and seed- recovery technology for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic systems; (6) solar energy collectors and thermal energy storage; (7) fast breeder reactor chemistry research - chemical support of reactor safety studies, chemistry of irradiated fuels, and sodium technology; (8) fuel cycle technology - reprocessing of nuclear fuels, management of nuclear wastes, geologic migration studies, and proof-of-breeding studies for the Light Water Breeder Reactor; (9) magnetic fusion research - lithium processing technology and materials research; and (10) basic energy sciences - homogeneous catalysis, thermodynamics of inorganic and organic materials, environmental chemistry, electrochemistry, and physical properties of salt vapors. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of these areas.

Burris, L.; Webster, D. S.; Barney, D. L.; Cafasso, F. A.; Steindler, M. J.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Biofuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Renewable Energy Biomass Biofuel Basics Biofuel Basics July 30, 2013 - 11:38am Addthis Text Version Photo of a woman in goggles handling a machine filled with biofuels....

70

SciTech Connect: Metal-Organic Framework Templated Inorganic...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Metal-Organic Framework Templated Inorganic Sorbents for Rapid and Efficient Extraction of Heavy Metals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Metal-Organic Framework Templated...

71

Inorganic Nanotubes DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803447  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Angewandte Chemie Inorganic Nanotubes DOI: 10.1002/anie.200803447 Core­Shell PbI2@WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes from Capillary Wetting** Ronen Kreizman, Sung You Hong, Jeremy Sloan, Ronit Popovitz-Biro, Ana cavity. Capillarity has been shown to drive the wetting and filling of multiwalled carbon nanotubes

Davis, Ben G.

72

Basic Research Needs: Catalysis for Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch HighlightsToolsBES ReportsExperimentBasic EnergyChemical

73

Determination of organic inorganic associations of trace elements in New Albany shale kerogen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inorganic and organic trace element associations in the kerogen isolated from the New Albany shale were studied by analysis of kerogen fractions and a mineral residue obtained using density separations. Elemental mass balance data from these fractions indicate a predominantly inorganic association with pyrite and marcasite for several elements (As, Co, Ga, Mn, Ni, Sb and Se). The degree of inorganic association of these elements was determined by treatment of the mineral residue ({approximately}85% FeS{sub 2}) with dilute HNO{sub 3} to remove pyrite and marcasite. The association of several other elements in minerals which are insoluble in dilute HNO{sub 3} (rutile, zircon, etc.) were also determined. The results of these studies indicate an essentially total organic association for V and approximately 95% organic association for Ni in New Albany kerogen. The determination of organically combined elements is very difficult for those elements which are predominantly concentrated in the mineral fraction. Correction methods based on low temperature ashing, chemical removal of pyrite, and physical methods of separation are compared.

Mercer, G.E.; Filby, R.H. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Toward High-Performance Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Solar Cells: Bringing Conjugated Polymers and Inorganic Nanocrystals in Close  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to traditional silicon solar cells due to the capacity of producing high- efficiency solar energy in a cost these advantages and progress, organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells still exhibit much lower PCEs (iToward High-Performance Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Solar Cells: Bringing Conjugated Polymers

Lin, Zhiqun

75

Nanostructured Basic Catalysts: Opportunities for Renewable Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research studied and developed novel basic catalysts for production of renewable chemicals and fuels from biomass. We focused on the development of unique porous structural-base catalysts zeolites. These catalysts were compared to conventional solid base materials for aldol condensation, that were being commercialized for production of fuels from biomass and would be pivotal in future biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals. Specifically, we had studied the aldolpyrolysis over zeolites and the trans-esterification of vegetable oil with methanol over mixed oxide catalysts. Our research has indicated that the base strength of framework nitrogen in nitrogen substituted zeolites (NH-zeolites) is nearly twice as strong as in standard zeolites. Nitrogen substituted catalysts have been synthesized from several zeolites (including FAU, MFI, BEA, and LTL) using NH3 treatment.

Conner, William C; Huber, George; Auerbach, Scott

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

SYLLABUS CH317 Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The course has been organized into three modules: 1) Basic skills and the scientific method; 2) Energy. The course does not require students to have extensive prior laboratory experience. As part of the course that include plastics and textiles, and from the formation of low-energy LED light sources to porous materials

77

Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics Organic Molecule Functionalized Zn3P2 Nanowire Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics...

78

Lecture outline Basic inventory problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lecture outline Basic inventory problems The economic order quantity An inventory game.B. Powell 1 #12;© 2013 W.B. Powell 2 Basic inventory problems Examples: » Products: · Customers consume). · Rainfall randomly replenishes reservoirs. · Release water from dam to maintain level. » Oil being stored

Powell, Warren B.

79

The Tutorial 1 Basic Editing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

17 Topics Not Covered #12;#12;Basic Editing THE VIM EDITOR IS ONE OF THE MOST powerful text editors. This chapter teaches you the basic set of 10 Vim commands you need to get started editing. In this chapter, you the more advanced editing commands. Before You Start If you have not installed Vim, you need to read

Faccanoni, Gloria

80

Research and development of hydrogen separation technology with inorganic membranes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic membrane technology has long been expected to provide new economical methods for industrial and waste management processes. At this time, the only commercially valuable inorganic membranes are the ultra filters derived from the French process that was used to produce the barrier for the French Gaseous Diffusion Plants. But these membranes are very expensive and have limited areas of application. Over the past fifteen years, scientists now in the Inorganic Membrane Technology Laboratory (IMTL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee have developed theories and processes for inorganic membranes that can be used to design and produce inorganic membranes for a very broad range of applications. A part of the fabrication process is an adaptive spinoff from the still classified process used to manufacture barriers for the U.S. Gaseous Diffusion Process. Although that part of the process is classified, it is a very flexible and adaptable process and it can be used with a broad range of materials. With the theories and design capabilities developed in the last fifteen years, this new adaptive manufacturing technology can be used to manufacture commercial inorganic membranes that are not useful for the separation of uranium isotopes and they have little or no relation to the barriers that were used to separate uranium isotopes. The development and deployment of such inorganic membranes can be very beneficial to U.S. industry. Inorganic membranes can be specifically designed and manufactured for a large number of different applications. Such membranes can greatly improve the efficiency of a broad range of industrial processes and provide new technology for waste management. These inorganic membranes have the potential for major energy savings and conservation of energy. They can provide the means for significant improvements in the competitiveness of US Industry and improve the economy and health and welfare of the nation.

Fain, D.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Thermal properties of organic and inorganic aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerogels are open-cell foams that have already been shown to be among the best thermal insulating solid materials known. This paper examines the three major contributions to thermal transport through porous materials; solid, gaseous, and radiative, to identify how to reduce the thermal conductivity of air-filled aerogels. We find that significant improvements in the thermal insulation property of aerogels are possible by; (i) employing materials with a low intrinsic solid conductivity, (ii) reducing the average pore size within aerogels, and (iii) affecting an increase of the infrared extinction in aerogels. Theoretically, polystyrene is the best of the organic materials and zirconia is the best inorganic material to use for the lowest achievable conductivity. Significant reduction of the thermal conductivity for all aerogel varieties is predicted with only a modest decrease of the average pore size. This might be achieved by modifying the sol-gel chemistry leading to aerogels. For example, a thermal resistance value of [ital R]=20 per inch would be possible for an air-filled resorcinol-formaldehyde aerogel at a density of 156 kg/m[sup 3], if the average pore size was less than 35 nm. An equation is included which facilitates the calculation of the optimum density for the minimum total thermal conductivity, for all varieties of aerogels.

Hrubesh, L.W.; Pekala, R.W. (Chemistry and Material Science Department, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551-9900 (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Lithium-based inorganic-organic framework materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation describes research into lithium-based inorganic-organic frameworks, which has led to an increased understanding of the structural diversity and properties of these materials. The crystal structures of 11 new forms of lithium...

Yeung, Hamish Hei-Man

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Polyelectrolyte multilayers as nanostructured templates for inorganic synthesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin film nanocomposites consisting of inorganic matter embedded within a soft polymeric matrix on the nanometer length scale are an important class of materials with potential application in optoelectronics and photonics, ...

Wang, Tom Chih-Hung, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Nanoporous Metal-Inorganic Materials for Storage and Capture...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Vehicles and Fuels Vehicles and Fuels Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search Nanoporous Metal-Inorganic Materials for Storage and...

85

Basic concept in plasma diagnostics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents the basic concept of various plasma diagnostics used for the study of plasma characteristics in different plasma experiments ranging from low temperature to high energy density plasma.

Rai, V N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Prediction of heat of melting and heat capacity of inorganic liquids by the method of group contributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Complex salts and salt/oxide combinations are being considered for the immobilization and storage or disposal of hazardous or radioactive wastes. There is very little information concerning such fundamental properties as heat of fusion and heat capacities for many of these inorganic materials. This work focuses on the use of elements or simple functional groups to estimate some of these fundamental thermodynamic properties for a variety of inorganic compounds. The major emphasis will be on properties for a variety of inorganic compounds. The major emphasis will be on properties for which some ancillary information may be easily measured, but which may be very difficult to measure directly. An example of such a property is the heat of fusion (or melting). The melting temperature for most pure materials is relatively easy to measure. However, the actual amount of energy required to liquefy, or conversely, the amount of energy which must be removed to solidify those same materials has not been measured. Similarly, important properties such as heat capacities of liquids are unavailable for many compounds. Such information is essential in the chemical industry and are paramount for chemical engineers if they are to design, build and operate plants and facilities in an economical and efficient manner.

Williams, J.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Eakman, J.M. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Montoya, M.M. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

1997-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

87

Chemical Innovation in Drug Dr Matthew Fuchter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Innovation in Drug Discovery Dr Matthew Fuchter Lecturer in Synthetic and Medicinal&D Spending and Output #12;Chemical Innovation Impact Discovery Development Basic research: years 0-3 Pre 3, File DRUG Chemical start point Hit to lead Preclinical Assessment Synthetic Chemistry Chemistry

88

Inorganic Nanoarchitectures by Organic Self Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . 43 3.2 Photonic device architectures for enhanced light absorption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Bibliography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 4 Experimental and analytical techniques 59 4... T 1 T 2 T 3 T c T 5 fr e e e n e rg y ? G f A f ’’ A f ’ A b 5 ?m C C’ Figure 1.2: Phase separation of polymer blends. a) Schematic of two chemically distinct ho- mopolymer chains. b) Atomic force microscopy image of a phase separated polymer film...

Guldin, Stefan

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

89

Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. Study ofJ U

90

aerosol assisted chemical: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 5 Simulating Aerosols Using a Chemical Transport Model with Assimilation of...

91

aerosol chemical characteristion: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

soluble in water: 2. Isolation of acid, neutral, and basic fractions by modified size Weber, Rodney 5 Simulating Aerosols Using a Chemical Transport Model with Assimilation of...

92

Cosmic Particle Acceleration: Basic Issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic-rays are ubiquitous, but their origins are surprisingly difficult to understand. A review is presented of some of the basic issues common to cosmic particle accelerators and arguments leading to the likely importance of diffusive shock acceleration as a general explanation. The basic theory of diffusive shock acceleration is outlined, followed by a discussion of some of the key issues that still prevent us from a full understanding of its outcomes. Some recent insights are mentioned at the end that may help direct ultimate resolution of our uncertainties.

T. W. Jones

2000-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

93

Biopower Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsBSCmemo.pdf BSCmemo.pdfBiopower Basics Biopower Basics August 14, 2013 - 12:35pm

94

Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Homes & Buildings Space Heating & Cooling Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings...

95

Basic Research Needs: Catalysis for Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents results of a workshop held August 6-8, 2007, by DOE SC Basic Energy Sciences to determine the basic research needs for catalysis research.

Bell, Alexis T.; Gates, Bruce C.; Ray, Douglas; Thompson, Michael R.

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hydrogen Delivery - Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Delivery Hydrogen Delivery - Basics Hydrogen Delivery - Basics Photo of light-duty vehicle at hydrogen refueling station. Infrastructure is required to move hydrogen from the...

97

Radiation Related Terms Basic Terms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Related Terms Basic Terms Radiation Radiation is energy in transit in the form of high not carry enough energy to separate molecules or remove electrons from atoms. Ionizing radiation Ionizing radiation is radiation with enough energy so that during an interaction with an atom, it can remove tightly

Vallino, Joseph J.

98

Keep Communication Professional BASIC TIPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keep Communication Professional BASIC TIPS: Staying professional in your career is vital. You the way through your career until you retire. It's important to not become too casual when communicating with employers or other professionals while seeking an internship/co-op. Don't use slang when communicating

Gering, Jon C.

99

Heterostructures based on inorganic and organic van der Waals systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two-dimensional limit of layered materials has recently been realized through the use of van der Waals (vdW) heterostructures composed of weakly interacting layers. In this paper, we describe two different classes of vdW heterostructures: inorganic vdW heterostructures prepared by co-lamination and restacking; and organic-inorganic hetero-epitaxy created by physical vapor deposition of organic molecule crystals on an inorganic vdW substrate. Both types of heterostructures exhibit atomically clean vdW interfaces. Employing such vdW heterostructures, we have demonstrated various novel devices, including graphene/hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and MoS{sub 2} heterostructures for memory devices; graphene/MoS{sub 2}/WSe{sub 2}/graphene vertical p-n junctions for photovoltaic devices, and organic crystals on hBN with graphene electrodes for high-performance transistors.

Lee, Gwan-Hyoung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chul-Ho [KU-KIST Graduate School of Converging Science and Technology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Zande, Arend M. van der [Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC), Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Han, Minyong [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Cui, Xu; Arefe, Ghidewon; Hone, James [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Nuckolls, Colin [Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Heinz, Tony F. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Kim, Philip, E-mail: pk2015@columbia.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Cellular morphology of organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on alkali alumino-silicate matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organic-inorganic hybrid foams based on an alkali alumino-silicate matrix were prepared by using different foaming methods. Initially, the synthesis of an inorganic matrix by using aluminosilicate particles, activated through a sodium silicate solution, was performed at room temperature. Subsequently the viscous paste was foamed by using three different methods. In the first method, gaseous hydrogen produced by the oxidization of Si powder in an alkaline media, was used as blowing agent to generate gas bubbles in the paste. In the second method, the porous structure was generated by mixing the paste with a “meringue” type of foam previously prepared by whipping, under vigorous stirring, a water solution containing vegetal proteins as surfactants. In the third method, a combination of these two methods was employed. The foamed systems were consolidated for 24 hours at 40°C and then characterized by FTIR, X-Ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compression tests. Low density foams (?500 Kg/m{sup 3}) with good cellular structure and mechanical properties were obtained by combining the “meringue” approach with the use of the chemical blowing agent based on Si.

Verdolotti, Letizia; Capasso, Ilaria; Lavorgna, Marino [Institute of Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Naples (Italy); Liguori, Barbara; Caputo, Domenico [Department of Chemical, Materials and Industrial Engineering, University of Naples Federico II, Naples (Italy); Iannace, Salvatore [Institute of Composite and Biomedical Materials, National Research Council, Naples, Italy and IMAST SCRAL, Piazza Bovio 22 Napoli 80133 (Italy)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Photocurable Inorganic-Organic Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................. 4 1.3 Hydrogels as Sensor Membranes ............................................. 6 II PHOTO-CROSSLINKED PDMSstar-PEG HYDROGELS: SYNTHESIS, CHARACTERIZATION, AND POTENTIAL APPLICATION FOR TISSUE ENGINEERING SCAFFOLD........... 9........................................................... 5 1.2 Sequence of events that leads to formation of fibrous capsules around implanted biosesors .................................................................................... 8 2.1 Synthesis of: (top) inorganic PDMS star -MA (A...

Hou, Yaping

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

102

Phonon Confinement Effects in Hybrid Virus-Inorganic Nanotubes for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phonon Confinement Effects in Hybrid Virus-Inorganic Nanotubes for Nanoelectronic Applications as nanotemplates, viruses can actually improve the electron transport properties in semiconductor nanotubes grown nanotubes deposited on tobacco mosaic viruses, the confined acoustic phonons are found to be redistributed

Fonoberov, Vladimir

103

Inorganic soil and groundwater chemistry near Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near-surface soils, boreholes, and sediments near the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) were sampled in 1989-91 as were monitoring wells, TVA wells, and privately-owned wells. Most wells were sampled two or three times. The resulting chemical analyses have been published in previous reports and have been previously described (CH2M HILL 1991, 1992; Clausen et al. 1992). The two reports by CH2M HILL are controversial, however, because, the concentrations of some constituents were reported to exceed background levels or drinking water standards and because both on-site (within the perimeter fence at PGDP) and off-site pollution was reported to have occurred. The groundwater samples upon which these interpretations were based may not be representative, however. The CH2M HILL findings are discussed in the report. The purpose of this report is to characterize the inorganic chemistry of groundwater and soils near PGDP, using data from the CH2M HILL reports (1991, 1992), and to determine whether or not any contamination has occurred. The scope is limited to analysis and interpretation of data in the CH2M HILL reports because previous interpretations of these data may not be valid, because samples were collected in a relatively short period of time at several hundred locations, and because the chemical analyses are nearly complete. Recent water samples from the same wells were not considered because the characterization of inorganic chemistry for groundwater and soil requirements only one representative sample and an accurate analysis from each location.

Moore, G.K. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Rapid extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon from seawater and groundwater samples for radiocarbon dating  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The focus of this thesis is the design and development of a system for rapid extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon from seawater and groundwater samples for radiocarbon dating. The Rapid Extraction of Dissolved Inorganic ...

Gospodinova, Kalina Doneva

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Chemical process hazards analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Office of Worker Health and Safety (EH-5) under the Assistant Secretary for the Environment, Safety and Health of the US Department (DOE) has published two handbooks for use by DOE contractors managing facilities and processes covered by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Rule for Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (29 CFR 1910.119), herein referred to as the PSM Rule. The PSM Rule contains an integrated set of chemical process safety management elements designed to prevent chemical releases that can lead to catastrophic fires, explosions, or toxic exposures. The purpose of the two handbooks, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` and ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate implementation of the provisions of the PSM Rule within the DOE. The purpose of this handbook ``Chemical Process Hazards Analysis,`` is to facilitate, within the DOE, the performance of chemical process hazards analyses (PrHAs) as required under the PSM Rule. It provides basic information for the performance of PrHAs, and should not be considered a complete resource on PrHA methods. Likewise, to determine if a facility is covered by the PSM rule, the reader should refer to the handbook, ``Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous Chemicals`` (DOE- HDBK-1101-96). Promulgation of the PSM Rule has heightened the awareness of chemical safety management issues within the DOE. This handbook is intended for use by DOE facilities and processes covered by the PSM rule to facilitate contractor implementation of the PrHA element of the PSM Rule. However, contractors whose facilities and processes not covered by the PSM Rule may also use this handbook as a basis for conducting process hazards analyses as part of their good management practices. This handbook explains the minimum requirements for PrHAs outlined in the PSM Rule. Nowhere have requirements been added beyond what is specifically required by the rule.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Catalyst for splitting water &Catalyst for splitting water & Synthetic Modeling of InorganicSynthetic Modeling of Inorganic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Importance Hydrogen technology in fuel cellsHydrogen technology in fuel cells As a combustion fuel, it producesCatalyst for splitting water &Catalyst for splitting water & Synthetic Modeling of Inorganic of evolution ·Optimized catalyst for water splitting in all oxygenic phototrophs S0 S4 S1 S2 S3 O2 2 H O2 e- e

Petta, Jason

107

Chemical analyses of selected thermal springs and wells in Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Basic chemical data for 27 selected thermal well and springs in Wyoming are presented. The samples were gathered from 1979 through 1982 in an effort to define geothermal resources in Wyoming. The basic data for the 27 analyzed samples generally include location, temperature, flow, date analyzed, and a description of what the sample is from. The chemical analyses for the sample are listed.

Heasler, H.P.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hybrid Core-Shell Nanowire Forests as Self-Selective Chemical Connectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hybrid Core-Shell Nanowire Forests as Self-Selective Chemical Connectors Hyunhyub Ko,,,§,| Jongho are presented that limit their successful operation. Here, we report unisex, chemical connectors based on hybridW bonding interactions of hybrid inorganic/organic NW forests. The weak vdW bond strengths result in the low

Javey, Ali

109

Hydropower Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLCBasics Hydropower Basics Content on this page

110

NREL: Learning - Solar Energy Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | National NuclearoverAcquisitionEnergy SponsorsEnergy Basics

111

Effects of composted dairy manure on soil chemical properties and forage yield and nutritive value of coastal Bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research was conducted to compare the effects of composted dairy manure and raw dairy manure alone, or in combination with supplemental inorganic fertilizer, on soil chemical properties and Coastal bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] yield...

Helton, Thomas J.

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

112

Basic Research Needs for the Hydrogen Economy  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use was held May 13-15, 2003 to assess the basic research needs to assure a secure energy future. This report is based on t

113

Use of carbonates for biological and chemical synthesis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system of using carbonates, especially water-insoluble or sparing soluble mineral carbonates, for maintaining or increasing dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations in aqueous media. In particular, the system generates concentrated dissolve inorganic carbon substrates for photosynthetic, chemosynthetic, or abiotic chemical production of carbonaceous or other compounds in solution. In some embodiments, the invention can also enhance the dissolution and retention of carbon dioxide in aqueous media, and can produce pH buffering capacity, metal ions, and heat, which can be beneficial to the preceding syntheses.

Rau, Gregory Hudson

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

114

CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEM 6471 CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings 9:35 ­ 10:55 am, Tuesday and Thursday of October 22-26 Textbooks Molecular Thermodynamics by D.A McQuarrie and J.D. Simon, University Science Books the laws of classical thermodynamics and some of their chemical applications. It also covers basic

Sherrill, David

115

Recycling of cleach plant filtrates by electrodialysis removal of inorganic non-process elements.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water use in the pulp and paper industry is very significant, and the U.S. pulp and paper industries as well as other processing industries are actively pursuing water conservation and pollution prevention by in-process recycling of water. Bleach plant effluent is a large portion of the water discharged from a typical bleached kraft pulp mill. The recycling of bleach plant effluents to the kraft recovery cycle is widely regarded as an approach to low effluent bleached kraft pulp production. The focus of this work has been on developing an electrodialysis process for recycling the acidic bleach plant effluent of bleached Kraft pulp mills. Electrodialysis is uniquely suited as a selective kidney to remove non-process elements (NPEs) from bleach plant effluent before they reach the chemical recovery cycle. Using electrodialysis for selective NPE removal can prevent the problems caused by accumulation of inorganic NPEs in the pulping cycle and recovery boiler. In this work, acidic bleach plant filtrates from three mills using different bleaching sequences based on chlorine dioxide were characterized. The analyses showed no fundamental differences in the inorganic NPE composition or other characteristics among these filtrates. The majority of total dissolved solids in the effluents were found to be inorganic NPEs. Chloride and nitrate were present at significant levels in all effluent samples. Sodium was the predominant metal ion, while calcium and magnesium were also present at considerable levels. The feasibility of using electrodialysis to selectively remove inorganic NPEs from the acidic bleach effluent was successfully demonstrated in laboratory experiments with effluents from all these three mills. Although there were some variations in these effluents, chloride and potentially harmful cations, such as potassium, calcium, and magnesium, were removed efficiently from the bleach effluents into a small-volume, concentrated purge stream. This effective removal of inorganic NPEs can enable the mills to recycle bleach effluents to reduce water consumption. The electrodialysis process also effectively retained up to 98% of the organics and can reduce the organic discharge in the mill wastewater. By using suitable commercially available electrodialysis membranes, there were no indications of rapid or irreversible membrane fouling or scale formation, even in extended laboratory scale operations up to 100 hours. Results of laboratory experiments also showed that commercially available membranes properly selected for this process would have good stability to withstand the potentially oxidative conditions of the filtrate. A pilot-scale field demonstration was also conducted at a southern mill, using the D0 filtrate from the bleach plant. During the field demonstration we found serious membrane 2 stack clogging problems, which apparently were caused by fine fibers that escaped through the 5-micron pre-filters, although such a pre-filtration method had been satisfactory in the laboratory tests. Additional R&D is recommended to address this pre-filtration or clogging issue with systems approaches integrating pre-filtration, other separation methods, and stack design. After the pre-filtration/clogging issue is overcome, laboratory development and pilot demonstration are recommended to optimize the process parameters and to evaluate the long-term process parameters. The key technical issues here include membrane lives, control and mitigation of fouling and scaling, and cleaning-in-place protocols. From the data collected in this work, a preliminary process design and economic evaluations were performed for a model mill with 1,000-ton/day pulp production that uses a bleaching sequence based on chlorine dioxide. Assuming 3 m{sup 3} acidic effluents to be treated per ton of pulp produced, the electrodialysis process would require a membrane area of about 361 m{sup 2} for this model mill. The energy consumption of the electrodialytic stack for separation is estimated to be about $160/day, and the estimated capital cost of the electrodia

Tsai, S. P.; Pfromm, P.; Henry, M. P.; Fracaro, A. T.; Swanstrom, C. P.; Moon, P.; Energy Systems; Inst. of Paper Science and Tech.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Inorganic metal oxide/organic polymer nanocomposites and method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal inorganic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophillic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the composite material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

Gash, Alexander E.; Satcher, Joe H.; Simpson, Randy

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

117

Survey of electrochemical production of inorganic compounds. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemical generation of inorganic compounds, excluding chlorine/caustic, has been critically reviewed. About 60 x 10/sup 12/ Btu/y fossil fuel equivalent will be used in the year 2000 for the electrosynthesis of inorganic compounds. Significant energy savings in chlorate production can result from the development of suitable electrocatalysts for lowering the cathodic overpotential. Perchlorates, electrolytic hypochlorite, electrolytic manganese dioxide, fluorine and other miscellaneous compounds use relatively small amounts of electrical energy. Implementation of caustic scrubber technology for stack gas cleanup would result in appreciable amounts of sodium sulfate which could be electrolyzed to regenerate caustic. Hydrogen peroxide, now produced by the alkyl anthraquinone process, could be made electrolytically by a new process coupling anodic oxidation of sulfate with cathodic reduction of oxygen in alkaline solution. Ozone is currently manufactured using energy-inefficient silent discharge equipment. A novel energy-efficient approach which uses an oxygen-enhanced anodic reaction is examined.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Size and Crystallinity in Protein-Templated Inorganic Nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Protein cages such as ferritins and virus capsids have been used as containers to synthesize a wide variety of protein-templated inorganic nanoparticles. While identification of the inorganic crystal phase has been successful in some cases, very little is known about the detailed nanoscale structure of the inorganic component. We have used pair distribution function analysis of total X-ray scattering to measure the crystalline domain size in nanoparticles of ferrihydrite, {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}, CoPt, and FePt grown inside 24-meric ferritin cages from H. sapiens and P. furiosus. The material properties of these protein-templated nanoparticles are influenced by processes at a variety of length scales: the chemistry of the material determines the precise arrangement of atoms at very short distances, while the interior volume of the protein cage constrains the maximum nanoparticle size attainable. At intermediate length scales, the size of coherent crystalline domains appears to be constrained by the arrangement of crystal nucleation sites on the interior of the cage. On the basis of these observations, some potential synthetic strategies for the control of crystalline domain size in protein-templated nanoparticles are suggested.

Jolley, Craig C.; Uchida, Masaki; Reichhardt, Courtney; Harrington, Richard; Kang, Sebyung; Klem, Michael T.; Parise, John B.; Douglas, Trevor (SBU); (Montana)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Inorganic arsenic exposure and type 2 diabetes mellitus in Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic arsenic exposure in drinking water has been recently related to diabetes mellitus. To evaluate this relationship the authors conducted in 2003, a case-control study in an arseniasis-endemic region from Coahuila, a northern state of Mexico with a high incidence of diabetes. The present analysis includes 200 cases and 200 controls. Cases were obtained from a previous cross-sectional study conducted in that region. Diagnosis of diabetes was established following the American Diabetes Association criteria, with two fasting glucose values {>=}126 mg/100 ml ({>=}7.0 mmol/l) or a history of diabetes treated with insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents. The next subject studied, subsequent to the identification of a case in the cross-sectional study was taken as control. Inorganic arsenic exposure was measured through total arsenic concentrations in urine, measured by hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Subjects with intermediate total arsenic concentration in urine (63.5-104 {mu}g/g creatinine) had two-fold higher risk of having diabetes (odds ratio=2.16; 95% confidence interval: 1.23, 3.79), but the risk was almost three times greater in subjects with higher concentrations of total arsenic in urine (odds ratio=2.84; 95% confidence interval: 1.64, 4.92). This data provides additional evidence that inorganic arsenic exposure may be diabetogenic.

Coronado-Gonzalez, Jose Antonio [Clinical Epidemiologic Research Unit, General Regional Hospital 1 'Gabriel Mancera', Mexican Institute of the Social Security, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Razo, Luz Maria del [Toxicology Departament, Cinvestav, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Garcia-Vargas, Gonzalo [School of Medicine, Durango State Juarez University, Gomez Palacio, Durango (Mexico); Biomedical Research Center, Coahuila, Autonomous University, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Sanmiguel-Salazar, Francisca [Biomedical Research Center, Coahuila, Autonomous University, Torreon, Coahuila (Mexico); Escobedo-de la Pena, Jorge [Clinical Epidemiologic Research Unit, General Regional Hospital 1 'Gabriel Mancera', Mexican Institute of the Social Security, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: jorgeep@servidor.unam.mx

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Transformations of inorganic coal constituents in combustion systems. Volume 1, sections 1--5: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inorganic constituents or ash contained in pulverized coal significantly increase the environmental and economic costs of coal utilization. For example, ash particles produced during combustion may deposit on heat transfer surfaces, decreasing heat transfer rates and increasing maintenance costs. The minimization of particulate emissions often requires the installation of cleanup devices such as electrostatic precipitators, also adding to the expense of coal utilization. Despite these costly problems, a comprehensive assessment of the ash formation and had never been attempted. At the start of this program, it was hypothesized that ash deposition and ash particle emissions both depended upon the size and chemical composition of individual ash particles. Questions such as: What determines the size of individual ash particles? What determines their composition? Whether or not particles deposit? How combustion conditions, including reactor size, affect these processes? remained to be answered. In this 6-year multidisciplinary study, these issues were addressed in detail. The ambitious overall goal was the development of a comprehensive model to predict the size and chemical composition distributions of ash produced during pulverized coal combustion. Results are described.

Helble, J.J. [ed.; Srinivasachar, S.; Wilemski, G.; Boni, A.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States); Kang, Shin-Gyoo; Sarofim, A.F.; Graham, K.A.; Beer, J.M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Peterson, T.W.; Wendt, J.O.L.; Gallagher, N.B.; Bool, L. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States); Huggins, F.E.; Huffman, G.P.; Shah, N.; Shah, A. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Inorganic origin of carbon dioxide during low temperature thermal recovery of bitumen: Chemical and isotopic evidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide, produced at low temperatures, is the dominant gaseous species evolved during steam-assisted thermal recovery of bitumen at the Tucker Lake pilot, Cold Lake, Alberta. Two possible sources for the produced CO{sub 2} are considered: pyrolysis of bitumen and dissolution of carbonate minerals. Data from natural systems and experiments by other authors suggest that clay-carbonate reactions are the dominant source of CO{sub 2}. Bitumen pyrolysis may contribute small amounts of CO{sub 2}, probably by decarboxylation, early in the production cycle but cannot contribute significant volumes. The recognition of production of CO{sub 2} by reactive calcite destruction at temperatures between 70 and 220{degree}C suggests that this process may be responsible for the production of large quantities of CO{sub 2} in natural systems, particularly in lithofeldspathic sands and shales with high carbonate content and abundant clays. Organic acids have been suggested to be the source of CO{sub 2} in diagenetic fluids, but the results presented here suggest that this hypothesis requires more complete investigation.

Hutcheon, I.; Abercrombia, H.J.; Krouse, H.R. (Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Environmental impacts of petroleum production: Fate of inorganic and organic chemicals in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in USA, and forecasts indicate that by 2020 natural gas and oil consumption will increase by 40% and 29 and inactive tank batteries. Results to date show that the produced water source is a Na-Ca-Cl brine (~150 `A' site, 35 water samples were obtained from an asphaltic pit and an adjacent weathered-oil pit

123

Phys780: Basic Plasma Physics 1 PHYS 780. Basic Plasma Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phys780: Basic Plasma Physics 1 PHYS 780. Basic Plasma Physics Course objective The course objective is to introduce students to basic concepts of plasma physics and magneto-hydrodynamics with applications to solar-terrestrial physics. The course topics include: plasma classification, basic plasma prop

124

2010 INORGANIC CHEMISTRY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE JUNE 20 - 25, 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Inorganic Chemistry GRC is one of the longest-standing of the GRCs, originating in 1951. Over the years, this conference has played a role in spawning many other GRCs in specialized fields, due to the involvement of elements from most of the periodic table. These include coordination, organometallic, main group, f-element, and solid state chemistries; materials science, catalysis, computational chemistry, nanotechnology, bioinorganic, environmental, and biomedical sciences just to name a few. The 2010 Inorganic Chemistry GRC will continue this tradition, where scientists at all levels from academic, industrial, and national laboratories meet to define the important problems in the field and to highlight emerging opportunities through exchange of ideas and discussion of unpublished results. Invited speakers will present on a wide variety of topics, giving attendees a look at areas both inside and outside of their specialized areas of interest. In addition to invited speakers, the poster sessions at GRCs are a key feature of the conference. All conferees at the Inorganic Chemistry GRC are invited to present a poster on their work, and here the informal setting promotes the free exchange of ideas and fosters new relationships. As in previous years, we will offer poster presenters the opportunity to compete for one of several program spots in which they can give an oral presentation based on the subject matter of their poster. This is a great way to get your work noticed by the scientists attending the meeting, especially for those early in their career path such as junior faculty members, postdoctoral fellows, and those at comparable ranks. Anyone interested in participating in the poster competition should bring an electronic slide presentation and a small hard copy of their poster to submit to the committee.

JOHN LOCKEMEYER

2010-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

125

Solid state radioluminescent sources: Mixed organic/inorganic hybrids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This concept brings a condensed source of tritium into close proximity with an inorganic phosphor. That source may thus become the equivalent of many atmospheres of tritium gas pressure. If both phosphor and tritium source material are optically clear, then a lamp's brightness may be made to scale with optical path length. Proof of principle of this concept has been demonstrated and will be described. A theoretical treatment is presented for the results here and for results from aerogel experiments. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Gill, J.T. (EG and G Mound Applied Technologies, Miamisburg, OH (USA)); Renschler, C.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Shepodd, T.J. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA)); Smith, H.M. (Allied-Signal, Inc., Kansas City, MO (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Automated process for solvent separation of organic/inorganic substance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is described an automated process for the solvent separation of organic/inorganic substances that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In the process, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control apparatus. The mixture in the filter is agitated by ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process. 4 figs.

Schweighardt, F.K.

1986-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

127

Automated process for solvent separation of organic/inorganic substance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

There is described an automated process for the solvent separation of organic/inorganic substances that operates continuously and unattended and eliminates potential errors resulting from subjectivity and the aging of the sample during analysis. In the process, metered amounts of one or more solvents are passed sequentially through a filter containing the sample under the direction of a microprocessor control apparatus. The mixture in the filter is agitated by ultrasonic cavitation for a timed period and the filtrate is collected. The filtrate of each solvent extraction is collected individually and the residue on the filter element is collected to complete the extraction process.

Schweighardt, Frank K. (Upper Macungie, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Engineering the Interface Between Inorganic Materials and Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To further optimize cell function in hybrid “living materials”, it would be advantageous to render mammalian cells responsive to novel “orthogonal” cues, i.e. signals they would not ordinarily respond to but that can be engineered to feed into defined intracellular signaling pathways. We recently developed an optogenetic method, based on A. thaliana Cry2, for rapid and reversible protein oligomerization in response to blue light. We also demonstrated the ability to use this method to channel the light input into several defined signaling pathways, work that will enhance communication between inorganic devices and living systems.

Schaffer, David

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Thermoelectrics | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensionalthe U.S.Indianaof Energy Innovative TechniqueInorganic-Organic

130

Electric-Drive Vehicle Basics (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Describes the basics of electric-drive vehicles, including hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, all-electric vehicles, and the various charging options.

Not Available

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Basic Instructor Training | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Training Basic Instructor Training December 5, 2013 - 12:03pm Addthis The Emergency Operations Training Academy, NA 40.2, Readiness and Training, Albuquerque, NM is pleased...

132

NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY Technology Transfer Basic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Basic Immobilized Amine Sorbent (BIAS) Process Success Story NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov Contact Capturing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from the flue or...

133

Frequency Regulation Basics and Trends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electric power system must address two unique requirements: the need to maintain a near real-time balance between generation and load, and the need to adjust generation (or load) to manage power flows through individual transmission facilities. These requirements are not new: vertically integrated utilities have been meeting them for a century as a normal part of conducting business. With restructuring, however, the services needed to meet these requirements, now called ''ancillary services'', are being more clearly defined. Ancillary services are those functions performed by the equipment and people that generate, control, and transmit electricity in support of the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) has defined such services as those ''necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system''. This statement recognizes the importance of ancillary services for both bulk-power reliability and support of commercial transactions. Balancing generation and load instantaneously and continuously is difficult because loads and generators are constantly fluctuating. Minute-to-minute load variability results from the random turning on and off of millions of individual loads. Longer-term variability results from predictable factors such as the daily and seasonal load patterns as well as more random events like shifting weather patterns. Generators also introduce unexpected fluctuations because they do not follow their generation schedules exactly and they trip unexpectedly due to a range of equipment failures. The output from wind generators varies with the wind. Storage technologies should be ideal suppliers of several ancillary services, including regulation, contingency reserves (spinning reserve, supplemental reserve, replacement reserve), and voltage support. These services are not free; in regions with energy markets, generators are paid to supply these services. In vertically integrated utilities (without energy markets) the utility incurs significant costs to supply these services. Supplying these services may be a significant business opportunity for emerging storage technologies. This report briefly explores the various ancillary services that may be of interest to storage. It then focuses on regulation, the most expensive ancillary service. It also examines the impact that increasing amounts of wind generation may have on regulation requirements, decreasing conventional regulation supplies, and the implications for energy storage.

Kirby, BJ

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

134

ATOMISTIC MODELING OF OIL SHALE KEROGENS AND ASPHALTENES ALONG WITH THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE INORGANIC MINERAL MATRIX  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to obtain and validate three dimensional atomistic models for the organic matter in both oil shales and oil sands. In the case of oil shales the modeling was completed for kerogen, the insoluble portion of the organic matter; for oil sands it was for asphaltenes, a class of molecules found in crude oil. The three dimensional models discussed in this report were developed starting from existing literature two dimensional models. The models developed included one kerogen, based on experimental data on a kerogen isolated from a Green River oil shale, and a set of six representative asphaltenes. Subsequently, the interactions between these organic models and an inorganic matrix was explored in order to gain insight into the chemical nature of this interaction, which could provide vital information in developing efficient methods to remove the organic material from inorganic mineral substrate. The inorganic substrate used to model the interaction was illite, an aluminum silicate oxide clay. In order to obtain the feedback necessary to validate the models, it is necessary to be able to calculate different observable quantities and to show that these observables both reproduce the results of experimental measurements on actual samples as well as that the observables are sensitive to structural differences between models. The observables that were calculated using the models include 13C NMR spectra, the IR vibrational spectra, and the atomic pair wise distribution function; these were chosen as they are among the methods for which both experimental and calculated values can be readily obtained. Where available, comparison was made to experiment results. Finally, molecular dynamic simulations of pyrolysis were completed on the models to gain an understanding into the nature of the decomposition of these materials when heated.

Facelli, Julio; Pugmire, Ronald; Pimienta, Ian

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

135

E-Print Network 3.0 - analytical chemistry inorganic Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: analytical chemistry inorganic Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Department of Chemistry Three Year Projection...

136

Fuel cell electrolyte membrane with basic polymer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an electrolyte membrane comprising an acid and a basic polymer, where the acid is a low-volatile acid that is fluorinated and is either oligomeric or non-polymeric, and where the basic polymer is protonated by the acid and is stable to hydrolysis.

Larson, James M.; Pham, Phat T.; Frey, Matthew H.; Hamrock, Steven J.; Haugen, Gregory M.; Lamanna, William M.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

137

Fuel cell electrolyte membrane with basic polymer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an electrolyte membrane comprising an acid and a basic polymer, where the acid is a low-volatile acid that is fluorinated and is either oligomeric or non-polymeric, and where the basic polymer is protonated by the acid and is stable to hydrolysis.

Larson, James M. (Saint Paul, MN); Pham, Phat T. (Little Canada, MN); Frey, Matthew H. (Cottage Grove, MN); Hamrock, Steven J. (Stillwater, MN); Haugen, Gregory M. (Edina, MN); Lamanna, William M. (Stillwater, MN)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

138

Matlab-based Optimization Basic Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matlab-based Optimization Basic Capabilities Gene Cliff (AOE/ICAM - ecliff@vt.edu ) 3:00pm - 4:45pm: Interdisciplinary Center for Applied Mathematics 1 / 28 #12;Matlab-based Optimization Introduction & function functions fminbnd fminsearch lsqnonneg fzero 2 / 28 #12;INTRO: Basic Matlab provides several functions

Crawford, T. Daniel

139

St. Louis Sites Fact Sheet RADIATION BASICS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Engineers, FUSRAP Project Office, 8945 Latty Avenue, Berkeley, Missouri 63134 #12;Rad Basics - 081202St. Louis Sites Fact Sheet RADIATION BASICS "Gateway to Excellence" U.S. Army Corps of Engineers St), St. Louis District, is conducting a radiological cleanup program for four Missouri sites (SLDS, SLAPS

US Army Corps of Engineers

140

Patent Information Basics Andrea Twiss-Brooks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Patent Information Basics Andrea Twiss-Brooks Bibliographer for Chemistry, Physics, Geophysical Patent Information Basics What are patents? Where do patents come from? Where will I see patent references? How do I find the full text of a patent? Where to go for more information? #12;11/30/2006Page 3

Ober, Carole

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

PLASMA PROCESSING LABORATORY, DEPT. OF CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING DIAGNOSTICS OF HIGHDIAGNOSTICS OF HIGH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PLASMA PROCESSING LABORATORY, DEPT. OF CHEMICAL AND BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING DIAGNOSTICS for advanced diagnostics techniques Some conventional techniques for measuring basic plasma parameters. Vincent Donnellyand Prof. Vincent Donnelly #12;PLASMA PROCESSING LABORATORY, DEPT. OF CHEMICAL

Economou, Demetre J.

142

CSC418 / CSCD18 / CSC2504 Basic Lighting and Reflection 8 Basic Lighting and Reflection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSC418 / CSCD18 / CSC2504 Basic Lighting and Reflection 8 Basic Lighting and Reflection Up things, on the lighting that illuminates the scene, and on the interaction of light with the objects in the scene. Some of the basic qualitative properties of lighting and object reflectance that we need

Toronto, University of

143

Basic Energy SciencesBasic Energy Sciences DOE/EERE Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic Energy SciencesBasic Energy Sciences DOE/EERE Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting, June 19, 2003 Report on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings inReport on Hydrogen Storage Panel Findings,Basic Research for Hydrogen Production, Storage and UseStorage and Use A follow-on workshop to BESAC

144

ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009 OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT & REGISTRATION INFORMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009ACT Basic Training 05/08/2009 OFFICIAL ANNOUNCEMENT & REGISTRATION INFORMATION ACT Basic Training ­ May 8, 2009 PURPOSE: The ACT Basic Training is designed to help staff who are new to Assertive Community Treatment

Zhou, Yaoqi

145

Electronic properties of 2D and 3D hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites for optoelectronic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electronic properties of 2D and 3D hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites for optoelectronic, optoelectronic properties, photovoltaic, exciton 1. Introduction Over the past decade, Hybrid Organic/inorganic Perovskites (HOP) have attracted increasing interest in the field of optoelectronics (Mitzi et al. 1995

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

146

Identifying Optimal Inorganic Nanomaterials for Hybrid Solar Cells Hongjun Xiang* and Su-Huai Wei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying Optimal Inorganic Nanomaterials for Hybrid Solar Cells Hongjun Xiang* and Su-Huai Wei and Department of Physics, Fudan UniVersity, Shanghai 200433, China ReceiVed: August 17, 2009 As a newly developed photovoltaic technology, organic-inorganic hybrid solar cells have attracted great interest

Gong, Xingao

147

Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon Sequestration Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon SequestrationA is the only active inorganic carbon sequestration system showed low activity of HCO3 ­ uptake and grew under the significance of carbon sequestration in dissipating excess light energy. Keywords: CO2 and HCO3 � uptake -- CO2

Roegner, Matthias

148

5.111 Principles of Chemical Science, Fall 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to chemistry, with emphasis on basic principles of atomic and molecular electronic structure, thermodynamics, acid-base and redox equilibria, chemical kinetics, and catalysis. Introduction to the chemistry of ...

Ceyer, Sylvia Teresse

149

Elucidation of the inorganic chemistry of hydrotreating catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New environmental regulations are making it necessary to developed improved hydrotreating catalysts for the removal of sulfur, nitrogen and aromatics from refinery streams. In order to develop better catalysts, the authors must gain a more detailed understanding of the inorganic chemistry of these catalysts. Commercial catalysts typically contain ca. 15 wt% molybdenum or tungsten oxides and ca. 4 wt% nickel or cobalt. Additives, such as phosphate and fluoride, are often added to improve the catalytic activity. However, the role of these additives is not fully understood. The authors have, therefore, carried out studies on alumina supported phosphate and flouride materials using FT-IR, powder x-ray diffraction, and solid-state NMR ({sup 31}P, {sup 27}Al, and {sup 1}H). The results of this work have enabled the authors to determine the structures of the various compounds formed on the alumina system when fluoride or phosphate is present.

DeCanio, E.C.; Edwards, J.C.; Storm, D.A. [Texaco, Inc., Beacon, NY (United States); Bruno, J.W. [Wesleyan Univ., Middletown, CT (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Inorganic Metal Oxide/Organic Polymer Nanocomposites And Method Thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A synthetic method for preparation of hybrid inorganic/organic energetic nanocomposites is disclosed herein. The method employs the use of stable metal in organic salts and organic solvents as well as an organic polymer with good solubility in the solvent system to produce novel nanocomposite energetic materials. In addition, fuel metal powders (particularly those that are oxophilic) can be incorporated into composition. This material has been characterized by thermal methods, energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), N.sub.2 adsoprtion/desorption methods, and Fourier-Transform (FT-IR) spectroscopy. According to these characterization methods the organic polymer phase fills the nanopores of the material, providing superb mixing of the component phases in the energetic nanocomposite.

Gash, Alexander E. (Livermore, CA); Satcher, Joe H. (Patterson, CA); Simpson, Randy (Livermore, CA)

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

151

Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July-December 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July-December 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications.

Jubin, R.T.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Organic/inorganic nanocomposites, methods of making, and uses as a permeable reactive barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nanocomposite materials having a composition including an inorganic constituent, a preformed organic polymer constituent, and a metal ion sequestration constituent are disclosed. The nanocomposites are characterized by being single phase, substantially homogeneous materials wherein the preformed polymer constituent and the inorganic constituent form an interpenetrating network with each other. The inorganic constituent may be an inorganic oxide, such as silicon dioxide, formed by the in situ catalyzed condensation of an inorganic precursor in the presence of the solvated polymer and metal ion sequestration constituent. The polymer constituent may be any hydrophilic polymer capable of forming a type I nanocomposite such as, polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polyethyleneoxide (PEO), polyethylene glycol (PEG), polyvinyl acetate (PVAc), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and combinations thereof. Nanocomposite materials of the present invention may be used as permeable reactive barriers (PRBs) to remediate contaminated groundwater. Methods for making nanocomposite materials, PRB systems, and methods of treating groundwater are also disclosed.

Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stewart, Frederick F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Limitations on Diversity in Basic Science Departments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE Limitations on Diversity in Basic Science Departments Phoebe S. Leboy 1,2, * and Janice F. Madden 3 It has been over 30 years since the beginning of...

155

Basic Research Needs for Countering Terrorism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To identify connections between technology needs for countering terrorism and underlying science issues and to recommend investment strategies to increase the impact of basic research on efforts to counter terrorism

Stevens, W.; Michalske, T.; Trewhella, J.; Makowski, L.; Swanson, B.; Colson, S.; Hazen, T.; Roberto, F.; David Franz, D.; Resnick, G.; Jacobson, S.; Valdez, J.; Gourley, P.; Tadros, M.; Sigman, M.; Sailor, M.; Ramsey, M.; Smith, B.; Shea, K.; Hrbek, J.; Rodacy, P.; Tevault, D.; Edelstein, N.; Beitz, J.; Burns, C.; Choppin, G.; Clark, S.; Dietz, M.; Rogers, R.; Traina, S.; Baldwin, D.; Thurnauer, M.; Hall, G.; Newman, L.; Miller, D.; Kung, H.; Parkin, D.; Shuh, D.; Shaw, H.; Terminello, L.; Meisel, D.; Blake, D.; Buchanan, M.; Roberto, J.; Colson, S.; Carling, R.; Samara, G.; Sasaki, D.; Pianetta, P.; Faison, B.; Thomassen, D.; Fryberger, T.; Kiernan, G.; Kreisler, M.; Morgan, L.; Hicks, J.; Dehmer, J.; Kerr, L.; Smith, B.; Mays, J.; Clark, S.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Craypat basics Craypat Automatic Performance Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approach Detecting load imbalance Apprentice2 basics XT5 Introduction Workshop - CSCS July 2-3, 2009 Slide CrayPat & Cray Apprentice2 module files module load xt-craypat apprentice2 Build application make clean

157

Chemical Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheck In &Chemical LabelChemical

158

Physical and chemical parameters in wastewater and at the water-sediment interface in sewer network  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physical and chemical parameters in wastewater and at the water- sediment interface in sewer parameters and concentrations of major ions, trace metals and sulphur species in wastewater but also, to the biogeochemical transformation of inorganic and organic compounds present in the wastewater (Ashley et al., 2004

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

159

Hydrogen Selective Inorganic membranes for Gas Separations under High Pressure Intermediate Temperature Hydrocarbonic Envrionment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project, we have successfully developed a full scale commercially ready carbon molecular sieve (CMS) based membrane for applications in H{sub 2} recovery from refinery waste and other aggressive gas streams. Field tests at a refinery pilot plant and a coal gasification facility have successfully demonstrated its ability to recovery hydrogen from hydrotreating and raw syngas respectively. High purity H{sub 2} and excellent stability of the membrane permeance and selectivity were obtained in testing conducted over >500 hours at each site. The results from these field tests as well as laboratory testing conclude that the membranes can be operated at high pressures (up to 1,000 psig) and temperatures (up to 300 C) in presence of aggressive contaminants, such as sulfur and nitrogen containing species (H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, NH{sub 3}, etc), condensable hydrocarbons, tar-like species, heavy metals, etc. with no observable effect on membrane performance. By comparison, similar operating conditions and/or environments would rapidly destroy competing membranes, such as polymeric, palladium, zeolitic, etc. Significant cost savings can be achieved through recovering H{sub 2} from refinery waste gas using this newly developed CMS membrane. Annual savings of $2 to 4MM/year (per 20,000 scfd of waste gas) can be realized by recovering the H{sub 2} for reuse (versus fuel). Projecting these values over the entire US market, potential H{sub 2} savings from refinery waste gases on the order of 750 to 1,000MM scfd and $750 to $1,000MM per year are possible. In addition to the cost savings, potential energy savings are projected to be ca. 150 to 220 tBTU/yr and CO{sub 2} gas emission reductions are projected to be ca. 5,000 to 6,500MMtons/year. The full scale membrane bundle developed as part of this project, i.e., 85 x 30 inch ceramic membrane tubes packaged into a full ceramic potting, is an important accomplishment. No comparable commercial scale product exists in the inorganic membrane field. Further, this newly developed full scale bundle concept can be extended to other thin film inorganic membrane technology (Pd, zeolite, etc), providing a potential commercialization pathway for these membrane materials that demonstrate high potential in a variety of separation applications yet remain a laboratory 'novelty' for lack of a full scale support. Overall, the project has been highly successful and all of the project objectives have been met. We have developed the first of its kind commercial scale carbon molecular sieve membrane and demonstrated its performance in field testing under aggressive operating conditions and in the presence of chemical contaminants that would rapidly destroy alternative organic and inorganic membranes. This innovative membrane permits H{sub 2} recovery from gas streams that up until now have not been successfully treated with membrane or conventional technology. Our end user participant is currently pursuing the field demonstration of this membrane for hydrogen recovery at its refinery site.

Rich Ciora; Paul KT Liu

2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

160

Chemical Occurrences  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Classification of Chemical Occurrence Reports into the following four classes: Occurrences characterized by serious energy release, injury or exposure requiring medical treatment, or severe environmental damage, Occurrences characterized by minor injury or exposure, or reportable environmental release, Occurrences that were near misses including notable safety violations and Minor occurrences.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SUPPORTING CHEMICALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The High Production Volume (HPV) Challenge Program 1 was conceived as a voluntary initiative aimed at developing and making publicly available screening-level health and environmental effects information on chemicals manufactured in or imported into the United States in quantities greater than one million pounds per year. In the Challenge Program, producers and importers of HPV chemicals voluntarily sponsored chemicals; sponsorship entailed the identification and initial assessment of the adequacy of existing toxicity data/information, conducting new testing if adequate data did not exist, and making both new and existing data and information available to the public. Each complete data submission contains data on 18 internationally agreed to “SIDS” (Screening Information Data Set 1,2) endpoints that are screening-level indicators of potential hazards (toxicity) for humans or the environment. The Environmental Protection Agency’s Office of Pollution Prevention and Toxics (OPPT) is evaluating the data submitted in the HPV Challenge Program on approximately 1400 sponsored chemicals by developing hazard characterizations (HCs). These HCs consist of an evaluation of the quality and completeness of the data set provided in the Challenge Program submissions. They are not intended to be definitive statements regarding the possibility of unreasonable risk of

See Section

162

Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The global utilization of nuclear energy has come a long way from its humble beginnings in the first sustained nuclear reaction at the University of Chicago in 1942. Today, there are over 440 nuclear reactors in 31 countries producing approximately 16% of the electrical energy used worldwide. In the United States, 104 nuclear reactors currently provide 19% of electrical energy used nationally. The International Atomic Energy Agency projects significant growth in the utilization of nuclear power over the next several decades due to increasing demand for energy and environmental concerns related to emissions from fossil plants. There are 28 new nuclear plants currently under construction including 10 in China, 8 in India, and 4 in Russia. In the United States, there have been notifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of intentions to apply for combined construction and operating licenses for 27 new units over the next decade. The projected growth in nuclear power has focused increasing attention on issues related to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste, the proliferation of nuclear weapons technologies and materials, and the sustainability of a once-through nuclear fuel cycle. In addition, the effective utilization of nuclear power will require continued improvements in nuclear technology, particularly related to safety and efficiency. In all of these areas, the performance of materials and chemical processes under extreme conditions is a limiting factor. The related basic research challenges represent some of the most demanding tests of our fundamental understanding of materials science and chemistry, and they provide significant opportunities for advancing basic science with broad impacts for nuclear reactor materials, fuels, waste forms, and separations techniques. Of particular importance is the role that new nanoscale characterization and computational tools can play in addressing these challenges. These tools, which include DOE synchrotron X-ray sources, neutron sources, nanoscale science research centers, and supercomputers, offer the opportunity to transform and accelerate the fundamental materials and chemical sciences that underpin technology development for advanced nuclear energy systems. The fundamental challenge is to understand and control chemical and physical phenomena in multi-component systems from femto-seconds to millennia, at temperatures to 1000?C, and for radiation doses to hundreds of displacements per atom (dpa). This is a scientific challenge of enormous proportions, with broad implications in the materials science and chemistry of complex systems. New understanding is required for microstructural evolution and phase stability under relevant chemical and physical conditions, chemistry and structural evolution at interfaces, chemical behavior of actinide and fission-product solutions, and nuclear and thermomechanical phenomena in fuels and waste forms. First-principles approaches are needed to describe f-electron systems, design molecules for separations, and explain materials failure mechanisms. Nanoscale synthesis and characterization methods are needed to understand and design materials and interfaces with radiation, temperature, and corrosion resistance. Dynamical measurements are required to understand fundamental physical and chemical phenomena. New multiscale approaches are needed to integrate this knowledge into accurate models of relevant phenomena and complex systems across multiple length and time scales.

Roberto, J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Gibala, R.; Zinkle, S.; Miller, J.R.; Pimblott, S.; Burns, C.; Raymond, K.; Grimes, R.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Clark, S.; Ewing, R.; Wagner, A.; Yip, S.; Buchanan, M.; Crabtree, G.; Hemminger, J.; Poate, J.; Miller, J.C.; Edelstein, N.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Gruzalski, G.; Michaels, G.; Morss, L.; Peters, M.; Talamini, K.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

DOE Office of Basic Sciences: An Overview of Basic Research Activities...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Publications Basic Energy Sciences Overview Progress from DOE EF RC: Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conversion Center (S3TEC ) Grid Storage and the Energy Frontier...

164

Optical Basicity and Nepheline Crystallization in High Alumina Glasses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to find compositions that increase waste loading of high-alumina wastes beyond what is currently acceptable while avoiding crystallization of nepheline (NaAlSiO4) on slow cooling. Nepheline crystallization has been shown to have a large impact on the chemical durability of high-level waste glasses. It was hypothesized that there would be some composition regions where high-alumina would not result in nepheline crystal production, compositions not currently allowed by the nepheline discriminator. Optical basicity (OB) and the nepheline discriminator (ND) are two ways of describing a given complex glass composition. This report presents the theoretical and experimental basis for these models. They are being studied together in a quadrant system as metrics to explore nepheline crystallization and chemical durability as a function of waste glass composition. These metrics were calculated for glasses with existing data and also for theoretical glasses to explore nepheline formation in Quadrant IV (passes OB metric but fails ND metric), where glasses are presumed to have good chemical durability. Several of these compositions were chosen, and glasses were made to fill poorly represented regions in Quadrant IV. To evaluate nepheline formation and chemical durability of these glasses, quantitative X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and the Product Consistency Test were conducted. A large amount of quantitative XRD data is collected here, both from new glasses and from glasses of previous studies that had not previously performed quantitative XRD on the phase assemblage. Appendix A critically discusses a large dataset to be considered for future quantitative studies on nepheline formation in glass. Appendix B provides a theoretical justification for choice of the oxide coefficients used to compute the OB criterion for nepheline formation.

Rodriguez, Carmen P.; McCloy, John S.; Schweiger, M. J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Winschell, Abigail E.

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Periodic Table as a Part of the Periodic Table of Chemical Compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The numbers of natural chemical elements, minerals, inorganic and organic chemical compounds are determined by 1, 2, 3 and 4-combinations of a set 95 and are respectively equal to 95, 4,465, 138,415 and 3,183,545. To explain these relations it is suggested the concept of information coefficient of proportionality as mathematical generalization of the proportionality coefficient for any set of positive numbers. It is suggested a hypothesis that the unimodal distributions of the sets of information coefficients of proportionality for atomic weights of chemical elements of minerals and chemical compounds correspond to unimodal distributions of the above sets for combination of 2, 3 and 4 atomic weights of 95 natural chemical elements. The expected values of symmetrized distributions of information coefficients of proportionality sets for atomic weights of minerals and chemical compounds are proposed to be used to define chemical compounds, like atomic weights define chemical elements. Variational series of the e...

Labushev, Mikhail M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization using combusted oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory study was conducted at the Western Research Institute to evaluate the ability of combusted oil shale to stabilize organic and inorganic constituents of hazardous wastes. The oil shale used in the research was a western oil shale retorted in an inclined fluidized-bed reactor. Two combustion temperatures were used, 1550{degrees}F and 1620{degrees}F (843{degrees}C and 882{degrees}C). The five wastes selected for experimentation were an API separator sludge, creosote-contaminated soil, mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste, metal-plating sludge, and smelter dust. The API separator sludge and creosote-contaminated soil are US EPA-listed hazardous wastes and contain organic contaminants. The mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste, metal-plating sludge (also an EPA-listed waste), and smelter dust contain high concentrations of heavy metals. The smelter dust and mixed metal oxide/hydroxide waste fail the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) for cadmium, and the metalplating sludge fails the TCLP for chromium. To evaluate the ability of the combusted oil shales to stabilize the hazardous wastes, mixtures involving varying amounts of each of the shales with each of the hazardous wastes were prepared, allowed to equilibrate, and then leached with deionized, distilled water. The leachates were analyzed for the hazardous constituent(s) of interest.

Sorini, S.S.; Lane, D.C.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Basic Solar Energy Research in Japan (2011 EFRC Forum)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Kazunari Domen, Chemical System Engineering Professor at the University of Tokyo, was the second speaker in the May 26, 2011 EFRC Forum session, "Global Perspectives on Frontiers in Energy Research." In his presentation, Professor Domen talked about basic solar energy research in Japan. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

Domen, Kazunari (University of Tokyo)

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

168

Macdonald Polynomials and Multivariable Basic Hypergeometric Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study Macdonald polynomials from a basic hypergeometric series point of view. In particular, we show that the Pieri formula for Macdonald polynomials and its recently discovered inverse, a recursion formula for Macdonald polynomials, both represent multivariable extensions of the terminating very-well-poised 6-phi-5 summation formula. We derive several new related identities including multivariate extensions of Jackson's very-well-poised 8-phi-7 summation. Motivated by our basic hypergeometric analysis, we propose an extension of Macdonald polynomials to Macdonald symmetric functions indexed by partitions with complex parts. These appear to possess nice properties.

Michael J. Schlosser

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel Cell Vehicle Basics Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 -

170

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWayElectricity Fuel Basics toWithHybrid ElectricBasics to

171

Basic Energy SciencesBasic Energy Sciences DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Hydrogen Production, Storage and UseProduction, Storage and Use Walter J. StevensWalter J. Stevens Director" #12;Basic Energy SciencesBasic Energy Sciences Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage, and UseWorkshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Use DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Coordination Meeting 6/2/2003 Workshop

172

Importance of spin-orbit coupling in hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites for photovoltaic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Importance of spin-orbit coupling in hybrid organic/inorganic perovskites for photovoltaic, optoelectronics, titanateoxyde, density functional theory Photovoltaic (PV) solar electricity is one of the key

Boyer, Edmond

173

First principles study of structure and lithium storage in inorganic nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The exact structure of layered inorganic nanotubes is difficult to determine, but this information is vital to using atomistic calculations to predict nanotube properties. A multi-walled nanotube with a circular cross ...

Tibbetts, Kevin (Kevin Joseph)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

FRED E. WOOD University of California, Davis, Ph.D., Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry, 1984  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FRED E. WOOD EDUCATION University of California, Davis, Ph.D., Inorganic and Bioinorganic Chemistry scholarship and $1 million for endowed reentry student scholarships. #12;FRED E. WOOD Page 2 Obtained over

Amin, S. Massoud

175

Salmon Carcasses Increase Stream Productivity More than Inorganic Fertilizer Pellets: A Test on Multiple Trophic Levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salmon Carcasses Increase Stream Productivity More than Inorganic Fertilizer Pellets: A Test experiment, we examined the short-term (6 weeks) comparative effects of artificial nutrient pellets pellet treatment was soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentration. Ammonium-nitrogen concentration

Wagner, Diane

176

Fundamental Studies on Polymer and Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Nanoparticles Reinforced Silica Aerogels.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this research was to reinforce silica aerogels using functional organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles, silane end-capped polyurethane oligomer and chain extended polymer, and self-crosslinkable… (more)

Duan, Yannan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Organic-inorganic nanocomposite membranes from highly ordered mesoporous thin films for solubility-based separations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties. In this study, we synthesized the organic-inorganic nanocomposite membranes by decorating the surfaces of commercially available mesoporous alumina substrates, and surfactant-templated highly ordered mesoporous silicate thin films placed...

Yoo, Suk Joon

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

Removal of inorganic trace contaminants by electrodialysis in a remote Australian community   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water provision for developing countries is a critical issue as a vast number of lives are lost annually due to lack of access to safe drinking water. The presence and fate of inorganic trace contaminants is of particular ...

Banasiak, Laura J.; Schäfer, Andrea

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Inorganic Chemistry, "01. 13,No. 7, 1974 exchange resin using acetonitrile as eluent. The acetonitrile was  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inorganic Chemistry, "01. 13,No. 7, 1974 exchange resin using acetonitrile as eluent. The acetonitrile was removed in vacuo and the residue sublimed at 40-45" to obtain 0.764 g (4.3 5% yield, mp 145

Bodner, George M.

180

'Grand Challenge' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

'Grand Challenge' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage Solicitation 'Grand Challenge' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage Solicitation DOE is issuing a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis &...

182

Electricity Grid Basics Webinar Presentation Slides and Text...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electricity Grid Basics Webinar Presentation Slides and Text Version Electricity Grid Basics Webinar Presentation Slides and Text Version Download presentation slides and a text...

183

Advanced Technology and Alternative Fuel Vehicle Basics | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Vehicles & Fuels Advanced Technology and Alternative Fuel Vehicle Basics Advanced Technology and Alternative Fuel Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:00am Addthis Photo of a...

184

Energy Saving Performance Contracting (ESPC) Basics (Text Version...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Saving Performance Contracting (ESPC) Basics (Text Version) Energy Saving Performance Contracting (ESPC) Basics (Text Version) Chani Vines: Hello. We'll be starting in five...

185

applying basic science: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

basic and applied domains (physics and meteorology). We Zhao, Yuxiao 2 189188 Master of Science in Informatics, Major in Applied Informatics 189 Basic Courses (30 ECTS)...

186

Chemical Management  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuels Chemical Kinetic Modeling of1 DOEKinetics

187

Exfoliation of self-assembled 2D organic-inorganic perovskite semiconductors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exfoliation of self-assembled 2D organic-inorganic perovskite semiconductors Wendy Niu,1,a) Anna-inorganic perovskite (C6H9C2H4NH3)2PbI4 are produced using micromechanical exfoliation. Mono- and few-layer areas microme- chanical exfoliation of 2D PbI perovskites and explore the few-layer behaviour of such systems

Steiner, Ullrich

188

Sam Madden Basically Everyone Except My Bank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sam Madden Physicists Biologists Basically Everyone Except My Bank #12;· Benefit(DBMS) DBMS? · DBMS setup & boundary crossings painful ­ Especially if you have to do it multiple times! MATLAB a fleet of 40 cabs on Boston streets · Pipeline ­ Raw data in DBMS ­ Trajectories with Matlab ­ Queries

O'Brien, James F.

189

Basic Considerations on Business Process Quality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

various #12;forms, which are often subsumed under the term Total Quality Management (TQM), can be foundBasic Considerations on Business Process Quality Matthias Lohrmann1,2 and Manfred Reichert1 1 WirtschaftsprĂĽfungsgesellschaft, Berlin, Germany mlohrmann@kpmg.com, manfred.reichert@uni-ulm.de Abstract. Quality management

Ulm, Universität

190

GOALS FOR BASIC RESEARCH IN CONSTRUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 GOALS FOR BASIC RESEARCH IN CONSTRUCTION A Report on a Workshop Sponsored by THE STANFORD CONSTRUCTION INSTITUTE and Funded by THE NATIONAL SCIENCE FQUNDATION Grant ENG 74-23lll Boyd C, Paulson, Jr, construction will be challenged by increasingly difficult and complex problems in both engineering

Tommelein, Iris D.

191

Line geometry and electromagnetism I: basic structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some key notions of line geometry are recalled, along with their application to mechanics. It is then shown that most of the basic structures that one introduces in the pre-metric formulation of electromagnetism can be interpreted directly in terms of corresponding concepts in line geometry. The results are summarized in a table.

D. H. Delphenich

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

192

Molecular Biology Basics Planning Restriction Enzyme Digests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular Biology Basics Planning Restriction Enzyme Digests A. Checklist: Buffer type Addition of BSA Optimum temperature Number of units of enzyme B. Plan to digest DNA with an "excess" of enzyme activity. Plan for the "excess" to be divided between time of digestion and number of units of enzyme

Aris, John P.

193

Health Promotion: An Overview ! Basic philosophy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Health Promotion: An Overview ! Basic philosophy ! Good health = individual and collective goal cancer, diabetes, stroke 50% #12;qActual Causes of Death in the U.S. Smoking triples the risk of CAD time ! Mortality ! number of DEATHS due to a particular cause #12;Epidemiology ! Risk factors

Meagher, Mary

194

Climate Change Basics: Science, Adaptation, & Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science Global atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide have increased from ice cores spanning many thousands of years. The global increases in carbon dioxide concentrationClimate Change Basics: Science, Adaptation, & Mitigation with a Family Forest Perspective Baylor

Fox-Kemper, Baylor

195

Fouling of ceramic filters and thin-film composite reverse osmosis membranes by inorganic and bacteriological constituents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two significant problems have been identified during the first three years of operating the Savannah River Site Effluent Treatment Facility. These problems encompass two of the facility`s major processing areas: the microfiltration and reverse osmosis steps. The microfilters (crossflow ceramic filters {minus}0.2{mu} nominal pore size) have been prone to pluggage problems. The presence of bacteria and bacteria byproducts in the microfilter feed, along with small quantities of colloidal iron, silica, and aluminum, results in a filter foulant that rapidly deteriorates filter performance and is difficult to remove by chemical cleaning. Processing rates through the filters have dropped from the design flow rate of 300 gpm after cleaning to 60 gpm within minutes. The combination of bacteria (from internal sources) and low concentrations of inorganic species resulted in substantial reductions in the reverse osmosis system performance. The salt rejection has been found to decrease from 99+% to 97%, along with a 50% loss in throughput, within a few hours of cleaning. Experimental work has led to implementation of several changes to plant operation and to planned upgrades of existing equipment. It has been shown that biological control in the influent is necessary to achieve design flowrates. Experiments have also shown that the filter performance can be optimized by the use of efficient filter backpulsing and the addition of aluminum nitrate (15 to 30 mg/L Al{sup 3+}) to the filter feed. The aluminum nitrate assists by controlling adsorption of colloidal inorganic precipitates and biological contaminants. In addition, improved cleaning procedures have been identified for the reverse osmosis units. This paper provides a summary of the plant problems and the experimental work that has been completed to understand and correct these problems.

Siler, J.L.; Poirier, M.R.; McCabe, D.J.; Hazen, T.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Fouling of ceramic filters and thin-film composite reverse osmosis membranes by inorganic and bacteriological constituents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two significant problems have been identified during the first three years of operating the Savannah River Site Effluent Treatment Facility. These problems encompass two of the facility's major processing areas: the microfiltration and reverse osmosis steps. The microfilters (crossflow ceramic filters {minus}0.2{mu} nominal pore size) have been prone to pluggage problems. The presence of bacteria and bacteria byproducts in the microfilter feed, along with small quantities of colloidal iron, silica, and aluminum, results in a filter foulant that rapidly deteriorates filter performance and is difficult to remove by chemical cleaning. Processing rates through the filters have dropped from the design flow rate of 300 gpm after cleaning to 60 gpm within minutes. The combination of bacteria (from internal sources) and low concentrations of inorganic species resulted in substantial reductions in the reverse osmosis system performance. The salt rejection has been found to decrease from 99+% to 97%, along with a 50% loss in throughput, within a few hours of cleaning. Experimental work has led to implementation of several changes to plant operation and to planned upgrades of existing equipment. It has been shown that biological control in the influent is necessary to achieve design flowrates. Experiments have also shown that the filter performance can be optimized by the use of efficient filter backpulsing and the addition of aluminum nitrate (15 to 30 mg/L Al{sup 3+}) to the filter feed. The aluminum nitrate assists by controlling adsorption of colloidal inorganic precipitates and biological contaminants. In addition, improved cleaning procedures have been identified for the reverse osmosis units. This paper provides a summary of the plant problems and the experimental work that has been completed to understand and correct these problems.

Siler, J.L.; Poirier, M.R.; McCabe, D.J.; Hazen, T.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Dialkylenecarbonate-Bridged Polysilsesquioxanes. Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Sol-Gels with a Thermally Labile Bridging Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce a new approach for altering the properties of bridged polysilsesquioxane xerogels using post-processing mobilization of the polymeric network. The bridging organic group contains latent functionalities that can be liberated thermally, photochemically, or by chemical means after the gel has been processed to a xerogel. These modifications can produce changes in density, volubility, porosity, and or chemical properties of the material. Since every monomer possesses two latent functional groups, the technique allows for the introduction of high levels of functionality in hybrid organic-inorganic materials. Dialkylenecarbonate-bridged polysilsesquioxane gels were prepared by the sol-gel polymerization of bis(triethoxysilylpropyl)carbonate (1) and bis(triethoxysilylisobutyl)-carbonate (2). Thermal treatment of the resulting non-porous xerogels and aerogels at 300-350 C resulted in quantitative decarboxylation of the dialkylenecarbonate bridging groups to give new hydroxyalkyl and olefinic substituted polysilsesquioxane monolithic xerogels and aerogels that can not be directly prepared through direct sol-gel polymerization of organotrialkoxysilanes.

Assink, Roger A.; Baugher, Brigitta M.; Beach, James V.; Loy, Douglas A.; Shea, Kenneth J.; Small, James H.; Tran, Joseph

1999-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

198

Reactions of inorganic nitrogen species in supercritical water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Redox reactions of nitrate salts with NH3 and methanol were studied in near-critical and supercritical water at 350 to 530 C and constant pressure of 302 bar. Sodium nitrate decomposition reactions were investigated at similar conditions. Reactions were conducted in isothermal tubular reactor under plug flow. For kinetic modeling, nitrate and nitrite reactants were lumped into an NO{sub x}{sup -} reactant; kinetic expressions were developed for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X and sodium nitrate decomposition reactions. The proposed elementary reaction mechanism for MNO{sub 3}/NH{sub 4}X reaction indicated that NO{sub 2} was the primary oxidizing species and that N{sub 2}/N{sub 2}O selectivities could be determined by the form of MNO{sub 3} used. This suggest a nitrogen control strategy for use in SCWO (supercritical water oxidation) processes; nitrate or NH3 could be used to remove the other, at reaction conditions far less severe than required by other methods. Reactions of nitrate with methanol indicated that nitrate was a better oxidant than oxygen in supercritical water. Nitrogen reaction products included NH3 and nitrite, while inorganic carbon was the major carbon reaction product. Analysis of excess experiments indicated that the reaction at 475 C was first order in methanol concentration and second order in NO{sub x}{sup -} concentration. In order to determine phase regimes for these reactions, solubility of sodium nitrate was determined for some 1:1 nitrate electrolytes. Solubilities were measured at 450 to 525 C, from 248 to 302 bar. A semi-empirical solvation model was shown to adequately describe the experimental sodium nitrate solubilities. Solubilities of Li, Na, and K nitrates revealed with cations with smaller ionic radii had greater solubilities with nitrate.

Dell`Orco, P.C. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)] [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

DOE Office of Science Funded Basic Research at NREL that Impacts Photovoltaic Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, supports a number of basic research projects in materials, chemicals, and biosciences at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that impact several renewable energy technologies, including photovoltaics (PV). The goal of the Material Sciences projects is to study the structural, optical, electrical, and defect properties of semiconductors and related materials using state-of-the-art experimental and theoretical techniques. Specific projects involving PV include: ordering in III-V semiconductors, isoelectronic co-doping, doping bottlenecks in semiconductors, solid-state theory, and computational science. The goal of the Chemical Sciences projects is to advance the fundamental understanding of the relevant science involving materials, photochemistry, photoelectrochemistry, nanoscale chemistry, and catalysis that support solar photochemical conversion technologies. Specific projects relating to PV include: dye-sensitized TiO2 solar cells, semiconductor nanostructures, and molecular semiconductors. This presentation will give an overview of some of the major accomplishments of these projects.

Deb, S. K.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Department of Basic Sciences Philadelphia University Module Syllabus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Basic Sciences ­ Philadelphia University Module Syllabus: Course Title: Computational

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING AND MANUFACTURING CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Objective Chemical Engineers manufacturing, etc. Now that students have a background on Chemical Engineers, it is time for the activity. Blue frosting e. Green frosting f. Pink frosting g. Purple frosting h. Sprinkle sorting i. Sprinkle

Provancher, William

202

1. BASICS 1 1 Lattices 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contents Preface ix 1. BASICS 1 1 Lattices 1 1.1 Determinant 6 1.2 Successive minima 7 1.3 Minkowski's theorems 11 2 Computational problems 14 2.1 Complexity Theory 15 2.2 Some lattice problems 17 2.3 Hardness of approximation 19 3 Notes 21 2. APPROXIMATION ALGORITHMS 23 1 Solving SVP in dimension 2 24 1.1

Micciancio, Daniele

203

Evaporative Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTanklessDOJExamination Laboratory -Evaporative Cooling Basics

204

Interactive toxicity of inorganic mercury and trichloroethylene in rat and human proximal tubules: Effects on apoptosis, necrosis, and glutathione status  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simultaneous or prior exposure to one chemical may alter the concurrent or subsequent response to another chemical, often in unexpected ways. This is particularly true when the two chemicals share common mechanisms of action. The present study uses the paradigm of prior exposure to study the interactive toxicity between inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) and trichloroethylene (TRI) or its metabolite S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC) in rat and human proximal tubule. Pretreatment of rats with a subtoxic dose of Hg{sup 2+} increased expression of glutathione S-transferase-{alpha}1 (GST{alpha}1) but decreased expression of GST{alpha}2, increased activities of several GSH-dependent enzymes, and increased GSH conjugation of TRI. Primary cultures of rat proximal tubular (rPT) cells exhibited both necrosis and apoptosis after incubation with Hg{sup 2+}. Pretreatment of human proximal tubular (hPT) cells with Hg{sup 2+} caused little or no changes in GST expression or activities of GSH-dependent enzymes, decreased apoptosis induced by TRI or DCVC, but increased necrosis induced by DCVC. In contrast, pretreatment of hPT cells with TRI or DCVC protected from Hg{sup 2+} by decreasing necrosis and increasing apoptosis. Thus, whereas pretreatment of hPT cells with Hg{sup 2+} exacerbated cellular injury due to TRI or DCVC by shifting the response from apoptosis to necrosis, pretreatment of hPT cells with either TRI or DCVC protected from Hg{sup 2+}-induced cytotoxicity by shifting the response from necrosis to apoptosis. These results demonstrate that by altering processes related to GSH status, susceptibilities of rPT and hPT cells to acute injury from Hg{sup 2+}, TRI, or DCVC are markedly altered by prior exposures.

Lash, Lawrence H. [Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 East Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)]. E-mail: l.h.lash@wayne.edu; Putt, David A. [Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 East Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Hueni, Sarah E. [Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 East Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Payton, Scott G. [Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 East Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Zwickl, Joshua [Department of Pharmacology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, 540 East Canfield Avenue, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Conceptual design report, CEBAF basic experimental equipment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) will be dedicated to basic research in Nuclear Physics using electrons and photons as projectiles. The accelerator configuration allows three nearly continuous beams to be delivered simultaneously in three experimental halls, which will be equipped with complementary sets of instruments: Hall A--two high resolution magnetic spectrometers; Hall B--a large acceptance magnetic spectrometer; Hall C--a high-momentum, moderate resolution, magnetic spectrometer and a variety of more dedicated instruments. This report contains a short description of the initial complement of experimental equipment to be installed in each of the three halls.

NONE

1990-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

206

Furnace and Boiler Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel Cell Vehicle Basics Fuel CellStandardsMotors |EnergyFurnace and

207

Geothermal Electricity Production Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel Cell Vehicle BasicsWashersEnergyGeospatialElectricity

208

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2perSep-14Base22,667The Basics of

209

Biodiesel Fuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsBSCmemo.pdf BSCmemo.pdf BSCmemo.pdfBetter BuildingsBetterBiodiesel Fuel Basics

210

Photovoltaic System Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652GrowE-mail onThe MirrorSystem Basics Photovoltaic

211

Vehicle Emission Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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212

Geothermal Heat Pump Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning FunNeuTel2011 Venezia,Lab GeorgeBiomassBasics

213

Basic Energy Sciences (BES) at LLNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch HighlightsToolsBES ReportsExperimentBasic Energy Sciences at

214

Basic Plasma Science | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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215

NREL: Learning - Concentrating Solar Power Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and Achievements ofLizResults InterpretingBiofuels Basics

216

NREL: Learning - Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and Achievements ofLizResults InterpretingBiofuels BasicsFuel Cell

217

NREL: Learning - Geothermal Electricity Production Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and Achievements ofLizResults InterpretingBiofuels BasicsFuel

218

NREL: Learning - Geothermal Heat Pump Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions and Achievements ofLizResults InterpretingBiofuels BasicsFuelHeat

219

Basic Energy Sciences Overview | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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220

Basic Instructor Training | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAreSmartWay TransportEthanolAll-Electric Vehicles toasFuel Basics

222

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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223

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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224

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Basics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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225

Sandia National Laboratories: Basic Energy Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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226

The retention time of inorganic mercury in the brain — A systematic review of the evidence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reports from human case studies indicate a half-life for inorganic mercury in the brain in the order of years—contradicting older radioisotope studies that estimated half-lives in the order of weeks to months in duration. This study systematically reviews available evidence on the retention time of inorganic mercury in humans and primates to better understand this conflicting evidence. A broad search strategy was used to capture 16,539 abstracts on the Pubmed database. Abstracts were screened to include only study types containing relevant information. 131 studies of interest were identified. Only 1 primate study made a numeric estimate for the half-life of inorganic mercury (227–540 days). Eighteen human mercury poisoning cases were followed up long term including autopsy. Brain inorganic mercury concentrations at death were consistent with a half-life of several years or longer. 5 radionucleotide studies were found, one of which estimated head half-life (21 days). This estimate has sometimes been misinterpreted to be equivalent to brain half-life—which ignores several confounding factors including limited radioactive half-life and radioactive decay from surrounding tissues including circulating blood. No autopsy cohort study estimated a half-life for inorganic mercury, although some noted bioaccumulation of brain mercury with age. Modelling studies provided some extreme estimates (69 days vs 22 years). Estimates from modelling studies appear sensitive to model assumptions, however predications based on a long half-life (27.4 years) are consistent with autopsy findings. In summary, shorter estimates of half-life are not supported by evidence from animal studies, human case studies, or modelling studies based on appropriate assumptions. Evidence from such studies point to a half-life of inorganic mercury in human brains of several years to several decades. This finding carries important implications for pharmcokinetic modelling of mercury and potentially for the regulatory toxicology of mercury.

Rooney, James P.K., E-mail: jrooney@rcsi.ie

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Fermentation and chemical treatment of pulp and paper mill sludge  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of chemically treating partially de-ashed pulp and/or paper mill sludge to obtain products of value comprising taking a sample of primary sludge from a Kraft paper mill process, partially de-ashing the primary sludge by physical means, and further treating the primary sludge to obtain the products of value, including further treating the resulting sludge and using the resulting sludge as a substrate to produce cellulase in an efficient manner using the resulting sludge as the only carbon source and mixtures of inorganic salts as the primary nitrogen source, and including further treating the resulting sludge and using the resulting sludge to produce ethanol.

Lee, Yoon Y; Wang, Wei; Kang, Li

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

228

Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

Lee, Chung-cheng (Irvine, CA); Sui, Guodong (Los Angeles, CA); Elizarov, Arkadij (Valley Village, CA); Kolb, Hartmuth C. (Playa del Rey, CA); Huang, Jiang (San Jose, CA); Heath, James R. (South Pasadena, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Los Angeles, CA); Quake, Stephen R. (Stanford, CA); Tseng, Hsian-rong (Los Angeles, CA); Wyatt, Paul (Tipperary, IE); Daridon, Antoine (Mont-Sur-Rolle, CH)

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

229

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Combining theory and neutron scattering to understand molecular diffusion in porous materials David Sholl School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Georgia Institute of Technology #12;Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Porous materials www

Pennycook, Steve

230

adult basic education: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ranging from the design of sorting. In this survey we review basic facts regarding expander graphs that are most relevant to the theory Goldreich, Oded 312 PHD BASIC SEMINAR...

231

Assessment of basic research needs for greenhouse gas control technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is an outgrowth of an effort undertaken by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research to assess the fundamental research needs to support a national program in carbon management. Five topics were identified as areas where carbon management strategies and technologies might be developed: (1) capture of carbon dioxide, decarbonization strategies, and carbon dioxide disposal and utilization; (2) hydrogen development and fuel cells; (3) enhancement of the natural carbon cycle; (4) biomass production and utilization; and (5) improvement of the efficiency of energy production, conversion, and utilization. Within each of these general areas, experts came together to identify targets of opportunity for fundamental research likely to lead to the development of mid- to long-term solutions for stabilizing or decreasing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Basic research to support the options outlined above are far reaching-from understanding natural global processes such as the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles to development of new materials and concepts for chemical separation. Examples of fundamental research needs are described in this paper.

Benson, S.M.; Chandler, W.; Edmonds, J.; Houghton, J.; Levine, M.; Bates, L.; Chum, H.; Dooley, J.; Grether, D.; Logan, J.; Wiltsee, G.; Wright, L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Basic studies of 3-5 high efficiency cell components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project's objective is to improve our understanding of the generation, recombination, and transport of carriers within III-V homo- and heterostructures. The research itself consists of fabricating and characterizing solar cell building blocks'' such as junctions and heterojunctions as well as basic measurements of material parameters. A significant effort is also being directed at characterizing loss mechanisms in high-quality, III-V solar cells fabricated in industrial research laboratories throughout the United States. The project's goal is to use our understanding of the device physics of high-efficiency cell components to maximize cell efficiency. A related goal is the demonstration of new cell structures fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The development of measurement techniques and characterization methodologies is also a project objective. This report describes our progress during the fifth and final year of the project. During the past five years, we've teamed a great deal about heavy doping effects in p[sup +] and n[sup +] GaAs and have explored their implications for solar cells. We have developed an understanding of the dominant recombination losses in present-day, high-efficiency cells. We've learned to appreciated the importance of recombination at the perimeter of the cell and have developed techniques for chemically passivating such edges. Finally, we've demonstrated that films grown by molecular beam epitaxy are suitable for high-efficiency cell research.

Lundstrom, M.S.; Melloch, M.R.; Pierret, R.F.; Carpenter, M.S.; Chuang, H.L.; Dodd, P.E.; Keshavarzi, A.; Klausmeier-Brown, M.E.; Lush, G.B.; Stellwag, T.B. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Quarterly Progress Report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January-March 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January-March 1998. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies.

Jubin, R.T.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

chemical analysis | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemical analysis chemical analysis Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

235

Net-Baryon Physics: Basic Mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well known that, in nuclear collisions, a sizable fraction of the available energy is carried away by baryons. As the baryon number is conserved, the net-baryon $B-\\bar{B}$ retains information on the energy-momentum carried by the incoming nuclei. A simple but consistent model for net-baryon production in high energy hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions is presented. The basic ingredients of the model are valence string formation based on standard PDFs with QCD evolution and string fragmentation via the Schwinger mechanism. The results of the model are presented and compared with both data and existing models. These results show that a good description of the main features of net-baryon data is possible on the framework of a simplistic model, with the advantage of making the fundamental production mechanisms manifest.

J. Alvarez-Muniz; R. Conceicao; J. Dias de Deus; M. C. Espirito Santo; J. G. Milhano; M. Pimenta

2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

236

Basic mechanisms for the new millennium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This part of the Short Course will review the basic mechanisms for radiation effects in semiconductor devices. All three areas of radiation damage will be considered -- total dose, displacement effects, and single event effects. Each of these areas will be discussed in turn. First an overview and background will be provided on the historical understanding of the damage mechanism. Then there will be a discussion of recent enhancements to the understanding of those mechanisms and an up-to-date picture provided of the current state of knowledge. Next the potential impact of each of these damage mechanisms on devices in emerging technologies and how the mechanisms may be used to understand device performance will be described, with an emphasis on those likely to be of importance in the new millennium. Finally some additional thoughts will be presented on how device scaling expected into the next century may impact radiation hardness.

Dressendorfer, P.V.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Basics of Low-temperature Refrigeration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This chapter gives an overview of the principles of low temperature refrigeration and the thermodynamics behind it. Basic cryogenic processes - Joule-Thomoson process, Brayton process as well as Claude process - are described and compared. A typical helium laboratory refrigerator based on Claude process is used as a typical example of a low-temperature refrigeration system. A description of the hardware components for helium liquefaction is an important part of this paper, because the design of the main hardware components (compressors, turbines, heat exchangers, pumps, adsorbers, etc.) provides the input for cost calculation, as well as enables to estimate the reliability of the plant and the maintenance expenses. All these numbers are necessary to calculate the economics of a low temperature application.

Alekseev, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Basic Sciences Branch annual report, FY 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL's in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Solid-State Spectroscopy. Each section of the report was written by the group leader principally in charge of the work. The task in each case was to explain the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Basic Sciences Branch annual report, FY 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL`s in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Solid-State Spectroscopy. Each section of the report was written by the group leader principally in charge of the work. The task in each case was to explain the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy`s National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Actual energy implementations and basic investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The actual implementations in guaranteeing the reliability of NDE systems applied in service inspections in nuclear power plants will be presented. The difference between the American PDI (Performance Demonstration Initiative) which is based on blind trials and the European ENIQ (European Network for Inspection Qualification) approach which is based on a mixed procedure of physical modeling, experience data and test experiments will be discussed. The ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) has been adapted from the signal detection theory to NDE problems at BAM to be used for basic investigations and for the validation of new exceptional NDE systems where modeling and reference to standards is not yet possible. Examples of application will be shown and critical discussed especially concerning the influence of the grading unit raster.

Nockemann, C.; Wuestenberg, H. [BAM, Berlin (Germany). Federal Inst. of Materials Research and Testing

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mirror Symmetry in Physics: The Basics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

These notes are aimed at mathematicians working on topics related to mirror symmetry, but are unfamiliar with the physical origins of this subject. We explain the physical concepts that enable this surprising duality to exist, using the torus as an illustrative example. Then, we develop the basic foundations of conformal field theory so that we can explain how mirror symmetry was first discovered in that context. Along the way we will uncover a deep connection between conformal field theories with (2,2) supersymmetry and Calabi-Yau manifolds. (Based on lectures given during the "Thematic Program on Calabi-Yau Varieties: Arithmetic, Geometry and Physics" at the Fields Institute in Toronto, October 10-11, 2013.)

Callum Quigley

2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

242

Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Basic Ground-Water Hydrology By RALPH C. HEATH Prepared in cooperation with the North Carolina., 1983, Basic ground-water hydrology: U .S. Geological Survey Water-Supply Paper 2220, 86 p. Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publications Data Heath, Ralph C . Basic ground-water hydrology (Geological Survey

Sohoni, Milind

243

Development of hybrid organic-inorganic light emitting diodes using conducting polymers deposited by oxidative chemical vapor deposition process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Difficulties with traditional methods of synthesis and film formation for conducting polymers, many of which are insoluble, motivate the development of CVD methods. Indeed, conjugated polymers with rigid linear backbones ...

Chelawat, Hitesh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Removal of organic and inorganic sulfur from Ohio coal by combined physical and chemical process. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project consisted of three sections. In the first part, the physical cleaning of Ohio coal by selective flocculation of ultrafine slurry was considered. In the second part, the mild oxidation process for removal of pyritic and organic sulfur.was investigated. Finally, in-the third part, the combined effects of these processes were studied. The physical cleaning and desulfurization of Ohio coal was achieved using selective flocculation of ultrafine coal slurry in conjunction with froth flotation as flocs separation method. The finely disseminated pyrite particles in Ohio coals, in particular Pittsburgh No.8 seam, make it necessary to use ultrafine ({minus}500 mesh) grinding to liberate the pyrite particles. Experiments were performed to identify the ``optimum`` operating conditions for selective flocculation process. The results indicated that the use of a totally hydrophobic flocculant (FR-7A) yielded the lowest levels of mineral matters and total sulfur contents. The use of a selective dispersant (PAAX) increased the rejection of pyritic sulfur further. In addition, different methods of floc separation techniques were tested. It was found that froth flotation system was the most efficient method for separation of small coal flocs.

Attia, Y.A.; Zeky, M.El.; Lei, W.W.; Bavarian, F.; Yu, S. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1989-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

Glossary of terms Basic feasible solutions: A basic solution which is nonnegative.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is made). For example, suppose that a gasoline is made by blending two types of crude oil, type A and type, then the leaving variable is the basic variable chosen is the one with the smallest index. Blending constraint: For a product made from a "blend" of different items, a constraint such that the percentage of one or more

Phillips, David

246

Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know …).

INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

Valerie L. Putman

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Multi-layered, chemically bonded lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disclosed are multilayer, porous, thin-layered lithium-ion batteries that include an inorganic separator as a thin layer that is chemically bonded to surfaces of positive and negative electrode layers. Thus, in such disclosed lithium-ion batteries, the electrodes and separator are made to form non-discrete (i.e., integral) thin layers. Also disclosed are methods of fabricating integrally connected, thin, multilayer lithium batteries including lithium-ion and lithium/air batteries.

Narula, Chaitanya Kumar; Nanda, Jagjit; Bischoff, Brian L; Bhave, Ramesh R

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

248

materials analysis of inorganic, organic, and bioma-terials. See ELECTRON MICROSCOPE.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

28 Plaster materials analysis of inorganic, organic, and bioma- terials. See ELECTRON MICROSCOPE: The next chip-scale technology, Mater. Today, 9:20­27, 2006. Plaster A plastic mixture of solids and water plaster is also used in the industry to designate plaster of paris. Plaster is usually applied in one

Anderson, Peter M.

249

Polygonal model for layered inorganic nanotubes Kevin Tibbetts,* Robert Doe, and Gerbrand Ceder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the shape of the cross section. Circular and polygonal nanotubes are compared based on their strain energy of several concentric "single-walled" nanotubes.2,19,20 In this paper we develop a model for the energyPolygonal model for layered inorganic nanotubes Kevin Tibbetts,* Robert Doe, and Gerbrand Ceder

Ceder, Gerbrand

250

Binary inorganic salt mixtures as high conductivity liquid electrolytes for .100 uC fuel cells{  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Binary inorganic salt mixtures as high conductivity liquid electrolytes for .100 uC fuel cells cations (e.g. ammonium) as electrolytes in fuel cells operating in the temperature range 100­200 uC, where cell operating with optimized electrodes in the same temperature range, while open circuit voltages

Angell, C. Austen

251

Inorganic Surface Nanostructuring by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Induced Graft Polymerization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inorganic Surface Nanostructuring by Atmospheric Pressure Plasma-Induced Graft PolymerizationVed February 27, 2007. In Final Form: May 29, 2007 Surface graft polymerization of 1-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone onto by graft polymerization in both N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and in an NMP/water solvent mixture

Hicks, Robert F.

252

INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE-SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INORGANIC NANOPARTICLES AS PHASE-CHANGE MATERIALS FOR LARGE- SCALE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE Miroslaw storage performance. The expected immediate outcome of this effort is the demonstration of high-energy generation at high efficiency could revolutionize the development of solar energy. Nanoparticle-based phase

Pennycook, Steve

253

Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Karsten Meyer Chair of Inorganic and General Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Uranium Coordination Chemistry Structure & Bonding 2008, 127, 119 ­ 176. C. Hauser and K. Meyer Uranchemie-Atom Transfer Chemistry Mediated by a Nucleophilic Uranium(V) Imido Complex Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2006, 45, 1757Prof. Dr. rer. nat. Karsten Meyer Chair of Inorganic and General Chemistry Department of Chemistry

Meyer, Karsten

254

Application of inorganic-contaminated groundwater to surface soils and compliance with toxicity characteristic (TCLP) regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is currently implementing a Purged Water Management Program (PWMP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. A variety of constituents and disposal strategies are being considered. Constituents investigated in the PWMP include radionuclides, organics, and inorganics (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Se, and Ag). One practical disposal alternative is to discharge purged water (all constituents below regulatory levels) to the ground surface near the monitoring well that is being purged. The purpose of this investigation is to determine if long-term application of purged water that contains inorganic constituents (below regulatory levels) to surface soils will result in the accumulation of inorganics such that the soil becomes a hazardous waste according to the Toxicity Characteristic regulations (40 CFR Part 261.24). Two study soils were selected that encompass the range of soils found at the SRS: Lakeland and Orangeburg. Laboratory batch equilibrium studies indicate that the soils, although able to retain a large amount of inorganics, will not exceed Toxicity Characteristic concentrations when subjected to the TCLP. Field studies are underway to confirm this.

Bergren, C.L.; Flora, M.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Jackson, J.L.; Hicks, E.M. [Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

Application of inorganic-contaminated groundwater to surface soils and compliance with toxicity characteristic (TCLP) regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is currently implementing a Purged Water Management Program (PWMP) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. A variety of constituents and disposal strategies are being considered. Constituents investigated in the PWMP include radionuclides, organics, and inorganics (As, Ba, Cd, Cr, Pb, Hg, Se, and Ag). One practical disposal alternative is to discharge purged water (all constituents below regulatory levels) to the ground surface near the monitoring well that is being purged. The purpose of this investigation is to determine if long-term application of purged water that contains inorganic constituents (below regulatory levels) to surface soils will result in the accumulation of inorganics such that the soil becomes a hazardous waste according to the Toxicity Characteristic regulations (40 CFR Part 261.24). Two study soils were selected that encompass the range of soils found at the SRS: Lakeland and Orangeburg. Laboratory batch equilibrium studies indicate that the soils, although able to retain a large amount of inorganics, will not exceed Toxicity Characteristic concentrations when subjected to the TCLP. Field studies are underway to confirm this.

Bergren, C.L.; Flora, M.A. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Jackson, J.L.; Hicks, E.M. (Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Nano Res (2010) 3: 170173170 Synthesis and Characterization of WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nano Res (2010) 3: 170­173170 Synthesis and Characterization of WS2 Inorganic Nanotubes]. Folding and bonding of edge atoms on the periphery of the quasi two-dimensional planar nano- structure this nanotubular structure is suitable for capillary filling using molten metal halides. Nano Res (2010) 3: 170

Davis, Ben G.

257

Coupling of Organic and Inorganic Vibrational States and Their Thermal Transport in Nanocrystal Arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) is a close-packed structure of nanocrystals (i.e., inorganic cores 2-20 nm in diameter encapsulated transistors,4 memory devices,5 light-emitting diodes,6 photodetectors,7,8 solar cells,9-11 and thermoelectric

Malen, Jonathan A.

258

Guidance Document Reactive Chemicals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

showers and chillers. Health Hazards: The reactive chemicals are grouped primarily because of the physical

259

Chemical Management Contacts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Contacts for additional information on Chemical Management and brief description on Energy Facility Contractors Group

260

Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Biological Engineering Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 B E 2100 ­ Basic Engineering III: Probability and Statistics in Engineering for Engineering: Materials Science for Engg. Applications 3 B E 1310 ­ Basic Engineering II: Materials Science for EnggDegree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Biological

Berdichevsky, Victor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Controlled binding and assembly of peptides onto inorganic substrates is at the core of bionanotechnology and biological-materials engineering. Peptides offer several  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

inorganic surfaces that are distinguishable by shape, crystallography, mineralogy, and chemistry. Second and theoretical approaches and concepts that will help advance this emerging field. Molecular Design of Inorganic-inorganic materials is dependent upon our understanding of the molecular factors that govern sequence

Samudrala, Ram

262

Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Biochemical, Environmental, Petroleum Engineering and Nantoechnology. CHEMICAL&MATERIALSSCIENCE CHE OVERVIEW of Science 131 units · Chemical Engineering (Petroleum) Bachelor of Science 136 units · Chemical Engineering38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical

Rohs, Remo

263

Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: January--March 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division (CTD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period January--March 1997. Created in March 1997 when the CTD Chemical Development and Energy Research sections were combined, the Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within seven major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, and Biotechnology Research. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described in the report, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

Jubin, R.T.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Microfabricated sleeve devices for chemical reactions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A silicon-based sleeve type chemical reaction chamber that combines heaters, such as doped polysilicon for heating, and bulk silicon for convection cooling. The reaction chamber combines a critical ratio of silicon and non-silicon based materials to provide the thermal properties desired. For example, the chamber may combine a critical ratio of silicon and silicon nitride to the volume of material to be heated (e.g., a liquid) in order to provide uniform heating, yet low power requirements. The reaction chamber will also allow the introduction of a secondary tube (e.g., plastic) into the reaction sleeve that contains the reaction mixture thereby alleviating any potential materials incompatibility issues. The reaction chamber may be utilized in any chemical reaction system for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction, which are examples of a synthetic, thermal-cycling-based reaction. The reaction chamber may also be used in synthesis instruments, particularly those for DNA amplification and synthesis.

Northrup, M. Allen (Berkeley, CA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Evaluation of GaN substrates grown in supercritical basic ammonia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GaN crystals grown by the basic ammonothermal method were investigated for their use as substrates for device regrowth. X-ray diffraction analysis indicated that the substrates contained multiple grains while secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) revealed a high concentration of hydrogen, oxygen, and sodium. Despite these drawbacks, the emission from the light emitting diode structures grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition on both the c-plane and m-plane epitaxial wafers was demonstrated. The SIMS depth profiles showed that the diffusion of the alkali metal from the substrate into the epitaxial film was small, especially in the m-direction.

Saito, Makoto; Yamada, Hisashi; Iso, Kenji; Sato, Hitoshi; Hirasawa, Hirohiko; Kamber, Derrick S.; Hashimoto, Tadao; Baars, Steven P. den; Speck, James S.; Nakamura, Shuji [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

266

Chemical factors affecting fission product transport in severe LMFBR accidents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was performed as a part of a larger evaluation effort on LMFBR accident, source-term estimation. Purpose was to provide basic chemical information regarding fission product, sodium coolant, and structural material interactions required to perform estimation of fission product transport under LMFBR accident conditions. Emphasis was placed on conditions within the reactor vessel; containment vessel conditions are discussed only briefly.

Wichner, R.P.; Jolley, R.L.; Gat, U.; Rodgers, B.R.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Mercury's thermo-chemical evolution from numerical models constrained  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury's thermo-chemical evolution from numerical models constrained by MESSENGER observations Globe de Paris, France #12;Basics facts about Mercury · Semi-major axis: 0.39 AU · 3:2 spin Earth!) · Black body temperature: 440 K #12;Exploration of Mercury Mariner10 ·First spacecraft to use

Cerveny, Vlastislav

268

Basic research needs to assure a secure energy future. A report from the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has highlighted many of the possible fundamental research areas that will help our country avoid a future energy crisis. The report may not have adequately captured the atmosphere of concern that permeated the discussions at the workshop. The difficulties facing our nation and the world in meeting our energy needs over the next several decades are very challenging. It was generally felt that traditional solutions and approaches will not solve the total energy problem. Knowledge that does not exist must be obtained to address both the quantity of energy needed to increase the standard of living world-wide and the quality of energy generation needed to preserve the environment. In terms of investments, it was clear that there is no single research area that will secure the future energy supply. A diverse range of economic energy sources will be required--and a broad range of fundamental research is needed to enable these. Many of the issues fall into the traditional materials and chemical sciences research areas, but with specific emphasis on understanding mechanisms, energy related phenomena, and pursuing novel directions in, for example, nanoscience and integrated modeling. An important result from the discussions, which is hopefully apparent from the brief presentations above, is that the problems that must be dealt with are truly multidisciplinary. This means that they require the participation of investigators with different skill sets. Basic science skills have to be complemented by awareness of the overall nature of the problem in a national and world context, and with knowledge of the engineering, design, and control issues in any eventual solution. It is necessary to find ways in which this can be done while still preserving the ability to do first-class basic science. The traditional structure of research, with specific disciplinary groupings, will not be sufficient. This presents great challenges and opportunities for the funders of the research that must be done. For example, the applied research programs in the DOE need a greater awareness of the user facilities and an understanding of how to use them to solve their unique problems. The discussions reinforced what all of the participants already knew: the issue of energy security is of major importance both for the U.S. and for the world. Furthermore, it is clear that major changes in the primary energy sources, in energy conversion, and in energy use, must be achieved within the next fifty years. This time scale is determined by two drivers: increasing world population and increasing expectations of that population. Much of the research and development currently being done are concerned with incremental improvements in what has been done in the immediate past; and it is necessary to take this path because improvements will be needed across the board. These advances extend the period before the radical changes have to be made; however, they will not solve the underlying, long-range problem. The Subpanel recommends that a major program be funded to conduct a multidisciplinary research program to address the issues to ensure a secure energy future for the U.S. It is necessary to recognize that this program must be ensured of a long-term stability. It is also necessary that a management and funding structure appropriate for such an approach be developed. The Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences is well positioned to support this initiative by enhancement of their already world-class scientific research programs and user facilities.

None

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC....

270

Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Storage: Statement of Objectives Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage: Statement of Objectives Statement of objectives for the Grand Challenge for...

271

UNIX/LINUX REFERENCE CARD Basic File and Directory Manipulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIX/LINUX REFERENCE CARD Basic File and Directory Manipulation ls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . List directory contents cp. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Link files cd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Change directory pwd

272

Chapter 5: Basic Concepts for Clean Energy Unsecured Lending...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Funds revfinalv3ch05basicconceptsdec9.pdf More Documents & Publications Path to Self-Sustainability Chapter 5. Basic Concepts for Clean Energy Unsecured Lending and Loan Loss...

273

A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Analysis & Reporting A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting September 2012 This pamphlet is intended to provide a short summary...

274

Clean Energy Finance Guide (Chapter 5: Basic Concepts for Clean...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Lending and Loan Loss Reserve Funds More Documents & Publications Path to Self-Sustainability Chapter 5. Basic Concepts for Clean Energy Unsecured Lending and Loan Loss Reserve...

275

atmospheric aerosols basic: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of atmospheric aerosol. Aplin, KL 2012-01-01 13 1. Introduction The atmospheric greenhouse effect is the basic mechanism Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: 1....

276

2013 INORGANIC REACTION MECHANISMS GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE (MARCH 3-8, 2013 - HOTEL GALVEZ, GALVESTON TX)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 2013 Gordon Conference on Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms will present cutting-edge research on the molecular aspects of inorganic reactions involving elements from throughout the periodic table and state-of-the art techniques that are used in the elucidation of reaction mechanisms. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, such as homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis, metallobiochemistry, electron-transfer in energy reactions, polymerization, nitrogen fixation, green chemistry, oxidation, solar conversion, alkane functionalization, organotransition metal chemistry, and computational chemistry. The talks will cover themes of current interest including energy, materials, and bioinorganic chemistry. Sections cover: Electron-Transfer in Energy Reactions; Catalytic Polymerization and Oxidation Chemistry; Kinetics and Spectroscopy of Heterogeneous Catalysts; Metal-Organic Chemistry and its Application in Synthesis; Green Energy Conversion;Organometallic Chemistry and Activation of Small Molecules; Advances in Kinetics Modeling and Green Chemistry; Metals in Biology and Disease; Frontiers in Catalytic Bond Activation and Cleavage.

Abu-Omar, Mahdi M.

2012-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

277

Elemental and isotopic analysis of inorganic salts by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry is applied for the analysis of elements as well as their isotopic composition in different inorganic salts. At very low laser energies the inorganic ions are desorbed and ionized from the thin layer of the sample surface. The naturally occurring isotopes of alkali and silver ions are resolved using time of flight mass spectrometer. Further increase in laser energy shows the appearance of Al, Cr, and Fe ions in the mass spectra. This indicates the penetration laser beam beyond the sample surface leading to the ablation of sample target at higher energies. The simultaneous appearance of atomic ions from the sample target at relatively higher laser energies hampers the unambiguous identification of amino acid residues from the biomolecular ions in MALDI-MS.

Jayasekharan, T.; Sahoo, N. K. [Applied Spectroscopy Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry 455 Chemical Nanotechnology 4 units Prof. Richard Brutchey, Fall 2014 (Lecture = 12:00­12:50 pm MWF) CHEM 455 is an upper-division undergraduate course in Chemical Nanotechnology. The intent

Rohs, Remo

279

Capacitive chemical sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

280

Composite Organic Radical - Inorganic Hybrid Cathode for Lithium-ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new organic radical inorganic hybrid cathode comprised of PTMA/LiFePO4 composite system is developed and reported for the first time. The hybrid cathodes demonstrate high pulse power capability resulting in a significant improvement over the pure PTMA or LiFePO4 cathode which is very promising for transportation and other high pulse power applications that require long cycle life and lower cost.

Huang, Qian; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Koech, Phillip K.; Choi, Daiwon; Lemmon, John P.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Carbons for lithium ion cells prepared using sepiolite as an inorganic template.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon anodes for Li ion cells have been prepared by the in situ polymerization of olefins such as propylene and ethylene in the channels of sepiolite clay mineral. Upon dissolution of the inorganic framework, a disordered carbon was obtained. The carbon was tested as anode in coin cells, yielding a reversible capacity of 633 mAh/g, 1.70 times higher than the capacity delivered by graphitic carbon, assuming 100% efficiency. The coulombic efficiency was higher than 90%.

Sandi, G.

1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

282

Inorganic-Organic Molecules and Solids with Nanometer-Sized Pores  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We are constructing porous inorganic-organic hybrid molecules and solids, many of which contain coordinatively unsaturated metal centers. In this work, we use multifunctional ���²-diketone ligands as �¢����building blocks�¢��� to prepare extended-solid and molecular porous materials that are capable of reacting with a variety of guest molecules.

Maverick, Andrew W.

2011-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

283

Study of Electron Transport in Organic and Inorganic Atomic Monolayer Based MOS/MOSFET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The wide research interest for the potential nanoelectronics applications are attracted by the organic and inorganic monolayer materials. In this work, we have studied the organic monolayer such as trichloro (1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorooctyl)-silane (FOTS), hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) and inorganic monolayers such as hexagonal - boron nitride (h-BN) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) based MOS devices. The organic monolayer based configurations are Au/FOTS/p-Si and Au/HMDS/p-Si. The inorganic monolayer based configurations are Au/MoS2/SiO2/p-Si and Au/h-BN/SiO2/p-Si. These configurations were examined and compared with Au/SiO2/p-Si MOS configuration using the Multi-dielectric Energy Band Diagram Program (MEBDP) and MOSFeT simulation software. The C-V and I-V characteristics of MOS and MOSFET of FOTS, HMDS, h-BN, MoS2 and SiO2 were reported. The results show that the above configurations are suitable for designing MOSFETs with smaller drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and reduced threshold voltage. We noted that th...

Azariah, J Cyril Robinson; Devaprakasam, D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemical Processes ICEHT Jump to: navigation, search Name: Institute of Chemical Engineering and High Temperature Chemical Processes (ICEHT) Place: Hellas, Greece Zip:...

285

Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division, April--June 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical and Energy Research Section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within six major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and thermodynamics, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Solution Thermodynamics, biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

Jubin, R.T.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HARVARD UNIVERSITY CHEMICAL BIOLOGY PHD PROGRAM 2013-2014 Student Handbook #12;Program Contacts at the beginning of each semester. Laboratory Rotations Students in the Chemical Biology Program are expected an interest in having Chemical Biology Program Students in their labs. Students may rotate in the labs

Church, George M.

287

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

Bolch, Tobias

288

Department of Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing Leaders of Innovation Department of Chemical Engineering #12;At the University of Virginia, we educate students in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering, giving them.Va. Department of Chemical Engineering benefit from a modern academic curriculum and state

Acton, Scott

289

Computational Chemical Materials Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Thermal barrier coatings, wear resistance coatings, radiation resistant materials · Materials for opticalHome Computational Chemical and Materials Engineering Tahir Cagin Chemical Engineering Department to understand behavior and properties of materials as a function of ­ Chemical constitution ­ Composition

290

High yield production of inorganic graphene-like materials (MoS?, WS?, BN) through liquid exfoliation testing key parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Inorganic graphene-like materials such as molybdenum disulfide (MoS?), tungsten sulfide (WS?), and boron nitride (BN) are known to have electronic properties. When exfoliated into layers and casted onto carbon nanofilms, ...

Pu, Fei, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Estimation of aboveground biomass and inorganic nutrient content of a 25-year-old loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESTIMATION OF ABOVEGROUND BIOMASS AND INORGANIC NUTRIENT CONTENT OF A 25-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) PLANTATION A Thesis by JAMES NELSON MOUSER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August lqBO Major Si bject: Forestry ESTIMATION OF ABOVEGROUND BIOMASS AND INORGANIC NUTRIENT CONTENT OF A 25-YEAR-OLD LOBLOLLY PINE (PINUS TAEDA L. ) PLANTATION A Thesis by JAMES NELSON HOUSER Approved...

Houser, James Nelson

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Bisymmetric functions, Macdonald polynomials and sl3 basic hypergeometric series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bisymmetric functions, Macdonald polynomials and sl3 basic hypergeometric series S. Ole Warnaar Abstract A new type of sl3 basic hypergeometric series based on Macdonald polynomials is intro- duced. Besides a pair of Macdonald polynomials attached to two different sets of variables, a key

Warnaar, Ole

293

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for Sealed Source Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Purpose: To provide basic radiation safety training to the users of sealed sources located

Dai, Pengcheng

294

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Training Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users for Physics 461 & 462 Modern Physics Laboratory Spring 2007 #12;#12;Radiation Safety Department, University of Tennessee Protocol Title: Basic Radiation Safety Training for X-ray Users Drafted By: Chris Millsaps, RSS Reviewers

Dai, Pengcheng

295

Free Basic Process Algebra Smile Markovski, Ana Sokolova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free Basic Process Algebra Smile Markovski, Ana Sokolova Faculty of Sciences and Mathematics, satisfying the laws (BPA1) ­ (BPA5) as given in the text. We present a description of free basic process algebras by using suitable descriptions of free semigroups and free semilattices. The description of free

Sokolova, Ana

296

Energy and Development: Is Energy a Basic Human Right?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy and Development: Is Energy a Basic Human Right? Skype/Video presentation for senior pupils national Laboratory/DTU Denmark #12;Is energy a basic human right? · What is energy? ­ the ability to make something happen · Different kinds of energy ­ or energy carriers - fuels · What do we use energy for

297

Ecology-basics and applications Planned activities 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecology- basics and applications Planned activities 2013 Last update 2013-04-23 Anna-Sara Liman Activities Approximate dates Contact persons Advances in Basic Ecology Nov ­February 2013 Pär Forslund of Ecological Ideas January 2013 Jan.Bengtsson@slu.se Statistical programming in R 22-26th April 2013 Matt

298

Accident/Injury Reporting, Investigation, & Basic First Aid Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accident/Injury Reporting, Investigation, & Basic First Aid Plan Environmental Health, Safety of accidents/injuries at Stephen F. Austin State University (SFASU) and provides basic first aid practices. It is designed to help reduce injuries by reducing unsafe or hazardous conditions and discouraging accident

Long, Nicholas

299

Physiological responses of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) to organic and inorganic amended heavy-metal contaminated chat tailings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Study plots established at the Galena subsite of the Cherokee County Superfund Site in Southeastern Kansas by the US Bureau of Mines in 1990 were examined during the summer of 1996 to determine whether physiological criteria could be used to determine suitability of switchgrass for remediation of heavy-metal contaminated substrates. Switchgrass was chosen because it was the most frequently encountered species on these plots. Treatment plots included a treatment control, an organic residue treatment of 89.6 Mg Ha{sup {minus}1} composted cattle manure, and two inorganic fertilizer treatments recommended for either native grass or grass/legume mixtures. Plant response variables were photosynthetic rate, leaf conductance to water vapor, internal concentration of carbon dioxide in leaves, foliar transpiration rate, leaf water-use-efficiency, predawn leaf xylem water potential, and midday leaf xylem water potential. Predawn and midday xylem water potentials were higher for grass/legume inorganic treatment than for the other inorganic treatments. Leaf conductances were lower for organically treated plots than those plots not organically amended and both photosynthesis and transpiration were lower for organically treated plots. Leaf conductances and transpiration were higher for grass/legume treated plots than for plots lacking inorganic treatment. Water-use-efficiency was higher for native grass inorganically treated plots than for other inorganic treatments.

Youngman, A.L. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

Removal of basic nitrogen compounds from hydrocarbon liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is provided for reducing the concentration of basic nitrogen compounds in hydrocarbonaceous feedstock fluids used in the refining industry by providing a solid particulate carbonaceous adsorbent/fuel material such as coal having active basic nitrogen complexing sites on the surface thereof and the coal with a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock containing basic nitrogen compounds to facilitate attraction of the basic nitrogen compounds to the complexing sites and the formation of complexes thereof on the surface of the coal. The adsorbent coal material and the complexes formed thereon are from the feedstock fluid to provide a hydrocarbonaceous fluid of reduced basic nitrogen compound concentration. The coal can then be used as fuel for boilers and the like.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Chemical Hygiene Plan i January 2013 Chemical Hygiene Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Hygiene Plan i January 2013 Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) (Appendix C in Lab Safety Manual........................................................................................................................1-1 Chapter 2: Chemical Hazard Communication....................................................................................2-1 Chapter 3: Classes of Hazardous Chemicals

Nizkorodov, Sergey

302

Chemical exchange program analysis.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of unneeded chemicals and the amount spent on new purchases, but will also avoid disposal costs. If SNL/NM were to realize a 5 percent reduction in chemical inventory and a 10 percent reduction in disposal of unused chemicals the total savings would be $189, 200 per year.

Waffelaert, Pascale

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

3 Basic AIPS Utilities This chapter reviews some basic AIPS utilities with which you should be familiar before you start  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 Basic AIPS Utilities This chapter reviews some basic AIPS utilities with which you should be familiar before you start calibrating data or processing images in AIPS . Many of these utilities, these utilities will be explained only briefly. 3.1 Talking to AIPS 3.1.1 POPS and AIPS utilities When using

Groppi, Christopher

304

Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emphasis in Nanotechnology · ChemicalEngineering Emphasis in Petroleum Engineering · ChemicalEngineering38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and electronics fields. Chemical Engineers are employed in areas as diverse as the chemical, materials, energy

Rohs, Remo

305

Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· ChemicalEngineering (Nanotechnology) Bachelor of Science 131 units · ChemicalEngineering(Petroleum38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and electronics fields. Chemical Engineers are employed in areas as diverse as the chemical, pharmaceutical

Rohs, Remo

306

Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Nanotechnology · ChemicalEngineering Emphasis in Petroleum Engineering · ChemicalEngineering Emphasis in Polymers38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and electronics fields. Chemical Engineers are employed in areas as diverse as the chemical, pharmaceutical

Rohs, Remo

307

Appendix G. Chemicals Appendix G. Chemicals G-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people with a chemical substance. Chemicals released to the air may remain suspended for long periods of timeAppendix G. Chemicals #12;#12;Appendix G. Chemicals G-3 Appendix G. Chemicals This appendix

Pennycook, Steve

308

Appendix G: Chemicals Appendix G: Chemicals G-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people with a chemical substance. Chemicals released to the air may remain suspended for long periods of timeAppendix G: Chemicals #12;#12;Appendix G: Chemicals G-3 Appendix G: Chemicals This appendix

Pennycook, Steve

309

Appendix H: Chemicals Appendix H: Chemicals H-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people with a chemical substance. Chemicals released to the air may remain suspended for long periods of timeAppendix H: Chemicals #12;#12;Appendix H: Chemicals H-3 Appendix H: Chemicals This appendix

Pennycook, Steve

310

Chemical evolution STRUCTURE OF GALAXIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Outline Absorption Chemical evolution STRUCTURE OF GALAXIES 8. Absorption; chemical evolution Piet Piet van der Kruit, Kapteyn Astronomical Institute Absorption; chemical evolution #12;Outline Absorption Chemical evolution Outline Absorption Holmberg's analysis Analysis of Disney et al. Edge

Kruit, Piet van der

311

Connection coefficients for basic Harish-Chandra series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic Harish-Chandra series are asymptotically free meromorphic solutions of the system of basic hypergeometric difference equations associated to root systems. The associated connection coefficients are explicitly computed in terms of Jacobi theta functions. We interpret the connection coefficients as the transition functions for asymptotically free meromorphic solutions of Cherednik's root system analogs of the quantum Knizhnik-Zamolodchikov equations. They thus give rise to explicit elliptic solutions of root system analogs of dynamical Yang-Baxter and reflection equations. Applications to quantum c-functions, basic hypergeometric functions, reflectionless difference operators and multivariable Baker-Akhiezer functions are discussed.

Jasper V. Stokman

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

312

Degree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Product and Process Engineering Option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 B E 2100 ­ Basic Engineering III: Probability and Statistics in Engineering for Engineering: Materials Science for Engg. Applications 3 B E 1310 ­ Basic Engineering II: Materials Science for EnggDegree Requirements for B.S. in Chemical Engineering at Wayne State University Product and Process

Berdichevsky, Victor

313

Chemical Rearrangement under Hydrothermal Conditions: Formation of Polymeric Chains (CuX)2(dpiz) and (CuX)3(dpiz) (X ) Cl, Br; dpiz ) Dipyrido[1,2-a:2,3-d]imidazole) and Crystal Structures of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rearrangement during the hydrothermal self- assembly process in forming copper dipyrido[1,2-a:2,3-d]imi- dazoleChemical Rearrangement under Hydrothermal Conditions: Formation of Polymeric Chains (CuX)2(dpiz the hydrothermal method7 has been widely applied in the synthesis and crystal growth of many inorganic compounds

Li, Jing

314

Biomass pyrolysis for chemicals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Biomass Pyrolysis for Chemicals The problems associated with the use of fossil fuels demand a transition to renewable sources (sun, wind, water, geothermal, biomass) for… (more)

Wild, Paul de

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Chemically Reactive Working Fluids  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

commercial application. Goal: Demonstrate feasibility of employing chemically reacting fluids (CRFW) as heat transfer fluids (HTF) for CSP systems operating at 650C-1200C....

316

EMSL - chemical analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

chemical-analysis en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-structural-...

317

Apparatus for chemical synthesis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for forming a chemical hydride is described and which includes a pseudo-plasma-electrolysis reactor which is operable to receive a solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further includes a cathode and a movable anode, and wherein the anode is moved into and out of fluidic, ohmic electrical contact with the solution capable of forming a chemical hydride and which further, when energized produces an oxygen plasma which facilitates the formation of a chemical hydride in the solution.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herring, J. Stephen (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

Quantum confinement of zero-dimensional hybrid organic-inorganic polaritons at room temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on the quantum confinement of zero-dimensional polaritons in perovskite-based microcavity at room temperature. Photoluminescence of discrete polaritonic states is observed for polaritons localized in symmetric sphere-like defects which are spontaneously nucleated on the top dielectric Bragg mirror. The linewidth of these confined states is found much sharper (almost one order of magnitude) than that of photonic modes in the perovskite planar microcavity. Our results show the possibility to study organic-inorganic cavity polaritons in confined microstructure and suggest a fabrication method to realize integrated polaritonic devices operating at room temperature.

Nguyen, H. S.; Lafosse, X.; Amo, A.; Bouchoule, S.; Bloch, J., E-mail: jacqueline.bloch@lpn.cnrs.fr [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, LPN/CNRS, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Han, Z. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, LPN/CNRS, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, bat. 505, campus d'Orsay, 91405 Orsay (France); Abdel-Baki, K.; Lauret, J.-S.; Deleporte, E. [Laboratoire Aimé Cotton, École Normale Supérieure de Cachan, CNRS, Université Paris Sud, bat. 505, campus d'Orsay, 91405 Orsay (France)

2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

319

Subsurface Monitor for Dissolved Inorganic Carbon at Geological Sequestration Site Phase 1 SBIR Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase I research of this SBIR contract has yielded anticipated results and enable us to develop a practical new instrument to measure the Dissolved Inorganic Carbons (DIC) as well as Supercritical (SC) CO2 in underground brine water at higher sensitivity, lower cost, higher frequency and longer period of time for the Monitoring, Verification & Accounting (MVA) of CO2 sequestration as well as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). We show that reduced cost and improved performance are possible; both future and emerging market exist for the proposed new instrument.

Sheng Wu

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

320

Understanding ligand-centred photoluminescence through flexibility and bonding of anthraquinone inorganic?organic frameworks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five novel inorganic-organic framework compounds containing the organic chromophore ligand anthraquinone-2,3-dicarboxylic acid (abbreviated H{sub 2}AQDC) and calcium (CaAQDC), zinc (ZnAQDC), cadmium (CdAQDC), manganese (MnAQDC), and nickel (NiAQDC), respectively, have been synthesized. The photoluminescence of these materials is only visible at low temperatures and this behaviour has been evaluated in terms of ligand rigidity. It is proposed that the 2,3 position bonding sites result in luminescence-quenching ligand motion, as supported by X-ray diffraction and temperature-dependent luminescence studies.

Furman, Joshua D.; Burwood, Ryan P.; Tang, Min; Mikhailovsky, Alexander A.; Cheetham, Anthony K. (Cambridge); (UCSB)

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Basic Integrative Models for Offshore Wind Turbine Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research study developed basic dynamic models that can be used to accurately predict the response behavior of a near-shore wind turbine structure with monopile, suction caisson, or gravity-based foundation systems. The marine soil conditions...

Aljeeran, Fares

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

Tutorial: The Basics of SAXS Data Analysis | Stanford Synchrotron...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tutorial: The Basics of SAXS Data Analysis Thursday, November 17, 2011 - 1:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Dr. Alexander V. Shkumatov, Biological Small Angle...

323

Ways of arrangement : the basic operations of form-making  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making forms is essentially a matter of arranging things, and arranging things is essentially to establish spatial relations among selected elements. The thesis provides a minimal set of basic operations believed to be ...

Wang, Minghong

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Energy 101 Videos: Learn More About the Basics! | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Okay, so we already pointed out the Energy Basics Web site last week. Because I'm going to talk about something on the site, I wanted to...

325

1. INTRODUCTION Smith (1979) reviewed the basic ways in which  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. INTRODUCTION Smith (1979) reviewed the basic ways in which upslope flow can affect precipitation is by how closely it achieves Smith's sim- plified model. One of the factors identified by Smith (1979

Houze Jr., Robert A.

326

Chemical Accelerators The phrase "chemical accelerators"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bonds, 2 to 10 ev). The methods that have revealed this richness and order of medium- and high-energy, mass spectrometry. While hot-atom studies overcome the energy limitations of thermochemical methods energies of a few electron volts. Most studies of chemical kinetics made by traditional thermochemical

Zare, Richard N.

327

CHEMICAL ABBREVIATION KEY ABBREVIATION CHEMICAL NAME HAZARDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corrosive - base LiCl Lithium chloride Harmful MeOH Methanol Flammable #12;CHEMICAL ABBREVIATION KEY Irritant destain Methanol,acetic acid,H2O Flammable, Corrosive - acid DI H2O Deionized water DCM FeCl3 Iron(III) chloride Corrosive - acid FeSO4 Iron(II) sulfate Toxic H2O Water HCl Hydrochloric

Pawlowski, Wojtek

328

Correlation among electronegativity, cation polarizability, optical basicity and single bond strength of simple oxides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements in different valence states and with the most common coordination numbers has been searched on the basis of the similarity in physical nature of both quantities. In general, the cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. A systematic periodic change in the polarizability against the electronegativity has been observed in the isoelectronic series. It has been found that generally the optical basicity increases and the single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. The observed trends have been discussed on the basis of electron donation ability of the oxide ions and type of chemical bonding in simple oxides. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the single bond strength of simple oxides as a function of element electronegativity. A remarkable correlation exists between these independently obtained quantities. High values of electronegativity correspond to high values of single bond strength and vice versa. It is obvious that the observed trend in this figure is closely related to the type of chemical bonding in corresponding oxide. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements was searched. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed trends were discussed on the basis of type of chemical bonding in simple oxides.

Dimitrov, Vesselin, E-mail: vesselin@uctm.edu [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8, Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria)] [Department of Silicate Technology, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8, Kl. Ohridski Blvd., Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Komatsu, Takayuki, E-mail: komatsu@mst.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)] [Department of Materials Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka-cho, Nagaoka 940-2188 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

Chemical Engineering Andrew Zydney  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;ChE Employment (2003 at PSU) Merck Dow ExxonMob Air Products Amgen PPG Sunoco Kraft Foods NRC Procter, microelectronics, consumer products, biotechnology, fuels / energy, environmental engineering, etc. ·Chemical Engineers focus on the processes involved in making new products, including chemical reactions

Maranas, Costas

330

Chemical and Biochemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carrying out two experi- ments each semester. Graduates find careers at hospitals, nuclear plants, research how plastics, petrochemicals, or certain foods are made? Chemical engineers develop ways of converting to a variety of industries including the chemical and petrochemical fields and the pharmaceutical and biotech

Neimark, Alexander V.

331

Tortuous path chemical preconcentrator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-planar, tortuous path chemical preconcentrator has a high internal surface area having a heatable sorptive coating that can be used to selectively collect and concentrate one or more chemical species of interest from a fluid stream that can be rapidly released as a concentrated plug into an analytical or microanalytical chain for separation and detection. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a sorptive support structure having a tortuous flow path. The tortuosity provides repeated twists, turns, and bends to the flow, thereby increasing the interfacial contact between sample fluid stream and the sorptive material. The tortuous path also provides more opportunities for desorption and readsorption of volatile species. Further, the thermal efficiency of the tortuous path chemical preconcentrator is comparable or superior to the prior non-planar chemical preconcentrator. Finally, the tortuosity can be varied in different directions to optimize flow rates during the adsorption and desorption phases of operation of the preconcentrator.

Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Simonson, Robert J. (Cedar Crest, NM)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

332

Influence of inorganic compounds on char formation and quality of fast pyrolysis oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Inorganic compounds, especially potassium, calcium, sodium, silicon, phosphorus, and chlorine, are the main constituents of ash in biomass feedstocks. The concentrations of ash in biomass feedstocks range from less than 1% in softwoods to 15% in herbaceous biomass and agricultural residues. During biomass pyrolysis, these inorganics, especially potassium and calcium, catalyze both decomposition and char formation reactions. Decomposition reactions may either result in levoglucosan-rich or hydroxyacetaldehyde-rich pyrolysis products depending on the concentration of the ash in the feedstocks. The catalytic effect of the ash levels off at high organic ion concentrations. Chars formed during these reactions invariably end up in the pyrolysis oils (biofuel oils). A high proportion of the alkali metals in the ash are sequestered in the chars. The presence of high concentrations of alkali metals in the biofuel oils make them unsuitable for combustion in boilers, diesel engines, and in turbine operations. The highest concentration of alkali metals are found in herbaceous feedstocks and agricultural residue biofuel oils. Leaching studies conducted on the chars suspended in the oils showed no leaching of the alkali metals from the chars into the oils. Our data suggest that hot gas filtration of the oils can effectively reduce the alkali metals contents of the biofuel oils to acceptable levels to be used as turbine, diesel engine, and boiler fuels.

Agbleyor, F.A.; Besler, S.; Montane, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Polymeric media comprising polybenzimidazoles N-substituted with organic-inorganic hybrid moiety  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be included in a separator medium. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2-- where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The separatory medium may exhibit an H.sub.2, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, CH.sub.3, or CO.sub.2 gas permeability greater than the gas permeability of a comparable separatory medium comprising the PBI compound without substitution. The separatory medium may further include an electronically conductive medium and/or ionically conductive medium. The separatory medium may be used as a membrane (semi-permeable, permeable, and non-permeable), a barrier, an ion exhcange media, a filter, a gas chromatography coating (such as stationary phase coating in affinity chromatography), etc.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID) [Shelley, ID; Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID) [Pocatello, ID

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PhD Chemical Engineering MS Chemical Engineering Bylaws Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering College of Engineering and Architecture Approved by Voiland School facultyD Chemical Engineering, MS Chemical Engineering B. Discipline: Edgar, et al.1 provide a succinct description

Collins, Gary S.

335

Appendix B: Chemicals Appendix B: Chemicals B-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people are exposed to chemicals by inhalation (breathing air), ingestion (eating exposed plants and animalsAppendix B: Chemicals #12;Appendix B: Chemicals B-3 Appendix B: Chemicals This appendix presents

Pennycook, Steve

336

Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

hydrides - Ray Anderson - anderp@inel.gov - Oak Ridge: chemical hydrides - Tim Armstrong - armstrongt@ornl.gov - Lawrence Berkeley: Lut DeJonghe - dejonghe@lbl.gov -...

337

Quarterly progress report for the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division: July--September 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the major activities conducted in the Chemical and Energy Research Section of the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during the period July--September 1997. The section conducts basic and applied research and development in chemical engineering, applied chemistry, and bioprocessing, with an emphasis on energy-driven technologies and advanced chemical separations for nuclear and waste applications. The report describes the various tasks performed within nine major areas of research: Hot Cell Operations, Process Chemistry and Thermodynamics, Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) Remediation Studies, Chemistry Research, Biotechnology, Separations and Materials Synthesis, Fluid Structure and Properties, Biotechnology Research, and Molecular Studies. The name of a technical contact is included with each task described, and readers are encouraged to contact these individuals if they need additional information.

Jubin, R.T.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

or ChemiCal engineering?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry or ChemiCal engineering? Do both at Wits! www.wits.ac.za #12;Chemistry or ChemiCal by a BScEng (Chem Eng)! Which should I choose: Chemistry or Chemical Engineering? Because the chemist and the chemical engineer work so closely in industry, there is little doubt that the chemical engineer who has

Wagner, Stephan

339

Summaries of FY 1982 research in the chemical sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this booklet is to help those interested in research supported by the Department of Energy's Division of Chemical Sciences, which is one of six Divisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. These summaries are intended to provide a rapid means for becoming acquainted with the Chemical Sciences program to members of the scientific and technological public and interested persons in the Legislative and Executive Branches of the Government. Areas of research supported by the Division are to be seen in the section headings, the index and the summaries themselves. Energy technologies which may be advanced by use of the basic knowledge discovered in this program can be seen in the index and again (by reference) in the summaries. The table of contents lists the following: photochemical and radiation sciences; chemical physics; atomic physics; chemical energy; separation and analysis; chemical engineering sciences; offsite contracts; equipment funds; special facilities; topical index; institutional index for offsite contracts; investigator index.

None

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Specimen Curriculum for Chemical Engineering Focus Area: Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry Chem 220B 3 hours Physical Chemistry Chem 230 3 hours Chemical Reactor Engineering ChBE 225 3Specimen Curriculum for Chemical Engineering Focus Area: Chemical Engineering Semester hours SOPHOMORE YEAR FALL SPRING Chem 219A

Bordenstein, Seth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Chemical Sciences Project Description  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheck In &Chemical LabelChemicalChemicalModeling

342

Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O[sub 3], PO, PO[sub 2], etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like. 20 figs.

Chang, S.G.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

343

Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O.sub.3, PO, PO.sub.2, etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

The Path to Sustainable Nuclear Energy. Basic and Applied Research Opportunities for Advanced Fuel Cycles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to identify new basic science that will be the foundation for advances in nuclear fuel-cycle technology in the near term, and for changing the nature of fuel cycles and of the nuclear energy industry in the long term. The goals are to enhance the development of nuclear energy, to maximize energy production in nuclear reactor parks, and to minimize radioactive wastes, other environmental impacts, and proliferation risks. The limitations of the once-through fuel cycle can be overcome by adopting a closed fuel cycle, in which the irradiated fuel is reprocessed and its components are separated into streams that are recycled into a reactor or disposed of in appropriate waste forms. The recycled fuel is irradiated in a reactor, where certain constituents are partially transmuted into heavier isotopes via neutron capture or into lighter isotopes via fission. Fast reactors are required to complete the transmutation of long-lived isotopes. Closed fuel cycles are encompassed by the Department of Energy?s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), to which basic scientific research can contribute. Two nuclear reactor system architectures can meet the AFCI objectives: a ?single-tier? system or a ?dual-tier? system. Both begin with light water reactors and incorporate fast reactors. The ?dual-tier? systems transmute some plutonium and neptunium in light water reactors and all remaining transuranic elements (TRUs) in a closed-cycle fast reactor. Basic science initiatives are needed in two broad areas: ? Near-term impacts that can enhance the development of either ?single-tier? or ?dual-tier? AFCI systems, primarily within the next 20 years, through basic research. Examples: Dissolution of spent fuel, separations of elements for TRU recycling and transmutation Design, synthesis, and testing of inert matrix nuclear fuels and non-oxide fuels Invention and development of accurate on-line monitoring systems for chemical and nuclear species in the nuclear fuel cycle Development of advanced tools for designing reactors with reduced margins and lower costs ? Long-term nuclear reactor development requires basic science breakthroughs: Understanding of materials behavior under extreme environmental conditions Creation of new, efficient, environmentally benign chemical separations methods Modeling and simulation to improve nuclear reaction cross-section data, design new materials and separation system, and propagate uncertainties within the fuel cycle Improvement of proliferation resistance by strengthening safeguards technologies and decreasing the attractiveness of nuclear materials A series of translational tools is proposed to advance the AFCI objectives and to bring the basic science concepts and processes promptly into the technological sphere. These tools have the potential to revolutionize the approach to nuclear engineering R&D by replacing lengthy experimental campaigns with a rigorous approach based on modeling, key fundamental experiments, and advanced simulations.

Finck, P.; Edelstein, N.; Allen, T.; Burns, C.; Chadwick, M.; Corradini, M.; Dixon, D.; Goff, M.; Laidler, J.; McCarthy, K.; Moyer, B.; Nash, K.; Navrotsky, A.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Peterson, P.; Sackett, J.; Sickafus, K. E.; Tulenko, J.; Weber, W.; Morss, L.; Henry, G.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Photochemistry of 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in solution. Part 2. Effects of inorganic anions: quenching vs. radical formation at moderate and high anion concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical aspects of the interactions between excited 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) and various inorganic anions are examined. The anions which quench triplet AQS can be divided into two groups: Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/, I/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/ (group I) photoreduce AQS to AQS/sup -/ radical anion only at concentrations higher than that required for complete triplet quenching. The effect increases with concentration and passes through a maximum, with highest quantum yields of radical formation reaching approx. 1 for Cl/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/; on the other hand, NO/sub 2//sup -/, SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, and N/sub 3//sup -/ (group II) give AQS/sup -/ in parallel to triplet quenching. The nature of the high-concentration effect shown by group I is analyzed. Some results obtained with mixtures of anions support the conclusion that triplet AQS is also responsible for this effect, and it is suggested that triple exciplexes of the type /sup 3/(AQS/sup -/.X/sub 2//sup -/) are involved. With this view and the recently proposed intraradical spin-orbit-coupling (IRSOC) model, a quantitative interpretation of the results is presented.

Loeff, I.; Treinin, A.; Linschitz, H.

1984-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

346

Photochemistry of 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in solution. Part II. Effects of inorganic anions; quenching vs. radical formation at moderate and high anion concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical aspects of the interactions between excited 9, 10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) and various inorganic anions are examined. The anions which quench triplet AQS can be divided into two groups: Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/, I/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/ (Group I) photoreduce the quinone to AQS/sup -/ only at concentrations higher than that required for complete triplet quenching. The effect increases with concentration and passes through a maximum with highest quantum yields of radical formation reaching approx. 1 for Cl/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/; NO/sub 2//sup -/, SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ and N/sub 3//sup -/ (Group II) reduce AQS in parallel to triplet quenching. The nature of the high-concentration effect shown by Group I is analyzed. Some results obtained with mixtures of anions support the conclusion that triplet AQS is also responsible for this effect and it is suggested that triple exciplexes of the type /sup 3/(AQS/sup -/.X/sub 2//sup -/) are involved. With this view and the recently proposed intra-radical-spin-orbit-coupling (IRSOC) model, a quantitative interpretation of the results is presented.

Loeff, I.; Treinin, A.; Linschitz, H.

1983-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

347

ITP Chemicals: Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A Powerful Tool for Identifying Process Inefficiencies in the U.S. Chemical Industry, Industrial Technologies Program, DRAFT Summary...

348

Assessment of the basic energy sciences program. Volume II. Appendices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A list of experts reviewing the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program and their organizations are given. The assessment plan is explained; the program examined the following: quality of science being conducted in the program, quality of performers supported by the Basic Energy Sciences (BES) program, and the impact of the research on mission oriented needs. The intent of the assessment is to provide an indication of general status relative to these questions for the BES divisions. The approach to the assessment is described. The sampling plan which was used as a guide in determining the sample size and selecting the sample to evaluate the research program of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences are discussed. Special analyses were conducted on the dispersion of reviewers' ratings, the ratings of the lower funded projects, and the amount of time the principal investigator devoted to the project. These are presented in the final appendix together with histograms for individual rating variables for each program area. (MCW)

Not Available

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Energy considerations for steam plasma gasification of black liquor and chemical recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the energy economics of using a hybrid steam plasma process to gasify black liquor. In the pulp and paper industry, gasification is gaining credibility as an incremental method to supplement the standard Kraft process, which bums the black liquor in large furnaces to recover energy and inorganic chemicals (sodium and sulfur) that are recycled back into the wood pulping process. This paper shows that despite the energy intensive nature of steam plasma processing, several fortuitous conditions arise that make it a viable technology for the gasification of black liquor.

Grandy, J.D.; Kong, P.C.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Energy considerations for steam plasma gasification of black liquor and chemical recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper investigates the energy economics of using a hybrid steam plasma process to gasify black liquor. In the pulp and paper industry, gasification is gaining credibility as an incremental method to supplement the standard Kraft process, which burns the black liquor in large furnaces to recover energy and inorganic chemicals (sodium and sulfur) that are recycled back into the wood pulping process. This paper shows that despite the energy intensive nature of steam plasma processing, several fortuitous conditions arise that make it a viable technology for the gasification of black liquor.

Grandy, J.D.; Kong, P.C. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Green alternatives to toxic release inventory (TRI) chemicals in the process industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Driven by TRI reporting requirements, the chemical process industry is searching for innovative ways to reduce pollution at the source. Distinct environmental advantages of biobased green chemicals (biochemicals) mean are attractive alternatives to petrochemicals. Biochemicals are made from renewable raw materials in biological processes, such as aerobic and anaerobic fermentation, that operate at ambient temperatures and pressures, and produce only nontoxic waste products. Key TRI chemicals and several classes of commodity and intermediate compounds, used on consumer end-products manufacturing, are examined and alternatives are suggested. Specific substitution options for chlorofluorocarbons, industrial solvents, and commodity organic and inorganic chemicals are reviewed. Currently encouraged pollution prevention alternatives in the manufacturing sector are briefly examined for their long-term feasibility such as bioalternatives to bleaching in the pulp & paper industry, solvent cleaning in the electronics and dry cleaning industries, and using petroleum-based feedstocks in the plastics industry. Total life cycle and cost/benefit analyses are employed to determine whether biochemicals are environmentally feasible and commercially viable as pollution prevention tools. Currently available green chemicals along with present and projected costs and premiums are also presented. Functional compatibility of biochemicals with petrochemicals and bioprocessing systems with conventional chemical processing methods are explored. This review demonstrates that biochemicals can be used cost effectively in certain industrial chemical operations due to their added environmental benefits.

Ahmed, I.; Baron, J.; Hamilton, C. [Booz-Allen & Hamilton Inc., McLean, VA (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Program of Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING Program of Study Research Facilities Financial Aid Applying Correspondence The Department of Chemical Engineering and Biological Engineering has well-established programs at both area of chemical engineering and include both fundamental and applied topics. The Department has

Thomas, Andrew

353

Chemistry and Engineering News Volume 90 Issue 7 | February 13, 2012 | pp. 48-49 | F. Albert Cotton Award In Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry and Engineering News Volume 90 Issue 7 | February 13, 2012 | pp. 48-49 | Awards F. Albert Cotton Award In Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry By Sophie Rovner Department: ACS News Keywords: inorganic chemistry, Christopher Reed Awards Reed Credit: Courtesy of Christopher A. Reed Sponsored by the F. Albert

Reed, Christopher A.

354

Small angle neutron and X-ray scattering studies of carbons prepared using inorganic templates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small angle neutron (SANS) and X-ray (SAXS) scattering analyses of carbons derived from organic-loaded inorganic template materials, used as anodes in lithium ion cells, have been performed. Two clays were used as templates to load the organic precursors, pillared montmorrillonite (PILC), a layered silicate clay whose sheets have been permanently propped open by sets of thermally stable molecular props, and sepiolite, a natural channeled clay. Five different organic precursors were used to load the PILC: pyrene, styrene, pyrene/trioxane copolymer, ethylene and propylene, whereas only propylene and ethylene were used to load sepiolite. Pyrolysis took place at 700{degrees}C under nitrogen. Values such as hole radius, fractal dimension, cutoff length and density of the final carbons will be compared as a function of the clay and carbon precursors.

Sandi, G.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Winans, R.E.; Carrado, K.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Electron spin and the origin of Bio-homochirality II. Prebiotic inorganic-organic reaction model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The emergence of biomolecular homochirality is a critically important question about life phenomenon and the origins of life. In a previous paper (arXiv:1309.1229), I tentatively put forward a new hypothesis that the emergence of a single chiral form of biomolecules in living organisms is specifically determined by the electron spin state during their enzyme-catalyzed synthesis processes. However, how a homochirality world of biomolecules could have formed in the absence of enzymatic networks before the origins of life remains unanswered. Here I discussed the electron spin properties in Fe3S4, ZnS, and transition metal doped dilute magnetic ZnS, and their possible roles in the prebiotic synthesis of chiral molecules. Since the existence of these minerals in hydrothermal vent systems is matter of fact, the suggested prebiotic inorganic-organic reaction model, if can be experimentally demonstrated, may help explain where and how life originated on early Earth.

Wang, Wei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

High-performance hybrid organic-inorganic solar cell based on planar n-type silicon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells were fabricated by spin coating the hole transporting conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) film on n-type crystalline silicon (n-Si). By incorporating different additives into the PEDOT:PSS, the conductivity and wettability of PEDOT:PSS film are markedly improved, and the device performance is greatly enhanced accordingly. To further optimize the device performance, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) layer was inserted between the n-Si and PEDOT:PSS layer. The P3HT layer blocks electrons from diffusing to the PEDOT:PSS, and hence reduces recombination at the anode side. The device eventually exhibits a high power conversion efficiency of 11.52%.

Chi, Dan [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, CAS Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Qi, Boyuan; Wang, Jizheng [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, CAS Key Laboratory of Organic Solids, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Qu, Shengchun, E-mail: qsc@semi.ac.cn; Wang, Zhanguo [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

357

Semiconductor nanocrystals covalently bound to solid inorganic surfaces using self-assembled monolayers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are described for attaching semiconductor nanocrystals to solid inorganic surfaces, using self-assembled bifunctional organic monolayers as bridge compounds. Two different techniques are presented. One relies on the formation of self-assembled monolayers on these surfaces. When exposed to solutions of nanocrystals, these bridge compounds bind the crystals and anchor them to the surface. The second technique attaches nanocrystals already coated with bridge compounds to the surfaces. Analyses indicate the presence of quantum confined clusters on the surfaces at the nanolayer level. These materials allow electron spectroscopies to be completed on condensed phase clusters, and represent a first step towards synthesis of an organized assembly of clusters. These new products are also disclosed. 10 figs.

Alivisatos, A.P.; Colvin, V.L.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

358

Semiconductor nanocrystals covalently bound to solid inorganic surfaces using self-assembled monolayers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are described for attaching semiconductor nanocrystals to solid inorganic surfaces, using self-assembled bifunctional organic monolayers as bridge compounds. Two different techniques are presented. One relies on the formation of self-assembled monolayers on these surfaces. When exposed to solutions of nanocrystals, these bridge compounds bind the crystals and anchor them to the surface. The second technique attaches nanocrystals already coated with bridge compounds to the surfaces. Analyses indicate the presence of quantum confined clusters on the surfaces at the nanolayer level. These materials allow electron spectroscopies to be completed on condensed phase clusters, and represent a first step towards synthesis of an organized assembly of clusters. These new products are also disclosed.

Alivisatos, A. Paul (Berkeley, CA); Colvin, Vicki L. (Berkeley, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Controlling the release of active compounds from the inorganic carrier halloysite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Halloysite (HNTs), a natural material characterized by a nanotube structure, has been used as an inorganic carrier of active compounds in several applications from medicine to anticorrosion coatings. In this present work, vanillin (VAN) used as a antimicrobial model, has been encapsulated within HNTs for exploiting its applicability in the active food packaging sector. The molecule release rate has been controlled by crosslinking at the tube ends the loaded vanillin with copper ions, thus producing a stopper network. The vanillin-loaded HNTs were characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and thermo gravimetric analysis. The antimicrobial release kinetics from the loaded nanoparticles (VAN/HNTs) in water was investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy. The results show that the vanillin crosslinked with cupper ions is a feasible method to tailor the release rate of antimicrobial model from HTNs nanoparticles.

Tescione, F.; Buonocore, G. G.; Stanzione, M.; Oliviero, M.; Lavorgna, M. [National Research Council - Institute of Composites and Biomedical Materials, P.le E. Fermi, 1 80055 Portici (Naples) (Italy)

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

360

Improved oxidation resistance of organic/inorganic composite atomic layer deposition coated cellulose nanocrystal aerogels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) aerogels are coated with thin conformal layers of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} using atomic layer deposition to form hybrid organic/inorganic nanocomposites. Electron probe microanalysis and scanning electron microscopy analysis indicated the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} penetrated more than 1500??m into the aerogel for extended precursor pulse and exposure/purge times. The measured profile of coated fiber radius versus depth from the aerogel surface agrees well with simulations of precursor penetration depth in modeled aerogel structures. Thermogravimetric analysis shows that Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} coated CNC aerogel nanocomposites do not show significant thermal degradation below 295?°C as compared with 175?°C for uncoated CNC aerogels, an improvement of over 100?°C.

Smith, Sean W.; Matthews, David J.; Conley, John F., E-mail: jconley@eecs.oregonstate.edu [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, 1148 Kelley Engineering Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States); Buesch, Christian; Simonsen, John [Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University, 119 Richardson Hall, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Inorganic Carbon Turnover caused by Digestion of Carbonate Sands and Metabolic Activity of Holothurians  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent measurements have shown that holothurians (sea cucumbers) play an important role in the cycling of CaCO3 in tropical coral reef systems through ingestion and processing of carbonate sediment. In this study inorganic additional aspects of carbon turnover were determined in laboratory incubations of Holothuria atra, H. leucospilota and Stichopus herrmanni from One Tree Reef, Great Barrier Reef. The pH values of the gut lumen ranged from 6.1 to 6.7 in animals with empty digestive tracts as opposed to 7.0 to 7.6 when digestive tracts were filled with sediment. Empty gut volume estimates for H. atra and S. herrmanni were 36 ± 4 mL and 151 ± 14 mL, respectively. Based on these measurements it is estimated that these species process 19 ± 2kg and 80 ± 7kg CaCO3 sand yr-1 per individual, respectively. The annual dissolution rates of H. atra and S. herrmanni of 6.5±1.9g and 9.6±1.4g, respectively, suggest that 0.05±0.02% and 0.1±0.02% of the CaCO3 processed through their gut annually is dissolved. During the incubations the CaCO3 dissolution was 0.07±0.01%, 0.04±0.01% and 0.21±0.05% of the fecal casts for H. atra, H. leucospilota and S. herrmanni, respectively. The CaCO3 saturation state for both aragonite and calcite minerals during laboratory incubations decreased markedly due to a greater increase in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) relative to total alkalinity (AT) as a result of respiration by the animals. Our results support the hypothesis that deposit feeders such as sea cucumbers play an important ecological role in the coral reef CaCO3 cycle.

Schneider, Kenneth; Silverman, Jacob; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rivlin, Tanya; Schneider-Mor, Aya; Barbosa, Sergio; Byrne, Maria; Caldeira, Ken

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

362

Beam coupling in hybrid photorefractive inorganic-cholesteric liquid crystal cells: Impact of optical rotation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a theoretical model to describe two-beam energy exchange in a hybrid photorefractive inorganic-cholesteric cell. A cholesteric layer is placed between two inorganic substrates. One of the substrates is photorefractive (Ce:SBN). Weak and strong light beams are incident on the hybrid cell. The interfering light beams induce a periodic space-charge field in the photorefractive window. This penetrates into the cholesteric liquid crystal (LC), inducing a diffraction grating written on the LC director. In the theory, the flexoelectric mechanism for electric field-director coupling is more important than the LC static dielectric anisotropy coupling. The LC optics is described in the Bragg regime. Each beam induces two circular polarized waves propagating in the cholesteric cell with different velocities. The model thus includes optical rotation in the cholesteric LC. The incident light beam wavelength can fall above, below, or inside the cholesteric gap. The theory calculates the energy gain of the weak beam, as a result of its interaction with the pump beam within the diffraction grating. Theoretical results for exponential gain coefficients are compared with experimental results for hybrid cells filled with cholesteric mixture BL038/CB15 at different concentrations of chiral agent CB15. Reconciliation between theory and experiment requires the inclusion of a phenomenological multiplier in the magnitude of the director grating. This multiplier is cubic in the space-charge field, and we provide a justification of the q-dependence of the multiplier. Within this paradigm, we are able to fit theory to experimental data for cholesteric mixtures with different spectral position of cholesteric gap relative to the wavelength of incident beams, subject to the use of some fitting parameters.

Reshetnyak, V. Yu.; Pinkevych, I. P. [Physics Faculty, National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Volodymyrs’ka Street 64, Kyiv 01601 (Ukraine); Sluckin, T. J. [Division of Mathematical Sciences, University of Southampton, Highfield, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Cook, G.; Evans, D. R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

363

Basic Research Needs | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Basic Research Needs Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events Publications History Grand Challenges Basic Research...

364

Role of the sediments in scavenging inorganic contaminants in the Syr Daria River and the Small Aral Sea (Kazakhstan)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Role of the sediments in scavenging inorganic contaminants in the Syr Daria River and the Small Particulate Material, Bottom Sediments, Trace Elements, Solid/Liquid Partitionning Abstract This study Material (SPM) and the Bottom Sediments (BS) of the Syr Daria River in its Kazakh course, including its

Boyer, Edmond

365

Inorganic composition of fine particles in mixed mineral dustpollution plumes observed from airborne measurements during ACE-Asia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the atmosphere (2419, 2427); 0345 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Pollution--urban and regional (0305Inorganic composition of fine particles in mixed mineral dust­pollution plumes observed from of Earth and Atmospheric Science, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia, USA G. R. Carmichael

Weber, Rodney

366

Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the optical components required to utilize XFEL beams, including radiation damage. Theoretical workDamage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength SC were exposed to single 25 fs long pulses of 32.5 nm free-electron-laser radiation at fluences of up

von der Linde, D.

367

Proceedings of the ARO Rotorcraft Wake Prediction Basic Research Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wake Structure Of A Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine 7 A.G. Brand BHTI The Nature Of Vortex Ring State 8 S Disk Model For Interacting Wind Turbine Wakes 15 R.B. Haehnel, Y. Wenren, J. Steinhoff USA CRREL, FProceedings of the ARO Rotorcraft Wake Prediction Basic Research Workshop Daniel Guggenheim School

368

NONSYMMETRIC INTERPOLATION MACDONALD POLYNOMIALS AND gln BASIC HYPERGEOMETRIC SERIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NONSYMMETRIC INTERPOLATION MACDONALD POLYNOMIALS AND gln BASIC HYPERGEOMETRIC SERIES ALAIN LASCOUX, ERIC M. RAINS AND S. OLE WARNAAR Abstract. The Knop­Sahi interpolation Macdonald polynomials are inho- mogeneous and nonsymmetric generalisations of the well-known Macdonald polynomials. In this paper we apply

Lascoux, Alain

369

KRNFYSIK AK FKF011 Nuclear Physics, Basic Course  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K�RNFYSIK AK FKF011 Nuclear Physics, Basic Course Poäng: 3.0 Betygskala: TH Obligatorisk för: F3 Valfri för: E4 Kursansvarig: Docent Per Kristiansson, per.kristiansson@nuclear.lu.se Förkunskapskrav

370

KRNFYSIK AK FKF 011 Nuclear Physics, Basic Course  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K�RNFYSIK AK FKF 011 Nuclear Physics, Basic Course Antal poäng: 3.0. Obligatorisk för: F3. Valfri för: E4. Kursansvarig: Docent Per Kristiansson, per.kristiansson@nuclear.lu.se Förkunskapskrav

371

Quick Tips: 7 Tips to Researching Companies BASIC TIPS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quick Tips: 7 Tips to Researching Companies BASIC TIPS: · Visit the company's website. This is one of the best ways to research a potential employer. You can learn about the company's history, industry, and products, how the company is structured, and being to gain an understanding of the company's culture

Gering, Jon C.

372

Introduction Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Introduction Welcome. Brain Basics provides information on how the brain works, how mental illnesses are disorders of the brain, and ongoing research that helps us better understand and treat be moderate, or serious and cause severe disability. Through research, we know that mental disorders are brain

Bandettini, Peter A.

373

RELATIVISTIC DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY: FOUNDATIONS AND BASIC FORMALISM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Chapter 10 RELATIVISTIC DENSITY FUNCTIONAL THEORY: FOUNDATIONS AND BASIC FORMALISM E. Engela a An overview of relativistic density functional theory (RDFT) is presented with special emphasis on its field-Cluster schemes in recent years density functional theory (DFT) still represents the method of choice

Engel, Eberhard

374

FWP executive summaries: Basic energy sciences materials sciences programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides an Executive Summary of the various elements of the Materials Sciences Program which is funded by the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

Samara, G.A.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Brilliant on the Basics A Guide for Leaders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for success from Day One, and to continuously create the right conditions for that success -- being Brilliant on the Basics creates a solid foundation upon which every successful career is launched and provides a road map for success. In many cases, these efforts are the command's first opportunities to prove it cares about

376

KH Computational Physics-2006 Basic Numerical Algorithms Integration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KH Computational Physics- 2006 Basic Numerical Algorithms Integration Numerical integration competing factors one needs to consider · speed - number of function evaluations or grid points · precision or "smart" meshes with lower order routines Kristjan Haule, 2006 ­1­ #12;KH Computational Physics- 2006

Glashausser, Charles

377

Estimation of steady-state basic parameters of stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From a minimum of total energy of celestial bodies, their basic parameters are obtained. The steady-state values of the mass, radius, and temperature of stars and white dwarfs, as well as masses of pulsars are calculated. The luminosity and giromagnetic ratio of celestial bodies are estimated. All the obtained values are in a satisfactory agreement with observation data.

B. V. Vasiliev

2000-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Auction Basics for Wholesale Power Markets: Objectives and Pricing Rules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Auction Basics for Wholesale Power Markets: Objectives and Pricing Rules Leigh Tesfatsion, Member to U.S. restructured wholesale power markets, i.e., centrally-administered wholesale power markets and illustrated. Complicating factors specific to wholesale power markets are clarified, and recent advances

Tesfatsion, Leigh

379

Mobile and Ubiquitous Compu3ng RFID Basics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mobile and Ubiquitous Compu3ng RFID Basics #12;· RFID principle(s) of opera3on #12;Component roles · High-frequency interface" ­ generates transmission power to activate tag" ­ modulates transmission/demodulates tag signal" · Control system" ­ control communication with tags" · anti

Roussos, George

380

Tutorial on seismic interferometry: Part 1 --Basic principles and applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tutorial on seismic interferometry: Part 1 -- Basic principles and applications Kees Wapenaar1 , Deyan Draganov1 , Roel Snieder2 , Xander Campman3 , and Arie Verdel3 ABSTRACT Seismic interferometry is the retrieval of seismic surface-wave responses from ambient noise and the subsequent tomographic determination

Snieder, Roel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

TruLifesaver American Heart Association Basic Life Support Course  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TruLifesaver American Heart Association Basic Life Support Course The Truman Institute P: 660 concepts of high-quality CPR · The American Heart Association Chain of Survival · Differences between Cost includes all instruction, materials and two year certification with the American Heart Association

Gering, Jon C.

382

1. Introduction The atmospheric greenhouse effect is the basic mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Introduction The atmospheric greenhouse effect is the basic mechanism whereby absorbed solar system of the Earth is endowed with a moderately strong greenhouse effect that is characterized by non CO2. There is a strong feedback contribution to the greenhouse effect by water vapor and clouds

383

basic student budget 2014 |2015 LIVING ON CAMPUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

basic student budget 2014 |2015 #12;LIVING ON CAMPUS HALL FEES Ł 119.18 ­ average cost x 40 weeks at Ł119.18 per week, and may be cheaper depending on type of accommodation. This budget is meant months (whether you live in the flat over the summer or not). This budget is meant as a realistic guide

Painter, Kevin

384

PATENT LAW BASICS 1. What is a Patent?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PATENT LAW BASICS 1. What is a Patent? A patent is an agreement between an inventor, or selling the described invention. As stated in the United States Constitution, the main purpose of patents from a patented invention, the public also benefits from it by buying and using it. The full patent

385

Start-Ups for Smarties Introduction and Basics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Start-Ups for Smarties 4 Introduction and Basics Introduction Academic researchers frequently suspect that a discovery of theirs may have what it takes to spawn a start-up company. Usually be missing the boat by not being in- volved in a start-up. This is a dramatic change from the situation

Arnold, Jonathan

386

Process Hijacking Process checkpointing is a basic mechanism required for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process Hijacking Abstract Process checkpointing is a basic mechanism required for providing High Throughput Computing service on distributively owned resources. We present a new process checkpoint and migration technique, called process hijacking, that uses dynamic program re­writing techniques to add

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

387

Process Hijacking Process checkpointing is a basic mechanism required for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process Hijacking Abstract Process checkpointing is a basic mechanism required for providing High Throughput Computing service on distributively owned resources. We present a new process checkpoint and migration technique, called process hijacking, that uses dynamic program re-writing techniques to add

Miller, Barton P.

388

Chemical Engineering Is Chemical Engineering right for me?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Engineering Is Chemical Engineering right for me? If you are interested in the uses and processes surrounding the engineering of new and raw materials, a degree in Chemical Engineering may be well suited to you. The Chemical Engineering degree programme will focus on the development of products

Harman, Neal.A.

389

Chemical Organization Theory as a Theoretical Base for Chemical Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Organization Theory as a Theoretical Base for Chemical Computing NAOKI MATSUMARU, FLORIAN-07743 Jena, Germany http://www.minet.uni-jena.de/csb/ Submitted 14 November 2005 In chemical computing- gramming chemical systems a theoretical method to cope with that emergent behavior is desired

Dittrich, Peter

390

Appendix G. Chemicals Appendix G. Chemicals G-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses or way in which a person can come in contact with a chemical substance. Chemicals released to the air may are exposed to chemicals by inhalation (breathing air), ingestion (eating exposed plants and animals

Pennycook, Steve

391

Appendix H. Chemicals Appendix H. Chemicals H-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Through the use of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses or way in which a person can come in contact with a chemical substance. Chemicals released to the air may are exposed to chemicals by inhalation (breathing air), ingestion (eating exposed plants and animals

Pennycook, Steve

392

Appendix G. Chemicals Appendix G. Chemicals G-3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of chemicals, we can increase food production, cure diseases, build more efficient houses, and send people with a chemical substance. Chemicals released to the air may remain suspended for long periods, or they may effluents, which can enter streams and rivers. People are exposed to chemicals by inhalation (breathing air

Pennycook, Steve

393

Future steelmaking technologies and the role of basic research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The steel industry is going through a technological revolution which will not only change how steel is produced but, also, the entire structure of the industry. The drivers for the new or improved technologies, including reduction in capital requirements, possible shortages in raw materials such as coke and low residual scrap, environmental concerns and customer demands are briefly examined. The current status of research and development in the US and selected international producers was examined. As expected, it was found that the industry`s research capabilities have been greatly reduced. Furthermore, less than half of the companies which identified a given technology as critical have significant R and D programs addressing the technology. Examples of how basic research aided in process improvements in the past are given. The examples include demonstrating how fundamentals of reaction kinetics, improved nitrogen control, thermodynamics of systems helped reduce nozzle clogging and fluid flow studies reduced defects in casting. However, in general, basic research did not play a major role in processes previously developed, but helped understanding and aided optimization. To have a major impact, basic research must be focused and be an integral part of any new process development. An example where this has been done successfully is the AISI Direct Ironmaking and Waste Oxide Recycle Projects in which fundamental studies on reduction, slag foaming, and post combustion reactions have led to process understanding, control and optimization. Industry leaders recognize the value and need for basic research but insist it be truly relevant and done with industry input. From these examples the lessons learned on how to make basic research more effective are discussed.

Fruehan, R.J. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Micromachined chemical jet dispenser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dispenser is disclosed for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 {micro}m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (ca. 200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments. 4 figs.

Swierkowski, S.P.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

395

Micromachined chemical jet dispenser  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dispenser for chemical fluid samples that need to be precisely ejected in size, location, and time. The dispenser is a micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) device fabricated in a bonded silicon wafer and a substrate, such as glass or silicon, using integrated circuit-like fabrication technology which is amenable to mass production. The dispensing is actuated by ultrasonic transducers that efficiently produce a pressure wave in capillaries that contain the chemicals. The 10-200 .mu.m diameter capillaries can be arranged to focus in one spot or may be arranged in a larger dense linear array (.about.200 capillaries). The dispenser is analogous to some ink jet print heads for computer printers but the fluid is not heated, thus not damaging certain samples. Major applications are in biological sample handling and in analytical chemical procedures such as environmental sample analysis, medical lab analysis, or molecular biology chemistry experiments.

Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA)

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

396

November 2006 CHEMICAL HYGIENE PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.0 DEPARTMENTAL SAFETY MANAGEMENT 4.1 CHEMISTRY SAFETY COMMITTEE 4.2 TRAINING 4.3 CHEMICAL SAFETY PROTOCOLS 4.2 CHEMICAL HAZARD INFORMATION 6.3 CHEMICAL STORAGE IN LABORATORIES 6.4 WORKING WITH PARTICULARLY HAZARDOUS PROCEDURES 6.8 CHEMICAL WASTE DISPOSAL 6.9 COMPRESSED GASES 6.10 CRYOGENIC LIQUIDS #12;November 2006 3 6

Bordenstein, Seth

397

New Science for Chemicals Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disease Control and Prevention, Third National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals (

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Process Intensification - Chemical Sector Focus  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Process Intensification - Chemical Sector Focus 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction ......

399

Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

G-31 Fluorocarbonhydrocarbons, and (3) fluorocarbon solvents. However, aHigh Hazard Chemicals Fluorocarbon Solvents Fluorocarbon

Ricks Editor, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Chemical Label Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStandingtheirCheck In &Chemical Label Information Chemical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

1998 Chemical Technology Division Annual Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division's activities during 1998 are presented.

Ackerman, J.P.; Einziger, R.E.; Gay, E.C.; Green, D.W.; Miller, J.F.

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

402

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical Technology (CMT) Division is a diverse technical organization with principal emphases in environmental management and development of advanced energy sources. The Division conducts research and development in three general areas: (1) development of advanced power sources for stationary and transportation applications and for consumer electronics, (2) management of high-level and low-level nuclear wastes and hazardous wastes, and (3) electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The Division also performs basic research in catalytic chemistry involving molecular energy resources, mechanisms of ion transport in lithium battery electrolytes, and the chemistry of technology-relevant materials and electrified interfaces. In addition, the Division operates the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory, which conducts research in analytical chemistry and provides analytical services for programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and other organizations. Technical highlights of the Division`s activities during 1997 are presented.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

NETL - Chemical Looping Reactor  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's Chemical Looping Reactor unit is a high-temperature integrated CLC process with extensive instrumentation to improve computational simulations. A non-reacting test unit is also used to study solids flow at ambient temperature. The CLR unit circulates approximately 1,000 pounds per hour at temperatures around 1,800 degrees Fahrenheit.

None

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

404

Basic DC Meter Design ECE 2100 Circuit Analysis Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic DC Meter Design ECE 2100 Circuit Analysis Laboratory updated 8 January 2008 Pre-Laboratory Assignment 1. Design an ammeter with full scale current IFS equal to 5 mA using a meter movement rated at 0.5 mA and 100 mV. 2. Design a voltmeter with a full scale voltage VFS equal to 10 V using the meter

Miller, Damon A.

405

Secondary porosity in sandstones: basic contributions of Chepikov and Savkevich  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of secondary porosity in sandstones - porosity caused primarly by dissolution - has gained considerable attention recently. The basic contributions made by Chepikov and Savkevich, however, have been ignored completely in North American publications. Chepikov et al not only developed the first set of criteria for recognizing secondary porosity, but also attributed the dissolution of cements to the arrival of oil. Savkevich was the first to illustrate the trend of increasing porosity at considerable depths. 1 figure, 1 table.

Shanmugam, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Secondary porosity in sandstones: basic contributions of Chepikov and Savkevich  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of secondary porosity in sandstones-porosity caused primarily by dissolution--has gained considerable attention recently. The basic contributions made by Chepikov and Savkevich, however, have been ignored completely in North American publications. Chepikov et al not only developed the first set of criteria for recognizing secondary porosity, but also attributed the dissolution of cements to the arrival of oil. Savkevich was the first to illustrate the trend of increasing porosity at considerable depths.

Shanmugam, G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Basic Data Report for Monitor Well AEC-7 Reconfiguration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (OSE) permitted well AEC-7 as C-2742. This well has been part of the far-field monitoring network since 1974. The well was used to obtain water level elevations and hydraulic parameters from both the Bell Canyon Formation and the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation. This basic data report provides a historical account of the well from the original installation to the current configuration.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

408

Wood and Pellet Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste and Materials Disposition InformationWindWood and Pellet Heating Basics

409

Inorganic, radioisotopic and organic analysis of 241-AP-101 tank waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Battelle received five samples from Hanford waste tank 241-AP-101, taken at five different depths within the tank. No visible solids or organic layer were observed in the individual samples. Individual sample densities were measured, then the five samples were mixed together to provide a single composite. The composite was homogenized and representative sub-samples taken for inorganic, radioisotopic, and organic analysis. All analyses were performed on triplicate sub-samples of the composite material. The sample composite did not contain visible solids or an organic layer. A subsample held at 10 C for seven days formed no visible solids. The characterization of the 241-AP-101 composite samples included: (1) Inductively-coupled plasma spectrometry for Ag, Al, Ba, Bi, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, La, Mg, Mn, Na, Nd, Ni, P, Pb, Pd, Ru, Rh, Si, Sr, Ti, U, Zn, and Zr (Note: Although not specified in the test plan, As, B, Be, Co, Li, Mo, Sb, Se, Sn, Tl, V, W, and Y were also measured and reported for information only) (2) Radioisotopic analyses for total alpha and total beta activities, {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 60}Co, {sup 79}Se, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 99}Tc as pertechnetate, {sup 106}Ru/Rh, {sup 125}Sb, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, {sup 154}Eu, {sup 155}Eu, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239+240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, {sup 242}Cm, and {sup 243+244}Cm; (3) Inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry for {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 126}Sn, {sup 129}I, {sup 231}Pa, {sup 233}U, {sup 234}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 236}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 241}AMU, {sup 242}AMU, {sup 243}AMU, As, B, Be, Ce, Co, Cs, Eu, I, Li, Mo, Pr, Rb, Sb, Se, Ta, Te, Th, Tl, V, and W; (4) total U by kinetic phosphorescence analysis; (5) Ion chromatography for Cl, F, NO{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}, PO{sub 4}, SO{sub 4}, acetate, formate, oxalate, and citrate; (6) Density, inorganic carbon and organic carbon by two different methods, mercury, free hydroxide, ammonia, and cyanide. The 241-AP-101 composite met all contract limits (molar ratio of analyte to sodium or ratio of becquerels of analyte to moles of sodium) defined in Specification 7 for Envelope A. Except for a few cases, the characterization results met or surpassed the quality control requirements established by the governing quality assurance plan and met or surpassed the minimum reportable quantity requirements specified by BNFL.

SK Fiskum; PR Bredt; JA Campbell; LR Greenwood; OT Farmer; GJ Lumetta; GM Mong; RT Ratner; CZ Soderquist; RG Swoboda; MW Urie; JJ Wagner

2000-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

410

Review of Wildfire Effects on Chemical Water Quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cerro Grande Fire of May 2000 burned almost 43,000 acres of forested land within the Pajarito Plateau watershed in northern New Mexico. Runoff events after the fire were monitored and sampled by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Changes in the composition of runoff water were noted when compared to runoff water composition of the previous 20 years. In order to understand the chemical water quality changes noted in runoff water after the Cerro Grande Fire, a summary of the reported effects of fire on runoff water chemistry and on soils that contribute to runoff water chemistry was compiled. The focus of this report is chemical water quality, so it does not address changes in sediment transport or water quantity associated with fires. Within the general inorganic parameters, increases of dissolved calcium, magnesium, nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium and pH in runoff water have been observed as a result of fire. However, the dissolved sodium, carbon, and sulfate have been observed to increase and decrease as a result of fire. Metals have been much less studied, but manganese, copper, zinc, and cesium-137 have been observed to increase as a result of fire.

Kelly Bitner; Bruce Gallaher; Ken Mullen

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Chemical Technology Division progress report, April 1, 1983-March 31, 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of the following programs is reported: fission energy; nuclear and chemical waste management; environmental control technology; basic science and technology; biotechnology programs; transuranium-element processing; Nuclear Regulatory Commission programs; Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Project; radioactive materials production; computer 1 engineering applications; and miscellanous programs.

Not Available

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Small angle neutron scattering characterization of the porous structure of carbons prepared using inorganic templates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) was used for the characterization of the microstructure of carbons derived from organic-loaded inorganic template materials that are used as anodes in lithium ion cells. Pillared clays (PILC), layered silicates whose sheets have been permanently propped open by sets of thermally stable molecular props, were used as a template to load the organic precursors. Five organic precursors, namely pyrene, styrene, pyrene/trioxane copolymer, ethylene, and propylene, were used to load the PILC. Pyrolysis was carried out at 700 C under nitrogen atmosphere. From SANS, information has been derived about the pore radius, mass fractal dimension, and the cutoff length (above which the fractal property breaks down) on each carbon. In general, the pore radius ranges from 4 to 11 {angstrom}, and the mass fractal dimension varies in the range from 2.5 to 2.9. Contrast-match SANS studies of carbons wetted in 84% deuterated toluene indicate that a significant amount of pores in carbon from pyrene are not accessible to the solvent, while most of the porous network of carbon from propylene is accessible.

Sandi, G.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Carrado, K.A.; Winans, R.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Direct determination of the local Hamaker constant of inorganic surfaces based on scanning force microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The energetics involved in the bonding fluctuations between nanometer-sized silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}) probes and highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) could be quantified directly and locally on the submicron scale via a time-temperature superposition analysis of the lateral forces between scanning force microscopy silicon dioxide probes and inorganic sample surfaces. The so-called “intrinsic friction analysis” (IFA) provided direct access to the Hamaker constants for HOPG and MoS{sub 2}, as well as the control sample, calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}). The use of scanning probe enables nanoscopic analysis of bonding fluctuations, thereby overcoming challenges associated with larger scale inhomogeneity and surface roughness common to conventional techniques used to determine surface free energies and dielectric properties. A complementary numerical analysis based on optical and electron energy loss spectroscopy and the Lifshitz quantum electrodynamic theory of van der Waals interactions is provided and confirms quantitatively the IFA results.

Krajina, Brad A.; Kocherlakota, Lakshmi S.; Overney, René M., E-mail: roverney@u.washington.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1750 (United States)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

414

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) procedure compendium. Volume 3, Inorganic instrumental methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methods cover: C in solutions, F (electrode), elements by atomic emission spectrometry, inorganic anions by ion chromatography, Hg in water/solids/sludges, As, Se, Bi, Pb, data calculations for SST (single shell tank?) samples, Sb, Tl, Ag, Pu, O/M ratio, ignition weight loss, pH value, ammonia (N), Cr(VI), alkalinity, U, C sepn. from soil/sediment/sludge, Pu purif., total N, water, C and S, surface Cl/F, leachable Cl/F, outgassing of Ge detector dewars, gas mixing, gas isotopic analysis, XRF of metals/alloys/compounds, H in Zircaloy, H/O in metals, inpurity extraction, reduced/total Fe in glass, free acid in U/Pu solns, density of solns, Kr/Xe isotopes in FFTF cover gas, H by combustion, MS of Li and Cs isotopes, MS of lanthanide isotopes, GC operation, total Na on filters, XRF spectroscopy QC, multichannel analyzer operation, total cyanide in water/solid/sludge, free cyanide in water/leachate, hydrazine conc., ICP-MS, {sup 99}Tc, U conc./isotopes, microprobe analysis of solids, gas analysis, total cyanide, H/N{sub 2}O in air, and pH in soil.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Catalyzed CO.sub.2-transport membrane on high surface area inorganic support  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are membranes and methods for making the same, which membranes provide improved permeability, stability, and cost-effective manufacturability, for separating CO.sub.2 from gas streams such as flue gas streams. High CO.sub.2 permeation flux is achieved by immobilizing an ultra-thin, optionally catalyzed fluid layer onto a meso-porous modification layer on a thin, porous inorganic substrate such as a porous metallic substrate. The CO.sub.2-selective liquid fluid blocks non-selective pores, and allows for selective absorption of CO.sub.2 from gas mixtures such as flue gas mixtures and subsequent transport to the permeation side of the membrane. Carbon dioxide permeance levels are in the order of 1.0.times.10.sup.-6 mol/(m.sup.2sPa) or better. Methods for making such membranes allow commercial scale membrane manufacturing at highly cost-effective rates when compared to conventional commercial-scale CO.sub.2 separation processes and equipment for the same and such membranes are operable on an industrial use scale.

Liu, Wei

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

416

Strategic Design and Optimization of Inorganic Sorbents for Cesium, Strontium and Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic science goal in this project is to identify structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The research will then apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of sorbents that will exhibit increased cesium, strontium and actinide removal. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to non-radioactive separations.

Maginn, Edward J.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Strategic Design and Optimization of Inorganic Sorbents For Cesium, Strontium and Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic science goal in this project identifies structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The task will apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of new sorbents that will exhibit increased affinity for cesium, strontium and actinide separations. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to nonradioactive separations.

Hobbs, D.; Nyman, M.; Clearfield, A.; Maginn, E.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

COOEE bitumen: chemical aging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study chemical aging in "COOEE bitumen" using molecular dynamic simulations. The model bitumen is composed of four realistic molecule types: saturated hydrocarbon, resinous oil, resin, and asphaltene. The aging reaction is modelled by the chemical reaction: "2 resins $\\rightarrow$ 1 asphaltene". Molecular dynamic simulations of four bitumen compositions, obtained by a repeated application of the aging reaction, are performed. The stress autocorrelation function, the fluid structure, the rotational dynamics of the plane aromatic molecules, and the diffusivity of each molecule, are determined for the four different compositions. The aging reaction causes a significant dynamics slowdown, which is correlated to the aggregation of asphaltene molecules in larger and dynamically slower nanoaggregates. Finally, a detailed description of the role of each molecule types in the aggregation and aging processes is given.

Lemarchand, Claire A; Dyre, Jeppe C; Hansen, Jesper S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Devices for collecting chemical compounds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

420

Removal mechanisms of organic and inorganic solutes in raw, upland drinking water by nanofiltration: influence of solute-solute and solute-membrane interactions   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanofiltration (NF) membranes have been applied successfully for the removal of inorganic and organic pollutants, including micropollutants, from drinking water for the past two decades. However, a complete and quantitative ...

De Munari, Annalisa; Munari, Annalisa de

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Basic Data Report for Drillhole SNL-2 (C-2948)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SNL-2 was drilled in the northwest quarter of Section 12, T22S, R30E, in eastern Eddy County, New Mexico (Figure 2-1). It is located 574 ft from the north line (fnl) and 859 ft from the west line (fwl) of the section (Figure 2-2). This location places the drillhole east of the Livingston Ridge escarpment among oil wells of the Cabin Lake field. SNL-2 will be used to test hydraulic properties and to monitor ground water levels of the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation. SNL-2 was permitted by the New Mexico State Engineer as C-2948. [Official correspondence regarding permitting and regulatory information must reference this permit number.] In the plan describing the integrated groundwater hydrology program (Sandia National Laboratories, 2003), SNL-2 is also codesignated WTS-1 because the location also satisfies needs for long-term monitoring of water quality and movement in the Culebra Dolomite for RCRA permitting; this program is under the management of Washington TRU Solutions LLC (WTS). In the event that additional wells are established on the SNL-2 drillpad to monitor other hydrological units (e.g., the Magenta Dolomite Member of the Permian Rustler Formation), the current drillhole will likely be referred to as SNL-2C because it is completed in the Culebra. Most drillholes at WIPP have been described after completion to provide an account of the geology, hydrology, or other basic data acquired during drilling and immediate completion of the drillhole. In addition, the basic data report provides an account of the drilling procedures and activities that may be helpful to later interpretations of data or for further work in the drillhole, including test activities and eventual plugging and abandoning activities. The basic data report also provides a convenient means of reporting information about administrative activities necessary to drill the hole.

Dennis W. Powers; Washington Regultory and Environmental Services

2005-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

422

Cotton Harvest-Aid Chemicals.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Application Managing Harvest-Aid Program Secondary Growth Insect Control Care of Equipment Safety with Chemicals Guide for Using Cotton Harvest Aids Defoliants Desiccants Mixtures Plant Regulators-Conditioners 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 6 7 7 COTTON... HARVEST-AID CHEMICALS Robert B. Metzer and James Supak* As the name implies, harvest-aid chemicals pre pare the cotton crop for harvest by reducing foliage and plant moisture that interfere with harvesting operations. Harvest-aid chemicals...

Metzer, Robert B.; Supak, James

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

424

Nuclear reactor engineering: Reactor design basics. Fourth edition, Volume One  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This new edition of this classic reference combines broad yet in-depth coverage of nuclear engineering principles with practical descriptions of their application in design and operation of nuclear power plants. Extensively updated, the fourth edition includes new material on reactor safety and risk analysis, regulation, fuel management, waste management, and operational aspects of nuclear power. This volume contains the following: energy from nuclear fission; nuclear reactions and radiations; neutron transport; nuclear design basics; nuclear reactor kinetics and control; radiation protection and shielding; and reactor materials.

Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Geothermal Direct-Use Basics | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel Cell Vehicle BasicsWashersEnergyGeospatial

426

Biomass Basics: The Facts About Bioenergy | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top Five EEREDepartmentFebruary 4, 2014Biogas and Fuel Cells2008:BiomassBasics: The

427

Flat-Plate Photovoltaic System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office0-72.pdf Flash2010-72.pdf Flash2010-72.pdf MoreFlash_2010-49.pdfSystem Basics

428

Revolving Loan Funds: Basics and Best Practices Webinar | Department of  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l LPROJECTS IN RENEWABLEOperatedDepartment ofEnergy Funds: Basics and

429

CHEMICAL LABORATORY SAFETY AND METHODOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL LABORATORY SAFETY AND METHODOLOGY MANUAL August 2013 #12;ii Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince-Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 6472 Biological the safe use, storage, handling, waste and emergency management of chemicals on the University of Northern

Northern British Columbia, University of

430

ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYTICAL METHODS in CHEMICAL ECOLOGY a post graduate course (doktorandkurs) when: February 10 ­ 28, 2014 where: Chemical Ecology, Plant Protection Biology, Swedish University of Agriculture (SLU to modern analytical methods used in Chemical Ecological and Ecotoxicological research, such as: methods

431

Research in the chemical sciences. Summaries of FY 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This summary book is published annually to provide information on research supported by the Department of Energy`s Division of Chemical Sciences, which is one of four Divisions of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the Office of Energy Research. These summaries provide the scientific and technical public, as well as the legislative and executive branches of the Government, information, either generally or in some depth, about the Chemical Sciences program. Scientists interested in proposing research for support will find the publication useful for gauging the scope of the present basic research program and it`s relationship to their interests. Proposals that expand this scope may also be considered or directed to more appropriate offices. The primary goal of the research summarized here is to add significantly to the knowledge base in which existing and future efficient and safe energy technologies can evolve. As a result, scientific excellence is a major criterion applied in the selection of research supported by the Division of Chemical Sciences, but another important consideration is emphasis on science that is advancing in ways that will produce new information related to energy.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Opportunities for discovery: Theory and computation in Basic Energy Sciences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New scientific frontiers, recent advances in theory, and rapid increases in computational capabilities have created compelling opportunities for theory and computation to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). The prospects for success in the experimental programs of BES will be enhanced by pursuing these opportunities. This report makes the case for an expanded research program in theory and computation in BES. The Subcommittee on Theory and Computation of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee was charged with identifying current and emerging challenges and opportunities for theoretical research within the scientific mission of BES, paying particular attention to how computing will be employed to enable that research. A primary purpose of the Subcommittee was to identify those investments that are necessary to ensure that theoretical research will have maximum impact in the areas of importance to BES, and to assure that BES researchers will be able to exploit the entire spectrum of computational tools, including leadership class computing facilities. The Subcommittee s Findings and Recommendations are presented in Section VII of this report.

Harmon, Bruce; Kirby, Kate; McCurdy, C. William

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

433

Three-dimensional simulations of inorganic aerosol distributions in east Asia during spring 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conditions of low dust loading, SO2 condensation and gas phase ammonia distribution determine the nitrate includes the on-line gas-aerosol thermodynamic module SCAPE II, and explicitly considers chemical aging of dust, is used in the analysis. The model is found to represent many of the important observed features

434

Chemical kinetics modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Chemical sensing flow probe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir. 7 figs.

Laguna, G.R.; Peter, F.J.; Butler, M.A.

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

436

Chemical Sciences Division - CSD  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User Group and Userof a blast-resistant navalChemCam laser ChemicalCSD

437

Chemical Processing Qualification Standard  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuels Chemical Kinetic Modeling of16-2010 February

438

CAMD Cleanroom Chemical List  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites Proposed Route Segments (notCAMD Cleanroom Chemical List

439

Chemical sensing flow probe  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A new chemical probe determines the properties of an analyte using the light absorption of the products of a reagent/analyte reaction. The probe places a small reaction volume in contact with a large analyte volume. Analyte diffuses into the reaction volume. Reagent is selectively supplied to the reaction volume. The light absorption of the reaction in the reaction volume indicates properties of the original analyte. The probe is suitable for repeated use in remote or hostile environments. It does not require physical sampling of the analyte or result in significant regent contamination of the analyte reservoir.

Laguna, George R. (Albuquerque, NM); Peter, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Chemical & Engineering Materials | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical & Engineering Materials SHARE Chemical and Engineering Materials Neutron-based research at SNS and HFIR in Chemical and Engineering Materials strives to understand the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Basic Research Needs for Electrical Energy Storage: Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Electrical Energy Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformationCenterResearch HighlightsToolsBES ReportsExperimentBasic Energy

442

Effect of chronic inhalation of inorganic arsenic on the risk of stillbirth in a community surrounding an agriculture chemical production facility: a hospital-based study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

series of epidemiological studies were carried out in a community surrounding a copper smelter in Ronnskar, Sweden, where arsenic was considered a major environmental pollutant. The frequency of spontaneous abortion was increased among women living... in the community nearest the smelter relative to the frequency in women living in similar communities located farther from the smelter (10). Furthermore, the birthweight of infants born to women living nearest the smelter were lower compared with those...

Ihrig, Melanie M

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Chemical Reactions in DSMC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DSMC simulations of chemically reacting gas flows have generally employed procedures that convert the macroscopic chemical rate equations to reaction cross-sections at the microscopic level. They therefore depend on the availability of experimental data that has been fitted to equations of the Arrhenius form. This paper presents a physical model for dissociation and recombination reactions and a phenomenological model for exchange and chain reactions. These are based on the vibrational states of the colliding molecules and do not require any experimentally-based data. The simplicity of the models allows the corresponding rate equations to be written down and, while these are not required for the implementation of the models, they facilitate their validation. The model is applied to a typical hypersonic atmospheric entry problem and the results are compared with the corresponding results from the traditional method. It is also used to investigate both spontaneous and forced ignition as well as the structure of a deflagration wave in an oxygen-hydrogen mixture.

Bird, G. A. [GAB Consulting Pty Ltd, 144/110 Sussex Street, Sydney NSW 2000 (Australia)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

444

Chemical Looping Combustion Kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most promising methods of capturing CO{sub 2} emitted by coal-fired power plants for subsequent sequestration is chemical looping combustion (CLC). A powdered metal oxide such as NiO transfers oxygen directly to a fuel in a fuel reactor at high temperatures with no air present. Heat, water, and CO{sub 2} are released, and after H{sub 2}O condensation the CO{sub 2} (undiluted by N{sub 2}) is ready for sequestration, whereas the nickel metal is ready for reoxidation in the air reactor. In principle, these processes can be repeated endlessly with the original nickel metal/nickel oxide participating in a loop that admits fuel and rejects ash, heat, and water. Our project accumulated kinetic rate data at high temperatures and elevated pressures for the metal oxide reduction step and for the metal reoxidation step. These data will be used in computational modeling of CLC on the laboratory scale and presumably later on the plant scale. The oxygen carrier on which the research at Utah is focused is CuO/Cu{sub 2}O rather than nickel oxide because the copper system lends itself to use with solid fuels in an alternative to CLC called 'chemical looping with oxygen uncoupling' (CLOU).

Edward Eyring; Gabor Konya

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

445

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate intallation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to faciliate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

Greiner, Leonard (2853-A Hickory Pl., Costa Mesa, CA 92626)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

TILLMPAD NUMERISK STRMNINGSMEKANIK MVK150 Applied Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFD), basic course  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TILLĂ?MPAD NUMERISK STRĂ?MNINGSMEKANIK MVK150 Applied Computational Fluid Mechanics (CFD), basic.D.; Computational Fluid Dynamics, The basics with applications, McGraw-Hill, 1995. #12;

450

Criticality Safety Basics for INL FMHs and CSOs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power is a valuable and efficient energy alternative in our energy-intensive society. However, material that can generate nuclear power has properties that require this material be handled with caution. If improperly handled, a criticality accident could result, which could severely harm workers. This document is a modular self-study guide about Criticality Safety Principles. This guide's purpose it to help you work safely in areas where fissionable nuclear materials may be present, avoiding the severe radiological and programmatic impacts of a criticality accident. It is designed to stress the fundamental physical concepts behind criticality controls and the importance of criticality safety when handling fissionable materials outside nuclear reactors. This study guide was developed for fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates to use with related web-based course 00INL189, BEA Criticality Safety Principles, and to help prepare for the course exams. These individuals must understand basic information presented here. This guide may also be useful to other Idaho National Laboratory personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. This guide also includes additional information that will not be included in 00INL189 tests. The additional information is in appendices and paragraphs with headings that begin with 'Did you know,' or with, 'Been there Done that'. Fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates may review additional information at their own discretion. This guide is revised as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Issued in 2006, Revision 0 established the basic text and integrated various programs from former contractors. Revision 1 incorporates operation and program changes implemented since 2006. It also incorporates suggestions, clarifications, and additional information from readers and from personnel who took course 00INL189. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that fissionable material handlers and criticality safety officers must understand. The reorganization is based on and consistent with changes made to course 00INL189 due to a review of course exam results and to discussions with personnel who conduct area-specific training.

V. L. Putman

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Basic Marketing of Texas Cotton: Forward Contracts, Cash Sales, Marketing Pools, and the USDA Loan Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication explains basic marketing alternatives for cotton producers, including forward contracts, cash sales, marketing pools and USDA loan programs....

Robinson, John; Park, John; Smith, Jackie; Anderson, Carl

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

452

Radiative Plasmas At The Edge And Their Basic Properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma radiation plays the determining role in temperature balance, equilibrium and stability of plasmas at the edge of fusion devices. The differences in properties of radiative plasmas and pure hydrogen ones are significant. The sound branch is split into two branches, i.e. fast and slow sounds. They may be destabilize by radiation and stabilized by internal relative motion of species. The basic properties of radiative plasmas are discussed in the current presentation. Radiation of multi-electron impurity ions is significant, even if the impurity concentration is small. It depends strongly on the Impurity Distribution Over Ionization States (IDOIS). One can find many interesting effects taking into account the finite relaxation time of IDOIS and thermal forces. In particular, the anomalous sound damping due to the internal friction, decompression shocks, slow thermal waves, and self-sustained thermal oscillation are discussed in the current presentation. Opacity effects also are discussed in the current presentation.

Morozov, D. Kh. [Institute of Nuclear Fusion, RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' Kurchatov square, 1, MOSCOW, 123182 (Russian Federation)

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

The basic CSP reductions revisited Libor Barto, joint with Michael Pinsker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The basic CSP reductions revisited Libor Barto, joint with Michael Pinsker Charles University in Prague Banff workshop November 2014 #12;Outline and notation Outline Basic CSP reductions ­ 3 views Questions Basic CSP reductions revisited Notation A . . . finite set of relations on A A . . . the clone

Barto, Libor

454

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 2012-2014 CATALOG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 2012-2014 CATALOG (catalog valid until August 2020) Suggested Arrangement 204, Introduction to Chemical Practice............................2 CHE 102, Introduction to Chemical ..............................1 CHE 317, Intro to Chemical Engineering Analysis...................3 CH 353, Physical Chemistry

Texas at Austin, University of

455

CHEMICAL SENSORS School of Chemistry and Biochemistry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHEMICAL SENSORS CHEM 6282 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Chemical sensors physics and electronics or a chemical instrumentation course. The topics covered will include general theory of chemical recognition, electrochemical, optical, mass sensors and data reduction. Text: J

Sherrill, David

456

Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Biochemical, Environmental, Petroleum Engineering and Nantoechnology. CHEMICAL&MATERIALSSCIENCE CHE OVERVIEW of Science 131 units · Chemical Engineering (Petroleum) Bachelor of Science 136 units · Chemical Engineering38 Chemical engineers design, control and optimize large-scale chemical, physicochemical

Rohs, Remo

457

Chemical comminution of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the present research is to study the chemical reactivity of a mixture of methyl alcohol and aqueous sodium hydroxide solution in the temperature range 298 to 363 K, and a caustic concentration of 0 to 10 wt. %, on an Iowa bituminous coal. The sample studied was collected from coal zone 4, equivalent to most historical references to Laddsdale coal. The coals in this zone are typical high-sulfur, high-ash middle Pennsylvania Cherokee group coals. The apparent rank is high-volatile C bituminous coal. The relatively high content of sulfur and 23 other elements in these coals is related to near neutral (6-8) pH conditions in the depositional and early diagenetic environments, and to postdepositional sphalerite/calcite/pyrite/kaolinite/barite mineralization.

Mamaghani, A.H.; Beddow, J.K.; Vetter, A.F.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

Greiner, Leonard (2750-C Segerstrom Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92704)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic Molten Salts for Concentrating Solar Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key technological issue facing the success of future Concentrating Solar Thermal Power (CSP) plants is creating an economical Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system. Current TES systems use either sensible heat in fluids such as oil, or molten salts, or use thermal stratification in a dual-media consisting of a solid and a heat-transfer fluid. However, utilizing the heat of fusion in inorganic molten salt mixtures in addition to sensible heat , as in a Phase change material (PCM)-based TES, can significantly increase the energy density of storage requiring less salt and smaller containers. A major issue that is preventing the commercial use of PCM-based TES is that it is difficult to discharge the latent heat stored in the PCM melt. This is because when heat is extracted, the melt solidifies onto the heat exchanger surface decreasing the heat transfer. Even a few millimeters of thickness of solid material on heat transfer surface results in a large drop in heat transfer due to the low thermal conductivity of solid PCM. Thus, to maintain the desired heat rate, the heat exchange area must be large which increases cost. This project demonstrated that the heat transfer coefficient can be increase ten-fold by using forced convection by pumping a hyper-eutectic salt mixture over specially coated heat exchanger tubes. However,only 15% of the latent heat is used against a goal of 40% resulting in a projected cost savings of only 17% against a goal of 30%. Based on the failure mode effect analysis and experience with pumping salt at near freezing point significant care must be used during operation which can increase the operating costs. Therefore, we conclude the savings are marginal to justify using this concept for PCM-TES over a two-tank TES. The report documents the specialty coatings, the composition and morphology of hypereutectic salt mixtures and the results from the experiment conducted with the active heat exchanger along with the lessons learnt during experimentation.

Mathur, Anoop [Terrafore Inc.] [Terrafore Inc.

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

460

B.1 Matlab basics This section contains some basics of Matlab. Matlab has a lot of powerful and painless toolboxes, but we will  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B Matlab B.1 Matlab basics This section contains some basics of Matlab. Matlab has a lot of powerful and painless toolboxes, but we will try to do most things by translating mathematics into matlab There are two ways to get help in matlab. The first is command line, which is useful if you know the name

Lakey, Joseph D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

|Archives| Charts| Companies/Links| Conferences| How A Fuel Cell Works | Patents| | Types of Fuel Cells | The Basics | Fuel Cell News | Basics on Hydrogen | Search|  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cells | The Basics | Fuel Cell News | Basics on Hydrogen | Search| *Stay Updated every week With a Free|Archives| Charts| Companies/Links| Conferences| How A Fuel Cell Works | Patents| | Types of Fuel Subscription To "Inside The Industry"As Well as a Weekly Updated Patents Page Gulliver's fuel cell travels

Lovley, Derek

462

|Archives| Charts| Companies/Links| Conferences| How A Fuel Cell Works | Patents| | Types of Fuel Cells | The Basics | Fuel Cell News | Basics on Hydrogen | Search|  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cells | The Basics | Fuel Cell News | Basics on Hydrogen | Search| *Stay Updated every week With a Free|Archives| Charts| Companies/Links| Conferences| How A Fuel Cell Works | Patents| | Types of Fuel Subscription To "Inside The Industry"As Well as a Weekly Updated Patents Page Fuel cell power Publication Date

Lovley, Derek

463

FAQS Reference Guide- Chemical Processing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the February 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1176-2010, Chemical Processing Functional Area Qualification Standard.

464

Chemical substructure analysis in toxicology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary examination of chemical-substructure analysis (CSA) demonstrates the effective use of the Chemical Abstracts compound connectivity file in conjunction with the bibliographic file for relating chemical structures to biological activity. The importance of considering the role of metabolic intermediates under a variety of conditions is illustrated, suggesting structures that should be examined that may exhibit potential activity. This CSA technique, which utilizes existing large files accessible with online personal computers, is recommended for use as another tool in examining chemicals in drugs. 2 refs., 4 figs.

Beauchamp, R.O. Jr. [Center for Information on Toxicology and Environment, Raleigh, NC (United States)

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

465

ChemicalChemical StratigraphyStratigraphy Oxygen, Carbon, Strontium,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2/25/2009 1 ChemicalChemical StratigraphyStratigraphy Oxygen, Carbon, Strontium, Sulphur Isotopes Change. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, U.S. Department evolves over time, with the geological time line running from right to left in this graph. The increased

Miami, University of

466

Chemical Biology Chemical Screening for Hair Cell Loss and Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Biology Chemical Screening for Hair Cell Loss and Protection in the Zebrafish Lateral Line Rubel,1,2 and David W. Raible1,4 Abstract In humans, most hearing loss results from death of hair cells, the mechanosensory receptors of the inner ear. Two goals of current hearing research are to protect hair cells from

Rubel, Edwin

467

Methods of chemically converting first materials to second materials utilizing hybrid-plasma systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In one aspect, the invention encompasses a method of chemically converting a first material to a second material. A first plasma and a second plasma are formed, and the first plasma is in fluid communication with the second plasma. The second plasma comprises activated hydrogen and oxygen, and is formed from a water vapor. A first material is flowed into the first plasma to at least partially ionize at least a portion of the first material. The at least partially ionized first material is flowed into the second plasma to react at least some components of the first material with at least one of the activated hydrogen and activated oxygen. Such converts at least some of the first material to a second material. In another aspect, the invention encompasses a method of forming a synthetic gas by flowing a hydrocarbon-containing material into a hybrid-plasma system. In yet another aspect, the invention encompasses a method of degrading a hydrocarbon-containing material by flowing such material into a hybrid-plasma system. In yet another aspect, the invention encompasses a method of releasing an inorganic component of a complex comprising the inorganic component and an other component, wherein the complex is flowed through a hybrid-plasma system.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grandy, Jon D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

The Creation of a French Basic Nuclear Installation - Description of the Regulatory Process - 13293  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CEA is a French government-funded technological research organization. It has to build a medium-level waste interim storage facility because the geological repository will not be available until 2025. This interim storage facility, called DIADEM, has to be available in 2017. These wastes are coming from the research facilities for spent fuel reprocessing and the dismantling of the most radioactive parts of nuclear facilities. The CEA handles the waste management by inventorying the needs and updating them regularly. The conception of the facility is mainly based on this inventory. It provides quantity and characteristics of wastes and it gives the production schedule until 2035. Beyond mass and volume, main characteristics of these radioactive wastes are chemical nature, radioisotopes, radioactivity, radiation dose, the heat emitted, corrosive or explosive gas production, etc. These characteristics provide information to study the repository safety. DIADEM mainly consists of a concrete cell, isolated from the outside, wherein stainless steel welded containers are stored, stacked in a vertical position in the racks. DIADEM is scheduled to store three types of 8 mm-thick, stainless steel cylindrical containers with an outside diameter 498 mm and height from 620 to 2120 mm. DIADEM will be a basic nuclear installation (INB in French) because of overall activity of radioactive substances stored. The creation of a French basic nuclear installation is subject to authorization according to the French law No. 2006-686 of 13 June 2006 on Transparency and Security in the Nuclear Field. The authorization takes into account the technical and financial capacities of the licensee which must allow him to conduct his project in compliance with these interests, especially to cover the costs of decommissioning the installation and conduct remediation work, and to monitor and maintain its location site or, for radioactive waste disposal installations, to cover the definitive shut-down, maintenance and surveillance expenditure. The authorization is issued by a decree adopted upon advice of the French Nuclear Safety Authority and after a public enquiry. In accordance with Decree No. 2007-1557 of November 2, 2007, the application is filed with the ministries responsible for nuclear safety and the Nuclear Safety Authority. It consists of twelve files and four records information. The favorable opinion of the Nuclear Safety Authority on the folder is required to start the public inquiry. Once the public inquiry is completed, the building permit is issued by the prefect. (authors)

Mahe, Carole [CEA Marcoule - BP17171 - 30207 Bagnols-Sur-Ceze (France)] [CEA Marcoule - BP17171 - 30207 Bagnols-Sur-Ceze (France); Leroy, Christine [CEA Cadarache - 13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)] [CEA Cadarache - 13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

The use of capacitive deionization with carbon aerogel electrodes to remove inorganic contaminants from water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capacitive deionization of water with a stack of carbon aerogel electrodes has been successfully demonstrated for the first time. Unlike ion exchange, one of the more conventional deionization processes, no chemicals were required for regeneration of the system. Electricity was used instead. Water with various anions and cations was pumped through the electrochemical cell. After polarization, ions were electrostatically removed from the water and held in the electric double layers formed at electrode surfaces. The water leaving the cell was purified, as desired.

Farmer, J.C.; Fix, D.V.; Mack, G.V.; Pekala, R.W.; Poco, J.F.

1995-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

470

Hadron Physics and QCD: Just the Basic Facts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With discovery of the Higgs boson, the Standard Model of Particle Physics became complete. Its formulation is a remarkable story; and the process of verification is continuing, with the most important chapter being the least well understood. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is that part of the Standard Model which is supposed to describe all of nuclear physics and yet, almost fifty years after the discovery of quarks, we are only just beginning to understand how QCD moulds the basic bricks for nuclei: pious, neutrons, protons. QCD is characterized by two emergent phenomena: confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking (DCSB), whose implications are extraordinary. This contribution describes how DCSB, not the Higgs boson, generates more than 98% of the visible mass in the Universe, explains why confinement guarantees that condensates, those quantities that were commonly viewed as constant mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons, and elucidates a range of observable consequences of confinement and DCSB whose measurement is the focus of a vast international experimental programme.

Craig D. Roberts

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

471

Modeling variable density effects in turbulent flames -- Some basic considerations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper discusses the basic physical phenomena involved in pressure-density interactions, and presents models of pressure-velocity, pressure-scalar, baroclinic and dilatation effects for variable density low Mach-number turbulence. Their implementation in the {kappa}-{epsilon} framework is then described and their performance evaluated. The models assume that both scalar transport and turbulence generation arising from pressure-density interactions in flames are caused by the motion of large scale turbulent thermals superposed on the normal turbulence mechanism. The velocity of the thermals is related directly to the mean pressure gradient and local density differences in the flames. It is furthermore assumed that the correction for dilatation effects in the {kappa}-{epsilon} system can be determined from the constraint of conservation of the angular momentum of turbulence per unit mass. Simple corrections of the {kappa}-{epsilon} system are proposed for fast chemistry diffusion and premixed flames subject to variable pressure gradients, which offer substantial improvements in the predictions of the flames. some problems remain, particularly in predictions of turbulence in premixed flames, owing to large scale instabilities of the flames observed in the experiments.

Chomiak, J.; Nisbet, J.R. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Thermo and Fluid Dynamics] [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Thermo and Fluid Dynamics

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Amphiphile nanoarchitectonics: from basic physical chemistry to advanced applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amphiphiles, either synthetic or natural, are structurally simple molecules with the unprecedented capacity to self-assemble into complex, hierarchical geometries in nanospace. Effective self-assembly processes of amphiphiles are often used to mimic biological systems, such as, assembly of lipids and proteins, which has paved a way for bottom-up nanotechnology with bio-like advanced functions. Recent developments on nanostructure formation combine simple processes of assembly with the more advanced concept of nanoarchitectonics. In this pespective, we summarize research on self-assembly of amphiphilic molecules such as lipids, surfactants or block copolymers that are a focus of interest for many colloid, polymer, and materials scientists and which have become increasingly important in emerging nanotechnology. Because the fundamental science of amphiphiles was initially developed for their solution assembly then transferred to assemblies on surfaces as a development of nanotechnological technique, this perspective attempts to mirro this development by introducing solution systems and progressing to interfacial systems, which are roughly categorized as (i) basic properties of amphiphiles, (ii) self-assembly of amphiphiles in bulk phases, (iii) assembly on static surfaces, (iv) assembly at dynamic interfaces, and (v) advanced topics from simulation to application. This progression also represents the evolution of amphiphile science and technology from simple assemblies to advanced assemblies to nanoarchitectonics.

Ramanathan, Nathan Muruganathan [ORNL; Shrestha, Lok Kumar [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA); Mori, Taizo [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA); Ji, Dr. Qingmin [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Japan; Hill, Dr. Jonathan P [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Japan; Ariga, Katsuhiko [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Japan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Basic features of the pion valence-quark distribution function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impulse-approximation expression used hitherto to define the pion's valence-quark distribution function is flawed because it omits contributions from the gluons which bind quarks into the pion. A corrected leading-order expression produces the model-independent result that quarks dressed via the rainbow-ladder truncation, or any practical analogue, carry all the pion's light-front momentum at a characteristic hadronic scale. Corrections to the leading contribution may be divided into two classes, responsible for shifting dressed-quark momentum into glue and sea-quarks. Working with available empirical information, we use an algebraic model to express the principal impact of both classes of corrections. This enables a realistic comparison with experiment that allows us to highlight the basic features of the pion's measurable valence-quark distribution, $q^\\pi(x)$; namely, at a characteristic hadronic scale, $q^\\pi(x) \\sim (1-x)^2$ for $x\\gtrsim 0.85$; and the valence-quarks carry approximately two-thirds of the pion's light-front momentum.

Lei Chang; Cédric Mezrag; Hervé Moutarde; Craig D. Roberts; Jose Rodríguez-Quintero; Peter C. Tandy

2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

474

MATLAB Applications in Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATLAB® Applications in Chemical Engineering James A. Carnell North Carolina State University MATLAB is a powerful code-based mathematical and engineering calculation program. It performs all introduction to MATLAB in chemical engineering, and in no way attempts to be a comprehensive MATLAB learning

Al-Juhani, Abdulhadi A.

475

Chemical Evolution in Omega Centauri  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The globular cluster Omega Centauri displays evidence of a complex star formation history and peculiar internal chemical evolution, setting it apart from essentially all other globular clusters of the Milky Way. In this review we discuss the nature of the chemical evolution that has occurred within Omega Cen and attempt to construct a simple scenario to explain its chemistry.

Verne V. Smith

2003-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

476

COSIMA-Rosetta calibration for in-situ characterization of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko cometary inorganic compounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COSIMA (COmetary Secondary Ion Mass Analyser) is a time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometer (TOF-SIMS) on board the Rosetta space mission. COSIMA has been designed to measure the composition of cometary dust grains. It has a mass resolution m/{\\Delta}m of 1400 at mass 100 u, thus enabling the discrimination of inorganic mass peaks from organic ones in the mass spectra. We have evaluated the identification capabilities of the reference model of COSIMA for inorganic compounds using a suite of terrestrial minerals that are relevant for cometary science. Ground calibration demonstrated that the performances of the flight model were similar to that of the reference model. The list of minerals used in this study was chosen based on the mineralogy of meteorites, interplanetary dust particles and Stardust samples. It contains anhydrous and hydrous ferromagnesian silicates, refractory silicates and oxides (present in meteoritic Ca-Al-rich inclusions), carbonates, and Fe-Ni sulfides. From the analyses of these mi...

Krüger, Harald; Engrand, Cécile; Briois, Christelle; Siljeström, Sandra; Merouane, Sihane; Baklouti, Donia; Fischer, Henning; Fray, Nicolas; Hornung, Klaus; Lehto, Harry; Orthous-Daunay, François-Régis; Rynö, Jouni; Schulz, Rita; Silen, Johan; Thirkell, Laurent; Trieloff, Mario; Hilchenbach, Martin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Method of forming a chemical composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of forming a chemical composition such as a chemical hydride is described and which includes the steps of selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of hydrogen; and exposing the selected composition to an amount of ionizing radiation to encourage the changing of the chemical bonds of the selected composition, and chemically reacting the selected composition with the source of hydrogen to facilitate the formation of a chemical hydride.

Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wendt, Kraig M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

478

Chemical analysis quality assurance at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is a uranium reprocessing facility operated by Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company for the Department of Energy at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The chemical analysis support required for the plant processes is provided by a chemical analysis staff of 67 chemists, analysts, and support personnel. The documentation and defense of the chemical analysis data at the ICPP has evolved into a complete chemical analysis quality assurance program with training/qualification and requalification, chemical analysis procedures, records management and chemical analysis methods quality control as major elements. The quality assurance procedures are implemented on a central analytical computer system. The individual features provided by the computer system are automatic method selection for process streams, automation of method calculations, automatic assignment of bias and precision estimates at analysis levels to all method results, analyst specific daily requalification or with-method-use requalification, untrained or unqualified analyst method lockout, statistical testing of process stream results for replicate agreement, automatic testing of process results against pre-established operating, safety, or failure limits at varying confidence levels, and automatic transfer and report of analysis data plus the results of all statistical testing to the Production Department.

Hand, R.L.; Anselmo, R.W.; Black, D.B.; Jacobson, J.J.; Lewis, L.C.; Marushia, P.C.; Spraktes, F.W.; Zack, N.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical Technology (CMT) Division this period, conducted research and development in the following areas: advanced batteries and fuel cells; fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; separating and recovering transuranic elements, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporators, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium; recovering actinide from IFR core and blanket fuel in removing fission products from recycled fuel, and disposing removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors; and physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, thin-film diamond surfaces, effluents from wood combustion, and molten silicates; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT also provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support.

Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic inorganic chemicals" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Chemical Technology Division, Annual technical report, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1991 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources; chemistry of superconducting oxides and other materials of interest with technological application; interfacial processes of importance to corrosion science, catalysis, and high-temperature superconductivity; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 135, 084103 (2011) How accurate are the nonlinear chemical Fokker-Planck and chemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 135, 084103 (2011) How accurate are the nonlinear chemical Fokker-Planck and chemical Langevin equations? Ramon Grima,1,a) Philipp Thomas,1,2 and Arthur V. Straube2 1 School August 2011) The chemical Fokker-Planck equation and the corresponding chemical Langevin equation are com

Straube, Arthur V.

484

ITP Chemicals: Energy and Environmental Profile of the U.S. Chemical...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Opportunity Assessment for the Pulp and Paper, Chemical Manufacturing, and Petroleum Refining Industries ITP Chemicals: Chemical Bandwidth Study - Energy Analysis: A Powerful Tool...

485

Strategic Design and Optimization of Inorganic Sorbents for Cesium, Strontium and Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been determined that poorly crystalline CST and SNT prepared at low temperature (100-150 C) exhibit much faster kinetics in uptake of Sr2+. In-situ X-ray studies has shown that SNT is a precursor phase to the formation of CST. It is possible to form mixtures of CST and SNT in a single reactant mix by control of temperature and time of reaction. It has been found that addition of a small amount of Cs+ to the reactant mix for the preparation of Nb-CST allows formation of the crystals in one day rather than ten days at 200 C. These discoveries suggest that a proper mix of sorbents (SNT, CST, Nb-CST) can be made easily at low cost that would remove all the HLW at the Savannah River site with a single in-tank procedure. The basic science goal in this project is to identify structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The research will then apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of sorbents that will exhibit increased cesium, strontium and actinide removal. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to non-radioactive separations.

Clearfield, Abraham

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Strategic Design and Optimization of Inorganic Sorbents for Cesium, Strontium and Actinides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has been determined that poorly crystalline CST and SNT prepared at low temperature (100-150 deg. C) exhibit much faster kinetics in uptake of Sr2+. 2. In-situ X-ray studies has shown that SNT is a precursor phase to the formation of CST. 3. It is possible to form mixtures of CST and SNT in a single reactant mix by control of temperature and time of reaction. 4. It has been found that addition of a small amount of Cs+ to the reactant mix for the preparation of Nb-CST allows formation of the crystals in one day rather than ten days at 200 deg. C. 5. These discoveries suggest that a proper mix of sorbents (SNT, CST, Nb-CST) can be made easily at low cost that would remove all the HLW at the Savannah River site with a single in-tank procedure. Research Objective The basic science goal in this project is to identify structure/affinity relationships for selected radionuclides and existing sorbents. The research will then apply this knowledge to the design and synthesis of sorbents that will exhibit increased cesium, strontium and actinide removal. The target problem focuses on the treatment of high-level nuclear wastes. The general approach can likewise be applied to non-radioactive separations.

Clearfield, Abraham

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Assessment of the current status of basic nuclear data compilations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Panel on Basic Nuclear Data Compilations believes that it is important to provide the user with an evaluated nuclear database of the highest quality, dependability, and currency. It is also important that the evaluated nuclear data are easily accessible to the user. In the past the panel concentrated its concern on the cycle time for the publication of A-chain evaluations. However, the panel now recognizes that publication cycle time is no longer the appropriate goal. Sometime in the future, publication of the evaluated A-chains will evolve from the present hard-copy Nuclear Data Sheets on library shelves to purely electronic publication, with the advent of universal access to terminals and the nuclear databases. Therefore, the literature cut-off date in the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) is rapidly becoming the only important measure of the currency of an evaluated A-chain. Also, it has become exceedingly important to ensure that access to the databases is as user-friendly as possible and to enable electronic publication of the evaluated data files. Considerable progress has been made in these areas: use of the on-line systems has almost doubled in the past year, and there has been initial development of tools for electronic evaluation, publication, and dissemination. Currently, the nuclear data effort is in transition between the traditional and future methods of dissemination of the evaluated data. Also, many of the factors that adversely affect the publication cycle time simultaneously affect the currency of the evaluated nuclear database. Therefore, the panel continues to examine factors that can influence cycle time: the number of evaluators, the frequency with which an evaluation can be updated, the review of the evaluation, and the production of the evaluation, which currently exists as a hard-copy issue of Nuclear Data Sheets.

Riemer, R.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

488

Basic science research to support the nuclear material focus area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

Boak, J. M. (Jeremy M.); Eller, P. Gary; Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Basic Science Research to Support the Nuclear Materials Focus Area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.; Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. G.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

490

Experimental characterization and chemical kinetics study of chemical looping combustion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical looping combustion (CLC) is one of the most promising technologies to achieve carbon capture in fossil fuel power generation plants. A novel rotary-bed reactor concept was proposed by Zhao et. al. [1] in 2013. It ...

Chen, Tianjiao, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings and sensors are described having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

1993-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

492

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, Gregory C. (P.O. Box 763, Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Doughty, Daniel H. (11724 Woodmar La., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Bein, Thomas (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106); Moller, Karin (1114 Princeton Dr., NE., Albuquerque, NM 87106)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings and sensors having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided.

Frye, Gregory C. (Bernalillo County, NM); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM); Doughty, Daniel H. (Albuquerque, NM); Bein, Thomas (Albuquerque, NM); Moller, Karin (Albuquerque, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Coatings with controlled porosity and chemical properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coatings and sensors are disclosed having both steric and chemical selectivity. Controlled porosity provides the steric selectivity, whereas chemically tailored film properties, using controlled composition or modification by coupling agents, chemical species replacement, or chemical species within pores, provide the chemical selectivity. Single or multiple layers may be provided. 7 figs.

Frye, G.C.; Brinker, C.J.; Doughty, D.H.; Bein, T.; Moller, K.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

495

Research on fundamental aspects of inorganic vapor and particle deposition in coal-fired systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parallel research studies are underway on the following interrelated and fundamental subjects; Geometrical Approach to Determining the Sticking Probability of Particles Impacting on Convex Solid Surfaces; Correlations for High Schmidt Number Particle Deposition From Dilute Flowing Rational Engineering Suspensions; Average Capture Probability of Arriving Particles Which Are Distributed With ResPect to ImPact VelocitY and Incidence Angle (Relative to Deposit Substrate); Experimental and Theoretical Studies of Vapor Infiltration of Non-isothermal Granular Deposits; Effective Area/Volume of Populations of 'MicroPorous' Aerosol Particles (Compact and 'Fractal' Quasispherical Aggregates); Effects of Radiative Heat Transfer on the Coagulation Rates of Combustion-Generated Particles; Structure-Sensitivity of Total Mass Deposition Rates from Combustion Product Streams containing Coagulation-Aged Populations of Aggregated Primary Particles; and Na[sub 2]SO[sub 4] Chemical Vapor Deposition From Chlorine-containing Coal-Derived Gases.

Rosner, D.E.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project, Development and Testing of a High Capacity Plasma Chemical Reactor in the Ukraine was established at the Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT). The associated CRADA was established with Campbell Applied Physics (CAP) located in El Dorado Hills, California. This project extends an earlier project involving both CAP and KIPT conducted under a separate CRADA. The initial project developed the basic Plasma Chemical Reactor (PCR) for generation of ozone gas. This project built upon the technology developed in the first project, greatly enhancing the output of the PCR while also improving reliability and system control.

Reilly, Raymond W.

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

497

Organic and inorganic components in estuarine colloids: Implications for sorption and transport of pollutants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In colloids isolated from Chesapeake Bay and its subestuaries the concentrations of Al, Fe, and a number of trace elements were determined to vary with the clay mineral fraction that was most abundant in freshwater samples collected during the winter. The elements As, Ba, Sb, and Zn, however, increased with increasing organic content, indicating a covariance with the organic component. Organic analyses for amino acids, carbohydrates, and lipids indicate that these biopolymers comprised 4 to 22%, 20 to 60%, and less than 1%, respectively, of the colloidal organic carbon in these samples. The results are significant because amino acids and carbohydrates contain oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur functional groups capable of reacting with trace metals and organic pollutants. The sorption properties of several neutral hydrophobic organic compounds, including PAHs and herbicides, and several aromatic amines were investigated using the estuarine colloidal material. The effects of several environmental variables on these sorption properties were determined. The results indicate that colloids have the capacity to sorb and transport relatively insoluble pollutants that otherwise might remain immobile in the environment. Colloidal organic matter in natural water systems may serve as substrates for the sorption or binding of organic contaminants. Although most of the data has been developed using neutral hydrophobic organic compounds, data also exist for selected polar compound groups such as aromatic amines. The chemical behavior of these compound groups in interaction with DOM appears to have some similarity to their chemical interaction with sediments and soils. Partitioning constants are linear, except for polar compounds, and appear to be closely correlated to fundamental compound properties such as solubilities and octanol-water partition coefficients. 84 references.

Sigleo, A.C.; Means, J.C. (Geological Survey, Lakewood, CO (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Chemical microreactor and method thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming a chemical microreactor includes forming at least one capillary microchannel in a substrate having at least one inlet and at least one outlet, integrating at least one heater into the chemical microreactor, interfacing the capillary microchannel with a liquid chemical reservoir at the inlet of the capillary microchannel, and interfacing the capillary microchannel with a porous membrane near the outlet of the capillary microchannel, the porous membrane being positioned beyond the outlet of the capillary microchannel, wherein the porous membrane has at least one catalyst material imbedded therein.

Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Jankowski, Alan (Livermore, CA)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

499

Non-planar chemical preconcentrator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a high-surface area, low mass, three-dimensional, flow-through sorption support structure that can be coated or packed with a sorptive material. The sorptive material can collect and concentrate a chemical analyte from a fluid stream and rapidly release it as a very narrow temporal plug for improved separations in a microanalytical system. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator retains most of the thermal and fabrication benefits of a planar preconcentrator, but has improved ruggedness and uptake, while reducing sorptive coating concerns and extending the range of collectible analytes.

Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Sokolowski, Sara S. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

500

The chemical industry, by country  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of its ACHEMA coverage, Hydrocarbon Processing contacted executives of petrochemical/chemical industry trade associations in 11 countries, seeking views of on the state of the industry. These reports thus provide an added dimension to feature articles in this issue that focus on petrochemical/chemical-product supply/demand trends, economic forecasts, etc. The nations represented here were chosen for commentary because collectively they contain most of the world's petrochemical capacity. Space limitations prohibit the publishing of commentaries from all countries that have petrochemical/chemical capacity. The countries are: Belgium, China, France, Germany, India, Italy, Japan, Korea, The Netherlands, United Kingdom, and the United States.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z