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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Basic Energy Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), and the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center...

2

Basic Energy Sciences at NREL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL's Center for Basic Sciences performs fundamental research for DOE's Office of Science. Our mission is to provide fundamental knowledge in the basic sciences and engineering that will underpin new and improved renewable energy technologies.

Moon, S.

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

3

Basic Energy Sciences  

Office of Science (SC) Website

http:science.energy.govbesaboutjobs Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the...

4

Basic Energy Sciences  

Office of Science (SC) Website

aboutjobs Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the links to the formal position...

5

Basic Energy Sciences Directorate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

andor outreach to the following initiatives: NY State Smart Grid Consortium, NY Battery and Energy Storage Technology (NY-BEST) Teams, and the SBUNYS Small Business...

6

Basic Energy SciencesBasic Energy Sciences DOE/EERE Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic Energy SciencesBasic Energy Sciences DOE/EERE Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting, June Energy SciencesBasic Energy Sciences Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Use Energy SciencesBasic Energy Sciences Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Use

7

Basic Energy SciencesBasic Energy Sciences DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

" #12;Basic Energy SciencesBasic Energy Sciences Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Use SciencesBasic Energy Sciences Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage, and UseWorkshop on Hydrogen Energy SciencesBasic Energy Sciences Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage, and Use

8

Audit Report on "Cost Sharing at Basic Energy Sciences' User...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report on "Cost Sharing at Basic Energy Sciences' User Facilities", DOEIG-0441 Audit Report on "Cost Sharing at Basic Energy Sciences' User Facilities", DOEIG-0441 The Department...

9

FWP executive summaries: Basic energy sciences materials sciences programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an Executive Summary of the various elements of the Materials Sciences Program which is funded by the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

Samara, G.A.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Office of Basic Energy Sciences 1990 summary report  

SciTech Connect

Basic research is an important investment in the future which will help the US maintain and enhance its economic strength. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) basic research activities, carried out mainly in universities and Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, are critical to the Nation's leadership in science, for training future scientists, and to fortify the Nation's foundations for social and economic well-being. Attainment of the national goals -- energy self-sufficiency, improved health and quality of life for all, economic growth, national security -- depends on both technological research achievements and the ability to exploit them rapidly. Basic research is a necessary element for technology development and economic growth. This report presents the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences program. The BES mission is to develop understanding and to stimulate innovative thinking needed to fortify the Department's missions.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Office of Basic Energy Sciences 1990 summary report  

SciTech Connect

Basic research is an important investment in the future which will help the US maintain and enhance its economic strength. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) basic research activities, carried out mainly in universities and Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories, are critical to the Nation's leadership in science, for training future scientists, and to fortify the Nation's foundations for social and economic well-being. Attainment of the national goals -- energy self-sufficiency, improved health and quality of life for all, economic growth, national security -- depends on both technological research achievements and the ability to exploit them rapidly. Basic research is a necessary element for technology development and economic growth. This report presents the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences program. The BES mission is to develop understanding and to stimulate innovative thinking needed to fortify the Department's missions.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

REPORT OF THE BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES ADVISORY COMMITTEE PANEL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES BASIC ENERGY SCIENCES ADVISORY COMMITTEE PANEL ON D.O.E. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION SOURCES AND SCIENCE NOVEMBER 1997 EPRI Electric Power Research Institute Powering Progress through Innovative Solutions January 14th, 1998 Dr. Martha A. Krebs, Director Office of Energy Research United States Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Dear Martha, The purpose of this letter is to summarize the discussions of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee at its meeting on October 8 - 9, 1997 at the Holiday Inn in Gaithersburg as they related to the report from our Panel on Synchrotron Radiation Sources and Science. This Panel was assembled in response to the Charge presented to BESAC in your letter of October 9th, 1996 to reassess the need for and the opportunities presented by each of the four synchrotron

13

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMPUTING AND STORAGE REQUIREMENTS Basic Energy SciencesEnergy Sciences 8.2.1.4 Computational and Storage Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

BES Home BES Home Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » Science for Energy Discovery science solves mysteries, sparks innovation, and stimulates future technologies. This principle provides the inspiration for the fundamental energy research and the remarkable collection of major scientific user facilities supported by Basic Energy Sciences.Read More Discovery Science Materials Sciences and Engineering Understanding, predicting, and controlling materials and their

15

FWP executive summaries: basic energy sciences materials sciences and engineering program (SNL/NM).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an Executive Summary of the various elements of the Materials Sciences and Engineering Program which is funded by the Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico. A general programmatic overview is also presented.

Samara, George A.; Simmons, Jerry A.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Opportunities for discovery: Theory and computation in Basic Energy Sciences  

SciTech Connect

New scientific frontiers, recent advances in theory, and rapid increases in computational capabilities have created compelling opportunities for theory and computation to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES). The prospects for success in the experimental programs of BES will be enhanced by pursuing these opportunities. This report makes the case for an expanded research program in theory and computation in BES. The Subcommittee on Theory and Computation of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee was charged with identifying current and emerging challenges and opportunities for theoretical research within the scientific mission of BES, paying particular attention to how computing will be employed to enable that research. A primary purpose of the Subcommittee was to identify those investments that are necessary to ensure that theoretical research will have maximum impact in the areas of importance to BES, and to assure that BES researchers will be able to exploit the entire spectrum of computational tools, including leadership class computing facilities. The Subcommittee s Findings and Recommendations are presented in Section VII of this report.

Harmon, Bruce; Kirby, Kate; McCurdy, C. William

2005-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

17

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Large-Scale Science: DOE's ESnet William E. Johnston ESnet Manager and Senior Scientist, DOE Lawrence approach and architecture for DOE's Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), which is the network that serves all community. 1 ESnet's Role in the DOE Office of Science "The Office of Science of the US Dept. of Energy

18

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Networking for the Future of Science ESnet Status Update William E. Johnston ESnet Department Head and Senior Scientist wej@es.net, www.es.net This talk is available at www.es.net/ESnet4 Energy, 2008 (Aloha!) #12;2 DOE Office of Science and ESnet ­ the ESnet Mission · ESnet's primary mission

19

Energy Basics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The EERE Energy Basics website contains basics about renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Learn how they work, what they're used for, and how they can improve our lives, homes,...

20

DOE Offices of Basic Energy Sciences and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Collaborate to Develop Nanostructured Electrolytes for Lithium Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE Offices of Basic Energy Sciences and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Collaborate the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy through LBNL's Batteries for Advanced of the Materials Sciences and Environmental Energy Technologies Divisions has led to the development of a new

Knowles, David William

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Homepage | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

BESAC Home BESAC Home Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) BESAC Home Meetings Members Charges/Reports Charter .pdf file (41KB) BES Committees of Visitors BES Home Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) - established on September 4, 1986 - provides valuable, independent advice to the Department of Energy on the Basic Energy Sciences program regarding the complex scientific and technical issues that arise in the planning, management, and implementation of the program. BESAC's recommendations include advice on establishing research and facilities priorities; determining proper program balance among disciplines; and identifying opportunities for interlaboratory collaboration, program integration, and

22

Basic Energy Sciences User Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BES User Facilities BES User Facilities User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities BER User Facilities FES User Facilities HEP User Facilities NP User Facilities User Facilities Frequently Asked Questions User Facility Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 BES User Facilities Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Basic Energy Sciences program supports the operation of the following national scientific user facilities: Synchrotron Radiation Light Sources National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS): External link The NSLS at Brookhaven National Laboratory External link , commissioned in 1982, consists of two distinct electron storage rings. The x-ray storage

23

Energy Basics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The basics about renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies: learn how they work, what they're used for, and how they can improve our lives, homes, businesses, vehicles, and industries.

24

Basic research needs to assure a secure energy future. A report from the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee  

SciTech Connect

This report has highlighted many of the possible fundamental research areas that will help our country avoid a future energy crisis. The report may not have adequately captured the atmosphere of concern that permeated the discussions at the workshop. The difficulties facing our nation and the world in meeting our energy needs over the next several decades are very challenging. It was generally felt that traditional solutions and approaches will not solve the total energy problem. Knowledge that does not exist must be obtained to address both the quantity of energy needed to increase the standard of living world-wide and the quality of energy generation needed to preserve the environment. In terms of investments, it was clear that there is no single research area that will secure the future energy supply. A diverse range of economic energy sources will be required--and a broad range of fundamental research is needed to enable these. Many of the issues fall into the traditional materials and chemical sciences research areas, but with specific emphasis on understanding mechanisms, energy related phenomena, and pursuing novel directions in, for example, nanoscience and integrated modeling. An important result from the discussions, which is hopefully apparent from the brief presentations above, is that the problems that must be dealt with are truly multidisciplinary. This means that they require the participation of investigators with different skill sets. Basic science skills have to be complemented by awareness of the overall nature of the problem in a national and world context, and with knowledge of the engineering, design, and control issues in any eventual solution. It is necessary to find ways in which this can be done while still preserving the ability to do first-class basic science. The traditional structure of research, with specific disciplinary groupings, will not be sufficient. This presents great challenges and opportunities for the funders of the research that must be done. For example, the applied research programs in the DOE need a greater awareness of the user facilities and an understanding of how to use them to solve their unique problems. The discussions reinforced what all of the participants already knew: the issue of energy security is of major importance both for the U.S. and for the world. Furthermore, it is clear that major changes in the primary energy sources, in energy conversion, and in energy use, must be achieved within the next fifty years. This time scale is determined by two drivers: increasing world population and increasing expectations of that population. Much of the research and development currently being done are concerned with incremental improvements in what has been done in the immediate past; and it is necessary to take this path because improvements will be needed across the board. These advances extend the period before the radical changes have to be made; however, they will not solve the underlying, long-range problem. The Subpanel recommends that a major program be funded to conduct a multidisciplinary research program to address the issues to ensure a secure energy future for the U.S. It is necessary to recognize that this program must be ensured of a long-term stability. It is also necessary that a management and funding structure appropriate for such an approach be developed. The Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences is well positioned to support this initiative by enhancement of their already world-class scientific research programs and user facilities.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Basic research needs to assure a secure energy future. A report from the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee  

SciTech Connect

This report has highlighted many of the possible fundamental research areas that will help our country avoid a future energy crisis. The report may not have adequately captured the atmosphere of concern that permeated the discussions at the workshop. The difficulties facing our nation and the world in meeting our energy needs over the next several decades are very challenging. It was generally felt that traditional solutions and approaches will not solve the total energy problem. Knowledge that does not exist must be obtained to address both the quantity of energy needed to increase the standard of living world-wide and the quality of energy generation needed to preserve the environment. In terms of investments, it was clear that there is no single research area that will secure the future energy supply. A diverse range of economic energy sources will be required--and a broad range of fundamental research is needed to enable these. Many of the issues fall into the traditional materials and chemical sciences research areas, but with specific emphasis on understanding mechanisms, energy related phenomena, and pursuing novel directions in, for example, nanoscience and integrated modeling. An important result from the discussions, which is hopefully apparent from the brief presentations above, is that the problems that must be dealt with are truly multidisciplinary. This means that they require the participation of investigators with different skill sets. Basic science skills have to be complemented by awareness of the overall nature of the problem in a national and world context, and with knowledge of the engineering, design, and control issues in any eventual solution. It is necessary to find ways in which this can be done while still preserving the ability to do first-class basic science. The traditional structure of research, with specific disciplinary groupings, will not be sufficient. This presents great challenges and opportunities for the funders of the research that must be done. For example, the applied research programs in the DOE need a greater awareness of the user facilities and an understanding of how to use them to solve their unique problems. The discussions reinforced what all of the participants already knew: the issue of energy security is of major importance both for the U.S. and for the world. Furthermore, it is clear that major changes in the primary energy sources, in energy conversion, and in energy use, must be achieved within the next fifty years. This time scale is determined by two drivers: increasing world population and increasing expectations of that population. Much of the research and development currently being done are concerned with incremental improvements in what has been done in the immediate past; and it is necessary to take this path because improvements will be needed across the board. These advances extend the period before the radical changes have to be made; however, they will not solve the underlying, long-range problem. The Subpanel recommends that a major program be funded to conduct a multidisciplinary research program to address the issues to ensure a secure energy future for the U.S. It is necessary to recognize that this program must be ensured of a long-term stability. It is also necessary that a management and funding structure appropriate for such an approach be developed. The Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences is well positioned to support this initiative by enhancement of their already world-class scientific research programs and user facilities.

None

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Opportunities for discovery: Theory and computation in Basic Energy Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at the Stanford Linearwith such pulses. The LCLS will take ultrafast science to apulses. Two aspects of proposed LCLS experiments offer great

Harmon, Bruce; Kirby, Kate; McCurdy, C. William

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energy Basics: Tidal Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

28

Energy Basics: Wave Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

29

Science for Energy Technology: Strengthening the Link Between Basic Research and Industry  

SciTech Connect

The nation faces two severe challenges that will determine our prosperity for decades to come: assuring clean, secure, and sustainable energy to power our world, and establishing a new foundation for enduring economic and jobs growth. These challenges are linked: the global demand for clean sustainable energy is an unprecedented economic opportunity for creating jobs and exporting energy technology to the developing and developed world. But achieving the tremendous potential of clean energy technology is not easy. In contrast to traditional fossil fuel-based technologies, clean energy technologies are in their infancy, operating far below their potential, with many scientific and technological challenges to overcome. Industry is ultimately the agent for commercializing clean energy technology and for reestablishing the foundation for our economic and jobs growth. For industry to succeed in these challenges, it must overcome many roadblocks and continuously innovate new generations of renewable, sustainable, and low-carbon energy technologies such as solar energy, carbon sequestration, nuclear energy, electricity delivery and efficiency, solid state lighting, batteries and biofuels. The roadblocks to higher performing clean energy technology are not just challenges of engineering design but are also limited by scientific understanding.Innovation relies on contributions from basic research to bridge major gaps in our understanding of the phenomena that limit efficiency, performance, or lifetime of the materials or chemistries of these sustainable energy technologies. Thus, efforts aimed at understanding the scientific issues behind performance limitations can have a real and immediate impact on cost, reliability, and performance of technology, and ultimately a transformative impact on our economy. With its broad research base and unique scientific user facilities, the DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) is ideally positioned to address these needs. BES has laid out a broad view of the basic and grand challenge science needs for the development of future clean energy technologies in a series of comprehensive 'Basic Research Needs' workshops and reports (inside front cover and http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/list.html) and has structured its programs and launched initiatives to address the challenges. The basic science needs of industry, however, are often more narrowly focused on solving specific nearer-term roadblocks to progress in existing and emerging clean energy technologies. To better define these issues and identify specific barriers to progress, the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) sponsored the Workshop on Science for Energy Technology, January 18-21, 2010. A wide cross-section of scientists and engineers from industry, universities, and national laboratories delineated the basic science Priority Research Directions most urgently needed to address the roadblocks and accelerate the innovation of clean energy technologies. These Priority Research Directions address the scientific understanding underlying performance limitations in existing but still immature technologies. Resolving these performance limitations can dramatically improve the commercial penetration of clean energy technologies. A key conclusion of the Workshop is that in addition to the decadal challenges defined in the 'Basic Research Needs' reports, specific research directions addressing industry roadblocks are ripe for further emphasis. Another key conclusion is that identifying and focusing on specific scientific challenges and translating the results to industry requires more direct feedback and communication and collaboration between industrial and BES-supported scientists. BES-supported scientists need to be better informed of the detailed scientific issues facing industry, and industry more aware of BES capabilities and how to utilize them. An important capability is the suite of BES scientific user facilities, which are seen as playing a key role in advancing the science of clean energy technology.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Systems. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems, July 31-August 3, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global utilization of nuclear energy has come a long way from its humble beginnings in the first sustained nuclear reaction at the University of Chicago in 1942. Today, there are over 440 nuclear reactors in 31 countries producing approximately 16% of the electrical energy used worldwide. In the United States, 104 nuclear reactors currently provide 19% of electrical energy used nationally. The International Atomic Energy Agency projects significant growth in the utilization of nuclear power over the next several decades due to increasing demand for energy and environmental concerns related to emissions from fossil plants. There are 28 new nuclear plants currently under construction including 10 in China, 8 in India, and 4 in Russia. In the United States, there have been notifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission of intentions to apply for combined construction and operating licenses for 27 new units over the next decade. The projected growth in nuclear power has focused increasing attention on issues related to the permanent disposal of nuclear waste, the proliferation of nuclear weapons technologies and materials, and the sustainability of a once-through nuclear fuel cycle. In addition, the effective utilization of nuclear power will require continued improvements in nuclear technology, particularly related to safety and efficiency. In all of these areas, the performance of materials and chemical processes under extreme conditions is a limiting factor. The related basic research challenges represent some of the most demanding tests of our fundamental understanding of materials science and chemistry, and they provide significant opportunities for advancing basic science with broad impacts for nuclear reactor materials, fuels, waste forms, and separations techniques. Of particular importance is the role that new nanoscale characterization and computational tools can play in addressing these challenges. These tools, which include DOE synchrotron X-ray sources, neutron sources, nanoscale science research centers, and supercomputers, offer the opportunity to transform and accelerate the fundamental materials and chemical sciences that underpin technology development for advanced nuclear energy systems. The fundamental challenge is to understand and control chemical and physical phenomena in multi-component systems from femto-seconds to millennia, at temperatures to 1000?C, and for radiation doses to hundreds of displacements per atom (dpa). This is a scientific challenge of enormous proportions, with broad implications in the materials science and chemistry of complex systems. New understanding is required for microstructural evolution and phase stability under relevant chemical and physical conditions, chemistry and structural evolution at interfaces, chemical behavior of actinide and fission-product solutions, and nuclear and thermomechanical phenomena in fuels and waste forms. First-principles approaches are needed to describe f-electron systems, design molecules for separations, and explain materials failure mechanisms. Nanoscale synthesis and characterization methods are needed to understand and design materials and interfaces with radiation, temperature, and corrosion resistance. Dynamical measurements are required to understand fundamental physical and chemical phenomena. New multiscale approaches are needed to integrate this knowledge into accurate models of relevant phenomena and complex systems across multiple length and time scales.

Roberto, J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Gibala, R.; Zinkle, S.; Miller, J.R.; Pimblott, S.; Burns, C.; Raymond, K.; Grimes, R.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.; Clark, S.; Ewing, R.; Wagner, A.; Yip, S.; Buchanan, M.; Crabtree, G.; Hemminger, J.; Poate, J.; Miller, J.C.; Edelstein, N.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Gruzalski, G.; Michaels, G.; Morss, L.; Peters, M.; Talamini, K.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

FWP executive summaries, Basic Energy Sciences Materials Sciences Programs (SNL/NM)  

SciTech Connect

The BES Materials Sciences Program has the central theme of Scientifically Tailored Materials. The major objective of this program is to combine Sandia`s expertise and capabilities in the areas of solid state sciences, advanced atomic-level diagnostics and materials synthesis and processing science to produce new classes of tailored materials as well as to enhance the properties of existing materials for US energy applications and for critical defense needs. Current core research in this program includes the physics and chemistry of ceramics synthesis and processing, the use of energetic particles for the synthesis and study of materials, tailored surfaces and interfaces for materials applications, chemical vapor deposition sciences, artificially-structured semiconductor materials science, advanced growth techniques for improved semiconductor structures, transport in unconventional solids, atomic-level science of interfacial adhesion, high-temperature superconductors, and the synthesis and processing of nano-size clusters for energy applications. In addition, the program includes the following three smaller efforts initiated in the past two years: (1) Wetting and Flow of Liquid Metals and Amorphous Ceramics at Solid Interfaces, (2) Field-Structured Anisotropic Composites, and (3) Composition-Modulated Semiconductor Structures for Photovoltaic and Optical Technologies. The latter is a joint effort with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Separate summaries are given of individual research areas.

Samara, G.A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Basic Research Needs for Solar Energy Utilization. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization, April 18-21, 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

World demand for energy is projected to more than double by 2050 and to more than triple by the end of the century. Incremental improvements in existing energy networks will not be adequate to supply this demand in a sustainable way. Finding sufficient supplies of clean energy for the future is one of society?s most daunting challenges. Sunlight provides by far the largest of all carbon-neutral energy sources. More energy from sunlight strikes the Earth in one hour (4.3 ? 1020 J) than all the energy consumed on the planet in a year (4.1 ? 1020 J). We currently exploit this solar resource through solar electricity ? a $7.5 billion industry growing at a rate of 35?40% per annum ? and solar-derived fuel from biomass, which provides the primary energy source for over a billion people. Yet, in 2001, solar electricity provided less than 0.1% of the world's electricity, and solar fuel from modern (sustainable) biomass provided less than 1.5% of the world's energy. The huge gap between our present use of solar energy and its enormous undeveloped potential defines a grand challenge in energy research. Sunlight is a compelling solution to our need for clean, abundant sources of energy in the future. It is readily available, secure from geopolitical tension, and poses no threat to our environment through pollution or to our climate through greenhouse gases. This report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization identifies the key scientific challenges and research directions that will enable efficient and economic use of the solar resource to provide a significant fraction of global primary energy by the mid 21st century. The report reflects the collective output of the workshop attendees, which included 200 scientists representing academia, national laboratories, and industry in the United States and abroad, and the U.S. Department of Energy?s Office of Basic Energy Sciences and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

Lewis, N. S.; Crabtree, G.; Nozik, A. J.; Wasielewski, M. R.; Alivisatos, P.; Kung, H.; Tsao, J.; Chandler, E.; Walukiewicz, W.; Spitler, M.; Ellingson, R.; Overend, R.; Mazer, J.; Gress, M.; Horwitz, J.; Ashton, C.; Herndon, B.; Shapard, L.; Nault, R. M.

2005-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

33

A report of the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee: 1992 review of the Basic Energy Sciences Program of the Department of Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general quality of BES research at each of the 4 laboratories is high. Diversity of management at the different laboratories is beneficial as long as the primary BES mission and goals are clearly identified and effectively pursued. External sources of personnel should be encouraged. DOE has been designing a new high flux research reactor, the Advanced Neutron Source, to replace DOE`s two aging research reactors; BESAC conducted a panel evaluation of neutron sources for the future. The two new light sources, Advanced Light Source and Advanced Photon source will come on line well before all of their beamline instrumentation can be funded, developed, and installed. Appointment of a permanent director and deputy for OBES would enhance OBES effectiveness in budget planning and intra-DOE program coordination. Some DOE and DP laboratories have substantial infrastructure which match well industry development-applications needs; interlaboratory partnerships in this area are encouraged. Funding for basic science research programs should be maintained at FY1993 levels, adjusted for inflation; OBES plans should be updated and monitored to maintain the balance between basic research and facilities construction and operation. The recommendations are discussed in detail in this document.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Review of the Lujan neutron scattering center: basic energy sciences prereport February 2009  

SciTech Connect

The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) at LANSCE is a designated National User Facility for neutron scattering and nuclear physics studies with pulsed beams of moderated neutrons (cold, thermal, and epithermal). As one of five experimental areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), the Lujan Center hosts engineers, scientists, and students from around the world. The Lujan Center consists of Experimental Room (ER) 1 (ERl) built by the Laboratory in 1977, ER2 built by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) in 1989, and the Office Building (622) also built by BES in 1989, along with a chem-bio lab, a shop, and other out-buildings. According to a 1996 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Defense Programs (DP) Office of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) and the Office of Science (SC, then the Office of Energy Research), the Lujan Center flight paths were transferred from DP to SC, including those in ERI. That MOA was updated in 2001. Under the MOA, NNSA-DP delivers neutron beam to the windows of the target crypt, outside of which BES becomes the 'landlord.' The leveraging nature of the Lujan Center on the LANSCE accelerator is a substantial annual leverage to the $11 M BES operating fund worth approximately $56 M operating cost of the linear accelerator (LINAC)-in beam delivery.

Hurd, Alan J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rhyne, James J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lewis, Paul S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility supporting research within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. NERSC provides high-performance computing (HPC) resources to approximately 4,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. In addition to hosting large-scale computing facilities, NERSC provides the support and expertise scientists need to effectively and efficiently use HPC systems. In February 2010, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BES research through 2013. The workshop was part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users future needs and deploying the necessary resources to meet these demands. Workshop participants reached a consensus on several key findings, in addition to achieving the workshop's goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The key requirements for scientists conducting research in BES are: (1) Larger allocations of computational resources; (2) Continued support for standard application software packages; (3) Adequate job turnaround time and throughput; and (4) Guidance and support for using future computer architectures. This report expands upon these key points and presents others. Several 'case studies' are included as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BES. Research teams scientific goals, computational methods of solution, current and 2013 computing requirements, and special software and support needs are summarized in these case studies. Also included are researchers strategies for computing in the highly parallel, 'multi-core' environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. NERSC has strategic plans and initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings. This report includes a brief summary of those relevant to issues raised by researchers at the workshop.

Gerber, Richard; Wasserman, Harvey

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the leading scientific computing facility supporting research within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. NERSC provides high-performance computing (HPC) resources to approximately 4,000 researchers working on about 400 projects. In addition to hosting large-scale computing facilities, NERSC provides the support and expertise scientists need to effectively and efficiently use HPC systems. In February 2010, NERSC, DOE's Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for BES research through 2013. The workshop was part of NERSC's legacy of anticipating users future needs and deploying the necessary resources to meet these demands. Workshop participants reached a consensus on several key findings, in addition to achieving the workshop's goal of collecting and characterizing computing requirements. The key requirements for scientists conducting research in BES are: (1) Larger allocations of computational resources; (2) Continued support for standard application software packages; (3) Adequate job turnaround time and throughput; and (4) Guidance and support for using future computer architectures. This report expands upon these key points and presents others. Several 'case studies' are included as significant representative samples of the needs of science teams within BES. Research teams scientific goals, computational methods of solution, current and 2013 computing requirements, and special software and support needs are summarized in these case studies. Also included are researchers strategies for computing in the highly parallel, 'multi-core' environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. NERSC has strategic plans and initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings. This report includes a brief summary of those relevant to issues raised by researchers at the workshop.

Gerber, Richard; Wasserman, Harvey

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

37

Energy Basics: Contacts  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Skip to Content U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Energy Basics Search Search Help Energy...

38

Energy Basics: Ocean Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

39

Basic Research Needs: Catalysis for Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report presents results of a workshop held August 6-8, 2007, by DOE SC Basic Energy Sciences to determine the basic research needs for catalysis research.

Bell, Alexis T.; Gates, Bruce C.; Ray, Douglas; Thompson, Michael R.

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

40

Energy Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Energy Basics Services » Energy Basics Energy Basics The basics about renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies: learn how they work, what they're used for, and how they can improve our lives, homes, businesses, and industries. The basics about renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies: learn how they work, what they're used for, and how they can improve our lives, homes, businesses, and industries. RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Biomass Technology Basics Geothermal Technology Basics Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology Basics Hydropower Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics Solar Energy Technology Basics Wind Energy Technology Basics More HOME & BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES Lighting and Daylighting Basics Passive Solar Building Design Basics Space Heating and Cooling Basics

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

42

Energy Basics: Geothermal Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Direct Use Electricity Production Geothermal Resources Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean...

43

Energy Basics: Photovoltaics  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

44

Energy Basics: Hydropower Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Large-Scale Hydropower Microhydropower Hydropower Resources...

45

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

46

Energy Basics: Microhydropower  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Large-Scale Hydropower Microhydropower Water Conveyance &...

47

Energy Basics: Hydropower Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Large-Scale Hydropower Microhydropower Hydropower Resources...

48

Energy Basics: Geothermal Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Direct Use Electricity Production Geothermal Resources Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean...

49

Lesson 1 Energy Basics ENERGY BASICS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Table of Contents Table of Contents Lesson 1 - Energy Basics Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics Lesson 3 - Atoms and Isotopes Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 5 - Fission, Chain Reactions Lesson 6 - Atom to Electricity Lesson 7 - Waste from Nuclear Power Plants Lesson 8 - Concerns Lesson 9 - Energy and You 1 Lesson 1 Energy Basics ENERGY BASICS What is energy? Energy is the ability to do work. But what does that really mean? You might think of work as cleaning your room, cutting the grass, or studying for a test. And all these require energy. To a scientist, "work" means something more exact. Work is causing a change. It can be a change in position, like standing up or moving clothes from the floor to the laundry basket. It can be a change in temperature, like heating water for a cup

50

Energy Basics: Ocean Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

51

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at NERSC HPC Requirements Reviews Requirements for Science: Target 2014 Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy...

52

Energy Basics: Solar Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Solar...

53

Energy Basics: Solar Energy Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Solar...

54

Energy Basics: Renewable Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Renewable Energy Technologies Renewable energy...

55

Energy Basics: Wind Turbines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Turbines...

56

Energy Basics: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Fuel Cells Photo of...

57

Energy Basics: Hydrogen Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen...

58

Energy Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

can improve our lives, homes, businesses, and industries. RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGIES Biomass Technology Basics Geothermal Technology Basics Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technology...

59

Energy Basics: Wind Energy Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Energy...

60

Energy Basics: Wind Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Energy Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics More Additional Links Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Here you'll find a glossary of energy-related terms. Related...

62

Energy Basics: Biodiesel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Biodiesel Biodiesel is a domestically produced, renewable fuel that can be manufactured from vegetable oils, animal fats, or recycled restaurant greases. What...

63

Energy Basics: Geothermal Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Resources Although geothermal heat pumps can be used almost anywhere, most direct-use and electrical production facilities in the United States are...

64

Energy Basics: Geothermal Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Technologies Photo of steam pouring out of a geothermal plant. Geothermal technologies use the clean, sustainable heat from the Earth. Geothermal...

65

Energy Basics: Air Conditioning  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the same operating principles and basic components as refrigerators. Refrigerators use energy (usually electricity) to transfer heat from the cool interior of the refrigerator to...

66

Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 12, 2007 ... Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Basic Research Needs for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems. Summarizes current status...

67

Basic Research Needs for Superconductivity. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Superconductivity, May 8-11, 2006  

SciTech Connect

As an energy carrier, electricity has no rival with regard to its environmental cleanliness, flexibility in interfacing with multiple production sources and end uses, and efficiency of delivery. In fact, the electric power grid was named ?the greatest engineering achievement of the 20th century? by the National Academy of Engineering. This grid, a technological marvel ingeniously knitted together from local networks growing out from cities and rural centers, may be the biggest and most complex artificial system ever built. However, the growing demand for electricity will soon challenge the grid beyond its capability, compromising its reliability through voltage fluctuations that crash digital electronics, brownouts that disable industrial processes and harm electrical equipment, and power failures like the North American blackout in 2003 and subsequent blackouts in London, Scandinavia, and Italy in the same year. The North American blackout affected 50 million people and caused approximately $6 billion in economic damage over the four days of its duration. Superconductivity offers powerful new opportunities for restoring the reliability of the power grid and increasing its capacity and efficiency. Superconductors are capable of carrying current without loss, making the parts of the grid they replace dramatically more efficient. Superconducting wires carry up to five times the current carried by copper wires that have the same cross section, thereby providing ample capacity for future expansion while requiring no increase in the number of overhead access lines or underground conduits. Their use is especially attractive in urban areas, where replacing copper with superconductors in power-saturated underground conduits avoids expensive new underground construction. Superconducting transformers cut the volume, weight, and losses of conventional transformers by a factor of two and do not require the contaminating and flammable transformer oils that violate urban safety codes. Unlike traditional grid technology, superconducting fault current limiters are smart. They increase their resistance abruptly in response to overcurrents from faults in the system, thus limiting the overcurrents and protecting the grid from damage. They react fast in both triggering and automatically resetting after the overload is cleared, providing a new, self-healing feature that enhances grid reliability. Superconducting reactive power regulators further enhance reliability by instantaneously adjusting reactive power for maximum efficiency and stability in a compact and economic package that is easily sited in urban grids. Not only do superconducting motors and generators cut losses, weight, and volume by a factor of two, but they are also much more tolerant of voltage sag, frequency instabilities, and reactive power fluctuations than their conventional counterparts. The challenge facing the electricity grid to provide abundant, reliable power will soon grow to crisis proportions. Continuing urbanization remains the dominant historic demographic trend in the United States and in the world. By 2030, nearly 90% of the U.S. population will reside in cities and suburbs, where increasingly strict permitting requirements preclude bringing in additional overhead access lines, underground cables are saturated, and growth in power demand is highest. The power grid has never faced a challenge so great or so critical to our future productivity, economic growth, and quality of life. Incremental advances in existing grid technology are not capable of solving the urban power bottleneck. Revolutionary new solutions are needed ? the kind that come only from superconductivity.

Sarrao, J.; Kwok, W-K; Bozovic, I.; Mazin, I.; Seamus, J. C.; Civale, L.; Christen, D.; Horwitz, J.; Kellogg, G.; Finnemore, D.; Crabtree, G.; Welp, U.; Ashton, C.; Herndon, B.; Shapard, L.; Nault, R. M.

2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

68

Energy Basics: Hydrogen Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal,...

69

Energy Basics: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Fuel Cells Photo of two hydrogen fuel cells. Fuel cells are an emerging technology that can provide heat and electricity for buildings and electrical power for...

70

Energy Basics: Wave Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

niche markets. Once built, they have low operation and maintenance costs because their fuel-seawater-is free. Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S. Department of Energy | USA.gov...

71

Energy Basics: Tidal Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the cost per kilowatt-hour of tidal power is not competitive with conventional fossil fuel power. Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S. Department of Energy | USA.gov Content Last...

72

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Overview Andrew Felmy, PNNL The BES Geosciences researchtable (PI, Andrew Felmy, PNNL) and included in the summarySciences Division at PNNL, Chief Scientist for Scientific

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences Report of the NERSC / BES / ASCR RequirementsScientific Computing Center (NERSC) Editors Richard A.Gerber, NERSC Harvey J. Wasserman, NERSC Lawrence Berkeley

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BES) Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR)Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilities

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Annual report, Basic Sciences Branch, FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. Seven technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL`s in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, Solid-State Spectroscopy, and Superconductivity. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy`s National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Renewable Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Energy Technology Basics Renewable Energy Technology Basics Renewable energy technologies produce sustainable, clean energy from sources such as the sun, the wind,...

77

Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure transformations of CdSe nanocrystals, Phys. Rev.structural transformation in CdSe nanocrystals under highto rock salt transformation in CdSe nanocrystals, Science,

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Energy Basics: Geothermal Electricity Production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Direct Use Electricity Production Geothermal Resources Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean...

79

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cell Structures  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

80

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cell Performance  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy Basics: Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

82

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic System Performance  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

83

Energy Basics: Concentrating Solar Power  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

84

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cell Materials  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

85

Basic Research Needs for Electrical Energy Storage. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Electrical Energy Storage, April 2-4, 2007  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

To identify research areas in geosciences, such as behavior of multiphase fluid-solid systems on a variety of scales, chemical migration processes in geologic media, characterization of geologic systems, and modeling and simulation of geologic systems, needed for improved energy systems.

Goodenough, J. B.; Abruna, H. D.; Buchanan, M. V.

2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

Annual report, Basic Sciences Branch, FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Basic Sciences Branch of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) from October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991. Seven technical sections of the report cover these main areas of NREL's in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, Solid-State Spectroscopy, and Superconductivity. Each section explains the purpose and major accomplishments of the work in the context of the US Department of Energy's National Photovoltaic Research Program plans.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Energy Basics: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

88

Energy Basics: Geothermal Electricity Production  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Electricity Production A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in California. Geothermal energy originates from deep...

89

Energy Basics: Wind Power Animation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Power...

90

NREL: Learning - Geothermal Energy Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About Renewable Energy Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Geothermal Energy Basics Photo of a hot spring. The Earth's heat-called geothermal...

91

Solar Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Energy Technology Basics Solar Energy Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:37pm Addthis Solar energy technologies produce electricity from the energy of the sun. Small solar...

92

Basic Research Needs for Solid-State Lighting. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solid-State Lighting, May 22-24, 2006  

SciTech Connect

The workshop participants enthusiastically concluded that the time is ripe for new fundamental science to beget a revolution in lighting technology. SSL sources based on organic and inorganic materials have reached a level of efficiency where it is possible to envision their use for general illumination. The research areas articulated in this report are targeted to enable disruptive advances in SSL performance and realization of this dream. Broad penetration of SSL technology into the mass lighting market, accompanied by vast savings in energy usage, requires nothing less. These new ?good ideas? will be represented not by light bulbs, but by an entirely new lighting technology for the 21st century and a bright, energy-efficient future indeed.

Phillips, J. M.; Burrows, P. E.; Davis, R. F.; Simmons, J. A.; Malliaras, G. G.; So, F.; Misewich, J.A.; Nurmikko, A. V.; Smith, D. L.; Tsao, J. Y.; Kung, H.; Crawford, M. H.; Coltrin, M. E.; Fitzsimmons, T. J.; Kini, A.; Ashton, C.; Herndon, B.; Kitts, S.; Shapard, L.; Brittenham, P. W.; Vittitow, M. P.

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

93

Wind Energy Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Resource Basics Wind Energy Resource Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:11pm Addthis Wind energy can be produced anywhere in the world where the wind blows with a strong and...

94

NETL: Computational and Basic Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to optimize the fossil energy plant lifecycle, from process synthesis and design to plant operations. Models are also being developed that consider uncertainties in operating...

95

Energy Basics: Biofuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The biomass-derived ethyl or methyl esters can be blended with conventional diesel fuel or used as a neat fuel (100% biodiesel). Learn more about biodiesel basics. Biofuel...

96

NREL: Energy Storage - Technology Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Basics Photo of an ultracapacitor. Electrochemical energy storage devices provide the power for many everyday devices-from cars, trains, and laptops to personal digital...

97

Energy Basics: Geothermal Heat Pumps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Geothermal Heat Pumps Geothermal heat pumps use the constant temperature of the earth as an exchange medium for heat. Although many parts of the country...

98

Large Scale Computing Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences (An BES / ASCR / NERSC Workshop) Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Meeting Center, Rockville MD 3D Geophysical Imaging  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences (An BES / ASCR / NERSC Workshop) Hilton Washington DC/Rockville Meeting Center, Rockville MD 3D Geophysical Modeling and Imaging G. A. Newman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory February 9 - 10 , 2010 Talk Outline * SEAM Geophysical Modeling Project - Its Really Big! * Geophysical Imaging (Seismic & EM) - Its 10 to 100x Bigger! - Reverse Time Migration - Full Waveform Inversion - 3D Imaging & Large Scale Considerations - Offshore Brazil Imaging Example (EM Data Set) * Computational Bottlenecks * Computing Alternatives - GPU's & FPGA's - Issues Why ? So that the resource industry can tackle grand geophysical challenges (Subsalt imaging, land acquisition, 4-D, CO2, carbonates ......) SEAM Mission Advance the science and technology of applied

99

EA-1340: Conducting Astrophysics and Other Basic Science Experiments...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

40: Conducting Astrophysics and Other Basic Science Experiments at the WIPP Site, Carlsbad, New Mexico EA-1340: Conducting Astrophysics and Other Basic Science Experiments at the...

100

Lesson 1- Energy Basics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This lesson covers the states and forms of energy, where energy comes from, as well as how the way we live is tied to our energy supply and what that means for the future.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Energy Basics: Heating Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of energy sources, including electricity, boilers, solar energy, and wood and pellet-fuel heating. Small Space Heaters Used when the main heating system is inadequate or when...

102

Energy Basics: Solar Air Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Solar Air Heating Solar air heating systems use air as the working fluid for absorbing and transferring solar energy. Solar air collectors (devices to heat air...

103

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Basics on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Basics on...

104

Energy Basics: LED Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

positivenegative junction of the diode, the electrons slow down to orbit at a lower energy level. The electrons emit the excess energy as photons of light. LEDs are often used...

105

Energy Basics: Evaporative Cooling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

absorbent material. Evaporative cooling uses evaporated water to naturally and energy-efficiently cool. How Evaporative Coolers Work There are two types of evaporative...

106

Energy Basics: Ventilation Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

building through the roof, walls, and windows. Heat-reflecting roofs, insulation, and energy efficient windows will help to reduce that heat conduction. Radiation is heat...

107

Energy Basics: Incandescent Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

The three most common types of incandescent lamps are: Standard incandescent lamps Energy-Saving Incandescent (or Halogen) Reflector lamps Standard Incandescent Lamps Known as...

108

Energy Basics: Cooling Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the...

109

Energy Basics: Radiant Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

very low heat capacity and have the quickest response time of any heating technology. More Information Visit the Energy Saver website for more information about radiant heating...

110

Energy Basics: Daylighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Daylighting in schools has even improved student grades and attendance. Today's highly energy-efficient windows, as well as advances in lighting design, allow efficient use of...

111

Energy Basics: Ocean Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Resources Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource...

112

Energy Basics: Fluorescent Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Cooling Water Heating Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent lamps to provide the same amount of illumination (efficacy of...

113

Energy Basics: Hydropower Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

expensive source of renewable electricity in the United States today. According to the Energy Information Administration, more than 6% of the country's electricity was produced...

114

Energy Basics: Radiant Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

low heat capacity and have the quickest response time of any heating technology. More Information Visit the Energy Saver website for more information about radiant heating in homes...

115

Energy Basics: Photovoltaics  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photovoltaics Photovoltaic (PV) materials and devices convert sunlight into electrical energy, and PV cells are commonly known as solar cells. Photovoltaics can literally be...

116

NREL: Energy Sciences - Richard Greene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was lead for the Photochemistry and Biochemistry Team in DOE's Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES), and supported research on the molecular mechanisms involved in the capture of...

117

Energy Basics: Electric Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of an electric bus driving up a hill. Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage...

118

Energy Basics: Anaerobic Digestion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of heat energy per cubic foot (0.028 cubic meters) when burned. Natural gas is a fossil fuel that was created eons ago by the anaerobic decomposition of organic materials. It is...

119

Energy Basics: Fluorescent Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent lamps to provide the same amount of illumination (efficacy of 30-110 lumens per watt). They...

120

Energy Basics: Wind Turbines  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of a crane lifting the blades onto a wind turbine that reads 'U.S. Department of Energy, NREL.' You can learn more about horizontal axis turbines from the EERE Wind Program's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

an entire PV system. This system is usually everything needed to meet a particular energy demand, such as powering a water pump, the appliances and lights in a home, or-if the...

122

Energy Basics: Webmaster  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or URL of that page. Your name: Your email address: Your message: Send Message Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S. Department of Energy | USA.gov Content Last Updated: 0814...

123

Energy Basics: Microhydropower  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

are small hydroelectric power systems of less than 100 kW used to produce mechanical energy or electricity for farms, ranches, homes, and villages. How a Microhydropower System...

124

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

mounting hardware, power-conditioning equipment, and batteries that store solar energy for use when the sun is not shining. When light shines on a PV cell, it may be...

125

Energy Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Science Energy Science Energy Science Print Our current fossil-fuel-based system is causing potentially catastrophic changes to our planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources of energy requires us to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Light-source facilities-the synchrotrons of today and the next-generation light sources of tomorrow-are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such these photon-science facilities are uniquely positioned to jump-start a global revolution in renewable and carbon-neutral energy technologies. To establish the scientific foundations for the kind of transformative breakthroughs needed to build a 21st-century energy economy, we must address fundamental questions involving matter and energy. Below is a sampling of such questions that can be addressed by light-source facilities:

126

Energy Basics: Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Flexible Fuel Vehicles Photo of a gray van with 'E85 Ethanol' written on the side. Flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) are capable of operating on gasoline, E85 (85%...

127

Energy Basics: Fuel Cell Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Fuel Cell Vehicles Photo of a blue car with 'The Road to Hydrogen' written on it, filling up at a hydrogen fueling station. Fuel cell vehicles, powered by...

128

NREL: Learning - Solar Energy Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Basics Photo of a solar electric system in Colorado with snow-covered mountain peaks in the background. Solar panels installed on a home in Colorado. Solar is the Latin word...

129

Energy Basics: Solar Liquid Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Solar Liquid Heating Solar liquid heating systems use a collector with a heat transfer or "working" fluid such as water, antifreeze (usually non-toxic propylene...

130

Energy Basics: Wind Power Animation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Wind Power Animation This animation discusses the advantages of wind power, the workings of a wind turbine, and wind resources in the United States. It also...

131

Energy Basics: Solar Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technologies Solar energy technologies produce electricity from the energy of the sun. Small solar energy systems can provide electricity for homes, businesses, and remote power...

132

Energy Basics: Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Standard "A" 10-17 750-2,500 98-100 (excellent) 2,700-2,800 (warm) Indoorsoutdoors Energy-Saving Incandescent (or Halogen) 12-22 1,000-4,000 98-100 (excellent) 2,900-3,200...

133

Energy Basics: Renewable Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

quality, and contribute to a strong energy economy. Learn more about: Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Energy Wind Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S....

134

Energy Basics: Wind Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of a hilly field, with six visible wind turbines spinning in the wind. Wind energy technologies use the energy in wind for practical purposes such as generating...

135

Basic Research Needs for the Hydrogen Economy. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use, May 13-15, 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The coupled challenges of a doubling in the world's energy needs by the year 2050 and the increasing demands for ''clean'' energy sources that do not add more carbon dioxide and other pollutants to the environment have resulted in increased attention worldwide to the possibilities of a ''hydrogen economy'' as a long-term solution for a secure energy future.

Dresselhaus, M; Crabtree, G.; Buchanan, M.; Mallouk, T.; Mets, L.; Taylor, K.; Jena, P.; DiSalvo, F.; Zawodzinski, T.; Kung, H.; Anderson, I.S.; Britt, P.; Curtiss, L.; Keller, J.; Kumar, R.; Kwok, W.; Taylor, J.; Allgood, J.; Campbell, B.; Talamini, K.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Daylighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Daylighting Basics Daylighting Basics Daylighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 11:24am Addthis Energy 101: Daylighting Basics This video explains how homeowners and businesses can use highly efficient, strategically placed windows to save money. Text Version Daylighting is the use of windows and skylights to bring sunlight into buildings. Daylighting in businesses and commercial buildings can result in substantial savings on electric bills, and not only provides a higher quality of light but also improves productivity and health. Daylighting in schools has even improved student grades and attendance. Today's highly energy-efficient windows, as well as advances in lighting design, allow efficient use of windows to reduce the need for artificial lighting during daylight hours without causing heating or cooling problems.

137

Basic Research Needs for Materials Under Extreme Environments. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Materials Under Extreme Environments, June 11-13, 2007  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the potential for developing revolutionary new materials that will meet demanding future energy requirements that expose materials to environmental extremes.

Wadsworth, J.; Crabtree, G. W.; Hemley, R. J.; Falcone, R.; Robertson, I.; Stringer, J.; Tortorelli, P.; Gray, G. T.; Nicol, M.; Lehr, J.; Tozer, S. W.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Vetrano, J. S.; Ashton, C. L.; Kitts, S.; Landson, C.; Campbell, B.; Gruzalski, G.; Stevens, D.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Energy Basics: Industrial Energy Efficiency  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

fuels supplied to a manufacturing plant from off-site power plants, gas companies, and fuel distributors. Energy then flows to either a central energy generation utility system or...

139

Energy Basics: Wind Energy Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Resources Wind energy can be produced anywhere in the world where the wind blows with a strong and consistent force. Windier locations produce more energy, which lowers the cost of...

140

Concentrating Solar Power Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basics Basics Concentrating Solar Power Basics August 20, 2013 - 4:38pm Addthis Text Version This solar concentrator has a fixed-focus faceted dish with a concentration of about 250 suns. This system can be used for large fields connected to the utility grid, hydrogen generation, or water pumping. Credit: Science Applications International Corporation / PIX 13464 Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies use mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight onto receivers that collect solar energy and convert it to heat. This thermal energy can then be used to produce electricity via a steam turbine or heat engine that drives a generator. Concentrating solar power offers a utility-scale, firm, dispatchable renewable energy option that can help meet our nation's demand for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

NREL: Learning - Energy Storage Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Basics Energy Storage Basics The demand for electricity is seldom constant over time. Excess generating capacity available during periods of low demand can be used to energize an energy storage device. The stored energy can then be used to provide electricity during periods of high demand, helping to reduce power system loads during these times. Energy storage can improve the efficiency and reliability of the electric utility system by reducing the requirements for spinning reserves to meet peak power demands, making better use of efficient baseload generation, and allowing greater use of renewable energy technologies. A "spinning reserve" is a generator that is spinning and synchronized with the grid, ready for immediate power generation - like a car engine running with the gearbox

142

NREL: Learning - Distributed Energy Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Energy Basics Distributed Energy Basics Photo of transmission towers and lines extending for miles towards a pink sunset in the distance. Distributed energy technologies can relieve transmission bottlenecks by reducing the amount of electricity that must be sent long distances down high-voltage power lines. Distributed energy refers to a variety of small, modular power-generating technologies that can be combined with load management and energy storage systems to improve the quality and/or reliability of the electricity supply. They are "distributed" because they are placed at or near the point of energy consumption, unlike traditional "centralized" systems, where electricity is generated at a remotely located, large-scale power plant and then transmitted down power lines to the consumer.

143

Ocean Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Text Version Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even though the sun affects all ocean activity, the gravitational pull of the moon primarily drives tides, and wind powers ocean waves. Learn more about: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Resources Addthis Related Articles Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

144

Basic Research Needs for Solar Energy Utilization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Cover: the Cover: One route to harvesting the energy of the sun involves learning to mimic natural photosynthesis. Here, sunlight falls on a porphyrin, one member of a family of molecules that includes the chlorophylls, which play a central role in capturing light and using its energy for photosynthesis in green plants. Efficient light-harvesting of the solar spectrum by porphyrins and related molecules can be used to power synthetic molecular assemblies and solid- state devices - applying the principles of photosynthesis to the produc- tion of hydrogen, methane, ethanol, and methanol from sunlight, water, and atmospheric carbon dioxide. BASIC RESEARCH NEEDS FOR SOLAR ENERGY UTILIZATION Report on the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization

145

Federal Energy Management Program: Sustainable Building Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sustainable Building Basics to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Sustainable Building Basics on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program:...

146

Federal Energy Management Program: Institutional Change Basics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Institutional Change Basics for Sustainability on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy...

147

Energy Basics: Ocean Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Technologies Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar...

148

Energy Basics: Solar Energy Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

emitted by the sun. Solar radiation can be captured and turned into useful forms of energy, such as heat and electricity, using a variety of technologies. However, the technical...

149

Wave Energy Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wave Energy Basics Wave Energy Basics Wave Energy Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:30pm Addthis Photo of a large wave. Wave energy technologies extract energy directly from surface waves or from pressure fluctuations below the surface. Renewable energy analysts believe there is enough energy in ocean waves to provide up to 2 terawatts of electricity. (A terawatt is equal to a trillion watts.) However, wave energy cannot be harnessed everywhere. Wave power-rich areas of the world include the western coasts of Scotland, northern Canada, southern Africa, and Australia as well as the northeastern and northwestern coasts of the United States. In the Pacific Northwest alone, it is feasible that wave energy could produce 40-70 kilowatts (kW) per 3.3 feet (1 meter) of western coastline. Wave Energy Technologies

150

Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics Industrial Energy Efficiency Basics The industrial sector is vital to the U.S. economy, but at the same time consumes the most energy in the country to manufacture products we use every day. Among the most energy-intensive industries are aluminum, chemicals, forest product, glass, metal casting, mining, petroleum refining, and steel. The energy supply chain begins with electricity, steam, natural gas, coal, and other fuels supplied to a manufacturing plant from off-site power plants, gas companies, and fuel distributors. Energy then flows to either a central energy generation utility system or is distributed immediately for direct use. Energy is then processed using a variety of highly energy-intensive systems, including steam, process heating, and

151

Computational Materials Science: from Basic Principles to Material ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 8, 2007... Thermodynamics Software/Codes, Visualization Software/Codes ... Topic Title: Computational Materials Science: from Basic Principles to...

152

Biofuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuel Basics Biofuel Basics Biofuel Basics July 30, 2013 - 11:38am Addthis Text Version Photo of a woman in goggles handling a machine filled with biofuels. Biofuels are liquid or gaseous fuels produced from biomass. Most biofuels are used for transportation, but some are used as fuels to produce electricity. The expanded use of biofuels offers an array of benefits for our energy security, economic growth, and environment. Current biofuels research focuses on new forms of biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel, and on biofuels conversion processes. Ethanol Ethanol-an alcohol-is made primarily from the starch in corn grain. It is most commonly used as an additive to petroleum-based fuels to reduce toxic air emissions and increase octane. Today, roughly half of the gasoline sold in the United States includes 5%-10% ethanol.

153

Microhydropower Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basics Basics Microhydropower Basics August 15, 2013 - 3:09pm Addthis Microhydropower systems are small hydroelectric power systems of less than 100 kilowatts (kW) used to produce mechanical energy or electricity for farms, ranches, homes, and villages. How a Microhydropower System Works All hydropower systems use the energy of flowing water to produce electricity or mechanical energy. Although there are several ways to harness moving water to produce energy, "run-of-the-river systems," which do not require large storage reservoirs, are most often used for microhydropower systems. Illustration of an example microhydropower system. A river flows down from some hills. The river first flows through an intake, which is indicated as two white walls on each side of the river. The intake diverts water to a canal. From the canal, the water travels to a forebay, which looks like a white, rectangular, aboveground pool. A pipeline, called a penstock, extends from the forebay to a building, called the powerhouse. You can see inside the powerhouse, which contains a turbine and other electric generation equipment. The water flows in and out of the powerhouse, returning to the river. Power lines also extend from the powerhouse, along and through two electrical towers, to a house that sits near the river's edge.

154

Energy Basics: Microhydropower Water Conveyance and Filters  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Large-Scale Hydropower Microhydropower Water Conveyance &...

155

Energy Basics: Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

156

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cell Quantum Efficiency  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

157

Energy Basics: Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

158

Energy Basics: Linear Concentrator Systems for Concentrating...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

159

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cell Conversion Efficiency  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

160

Energy Basics: Microhydropower Turbines, Pumps, and Waterwheels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Large-Scale Hydropower Microhydropower Water Conveyance &...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Energy Basics: Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Modules  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

162

Energy Basics: Large-Scale Hydropower  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Large-Scale Hydropower Microhydropower Hydropower Resources...

163

Wind Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Technology Basics Wind Energy Technology Basics Wind Energy Technology Basics August 15, 2013 - 4:10pm Addthis Photo of a hilly field, with six visible wind turbines spinning in the wind. Wind energy technologies use the energy in wind for practical purposes such as generating electricity, charging batteries, pumping water, and grinding grain. Most wind energy technologies can be used as stand-alone applications, connected to a utility power grid, or even combined with a photovoltaic system. For utility-scale sources of wind energy, a large number of turbines are usually built close together to form a wind farm that provides grid power. Several electricity providers use wind farms to supply power to their customers. Stand-alone turbines are typically used for water pumping or

164

Solar Energy Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Energy Resource Basics Solar Energy Resource Basics Solar Energy Resource Basics August 21, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Solar radiation, often called the solar resource, is a general term for the electromagnetic radiation emitted by the sun. Solar radiation can be captured and turned into useful forms of energy, such as heat and electricity, using a variety of technologies. However, the technical feasibility and economical operation of these technologies at a specific location depends on the available solar resource. Basic Principles Every location on Earth receives sunlight at least part of the year. The amount of solar radiation that reaches any one spot on the Earth's surface varies according to: Geographic location Time of day Season Local landscape Local weather. Because the Earth is round, the sun strikes the surface at different

165

Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next-Generation Instrumentation and Beyond. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Electron Scattering for Materials Characterization, March 1-2, 2007  

SciTech Connect

To identify emerging basic science and engineering research needs and opportunities that will require major advances in electron-scattering theory, technology, and instrumentation.

Miller, D. J.; Williams, D. B.; Anderson, I. M.; Schmid, A. K.; Zaluzec, N. J.

2007-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

166

basic research needs | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Reports » Reports » Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Program Summaries Brochures Reports Abstracts Accomplishments Presentations BES and Congress Science for Energy Flow Seeing Matter Scale of Things Chart Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » Reports Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page BES-sponsored workshop reports address the current status and possible future directions of some important research areas of relevance to energy missions. These reports include those resulting from the "Basic Research

167

Tidal Energy Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tidal Energy Basics Tidal Energy Basics Tidal Energy Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:26pm Addthis Photo of the ocean rising along the beach. Some of the oldest ocean energy technologies use tidal power. All coastal areas experience two high tides and two low tides over a period of slightly more than 24 hours. For those tidal differences to be harnessed into electricity, the difference between high and low tides must be more than 16 feet (or at least 5 meters). However, there are only about 40 sites on Earth with tidal ranges of this magnitude. Currently, there are no tidal power plants in the United States, but conditions are good for tidal power generation in the Pacific Northwest and the Atlantic Northeast regions. Tidal Energy Technologies Tidal energy technologies include barrages or dams, tidal fences, and tidal

168

Hydropower Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

potential from the EERE Wind and Water Power Technologies Office. Addthis Related Articles Hydropower Technology Basics Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Microhydropower Basics...

169

Geothermal Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Or read more about EERE's geothermal technologies research. Addthis Related Articles Geothermal Direct-Use Basics Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Geothermal Resource Basics...

170

BASIC RESEARCH DIRECTIONS for User Science at the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(K.O.H.). XAS data were measured at the Stanford Synchro- tron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL), which is supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The SSRL Structural Molecular

Stewart, Sarah T.

171

Infrared Basics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Infrared Basics Citation Protherm. Infrared Basics Internet. 2013. cited...

172

Energy Basics: Wind Power Animation (Text Version)  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Wind Turbines Wind Resources Wind Power...

173

Energy Basics: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Hydrogen and Fuel Cell...

174

BASIC Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name BASIC Solar Place Bulgaria Product Project development SPV focused on utility-scale PV projects. References BASIC Solar1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

175

Energy Dept. Awards $22.7 Million for Basic Solar Energy Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Dept. Awards $22.7 Million for Basic Solar Energy Research Energy Dept. Awards $22.7 Million for Basic Solar Energy Research Energy Dept. Awards $22.7 Million for Basic Solar Energy Research May 22, 2007 - 1:24pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $22.7 million in basic research projects aimed at improving the capture, conversion and use of solar energy. The research will help increase the amount of solar power in the nation's energy supply. "These projects are part of our aggressive basic research in the physical sciences--what I call 'transformational science'--aimed at achieving a new generation of breakthrough technologies that will push the cost-effectiveness of renewable energy sources to levels comparable to petroleum and natural gas sources," Under Secretary for Science Dr. Raymond

176

NREL: Learning - Energy Delivery and Storage Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Delivery and Storage Basics Helping secure a clean energy future for the nation and the world isn't just about reducing energy usage or producing clean energy. It is about...

177

Contacts, Basic Energy Sciences Directorate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Compliance Representative Debbie Bauer - x5664, bauer@bnl.gov Safety & Health Services Representative Mary Chuc - x2711, mchuc@bnl.gov Business Manager Ken Koebel -...

178

Solar Energy Science Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Science Projects Curriculum: Solar Power -(thermodynamics, lightelectromagnetic, radiation, energy transformation, conductionconvection, seasons, trigonometry) Grade...

179

Basic Research Needs | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Basic Research Needs Basic Research Needs Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Basic Research Needs Grand Challenges Science Highlights News & Events Publications Contact BES Home Research Basic Research Needs Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page In 2001, the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) conducted a far reaching study to assess the scope of fundamental scientific research that must be considered to address the DOE missions in energy efficiency, renewable energy resources, improved use of fossil fuels, safe and publicly acceptable nuclear energy, future energy sources, and reduced environmental impacts of energy production and use. The scientific community responded to this BESAC study with enthusiasm through participation in a week-long

180

Energy Dept. Awards $22.7 Million for Basic Solar Energy Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22.7 Million for Basic Solar Energy Research 22.7 Million for Basic Solar Energy Research Energy Dept. Awards $22.7 Million for Basic Solar Energy Research May 22, 2007 - 1:24pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $22.7 million in basic research projects aimed at improving the capture, conversion and use of solar energy. The research will help increase the amount of solar power in the nation's energy supply. "These projects are part of our aggressive basic research in the physical sciences--what I call 'transformational science'--aimed at achieving a new generation of breakthrough technologies that will push the cost-effectiveness of renewable energy sources to levels comparable to petroleum and natural gas sources," Under Secretary for Science Dr. Raymond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Potential Operation and Maintenance (O&M) Savings in the Basic Science Building at UTMB  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study of the potential energy savings due to optimizing the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) operation schedule in the Basic Science Building at University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB), Galveston, Texas.

Liu, M.; Athar, A.; Claridge, D. E.; Reddy, T. A.; Haberl, J. S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Materials Science | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economy Funding Opportunities State & Local Government Science & Innovation Science & Technology Science Education Innovation Energy Sources Energy Usage Energy Efficiency...

183

Basic Plasma Science | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are carried out today in the United States, the European Union, Russia, Japan, Korea and China. PPPL research has expanded knowledge of the science behind such systems and...

184

Energy Basics: Electricity as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Electricity as a Transportation Fuel Electricity used to power vehicles is generally provided by the electricity grid and stored in the vehicle's batteries....

185

Energy Basics: Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Photo of a woman scientist using a machine that is purifying biological catalysts for hydrogen production. Hydrogen is the...

186

Energy Basics: Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not...

187

Photovoltaic Cell Performance Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photovoltaic Cell Performance Basics August 19, 2013 - 4:55pm Addthis Photovoltaic (PV), or solar cells use the energy in sunlight to produce electricity. However, the amount...

188

Energy Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sources of tomorrow-are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such these photon-science facilities are uniquely...

189

Biodiesel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biodiesel Basics Biodiesel Basics Biodiesel Basics July 30, 2013 - 2:43pm Addthis Looking for Biodiesel stations? Checkout the Alternative Fuels Data Center station locator. Biodiesel station locator Biodiesel is a domestically produced, renewable fuel that can be manufactured from vegetable oils, animal fats, or recycled restaurant greases. What is Biodiesel? Biodiesel is a liquid fuel made up of fatty acid alkyl esters, fatty acid methyl esters, or long-chain mono alkyl esters. It is produced from renewable sources such as new and used vegetable oils and animal fats and is a cleaner-burning replacement for petroleum-based diesel fuel. It is nontoxic and biodegradable. Like petroleum diesel, biodiesel is used to fuel compression-ignition (diesel) engines. B20, which is 20% biodiesel and 80% petroleum diesel, is

190

Biopower Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biopower Basics Biopower Basics Biopower Basics August 14, 2013 - 12:35pm Addthis Biopower is the production of electricity or heat from biomass resources. With 10 gigawatts of installed capacity, biopower technologies are proven options in the United States today. Biopower technologies include direct combustion, co-firing, and anaerobic digestion. Direct Combustion Most electricity generated from biomass is produced by direct combustion using conventional boilers. These boilers primarily burn waste wood products from the agriculture and wood-processing industries. When burned, the wood produces steam, which spins a turbine. The spinning turbine then activates a generator that produces electricity. Co-Firing Co-firing involves replacing a portion of the petroleum-based fuel in

191

Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Basics Lighting Basics Lighting Basics August 15, 2013 - 5:12pm Addthis Text Version There are many different types of artificial lights, all of which have different applications and uses. Types of lighting include: Fluorescent Lighting High-intensity Discharge Lighting Incandescent Lighting LED Lighting Low-pressure Sodium Lighting. Which type is best depends on the application. See the chart below for a comparison of lighting types. Lighting Comparison Chart Lighting Type Efficacy (lumens/watt) Lifetime (hours) Color Rendition Index (CRI) Color Temperature (K) Indoors/Outdoors Fluorescent Straight Tube 30-110 7000-24,000 50-90 (fair to good) 2700-6500 (warm to cold) Indoors/outdoors Compact Fluorescent 50-70 10,000 65-88 (good) 2700-6500 (warm to cold) Indoors/outdoors

192

Biopower Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biopower Basics Biopower Basics Biopower Basics August 14, 2013 - 12:35pm Addthis Biopower is the production of electricity or heat from biomass resources. With 10 gigawatts of installed capacity, biopower technologies are proven options in the United States today. Biopower technologies include direct combustion, co-firing, and anaerobic digestion. Direct Combustion Most electricity generated from biomass is produced by direct combustion using conventional boilers. These boilers primarily burn waste wood products from the agriculture and wood-processing industries. When burned, the wood produces steam, which spins a turbine. The spinning turbine then activates a generator that produces electricity. Co-Firing Co-firing involves replacing a portion of the petroleum-based fuel in

193

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic System Performance  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

regulator, specified either as peak power or average power produced during one day. Energy output The energy (watt-hour or Wh) output. This indicates the amount of energy...

194

Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND LANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications...

195

Energy Basics: Concentrating Solar Power  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

use mirrors to reflect and concentrate sunlight onto receivers that collect solar energy and convert it to heat. This thermal energy can then be used to produce electricity...

196

Energy Basics: Concentrator Photovoltaic Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

inexpensive materials such as plastic lenses and metal housings to capture the solar energy shining on a fairly large area and focus that energy onto a smaller area-the solar...

197

EERE: Energy Basics Home Page  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

businesses, and industries. Technologies Renewable Energy Technologies Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Home and Building Technologies Lighting and...

198

Energy Basics: Electric Resistance Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to heat. Types of Electric Resistance Heaters Electric resistance...

199

Energy Basics: Small Space Heaters  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

storage, allowing the heater to cycle less and to provide a more constant heat source. More Information Visit the Energy Saver website for more information about portable heaters...

200

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cell Performance  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Performance Photovoltaic (PV), or solar cells use the energy in sunlight to produce electricity. However, the amount of electricity produced depends on the quality of the light...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy Basics: Biofuel Conversion Processes  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

from the EERE Bioenergy Technologies Office. Thermochemical Conversion Processes Heat energy and chemical catalysts can be used to break down biomass into intermediate compounds...

202

Energy and Development: Is Energy a Basic Human Right?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Development: Is Energy a Basic Human Right? Skype/Video presentation for senior pupils national Laboratory/DTU Denmark #12;Is energy a basic human right? · What is energy? ­ the ability to make something happen · Different kinds of energy ­ or energy carriers - fuels · What do we use energy for

203

Energy Basics: Heat Pump Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of air-source heat pumps. Absorption Heat Pump Uses heat as its energy source. Geothermal Heat Pumps Use the constant temperature of the earth as the exchange medium instead...

204

NREL: Learning - Renewable Energy Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The United States currently relies heavily on coal, oil, and natural gas for its energy. Fossil fuels are nonrenewable, that is, they draw on finite resources that will eventually...

205

Energy Basics: Active Solar Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

systems based on the type of fluid-either liquid or air-that is heated in the solar energy collectors. The collector is the device in which a fluid is heated by the sun....

206

Energy Basics: Solar Water Heaters  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

solar storage in one tank. Types of Solar Collectors Solar collectors gather the sun's energy, transform its radiation into heat, and then transfer that heat to water or solar...

207

Energy Basics: Passive Solar Design  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

using a building's windows, walls, and floors to collect, store, and distribute solar energy in the form of heat in the winter and reject solar heat in the summer. Learn how...

208

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cell Materials  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

one crystal to another. Bandgap The bandgap of a semiconductor material is the minimum energy needed to move an electron from its bound state within an atom to a free state. This...

209

Energy Basics: Small Space Heaters  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

allowing the heater to cycle less and to provide a more constant heat source. More Information Visit the Energy Saver website for more information about portable heaters in homes...

210

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cell Structures  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

the middle, is Eg2; and Cell 3, at the bottom, is Eg3. The top cell captures the high-energy photons and passes the rest of the photons on to be absorbed by lower-bandgap cells. A...

211

Fusion Energy Sciences  

Office of Science (SC) Website

http:science.energy.govfesaboutjobs Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the...

212

Energy Science at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Artificial Photosynthesis II - EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC Novel Methods for Harvesting Solar Energy Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion...

213

Basic science research to support the nuclear material focus area  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE'S) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

Boak, J. M. (Jeremy M.); Eller, P. Gary; Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Basic Science Research to Support the Nuclear Materials Focus Area  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) is responsible for managing more than 760,000 metric tons of nuclear material that is excess to the current DOE weapons program, as a result of shutdown of elements of the weapons program, mainly during the 1990s. EMowned excess nuclear material comprises a variety of material types, including uranium, plutonium, other actinides and other radioactive elements in numerous forms, all of which must be stabilized for storage and ultimate disposition. Much of this quantity has been in storage for many years. Shutdown of DOE sites and facilities requires removal of nuclear material and consolidation at other sites, and may be delayed by the lack of available technology. Within EM, the Office of Science and Technology (OST) is dedicated to providing timely, relevant technology to accelerate completion and reduce cleanup cost of the DOE environmental legacy. OST is organized around five focus areas, addressing crucial areas of end-user-defined technology need. The Focus Areas regularly identify potential technical solutions for which basic scientific research is needed to determine if the technical solution can be developed and deployed. To achieve a portfolio of projects that is balanced between near-term priorities driven by programmatic risks (such as site closure milestones) and long-term, high-consequence needs that depend on extensive research and development, OST has established the Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) to develop the scientific basis for solutions to long-term site needs. The EMSP directs calls for proposals to address scientific needs of the focus areas. Needs are identified and validated annually by individual sites in workshops conducted across the complex. The process captures scope and schedule requirements of the sites, so that focus areas can identify technology that can be delivered to sites in time to complete site cleanup. The Nuclear Material Focus Area (NMFA) has identified over two hundred science and technology needs, of which more than thirty are science needs.

Chipman, N. A.; Castle, P. M.; Boak, J. M.; Eller, P. G.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

215

Energy Basics: Wood and Pellet Heating  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Wood and Pellet Heating Wood-burning and pellet fuel appliances use biomass or waste resources to heat homes or buildings. Types of Wood- and Pellet-Burning...

216

Energy Basics: Propane as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Propane as a Transportation Fuel Photo of a man standing next to a propane fuel pump with a tank in the background. Propane, also known as liquefied petroleum...

217

Wind Turbine Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Turbine Basics Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics July 30, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis Energy 101: Wind Turbines Basics This video explains the basics of how wind turbines operate to produce clean power from an abundant, renewable resource-the wind. Text Version Wind turbine assembly Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines. Horizontal Axis Turbines Horizontal axis turbines are the most common turbine configuration used today. They consist of a tall tower, atop which sits a fan-like rotor that faces into or away from the wind, a generator, a controller, and other components. Most horizontal axis turbines built today are two- or three-bladed. Horizontal axis turbines sit high atop towers to take advantage of the

218

Wind Turbine Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics Wind Turbine Basics July 30, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis Energy 101: Wind Turbines Basics This video explains the basics of how wind turbines operate to produce clean power from an abundant, renewable resource-the wind. Text Version Wind turbine assembly Although all wind turbines operate on similar principles, several varieties are in use today. These include horizontal axis turbines and vertical axis turbines. Horizontal Axis Turbines Horizontal axis turbines are the most common turbine configuration used today. They consist of a tall tower, atop which sits a fan-like rotor that faces into or away from the wind, a generator, a controller, and other components. Most horizontal axis turbines built today are two- or three-bladed. Horizontal axis turbines sit high atop towers to take advantage of the

219

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy S ciences N etwork Enabling Virtual Science June 9, 2009 Steve C oer steve@es.net Dept. H ead, E nergy S ciences N etwork Lawrence B erkeley N aDonal L ab The E nergy S...

220

Sustainable Building Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sustainable Sustainable Building Basics Sustainable Building Basics October 4, 2013 - 4:21pm Addthis Image of the side of a sustainable building Sustainable building design results in energy savings and environment stewardship. Sustainable building design and operation strategies demonstrate a commitment to energy efficiency and environmental stewardship. These approaches result in an optimal balance of energy, cost, environmental, and societal benefits, while still meeting the mission of a Federal agency and the function of the facility or infrastructure. For buildings and facilities, responsible resource management and the assessment of operational impacts encompass the principles of sustainability. Sustainable development aims to meet the needs of the present without compromising future needs.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Federal Energy Management Program: Sustainable Building Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics Basics Image of the side of a sustainable building Sustainable building design results in energy savings and environment stewardship. Sustainable building design and operation strategies demonstrate a commitment to energy efficiency, and environmental stewardship. These approaches result in an optimal balance of energy, cost, environmental, and societal benefits, while still meeting the mission of a Federal agency and the function of the facility or infrastructure. For buildings and facilities, responsible resource management and the assessment of operational impacts encompass the principles of sustainability. Sustainable development aims to meet the needs of the present without compromising future needs. Learn more about the: Benefits of sustainable building design

222

Geothermal Electricity Production Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Production Basics Electricity Production Basics Geothermal Electricity Production Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:49pm Addthis A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in California. Geothermal energy originates from deep within the Earth and produces minimal emissions. Photo credit: Pacific Gas & Electric Heat from the earth-geothermal energy-heats water that has seeped into underground reservoirs. These reservoirs can be tapped for a variety of uses, depending on the temperature of the water. The energy from high-temperature reservoirs (225°-600°F) can be used to produce electricity. In the United States, geothermal energy has been used to generate electricity on a large scale since 1960. Through research and development, geothermal power is becoming more cost-effective and competitive with

223

Air-Conditioning Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air-Conditioning Basics Air-Conditioning Basics Air-Conditioning Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Air conditioning is one of the most common ways to cool homes and buildings. How Air Conditioners Work Air conditioners employ the same operating principles and basic components as refrigerators. Refrigerators use energy (usually electricity) to transfer heat from the cool interior of the refrigerator to the relatively warm surroundings; likewise, an air conditioner uses energy to transfer heat from the interior space to the relatively warm outside environment. An air conditioner uses a cold indoor coil called the evaporator. The condenser, a hot outdoor coil, releases the collected heat outside. The evaporator and condenser coils are serpentine tubing surrounded by aluminum fins. This tubing is usually made of copper.

224

Energy Basics: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when...

225

Science for Energy Flow | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science for Energy Flow Science for Energy Flow Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Program Summaries Brochures Reports Accomplishments Presentations BES and Congress Science for Energy Flow Energy Flow Diagram Seeing Matter Scale of Things Chart Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » News & Resources Science for Energy Flow Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Powering the Future with a New Era of Science Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Energy Flow 2010

226

New Energy Basics Site: Check It Out! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Energy Basics Site: Check It Out! New Energy Basics Site: Check It Out! New Energy Basics Site: Check It Out! August 23, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL Interested in energy efficiency and renewable energy but a little confused by all the terms? Wondering how the technologies actually work? Maybe you're doing some research or working on a paper and just need a little background info. EERE's new Energy Basics site is the place for you. There you can learn things like how a wind turbine works and all about the different types of fuel cells. If you just need a quick definition of a term you've heard, check out the glossary. Energy Basics is not meant to replace Energy Savers or any of the program sites throughout the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

227

Electric Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Vehicle Basics Electric Vehicle Basics Electric Vehicle Basics July 30, 2013 - 4:45pm Addthis Text Version Photo of an electric bus driving up a hill. Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage device, such as a battery. The electricity powers the vehicle's wheels via an electric motor. EVs have limited energy storage capacity, which must be replenished by plugging into an electrical source. In an electric vehicle, a battery or other energy storage device is used to store the electricity that powers the motor. EV batteries must be replenished by plugging the vehicle to a power source. Some EVs have onboard chargers; others plug into a charger located outside the vehicle. Both types use electricity that comes from the power grid. Although

228

Hydrogen Fuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Fuel Basics Hydrogen Fuel Basics Hydrogen Fuel Basics August 14, 2013 - 2:06pm Addthis Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal, natural gas, nuclear power, and renewable power. These qualities make it an attractive fuel option for transportation and electricity generation applications. Hydrogen is an energy carrier that can be used to store, move, and deliver energy produced from other sources. The energy in hydrogen fuel is derived from the fuels and processes used to produce the hydrogen. Today, hydrogen fuel can be produced through several methods. The most common methods are thermal, electrolytic, and photolytic processes. Thermal Processes Thermal processes for hydrogen production typically involve steam

229

Biomass Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes-that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007. Biomass technologies break down organic matter to release stored energy from the sun. The process used depends on the type of biomass and its

230

Biomass Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics Biomass Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 11:31am Addthis Photo of a pair of hands holding corn stover, the unused parts of harvested corn. There are many types of biomass-organic matter such as plants, residue from agriculture and forestry, and the organic component of municipal and industrial wastes-that can now be used to produce fuels, chemicals, and power. Wood has been used to provide heat for thousands of years. This flexibility has resulted in increased use of biomass technologies. According to the Energy Information Administration, 53% of all renewable energy consumed in the United States was biomass-based in 2007. Biomass technologies break down organic matter to release stored energy from the sun. The process used depends on the type of biomass and its

231

Hydrogen Fuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Fuel Basics Hydrogen Fuel Basics Hydrogen Fuel Basics August 14, 2013 - 2:06pm Addthis Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal, natural gas, nuclear power, and renewable power. These qualities make it an attractive fuel option for transportation and electricity generation applications. Hydrogen is an energy carrier that can be used to store, move, and deliver energy produced from other sources. The energy in hydrogen fuel is derived from the fuels and processes used to produce the hydrogen. Today, hydrogen fuel can be produced through several methods. The most common methods are thermal, electrolytic, and photolytic processes. Thermal Processes Thermal processes for hydrogen production typically involve steam

232

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

233

Biomass Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics Biomass Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:22pm Addthis Biomass resources include any plant-derived organic matter that is available on a renewable basis. These materials are commonly referred to as feedstocks. Biomass Feedstocks Biomass feedstocks include dedicated energy crops, agricultural crops, forestry residues, aquatic crops, biomass processing residues, municipal waste, and animal waste. Dedicated energy crops Herbaceous energy crops are perennials that are harvested annually after taking 2 to 3 years to reach full productivity. These include such grasses as switchgrass, miscanthus (also known as elephant grass or e-grass), bamboo, sweet sorghum, tall fescue, kochia, wheatgrass, and others. Short-rotation woody crops are fast-growing hardwood trees that are

234

Photovoltaic Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Basics Technology Basics Photovoltaic Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:47pm Addthis Text Version Photovoltaic (PV) materials and devices convert sunlight into electrical energy, and PV cells are commonly known as solar cells. Photovoltaics can literally be translated as light-electricity. First used in about 1890, "photovoltaic" has two parts: photo, derived from the Greek word for light, and volt, relating to electricity pioneer Alessandro Volta. And this is what photovoltaic materials and devices do-they convert light energy into electrical energy, as French physicist Edmond Becquerel discovered as early as 1839. Becquerel discovered the process of using sunlight to produce an electric current in a solid material. But it took more than another century to truly

235

Photovoltaic Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photovoltaic Technology Basics Photovoltaic Technology Basics Photovoltaic Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:47pm Addthis Text Version Photovoltaic (PV) materials and devices convert sunlight into electrical energy, and PV cells are commonly known as solar cells. Photovoltaics can literally be translated as light-electricity. First used in about 1890, "photovoltaic" has two parts: photo, derived from the Greek word for light, and volt, relating to electricity pioneer Alessandro Volta. And this is what photovoltaic materials and devices do-they convert light energy into electrical energy, as French physicist Edmond Becquerel discovered as early as 1839. Becquerel discovered the process of using sunlight to produce an electric current in a solid material. But it took more than another century to truly

236

Department of Energy Office of Science Transportation Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy (DOE) Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC) Transportation Overview Jon W. Neuhoff, Director N B i k L b t New Brunswick Laboratory 1 DOE National Transportation Stakeholders Forum May 26, 2010 About the Office of Science The Office of Science (SC) with a budget of approximately $5 Billion...  Single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the U.S. (> 40% of the total funding) ( g)  Principal Federal funding agency for the Nation's research programs in high energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences  Manages fundamental research programs in basic energy sciences, biological and environmental sciences, and computational science

237

Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these technologies work. Ventilation Ventilation allows air to move into and out of homes and buildings either by natural or mechanical means. Evaporative Cooling In dry climates, evaporative cooling or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the cooler. The heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and basic

238

Basic Instructor Training | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basic Instructor Training Basic Instructor Training Basic Instructor Training December 5, 2013 - 12:03pm Addthis The Emergency Operations Training Academy, NA 40.2, Readiness and Training, Albuquerque, NM is pleased to announce site certification by the National Training Center for conduct of the Basic Instructor Training class. This one -week, 40 hour course is offered to ensure the quality and consistency of classroom instruction provided at Department of Energy facilities nationwide. The purpose is to equip DOE federal and contractor instructors with best methods and techniques and deliver instruction and practice in classroom activitives that promote student success. The Emergency Operations Training Academy will be offering this class three (3) times per year starting in 2014.

239

Cooling System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics Cooling System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:08pm Addthis Cooling technologies used in homes and buildings include ventilation, evaporative cooling, air conditioning, absorption cooling, and radiant cooling. Learn more about how these technologies work. Ventilation Ventilation allows air to move into and out of homes and buildings either by natural or mechanical means. Evaporative Cooling In dry climates, evaporative cooling or "swamp cooling" provides an experience like air conditioning, but with much lower energy use. An evaporative cooler uses the outside air's heat to evaporate water inside the cooler. The heat is drawn out of the air and the cooled air is blown into the space by the cooler's fan. Air Conditioning Air conditioners, which employ the same operating principles and basic

240

Absorption Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cooling Basics Cooling Basics Absorption Cooling Basics August 16, 2013 - 2:26pm Addthis Absorption coolers use heat rather than electricity as their energy source. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption cooling, it is also referred to as gas-fired cooling. Other potential heat sources include propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Although mainly used in industrial or commercial settings, absorption coolers are commercially available for large residential homes. How Absorption Cooling Works An absorption cooling cycle relies on three basic principles: When a liquid is heated it boils (vaporizes) and when a gas is cooled it condenses Lowering the pressure above a liquid reduces its boiling point Heat flows from warmer to cooler surfaces.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Active Solar Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Active Solar Heating Basics Active Solar Heating Basics Active Solar Heating Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:23pm Addthis There are two basic types of active solar heating systems based on the type of fluid-either liquid or air-that is heated in the solar energy collectors. The collector is the device in which a fluid is heated by the sun. Liquid-based systems heat water or an antifreeze solution in a "hydronic" collector, whereas air-based systems heat air in an "air collector." Both of these systems collect and absorb solar radiation, then transfer the solar heat directly to the interior space or to a storage system, from which the heat is distributed. If the system cannot provide adequate space heating, an auxiliary or back-up system provides the additional heat. Liquid systems are more often used when storage is included, and are well

242

Federal Energy Management Program: Combined Heat and Power Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Heat and Power Basics to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Combined Heat and Power Basics on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management...

243

LED Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LED Lighting Basics LED Lighting Basics LED Lighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 10:07am Addthis Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are light sources that differ from more traditional sources of light in that they are semiconductor devices that produce light when an electrical current is applied. Applying electrical current causes electrons to flow from the positive side of a diode to the negative side. Then, at the positive/negative junction of the diode, the electrons slow down to orbit at a lower energy level. The electrons emit the excess energy as photons of light. LEDs are often used as small indicator lights on various electronic devices. Because of their long life, durability, and efficiency, LEDs are becoming more common in residential, commercial, and outdoor area lighting

244

Concentrator Photovoltaic System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Concentrator Photovoltaic System Basics Concentrator Photovoltaic System Basics Concentrator Photovoltaic System Basics August 20, 2013 - 4:12pm Addthis Concentrator photovoltaic (PV) systems use less solar cell material than other PV systems. PV cells are the most expensive components of a PV system, on a per-area basis. A concentrator makes use of relatively inexpensive materials such as plastic lenses and metal housings to capture the solar energy shining on a fairly large area and focus that energy onto a smaller area-the solar cell. One measure of the effectiveness of this approach is the concentration ratio-in other words, how much concentration the cell is receiving. Concentrator PV systems have several advantages over flat-plate systems. First, concentrator systems reduce the size or number of cells needed and

245

Heat Pump System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pump System Basics Heat Pump System Basics Heat Pump System Basics August 19, 2013 - 11:02am Addthis Like a refrigerator, heat pumps use electricity to move heat from a cool space into a warm space, making the cool space cooler and the warm space warmer. Because they move heat rather than generate heat, heat pumps can provide up to four times the amount of energy they consume. Air-Source Heat Pump Transfers heat between the inside of a building and the outside air. Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pump Ductless versions of air-source heat pumps. Absorption Heat Pump Uses heat as its energy source. Geothermal Heat Pumps Use the constant temperature of the earth as the exchange medium instead of the outside air temperature. Addthis Related Articles A heat pump can provide an alternative to using your air conditioner. | Photo courtesy of iStockPhoto/LordRunar.

246

Hydropower Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydropower Technology Basics Hydropower Technology Basics Hydropower Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 3:03pm Addthis Text Version Photo of the reservoir in front of a hydropower dam. Hydropower, or hydroelectric power, is the most common and least expensive source of renewable electricity in the United States today. According to the Energy Information Administration, more than 6% of the country's electricity was produced from hydropower resources in 2008, and about 70% of all renewable electricity generated in the United States came from hydropower resources. Hydropower technologies have a long history of use because of their many benefits, including high availability and lack of emissions. Hydropower technologies use flowing water to create energy that can be captured and turned into electricity. Both large and small-scale power

247

Vehicle Battery Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Battery Basics Vehicle Battery Basics Vehicle Battery Basics November 22, 2013 - 1:58pm Addthis Batteries are essential for electric drive technologies such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and all-electric vehicles (AEVs). What is a Battery? A battery is a device that stores chemical energy and converts it on demand into electrical energy. It carries out this process through an electrochemical reaction, which is a chemical reaction involving the transfer of electrons. Batteries have three main parts, each of which plays a different role in the electrochemical reaction: the anode, cathode, and electrolyte. The anode is the "fuel" electrode (or "negative" part), which gives up electrons to the external circuit to create a flow of electrons, otherwise

248

Hydropower Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydropower Technology Basics Hydropower Technology Basics Hydropower Technology Basics August 14, 2013 - 3:03pm Addthis Text Version Photo of the reservoir in front of a hydropower dam. Hydropower, or hydroelectric power, is the most common and least expensive source of renewable electricity in the United States today. According to the Energy Information Administration, more than 6% of the country's electricity was produced from hydropower resources in 2008, and about 70% of all renewable electricity generated in the United States came from hydropower resources. Hydropower technologies have a long history of use because of their many benefits, including high availability and lack of emissions. Hydropower technologies use flowing water to create energy that can be captured and turned into electricity. Both large and small-scale power

249

Basic Solar Energy Research in Japan (2011 EFRC Forum)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Kazunari Domen, Chemical System Engineering Professor at the University of Tokyo, was the second speaker in the May 26, 2011 EFRC Forum session, "Global Perspectives on Frontiers in Energy Research." In his presentation, Professor Domen talked about basic solar energy research in Japan. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several grand challenges and use-inspired basic research needs recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

Domen, Kazunari (University of Tokyo)

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

250

Basics of Inertial Confinement Fusion NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basics of Inertial Confinement Fusion John Lindl NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist (NIC) · Opportunities for the future on NIF #12;Fusion can be accomplished in three different ways density) 102 103 104 105 500 50 5 0.5 Capsule energy (KJ) NIF Relaxed pressure and stability requirements

251

Ocean Energy Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

resource-assessment projects for advanced water power. Addthis Related Articles Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Frequently Asked Questions Pamela Sydelko is the Deputy...

252

Sustainable Building Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Sustainable Buildings & Campuses » Sustainable Program Areas » Sustainable Buildings & Campuses » Sustainable Building Basics Sustainable Building Basics October 4, 2013 - 4:21pm Addthis Image of the side of a sustainable building Sustainable building design results in energy savings and environment stewardship. Sustainable building design and operation strategies demonstrate a commitment to energy efficiency and environmental stewardship. These approaches result in an optimal balance of energy, cost, environmental, and societal benefits, while still meeting the mission of a Federal agency and the function of the facility or infrastructure. For buildings and facilities, responsible resource management and the assessment of operational impacts encompass the principles of sustainability. Sustainable development aims to meet the needs of the

253

Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity August 19, 2013 - 5:44pm Addthis Electricity used to power vehicles is generally provided by the electricity grid and stored in the vehicle's batteries. Fuel cells are being explored as a way to use electricity generated on board the vehicle to power electric motors. Unlike batteries, fuel cells convert chemical energy from hydrogen into electricity. Vehicles that run on electricity have no tailpipe emissions. Emissions that can be attributed to electric vehicles are generated in the electricity production process at the power plant. Home recharging of electric vehicles is as simple as plugging them into an electric outlet. Electricity fueling costs for electric vehicles are

254

Evaporative Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaporative Cooling Basics Evaporative Cooling Basics Evaporative Cooling Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:53pm Addthis Evaporative cooling uses evaporated water to naturally and energy-efficiently cool. An illustration of an evaporative cooler. In this example of an evaporative cooler, a small motor (top) drives a large fan (center) which blows air out the bottom and into your home. The fan sucks air in through the louvers around the box, which are covered with water-saturated absorbent material. How Evaporative Coolers Work There are two types of evaporative coolers: direct and indirect. Direct evaporative coolers, also called swamp coolers, work by cooling outdoor air by passing it over water-saturated pads, causing the water to evaporate into it. The 15°-40°F-cooler air is then directed into the home

255

Heating System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating System Basics Heating System Basics Heating System Basics August 16, 2013 - 2:32pm Addthis A variety of heating technologies are available today. You can learn more about what heating systems and heat pumps are commonly used today and how they work below. To learn how to use these technologies in your own home, see the Home Heating Systems section on Energy Saver. Furnaces and Boilers Furnaces heat air and distribute the heated air through a building using ducts. Boilers heat water, providing either hot water or steam for heating. Wood and Pellet Heating Provides a way to heat a building using biomass or waste sources. Electric Resistance Heating Can be supplied by centralized electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Active Solar Heating Uses the sun to heat either air or liquid and can serve as a supplemental

256

Anaerobic Digestion Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anaerobic Digestion Basics Anaerobic Digestion Basics Anaerobic Digestion Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:07pm Addthis Anaerobic digestion is a common technology in today's agriculture, municipal waste, and brewing industries. It uses bacteria to break down waste organic materials into methane and other gases, which can be used to produce electricity or heat. Methane and Anaerobic Bacteria Methane is a gas that contains molecules of methane with one atom of carbon and four atoms of hydrogen (CH4). It is the major component of the natural gas used in many homes for cooking and heating. It is odorless, colorless, and yields about 1,000 British thermal units (Btu) [252 kilocalories (kcal)] of heat energy per cubic foot (0.028 cubic meters) when burned. Natural gas is a fossil fuel that was created eons ago by the anaerobic

257

Water Efficiency Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basics Basics Water Efficiency Basics October 7, 2013 - 2:38pm Addthis Training Available Graphic of the eTraining logo Managing Water Assessment in Federal Facilities: Learn how to manage the Water Assessment process in Federal facilities by taking this FEMP eTraining course. Although two-thirds of the Earth's surface is water, less than one-half of one percent of that water is currently available for our use. As the U.S. population increases, so does our water use, making water resources increasingly scarce. Many regions feel the strain. The Federal Government uses an estimated 148 to 165 billion gallons of potable water annually. This is equal to the annual water use of a state the size of New Jersey or almost 8 million people1. This is, in part, because water requires significant energy input for treatment, pumping,

258

Electric Resistance Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Resistance Heating Basics Electric Resistance Heating Basics Electric Resistance Heating Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:10pm Addthis Electric resistance heat can be supplied by centralized forced-air electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to heat. Types of Electric Resistance Heaters Electric resistance heat can be provided by electric baseboard heaters, electric wall heaters, electric radiant heat, electric space heaters, electric furnaces, or electric thermal storage systems. Electric Furnaces With electric furnaces, heated air is delivered throughout the home through supply ducts and returned to the furnace through return ducts. Blowers (large fans) in electric furnaces move air over a group of three to seven

259

Evaporative Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaporative Cooling Basics Evaporative Cooling Basics Evaporative Cooling Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:53pm Addthis Evaporative cooling uses evaporated water to naturally and energy-efficiently cool. An illustration of an evaporative cooler. In this example of an evaporative cooler, a small motor (top) drives a large fan (center) which blows air out the bottom and into your home. The fan sucks air in through the louvers around the box, which are covered with water-saturated absorbent material. How Evaporative Coolers Work There are two types of evaporative coolers: direct and indirect. Direct evaporative coolers, also called swamp coolers, work by cooling outdoor air by passing it over water-saturated pads, causing the water to evaporate into it. The 15°-40°F-cooler air is then directed into the home

260

Electric Resistance Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Resistance Heating Basics Electric Resistance Heating Basics Electric Resistance Heating Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:10pm Addthis Electric resistance heat can be supplied by centralized forced-air electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Electric resistance heating converts nearly all of the energy in the electricity to heat. Types of Electric Resistance Heaters Electric resistance heat can be provided by electric baseboard heaters, electric wall heaters, electric radiant heat, electric space heaters, electric furnaces, or electric thermal storage systems. Electric Furnaces With electric furnaces, heated air is delivered throughout the home through supply ducts and returned to the furnace through return ducts. Blowers (large fans) in electric furnaces move air over a group of three to seven

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:11am Addthis Photo of a blue car with 'The Road to Hydrogen' written on it, filling up at a hydrogen fueling station. Fuel cell vehicles, powered by hydrogen, have the potential to revolutionize our transportation system. They are more efficient than conventional internal combustion engine vehicles and produce no harmful tailpipe exhaust-their only emission is water. Fuel cell vehicles and the hydrogen infrastructure to fuel them are in an early stage of development. The U.S. Department of Energy is leading government and industry efforts to make hydrogen-powered vehicles an affordable, environmentally friendly, and safe transportation option. Visit the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center to learn more

262

Heating System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating System Basics Heating System Basics Heating System Basics August 16, 2013 - 2:32pm Addthis A variety of heating technologies are available today. You can learn more about what heating systems and heat pumps are commonly used today and how they work below. To learn how to use these technologies in your own home, see the Home Heating Systems section on Energy Saver. Furnaces and Boilers Furnaces heat air and distribute the heated air through a building using ducts. Boilers heat water, providing either hot water or steam for heating. Wood and Pellet Heating Provides a way to heat a building using biomass or waste sources. Electric Resistance Heating Can be supplied by centralized electric furnaces or by heaters in each room. Active Solar Heating Uses the sun to heat either air or liquid and can serve as a supplemental

263

Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Basics Vehicle Basics Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:11am Addthis Photo of a blue car with 'The Road to Hydrogen' written on it, filling up at a hydrogen fueling station. Fuel cell vehicles, powered by hydrogen, have the potential to revolutionize our transportation system. They are more efficient than conventional internal combustion engine vehicles and produce no harmful tailpipe exhaust-their only emission is water. Fuel cell vehicles and the hydrogen infrastructure to fuel them are in an early stage of development. The U.S. Department of Energy is leading government and industry efforts to make hydrogen-powered vehicles an affordable, environmentally friendly, and safe transportation option. Visit the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center to learn more

264

Energy Basics: Power Tower Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

265

Energy Basics: Polycrystalline Thin Film Used in Photovoltaics  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

266

Energy Basics: Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Balance of System  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

267

Energy Basics: Thermal Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

268

Energy Basics: Direct-Use of Geothermal Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Direct Use Electricity Production Geothermal Resources Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean...

269

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Electrical Contacts and Cell Coatings  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

270

Energy Basics: Single-Crystalline Thin Film Used in Photovoltaics  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

271

Energy Basics: Types of Silicon Used in Photovoltaics  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

272

Energy Basics: Dish/Engine Systems for Concentrating Solar Power  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

273

Energy Basics: Semiconductors and the Built-In Electric Field...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Cells Systems Concentrating Solar...

274

Fusion Energy Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences: Target 2017 The NERSC Program Requirements Review "Large Scale Production Computing and...

275

Federal Energy Management Program: Water Efficiency Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics Basics Graphic of the eTraining logo Training Available Managing Water Assessment in Federal Facilities: Learn how to manage the Water Assessment process in Federal facilities by taking this FEMP eTraining course. Although two-thirds of the Earth's surface is water, less than one-half of one percent of that water is currently available for our use. As the U.S. population increases, so does our water use, making water resources increasingly scarce. Many regions feel the strain. The Federal Government uses an estimated 148 to 165 billion gallons of potable water annually. This is equal to the annual water use of a state the size of New Jersey or almost 8 million people1. This is, in part, because water requires significant energy input for treatment, pumping, heating, and process uses. Water is integral to the cooling of power plants that provide energy to Federal facilities.

276

IndianEnergySummitBasicFactSHEET  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUMMIT BASIC FACTS SHEET SUMMIT BASIC FACTS SHEET WHAT: DOE TRIBAL LEADERS ROUNDTABLES AND ENERGY SUMMIT WHO: Tribal Leadership and Tribal Policy Makers Secretary Chu and DOE Senior Leadership DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs WHEN: MAY 4 th and 5 th , 2011 WHERE: WASHINGTON, D.C., AREA Summit Location CRYSTAL GATEWAY MARRIOTT www.marriott.com/hotels/.../wasgw-crystal-gateway-marriott/ 1700 Jefferson Davis Highway Arlington, Virginia (703) 920-3230 REGISTRATION: There are NO registration fees to participate. Tribal Leaders will have to make their own arrangements for travel and accomodations. Summit Working Session meals/refreshments (limited) are included by the hotel. Please confirm your attendance by completing the registration form (WEB link to

277

Home and Building Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Home and Building Technology Basics Home and Building Technology Basics Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water,...

278

Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND LANL | U.S.  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND LANL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy at LBNL, LLNL, AND LANL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Basic Research for an Era of Nuclear Energy Developed at: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National

279

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when the temperature difference between the warmer, top layer of the ocean and the colder, deep ocean water is about 36°F (20°C). These conditions exist in tropical coastal areas, roughly between the Tropic of Capricorn and the Tropic of Cancer. To bring the cold water to the surface, ocean thermal energy conversion plants require an expensive, large-diameter intake pipe, which is submerged a mile or more into the ocean's depths. Some energy experts believe that if ocean thermal energy conversion can become cost-competitive with conventional power technologies, it could be

280

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when the temperature difference between the warmer, top layer of the ocean and the colder, deep ocean water is about 36°F (20°C). These conditions exist in tropical coastal areas, roughly between the Tropic of Capricorn and the Tropic of Cancer. To bring the cold water to the surface, ocean thermal energy conversion plants require an expensive, large-diameter intake pipe, which is submerged a mile or more into the ocean's depths. Some energy experts believe that if ocean thermal energy conversion can become cost-competitive with conventional power technologies, it could be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Water Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heaters Solar Water Heaters Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters Addthis Related Articles Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics Solar Water Heater Basics Heat Pump Water Heater...

282

Geothermal Electricity Production Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Production Basics Geothermal Electricity Production Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:49pm Addthis A photo of steam emanating from geothermal power plants at The Geysers in...

283

REScheck Basics | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics This training covers the basics of using the REScheck(tm) software, and is geared toward the beginning user. Estimated Length: 1 hour, 8 minutes Presenters: Rosemarie...

284

NREL: Energy Sciences Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Science and Technology Technology Transfer Technology Deployment Energy Systems Integration Energy Sciences Search More Search Options Site Map Main Menu Biosciences...

285

Computational Energy Sciences Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational EnErgy SCiEnCES program Computational EnErgy SCiEnCES program Description Led by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the Advanced Research (AR) Computational Energy Sciences (CES) Program provides high-performance computational modeling and simulation resources to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and other programs of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These resources are dedicated to speeding development and reducing costs associated with advanced power system design and performance modeling. CES research is focused on developing a set of complex but flexible computational tools that allow more rapid and efficient scale-up of new subsystems, devices, and components, thereby reducing the need for large and expensive demonstration-scale testing of integrated energy systems,

286

NREL: Energy Sciences - Seth Noone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Since: 2009 Seth Noone received his M.S. in Biomedical Basic Science from the University of Colorado Denver Health Sciences Center in 2009 under the supervision of Dr....

287

Transportation Fuel Basics - Propane | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Propane Propane Transportation Fuel Basics - Propane July 30, 2013 - 4:31pm Addthis Photo of a man standing next to a propane fuel pump with a tank in the background. Propane, also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or LP-gas), or autogas in Europe, is a high-energy alternative fuel. It has been used for decades to fuel light-duty and heavy-duty propane vehicles. Propane is a three-carbon alkane gas (C3H8). Stored under pressure inside a tank, propane turns into a colorless, odorless liquid. As pressure is released, the liquid propane vaporizes and turns into gas that is used for combustion. An odorant, ethyl mercaptan, is added for leak detection. Propane has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic and presents no threat to soil,

288

Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Electricity Transportation Fuel Basics - Electricity August 19, 2013 - 5:44pm Addthis Electricity used to power vehicles is generally provided by the electricity grid and stored in the vehicle's batteries. Fuel cells are being explored as a way to use electricity generated on board the vehicle to power electric motors. Unlike batteries, fuel cells convert chemical energy from hydrogen into electricity. Vehicles that run on electricity have no tailpipe emissions. Emissions that can be attributed to electric vehicles are generated in the electricity production process at the power plant. Home recharging of electric vehicles is as simple as plugging them into an electric outlet. Electricity fueling costs for electric vehicles are reasonable compared to gasoline, especially if consumers take advantage of

289

Solar Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Water Heater Basics Solar Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 3:01pm Addthis Illustration of an active, closed loop solar water heater. A large, flat panel called a flat...

290

Photovoltaic Cell Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cell Basics Photovoltaic Cell Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:53pm Addthis Photovoltaic (PV) cells, or solar cells, take advantage of the photoelectric effect to produce electricity. PV...

291

Science Education | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science & Innovation » Science Education Science & Innovation » Science Education Science Education Learn more about Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla, two of history's most important energy inventors, and how their rivalry and scientific innovations still impact the way we use energy today. | Photo illustration by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Learn more about Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla, two of history's most important energy inventors, and how their rivalry and scientific innovations still impact the way we use energy today. | Photo illustration by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. For kids of all ages, there is always something new to learn about science and technology. The Energy Department supports science education through

292

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Solar Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Solar Electricity Solar-thermally generated based on largely according to how good conductor it is. Solar Cells- Energy bands The energies Current #12;Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center The solar cell is the basic building block

Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

293

Active Solar Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL Active Solar Heating Linear Concentrator System Basics for Concentrating Solar Power Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. |...

294

Federal Energy Management Program: Institutional Change Basics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics for Sustainability Graphic of the eTraining logo Training Available Sustainable Institutional Change for Federal Facility Managers: Learn strategies to change behavior to...

295

Basic Research for Our Nations Energy Future  

Spallation Neutron Source. Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science . 9. Department of Energy National ...

296

BASIC RESEARCH NEEDS IN ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

achievable at given energy prices, It is extremely importantin societies where energy prices are higher or lower than inof changes in lifestyle, energy prices, or energy-related

Hollander, Jack M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Sciences Technology Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Sciences Technology Analysis To help meet the nation's needs for clean energy, inexpensive alternative fuels, and a healthy environment, researchers in NREL's Energy...

298

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2011 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2011 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile FY 2010 Current Appropriation FY 2011 Request Fusion Energy Sciences Science 163,479 +57,399 182, Fusion Energy Sciences 394,518b +91,023 426,000 380,000 Public Law Authorizations: Public Law 95

299

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2007 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science/Fusion Energy Sciences FY 2007 Congressional Budget Fusion Energy Sciences Funding Profile Adjustments FY 2006 Current Appropriation FY 2007 Request Fusion Energy Sciences Science,182 Total, Fusion Energy Sciences........... 266,947b 290,550 -2,906 287,644 318,950 Public Law

300

Photovoltaic Cell Structure Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Structure Basics Structure Basics Photovoltaic Cell Structure Basics August 19, 2013 - 4:50pm Addthis The actual structural design of a photovoltaic (PV), or solar cell, depends on the limitations of the material used in the PV cell. The four basic device designs are: Homojunction Devices Crystalline silicon is the primary example of this kind of cell. A single material-crystalline silicon-is altered so that one side is p-type, dominated by positive holes, and the other side is n-type, dominated by negative electrons. The p/n junction is located so that the maximum light is absorbed near it. The free electrons and holes generated by light deep in the silicon diffuse to the p/n junction and then separate to produce a current if the silicon is of sufficiently high quality. In this homojunction design, these aspects of the cell may be varied to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Photovoltaic System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Basics System Basics Photovoltaic System Basics August 20, 2013 - 4:00pm Addthis A photovoltaic (PV), or solar electric system, is made up of several photovoltaic solar cells. An individual PV cell is usually small, typically producing about 1 or 2 watts of power. To boost the power output of PV cells, they are connected together to form larger units called modules. Modules, in turn, can be connected to form even larger units called arrays, which can be interconnected to produce more power, and so on. In this way, PV systems can be built to meet almost any electric power need, small or large. Illustration of solar cells combined to make a module and modules combined to make an array. The basic PV or solar cell produces only a small amount of power. To produce more power, cells can be interconnected to

302

Greenhouse Gas Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Greenhouse Gas Basics Program Areas » Greenhouse Gases » Greenhouse Gas Basics Greenhouse Gas Basics October 7, 2013 - 10:01am Addthis Federal agencies must understand key terms and management basics to successfully manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Greenhouse gases are trace gases in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect." This process keeps the planet habitable. International research has linked human activities to a rapid increase in GHG concentrations in the atmosphere, contributing to major shifts in the global climate. Graphic of the top half of earth depicting current arctic sea ice. A red outline depicts arctic sea ice boundaries in 1979. Current arctic sea ice is shown roughly 50% smaller than the 1979 depiction.

303

Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basics It's difficult to imagine life without convenient electricity. You just flip a switch or plug in an appliance, and it's there. But how did it get there? Many steps...

304

Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 - Electricity Basics 2 - Electricity Basics Lesson 2 - Electricity Basics It's difficult to imagine life without convenient electricity. You just flip a switch or plug in an appliance, and it's there. But how did it get there? Many steps go into providing the reliable electricity we take for granted. This lesson takes a closer look at electricity. It follows the path of electricity from the fuel source to the home, including the power plant and the electric power grid. It also covers the role of electric utilities in the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity. Topcis addressed include: Basics of electricity Generating electricity Using steam, turbines, generator Similarities of power plants Distributing Electricity Generation Transmission Distribution Power grid

305

Space Heating and Cooling Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Systems Supporting Equipment for Heating and Cooling Systems Addthis Related Articles Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Water Heating Basics Heating and Cooling System Support...

306

BASIC RESEARCH NEEDS IN ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a "perfect" economic market, energy prices would reflect thehave produced an energy market with a price structure veryhow energy use responds to price signals from the market and

Hollander, Jack M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

BASIC RESEARCH NEEDS IN ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

human dimensions of the energy problem: impacts of energyenergy and materials use energy problem. is an important andresource- A central problem in energy conservation is the

Hollander, Jack M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

BASIC RESEARCH NEEDS IN ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Nuclear and Alternative Energy Systems (CONAES). Chapterand allocation of alternative energy supply resources andJ. M. "United States Energy Alternatives to 2010 and Beyond:

Hollander, Jack M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Science Education | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Education Science Education Science Education Learn more about Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla, two of history's most important energy inventors, and how their rivalry and scientific innovations still impact the way we use energy today. | Photo illustration by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. Learn more about Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla, two of history's most important energy inventors, and how their rivalry and scientific innovations still impact the way we use energy today. | Photo illustration by Sarah Gerrity, Energy Department. For kids of all ages, there is always something new to learn about science and technology. The Energy Department supports science education through

310

AFRD - Fusion Energy Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory AFRD - Fusion Energy Sciences AFRD - Home Fusion - Home HIF-VNL Website Ion Beam Technology Group website Artist's conception of a heavy ion fusion power plant Artist's conception of an IFE powerplant We further inertial fusion energy as a future power source, primarily through R&D on heavy-ion induction accelerators. Our program is part of a "Virtual National Laboratory," headquartered in AFRD, that joins us with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory in close collaboration on inertial fusion driven by beams of heavy ions. The related emergent science of high-energy-density physics (HEDP) has become a major focus. For further synergy, we have combined forces with the former Ion Beam

311

ESNET (Energy Sciences Network)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the Energy Sciences Network (ESNET) project which was undertaken by the Scientific Computing Staff during fiscal year (FY) 1986 at the direction of the Director, Office of Energy Research (ER). This document serves as the program plan for the ESNET project and is the result of the effort of the cross program Energy Sciences Network Steering Committee. The ESNET Steering Committee has been charged to codify the overall ER computer network requirements, to document and set priorities for computer networking requirements including performance objectives. Further, this committee has been asked to identify future ESNET functional characteristics, to identify research and development needs for the ESNET, to establish ESNET performance objectives and to define the intrastructure necessary to manage and operate the ESNET facilities.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Basic Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 II Basic Research The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) office within the DOE Office of Science supports the DOE Hydrogen Program by providing basic, fundamental research in those technically challenging areas facing the Program, complementing the applied research and demonstration projects conducted by the Offices of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Fossil Energy; and Nuclear Engineering, Science and Technology. In May 2005 Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced the selection of over $64 million in BES research and development projects aimed at making hydrogen fuel cell vehicles and refueling stations available, practical and affordable for American consumers by 2020. A total of 70 hydrogen research projects were selected to focus on fundamental science and enable

313

Energy Flow Diagram | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Science for Energy Flow » Energy Flow Diagram Science for Energy Flow » Energy Flow Diagram Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Program Summaries Brochures Reports Accomplishments Presentations BES and Congress Science for Energy Flow Energy Flow Diagram Seeing Matter Scale of Things Chart Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » Science for Energy Flow Energy Flow Diagram Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page This diagram shows 2010 energy flow from primary sources (oil, natural gas,

314

Science as Knowledge, Practice, and Map Making: The Challenge of Defining Metrics for Evaluating and Improving DOE-Funded Basic Experimental Science  

SciTech Connect

Industrial R&D laboratories have been surprisingly successful in developing performance objectives and metrics that convincingly show that planning, management, and improvement techniques can be value-added to the actual output of R&D organizations. In this paper, I will discuss the more difficult case of developing analogous constructs for DOE-funded non-nuclear, non-weapons basic research, or as I will refer to it - basic experimental science. Unlike most industrial R&D or the bulk of applied science performed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the purpose of basic experimental science is producing new knowledge (usually published in professional journals) that has no immediate application to the first link (the R) of a planned R&D chain. Consequently, performance objectives and metrics are far more difficult to define. My claim is that if one can successfully define metrics for evaluating and improving DOE-funded basic experimental science (which is the most difficult case), then defining such constructs for DOE-funded applied science should be much less problematic. With the publication of the DOE Standard - Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance Programs for Basic and Applied Research (DOE-ER-STD-6001-92) and the development of a conceptual framework for integrating all the DOE orders, we need to move aggressively toward the threefold next phase: (1) focusing the management elements found in DOE-ER-STD-6001-92 on the main output of national laboratories - the experimental science itself; (2) developing clearer definitions of basic experimental science as practice not just knowledge; and (3) understanding the relationship between the metrics that scientists use for evaluating the performance of DOE-funded basic experimental science, the management elements of DOE-ER-STD-6001-92, and the notion of continuous improvement.

Bodnarczuk, M.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

NREL: Energy Sciences - William Tumas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical & Nanoscale Science Theoretical Materials Science Materials Science Hydrogen Technology & Fuel Cells Process Technology & Advanced Concepts Research Staff Computational Science Printable Version William Tumas Associate Laboratory Director, Materials and Chemical Science and Technology Photo of William Tumas Phone: (303) 384-7955 Email: Bill.Tumas@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 2009 Dr. William Tumas is the Associate Laboratory Director for Materials and Chemical Science and Technology, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). He is responsible for overall leadership, management, technical direction, and workforce development of the materials and chemical science and technology capabilities at NREL spanning fundamental and applied R&D for renewable energy and energy efficiency. Key program areas include solar

316

Earth Sciences Division Research Summaries 2006-2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energyby the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energyby the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy

DePaolo, Donald

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Absorption Heat Pump Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Absorption Heat Pump Basics Absorption Heat Pump Basics Absorption Heat Pump Basics August 19, 2013 - 11:11am Addthis Absorption heat pumps are essentially air-source heat pumps driven not by electricity, but by a heat source such as natural gas, propane, solar-heated water, or geothermal-heated water. Because natural gas is the most common heat source for absorption heat pumps, they are also referred to as gas-fired heat pumps. There are also absorption coolers available that work on the same principal, but are not reversible and cannot serve as a heat source. These are also called gas-fired coolers. How Absorption Heat Pumps Work Residential absorption heat pumps use an ammonia-water absorption cycle to provide heating and cooling. As in a standard heat pump, the refrigerant (in this case, ammonia) is condensed in one coil to release its heat; its

318

Geothermal Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resource Basics Resource Basics Geothermal Resource Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:58pm Addthis Although geothermal heat pumps can be used almost anywhere, most direct-use and electrical production facilities in the United States are located in the west, where the geothermal resource base is concentrated. Current drilling technology limits the development of geothermal resources to relatively shallow water- or steam-filled reservoirs, most of which are found in the western part of the United States. But researchers are developing new technologies for capturing the heat in deeper, "dry" rocks, which would support drilling almost anywhere. Geothermal Resources Map This map shows the distribution of geothermal resources across the United States. If you have trouble accessing this information because of a

319

Fluorescent Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluorescent Lighting Basics Fluorescent Lighting Basics Fluorescent Lighting Basics October 17, 2013 - 5:39pm Addthis Light from a fluorescent lamp is first created by an electric current conducted through an inert gas producing ultraviolet light that is invisible to the human eye. The ultraviolet light in turn interacts with special blends of phosphors coating the interior surface of the fluorescent lamp tube that efficiently converts the invisible light into useful white light. Fluorescent lamps require a special power supply called a ballast that is needed to regulate lamp operating current and provide a compatible start-up voltage. Electronic ballasts perform the same function as a magnetic ballast but outperform the outdated magnetic products by operating at a very high frequency that eliminates flicker and noise while

320

Photovoltaic System Performance Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System Performance Basics System Performance Basics Photovoltaic System Performance Basics August 20, 2013 - 4:17pm Addthis Photovoltaic (PV) systems are usually composed of numerous solar arrays, which in turn, are composed of numerous PV cells. The performance of the system is therefore dependent on the performance of its components. Reliability The reliability of PV arrays is an important factor in the cost of PV systems and in consumer acceptance. However, the building blocks of arrays, PV cells, are considered "solid-state" devices with no moving parts and, therefore, are highly reliable and long-lived. Therefore, reliability measurements of PV systems are usually focused not on cells but on modules and whole systems. Reliability can be improved through fault-tolerant circuit design, which

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Fuel Cell Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basics Basics Fuel Cell Basics August 14, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis Photo of two hydrogen fuel cells. Fuel cells are an emerging technology that can provide heat and electricity for buildings and electrical power for vehicles and electronic devices. How Fuel Cells Work Fuel cells work like batteries, but they do not run down or need recharging. They produce electricity and heat as long as fuel is supplied. A fuel cell consists of two electrodes-a negative electrode (or anode) and a positive electrode (or cathode)-sandwiched around an electrolyte. A fuel, such as hydrogen, is fed to the anode, and air is fed to the cathode. Activated by a catalyst, hydrogen atoms separate into protons and electrons, which take different paths to the cathode. The electrons go through an external circuit, creating a flow of electricity. The protons

322

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:13am Addthis Photo of hands holding a battery pack (grey rectangular box) for a hybrid electric vehicle. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) combine the benefits of high fuel economy and low emissions with the power, range, and convenience of conventional diesel and gasoline fueling. HEV technologies also have potential to be combined with alternative fuels and fuel cells to provide additional benefits. Future offerings might also include plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Hybrid electric vehicles typically combine the internal combustion engine of a conventional vehicle with the battery and electric motor of an electric vehicle. The combination offers low emissions and convenience-HEVs never need to be plugged in.

323

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics Hybrid Electric Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:13am Addthis Photo of hands holding a battery pack (grey rectangular box) for a hybrid electric vehicle. Hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) combine the benefits of high fuel economy and low emissions with the power, range, and convenience of conventional diesel and gasoline fueling. HEV technologies also have potential to be combined with alternative fuels and fuel cells to provide additional benefits. Future offerings might also include plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. Hybrid electric vehicles typically combine the internal combustion engine of a conventional vehicle with the battery and electric motor of an electric vehicle. The combination offers low emissions and convenience-HEVs never need to be plugged in.

324

Photovoltaic Cell Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cell Basics Cell Basics Photovoltaic Cell Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:53pm Addthis Photovoltaic (PV) cells, or solar cells, take advantage of the photoelectric effect to produce electricity. PV cells are the building blocks of all PV systems because they are the devices that convert sunlight to electricity. Commonly known as solar cells, individual PV cells are electricity-producing devices made of semiconductor materials. PV cells come in many sizes and shapes, from smaller than a postage stamp to several inches across. They are often connected together to form PV modules that may be up to several feet long and a few feet wide. Modules, in turn, can be combined and connected to form PV arrays of different sizes and power output. The modules of the array make up the major part of a PV system, which can also include electrical connections,

325

Incandescent Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incandescent Lighting Basics Incandescent Lighting Basics Incandescent Lighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis Incandescent lamps operate simply by heating a metal filament inside a bulb filled with inert gas. Because they operate directly on variety of common power types including common household alternating current or direct current such as batteries or automobiles, they do not require a special power supply or ballast. They turn on up instantly, providing a warm light with excellent color rendition because the light is produced in much the same way as the light from the sun. They can also be easily dimmed using inexpensive controls and are available in a staggering variety of shapes and sizes. However, incandescent lamps have a low efficacy (10-17 lumens per watt) compared with other lighting options and a short average

326

Ventilation System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:33pm Addthis Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings. Ventilation supplies air for occupants to breathe and removes moisture, odors, and indoor pollutants like carbon dioxide. Too little ventilation may result in poor indoor air quality, while too much may cause unnecessarily higher heating and cooling loads. Natural Ventilation Natural ventilation occurs when outdoor air is drawn inside through open windows or doors. Natural ventilation is created by the differences in the distribution of air pressures around a building. Air moves from areas of

327

Photovoltaic Silicon Cell Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Silicon Cell Basics Silicon Cell Basics Photovoltaic Silicon Cell Basics August 20, 2013 - 2:19pm Addthis Silicon-used to make some the earliest photovoltaic (PV) devices-is still the most popular material for solar cells. Silicon is also the second-most abundant element in the Earth's crust (after oxygen). However, to be useful as a semiconductor material in solar cells, silicon must be refined to a purity of 99.9999%. In single-crystal silicon, the molecular structure-which is the arrangement of atoms in the material-is uniform because the entire structure is grown from the same crystal. This uniformity is ideal for transferring electrons efficiently through the material. To make an effective PV cell, however, silicon has to be "doped" with other elements to make n-type and p-type layers.

328

Photovoltaic Cell Material Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Material Basics Material Basics Photovoltaic Cell Material Basics August 19, 2013 - 4:43pm Addthis Although crystalline silicon cells are the most common type, photovoltaic (PV), or solar cells, can be made of many semiconductor materials. Each material has unique strengths and characteristics that influence its suitability for specific applications. For example, PV cell materials may differ based on their crystallinity, bandgap, absorbtion, and manufacturing complexity. Learn more about each of these characteristics below or learn about these solar cell materials: Silicon (Si)-including single-crystalline Si, multicrystalline Si, and amorphous Si Polycrystalline Thin Films-including copper indium diselenide (CIS), cadmium telluride (CdTe), and thin-film silicon Single-Crystalline Thin Films-including high-efficiency material

329

Natural Gas Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Vehicle Basics Natural Gas Vehicle Basics Natural Gas Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:15am Addthis Photo of a large truck stopped at a gas station that reads 'Natural Gas for Vehicles.' Natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are either fueled exclusively with compressed natural gas or liquefied natural gas (dedicated NGVs) or are capable of natural gas and gasoline fueling (bi-fuel NGVs). Dedicated NGVs are designed to run only on natural gas. Bi-fuel NGVs have two separate fueling systems that enable the vehicle to use either natural gas or a conventional fuel (gasoline or diesel). In general, dedicated natural gas vehicles demonstrate better performance and have lower emissions than bi-fuel vehicles because their engines are optimized to run on natural gas. In addition, the vehicle does not have to

330

Geothermal Heat Pump Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Pump Basics Heat Pump Basics Geothermal Heat Pump Basics August 19, 2013 - 11:12am Addthis Text Version Geothermal heat pumps use the constant temperature of the earth as an exchange medium for heat. Although many parts of the country experience seasonal temperature extremes-from scorching heat in the summer to sub-zero cold in the winter-the ground a few feet below the earth's surface remains at a relatively constant temperature. Depending on the latitude, ground temperatures range from 45°F (7°C) to 75°F (21°C). So, like a cave's, the ground's temperature is warmer than the air above it during winter and cooler than the air above it in summer. Geothermal heat pumps take advantage of this by exchanging heat with the earth through a ground heat exchanger. Geothermal heat pumps are able to heat, cool, and, if so equipped, supply

331

Small Space Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Small Space Heater Basics Small Space Heater Basics Small Space Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 10:38am Addthis Small space heaters, also called portable heaters, are typically used when the main heating system is inadequate or when central heating is too costly to install or operate. Space heater capacities generally range between 10,000 Btu to 40,000 Btu per hour. Common fuels used for this purpose are electricity, propane, natural gas, and kerosene. Although most space heaters rely on convection (the circulation of air in a room), some rely on radiant heating; that is, they emit infrared radiation that directly heats up objects and people that are within their line of sight. Combustion Space Heaters Space heaters are classified as vented and unvented, or "vent free." Unvented combustion units are not recommended for inside use, as they

332

Federal Energy Management Program: Greenhouse Gas Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics Basics Federal agencies must understand key terms and management basics to successfully manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Graphic of the top half of earth depicting current arctic sea ice. A red outline depicts arctic sea ice boundaries in 1979. Current arctic sea ice is shown roughly 50% smaller than the 1979 depiction. Greenhouse gases correlate directly to global warming, which impacts arctic sea ice. This image shows current arctic sea ice formation. The red outline depicts arctic sea ice boundaries in 1979. Greenhouse gases are trace gases in the lower atmosphere that trap heat through a natural process called the "greenhouse effect." This process keeps the planet habitable. International research has linked human activities to a rapid increase in GHG concentrations in the atmosphere, contributing to major shifts in the global climate.

333

Vehicle Emission Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics November 22, 2013 - 2:07pm Addthis Vehicle emissions are the gases emitted by the tailpipes of vehicles powered by internal combustion engines, which include gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and propane vehicles. Vehicle emissions are composed of varying amounts of: water vapor carbon dioxide (CO2) nitrogen oxygen pollutants such as: carbon monoxide (CO) nitrogen oxides (NOx) unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) particulate matter (PM) A number of factors determine the composition of emissions, including the vehicle's fuel, the engine's technology, the vehicle's exhaust aftertreatment system, and how the vehicle operates. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation during fueling or even when vehicles are

334

Incandescent Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Incandescent Lighting Basics Incandescent Lighting Basics Incandescent Lighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis Incandescent lamps operate simply by heating a metal filament inside a bulb filled with inert gas. Because they operate directly on variety of common power types including common household alternating current or direct current such as batteries or automobiles, they do not require a special power supply or ballast. They turn on up instantly, providing a warm light with excellent color rendition because the light is produced in much the same way as the light from the sun. They can also be easily dimmed using inexpensive controls and are available in a staggering variety of shapes and sizes. However, incandescent lamps have a low efficacy (10-17 lumens per watt) compared with other lighting options and a short average

335

Ventilation System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics Ventilation System Basics August 16, 2013 - 1:33pm Addthis Ventilation is the process of moving air into and out of an interior space by natural or mechanical means. Ventilation is necessary for the health and comfort of occupants of all buildings. Ventilation supplies air for occupants to breathe and removes moisture, odors, and indoor pollutants like carbon dioxide. Too little ventilation may result in poor indoor air quality, while too much may cause unnecessarily higher heating and cooling loads. Natural Ventilation Natural ventilation occurs when outdoor air is drawn inside through open windows or doors. Natural ventilation is created by the differences in the distribution of air pressures around a building. Air moves from areas of

336

Solar Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Water Heater Basics Solar Water Heater Basics Solar Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 3:01pm Addthis Illustration of an active, closed loop solar water heater. A large, flat panel called a flat plate collector is connected to a tank called a solar storage/backup water heater by two pipes. One of these pipes runs through a cylindrical pump into the bottom of the tank, where it becomes a coil called a double-wall heat exchanger. This coil runs up through the tank and out again to the flat plate collector. Antifreeze fluid runs only through this collector loop. Two pipes run out the top of the water heater tank; one is a cold water supply into the tank, and the other sends hot water to the house. Solar water heaters use the sun's heat to provide hot water for a home or

337

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen August 19, 2013 - 5:45pm Addthis Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not widely used today as a transportation fuel, government and industry research and development are working toward the goal of clean, economical, and safe hydrogen production and hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles. Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the universe. However, it is rarely found alone in nature. Hydrogen is locked up in enormous quantities in water (H2O), hydrocarbons (such as methane, CH4), and other organic matter. Efficiently producing hydrogen from these compounds is one of the challenges of using hydrogen as a fuel. Currently,

338

Radiant Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiant Heating Basics Radiant Heating Basics Radiant Heating Basics August 19, 2013 - 10:33am Addthis Radiant heating systems involve supplying heat directly to the floor or to panels in the walls or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer: the delivery of heat directly from the hot surface to the people and objects in the room via the radiation of heat, which is also called infrared radiation. Radiant heating is the effect you feel when you can feel the warmth of a hot stovetop element from across the room. When radiant heating is located in the floor, it is often called radiant floor heating or simply floor heating. Despite the name, radiant floor heating systems also depend heavily on convection, the natural circulation of heat within a room, caused by heat rising from the floor. Radiant floor

339

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen August 19, 2013 - 5:45pm Addthis Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not widely used today as a transportation fuel, government and industry research and development are working toward the goal of clean, economical, and safe hydrogen production and hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles. Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the universe. However, it is rarely found alone in nature. Hydrogen is locked up in enormous quantities in water (H2O), hydrocarbons (such as methane, CH4), and other organic matter. Efficiently producing hydrogen from these compounds is one of the challenges of using hydrogen as a fuel. Currently,

340

Ethanol Fuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ethanol Fuel Basics Ethanol Fuel Basics Ethanol Fuel Basics July 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis biomass in beekers Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials, which collectively are called "biomass." Ethanol contains the same chemical compound (C2H5OH) found in alcoholic beverages. Studies have estimated that ethanol and other biofuels could replace 30% or more of U.S. gasoline demand by 2030. Nearly half of U.S. gasoline contains ethanol in a low-level blend to oxygenate the fuel and reduce air pollution. Ethanol is also increasingly available in E85, an alternative fuel that can be used in flexible fuel vehicles. Several steps are required to make ethanol available as a vehicle fuel. Biomass feedstocks are grown and transported to ethanol production

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Biofuel Conversion Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuel Conversion Basics Biofuel Conversion Basics Biofuel Conversion Basics August 14, 2013 - 12:31pm Addthis The conversion of biomass solids into liquid or gaseous biofuels is a complex process. Today, the most common conversion processes are biochemical- and thermochemical-based. However, researchers are also exploring photobiological conversion processes. Biochemical Conversion Processes In biochemical conversion processes, enzymes and microorganisms are used as biocatalysts to convert biomass or biomass-derived compounds into desirable products. Cellulase and hemicellulase enzymes break down the carbohydrate fractions of biomass to five- and six-carbon sugars in a process known as hydrolysis. Yeast and bacteria then ferment the sugars into products such as ethanol. Biotechnology advances are expected to lead to dramatic

342

Furnace and Boiler Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Furnace and Boiler Basics Furnace and Boiler Basics Furnace and Boiler Basics August 16, 2013 - 2:50pm Addthis Furnaces heat air and distribute the heated air through a building using ducts; boilers heat water, providing either hot water or steam for heating. Furnaces Furnaces are the most common heating systems used in homes in the United States. They can be all electric, gas-fired (including propane or natural gas), or oil-fired. Boilers Boilers consist of a vessel or tank where heat produced from the combustion of such fuels as natural gas, fuel oil, or coal is used to generate hot water or steam. Many buildings have their own boilers, while other buildings have steam or hot water piped in from a central plant. Commercial boilers are manufactured for high- or low-pressure applications.

343

Radiant Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiant Heating Basics Radiant Heating Basics Radiant Heating Basics August 19, 2013 - 10:33am Addthis Radiant heating systems involve supplying heat directly to the floor or to panels in the walls or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer: the delivery of heat directly from the hot surface to the people and objects in the room via the radiation of heat, which is also called infrared radiation. Radiant heating is the effect you feel when you can feel the warmth of a hot stovetop element from across the room. When radiant heating is located in the floor, it is often called radiant floor heating or simply floor heating. Despite the name, radiant floor heating systems also depend heavily on convection, the natural circulation of heat within a room, caused by heat rising from the floor. Radiant floor

344

Photon Science for Renewable Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photon Science for renewable Energy at Light-Sourceour planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources ofa global revolution in renewable and carbon- neutral energy

Hussain, Zahid

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

BASIC RESEARCH NEEDS IN ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Energy Demand and Conservation. 1979 (in press). Brooks.Look at Energy Conservation," Papers and Proceedings,Research Opportunities," in Conservation and Public Policy,

Hollander, Jack M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Energy Basics: Microhydropower Turbines, Pumps, and Waterwheels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

A microhydropower system needs a turbine, pump, or waterwheel to transform the energy of flowing water into rotational energy, which is then converted into electricity....

347

Tribal Renewable Energy Foundational Course: Electricity Grid Basics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Watch the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy foundational course webinar on electricity grid basics by clicking on the .swf link below. You can also download the PowerPoint slides...

348

BASIC RESEARCH NEEDS IN ENERGY CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal activation for use with solar systems, is very important to increasing the energy efficiency

Hollander, Jack M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Energy Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences > CINT User Program > CINT Science Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Neal Shinn Neal D. Shinn Sr....

350

Environmental Data Science & Systems | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Change Science Institute Earth and Aquatic Sciences Ecosystem Science Environmental Data Science and Systems Energy, Water and Ecosystem Engineering Human Health Risk and...

351

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cell Conversion Efficiency  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

efficiency of a photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, is the percentage of the solar energy shining on a PV device that is converted into electrical energy, or electricity....

352

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering -Electrochemical Energy Storage -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basic Research Basic Research * Members * Contact * Publications * Overview * CEES EES Home Electrochemical Energy Storage - Basic Research Electrochemical Energy Storage Chemistry co-op student Sara Busking loads a lithium-ion battery cell in a pouch into a test oven to evaluate its electrochemical performance. EES conducts basic research to support its applied electrochemical energy storage R&D initiatives. EES also leads an Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC), recently awarded by DOE's Office of Science, with partners at Northwestern University and the University of Illinois (Urbana Champaign). The EFRC, the Center for Electrical Energy Storage: Tailored Interfaces (CEES), focuses on understanding electrochemical phenomena at electrode/electrolyte interfaces

353

A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program July 2009 A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program This pamphlet is developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as an outreach and awareness tool to assist former and current DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees to become familiar with and utilize the services and benefits authorized under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOIPCA). There are several Federal entities that support implementation of EEOICPA. Each of these entities serves a critical and unique role in this process. Briefly, the Department of Labor's (DOL) Office of Workers'

354

COMcheck Basics | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Software: COMcheck Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site...

355

REScheck Basics | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Software: REScheck Target Audience: ArchitectDesigner Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer State Official Contacts Web Site...

356

Energy Basics: Air-Source Heat Pumps  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

from ductwork that protrudes through a wall or roof. More Information Visit the Energy Saver website for more information about the selection and performance of air-source...

357

Energy Basics: Space Heating and Cooling  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in common, such as thermostats and ducts, which provide opportunities for saving energy. Learn how these technologies and systems work. Learn about: Cooling Systems Heating...

358

Energy Basics: Home and Building Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Home and Building Technologies Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for appliances and electronics. Today's...

359

Energy Basics: Home and Building Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Cooling Water Heating Home and Building Technologies Homes and other buildings use energy every day for space heating and cooling, for lighting and hot water, and for...

360

Energy Basics: Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

(PV) cell's semiconductors. This section describes the atomic structure and bandgap energy of these cells. Atomic Structure All matter is composed of atoms, which are made up of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Electric Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

bus driving up a hill. Electricity can be used as a transportation fuel to power battery electric vehicles (EVs). EVs store electricity in an energy storage device, such as a...

362

Energy Basics: Flat-Plate Photovoltaic Systems  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

is usually at an angle that is less than optimal. Therefore, fixed arrays collect less energy per unit area of array than tracking arrays. However, this drawback must be balanced...

363

Energy Basics: Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color...

364

Energy Basics: Photovoltaic Cell Quantum Efficiency  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

by a photovoltaic (PV) cell to the number of photons-or packets of light-of a given energy shining on the solar cell. Quantum efficiency therefore relates to the response of a...

365

Energy Basics: Tankless Demand Water Heaters  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

only as needed and without the use of a storage tank. They don't produce the standby energy losses associated with storage water heaters. How Demand Water Heaters Work Demand...

366

Energy Basics: Bio-Based Products  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

products, are not only made from renewable sources, but they also often require less energy to produce than petroleum-based ones. Researchers have discovered that the process for...

367

Energy Basics: High-Intensity Discharge Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and longest service life of any lighting type. It can save 75%-90% of lighting energy when it replaces incandescent lighting. HID lamps use an electric arc to produce...

368

BASIC SCIENCE INVESTIGATIONS Kinetic Analysis of I-Iodorotenone as ...  

myocardial ow tracer and compare the results with those for ... h D %t& ! h R %t& ! i%t& ! " 0 t ... the director of the Ofce of Science, ...

369

BES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedBasic Energy Sciences, DOE Office of Science Energy SciencesDepartment of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Advanced

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Workshop Reports | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Reports Workshop Reports Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About BES Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences...

371

Energy Basics: Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel Ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) is diesel fuel with 15 parts per million or lower sulfur content. The U.S. Environmental Protection...

372

Energy Basics: Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation...

373

Energy Basics: Direct-Use of Geothermal Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Direct-Use of Geothermal Technologies Hot water near the surface of the Earth can be used for heat for a variety of commercial and industrial uses. Direct-use...

374

Energy Management: Back to the Basics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2005, Texas Petrochemicals LP achieved a reduction in energy usage of 6.2 percent when compared to 2004. This is based on the but per pound of plant-wide production. Also, halfway through 2006, the company has achieved a reduction in energy usage of 11.6 percent when compared to 2005. This was accomplished in spite of the fact that market conditions forced plant-wide production to be reduced by 2.5 percent. The following projects and procedures were implemented to achieve these results: Overall energy management system with top-down support Conversion of 2 boilers to a CO control strategy Using combustion analysis metrics to drive boiler pre-heater cleanings Deaerator optimization Utility leak repair program Steam trap management program Insulation program Distillation targets assessment and optimization Advanced and regulatory process control improvements Conversion of steam turbines (vented to atmosphere) to high-efficiency motors Diversity of natural gas suppliers The company is initially targeting an energy reduction goal of 5 percent year over year.

Diamond, S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

National Science Bowl 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Pumpkin Patterns Science Alliance 2012 Science Alliance David Sandalow, Acting Under Secretary of the U.S. Energy Department Women in Clean Energy Symposium Celebrating the...

376

Environmental Science | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation » Science & Technology » Environmental Science & Innovation » Science & Technology » Environmental Science Environmental Science A revolutionary new turbine technology for hydropower plants is one step closer to its first commercial deployment. At peak performance, an Alden turbine should convert about 94 percent of the water’s energy into usable electricity, comparable or superior to the efficiency of traditional turbines; the overall wildlife survival rate should be over 98 percent, up from 80-85 percent for a traditional turbine. Read more. A revolutionary new turbine technology for hydropower plants is one step closer to its first commercial deployment. At peak performance, an Alden

377

Photovoltaic Cell Conversion Efficiency Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conversion Efficiency Basics Conversion Efficiency Basics Photovoltaic Cell Conversion Efficiency Basics August 20, 2013 - 2:58pm Addthis The conversion efficiency of a photovoltaic (PV) cell, or solar cell, is the percentage of the solar energy shining on a PV device that is converted into electrical energy, or electricity. Improving this conversion efficiency is a key goal of research and helps make PV technologies cost-competitive with more traditional sources of energy. Factors Affecting Conversion Efficiency Much of the energy from sunlight reaching a PV cell is lost before it can be converted into electricity. But certain characteristics of solar cell materials also limit a cell's efficiency to convert the sunlight it receives. Wavelength of Light Light is composed of photons-or packets of energy-that range in

378

Science Education | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 3, 2013 May 3, 2013 Panelists discuss the role of colleges and universities in helping to further clean-energy research and entrepreneurship during a forum at Stanford University. | Photo courtesy of Stanford Energy Club. Energy Wrap-Up: Charging Students To Take the Lead in Energy Innovation Students, academics and entrepreneurs came together at Stanford University to discuss how the next generation can lead the way in creating the next big breakthroughs in sustainable energy. April 23, 2013 The Final Match at the U.S Department of Energy National Science Bowl in Washington, DC on April 30, 2012. | Photograph by Dennis Brack, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Upcoming Science Bowl Championship is a Competition like No Other The Finals of the Department of Energy's 2013 National Science Bowl, set to

379

NREL: Energy Sciences - B. Ray Stults  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical & Materials Science Computational Science News Events Printable Version B. Ray Stults Ph.D. - Associate Laboratory Director, Energy Sciences Ray Stults is the Associate...

380

NREL: Learning - Wind Energy Basics: How Wind Turbines Work  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Energy Basics: How Wind Turbines Work Wind Energy Basics: How Wind Turbines Work We have been harnessing the wind's energy for hundreds of years. From old Holland to farms in the United States, windmills have been used for pumping water or grinding grain. Today, the windmill's modern equivalent-a wind turbine-can use the wind's energy to generate electricity. Wind turbines, like windmills, are mounted on a tower to capture the most energy. At 100 feet (30 meters) or more aboveground, they can take advantage of the faster and less turbulent wind. Turbines catch the wind's energy with their propeller-like blades. Usually, two or three blades are mounted on a shaft to form a rotor. A blade acts much like an airplane wing. When the wind blows, a pocket of low-pressure air forms on the downwind side of the blade. The low-pressure

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Fact Sheets : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fact Sheets DOE Mission Focus: BioFuels US Department of Energy's Genomic Science Program DOE BioEnergy Science Center - fact sheet - 2011 DOE BioEnergy Science Center - fact sheet...

382

Energy 101 Videos: Learn More About the Basics! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy 101 Videos: Learn More About the Basics! Energy 101 Videos: Learn More About the Basics! Energy 101 Videos: Learn More About the Basics! August 30, 2010 - 4:42pm Addthis Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Okay, so we already pointed out the Energy Basics Web site last week. Because I'm going to talk about something on the site, I wanted to remind you all of what it is: a brand new Web site on EERE that talks about the basics of how energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies work. A little place to find out the "What is it, and how does it work?" nuggets of information, basically. But I wanted to point out something in particular: the Energy 101 series of videos! There are two so far, although more will be posted in the future. The two that are there now, Wind Turbines Basics and Concentrating Solar Power

383

Heating and Cooling System Support Equipment Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heating and Cooling System Support Equipment Basics Heating and Cooling System Support Equipment Basics Heating and Cooling System Support Equipment Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:28pm Addthis Thermostats and ducts provide opportunities for saving energy. Dehumidifying heat pipes provide a way to help central air conditioners and heat pumps dehumidify air. Electric and gas meters allow users to track energy use. Thermostats Programmable thermostats can store and repeat multiple daily settings. Users can adjust the times heating or air-conditioning is activated according to a pre-set schedule. Visit the Energy Saver website for more information about thermostats and control systems in homes. Ducts Efficient and well-designed duct systems distribute air properly throughout a building, without leaking, to keep all rooms at a comfortable

384

Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:58pm Addthis A microhydropower system needs a turbine, pump, or waterwheel to transform the energy of flowing water into rotational energy, which is then converted into electricity. Turbines Turbines are commonly used to power microhydropower systems. The moving water strikes the turbine blades, much like a waterwheel, to spin a shaft. But turbines are more compact in relation to their energy output than waterwheels. They also have fewer gears and require less material for construction. There are two general types of turbines: impulse and reaction. Impulse Turbines Impulse turbines, which have the least complex design, are most commonly

385

Photovoltaic Cell Quantum Efficiency Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cell Quantum Efficiency Basics Cell Quantum Efficiency Basics Photovoltaic Cell Quantum Efficiency Basics August 20, 2013 - 3:05pm Addthis Quantum efficiency (QE) is the ratio of the number of charge carriers collected by a photovoltaic (PV) cell to the number of photons-or packets of light-of a given energy shining on the solar cell. Quantum efficiency therefore relates to the response of a solar cell to the various wavelengths in the spectrum of light shining on the cell. The QE is given as a function of either wavelength or energy. If all the photons of a certain wavelength are absorbed and the resulting minority carriers (for example, electrons in a p-type material) are collected, then the QE at that particular wavelength has a value of one. The QE for photons with energy below the bandgap is zero.

386

Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics Microhydropower Turbine, Pump, and Waterwheel Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:58pm Addthis A microhydropower system needs a turbine, pump, or waterwheel to transform the energy of flowing water into rotational energy, which is then converted into electricity. Turbines Turbines are commonly used to power microhydropower systems. The moving water strikes the turbine blades, much like a waterwheel, to spin a shaft. But turbines are more compact in relation to their energy output than waterwheels. They also have fewer gears and require less material for construction. There are two general types of turbines: impulse and reaction. Impulse Turbines Impulse turbines, which have the least complex design, are most commonly

387

Basic research needed for the development of geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Basic research needed to facilitate development of geothermal energy is identified. An attempt has been made to make the report representative of the ideas of productive workers in the field. The present state of knowledge of geothermal energy is presented and then specific recommendations for further research, with status and priorities, are listed. Discussion is limited to a small number of applicable concepts, namely: origin of geothermal flux; transport of geothermal energy; geothermal reservoirs; rock-water interactions, and geophysical and geochemical exploration.

Aamodt, R.L.; Riecker, R.E.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The Office of Science - What is Physics?  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Lab. Patricia Berge Patricia Berge Office of Basic Energy Science Lawrence Livermore National Lab. Ian Fisher Ian Fisher Office of Basic Energy Sciences Stanford University...

389

Fusion Energy Sciences  

Office of Science (SC) Website

aboutjobs Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the links to the formal position...

390

BIT101 - EOTA Basic Instructor Training | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

BIT101 - EOTA Basic Instructor Training BIT101 - EOTA Basic Instructor Training BIT101 - EOTA Basic Instructor Training April 4, 2014 7:30AM MDT to April 18, 2014 5:00PM MDT Registration link: EOTA Registration Course Type: Classroom Training (Instructor-Led) Course Location: Phillips Technlogoy Institute (PTi) Kirtland Air Force Base, Building 1900 (Maxwell) Course Description: This course is offered to instructors who provide training to site personnel. The mission is to assure the quality and consistency of training provided to the Department of Energy facilities nationwide. The purpose is to train DOE and DOE contractor instructors in the basic teaching tools needed to provide effecitve and current training techniques, as well as make classroom activities a valuable learning experience.

391

National Science Bowl 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting --Solar Decathlon Energy Sources -Renewables --Solar ---SunShot --Wind -Nuclear Energy Usage -Smart Grid Science & Innovation -Science & Technology --Computing...

392

BES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedOffice of Basic Energy Sciences. This is LBNL report LBNL-BES Science Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Electrochemical Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Energy Storage Electrochemical Energy Storage * Basic Research * Applied R&D * Engineering * Battery Testing Electrochemical Energy Storage The Energy Storage Theme The electrochemical Energy Storage (EES) Theme is internationally recognized as a world-class center for lithium battery R&D. It effectively integrates basic research, applied R&D, engineering, and battery testing, as shown in the diagram below. ees chart Its current focus is on developing improved materials and cell chemistries that will enable lithium-ion (Li-Ion) batteries for commercial light-duty vehicle applications, e.g. hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), and electric vehicle (EV) applications. Basic Research EES recently won a new Office of Science Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) denoted the "Center for Electrical Energy Storage: Tailored Interfaces." This new EFRC will focus on the science of stabilizing electrode/electrolyte interfaces in lithium batteries to achieve longer life and enhanced abuse tolerance.

394

Battery Researchers Go With the Flow | U.S. DOE Office of Science...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Battery Researchers Go With the Flow Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences...

395

BES and Congress | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

BES and Congress Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee...

396

Combined Heat and Power Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Combined Heat and Power Basics Combined Heat and Power Basics Combined Heat and Power Basics November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Combined heat and power (CHP), also known as cogeneration, is: A process flow diagram showing efficiency benefits of CHP CHP Process Flow Diagram The concurrent production of electricity or mechanical power and useful thermal energy (heating and/or cooling) from a single source of energy. A type of distributed generation, which, unlike central station generation, is located at or near the point of consumption. A suite of technologies that can use a variety of fuels to generate electricity or power at the point of use, allowing the heat that would normally be lost in the power generation process to be recovered to provide needed heating and/or cooling. CHP technology can be deployed quickly, cost-effectively, and with few

397

Crystalline Silicon Photovolatic Cell Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crystalline Silicon Photovolatic Cell Basics Crystalline Silicon Photovolatic Cell Basics Crystalline Silicon Photovolatic Cell Basics August 19, 2013 - 4:58pm Addthis Crystalline silicon cells are made of silicon atoms connected to one another to form a crystal lattice. This lattice comprises the solid material that forms the photovoltaic (PV) cell's semiconductors. This section describes the atomic structure and bandgap energy of these cells. Atomic Structure Illustration of a silicon crystal with its 14 electrons orbiting a nucleus of protons and neutrons. As depicted in this simplified diagram, silicon has 14 electrons. The four electrons that orbit the nucleus in the outermost "valence" energy level are given to, accepted from, or shared with other atoms. All matter is composed of atoms, which are made up of positively charged

398

Energy 101 Videos: Learn More About the Basics! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Videos: Learn More About the Basics! Videos: Learn More About the Basics! Energy 101 Videos: Learn More About the Basics! August 30, 2010 - 4:42pm Addthis Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Okay, so we already pointed out the Energy Basics Web site last week. Because I'm going to talk about something on the site, I wanted to remind you all of what it is: a brand new Web site on EERE that talks about the basics of how energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies work. A little place to find out the "What is it, and how does it work?" nuggets of information, basically. But I wanted to point out something in particular: the Energy 101 series of videos! There are two so far, although more will be posted in the future. The two that are there now, Wind Turbines Basics and Concentrating Solar Power

399

NREL: Energy Sciences - Biosciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Lignocellulosic Biomass. An arrow from this latter term points to the right to Biofuels. This process is labeled Biomolecular Science underneath it. At the top right are the...

400

Institutional Change Basics for Sustainability | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Areas » Institutional Change » Institutional Change Program Areas » Institutional Change » Institutional Change Basics for Sustainability Institutional Change Basics for Sustainability October 8, 2013 - 10:55am Addthis Training Available Graphic of the eTraining logo Sustainable Institutional Change for Federal Facility Managers: Learn strategies to change behavior to meet sustainability goals by completing this FEMP eTraining course. Institutional change integrates technology, policy, and behavior to make new sustainability practices and perspectives become a typical part of how an agency operates. For example: Technology provides means to decrease energy and resource use. Policy provides directives to decrease energy and resource use. Institutional and individual behaviors provide avenues to ensure technologies, and policies are used effectively in meeting energy and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Passive Solar Building Design Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Passive Solar Building Design Basics Passive Solar Building Design Basics Passive Solar Building Design Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:20pm Addthis The difference between a passive solar home and a conventional home is design. Passive solar homes and other buildings are designed to take advantage of the local climate. Passive solar design-also known as climatic design-involves using a building's windows, walls, and floors to collect, store, and distribute solar energy in the form of heat in the winter and reject solar heat in the summer. Learn how passive solar design techniques work. Direct Gain Direct gain is the process by which sunlight directly enters a building through the windows and is absorbed and temporarily stored in massive floors or walls. Indirect Gain Indirect gain is the process by which the sun warms a heat storage

402

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 10:17am Addthis Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color rendition. Typical applications include highway and security lighting, where color is not important. Low-pressure sodium lamps work somewhat like fluorescent lamps. Like high-intensity discharge lighting, low-pressure sodium lamps require up to 10 minutes to start and have to cool before they can restart. Therefore, they are most suitable for applications in which they stay on for hours at a time. They are not suitable for use with motion detectors. The chart below compares low-pressure sodium lamps and high-intensity

403

Bio-Based Product Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bio-Based Product Basics Bio-Based Product Basics Bio-Based Product Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:19pm Addthis Almost all of the products we currently make from fossil fuels can also be made from biomass. These bioproducts, or bio-based products, are not only made from renewable sources, but they also often require less energy to produce than petroleum-based ones. Researchers have discovered that the process for making biofuels also can be used to make antifreeze, plastics, glues, artificial sweeteners, and gel for toothpaste. Other important building blocks for bio-based products are carbon monoxide and hydrogen. When biomass is heated with a small amount of oxygen, these two gases are produced in abundance. Scientists call this mixture biosynthesis gas. Biosynthesis gas can be used to make plastics and acids,

404

Bio-Based Product Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bio-Based Product Basics Bio-Based Product Basics Bio-Based Product Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:19pm Addthis Almost all of the products we currently make from fossil fuels can also be made from biomass. These bioproducts, or bio-based products, are not only made from renewable sources, but they also often require less energy to produce than petroleum-based ones. Researchers have discovered that the process for making biofuels also can be used to make antifreeze, plastics, glues, artificial sweeteners, and gel for toothpaste. Other important building blocks for bio-based products are carbon monoxide and hydrogen. When biomass is heated with a small amount of oxygen, these two gases are produced in abundance. Scientists call this mixture biosynthesis gas. Biosynthesis gas can be used to make plastics and acids,

405

High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics High-Intensity Discharge Lighting Basics August 15, 2013 - 5:59pm Addthis High-intensity discharge (HID) lighting provides the highest efficacy and longest service life of any lighting type. It can save 75%-90% of lighting energy when it replaces incandescent lighting. Illustration of a high-intensity discharge (HID) lIllustration amp. The lamp is a tall cylindrical shape, and a cutout of the outer tube shows the materials inside. A long, thin cylinder called the arc tube runs through the lamp between two electrodes. The space around the arc tube is labeled as a vacuum. In a high-intensity discharge lamp, electricity arcs between two electrodes, creating an intensely bright light. Mercury, sodium, or metal halide gas

406

Industrial Energy Audit Basics by an Energy Auditor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of an energy audit is the first step in energy cost control. There are two types of energy audits Traditional and Investment grades. The process of an energy audit consists of collecting and then processing data, specifying changes, and finally producing an action plan. With the high cost of energy today, energy audits are a worthwhile consideration for any business. Know what is available in the market and who is qualified. You are loosing money every hour equipment is operating inefficiently.

Phillips, J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Climate Change Science Institute | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate & Environment Climate & Environment Climate Change Science Institute Earth and Aquatic Sciences Ecosystem Science Environmental Data Science and Systems Energy, Water and Ecosystem Engineering Human Health Risk and Environmental Analysis Renewable Energy Systems Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Climate & Environment | Climate Change Science Institute SHARE Climate Change Science Institute To advance understanding of the Earth system, describe the consequences of climate change, and evaluate and inform policy on the outcomes of climate change responses. The Climate Change Science Institute is an inter-disciplinary, cross-directorate research organization created in 2009 to advance climate change science research. More than 100 researchers from the Computing and

408

New Science for a Secure and Sustainable Energy Future  

SciTech Connect

Over the past five years, the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences has engaged thousands of scientists around the world to study the current status, limiting factors and specific fundamental scientific bottlenecks blocking the widespread implementation of alternate energy technologies. The reports from the foundational BESAC workshop, the ten 'Basic Research Needs' workshops and the panel on Grand Challenge science detail the necessary research steps (http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/list.html). This report responds to a charge from the Director of the Office of Science to the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee to conduct a study with two primary goals: (1) to assimilate the scientific research directions that emerged from these workshop reports into a comprehensive set of science themes, and (2) to identify the new implementation strategies and tools required to accomplish the science. From these efforts it becomes clear that the magnitude of the challenge is so immense that existing approaches - even with improvements from advanced engineering and improved technology based on known concepts - will not be enough to secure our energy future. Instead, meeting the challenge will require fundamental understanding and scientific breakthroughs in new materials and chemical processes to make possible new energy technologies and performance levels far beyond what is now possible.

None

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

New Science for a Secure and Sustainable Energy Future  

SciTech Connect

Over the past five years, the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences has engaged thousands of scientists around the world to study the current status, limiting factors and specific fundamental scientific bottlenecks blocking the widespread implementation of alternate energy technologies. The reports from the foundational BESAC workshop, the ten 'Basic Research Needs' workshops and the panel on Grand Challenge science detail the necessary research steps (http://www.sc.doe.gov/bes/reports/list.html). This report responds to a charge from the Director of the Office of Science to the Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee to conduct a study with two primary goals: (1) to assimilate the scientific research directions that emerged from these workshop reports into a comprehensive set of science themes, and (2) to identify the new implementation strategies and tools required to accomplish the science. From these efforts it becomes clear that the magnitude of the challenge is so immense that existing approaches - even with improvements from advanced engineering and improved technology based on known concepts - will not be enough to secure our energy future. Instead, meeting the challenge will require fundamental understanding and scientific breakthroughs in new materials and chemical processes to make possible new energy technologies and performance levels far beyond what is now possible.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Science Education | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 23, 2009 April 23, 2009 103 Teams to Head to DOE's National Science Bowl in Washington, D.C. High School and Middle School Regional Champions from Around the Country to Compete at National Championship April 3, 2009 Department of Energy Issues Funding Opportunity Announcement to U.S. Universities for Nuclear Science and Engineering Fellowships and Scholarships The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a new Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to provide approximately $2.4 million in university nuclear science and engineering fellowships and scholarships. March 11, 2009 Department of Energy Issues Funding Opportunity Announcement to U.S. Universities for Nuclear Research Infrastructure Needs The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a new Funding Opportunity

411

Science Education | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation » Science Education Science & Innovation » Science Education Science Education January 15, 2014 Dr. Adam Weber oversees the work of intern Sara Kelly at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. Dr. Weber was recently named one of the winners of the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientists and Engineers. | Photo by Roy Kaltschmidt, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 10 Questions for a Scientist: Dr. Adam Weber of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Dr. Adam Weber of the Energy Department's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was recently honored for his cutting edge work to help make hydrogen fuel cells and their components more efficient and durable. Dr. Weber talks to us about what inspired him to become a scientist, why he loves Lord of the Rings, and gives some advice to future scientists.

412

Science Education | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 12, 2010 March 12, 2010 Department of Energy Issues Requests for Applications for Nuclear-Related Science and Engineering Scholarships and Fellowships Washington, D.C. - The Department of Energy today issued two Request for Applications (RFA) for scholarships and fellowships as part of its efforts to recruit and train the next generation of nuclear scientists and engineers. The Department's Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP) will provide approximately $5 million for scholarships and fellowships for students enrolled in two-year, four-year and graduate engineering and science programs related to nuclear energy at accredited U.S. universities and colleges. October 9, 2009 Department of Energy Issues Request for Pre-Applications to U.S. Universities for Nuclear Energy Research and Development Proposals

413

About BESC : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About BESC The BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) is a multi-institutional (18 partner), multidisciplinary research (biological, chemical, physical and computational sciences,...

414

Science Education | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

October 22, 2013 October 22, 2013 The deadline to register for the Home Energy Education Challenge is November 15. America's Home Energy Education Challenge: Teaching Kids to Save Energy and Money America's Home Energy Education Challenge, or AHEEC, is a competition developed by the Energy Department and the National Science Teachers Association designed to show students how they can save energy at home. October 22, 2013 Video: Training Clean Energy Leaders of the Future Solar Decathlon 2013 might have ended, but it is having a lasting effect on sustainable design and our nation's clean energy leaders. October 22, 2013 Solar Decathlon 2013 October 18, 2013 "Energize" Your Neighborhood with Energy-Themed Pumpkins Now through Halloween, we're highlighting scarily effective ways to save

415

NREL: Energy Sciences - Theoretical Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Materials Science Solid-State Theory Materials Science Hydrogen Technology & Fuel Cells Process Technology & Advanced Concepts Research Staff Computational Science Printable Version Theoretical Materials Science Learn about our research staff including staff profiles, publications, and contact information. Using modern computational techniques, the Theoretical Materials Science Group, within NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center, applies quantum mechanics to complex materials, yielding quantitative predictions to guide and interact with experimental explorations. Current research focuses on the following efforts: Design new photovoltaic materials that can improve solar cell efficiency and reduce its cost. Explain the underlying physics of new

416

Energy Sciences Network (ESnet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

ESnet ESnet ESnet ESnet ESnet ESnet » MyESnet search... Go Home Network Overview Tools Peering Information Interactive Network Map Network Maps Connected Sites Services Overview ECS Audio/Video Conferencing Fasterdata IPv6 Network Network Performance Tools (perfSONAR) ESnet OID Registry PGP Key Service Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) DOE Grids Service Transition R&D Overview 100G Testbed Virtual Circuits (OSCARS) Performance (perfSONAR) Tools Development Green Networking Authentication & Trust Federation (ATF) Partnerships News & Publications ESnet in the News ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Careers Contact Us

417

Science Education | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

April 21, 2011 April 21, 2011 It Starts with Science... March 30, 2011 Mentoring Our Future Generation of STEM Professionals A program aimed at introducing the students to successful women in science and technology. March 10, 2011 Morgan State alumnus and PNNL electrical engineer Jewel Adgerson | Courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory From Gadgets to Labs: Morgan State Alum Jewel Adgerson Jewel Adgerson is an electrical engineer at the Energy Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Morgan State University alum. We got to talk with her about her work with the Department's Energy Innovation Hub and her passion for building up the next generation of scientists and engineers through STEM education. February 9, 2011 Multimedia and Visualization Innovations for Science

418

Science Energy Literacy and Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Energy Literacy and Activities Elementary School Curriculum Created by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Click on the links below to take you to the Chapter heading: Circuit Electromagnetism Electrolysis Potato Power Fermentation Volcanoes Kites Wind Tower Solar Cars Solar Ovens and Beads Tie Dye Vanishing Resources Standards Circuits Objective: We will learn about electricity by making a simple circuit with your own bodies! Science Background Electricity is a versatile form of energy. Windmills, water wheels and coal power plants, all have generators, which convert energy from the wind, water, or coal into electricity. The electricity can then be used to make light bulbs glow and electric heaters warm. It can make the sound in speakers and the

419

Basic research needs and priorities in solar energy. Volume II. Technology crosscuts for DOE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Priorities for basic research important to the future developments of solar energy are idenified, described, and recommended. SERI surveyed more than 120 leading scientists who were engaged in or knowledgeable of solar-related research. The result is an amalgam of national scientific opinion representing the views of key researchers in relevant disciplines and of SERI staff members. The scientific disciplines included in the report are: chemistry, biology, materials sciences, engineering and mathematics, and the social and behavioral sciences. Each discipline is subdivided into two to five topical areas-and, within each topical area, research needs are described and ranked according to the priorities suggested in the survey. Three categories of priority were established: crucial, important, and needed. A narrative accompanying the description of research needs in each topical area discusses the importance of research in the area for solar energy development and presents the bases for the priority rankings recommended.

Jayadev, J S; Roessner, D [eds.] eds.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

FACT SHEET: U.S.-China Clean Energy Cooperation Announcements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

specific topics of focus include high energy physics, nuclear physics, nuclear energy sciences, basic energy science, biological science, and environmental science....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Industrial Energy Audit Basics by an Energy Auditor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of an energy audit is the first step in energy cost control. There are two types of energy audits - Traditional and Investment grades. The process of an energy audit consists of collecting and then processing data, specifying changes, and finally producing an action plan. Before visiting the site utility bills need to be obtained. Building information and weather data should be gathered and any information on major equipment should be gathered. When the auditor goes to the site, safety if of prime importance. Before starting a walk-thru, a meeting with plant managers and equipment operators should take place, then the collecting of data. After returning to the office the data is analyzed and energy conservation opportunities are developed and a report written. A Traditional energy audit is technical. It is a snapshot that assumes all conditions stay the same. It is about 75 percent accurate. It consists of all the steps above but its weaknesses is that it is focused on equipment, ignoring the human element, and is generic in its recommendations. No commitment is obtained from management and no measurement or verification is established. The Investment Grade audit is the Traditional audit plus Risk Assessment. It reduces uncertainty, increases consistency, and produces a 95 to 115 percent accuracy. It looks at ancillary equipment, provides a maintenance program, and looks at future plans. The Investment Grade audit considers the PEOPLE factor which includes management commitment, operator training, budget, and maintenance. It also considers Financial and Legal factors as well as Air Quality issues. Generally, utility bills should exceed $500,000 to justify an Investment Grade audit. Time is also an issue in that money is going out in fees and expenses and not coming in as savings. There must also be a project manager assigned to coordinate communications. The Investment Grade audit makes continuous commissioning and performance contracting possible. With the high cost of energy today, energy audits are a worthwhile consideration for any business. Know what is available in the market and who is qualified. You are loosing money every hour equipment is operating inefficiently.

Phillips, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Neutron Transfer Reactions: Surrogates for Neutron Capture for Basic and Applied Nuclear Science  

SciTech Connect

Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

Cizewski, J. A.; Peters, W. A.; Allen, J.; Hatarik, R.; Matthews, C.; O'Malley, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Jones, K. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Kozub, R. L.; Howard, J.; Patterson, N.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Rogers, J.; Sissom, D. J. [Department of Physics, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505 (United States); Pain, S. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Adekola, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45703 (United States); Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Liang, F.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pittman, S. T. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] (and others)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

423

Basic Research Needs for the Hydrogen Economy  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

The Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Workshop on Hydrogen Production, Storage and Use was held May 13-15, 2003 to assess the basic research needs to assure a secure energy future. This report is based on t

424

Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics Concentrating Solar Power Tower System Basics August 20, 2013 - 5:06pm Addthis In power tower concentrating solar power systems, numerous large, flat, sun-tracking mirrors, known as heliostats, focus sunlight onto a receiver at the top of a tall tower. A heat-transfer fluid heated in the receiver is used to generate steam, which, in turn, is used in a conventional turbine generator to produce electricity. Some power towers use water/steam as the heat-transfer fluid. Other advanced designs are experimenting with molten nitrate salt because of its superior heat-transfer and energy-storage capabilities. Individual commercial plants can be sized to produce up to 200 megawatts of electricity. Illustration of a power tower power plant. Sunlight is shown reflecting off a series of heliostats surrounding the tower and onto the receiver at the top of the tower. The hot heat-transfer fluid exiting from the receiver flows down the tower, into a feedwater reheater, and then into a turbine, which generates electricity that is fed into the power grid. The cool heat-transfer fluid exiting the turbine flows into a steam condenser to be cooled and sent back up the tower to the receiver.

425

Nano-Composite Designs for Energy Storage | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Nano-Composite Designs for Energy Storage Nano-Composite Designs for Energy Storage Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » February 2013 Nano-Composite Designs for Energy Storage Nano-porous metal oxide coatings on carbon fiber dramatically enhance the electrical storage capacity for supercapacitors. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Meilin Liu Scanning electron microscopy of conductive carbon fibers coated with metal

426

Climate & Environmental Sciences | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change Science Institute Earth and Aquatic Sciences Ecosystem Science Environmental Data Science and Systems Energy, Water and Ecosystem Engineering Human Health Risk and Environmental Analysis Renewable Energy Systems Manufacturing Fossil Energy Sensors & Measurement Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Climate & Environment SHARE Climate and Environmental Sciences Scientists Scott Brooks and Carrie Miller collect water quality data, East Fork Poplar Creek, November 15, 2012. Sampling site for mercury. Climate and environmental scientists at ORNL conduct research, develop technology and perform analyses to understand and predict how environmental systems respond to global and regional changes - including

427

Department of Energy Office of Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy Office of Science Washington, DC 20585 October 5, 2010 Dear Student: Congratulations! You have been selected to attend and compete in the Science and Energy Research Challenge (SERCh

428

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Illustration showing the components of a storage water heater. On...

429

NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemical and Nanoscale Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoscale Science Nanoscale Science Learn about our research staff including staff profiles, publications, and contact information. The primary goal of the Chemical and Nanoscale Science Group, within NREL's Chemical and Materials Science Center, is to understand photoconversion processes in nanoscale, excitonic photoconversion systems, such as semiconductor quantum dots, molecular dyes, conjugated molecules and polymers, nanostructured oxides, and carbon nanotubes. Closely associated with this goal are efforts to gain an understanding of how to use chemistry and physical tools to control and maximize the photoconversion process. The innovative chemistry and physics that evolve from these fundamental studies are used on a number of applied projects, maximizing the benefits from these discoveries.

430

NREL: Energy Sciences - Computational Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Version Computational Materials Science Illustration of molecular structure. Overall shape is a somewhat canted diamond, with a grid of small green balls connected in either a...

431

SuperComputing | Energy Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Future Technology Knowledge Discovery Materials Mathematics National Security Systems Modeling Engineering Analysis Behavioral Sciences Geographic Information...

432

2012 Science Alliance | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Alliance Science Alliance 2012 Science Alliance Addthis Science Alliance 1 of 5 Science Alliance Students arrive at the welcome tent during the beginning of the two-day Science Alliance, in which more than 900 area high school juniors enjoyed presentations in 14 separate areas on a midway in the X-2207A parking lot. Image: Energy Department's Office of Environmental Management Date taken: 2012-09-25 08:59 Science Alliance 2 of 5 Science Alliance DOE Site Lead Joel Bradburne, Site Director Dr. Vince Adams and Science Alliance team member John Zangri of Fluor-B&W join students in watching one of the presentations during the Science Alliance. Image: Energy Department's Office of Environmental Management Date taken: 2012-09-25 10:16 Science Alliance 3 of 5 Science Alliance

433

Solar Energy Education. Renewable energy activities for junior high/middle school science  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some basic topics on the subject of solar energy are outlined in the form of a teaching manual. The manual is geared toward junior high or middle school science students. Topics include solar collectors, solar water heating, solar radiation, insulation, heat storage, and desalination. Instructions for the construction of apparatus to demonstrate the solar energy topics are provided. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

NREL: Energy Sciences - Pawel Zawadzki  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pawel Zawadzki Pawel Zawadzki Postdoctoral Researcher Phone: (303) 384-6444 Email: pawel.zawadzki@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 2012 Dr. Pawel Zawadzki joined the Chemical and Materials Science team at NREL in 2012 as a Postdoctoral Researcher. He is a graduate of Warsaw University of Technology and Jules Verne University. He received his Ph.D. in Physics from the Technical University of Denmark, where he worked on first-principles photocatalysis. Research Interests Amorphous materials Thin-film solar cells Photocatalysis Materials for energy storage and conversion Selected Publications Zawadzki P.; Laursen A. B.; Jacobsen K. W.; Dahl S.; Rossmeisl J. (2012). "Oxidative trends of TiO2 - hole trapping at anatase and rutile surfaces." Energy & Environmental Science (Advance Article:2012); Accessed November

435

NREL: Energy Sciences - Lin Simpson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lin Simpson Lin Simpson Senior Scientist Photo of Lin Simpson Phone: (303) 384-6625 Email: lin.simpson@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 2005 Lin Simpson has a broad background in research, development, and program management. This includes extensive experience in nanotechnology, materials science, physics, and surface science. At NREL, he was the director of the Department of Energy's Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence and performs associated advanced materials development and testing. Previously, Dr. Simpson was the Manager of Advanced Programs at ITN Energy Systems, Inc., where he planned, implemented, and managed R&D activities to produce the next generation of enabling technologies for a broad range of commercial applications in technology areas that included: nanotechnology,

436

NREL: Energy Sciences - Calvin Curtis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calvin Curtis Calvin Curtis Senior Scientist Photo of Calvin Curtis At NREL Since: 1980 Calvin Curtis has worked at NREL since 1980. He is a member of the Carbon-Based Nanoscience Team in the Center for Basic Sciences and the Advanced Concepts Team in the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV). He was previously on the Catalysis Team, where his work involved development of new electrocatalysts for CO reduction and for alcohol and H2 oxidation. Recent major accomplishments of this team include development of the first methods to measure the thermodynamic hydricity of transition metal hydride complexes and the synthesis of a nickel-based electrocatalyst for H2 oxidation. On the Advanced Concepts Team in the NCPV, he has used his experience with the synthesis of nanoparticles and organometallic materials precursors to

437

Science Education | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 25, 2013 January 25, 2013 AVESTAR provides high-quality, hands-on, simulator-based workforce training delivered by an experienced team of power industry training professionals for West Virginia students. | Photo courtesy of the Office of Fossil Energy. National Lab Helping to Train Operators for Next Generation of Power Plants Students in West Virginia are receiving hands-on experience for careers at cleaner-burning coal-fired power plants. January 19, 2013 Bill Nye (Energy All Stars Presentation) Bill Nye the Science Guy delivered this presentation on space and the lessons about climate change that can be gleaned from the other planets in our solar system at the Energy All Stars event on January 19, 2013, at the US Department of Energy in Washington, DC. January 11, 2013

438

NREL: Energy Sciences - Kara Podkaminer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kara Podkaminer Kara Podkaminer Postdoctoral Researcher Photo of Kara Podkaminer Phone: (303) 384-7970 Email: Kara.Podkaminer@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 2011 Kara Podkaminer received her Ph.D. in Engineering Sciences from the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College in 2011. For her dissertation work, she studied the thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacterium saccharolyticum ALK2 and its application in a thermophliic SSF process. At NREL, Dr. Podkaminer is working on heterologous protein expression in T. reesei, looking to better understand the bottlenecks and increase protein production. This work will serve as the foundation for future expression of NREL's chimera proteins. Printable Version NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC.

439

Clean Energy | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sciences, advanced materials, neutron sciences, nuclear sciences, and high-performance computing, and brings multidisciplinary teams together to address key issues. That...

440

Renewable Energy and Climate Science for the Americas ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Renewable Energy and Climate Science for the Americas: ... Are there other driving forces for renewable energy and climate science? ...

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Research : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research 2011 Biotechnology Industry Organization Annual Convention Plenary Session Basic Biomass info Biofuels: Bringing Biological Solutions to Energy Challenges How Cellulosic...

442

Alternative and Advanced Fuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Advanced Fuel Basics Alternative and Advanced Fuel Basics August 19, 2013 - 5:42pm Addthis Photo of a man in goggles looking at test tubes full of biodiesel. There are a...

443

NREL: Energy Sciences - Arthur J. Frank  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Arthur J. Frank Arthur J. Frank Principal Scientist Photo of Arthur J. Frank Phone: (303) 384-6262 Email: Arthur.Frank@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 1978 Dr. Arthur J. Frank is a Principal Scientist in the Chemical & Materials Science Center. His interests include basic and applied research on the direct conversion of sunlight to electrical energy and fuels (specifically, hydrogen production from water splitting) using sensitized and nonsensitized nanostructured semiconductor electrodes. His research involves both experimental and theoretical studies to understand the physical and chemical factors that govern the energetics/kinetics of transport and interfacial charge transfer and the limitations that these processes impose on the performance and stability of these photosystems. A

444

NREL: Energy Sciences - Junyi Zhu  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Junyi Zhu Junyi Zhu Research Associate Photo of Junyi Zhu Phone: (303) 384-6294 Email: junyi.zhu@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 2009 Dr. Zhu joined NREL in Sep. 2009 as a postdoctoral researcher in the Computational Materials Science Team. He received his B.A. in physics from the Beijing University, China, and gained his Ph.D. in materials science and engineering in 2009 at University of Utah, under the supervision of Prof. Feng Liu and Prof. G. B. Stringfellow. He is experienced in modeling and simulating of surface related problems, strain and stress effects, and doping in semiconductor materials. Research Interests Doping properties in semiconductors and insulators Stress induced effects Thermal energy storage materials Selected Publications Zhu, J.; Wei, S.-H. (2011). "Tuning doping site and type by strain:

445

Science Education | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 15, 2010 December 15, 2010 Environmental Justice Starts with Education Hundreds gathered at the White House Summit on Environmental Justice to discuss green jobs and clean energy, and open up a dialogue on these and other issues. December 8, 2010 Middle school girls attending the Argonne National Laboratory's "Introduce a Girl to Engineering Day." Tomorrow's Women Engineers Middle school girls in Argonne, Illinois, will meet with women engineers to work together on hands-on projects. December 3, 2010 Calling Excellent Math and Science Teachers -- Einstein Fellowship Deadline is January 4 Elementary and secondary math and science teachers are eligible the fellowship that bring them to DC to share their teaching expertise with policy makers. October 26, 2010

446

Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Before the House Science and...

447

Energy: Science, Policy, and the Pursuit of Sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

environment friendly energy policy. Energy: Science, Policydeveloping a sustainable energy policy has been dealt withReview: Energy: Science, Policy, and the Pursuit of

Mirza, Umar Karim

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Development of a high intensity EBIT for basic and applied science/011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electron-beam ion trap (EBIT) is a device for producing and studying cold, very highly charged ions of any element, up to a fully ionized U{sup 92+}. These highly charged ions occur in hot plasmas and therefore play important roles in nuclear weapons, controlled fusion, and astrophysical phenomena. The remarkable interaction of these ions with surfaces may lead to technological applications. The highly charged ions can either be studied inside the EBIT itself with measurements of their x-ray emission spectra, or the ions can be extracted from the EBIT in order to study their interaction with solid material. Both types of measurements are being pursued vigorously with the two existing low-intensity EBITs at LLNL and with similar EBITs that have been built at six other laboratories around the world since the EBIT was first developed at LLNL 10 years ago. However, all existing EBITs have approximately the same intensity as the original LLNL EBIT; that is, they all produce about the same number of very-highly-charged ions (roughly 2 x 10{sup 6} per second) and the same number of x-ray photons (roughly 10{sup 7} per second). The goal of the High-Intensity-EBIT project is to increase the x-ray emission per centimeter of length along the electron beam by a factor of 100 and to increase the ion output by a factor of 1000. This dramatic increase in intensity will enable the next generation of basic and applied experimental research in the structure of highly charged ions. For example, the precision of EBIT x-ray measurements of atomic energy levels- which is now limited by count rate-can be improved by an order of magnitude, and new applications in surface science, nanotechnology, and microscopy will be possible with the expected intense ion beams. When the high ion output is combined with the demonstrated low emittance of EBIT ions, we will have a high-brightness source of highly charged ions that can be focused to submicrometer spots. One example of a measurement that will benefit from increased x-ray intensity is our study of the binding energy of high-Z heliumlike ions. The small ``two-electron`` contribution to this binding energy is a fundamental aspect of atomic structure. It arises from the small forces that the two electrons exert on each other in the presence of the much larger force from the atomic nucleus. Our existing EBIT measurements are sensitive to the so-called ``second order`` contribution to the two-electron binding energy, but with the High-Intensity EBIT we can probe an even more subtle effect: the screening by one electron of the quantum electrodynamic (QED) energy contribution from the other electron.

Marrs, R.E., LLNL

1998-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

449

Photon Science for Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect

Our current fossil-fuel-based system is causing potentially catastrophic changes to our planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources of energy requires us to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Light-source facilities - the synchrotrons of today and the next-generation light sources of tomorrow - are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such, these photon-science facilities are uniquely positioned to jump-start a global revolution in renewable and carbonneutral energy technologies. In these pages, we outline and illustrate through examples from our nation's light sources possible scientific directions for addressing these profound yet urgent challenges.

Hussain, Zahid; Tamura, Lori; Padmore, Howard; Schoenlein, Bob; Bailey, Sue

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

Photon Science for Renewable Energy  

SciTech Connect

Our current fossil-fuel-based system is causing potentially catastrophic changes to our planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources of energy requires us to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Light-source facilities - the synchrotrons of today and the next-generation light sources of tomorrow - are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure of matter. As such, these photon-science facilities are uniquely positioned to jump-start a global revolution in renewable and carbonneutral energy technologies. In these pages, we outline and illustrate through examples from our nation's light sources possible scientific directions for addressing these profound yet urgent challenges.

Hussain, Zahid; Tamura, Lori; Padmore, Howard; Schoenlein, Bob; Bailey, Sue

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

National Science Bowl 2013 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Science Bowl 2013 National Science Bowl 2013 National Science Bowl 2013 Addthis National Science Bowl 2013 1 of 16 National Science Bowl 2013 The 2013 National Science Bowl started off at the 4H Center, Thursday, April 25, 2013 in Chevy Chase, Maryland. | Photo courtesy of Sarah Gerrity, Department of Energy. Date taken: 2013-04-26 15:20 National Science Bowl 2013 2 of 16 National Science Bowl 2013 The high school students participated in a team challenge competition, which prompted them to solve problems by conducting experiments and collecting data. | Photo courtesy of Sarah Gerrity, Department of Energy. Date taken: 2013-04-26 15:19 National Science Bowl 2013 3 of 16 National Science Bowl 2013 The high school students participated in a team challenge competition, which prompted them to solve problems by conducting experiments and

452

Department of Energy National Science Bowl | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Department of Energy National Science Bowl Department of Energy National Science Bowl May 5, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis Remarks as Prepared for Delivery by Secretary Bodman Thank you,...

453

Teacher Tools : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools for the Teacher The BioEnergy Science Center is committed to communicating research on bioenergy with the education community and to promote understanding of the science by...

454

Geospatial Science Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geospatial Science Program Geospatial Science Program Geospatial Science Program June 21, 2011 - 3:50pm Addthis The overarching mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) is to discover solutions to power and secure America's future. DOE's Geospatial Science Program was established to optimize geospatial investments across our complex and to enable prudent stewardship of the resources provided by the American taxpayer. The term 'geospatial science' encompasses both the concepts of geographic information science and geographic information systems. Geographic information science is the study of spatially-referenced data, including geographic theory, technological design, and analytical algorithms. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are specialized software and hardware used to manage, manipulate, query, and

455

BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

& Resources News and Awards Supporting Organizations Redefining The Frontiers of Bioenergy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Facilities and Centers | BioEnergy...

456

NREL: Energy Sciences - Liping Yu  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liping Yu Liping Yu Postdoctoral Researcher Photo of Liping Yu Phone: (303) 384-6455 Email: liping.yu@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 2009 Dr. Yu joined NREL in August 2009 as a postdoctoral researcher in the Solid State Theory Team. He received his Ph.D. in physics from North Carolina State University in 2009 under the supervision of Dr. Jerry Bernholc. His research in computational materials science focuses on first principles (DFT) studies of defect, electronic, optical, and dielectric properties of real materials. Currently he works on the computational design and theoretical modeling of renewable energy materials for the Center of Inverse Design, a DOE Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC). Research Interests High-throughput calculations Solar photovoltaic and solid state lighting

457

NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemical and Materials Science Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical and Materials Science Staff Chemical and Materials Science Staff The Chemical and Materials Science staff members at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory work within one of five groups: the Chemical and Nanoscale Science Group, the Theoretical Materials Science Group, the Materials Science Group, the Process Technology and Advanced Concepts Group, and the Fuel Cells Group. Access the staff members' background, areas of expertise, and contact information below. Jao van de Lagemaat Director Marisa Howe Project Specialist Chemical & Nanoscale Science Group Nicole Campos Administrative Professional Paul Ackerman Natalia Azarova Brian Bailey Matthew C. Beard Matt Bergren Raghu N. Bhattacharya Julio Villanueva Cab Rebecca Callahan Russ Cormier Ryan Crisp Alex Dixon Andrew J. Ferguson Arthur J. Frank

458

Snowflake Science | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

tokamaks and fusion via Science Accelerator, a gateway to science, including R&D results, project descriptions, and accomplishments, and resources from the Office of...

459

DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course on Electricity Grid Basics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Energy Basics ELECTRICITY GRID BASICS Presented by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Course Outline What we will cover...  About the DOE Office of Indian Energy Education Initiative  Course Introduction  Interconnection of Electric Power Systems  Technology Overview: - Conventional Generators - Transmission Systems - Substations - Distribution Systems  Policy and Tribal Utilities  Information & Resources 2 Introduction The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy & Programs is responsible for assisting Tribes with energy planning and development, infrastructure, energy costs, and electrification of Indian lands and homes. As part of this commitment and on behalf of

460

Image Gallery : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GO About Research Resources Education Industry Redefining the Frontiers of Bioenergy Research Publications BESC Wiki (internal only) BESC Knowledgbase Biofacts BioEnergy Science...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Electronic Materials Science Challenges in Renewable Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Electronic Materials Science Challenges in Renewable Energy. Author(s), Richard R. King. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Richard R. King.

462

Resources : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Publications BESC Knowledgebase Biofacts BESC BioEnergy Science Center Fact Sheets BESC Press Releases Videos Audio e-Magazine Images Our Research BESC Wiki (internal...

463

NREL: Energy Sciences - News Archives - 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

News Archives - 2012 Following is recent science and energy news. November 26, 2012 NREL Researchers Use Imaging Technologies to Solve Puzzle of Plant Architecture Scientists at...

464

Federal Energy Management Program: National Science Foundation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Foundation - Lake Hoare, Antarctica to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: National Science Foundation - Lake Hoare, Antarctica on Facebook Tweet...

465

Vehicle Technology and Alternative Fuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Technology and Alternative Fuel Basics Vehicle Technology and Alternative Fuel Basics Vehicle Technology and Alternative Fuel Basics Photo of an electric car plugged in and charging. Learn more about exciting technologies and ongoing research in alternative and advanced vehicles-or vehicles that run on fuels other than traditional petroleum. Alternative Vehicles There are a variety of alternative vehicle fuels available. Learn more about: Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane Vehicles Also learn about: Vehicle Battery Basics Vehicle Emissions Basics Alternative Fuels There are a number of alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Learn more about the following types of vehicles: Biodiesel Electricity Ethanol Hydrogen Natural Gas

466

Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, 2006 #12;Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 2/6/2006 Final 2 The FY 2007 President's Request of Science U.S. Department of Energy 2/6/2006 Final 3 Office of Science Missions Future of Science

467

Before the House Science and Technology Subcommittee on Energy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

on Energy and Environment BY: Dr. Edmund Synakowski, Associate Director Offfice of Fusion Energy Sciences Office of Science Subject: DOE Fusion Energy Program...

468

Los Alamos Lab: Science Program Office, Energy Security Newsletter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Energy & Environment (SPO-FE) SPO FE Science AEI Nuclear Fossil Energy & Environment Home Office of Science Home Alternative Energy & Infrastructure Home Civilian Nuclear...

469

Energy Education & Workforce Development: Energy 101 Undergraduate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

101 Undergraduate Course Framework: Teaching the Fundamentals of Energy Energy 101 Outline. Energy 101 Science Technology Society. Introduction to Energy. Energy Basics. Energy...

470

Research and Education in Basic Space Science: The Approach Pursued in the UN/ESA Workshops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1990, the United Nations in cooperation with the European Space Agency is holding annually a workshop on basic space science for the benefit of the worldwide development of astronomy. These workshops have been held in countries of Asia and the Pacific (India, Sri Lanka), Latin America and the Caribbean (Costa Rica, Colombia, Honduras), Africa (Nigeria), Western Asia (Egypt, Jordan), and Europe (Germany, France). Additional to the scientific benefits of the workshops and the strengthening of international cooperation, the workshops lead to the establishment of astronomical telescope facilities in Colombia, Egypt, Honduras, Jordan, Morocco, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Uruguay. The annual UN/ESA Workshops continue to pursue an agenda to network these astronomical telescope facilities through similar research and education programmes. Teaching material and hands-on astrophysics material has been developed for the operation of such astronomical telescope facilities in an university environment.

H. M. K. Al-Naimiy; C. P. Celebre; K. Chamcham; H. S. P. de Alwis; M. C. P. de Carias; H. J. Haubold; A. E. Troche Boggino

2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

471

Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences Program | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BES Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Program SHARE BES Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Program The Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy...

472

DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Course Webinar: Electricity Grid Basics Text Version  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electricity Grid Basics Electricity Grid Basics Webinar (text version) Below is the text version of the Webinar titled "DOE Office of Indian Energy Foundational Courses Renewable Energy Technologies: Electricity Grid Basics." Amy Hollander: Hello. I'm Amy Hollander with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Welcome to today's Webinar on Electricity Grid Basics sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs. This webinar is being recorded from DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory's brand new state-of-the-art net-zero energy research support facility in Golden, Colorado. This presentation on electricity grid basics is one of nine foundational webinars in the series from the DOE Office of Indian Energy and Education Initiative, designed to assist

473

NREL: Energy Sciences - Daniel Ruddy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ruddy Ruddy Scientist III Photo of Daniel Ruddy Phone: (303) 384-6322 Email: dan.ruddy@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 2010 Dan Ruddy received a Ph.D. degree in Inorganic Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 2008. His research combined synthetic molecular and materials chemistry with detailed characterization to study novel heterogeneous catalysts. He then worked on a variety of catalyst development projects at the Dow Chemical Company in the Renewable Feedstocks & Process Catalysis Group before joining the Chemical and Nanoscale Science Group at NREL in 2010. Dr. Ruddy's research at NREL integrates the synthesis and characterization of functional molecules and materials for advanced energy technologies including solar fuels production, biomass conversion catalysis, and next-generation PV materials.

474

Bio-Based Products Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basics August 14, 2013 - 1:19pm Addthis Almost all of the products we currently make from fossil fuels can also be made from biomass. These bioproducts, or bio-based products, are...

475

Mesa Energy formerly called Mesa Environmental Sciences | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

called Mesa Environmental Sciences called Mesa Environmental Sciences Jump to: navigation, search Name Mesa Energy (formerly called Mesa Environmental Sciences) Place Pennsylvania Zip 19355 Sector Services, Solar Product Environmental and energy services company focused on solar PV design and installation. References Mesa Energy (formerly called Mesa Environmental Sciences)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Mesa Energy (formerly called Mesa Environmental Sciences) is a company located in Pennsylvania . References ↑ "Mesa Energy (formerly called Mesa Environmental Sciences)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Mesa_Energy_formerly_called_Mesa_Environmental_Sciences&oldid=34874

476

Students & Kids : BioEnergy Science Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our Earth needs Your Help The Department of Energy BioEnergy Science Center (BESC) created this web site to give you the tools and resources to start making a difference. Learn...

477

Energy science and technology database (on the internet). Online data  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Science and Technology Database (EDB) is a multidisciplinary file containing worldwide references to basic and applied scientific and technical research literature. The information is collected for use by government managers, researchers at the national laboratories, and other research efforts sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, and the results of this research are transferred to the public. Abstracts are included for records from 1976 to the present. The EDB also contains the Nuclear Science Abstracts which is a comprehensive abstract and index collection to the international nuclear science and technology literature for the period 1948 through 1976. Included are scientific and technical reports of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, U.S. Energy Research and Development Administration and its contractors, other agencies, universities, and industrial and research organizations. Approximately 25% of the records in the file contain abstracts. Nuclear Science Abstracts contains over 900,000 bibliographic records. The entire Energy Science and Technology Database contains over 3 million bibliographic records. This database is now available for searching through the GOV. Research-Center (GRC) service. GRC is a single online web-based search service to well known Government databases. Featuring powerful search and retrieval software, GRC is an important research tool. The GRC web site is at http://grc.ntis.gov.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research * Basic Energy Sciences * Biological  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Network Monitoring and Network Monitoring and Visualiza4on at ESnet Jon Dugan, Network Engineer ESnet Network Engineering Group February 3, 2010 Winter Joint Techs, Salt Lake City, UT Overview Data Collec4on (ESxSNMP) Data Visualiza4on (Graphite) Event/Metadata Log (Net Almanac) ESxSNMP: Goals * Automate everything possible * Provide summaries but don't lose raw data - Disk is cheap - It can be useful to take a hard look at the past * Flexibility and scalability * Minimize up front assumptions * Protect data collection from DoS by users * Make data easy to access and manipulate ESxSNMP: Polling * Interface metadata - Automatically detects new interfaces - Automatically detects interface changes - Historical log of interface info * Automatic addition of new devices

479

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Allied Signal ARM KCP NOAA OSTI ORAU SRS JLAB PPPL Lab DC Offices MIT/ PSFC BNL NREL GA DOE GTN NNSA NNSA

480

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jacobs Company (BJC) 44 Mb/s none via ORNL connecDon DOE NNSA Headquarters - Germantown (DOE-NNSA-GTN) 155 Mb/s none Future: DC MAN parDcipant DOE NNSA Service Center - Albuquerque (DOE-NNSA-SC) 52 Mb/s none via SNL-NM connec

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "basic energy sciences" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· NERSC / LBNL · ALCF / ANL ­ Will provide multiple 10's of teraflops and multiple petabytes of storageNetwork Sunnyvale NYC Nashville Chicago OLCF/ ORNL 100G ALCF/ANL NERSC Magellan Magellan 6 #12;ARRA/ANI Testbed (Oakland, CA) and ALCF (Argonne, IL) 9 #12;Network Testbed Components · Network Testbed will consist of

482

Materials Research Support at the Office of Basic Energy Sciences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Federal Funding Workshop. Presentation Title, Materials Research Support at...

483

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reoccurrence (of 1 cause of this particular class of soft faults) #12;Example: NERSC & OLCF · Users were having

484

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bechtel-NV IARC INL NSTEC Pantex SNLA DOE-ALB Allied Signal KCP SRS NREL DOE NETL NNSA ARM ORAU OSTI NOAA

485

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· CombineofLOSASUNN&ELPALOSAintonewELPASUNNSDN(priortothe decommissionofLOSAHUB)Dec.3rd · OC12betweenDENVHUBandPantex

486

Supporting Advanced Scientific Computing Research Basic Energy Sciences Biological  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEquinixASH(DC2)fabricupgradedonJan14th · 10GEquinixSJ(SV1)fabricupgradedonJan19th · OC12betweenDENVHUBandPantex

487

India Added to WorldWideScience.org | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

India Added to WorldWideScience.org India Added to WorldWideScience.org NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: Cathey Daniels, (865) 576-9539 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE January 29, 2008 India Added to WorldWideScience.org Online gateway makes world's science available to citizens everywhere Oak Ridge, TN - WorldWideScience.org, the online gateway that makes the world's science readily available to researchers and citizens alike, recently added four important science sources from India to its global reach. Users can search these and many other science sources from a single entry point and retrieve the most current science findings in fields such as energy, medicine, agriculture and basic sciences. The addition of India effectively doubled the percentage of the world's population represented in the searches of WorldWideScience.org. The newest

488

Why Climate Science Doesn?t Unite Us But Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Why Climate Science Doesn't Unite Us But Energy Technology Does. Purpose: Climate science was supposed to unite ...

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

489

Science (WFP) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science (WFP) Science (WFP) The purpose of the workforce Plan is to provide focus and direction to Human Resources (HR) strategy. This will enable the agency to have the right...

490

Science Funding and the Economy | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science Funding and the Economy Science Funding and the Economy Science Funding and the Economy More Documents & Publications Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources...

491

NREL: Energy Sciences - Ziqi Liang  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science. Research Interests Conjugated polymers and molecular organic semiconductors Quantum dotsrods and anisotropic metallic nanostructures Micronano-patterning and...

492

Building Science Education | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Residential Buildings » Building America » Building Science Residential Buildings » Building America » Building Science Education Building Science Education The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Building America program recognizes that the education of future design/construction industry professionals in solid building science principles is critical to widespread development of high performance homes that are energy efficient, healthy, and durable. In November 2012, DOE met with leaders in the building science community to develop a strategic Building Science Education Roadmap that will chart a path for training skilled professionals who apply proven innovations and recognize the value of high performance homes. The roadmap aims to: Increase awareness of high performance home benefits Build a solid infrastructure for delivering building science

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Microhydropower Conveyance and Filter Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conveyance and Filter Basics Conveyance and Filter Basics Microhydropower Conveyance and Filter Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:53pm Addthis Before water enters the turbine or waterwheel of a microhydropower system, it is funneled through a series of components that control its flow and filter out debris. These components include the headrace, forebay, and water conveyance (or channel, pipeline, or penstock). The headrace is a waterway that runs parallel to the water source. A headrace is sometimes necessary for hydropower systems when insufficient head, or vertical drop, is provided and is usually constructed of cement or masonry. The headrace leads to the forebay, which also is made of concrete or masonry. It functions as a settling pond for large debris that would otherwise flow into the system and damage the turbine.

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Photovoltaic Crystalline Silicon Cell Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Crystalline Silicon Cell Basics Crystalline Silicon Cell Basics Photovoltaic Crystalline Silicon Cell Basics August 20, 2013 - 2:00pm Addthis To separate electrical charges, crystalline silicon cells must have a built-in electric field. Light shining on crystalline silicon may free electrons within the crystal lattice, but for these electrons to do useful work-such as provide electricity to a light bulb-they must be separated and directed into an electrical circuit. PV Semiconductors To create an electric field within a crystalline silicon photovoltaic (PV) cell, two silicon semiconductor layers are sandwiched together. P-type (or positive) semiconductors have an abundance of positively charged holes, and n-type (or negative) semiconductors have an abundance of negatively charged electrons. When n- and p-type silicon layers contact, excess electrons move

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Photovoltaic Polycrystalline Thin-Film Cell Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Polycrystalline Thin-Film Cell Basics Polycrystalline Thin-Film Cell Basics Photovoltaic Polycrystalline Thin-Film Cell Basics August 20, 2013 - 2:36pm Addthis Polycrystalline thin-film cells are made of many tiny crystalline grains of semiconductor materials. The materials used in these cells have properties that are different from those of silicon. Thin-film cells have many advantages over their thick-film counterparts. For example, they use much less material. The cell's active area is usually only 1 to 10 micrometers thick, whereas thick films typically are 100 to 300 micrometers thick. Also, thin-film cells can usually be manufactured in a large-area process, which can be an automated, continuous production process. Finally, they can be deposited on flexible substrate materials. The term thin film comes from the method used to deposit the film, not from

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Propane-Fueled Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Propane-Fueled Vehicle Basics Propane-Fueled Vehicle Basics Propane-Fueled Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:16am Addthis There are more than 270,000 on-road propane vehicles in the United States and more than 10 million worldwide. Many are used in fleets, including light- and heavy-duty trucks, buses, taxicabs, police cars, and rental and delivery vehicles. Compared with vehicles fueled with conventional diesel and gasoline, propane vehicles can produce significantly fewer harmful emissions. The availability of new light-duty original equipment manufacturer propane vehicles has declined in recent years. However, certified installers can economically and reliably retrofit many light-duty vehicles for propane operation. Propane engines and fueling systems are also available for heavy-duty vehicles such as school buses and street sweepers.

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Flexible-Fuel Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flexible-Fuel Vehicle Basics Flexible-Fuel Vehicle Basics Flexible-Fuel Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:05am Addthis Photo of a gray van with 'E85 Ethanol' written on the side. Flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) are capable of operating on gasoline, E85 (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline), or a mixture of both. There are almost 8 million flexible fuel vehicles on U.S. roads today, but many FFV owners don't know their vehicle is one. Unlike natural gas vehicles and propane bi-fuel vehicles, flexible fuel vehicles contain one fueling system, which is made up of ethanol-compatible components and is set to accommodate the higher oxygen content of E85. E85 should only be used in ethanol-capable FFVs. For more information, read Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Powered by a Renewable American Fuel. Download Adobe Reader.

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Flat-Plate Photovoltaic System Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flat-Plate Photovoltaic System Basics Flat-Plate Photovoltaic System Basics Flat-Plate Photovoltaic System Basics August 20, 2013 - 4:03pm Addthis The most common photovoltaic (PV) array design uses flat-plate PV modules or panels. These panels can be fixed in place or allowed to track the movement of the Illustration of a cutaway of a typical flat-plate module. The layers, in order from top to bottom, are: cover film, solar cell, encapsulant, substrate, cover film, seal, gasket, and frame. One typical flat-plate module design uses a substrate of metal, glass, or plastic to provide structural support in the back; an encapsulant material to protect the cells; and a transparent cover of plastic or glass. sun. They respond to sunlight that is direct or diffuse. Even in clear skies, the diffuse component of sunlight accounts for between 10% and 20%

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Air-Source Heat Pump Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Air-Source Heat Pump Basics Air-Source Heat Pump Basics Air-Source Heat Pump Basics August 19, 2013 - 11:03am Addthis Air-source heat pumps transfer heat between the inside of a building and the outside air. How Air-Source Heat Pumps Work This diagram of a split-system heat pump heating cycle shows refrigerant circulating through a closed loop that passes through the wall of a house. Inside the house the refrigerant winds through indoor coils, with a fan blowing across them, and outside the house is another fan and another set of coils, the outdoor coils. A compressor is between the coils on one half of the loop, and an expansion valve is between the coils on the other half. The diagram is explained in the caption. In heating mode, an air-source heat pump evaporates a refrigerant in the outdoor coil; as the liquid evaporates it pulls

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Wood and Pellet Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wood and Pellet Heating Basics Wood and Pellet Heating Basics Wood and Pellet Heating Basics August 16, 2013 - 3:02pm Addthis Wood-burning and pellet fuel appliances use biomass or waste resources to heat homes or buildings. Types of Wood- and Pellet-Burning Appliances The following is a brief overview of the different types of wood and pellet fuel appliances available. High-Efficiency Fireplaces and Fireplace Inserts Designed more for show, traditional open masonry fireplaces should not be considered heating devices. Traditional fireplaces draw in as much as 300 cubic feet per minute of heated room air for combustion, then send it straight up the chimney. Fireplaces also produce significant air pollution. Although some fireplace designs seek to address these issues with dedicated air supplies, glass doors, and heat recovery systems, fireplaces are still